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Sample records for 50-mpa confining pressure

  1. Thermal properties of rock salt and quartz monzonite to 573{sup 0}K and 50-MPa confining pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-03-18

    Measurements of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal linear expansion have been made on two rock types, a rock salt and a quartz monzonite, at temperatures from 300 to 573{sup 0}K and confining pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. The samples were taken from deep rock formations under consideration as possible sites for a nuclear waste repository - the rock salt from a domal salt formation at Avery Island, Louisiana, and the quartz monzonite from the Climax Stock, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The testing temperature and pressures are meant to bracket conditions expected in the repository. In both rock types, the thermal properties show a strong dependence upon temperature and a weak or non-dependence upon confining pressure. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity both decrease with increasing temperature in approximately linear fashion for samples which have not been previously heated. At 50 MPa in both rocks this decrease closely matches the measured or expected intrinsic (crack-free) behavior of the material. Preliminary indications from the quartz monzonite suggest that conductivity and diffusivity at low pressure and temperature may decrease as a result of heat treatment above 400{sup 0}K.

  2. Projectile acceleration in a single-stage gun at breech pressures below 50 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasoh, A.; Ohba, S.; Takayama, K.

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate projectile acceleration in a single-stage gun at breech pressures below 50 MPa. The gun was driven by firing either liquid or solid propellant. In-bore projectile velocity was continuously recorded using the well-known, precise VISAR interferometer technique so that accurate projectile acceleration data could be deduced. Both the attained projectile acceleration and muzzle exit velocity depend upon the charge-to-mass ratio and the pressure at which the blow-out disk ruptures. The results obtained from these experiments render information on the interplay between propellant combustion and projectile acceleration for low in-bore pressure regimes, and they provide the input data required for adequate numerical simulation.

  3. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures 10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

  4. Viscosity of NaCl and other solutions up to 350{sup 0}C and 50 MPa pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Ozbek, H.; Igbene, A.; Litton, G.

    1980-11-01

    Experimental values for the viscosity of sodium chloride solutions are critically reviewed for application to geothermal energy. Data published recently by Kestin, Los, Pepinov, and Semenyuk as well as earlier data are included. A theoretically based equation for calculating relative viscosity was developed, and used to generate tables of smoothed values over the ranges 20{sup 0}C to 350{sup 0}C, 0 to 5 m and pressures up to 50 MPa. The equation reproduces selected data to an average of better than 2 percent over the entire range of temperatures and pressures. Selected tables of data are included for KCl up to 150{sup 0}C, CaCl{sub 2} solutions up to 100{sup 0}C, and for mixtures of NaCl with KCl and CaCl{sub 2}. Recommendations are given for additional data needs.

  5. Final report of EURAMET 1197: Supplementary bilateral comparison of hydraulic gauge pressure standards up to 50 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgut, Yasin; Petrovski, Nenad; Kacarski, Vanco

    2012-01-01

    Interlaboratory comparisons are important for the laboratories to assess their own measurement capability. It is equally important for the accreditation bodies and assessors during the audit process of a laboratory to judge whether the laboratory is doing well. As per accreditation rules, it is mandatory for the testing and calibration laboratories to participate in such comparisons from time to time. In this report, results of the bilateral interlaboratory comparison in pressure area in hydraulic media up to 50 MPa gauge between UME (Turkey) and BOM (The FYR of Macedonia) are presented. The artefact used for the comparison was a digital pressure calibrator and its drift was taken into account in the calculation. Results show that all En values lie in acceptable limits. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

  7. Final report on key comparison APMP.M.P-K13 in hydraulic gauge pressure from 50 MPa to 500 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, Hiroaki; Kobata, Tokihiko; Yadav, Sanjay; Jian, Wu; Changpan, Tawat; Owen, Neville; Yanhua, Li; Hung, Chen-Chuan; Ginanjar, Gigin; Choi, In-Mook

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the results of a key comparison of hydraulic high-pressure standards at nine National Metrology Institutes (NMIs: NMIJ/AIST, NPLI, NMC/A*STAR, NIMT, NMIA, NIM, CMS/ITRI, KIM-LIPI, and KRISS) within the framework of the Asia-Pacific Metrology Programme (APMP) in order to determine their degrees of equivalence in the pressure range from 50 MPa to 500 MPa in gauge mode. The pilot institute was the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ/AIST). All participating institutes used hydraulic pressure balances as their pressure standards. A set of pressure balance with a free-deformational piston-cylinder assembly was used as the transfer standard. Three piston-cylinder assemblies, only one at a time, were used to complete the measurements in the period from November 2010 to January 2013. Ten participants completed their measurements and reported the pressure-dependent effective areas of the transfer standard at specified pressures with the associated uncertainties. Since one of the participants withdrew its results, the measurement results of the nine participants were finally compared. The results were linked to the CCM.P-K13 reference values through the results of two linking laboratories, NMIJ/AIST and NPLI. The degrees of equivalence were evaluated by the relative deviations of the participants' results from the CCM.P-K13 key comparison reference values, and their associated combined expanded (k=2) uncertainties. The results of all the nine participating NMIs agree with the CCM.P-K13 reference values within their expanded (k=2) uncertainties in the entire pressure range from 50 MPa to 500 MPa. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Final report on key comparison EURAMET.M.P-K13 in the range 50 MPa to 500 MPa of hydraulic gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocas, I.; Sabuga, W.; Bergoglio, M.; Eltaweel, A.; Korasie, C.; Farar, P.; Setina, J.; Waller, B.; Durgut, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The regional key comparison EURAMET.M.P-K13 for pressure measurements in liquid media from 50 MPa to 500 MPa was piloted by the TÜBİTAK UME Pressure Group Laboratories, Turkey. The transfer standard was a DH-Budenberg pressure balance with a free deformation piston-cylinder unit of 2 mm2 nominal effective area. Six laboratories from the EURAMET region, namely PTB, INRIM, SMU, IMT, NPL and UME, and two laboratories from the AFRIMETS region, NIS and NMISA participated in this comparison. Participant laboratories and countries are given in the bottom of the page. PTB participated in this comparison to provide a link to corresponding 500 MPa CCM key comparison CCM.P-K13. The results of all participants excepting NMISA and NPL were found to be consistent with the reference value of the actual comparison and of CCM.P-K13 within their claimed uncertainties (k = 2), at all pressures. Compared in pairs all laboratories with exception of NPL and NMISA demonstrate their agreement with each other within the expanded uncertainties (k = 2) at all pressures. The results are therefore considered to be satisfactory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  9. Final report on key comparison CCM.P-K13 in the range 50 MPa to 500 MPa of hydraulic gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabuga, W.; Olson, D. A.; Torres, J. C.; Yadav, S.; Jin, Y.; Kobata, T.; Otal, P.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a CCM key comparison of hydraulic pressure standards of seven National Metrology Institutes, listed in the chronological order of their measurements, that was carried out in the period from December 2008 to March 2010 in order to determine their degrees of equivalence in the range 50 MPa to 500 MPa of gauge pressure. The pilot laboratory was PTB. The primary pressure standards were pressure balances of different design equipped with piston-cylinder assemblies operated in free-deformation, controlled-clearance or re-entrant operation mode. The transfer standard was a piston-cylinder assembly in a pressure balance. The pressure-dependent effective areas of the transfer standard at specified pressures were reported by the participants and led to the reference values calculated as medians. Results of all participants excepting NIM agree with the reference values and with each other within the expanded uncertainties calculated with a coverage factor 2, most of them even within their standard uncertainties. In addition, the results were analysed in terms of the zero pressure effective area and the pressure distortion coefficient. Also for them agreement within expanded uncertainties (k = 2) is observed. The results of the comparison demonstrate equivalence of the laboratory standards and of the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities currently presented in the BIPM key comparison database. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  10. Influence of the confining pressure on precursory and rupture processes of Westerly granite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelegue, Francois; Nicolas, Aurelien; Madonna, Claudio; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-04-01

    In the shallow crust, brittle deformation mechanisms lead to damage and rupture of rocks. These mechanisms are generally described by non-linear stress relations and decrease of the elastic moduli due to microcrak opening and sliding. However, failure mode depends on confining pressure and ranges from axial splitting to shear localization. Here we report experiments on Westerly granite samples deformed under controlled upper crustal stress conditions in the laboratory. Experiments were conducted under triaxial loading (σ1>σ2=σ3) at confining pressures (σ3) ranging from 2 to 50 MPa (similar to upper crustal stress conditions) and at constant axial strain rate 10-5/s. Usual a dual gain system, a high frequency acoustic monitoring array recorded particles acceleration during macroscopic rupture of the intact specimen and premonitory background microseismicity. Secondly, acoustic sensors were used in an active way to measure the evolution of elastic wave velocities. In addition, we used an amplified strain gage to record the dynamic stress change during the dynamic rupture. Our preliminary results show that increasing confining pressure leads to the transition between axial cracks opening to shear localization. This result is supported by the moment tensor solutions of acoustic emissions and CT scan imaging of the post mortem sample. In addition, we systematically observe an exponential increase of the premonitory activity up to the shear failure of the sample. While the intensity of this precursory activity increase with the confining pressure in term of energy, the crack density leading to the failure of the sample is independent of the confinement. We show that the dynamic rupture occurs in only few microseconds, suggesting a rupture speed close to the shear wave velocity. In addition, the ratio between the stress drop and the peak of stress increases with the confinement. This result suggest that the weakening of faulting increases with the confinement. Finally

  11. Pressure-confined Lyman-alpha clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, E.; Carswell, R. F.; Hogan, C. J.; Weymann, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented of numerical models of pressure-confined spherical gas clouds which produce absorption resembling the low to intermediate atomic column density lines found in high-redshift QSO spectra. One-dimensional hydrodynamical models including electron conduction are described, and the rate equations are solved to find ionization and excitation states. Results are presented for both static and adiabatically expanding confining media covering a range of initial pressures. It is found that Ly-alpha lines are very similar over a wide range of conditions and that the most promising diagnostic of pressure is to compare the column density in H I to that in He I and He II. No single-pressure model can explain the wide range of observed H I column densities.

  12. Experimental Studies on Permeability of Intact and Singly Jointed Meta-Sedimentary Rocks Under Confining Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Li, Diyuan; Liu, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Three different types of permeability tests were conducted on 23 intact and singly jointed rock specimens, which were cored from rock blocks collected from a rock cavern under construction in Singapore. The studied rock types belong to inter-bedded meta-sandstone and meta-siltstone with very low porosity and high uniaxial compressive strength. The transient pulse water flow method was employed to measure the permeability of intact meta-sandstone under a confining pressure up to 30 MPa. It showed that the magnitude order of meta-sandstone's intrinsic permeability is about 10-18 m2. The steady-state gas flow method was used to measure the permeability of both intact meta-siltstone and meta-sandstone in a triaxial cell under different confining pressures spanning from 2.5 to 10 MPa. The measured permeability of both rock types ranged from 10-21 to 10-20 m2. The influence of a single natural joint on the permeability of both rock types was studied by using the steady-state water flow method under different confining pressures spanning from 1.25 to 5.0 MPa, including loading and unloading phases. The measured permeability of both jointed rocks ranged from 10-13 to 10-11 m2, where the permeability of jointed meta-siltstone was usually slightly lower than that of jointed meta-sandstone. The permeability of jointed rocks decreases with increasing confining pressure, which can be well fitted by an empirical power law relationship between the permeability and confining pressure or effective pressure. The permeability of partly open cracked specimens is lower than that of open cracked specimens, but it is higher than that of the specimen with a dominant vein for the meta-sandstone under the same confining pressure. The permeability of open cracked rock specimens will partially recover during the unloading confining pressure process. The equivalent crack (joint) aperture is as narrow as a magnitude order of 10-6 m (1 μm) in the rock specimens under confining pressures

  13. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Lassila, David H.; Bonner, Brian P.

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  14. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  15. Diffusion NMR of Fluids Confined to Mesopores under High Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigermann, Philipp; Dvoyashkin, Muslim; Gläser, Roger; Valiullin, Rustem

    2011-03-01

    Supercritical fluids are extensively used in various chemical applications including processes involving porous solids. The knowledge of their transport in bulk as well as under spatial confinements is critical for modeling and optimizing chemical reactions. In this contribution, we describe a high-pressure cell designed for pulsed field gradient NMR studies of diffusion of supercritical solvents in mesoporous materials. Some preliminary results on diffusion properties of ethane in bulk phase and confined to pores of mesoporous silicon obtained in a broad range of pressures below and above the critical temperature are reported.

  16. The Pressure induced by salt crystallization in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desarnaud, J.; Bonn, D.; Shahidzadeh, N.

    2016-08-01

    Salt crystallization is a major cause of weathering of rocks, artworks and monuments. Damage can only occur if crystals continue to grow in confinement, i.e. within the pore space of these materials, thus generating mechanical stress. We report the direct measurement, at the microscale, of the force exerted by growing alkali halide salt crystals while visualizing their spontaneous nucleation and growth. The experiments reveal the crucial role of the wetting films between the growing crystal and the confining walls for the development of the pressure. Our results suggest that the measured force originates from repulsion between the similarly charged confining wall and the salt crystal separated by a ~1.5 nm liquid film. Indeed, if the walls are made hydrophobic, no film is observed and no repulsive forces are detected. We also show that the magnitude of the induced pressure is system specific explaining why different salts lead to different amounts of damage to porous materials.

  17. The Pressure induced by salt crystallization in confinement.

    PubMed

    Desarnaud, J; Bonn, D; Shahidzadeh, N

    2016-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a major cause of weathering of rocks, artworks and monuments. Damage can only occur if crystals continue to grow in confinement, i.e. within the pore space of these materials, thus generating mechanical stress. We report the direct measurement, at the microscale, of the force exerted by growing alkali halide salt crystals while visualizing their spontaneous nucleation and growth. The experiments reveal the crucial role of the wetting films between the growing crystal and the confining walls for the development of the pressure. Our results suggest that the measured force originates from repulsion between the similarly charged confining wall and the salt crystal separated by a ~1.5 nm liquid film. Indeed, if the walls are made hydrophobic, no film is observed and no repulsive forces are detected. We also show that the magnitude of the induced pressure is system specific explaining why different salts lead to different amounts of damage to porous materials. PMID:27493020

  18. The Pressure induced by salt crystallization in confinement

    PubMed Central

    Desarnaud, J.; Bonn, D.; Shahidzadeh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a major cause of weathering of rocks, artworks and monuments. Damage can only occur if crystals continue to grow in confinement, i.e. within the pore space of these materials, thus generating mechanical stress. We report the direct measurement, at the microscale, of the force exerted by growing alkali halide salt crystals while visualizing their spontaneous nucleation and growth. The experiments reveal the crucial role of the wetting films between the growing crystal and the confining walls for the development of the pressure. Our results suggest that the measured force originates from repulsion between the similarly charged confining wall and the salt crystal separated by a ~1.5 nm liquid film. Indeed, if the walls are made hydrophobic, no film is observed and no repulsive forces are detected. We also show that the magnitude of the induced pressure is system specific explaining why different salts lead to different amounts of damage to porous materials. PMID:27493020

  19. Negative Pressure Vitrification of the Isochorically Confined Liquid in Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrjanowicz, K.; Kaminski, K.; Koperwas, K.; Paluch, M.

    2015-12-01

    Dielectric relaxation studies for model glass-forming liquids confined to nanoporous alumina matrices were examined together with high-pressure results. For confined liquids which show the deviation from bulk dynamics upon approaching the glass transition (the change from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann to the Arrhenius law), we have observed a striking agreement between the temperature dependence of the α -relaxation time in the Arrhenius-like region and the isochoric relaxation times extrapolated from the positive range of pressure to the negative pressure domain. Our finding provides strong evidence that glass-forming liquid confined to native nanopores enters the isochoric conditions once the mobility of the interfacial layer becomes frozen in. This results in the negative pressure effects on cooling. We also demonstrate that differences in the sensitivity of various glass-forming liquids to the "confinement effects" can be rationalized by considering the relative importance of thermal energy and density contributions in controlling the α -relaxation dynamics (the Ev/Ep ratio).

  20. Confinement of active systems: trapping, swim pressure, and explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatori, Sho; de Dier, Raf; Vermant, Jan; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    We analyze the run-and-tumble dynamics and motion of living bacteria and self-propelled Janus motors confined in an acoustic trap. Since standard optical tweezers are far too weak, we developed an acoustic trap strong enough to confine swimmers over distances large compared to the swimmers' size and run length. The external trap behaves as an ``osmotic barrier'' that confines the swimmers inside the trapping region, analogous to semipermeable membranes that confine passive Brownian particles inside a boundary. From the swimmers' restricted motion inside the trap, we calculate the unique swim pressure generated by active systems originating from the force required to confine them by boundaries. We apply a strong trap to collect the swimmers into a close-packed active crystal and then turn off the trap which causes the crystal to ``explode'' due to an imbalance of the active pressure. We corroborate all experimental results with Brownian dynamics simulations and analytical theory. ST is supported by a Gates Millennium Scholars fellowship and a NSF Fellowship No. DGE-1144469. RDD is supported by a doctoral fellowship of the fund for scientific research (FWO-Vlaanderen). This work is also supported by NSF Grant CBET 1437570.

  1. Microscopic pressure-cooker model for studying molecules in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Rosas-Acevedo, Hortensia

    2015-04-01

    A model for a system of a finite number of molecules in confinement is presented and expressions for determining the temperature, pressure, and volume of the system are derived. The present model is a generalisation of the Zwanzig-Langevin model because it includes pressure effects in the system. It also has general validity, preserves the ergodic hypothesis, and provides a formal framework for previous studies of hydrogen clusters in confinement. The application of the model is illustrated by an investigation of a set of prebiotic compounds exposed to varying pressure and temperature. The simulations performed within the model involve the use of a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods implemented on a computer system with a mixed CPU-GPU architecture.

  2. Dependency of hydromechanical properties of monzonitic granite on confining pressure and fluid pressure under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Lui, Zaobao; Chao, Zhiming; Meng, Qingxiang

    2016-05-01

    Monzonitic granite is a low-permeability rock. Monzonitic granite formations are ideal for underground storage of oil due to their low permeability and high mechanical strength. In this study, a series of coupled hydromechanical triaxial tests are carried out using monzonitic granite specimens. The influence of confining and fluid pressures on stress, strain, and permeability is investigated. Failure characteristics under different confining and fluid pressures are discussed based on the analysis of macro fracture planes and micro scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The test results show that the change of permeability with stress and strain reflects the deformation stages of compaction, compression, crack propagation, coalesce, and failure of cracks. Due to the low porosity, the change of permeability is small in the initial phases of compaction and compression, whereas there is a significant increase in permeability when new cracks start to develop and coalesce. Confining pressures have a significant impact on the strength and permeability, particularly the crack damage stress of the rock. Compared with confining pressure, the effect of fluid pressure on rock strength and crack damage stress is small. For the monzonitic granite specimens tested, changing the confining pressure results in different failure modes, whereas the fluid pressure has a relatively small effect on the failure modes.

  3. Mechanical Failure of a Plastic Bonded Explosive vs Confining Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, Donald; Elllis, Kevin; Leppard, Claire

    2011-06-01

    EDC37 fails by crack growth between 0.1 and about 7 MPa and by yield and plastic flow between about 7 and at least 138 MPa. In the low pressure range the compressive strength increases with pressure due to a threshold stress which also increases with pressure. The threshold stress is due to friction between crack surfaces and must be overcome for crack growth. In the higher pressure range the yield strength also increases with pressure but at a much lower rate. In the low pressure range the threshold stress for crack growth is less than the yield strength so primarily crack growth is observed while in the higher pressure range the yield strength is less the the threshold stress for crack growth so that only yield is observed. Thus at moderately low confining pressures greater than 7 MPa crack growth does not take place and so processes depending on crack motion such as frictional heating will not take place. Supported by AWE Aldermaston

  4. Dynamics of Nano-Confined Water under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Jazdzewska, Monika; Palmer, Jeremy; Mamontov, Eugene; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, M

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of the effects of pressure on the diffusivity of water molecules confined in single- wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with average mean pore diameter of 16 A. The measurements were carried out using high-resolution neutron scattering, over the temperature range 220 T 260 K, and at two pressure conditions: ambient and elevated pressure. The high pressure data were collected at constant volume on cooling, with P varying from 1.92 kbar at temperature T = 260 K to 1.85 kbar at T = 220 K. Analysis of the observed dynamic structure factor S(Q, E) reveals the presence of two relaxation processes, a faster diffusion component (FC) associated with the motion of caged or restricted molecules, and a slower component arising from the free water molecules diffusing within the SWNT matrix. While the temperature dependence of the slow relaxation time exhibits a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann law and is non-Arrhenius in nature, the faster component follows an Arrhenius exponential law at both pressure conditions. The application of pressure remarkably slows down the overall molecular dynamics, in agreement with previous observations, but most notably affects the slow relaxation. The faster relaxation shows marginal or no change with pressure within the experimental conditions.

  5. Direct measurement of the effective pressure law: Deformation of joints subject to pore and confining pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Boitnott, G.N.; Scholz, C.H. )

    1990-11-10

    When describing the deformation of poro-elastic materials subject to pore pressure (P{sub p}) and confining pressure (P{sub c}), the concept of effective pressure is commonly used. In such a description the deformation is described in terms of a single stress parameter, the effective stress (P{sub e}). Experimental studies which attempt to describe the effective pressure law are troubled by the fact that deformation of geologic materials invariably exhibits loading path dependence (hysteresis). Here the authors develop an experimental technique for measuring the effective pressure law which is useful for many properties of interest, including those that are highly nonlinear and exhibit common types of hysteresis. They experimentally derive an effective pressure law which describes the values of pore and confining pressure consistent with a given joint closure for a law which describes the values of pore and confining pressure consistent with a given joint closure for a loading path of constant closure. The study can be viewed as an attempt to include both pore and confining pressure in a single constitutive law for joint closure. The constant closure loading path is such that the measurement is not affected by hysteresis caused by joint closure. The results provide insight into the microgeometrical and micromechanical properties of joints. The data are not consistent with a simple extension of commonly used linear elastic constitutive models for joint deformation which have compared favorably with experiments in the absence of pore pressure. For smooth lapped glass joints, the effective pressure relation is found to be dependent on the local joint stiffness, with the relationship between the effective pressure law and the local joint stiffness being insensitive to the measured surface topography. Similar measurements on lapped and fractured rock provide some constraints on the effective pressure behavior of jointed rock.

  6. Formation of CO2, H2 and condensed carbon from siderite dissolution in the 200-300 °C range and at 50 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milesi, Vincent; Guyot, François; Brunet, Fabrice; Richard, Laurent; Recham, Nadir; Benedetti, Marc; Dairou, Julien; Prinzhofer, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the chemical processes governing the carbon speciation associated to hydrothermal decomposition of siderite. Experiments were carried out in sealed gold capsules using synthetic siderite and deionised water. The samples were reacted at 200 and 300 °C, under a pressure of 50 MPa. Siderite dissolved to reach the 3FeCO3 + H2O = Fe3O4 + 3CO2 + H2 equilibrium and magnetite, Fe3O4, was produced accordingly. The gas phase was dominated by CO2, H2 and CH4, the latter being in strong thermodynamic disequilibrium with CO2. Contrary to the other gas products, H2 concentration was found to decrease with run duration. TEM observations showed the occurrence of condensed carbon phases at the surfaces of magnetite and residual siderite grains. Thermodynamic calculations predict the formation of condensed carbon in the experiments according to the reaction: CO2 + 2H2 ⇒ C + 2H2O, which accounted for the observed H2 concentration decrease up to the point where H2 and CO2 activities were buffered by the graphite-siderite-magnetite assemblage. The well-organized structure of the carbon coating around magnetite emphasizes the high catalytic potential of magnetite surface for carbon reduction and polymerization. The formation of such C-rich phases may represent a potential source of CH4 by hydrogenation. On the other hand, the catalysis of Fischer-Tropsch type reactions may be poisoned by the presence of carbon coating on mineral surfaces. In any case, this study also demonstrates that abiotic H2 generation by water reduction, widely studied in recent years in ultrabasic contexts, can also occur in sedimentary contexts where siderite is present. We show that, in the latter case, natural H2 concentration will be buffered by a condensed carbon phase associated with magnetite.

  7. Geosynthetic tubes for confining pressurized slurry: Some design aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Leshchinsky, D.; Ling, H.I.; Leshchinsky, O.; Gilbert, P.A.

    1996-08-01

    This paper deals with geosynthetic tubes that are made of several geosynthetic sheets sewn together to form a shell capable of confining pressurized slurry. The slurry is sufficiently fluid so that it is possible to hydraulically fill the tube. After pumping the slurry in, the geosynthetic shell acts as a cheese cloth, allowing seepage of liquid out and retaining the solid particles. The availability of a wide selection of geosynthetics in terms of strength, durability, and permeability enables the use of hydraulically filled tubes in many applications, some of which may be considered critical (e.g., encapsulate contaminated soil). This paper presents an overview of an analysis to calculate both stresses in the geosynthetic and geometry of the tube. It also verifies the correctness and validity of the results obtained from a computer program developed to solve the problem. An instructive parametric study implies that the most critical factor needed to assure successful construction is the pumping pressure; a slight accidental increase in this pressure may result in a very significant stress increase in the encapsulating geosynthetic. Pressure increase beyond a certain level, however, has little influence on the storage capacity of the tube. Guidance in selecting an adequate geosynthetic, including partial safety factors and filtration properties, is also presented. Design aspects associated with required spacing of inlets and head loss of the slurry as it flows through the tube are considered outside the scope of this paper.

  8. Permeability of fault gouge under confining pressure and shear stress.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Shi, L.Q.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The permeability of both clay-rich and non-clay gouges, as well as several pure clays, was studied as a function of confining pressures from 5 to 200 MPa and shear strain to 10. Permeability ranged over 4 orders of magnitude, from around 10-22 to 10-18 m2 (1 darcy = 0.987 X 10-12 m2). Grain size was an important factor in determining permeability, particularly for the clay-rich samples. The permeabilities of the non-clay samples were not significantly different than those of the clays. Strength of the saturated samples under drained (low pore pressure) conditions did not correlate with high or low permeability. However, the low permeabilities of these gouges could be a factor in the measured low shear stresses along fault regions if excess pore pressures were created as a result of shearing or compaction, and this pressure was unable to dissipate through a thick section of the material.-from Authors

  9. Pressure confinement effect in MoS2 monolayers.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangfei; Yan, Yalan; Han, Bo; Li, Liang; Huang, Xiaoli; Yao, Mingguang; Gong, Yuanbo; Jin, Xilian; Liu, Baoli; Zhu, Chuanrui; Zhou, Qiang; Cui, Tian

    2015-05-21

    With ever increasing interest in layered materials, molybdenum disulfide has been widely investigated due to its unique optoelectronic properties. Pressure is an effective technique to tune the lattice and electronic structure of materials such that high pressure studies can disclose new structural and optical phenomena. In this study, taking MoS2 as an example, we investigate the pressure confinement effect on monolayer MoS2 by in situ high pressure Raman and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Our results reveal a structural deformation of monolayer MoS2 starting from 0.84 GPa, which is evidenced by the splitting of E(1)2g and A1g modes. A further compression leads to a transition from the 1H-MoS2 phase to a novel structure evidenced by the appearance of two new peaks located at 200 and 240 cm(-1). This is a distinct feature of monolayer MoS2 compared with bulk MoS2. The new structure is supposed to have a distorted unit with the S atoms slided within a single layer like that of metastable 1T'-MoS2. However, unlike the non-photoluminescent 1T'-MoS2 structure, our monolayer shows a remarkable PL peak and a pressure-induced blue shift up to 13.1 GPa. This pressure-dependent behavior might enable the development of novel devices with multiple phenomena involving the strong coupling of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of layered nanomaterials. PMID:25922917

  10. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%--samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  11. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  12. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-02-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems.

  13. ON THE COAGULATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PRESSURE CONFINED CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xu; Zhou Tingtao; Lin, D. N. C.

    2013-05-20

    Observations of the Pipe Nebula have led to the discovery of dense starless cores. The mass of most cores is too small for their self-gravity to hold them together. Instead, they are thought to be pressure confined. The observed dense cores' mass function (CMF) matches well with the initial mass function of stars in young clusters. Similar CMFs are observed in other star forming regions such as the Aquila Nebula, albeit with some dispersion. The shape of these CMF provides important clues to the competing physical processes which lead to star formation and its feedback on the interstellar media. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical origin of the mass function of starless cores which are confined by a warm, less dense medium. In order to follow the evolution of the CMF, we construct a numerical method to consider the coagulation between the cold cores and their ablation due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by their relative motion through the warm medium. We are able to reproduce the observed CMF among the starless cores in the Pipe Nebula. Our results indicate that in environment similar to the Pipe Nebula: (1) before the onset of their gravitational collapse, the mass distribution of the progenitor cores is similar to that of the young stars, (2) the observed CMF is a robust consequence of dynamical equilibrium between the coagulation and ablation of cores, and (3) a break in the slope of the CMF is due to the enhancement of collisional cross section and suppression of ablation for cores with masses larger than the cores' Bonnor-Ebert mass.

  14. Volumetric Properties of Dilute Aqueous Solutions of 1- and 2-propanol to 50 MPa and 373.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, J.; Bahramian, J.; Blackwell, R.; Inaki, T.; York, D.; Schulte, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The need to accurately model and understand reactions among organic compounds and biomolecules in solution is necessary to develop realistic chemical models for the reactions leading to the emergence of life and metabolic processes of extremophiles under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. Unfortunately, the scarcity of experimentally determined volumetric (and other) properties for important compounds at high temperatures and pressures leads to uncertainty in the calculation of reaction properties. Experimentally determined volumetric properties of aqueous solutions at non-standard conditions provide direct tests of current estimation methods and aid in the refinement of these methods. The goal of our research is to provide a database of experimentally determined volumetric properties. In previous studies, we have examined important organic molecules and biomolecules such as adenosine, coenzyme M and D-ribose. In this study, we investigate the volumetric properties of the structural isomers 1- and 2-propanol. 1-propanol (n-propanol) is a primary alcohol (CH3CH2CH2OH) and 2-propanol (isopropanol) is the simplest example of a secondary alcohol (CH3CHOHCH3). These compounds differ slightly in structure depending on to which carbon atom the hydroxyl group is bonded and will provide a sensitive test of current estimation methods and lead to more accurate predictions of the properties of complex aqueous systems at elevated temperatures and pressures. We obtained the densities of aqueous solutions of the alchohols using an Anton Paar DMA HP vibrating tube densimeter. Pressure was measured (pressure transducer) to an accuracy of ±0.01% and temperature was measured (integrated platinum thermometer) with an accuracy of ±0.05 K. Experimental uncertainty of density measurements is less than ±0.0001 g·cm-3. The partial molar volumes at infinite dilution (V∞) for 1- and 2-propanol were calculated from the measured densities and are shown in the figure at 0

  15. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of climax stock quartz monzonite at high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity have been made on two samples of Climax Stock quartz monzonite at pressures between 3 and 50 MPa and temperatures between 300 and 523{sup 0}K. Following those measurements the apparatus was calibrated with respect to the thermal conductivity measurement using a reference standard of fused silica. Corrected thermal conductivity of the rock indicates a value at room temperature of 2.60 +- 0.25 W/mK at 3 MPa increasing linearly to 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 50 MPa. These values are unchanged (+- 0.07 W/mK) by heating under 50-MPa pressure to as high as 473{sup 0}K. The conductivity under 50-MPa confining pressure falls smoothly from 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 313{sup 0}K to 2.15 +- 0.25 W/mK at 473{sup 0}K. Thermal diffusivity at 300{sup 0}K was found to be 1.2 +- 0.4 X 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s and shows approximately the same pressure and temperature dependencies as the thermal conductivity.

  16. Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

  17. Pressure signature and evaluation of hammer pulses during underwater implosion in confining environments.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sachin; Matos, Helio; Shukla, Arun; LeBlanc, James M

    2016-08-01

    The fluid structure interaction phenomenon occurring in confined implosions is investigated using high-speed three-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) experiments. Aluminum tubular specimens are placed inside a confining cylindrical structure that is partially open to a pressurized environment. These specimens are hydrostatically loaded until they naturally implode. The implosion event is viewed, and recorded, through an acrylic window on the confining structure. The velocities captured through DIC are synchronized with the pressure histories to understand the effects of confining environment on the implosion process. Experiments show that collapse of the implodable volume inside the confining tube leads to strong oscillating water hammer waves. The study also reveals that the increasing collapse pressure leads to faster implosions. Both peak and average structural velocities increase linearly with increasing collapse pressure. The effects of the confining environment are better seen in relatively lower collapse pressure implosion experiments in which a long deceleration phase is observed following the peak velocity until wall contact initiates. Additionally, the behavior of the confining environment can be viewed and understood through classical water hammer theory. A one-degree-of-freedom theoretical model was created to predict the impulse pressure history for the particular problem studied. PMID:27586733

  18. Mechanical impulse propagation in a three-dimensional packing of spheres confined at constant pressure.

    PubMed

    Santibanez, Francisco; Zuñiga, Rene; Melo, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical impulse propagation in granular media depends strongly on the imposed confinement conditions. In this work, the propagation of sound in a granular packing contained by flexible walls that enable confinement under hydrostatic pressure conditions is investigated. This configuration also allows the form of the input impulse to be controlled by means of an instrumented impact pendulum. The main characteristics of mechanical wave propagation are analyzed, and it is found that the wave speed as function of the wave amplitude of the propagating pulse obeys the predictions of the Hertz contact law. Upon increasing the confinement pressure, a continuous transition from nonlinear to linear propagation is observed. Our results show that in the low-confinement regime, the attenuation increases with an increasing impulse amplitude for nonlinear pulses, whereas it is a weak function of the confinement pressure for linear waves. PMID:26871144

  19. Mechanical impulse propagation in a three-dimensional packing of spheres confined at constant pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santibanez, Francisco; Zuñiga, Rene; Melo, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical impulse propagation in granular media depends strongly on the imposed confinement conditions. In this work, the propagation of sound in a granular packing contained by flexible walls that enable confinement under hydrostatic pressure conditions is investigated. This configuration also allows the form of the input impulse to be controlled by means of an instrumented impact pendulum. The main characteristics of mechanical wave propagation are analyzed, and it is found that the wave speed as function of the wave amplitude of the propagating pulse obeys the predictions of the Hertz contact law. Upon increasing the confinement pressure, a continuous transition from nonlinear to linear propagation is observed. Our results show that in the low-confinement regime, the attenuation increases with an increasing impulse amplitude for nonlinear pulses, whereas it is a weak function of the confinement pressure for linear waves.

  20. Possibility of Shear Type Fracture in Viscoplastic Material under Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Sakaguchi, K.; Sato, K.; Matsuki, K.; Hashida, T.

    2008-02-01

    Transition from opening-mode wing crack growth to shear type fracture has been investigated by conducting triaxial compression tests under confining pressures, using epoxy resin cylindrical specimens. The epoxy resin used exhibited viscoplastic deformation characteristics under confining pressures, which is expected to simulate the nonlinear deformation observed commonly for rocks at great depths and to provide useful insight in understanding of the fracture transition in rocks. Under the range of confining pressures, 10 MPa-30 MPa, an array of opening-mode wing cracks were initiated from a preexisting inclined penny-shaped crack, as the axial stress was increased. Only the extension of a wing crack was observed to take place under no confining pressure condition. It was shown that the growth of the wing cracks were suppressed when higher confining pressures were applied and shear type fracture consisting of several wing cracks was induced as the deformation progressed. The experimental observation suggests the possibility of occurrence of shear type fracture in such a homogeneous material under higher confining pressures, and the mechanical interaction between cracks plays a crucial role in the generation of shear type fracture rather than the inhomogeneity of rocks.

  1. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    PubMed Central

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  2. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement.

    PubMed

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P; Cattin, Cedric J; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  3. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells.

  4. Water Pressure Effects on Strength and Deformability of Fractured Rocks Under Low Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorian Bidgoli, Majid; Jing, Lanru

    2015-05-01

    The effect of groundwater on strength and deformation behavior of fractured crystalline rocks is one of the important issues for design, performance and safety assessments of surface and subsurface rock engineering problems. However, practical difficulties make the direct in situ and laboratory measurements of these properties of fractured rocks impossible at present, since effects of complex fracture system hidden inside the rock masses cannot be accurately estimated. Therefore, numerical modeling needs to be applied. The overall objective of this paper is to deepen our understanding on the validity of the effective stress concept, and to evaluate the effects of water pressure on strength and deformation parameters. The approach adopted uses discrete element methods to simulate the coupled stress-deformation-flow processes in a fractured rock mass with model dimensions at a representative elementary volume (REV) size and realistic representation of fracture system geometry. The obtained numerical results demonstrate that water pressure has significant influence on the strength, but with minor effects on elastic deformation parameters, compared with significant influence by the lateral confining pressure. Also, the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock can be quite different with that applied in soil mechanics. Therefore, one should be cautious when applying the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock media.

  5. Dynamic testing of concrete under high confined pressure. Influence of saturation ratio and aggregate size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.; Piotrowska, E.; Gary, G.

    2015-09-01

    Concrete structures can be exposed to intense pressure loadings such as projectile-impact or detonation near a concrete structural element. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confining pressure, dynamic quasi-oedometric compression tests have been performed with a large diameter (80 mm) Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. The concrete sample is placed within a steel confining ring and compressed along its axial direction. Hydrostatic pressures as high as 800 MPa and axial strain of about - 10% are reached during the tests. In the present work, experiments have been conducted on two types of concrete: MB50 microconcrete with a maximum grain size of 2 mm and R30A7 ordinary concrete of maximum grain size about 8 mm. Both concretes are tested in dry or saturated conditions. According to these dynamic experiments it is noted that grain size has a small influence whereas water content has a strong effect on the confined behaviour of concrete.

  6. Gravitational Instability of Rotating, Pressure-confined, Polytropic Gas Disks with Vertical Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Young Min; Hong, Seung Soo

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the gravitational instability (GI) of rotating, vertically stratified, pressure-confined, polytropic gas disks using a linear stability analysis as well as analytic approximations. The disks are initially in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium and bounded by a constant external pressure. We find that the GI of a pressure-confined disk is in general a mixed mode of the conventional Jeans and distortional instabilities, and is thus an unstable version of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. The Jeans mode dominates in weakly confined disks or disks with rigid boundaries. On the other hand, when the disk has free boundaries and is strongly pressure confined, the mixed GI is dominated by the distortional mode that is surface-gravity waves driven unstable under their own gravity and thus incompressible. We demonstrate that the Jeans mode is gravity-modified acoustic waves rather than inertial waves and that inertial waves are almost unaffected by self-gravity. We derive an analytic expression for the effective sound speed c eff of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. We also find expressions for the gravity reduction factors relative to a razor-thin counterpart that are appropriate for the Jeans and distortional modes. The usual razor-thin dispersion relation, after correcting for c eff and the reduction factors, closely matches the numerical results obtained by solving a full set of linearized equations. The effective sound speed generalizes the Toomre stability parameter of the Jeans mode to allow for the mixed GI of vertically stratified, pressure-confined disks.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Seepage Properties of Fractured Rocks Under Different Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Miao, X. X.; Chen, Z. Q.; Mao, X. B.

    2013-09-01

    The effectiveness of transmitting underground water in rock fractures is strongly influenced by the widths of the fractures and their interconnections. However, the geometries needed for water flow in fractured rock are also heavily controlled by the confining pressure conditions. This paper is intended to study the seepage properties of fractured rocks under different confining pressures. In order to do this, we designed and manufactured a water flow apparatus that can be connected to the electro-hydraulic servo-controlled test system MTS815.02, which provides loading and exhibits external pressures in the test. Using this apparatus, we tested fractured mudstone, limestone and sandstone specimens and obtained the relationship between seepage properties and variations in confining pressure. The calculation of the seepage properties based on the collection of water flow and confining pressure differences is specifically influenced by non-Darcy flow. The results show that: (1) The seepage properties of fractured rocks are related to confining pressure, i.e. with the increase of confining pressure, the permeability decreases and the absolute value of non-Darcy flow coefficient increases. (2) The sandstone coefficients and range from to m2 and to m-1, respectively, and exhibit a greater change compared to coefficients of mudstone and limestone. (3) From the regression analysis of experimental data, it is concluded that the polynomial function is a better fit than the power and logarithmic functions. The results obtained can provide an important reference for understanding the stability of rock surrounding roadways toward prevention of underground water gushing-out, and for developing underground resources (e.g. coal).

  8. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  9. The effects of confining pressure and stress difference on static fatigue of granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Samples of Barre granite were creep tested at room temperature at confining pressures up to 2 kilobars. The time to fracture increased with decreasing stress difference at every pressure, but the rate of change of fracture time with respect to the stress difference increased with pressure. At 87% of the short-term fracture strength, the time to fracture increased from about 4 minutes at atmospheric pressure to longer than one day at 2 Kb of pressure. The inelastic volumetric strain at the onset of tertiary creep, delta, was constant within 25% at any particular pressure but increased with pressure in a manner analogous to the increase of strength with pressure. At the onset of tertiary creep, the number of cracks and their average length increased with pressure. The crack angle and crack length spectra were quite similar, however, at each pressure at the onset of tertiary creep.

  10. Adsorption and disjoining pressure isotherms of confined polymers using dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goicochea, A Gama

    2007-11-01

    The adsorption and disjoining pressure isotherms of polymers confined by planar walls are obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the Grand Canonical (GC) ensemble in combination with the mesoscopic technique known as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Two models of effective potentials for the confining surfaces are used: one with both an attractive and a repulsive term and one with a purely repulsive term. As for the polymer, seven-bead linear model of polyethylene glycol (PEG) dissolved in water is used. The results indicate remarkably good agreement between the trends shown by our adsorption isotherms and those obtained from experiments of PEG on oxide surfaces. Additionally, the disjoining pressure isotherm of water shows oscillations, while those of PEG display the same trend for both wall models. Moreover, it is found that the disjoining pressure isotherms are in qualitative agreement with those from experiments on confined linear polymers. PMID:17914849

  11. Effects of Thermal Damage and Confining Pressure on the Mechanical Properties of Coarse Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mengdi; Rong, Guan; Zhou, Chuangbing; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Heating treatment generally causes thermal damage inside rocks, and the influence of thermal damage on mechanical properties of rocks is an important topic in rock mechanics. The coarse marble specimens drilled out from a rock block were first heated to a specific temperature level of 200, 400 and 600 °C except the control group left at 20 °C. A series of triaxial compression tests subjected to the confining pressure of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 MPa were conducted. Coupling effects of thermal damage and confining pressure on the mechanical properties of marbles including post-peak behaviors and failure modes, strength and deformation parameters, characteristic stresses in the progressive failure process had been investigated. Meanwhile, accompanied tests of physical properties were carried out to study the effect of thermal damage on microstructure, porosity and P-wave velocity. Finally, the degradation parameter was defined and a strength-degradation model to describe the peak strength was proposed. Physical investigations show that porosity increases slowly and P-wave velocity reduces dramatically, which could be re-demonstrated by the microscopy results. As for the post-peak behaviors and the failure modes, there is a brittle to ductile transition trend with increasing confining pressure and thermal effect reinforces the ductility to some degree. The comparative study on strength and deformation parameters concludes that heating causes damage and confining pressure inhibits the damage to develop. Furthermore, crack damage stress and crack initiation stress increase, while the ratios of crack damage stress to peak strength and crack initiation stress to peak strength show a decreasing trend with the increase of confining pressure; the magnitude of crack damage stress or crack initiation stress shows a tendency of decrease with the increasing heating temperature and the tendency vanishes subjected to high confinement.

  12. Competition between pressure and gravity confinement in Lyman Alpha forest observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.; Salpeter, Edwin E.; Linder, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    A break in the distribution function of Lyman Alpha clouds (at a typical redshift of 2.5) has been reported by Petit-jean et al. (1993). This feature is what would be expected from a transition between pressure confinement and gravity confinement (as predicted in Charlton, Salpeter & Hogan 1993). The column density at which the feature occurs has been used to determine the external confining pressure approximately 10 per cu cm K, which could be due to a hot, intergalactic medium. For models that provide a good fit to the data, the contribution of the gas in clouds to omega is small. The specific shape of the distribution function at the transition (predicted by models to have a nonmonotonic slope) can serve as a diagnostic of the distribution of dark matter around Lyman Alpha forest clouds, and the present data already eliminate certain models.

  13. Sustained spheromaks with ideal n = 1 kink stability and pressure confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, B. S. Jarboe, T. R.; Hansen, C. J.; Akcay, C.; Morgan, K. D.; Hossack, A. C.; Nelson, B. A.

    2014-08-15

    Increasing the helicity injector drive frequency up to 68.5 kHz on the Helicity Injected Torus-Steady Inductive (HIT-SI) experiment has produced spheromaks with current amplifications of 3.8, ideal n = 1 kink stability, improved toroidal symmetry and pressure confinement. Current centroid calculations from surface magnetic probes show an outward shift in the magnetic field at frequencies above 50 kHz. Grad-Shafranov equilibria indicate pressure confinement at higher injector operating frequencies. The minimum characteristic frequency needed to achieve this confining effect on HIT-SI plasmas is found to be approximately 30 kHz by analysis of the density fluctuations.

  14. The effects of confining pressure and stress difference on static fatigue of granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Samples of Barre granite have been creep tested at room temperature at confining pressures up to 2 kbar. Experimental procedures are described and the results of observations and analysis are presented. It is noted that the effect of pressure is to increase the amount of inelastic deformation the rock can sustain before becoming unstable. It is also shown that this increased deformation is due to longer and more numerous microcracks.

  15. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M. ); Sheppard, M.C. ); Houwen, O.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  16. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF ROTATING, PRESSURE-CONFINED, POLYTROPIC GAS DISKS WITH VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Young Min; Hong, Seung Soo E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: sshong@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the gravitational instability (GI) of rotating, vertically stratified, pressure-confined, polytropic gas disks using a linear stability analysis as well as analytic approximations. The disks are initially in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium and bounded by a constant external pressure. We find that the GI of a pressure-confined disk is in general a mixed mode of the conventional Jeans and distortional instabilities, and is thus an unstable version of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. The Jeans mode dominates in weakly confined disks or disks with rigid boundaries. On the other hand, when the disk has free boundaries and is strongly pressure confined, the mixed GI is dominated by the distortional mode that is surface-gravity waves driven unstable under their own gravity and thus incompressible. We demonstrate that the Jeans mode is gravity-modified acoustic waves rather than inertial waves and that inertial waves are almost unaffected by self-gravity. We derive an analytic expression for the effective sound speed c{sub eff} of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. We also find expressions for the gravity reduction factors relative to a razor-thin counterpart that are appropriate for the Jeans and distortional modes. The usual razor-thin dispersion relation, after correcting for c{sub eff} and the reduction factors, closely matches the numerical results obtained by solving a full set of linearized equations. The effective sound speed generalizes the Toomre stability parameter of the Jeans mode to allow for the mixed GI of vertically stratified, pressure-confined disks.

  17. Experimentally generated normal faults in single-layer and multilayer limestone specimens at confining pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Thomas L.; Logan, John M.; Friedman, Melvin

    1998-09-01

    We examined the deformation of single-layer and multilayer rock veneers at confining pressure due to slip on an underlying, pre-existing, 70°-dipping normal fault. Single-layer specimens consisted of centimeter-thick Indiana Limestone veneers; centimeter-thick multilayer specimens consisted of three layers of Indiana Limestone or two layers of Indiana Limestone separated by a middle layer of weaker, Austin Chalk. The experiments investigated the evolution of induced deformation features — fractures, faults and folds — as functions of; (1) offset on the pre-existing normal fault, (2) confining pressure (100 MPa and 200 MPa), (3) `bedding' (three-layer specimens), and (4) compositional layering (three-layer specimens with a weak middle layer). Single-layer limestone specimens deformed at 200-MPa confining pressure provided the most reproducible results, forming arrays of nested arcuate normal faults; the concave sides of the faults faced in the hanging wall direction. Older faults of the array, propagating from the tip of the pre-existing fault, died out upward into the hanging wall. Younger faults formed towards the footwall side of the array and propagated to the upper surface of the specimen. These latter faults accommodated subsequent slip on the pre-existent fault, and in doing so, fragmented and offset the monoclinally folded upper surface of the specimen. Reducing the confining pressure to 100 MPa produced a more brittle behavior in the specimen, manifested as fewer faults with more irregular profiles and less monoclinal folding at the upper surface of the specimen. Introducing bedding and weak layering in the specimens at 100-MPa confining pressure increased the bulk ductile response of the specimen. Our model-generated deformation features share strong similarities with those documented in other laboratory normal-fault experiments in sand and clay, and with normal-fault features found in outcrop.

  18. Seismic attenuation in partially saturated Berea sandstone submitted to a range of confining pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Samuel; Tisato, Nicola; Quintal, Beatriz; Holliger, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using the forced oscillation method, we measure the extensional-mode attenuation and Young's modulus of a Berea sandstone sample at seismic frequencies (0.5-50 Hz) for varying levels of water saturation (~0-100%) and confining pressures (2-25 MPa). Attenuation is negligible for dry conditions and saturation levels <80%. For saturation levels between ~91% and ~100%, attenuation is significant and frequency dependent in the form of distinct bell-shaped curves having their maxima between 1 and 20 Hz. Increasing saturation causes an increase of the overall attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to lower frequencies. On the other hand, increasing the confining pressure causes a reduction in the attenuation magnitude and a shift of its peak to higher frequencies. For saturation levels above ~98%, the fluid pressure increases with increasing confining pressure. When the fluid pressure is high enough to ensure full water saturation of the sample, attenuation becomes negligible. A second series of comparable experiments reproduces these results satisfactorily. Based on a qualitative analysis of the data, the frequency-dependent attenuation meets the theoretical predictions of mesoscopic wave-induced fluid flow (WIFF) in response to a heterogeneous water distribution in the pore space, so-called patchy saturation. These results show that mesoscopic WIFF can be an important source of seismic attenuation at reservoir conditions.

  19. Thermal behavior of water confined in micro porous of clay mineral at additional pressure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Y.; Takemura, T.; Fujimori, H.; Nagoe, A.; Sugimoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Water is the most familiar substance. However water has specific properties that has a crystal structure of a dozen and density of that is maximum at 277.15 K. Therefore it understands various natural phenomena to study physical properties of water. Oodo et al study physical properties of water confined in silica gel [1]. They indicate that melting point of water confined in silica gel decrease with decreasing pore size of silica gel. Also in case that pore size is less than 2 nm, water confined in silica gel is unfreezing water at low temperature. It is considered that effect of pore size prevent crystal growth of water. Therefore we are interested in water confined in clay minerals. Clay minerals have a number of water conditions. Also it is thought that water confined in clay minerals show different physical behavior to exist the domain where change with various effect. Therefore we studied a thermal properties and phase behavior of absorption water in clay minerals. In addition, we analyzed the changes in the thermal behavior of absorption water due to the effect of earth pressure that was an environmental factor in the ground. [1] Oodo & Fujimori, J. Non-Cryst. Solids, 357 (2011) 683.

  20. Pressure induced by thermal fluctuation of an elastic filament confined within a narrow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, L. B.

    2016-08-01

    Consider a flexible macro-molecule that is immersed in water at or above room temperature. As a result of thermal motion within the water, the filament is driven to undergo random fluctuations in shape. These fluctuations are a consequence of uncoordinated motion of water molecules. If the range of filament motion is restricted by nearby surfaces, the phenomenon becomes more complex. In this study, it is presumed that the filament is restricted to lie within a plane so that the motion is two dimensional. Furthermore, the range of the planar motion of the filament is confined to the region between inflexible straight boundaries lying in the plane of motion. A result of thermal fluctuation of the filament is that, when in close proximity to a boundary, a normal pressure is induced between the filament and that confining boundary. In the present development, frictional interaction of the filament with either confining boundary is presumed to be negligible. The goal is to determine the dependence of the induced pressure on the separation distance between the confining boundaries in terms of prevailing thermal conditions and physical characteristics of the system.

  1. On spatial segregation of vortices and pressure eddies in a confined slot jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanjalić, K.; Mullyadzhanov, R.

    2015-03-01

    A vortex in fluids is usually associated with pressure minimum, a presumption that served for defining various criteria for eduction of vortices and coherent structures in turbulence. We demonstrate that in a shallow confined turbulent slot jet, the dominant vortical structures may detach from pressure eddies. The numerical simulations show that pressure field proceeds by its own dynamics in which the irrotational contribution gradually takes over the weakened rotational effect of the wall-damped planar jet-edge vortices. Pressure sources move with their own velocity creating depressions and domes, the latter acting as "obstacles" that enhance jet meandering. The pressure zig-zag pattern is only weakly reinforced by the decaying planar vortices.

  2. Shock pressure induced by glass-confined laser shock peening: Experiments, modeling and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xianqian; Song Hongwei; Wei Yanpeng; Wang Xi; Huang Chenguang; Duan Zhuping

    2011-09-01

    The shock pressure generated by the glass confined regime in laser shock peening and its attenuation in the target material are investigated. First, the particle velocity of the target back free surface induced by laser generated shock pressure of this regime is measured using a photonic Doppler velocimetry system. The temporal profile of the particle velocity at the back free surface, where the elastic precursor is captured, manifests a powerful diagnostic capability of this newly developed photonic Doppler velocimetry system for tracking the velocity on short time scales in shock-wave experiments. Second, a coupling pressure analytical model, in which the material constitutive models of confined layers and target material are considered, is proposed to predict the plasma pressure profile at the surface of target. Furthermore, using the predicted shock pressure profile as the input condition, the dynamic response of the target under the shock pressure is simulated by LS-DYNA. The simulated back free surface velocity profile agrees well with that measured by the photonic Doppler velocimetry system. Finally, the attenuation behavior of stress waves and particle velocities in the depth of the target is analyzed, and it indicates an exponential decay. The corresponding empirical formulas for the attenuation behavior are given based on the numerical results.

  3. Confined H2O molecules as local probes of pressure-induced amorphisation in faujasite.

    PubMed

    Catafesta, Jadna; Alabarse, Frederico; Levelut, Claire; Isambert, Aude; Hébert, Philippe; Kohara, Shinji; Maurin, David; Bantignies, Jean-Louis; Cambon, Olivier; Creff, Gaëlle; Roy, Pascale; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Hammouda, Tahar; Andrault, Denis; Haines, Julien

    2014-06-28

    Confined H2O molecules act as local probes for depressurization phenomena during the pressure induced amorphisation of faujasite NaX at which the OH stretching frequency first decreases and then increases almost to its room pressure value upon further compression. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis provides evidence that amorphisation corresponds to a collapse of the structure around hydrated sodium cations with strong distortion of the secondary building units (double six-membered rings, sodalite cages). Both the use of guest molecules as local probes in far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy, where we correlate intermolecular water H bonding vibrations and internal mode behaviour under confinement, and PDF analysis could be of great use to study the mechanical behaviour of other hydrated materials. PMID:24816994

  4. High pressure induced phase transition and superdiffusion in anomalous fluid confined in flexible nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Bordin, José Rafael; Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2014-10-14

    The behavior of a confined spherical symmetric anomalous fluid under high external pressure was studied with Molecular Dynamics simulations. The fluid is modeled by a core-softened potential with two characteristic length scales, which in bulk reproduces the dynamical, thermodynamical, and structural anomalous behavior observed for water and other anomalous fluids. Our findings show that this system has a superdiffusion regime for sufficient high pressure and low temperature. As well, our results indicate that this superdiffusive regime is strongly related with the fluid structural properties and the superdiffusion to diffusion transition is a first order phase transition. We show how the simulation time and statistics are important to obtain the correct dynamical behavior of the confined fluid. Our results are discussed on the basis of the two length scales.

  5. Fluctuating Wall Pressure and Vibratory Response of a Cylindrical Elastic Shell due to Confined Jet Excitations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kam Wing

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted to investigate the flow-induced noise and vibration caused by confined jet flows in a cylindrical duct. Unrestricted pipe flow and flows restricted by various orifices were tested for a wide range of velocities to simulate the flow in piping systems. Wall pressure data showed that the noise levels vary with the pipe's axial location and the peak noise is located at the vicinity of the end of the jet potential core. A non-dimensional wall pressure spectrum was established for the various confined jets by the Strouhal relationship, where the length scale is the jet hydraulic diameter. This jet pressure spectrum agrees with the wall pressure spectrum of a turbulent boundary layer above a rigid plane. Correlations of wall pressure fluctuations and pipe wall acceleration signals showed that jet flows generate more deterministic features than pipe flow. The coherence functions of the wall pressure and pipe wall acceleration signals are relatively high near the exit of the jet. The high coherence is probably due to the large-scale coherent structures. An analytical model was developed to study the effect of the turbulent jet flow field on the wall pressure and vibratory motion of the duct wall. Based on flow field measurements, the blocked surface pressure was calculated using Lighthill's method, and then used to drive the fluid -filled shell. The wall pressure and pipe wall acceleration were determined by solving the coupled fluid solid interaction problem. The wall pressure was obtained by summing the blocked surface pressure and the pressure due to the wall vibration. An amplitude modulated convecting wave field was used to simulate the moving acoustic sources of the jet. The random nature of the turbulent jet was incorporated into the analytical model. Specifically, the acoustic pressure was assumed to result from hydrodynamic pressure fluctuations which are uncorrelated in the radial direction, but are correlated in

  6. Low beta equilibrium and stability for anisotropic pressure closed field line plasma confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pastukhov, V.P.; Ilgisonis, V.I.; Subbotin, A.A.

    1994-05-01

    General formalism is developed to analyze the equilibrium and stability of low beta anisotropic pressure plasmas confined in closed field line magnetic systems. The formalism allows one to consider rather general magnetic systems with nonuniform axis curvature and longitudinal profiles of toroidal and multipole poloidal field. It also allows having a strong pressure anisotropy corresponding to enhanced plasma pressure in mirror cells of the system. As an example of such a system the authors consider the recently proposed linked mirror neutron source (LMNS). Application of the above formalism to the LMNS analysis confirms most of the preliminary results, however, they obtain a considerable reduction of mirror cell axis curvature and an appreciable ellipticity of plasma cross-section in the mirror cell midplane. They have also optimized the longitudinal pressure and magnetic field distribution.

  7. Effect of nanoscale confinement on freezing of modified water at room temperature and ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the phase behavior of confined water is central to fields as diverse as heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion, nanofluidics, and to emerging energy technologies. Altering the state points (temperature, pressure, etc.) or introduction of a foreign surface can result in the phase transformation of water. At room temperature, ice nucleation is a very rare event and extremely high pressures in the GPa-TPa range are required to freeze water. Here, we perform computer experiments to artificially alter the balance between electrostatic and dispersion interactions between water molecules, and demonstrate nucleation and growth of ice at room temperature in a nanoconfined environment. Local perturbations in dispersive and electrostatic interactions near the surface are shown to provide the seed for nucleation (nucleation sites), which lead to room temperature liquid-solid phase transition of confined water. Crystallization of water occurs over several tens of nanometers and is shown to be independent of the nature of the substrate (hydrophilic oxide vs. hydrophobic graphene and crystalline oxide vs. amorphous diamond-like carbon). Our results lead us to hypothesize that the freezing transition of confined water can be controlled by tuning the relative dispersive and electrostatic interaction. PMID:24715572

  8. Water-Level Responses to Barometric-Pressure Fluctuations in Wells in Semi-Confined Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W.; Butler, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrologists have long recognized that changes in barometric pressure can produce changes in water levels in wells. The relationship between barometric pressure and water level has traditionally been characterized using the barometric efficiency (BE), the ratio of the change in water level to the change in barometric pressure head. Although BE has proven to be an effective means of characterizing the short-term response of a well to a change in barometric pressure, the barometric response function (BRF) is a more effective means to characterize the longer-term response. The BRF, which can be determined through a regression deconvolution procedure developed by Rasmussen and co-workers (Rasmussen and Crawford, 1997; Toll and Rasmussen, 2007), characterizes the water level response over time to a step change in barometric pressure, essentially BE as a function of the time since the imposed load. We have extended earlier work of Rasmussen and Spane (Rasmussen and Crawford, 1997; Spane, 2002) to show that the BRF can be utilized to glean important insights into semi-confined aquifer systems. The form of the BRF indicates the degree of aquifer confinement, while a comparison of BRFs from different wells provides insight into aquitard continuity. Recently, we have developed a new approach for estimating aquitard K by fitting type curves to experimentally determined BRFs. We will demonstrate the power of the BRF using field data from a long-term monitoring site of the Kansas Geological Survey at which a four-day pumping test has previously been performed. The aquitard K estimates obtained from the BRFs are in good agreement at this site with the estimate determined from the pumping test. We will also show how the BRF for a well in a semi-confined aquifer can be used to gain insights into conditions in the overlying unconfined aquifer and vadose zone. Although the BE is considered an invariant parameter of a well, we will show that the BRF of a well in a semi-confined

  9. Transient pore pressure response to confining stress excursions in Berea sandstone flooded with an aqueous solution of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-06-01

    We measured the pore pressure response due to carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble nucleation and growth in a Berea sandstone core flooded with an initially subsaturated aqueous solution of CO2, in response to a rapid drop in confining stress, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. A portion of the CO2 in the Earth's crust, derived from volcanic, magmatic, and biogenic sources, dissolves in groundwater. Sudden reductions in confining stress in the Earth's crust occur due to dilational strain generated by the propagation of seismic Rayleigh and P waves, or aseismic slip in the near field of earthquakes. A drop in confining stress produces a proportional drop in pore fluid pressure. When the pore fluid contains dissolved CO2, the pore pressure responds to a drop in confining stress like it does in the dissolved gas-free case, until the pore pressure falls below the bubble pressure. Gas bubble nucleation and diffusive growth in the pore space trigger spontaneous, transient buildup of the pore fluid pressure, and reduction of effective stress. We measured the rate of pore fluid pressure buildup in the 100 s immediately following the confining stress drop, as a function of the saturation with respect to CO2 at the lowest pore pressure realized during the confining stress drop, using five different CO2 partial pressures. The rate scales with the saturation with respect to dissolved CO2, from 10 kPa/min at 1.25 to 166 kPa/min at 1.8. The net pore pressure rise was as large as 0.7 MPa (100 psi) over 5 h.

  10. Array of surface-confined glow discharges in atmospheric pressure helium: Modes and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Liu, D. X. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com; Nie, Q. Y.; Li, H. P.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com

    2014-05-19

    Array of atmospheric pressure surface discharges confined by a two-dimensional hexagon electrode mesh is studied for its discharge modes and temporal evolution so as to a theoretical underpinning to their growing applications in medicine, aerodynamic control, and environmental remediation. Helium plasma surface-confined by one hexagon-shaped rim electrode is shown to evolve from a Townsend mode to a normal and abnormal glow mode, and its evolution develops from the rim electrodes as six individual microdischarges merging in the middle of the hexagon mesh element. Within one hexagon element, microdischarges remain largely static with the mesh electrode being the instantaneous cathode, but move towards the hexagon center when the electrode is the instantaneous anode. On the entire array electrode surface, plasma ignition is found to beat an unspecific hexagon element and then spreads to ignite surrounding hexagon elements. The spreading of microdischarges is in the form of an expanding circle at a speed of about 3 × 10{sup 4} m/s, and their quenching starts in the location of the initial plasma ignition. Plasma modes influence how input electrical power is used to generate and accelerate electrons and as such the reaction chemistry, whereas plasma dynamics are central to understand and control plasma instabilities. The present study provides an important aspect of plasma physics of the atmospheric surface-confined discharge array and a theoretical underpinning to its future technological innovation.

  11. Pressure-Induced Confined Metal from the Mott Insulator Sr3 Ir2 O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Yang, Liuxiang; Chen, Cheng-Chien; Kim, Heung-Sik; Han, Myung Joon; Luo, Wei; Feng, Zhenxing; Upton, Mary; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Zeng, Zhidan; Cao, Gang; Mao, Ho-kwang; van Veenendaal, Michel

    2016-05-01

    The spin-orbit Mott insulator Sr3Ir2O7 provides a fascinating playground to explore insulator-metal transition driven by intertwined charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom. Here, we report high-pressure electric resistance and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on single-crystal Sr3Ir2O7 up to 63-65 GPa at 300 K. The material becomes a confined metal at 59.5 GPa, showing metallicity in the a b plane but an insulating behavior along the c axis. Such an unusual phenomenon resembles the strange metal phase in cuprate superconductors. Since there is no sign of the collapse of spin-orbit or Coulomb interactions in x-ray measurements, this novel insulator-metal transition is potentially driven by a first-order structural change at nearby pressures. Our discovery points to a new approach for synthesizing functional materials.

  12. Pressure-Induced Confined Metal from the Mott Insulator Sr_{3}Ir_{2}O_{7}.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yang; Yang, Liuxiang; Chen, Cheng-Chien; Kim, Heung-Sik; Han, Myung Joon; Luo, Wei; Feng, Zhenxing; Upton, Mary; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Zeng, Zhidan; Cao, Gang; Mao, Ho-Kwang; van Veenendaal, Michel

    2016-05-27

    The spin-orbit Mott insulator Sr_{3}Ir_{2}O_{7} provides a fascinating playground to explore insulator-metal transition driven by intertwined charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom. Here, we report high-pressure electric resistance and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on single-crystal Sr_{3}Ir_{2}O_{7} up to 63-65 GPa at 300 K. The material becomes a confined metal at 59.5 GPa, showing metallicity in the ab plane but an insulating behavior along the c axis. Such an unusual phenomenon resembles the strange metal phase in cuprate superconductors. Since there is no sign of the collapse of spin-orbit or Coulomb interactions in x-ray measurements, this novel insulator-metal transition is potentially driven by a first-order structural change at nearby pressures. Our discovery points to a new approach for synthesizing functional materials. PMID:27284666

  13. Scaling regimes of thermocapillarity-driven dynamics of confined long bubbles: Effects of disjoining pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    During thermocapillary transport of a confined long bubble, we unveil the existence of a contrary-to-the-conventional disjoining-pressure-dominant scaling regime characterizing the dynamics of the thin liquid film engulfed between the bubble interface and the channel surface. Such a regime is realized for the limitingly small magnitude of the Marangoni stress (surface tension gradient) when the separating liquid region reaches an ultrathin dimension. Over this regime, we witness a severe breakdown of the seemingly intuitive scaling arguments based on the balance of viscous and capillary forces. Starting from competent balance criteria, we uncover the characteristic length scales involved, leading towards obtaining the new consistent scaling laws of the disjoining-pressure-dominant regime, in a simple closed form analytical fashion. Our scaling estimations are substantiated by full-scale numerical simulations of the pertinent thin-film equations. These new scaling laws appear to be convenient for implementing as a fundamental design basis for multiphase microfluidic systems.

  14. Are Pressure-Confined Clouds in Galactic Halos Possible for a Model of Lyman Alpha Clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahata, K.; Ikeuchi, S.

    Lanzetta et al (1995) found that most luminous galaxies at low redshifts produce Ly alpha absorptions at the mean impact parameter ~160h-1 kpc. Motivated by this observation, we propose the two-component protogalaxy model as a model for the Ly alpha cloud besed upon the previous work (MI 1995). In our model, the Ly alpha clouds are supposed to be stable cold clouds confined by the pressure of ambient hot gas in galactic halo. We determine the properties of these cold clouds and hot gas on the basis of theoretical and observational constraints. Especially, we take into account the stability of cold cloud in the galactic halo in addition to the general stability conditions in a two-component medium, and compare the derived quantities of Ly alpha cloud both cases in galactic halo and in intergalactic medium. We conclude that the condition that cloud is stable against both evaporation and tidal destruction by a hot galactic halo is very severe. As a result, at z ~0.5, it is concluded that a pressure-confined, stable spherical Ly alpha cloud of typical column density NHI = 1014 cm-2 cannot survive in the galactic halo, although much higher column density clouds of NHI = 1017 cm-2 can do there. We discuss how our result constraints an alternative model for a Ly alpha cloud which associates with galaxy observed by Lanzetta et.al.

  15. Radiation pressure confinement - II. Application to the broad-line region in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Alexei; Laor, Ari; Stern, Jonathan

    2014-02-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are characterized by similar broad emission lines properties at all luminosities (1039 - 1047 erg s-1). What produces this similarity over a vast range of 108 in luminosity? Photoionization is inevitably associated with momentum transfer to the photoionized gas. Yet, most of the photoionized gas in the broad-line region (BLR) follows Keplerian orbits, which suggests that the BLR originates from gas with a large enough column for gravity to dominate. The photoionized surface layer of the gas must develop a pressure gradient due to the incident radiation force. We present solutions for the structure of such a hydrostatic photoionized gas layer in the BLR. The gas is stratified, with a low-density highly ionized surface layer, a density rise inwards and a uniform-density cooler inner region, where the gas pressure reaches the incident radiation pressure. This radiation pressure confinement (RPC) of the photoionized layer leads to a universal ionization parameter U ˜ 0.1 in the inner photoionized layer, independent of luminosity and distance. Thus, RPC appears to explain the universality of the BLR properties in AGN. We present predictions for the BLR emission per unit covering factor, as a function of distance from the ionizing source, for a range of ionizing continuum slopes and gas metallicity. The predicted mean strength of most lines (excluding H β), and their different average-emission radii, are consistent with available observations.

  16. Kinetic theory of a confined polymer driven by an external force and pressure-driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Jason E.; Usta, O. Berk; Kekre, Rahul; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2007-11-01

    Kinetic theory is used to investigate the mechanisms causing cross-stream migration of confined polymers and polyelectrolytes under the influence of external forces and flow fields. Numerical simulations and experiments have demonstrated that confined polymers migrate towards the center of the channel in response to both external forces and uniaxial flows. Yet, migration towards the walls has been observed with combinations of external force and flow. In this paper, the kinetic theory for an elastic dumbbell developed by Ma and Graham [Phys. Fluids 17, 083103 (2005)] has been extended to account for the effects of an external force. Further modifications account for counterion screening within a Debye-Hückel approximation. This enables qualitative comparison with experimental results [Zheng and Yeung, Anal. Chem. 75, 3675 (2003)] on DNA migration under combined electric and pressure-driven flow fields. The comparison supports the contention [Long et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3858 (1996)] that the hydrodynamic interactions in polyelectrolytes decay algebraically, as 1/r3, rather than exponentially. The theory qualitatively reproduces results of both simulations and experiments for the migration of neutral polymers and polyelectrolytes. Concentration profiles similar to those found in numerical simulations are observed, but the Peclet numbers differ by factors of 2-3.

  17. Rotational dynamics of confined C60 from near-infrared Raman studies under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, L.; Liu, D.; Yu, S.; Wang, P.; Wang, T.; Yao, M.; Li, Q.; Zou, B.; Cui, T.; Zou, G.; Wagberg, T.; Sundqvist, B.; Mao, H.-K.

    2009-12-29

    Peapods present a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained crystal structures, whose dynamical properties are very important. We have recently studied the rotational dynamics of C60 molecules confined inside single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by analyzing the intermediate frequency mode lattice vibrations using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The rotation of C60 was tuned to a known state by applying high pressure, at which condition C60 first forms dimers at low pressure and then forms a single-chain, nonrotating, polymer structure at high pressure. In the latter state the molecules form chains with a 2-fold symmetry. We propose that the C60 molecules in SWNT exhibit an unusual type of ratcheted rotation due to the interaction between C60 and SWNT in the “hexagon orientation,” and the characteristic vibrations of ratcheted rotation becomes more obvious with decreasing temperature.

  18. Force-free equilibria of magnetized jets. [pressure confined extragalactic radio hydromagnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenigl, A.; Choudhuri, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    Force-free equilibrium configurations of magnetic-pressure-dominated magnetized supersonic jets confined by slowly varying external pressure are investigated analytically. For the case where internal dissipation mechanisms are active, the lowest-energy field configuration is found to be the superposition of an axisymmetric mode and a helical mode with a wavelength equal to 5 times the jet radius, and the pressure below which the nonaxisymmetric mode becomes energetically favorable is given as 2700 times the product of the 4th power of the magnetic helicity per unit length and the -6th power of the magnetic flux. A model of the total and polarized emission of such a configuration is developed and applied to the extended well-collimated astronomically resolved jet NGC 6251. The model is shown to reproduce significant features such as transverse oscillations of the ridge line, width oscillations and emission knots, the projected magnetic-field configuration, oscillations of the degree of polarization, and the distribution of the Faraday rotation measure.

  19. The effect of artesian-pressure decline on confined aquifer systems and its relation to land subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, J.H.

    1964-01-01

    Ground water in the Southwestern United States is derived chiefly from unconsolidated to semiconsolidated alluvial deposits. Where these deposits contain confined water, they may be susceptible to compaction and related land- surface subsidence, if artesian pressures are reduced. Compaction of artesian-aquifer systems can be estimated from core tests if the artesian-pressure decline is known. Compaction occurs chiefly in the finer grained deposits ; porosity decrease is greater near the top of the confined aquifer than near the bottom. Because most of the compaction of these aquifer systems is permanent, the storage coefficient during the initial decline of artesian pressure greatly exceeds the storage coefficient during a subsequent pressure decline through the same depth range, after an intervening period of pressure recovery.

  20. Particle modelling of magnetically confined oxygen plasma in low pressure radio frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Benyoucef, Djilali; Yousfi, Mohammed

    2015-01-15

    The main objective of this paper is the modelling and simulation of a radio frequency (RF) discharge in oxygen at low pressure and at room temperature, including the effect of crossed electric and magnetic fields for generation and confinement of oxygen plasma. The particle model takes into account one axial dimension along the electric field axis and three velocity components during the Monte Carlo treatment of the collisions between charged particles and background gas. The simulation by this developed code allows us not only to determine the electrodynamics characteristics of the RF discharge, but also to obtain kinetics and energetic description of reactive oxygen plasma at low pressure. These information are very important for the control of the deep reactive-ion etching technology of the silicon to manufacture capacitors with high density and for the deposition thick insulating films or thick metal to manufacture micro-coils. The simulation conditions are as follows: RF peak voltage of 200 V, frequency of 13.56 MHz, crossed magnetic field varying from 0 to 50 Gauss, and oxygen pressure of 13.8 Pa. In the presence of magnetic field, the results show an increase of the plasma density, a decrease of the electron mean energy, and also a reduction of the ratio between electron density and positive ion density. Finally in order to validate, the results are successfully compared with measurements already carried out in the literature. The conditions of comparison are from 100 to 300 V of the peak voltage at 13.56 MHz under a pressure of 13.8 Pa and a gap distance of 2.5 cm.

  1. Traction and nonequilibrium phase behavior of confined sheared liquids at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattinoni, Chiara; Heyes, David M.; Lorenz, Christian D.; Dini, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined model liquids under pressure and sheared by the relative sliding of the boundary walls have been carried out. The relationship between the time-dependent traction coefficient, μ(t), and the state of internal structure of the film is followed from commencement of shear for various control parameters, such as applied load, global shear rate, and solid-liquid atom interaction parameters. Phase diagrams, velocity and temperature profiles, and traction coefficient diagrams are analyzed for pure Lennard-Jones (LJ) liquids and a binary LJ mixture. A single component LJ liquid is found to form semicrystalline arrangements with high-traction coefficients, and stick-slip behavior is observed for high pressures and low-shear velocities, which is shown to involve periodic deformation and stress release of the wall atoms and slip in the solid-liquid boundary region. A binary mixture, which discourages crystallization, gives a more classical tribological response with the larger atoms preferentially adsorbing commensurate with the wall. The results obtained are analyzed in the context of tribology: the binary mixture behaves like a typical lubricant, whereas the monatomic system behaves like a traction fluid. It is discussed how this type of simulation can give insights on the tribological behavior of realistic systems.

  2. Thermal properties of Permian Basin evaporites to 493 K and 30 MPa confining pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Heard, H.C.; Boro, C.O.; Keller, K.T.; Ralph, W.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1987-01-26

    Laboratory measurements have been made of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of four rock salts, two anhydrites, and two dolomites bordering the Cycle 4 and Cycle 5 bedded salt formations in the Permian Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Measurement conditions ranged from 303 to 473 K in temperature, and 0.1 to 31.0 MPa in hydrostatic confining pressure. Within the +-5% measurement resolution neither conductivity nor diffusivity showed a dependence upon pressure in any of the rocks. Conductivity and diffusivity in all rocks had a negative temperature dependence. For the two Cycle 4 salt samples, conductivity over the temperature range explored fell from 5.5 to 3.75 W/m.K, and diffusivity fell from about 2.7 to 1.7 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s. One of the Cycle 5 salts was a single crystal which had anomalous results, but the other had a low conductivity, about 3.4 W/m.K, with very weak temperature dependence, and a high diffusivity, 3.8 to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s over the temperature range. In the nonsalts, conductivity and diffusivity decreased 10 to 20% over the temperature range explored, which was 308 < T < 373 K. Typical values at 308 K for conductivity were 5.4 W/m.K for both anhydrites and 3.4 and 2.6 W/m.K for the two different dolomite samples. Approximate values at 308 K for diffusivity were 2.3 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s for the anhydrites and 1.4 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s for both the dolomites. The coefficient of thermal linear expansion was measured for the Cycle 5 salt and nonsalts over 308 < T < 493 and 0.1 < P < 30.0 MPa. Typically, the coefficient varied from about 12 x 10/sup -6/ K/sup -1/ at P = 3.0 MPa to 4 x 10/sup -6/ K/sup -1/ at P = 30 MPa for both nonsalt rocks. In anhydrite, it decreased with increasing temperature at a rate of roughly 5 x 10/sup -8/ K/sup -2/ at all pressures. In dolomite, the coefficient increased at roughly the same rate. Expansion of the salt ranged from 33 to 38 x 10/sup -6/ K/sup -1/ and was independent of pressure

  3. Removal of volatile organic compounds in the confined space using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Toyoura, T.; Matsui, M.; Kishimoto, T.

    2013-10-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated as hazardous pollutants. Thus, the control of VOCs in the atmosphere is one of the most important environmental problems. Removal of VOCs has been generally carried out by conventional methods such as absorption, adsorption and incineration. There are some researches on development of removal system using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas. In this study, the plasma process is applied to removal of VOCs in the confined space such as an underwater vehicle because of low operating temperature and compact system. A copper wire is helically wound outside a glass tube, and a tungsten rod is inserted inside the glass tube. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced inside the glass tube by a high-voltage bipolar power supply for the removal of VOC. The DBD plasma decomposed hexane with the initial concentration of 30 ppm diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air. As the result, the removal efficiency of hexane diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air was 15%, 45% and 80%, respectively. Thus, it is considered that O and OH radicals are effective for removal of hexane. Optimization of the electrodes and the applied voltage waveforms for the enhancement of removal efficiency and the reduction of second products such as ozone will be investigated.

  4. Geometric scaling for a detonation wave governed by a pressure-dependent reaction rate and yielding confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Mi, X.; Higgins, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    The propagation of detonation waves in reactive media bounded by an inert, compressible layer is examined via computational simulations in two different geometries, axisymmetric cylinders, and two dimensional, planar slabs. For simplicity, an ideal gas equation of state is used with a pressure-dependent reaction rate that results in a detonation wave structure that does not exhibit cellular instability. The detonation is initiated as an ideal Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation with a one-dimensional structure, and then allowed to propagate into a finite diameter or thickness layer of explosive surrounded by an inert layer. The yielding confinement of the inert layer results in the detonation wave decaying to a sub-CJ steady state velocity or failing entirely. Simulations are performed with different values of the reaction rate pressure exponent (n = 2 and 3) and different impedance confinement (greater than, less than, and equal to that of the explosive). The velocity decrement and critical dimension (critical diameter or thickness) are determined, and a 2:1 scaling between the cylinder diameter and slab thickness results is confirmed, in good agreement with curvature-based models of detonation propagation. The measured shock front curvature and detonation velocity relation (DN-κ) agrees with the classic model of Wood and Kirkwood. The computational simulations are compared to a simple, analytic model that treats the interaction of the confinement with the detonation products via Newtonian theory and a model that assumes a continuous variation in shock front curvature with the shock angle at the interface with the confinement matching the angle determined by shock polar analysis. The Newtonian model works very well for the case of high impedance confinement, while the shock front curvature model agrees with the simulations for the case of low impedance confinement.

  5. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, P. E.; Sochet, I.; Trélat, S.

    2012-05-01

    To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the similitude between real and small scales. To study the interactions and propagations of the reflected shock waves, the present study was conducted by progressively building a confined volume around the charge. In this way, the influence of each wall and the origins of the reflected shock waves can be determined. The purpose of this paper is to report the blast wave interactions that resulted from the detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture in a confined room.

  6. Growth of GaAs from a free surface melt under controlled arsenic pressure in a partially confined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.; Wu, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A partially confined configuration for the growth of GaAs from melt in space was developed, consisting of a triangular prism containing the seed crystal and source material in the form of a rod. It is suggested that the configuration overcomes two obstacles in the growth of GaAs in space: total confinement in a quartz crucible and lack of arsenic pressure control. Ground tests of the configuration show that it is capable of crystal growth in space and is useful for studying the growth of GaAs from a free-surface melt on earth. The resulting chemical composition, electrical property variations, and phenomenological models to account for the results are presented.

  7. Influence of external pressure and surface energies on the phase evolution of ultrathin blend films under symmetrical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Zhen; Ding, Yifu

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the phase evolution of an ultrathin (100 nm) PS/PMMA blend film strongly confined between two parallel rigid plates with identical surface energy. The symmetry was achieved by pressurizing a spun-cast PS/PMMA film on a silicon wafer with a native oxide layer against another silicon wafer under a nanoimprinter. During subsequent annealing without pressurization, preferential wetting of a component (PMMA) occurred on both substrates, leading to phase inversion. The correlation wavelength in the final morphologies was reduced in half, compared with non-capped systems. When annealed while maintaining an external pressure, the predominant preferential substrate wetting of PMMA was prevented completely. Acknowledgement is made to NSF and ACS-PRF for financial support.

  8. Line broadening of confined CO gas: from molecule-wall to molecule-molecule collisions with pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, J-M; Boulet, C; Auwera, J Vander; El Hamzaoui, H; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M

    2014-02-14

    The infrared absorption in the fundamental band of CO gas confined in porous silica xerogel has been recorded at room temperature for pressures between about 5 and 920 hPa using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. The widths of individual lines are determined from fits of measured spectra and compared with ab initio predictions obtained from requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. Good agreement is obtained from the low pressure regime where the line shapes are governed by molecule-wall collisions to high pressures where the influence of molecule-molecule interactions dominates. These results, together with those obtained with a simple analytical model, indicate that both mechanisms contribute in a practically additive way to the observed linewidths. They also confirm that a single collision of a molecule with a wall changes its rotational state. These results are of interest for the determination of some characteristics of the opened porosity of porous materials through optical soundings. PMID:24527910

  9. Quantification of Viscosity and Capillary Pressure Anomalies for Polar Liquids in 2D Hydrophilic Nano-Confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. A.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Balhoff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Interest in liquid and interfacial behavior within nano-confinements spans many disciplines. Geophysical interest originates from a desire to understand flow mechanisms through hydrocarbon-rich nano-porous shale media, especially communication between fractures and the adjacent nano-porous matrix (imbibition). This work investigates the extent of boundary layer nucleation during polar liquid flows in hydrophilic nano-confinements via discrepancies seen in viscosity and capillary pressure from their bulk values. We perform our experiments in two-dimensional nanochannels of varying size and as small as 30 nm x 60 nm in cross section and still obtain visual data with reflected differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The simple geometry of the nanochannels enables the comparison against analytical transport solutions. By designing a nanochannel experiment that allows us to monitor the rate of fluid imbibition and volume loss of a trapped air pocket the liquid is imbibing into, we are able to decouple capillary pressure and viscosity from imbibition data, as well as gain information about gas partitioning at the meniscus interface. Our current experiments are performed with organic solvents within siliceous nanochannels and the results of the decoupling scheme indicate that for rectangular nanochannels with heights of 60 nm and varying widths, effective viscosity is consistently between 4-12 times higher than the bulk value and capillary pressure is around 50% less than the macroscopic Young-Laplace equation prediction. These results equate to the nucleation of wall boundary layers on the order of tens of molecular layers thick. Structured boundary layers have an inherently increased viscosity compared to the liquid bulk value, resulting in a significant reduction in imbibition efficacy. This presence of approximately 15 nm boundary layers in on the threshold of two different theories - thin bimolecular boundary layers and exclusion zones (thick boundary

  10. Pressure Effect on the Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Ito, Kanae; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-12-03

    We studied the boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores in order to examine the liquid-liquid transition (LLT). Below ~180 K, the boson peaks at pressures P higher than ~3.5 kbar are evidently distinct from those at low pressures by higher mean frequencies and lower heights. Moreover, the higher-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a master curve while the lower-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a different one. Moreover, these phenomena agree with the existence of two liquid phases with different densities and local structures and the associated LLT in the measured (P, T) region. Additionally,more » the P dependence of the librational band also agrees with the above conclusion.« less

  11. Pressure Effect on the Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Ito, Kanae; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-12-03

    We studied the boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores in order to examine the liquid-liquid transition (LLT). Below ~180 K, the boson peaks at pressures P higher than ~3.5 kbar are evidently distinct from those at low pressures by higher mean frequencies and lower heights. Moreover, the higher-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a master curve while the lower-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a different one. Moreover, these phenomena agree with the existence of two liquid phases with different densities and local structures and the associated LLT in the measured (P, T) region. Additionally, the P dependence of the librational band also agrees with the above conclusion.

  12. Application of Pressure Sensitive Paint to Confined Flow at Mach Number 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Bencic, T. J.; Bruckner, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paint (PSP) is a novel technology that is being used frequently in external aerodynamics. For internal flows in narrow channels, and applications at elevated nonuniform temperatures, however, there are still unresolved problems that complicate the procedures for calibrating PSP signals. To address some of these problems, investigations were carried out in a narrow channel with supersonic flows of Mach 2.5. The first set of tests focused on the distribution of the wall pressure in the diverging section of the test channel downstream of the nozzle throat. The second set dealt with the distribution of wall static pressure due to the shock/wall interaction caused by a 25 deg. wedge in the constant Mach number part of the test section. In addition, the total temperature of the flow was varied to assess the effects of temperature on the PSP signal. Finally, contamination of the pressure field data, caused by internal reflection of the PSP signal in a narrow channel, was demonstrated. The local wall pressures were measured with static taps, and the wall pressure distributions were acquired by using PSP. The PSP results gave excellent qualitative impressions of the pressure field investigated. However, the quantitative results, specifically the accuracy of the PSP data in narrow channels, show that improvements need to be made in the calibration procedures, particularly for heated flows. In the cases investigated, the experimental error had a standard deviation of +/- 8.0% for the unheated flow, and +/- 16.0% for the heated flow, at an average pressure of 11 kpa.

  13. Effect of confining pressure due to external jacket of steel plate or shape memory alloy wire on bond behavior between concrete and steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun; Park, Kyoungsoo

    2014-12-01

    For external jackets of reinforced concrete columns, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are easy to install, and they provide active and passive confining pressure; steel plates, on the other hand, only provide passive confining pressure, and their installation on concrete is not convenient because of the requirement of a special device. To investigate how SMA wires distinctly impact bond behavior compared with steel plates, this study conducted push-out bond tests of steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete confined by SMA wires or steel plates. For this purpose, concrete cylinders were prepared with dimensions of 100 mm x 200 mm, and D-22 reinforcing bars were embedded at the center of the concrete cylinders. External jackets of 1.0 mm and 1.5 mm thickness steel plates were used to wrap the concrete cylinders. Additionally, NiTiNb SMA wire with a diameter of 1.0 mm was wound around the concrete cylinders. Slip of the reinforcing bars due to pushing force was measured by using a displacement transducer, while the circumferential deformation of specimens was obtained by using an extensometer. The circumferential deformation was used to calculate the circumferential strains of the specimens. This study assessed the radial confining pressure due to the external jackets on the reinforcing bars at bond strength from bond stress-slip curves and bond stress-circumferential strain curves. Then, the effects of the radial confining pressure on the bond behavior of concrete are investigated, and an equation is suggested to estimate bond strength using the radial confining pressure. Finally, this study focused on how active confining pressure due to recovery stress of the SMA wires influences bond behavior. PMID:25971115

  14. Water-biomolecule systems under extreme conditions: from confinement to pressure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Water is a unique liquid, many of whose properties are critical for the continued support of life. In living systems, essential water-related phenomena occur in restricted geometries in cells, and at active sites of proteins and membranes or at their surface. The effects of hydration on equilibrium protein structure and dynamics are fundamental to the relationship between structure and biological function. In particular, the configuration of water molecules near the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces is of considerable relevance. The structure and dynamics of water confined in model systems developing hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by neutron scattering. It is well known that hydration, internal dynamics, and function in proteins are intimately associated. Studies of dynamics of water molecules at surface of a C-phycocyanin protein are presented.

  15. Water confinement in hydrophobic nanopores. Pressure-induced wetting and drying.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Sergei; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Takmakov, Pavel; Rios, Fabian

    2010-09-28

    Wetting and drying of hydrophobic pores with diameters lower than 0.2 μm by aqueous solutions at different hydrostatic pressures is investigated by measuring the ionic conductance variation through the nanopores. The critical pressure for water intrusion into the nanopores increases with lowering the pore diameter and the surface tension of the hydrophobic modification, in agreement with the Laplace equation. Nevertheless, restoring the pressure to the atmospheric one does not result in spontaneous pore dewetting unless bubbles are left inside the pores. Such bubbles can appear at the regions of narrowing cross section and/or varying quality of the hydrophobic modification and thus can be engineered to control water expulsion. PMID:20690599

  16. Radiation pressure confinement - III. The origin of the broad ionization distribution in AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Jonathan; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Baskin, Alexei; Holczer, Tomer

    2014-12-01

    The winds of ionized gas driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be studied through absorption lines in their X-ray spectra. A recurring feature of these outflows is their broad ionization distribution, including essentially all ionization levels (e.g., Fe0+ to Fe25+). This characteristic feature can be quantified with the absorption measure distribution (AMD), defined as the distribution of column density with ionization parameter |dN/d log ξ|. Observed AMDs extend over 0.1 ≲ ξ ≲ 104 (cgs), and are remarkably similar in different objects. Power-law fits (|dN/d log ξ| ≈ N1ξa) yield N1 = 3 × 1021 cm- 2 ± 0.4 dex and a = 0-0.4. What is the source of this broad ionization distribution, and what sets the small range of observed N1 and a? A common interpretation is a multiphase outflow, with a wide range of gas densities in a uniform gas pressure medium. However, the incident radiation pressure leads to a gas pressure gradient in the photoionized gas, and therefore to a broad range of ionization states within a single slab. We show that this compression of the gas by the radiation pressure leads to an AMD with |dN/d log ξ| = 8 × 1021 ξ0.03 cm-2, remarkably similar to that observed. The calculated values of N1 and a depend weakly on the gas metallicity, the ionizing spectral slope, the distance from the nucleus, the ambient density, and the total absorber column. Thus, radiation pressure compression (RPC) of the photoionized gas provides a natural explanation for the observed AMD. RPC predicts that the gas pressure increases with decreasing ionization, which can be used to test the validity of RPC in ionized AGN outflows.

  17. Effects of polymer stiffness on surface tension and pressure in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchev, Andrey

    2015-08-01

    We study the effect of chain rigidity on the behavior of semiflexible polymers in the vicinity of flat walls in a slit, and of surfactants at the liquid-liquid interface between immiscible liquids. Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is demonstrated that the impact of bending angle forces is particularly strong within the depletion layer at the phase boundary whereas at distance Re away from the interface, where Re is the mean distance between the ends of a semiflexible chain, the contribution of these non-local triplet interactions to pressure tensor virtually disappears. The present study also demonstrates that growing stiffness of the macromolecules leads to an increase in surface tension and total pressure.

  18. Summary of results of frictional sliding studies, at confining pressures up to 6.98 kb, in selected rock materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Summers, R.; Byerlee, J.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a collection of stress-strain charts which were produced by deforming selected simuiated fault gouge materials. Several sets of samples consisted of intact cylinders, 1.000 inch in diameter and 2.500 inches long. The majority of the samples consisted of thin layers of the selected sample material, inserted within a diagonal sawcut in a 1.000-inch by 2.500-inch Westerly Granite cylinder. Two sorts of inserts were used. The first consisted of thin wafers cut from 1.000-inch-diameter cores of the rock being tested. The other consisted of thin layers of crushed material packed onto the sawcut surface. In several groups of tests using various thicknesses (0.010 inch to 0.160 inch) of a given type material there were variations in the stress level and/or stability of sliding as a function of the fault zone width. Because of this we elected to use a standard 0.025-inch width fault zone to compare the frictional properties of many of the different types of rock materials. This 0.025-inch thickness was chosen partially because this thickness of crushed granite behaves approximately the same as a fractured sample of initially intact granite, and also because this is near the lower limit at which we could cut intact wafers for those samples that were prepared from thin slices of rock. One series of tests was done with saw cut granite cylinders without fault gouge inserts. All of these tests were done in a hydraulically operated triaxial testing machine. The confining pressure (δ1, least principal stress) was applied by pumping petroleum ether into a pressure vessel. The differential stress (δ3-δ1) was applied by a hydraulically operated ram that could be advanced into the pressure vessel at any of several strain rates (10-4sec-1, 10-5sec-1, 10-6sec-1, 10-7sec-1, or 10-8sec-1). All samples were jacketed in polyurethane tubing to exclude the confining pressure medium from the samples. The majority of the samples, with the exception of some of the initially

  19. The bird: A pressure-confined explosion in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Helfand, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The non-thermal radio continuum source G5.3-1.0, mapped at 20 cm with the Very Large Array (VLA) by Becker and Helfand, has an unusual bird-like shape. In order to determine possible interaction of this source with adjacent cold gas, we have mapped this region in the J=1-0 line of CO using the AT and T Bell Laboratories 7m antenna and the FCRAO 14m antenna. The map shown contains 1859 spectra sampled on a 1.5 arcminute grid; each spectrum has an rms noise of 0.2 K in 1 MHz channels. There are several molecular clouds at different velocities along the line of sight. The outer regions of a previously unknown Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) at l=4.7 deg., b=-0.85 deg., v=200 km s(-1) appears to be interacting with G5.3-10: the molecular cloud has a bird-shaped hole at the position of the continuum source, except that the brightest continuum point (the bird's head) appears to be embedded in the cloud. The velocity of this GMC indicates it is within 2 kpc of the galactic center. The morphology suggests that a supernova or other explosive event occurred near the outside of the GMC, in a region where (n) is approximately 300 cm(-3), and expanded into a region of lower density and pressure. The pressures, densities, and velocity gradients of molecular clouds near the galactic center are on average higher than those of clouds near the Sun. We therefore expect that Type II supernovae near the galactic center would be distorted by their interactions with their parent molecular clouds.

  20. Self-diffusion of polycrystalline ice Ih under confining pressure: Hydrogen isotope analysis using 2-D Raman imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Naoki; Kubo, Tomoaki; Durham, William B.; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a high-resolution technique based on micro Raman spectroscopy to measure hydrogen isotope diffusion profiles in ice Ih. The calibration curve for quantitative analysis of deuterium in ice Ih was constructed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion experiments using diffusion couples composed of dense polycrystalline H2O and D2O ice were carried out under a gas confining pressure of 100 MPa (to suppress micro-fracturing and pore formation) at temperatures from 235 K to 245 K and diffusion times from 0.2 to 94 hours. Two-dimensional deuterium profiles across the diffusion couples were determined by Raman imaging. The location of small spots of frost from room air could be detected from the shapes of the Raman bands of OH and OD stretching modes, which change because of the effect of the molar ratio of deuterium on the molecular coupling interaction. We emphasize the validity for screening the impurities utilizing the coupling interaction. Some recrystallization and grain boundary migration occurred in recovered diffusion couples, but analysis of two-dimensional diffusion profiles of regions not affected by grain boundary migration allowed us to measure a volume diffusivity for ice at 100 MPa of (2.8 ± 0.4) ×10-3exp[ -57.0±15.4kJ/mol/RT ] m2 /s (R is the gas constant, T is temperature). Based on ambient pressure diffusivity measurements by others, this value indicates a high (negative) activation volume for volume diffusivity of -29.5 cm3/mol or more. We can also constrain the value of grain boundary diffusivity in ice at 100 MPa to be <104 that of volume diffusivity.

  1. Evidence of the existence of the high-density and low-density phases in deeply-cooled confined heavy water under high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Harriger, Leland; Leão, Juscelino B.

    2014-07-07

    The average density of D{sub 2}O confined in a nanoporous silica matrix (MCM-41-S) is studied with neutron scattering. We find that below ∼210 K, the pressure-temperature plane of the system can be divided into two regions. The average density of the confined D{sub 2}O in the higher-pressure region is about 16% larger than that in the lower-pressure region. These two regions could represent the so-called “low-density liquid” and “high-density liquid” phases. The dividing line of these two regions, which could represent the associated 1st order liquid-liquid transition line, is also determined.

  2. The peculiar behavior of the molecular dynamics of a glass-forming liquid confined in native porous materials - the role of negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Tarnacka, Magdalena; Kipnusu, Wycliffe K; Kaminska, Ewa; Pawlus, Sebastian; Kaminski, Kamil; Paluch, Marian

    2016-08-24

    In this paper, we combine Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) at ambient and high pressure, and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) data of 2-ethylhexanol in the bulk state and when infiltrated in native silica nanopores to elucidate the relative role of surface effects on the Debye and structural relaxation processes under 2D spatial constraints. We show that the two processes have different sensitivities to (i) the changes in density as quantified by the EV/Hp ratio and (ii) the degree of confinement. Significant enhancement of the dynamics of the confined molecules at low temperatures is related to the vitrification of the interfacial molecules (Tg,int) affecting the packing density of the core molecules. This is corroborated by the PALS measurements, which demonstrated that the effective volume for the confined samples is slightly higher and seems to be temperature invariant below Tg,int. Consequently, negative pressure systematically develops with lowering temperature reaching values of -100 and -110 MPa (depending on the pore size) at the glass transition temperature. This result offers a better understanding of the counterbalance between surface and finite size effects as well as the role of negative pressure in controlling the dynamics and the glass transition of liquids under 2D spatial restrictions. PMID:27510859

  3. Accounting for pore water pressure and confined aquifers in assessing the stability of slopes: a Limit Equilibrium analysis carried out through the Minimum Lithostatic Deviation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausilia Paparo, Maria; Tinti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The model we introduce is an implementation of the Minimum Lithostatic Deviation (MLD) method, developed by Tinti and Manucci (Tinti and Manucci 2006; 2008), that makes use of the limit equilibrium (LE) theory to estimate the stability of a slope. The main purpose here is to analyse the role of a confined aquifer on the value of the Safety Factor (F), the parameter that in the LE is used to determine if a slope is stable or unstable. The classical LE methods treat unconfined aquifers by including the water pore pressure in the Mohr-Coulomb failure formula: since the water decreases the friction shear strength, the soil above the sliding surface turns out to be more prone to instability. In case of a confined aquifer, however, due to a presence of impermeable layers, the water is not free to flow into the matrix of the overlying soil. We consider here the assumption of a permeable soil sliding over an impermeable layer, which is an occurrence that is found in several known landslide cases (e.g. Person, 2008; Strout and Tjeltja, 2008; Morgan et al., 2010 for offshore slides; and Palladino and Peck, 1972; Miller and Sias, 1998; Jiao et al. 2005; Paparo et al., 2013 for slopes in proximity of artificial or natural water basins) where clay beds form the potential sliding surface: the water, confined below, pushes along these layers and acts on the sliding body as an external bottom load. We modify the MLD method equations in order to take into account the load due to a confined aquifer and apply the new model to the Vajont case, where many have hypothesised the contribution of a confined aquifer to the failure. Our calculations show that the rain load i) infiltrating directly into the soil body and ii) penetrating into the confined aquifer below the clay layers, in addition with the lowering of the reservoir level, were key factors of destabilization of the Mt Toc flank and caused the disastrous landslide.

  4. Elastic membranes in confinement.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, J B; Miksis, M J; Davis, S H

    2016-07-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and coiled DNA, have fine internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically 'confined' by another object. Here, the two-dimensional shape of an elastic membrane in a 'confining' box is studied by introducing a repulsive confinement pressure that prevents the membrane from intersecting the wall. The stage is set by contrasting confined and unconfined solutions. Continuation methods are then used to compute response diagrams, from which we identify the particular membrane mechanics that generate mitochondria-like shapes. Large confinement pressures yield complex response diagrams with secondary bifurcations and multiple turning points where modal identities may change. Regions in parameter space where such behaviour occurs are then mapped. PMID:27440257

  5. High pressure deformation experiments using solid confining media and Griggs piston-cylinder methods: Appraisal of stress and deformation in talc assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Eric D.; Holyoke, , Caleb W.; Kronenberg, Andreas K.

    2013-03-01

    Attempts to calibrate mechanical results obtained in triaxial compression experiments using solid media assemblies in a Griggs piston-cylinder apparatus have failed to reveal a dependable relationship between results obtained using a talc assembly and results obtained with a gas triaxial deformation apparatus. Temperature-stepping experiments (600 °C-1000 °C) were performed on high-purity molybdenum (Mo) and a Ti-Zr-Mo alloy (TZM), pressurized by talc in a Griggs apparatus and by argon gas using a Heard apparatus. Apparent strengths of metal samples deformed at temperatures in the stability field of talc were at least 1500 MPa (> 6 times) greater than those determined in gas apparatus experiments, and they do not appear to follow any simple trend. At temperatures above talc dehydration, apparent strengths in talc assemblies were 500-800 MPa (> 2 1/2 times) greater. Total shortening strains of the metal samples measured after deformation in talc exceeded axial strains monitored during the triaxial deformation stage of the experiments by as much as 15-25%. A pressurization experiment performed on a TZM cylinder in talc, without engaging the load column, shows that samples can be shortened axially by the pressurization process. This test and a pressurization experiment conducted on a compound sample of Balsam Gap dunite and San Carlos olivine indicate that differential stresses within talc assemblies exceed the yield strengths of these materials during pressurization. Deformation of Balsam Gap dunite and San Carlos olivine during pressurization leads to complex microstructures, consisting of brittle faults, high dislocation densities, and small (10-40 μm) recrystallized grains. Experimental studies of deformation mechanisms and microstructures in samples deformed in strong solid confining media using Griggs piston-cylinder methods must therefore establish that the observed crystalline defects and microstructures are due to deformation at the controlled temperature

  6. The effect of morphology and confinement on the high-pressure phase transition in ZnO nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-03-21

    The transition pressure (P{sub t}) of the B4-to-B1 phase transformation of zinc oxide nanoparticle (n-ZnO) structures was investigated in terms of their size and morphology. Nanorods, nanopencils, nanopyramids, nanowires, and nanotubes of the B4 phase in various sizes were directly built up by accounting for the atomic basis of the core and surface regions. The previously proposed transformation path was performed for constructing shapes and sizes compatible with B1 phases. Using systematic density functional theory, the surfaces were cleaved from the optimized crystal structures at different pressures in both the B4 and B1 phases. A method for calculating the surface energy at different pressures is proposed using an asymmetric slab model. Using the proposed model, the transition pressure of n-ZnO structures was found to significantly depend on their morphology and size, which is in good agreement with the available experimental reports.

  7. Alterations in streaming potential in presence of time periodic pressure-driven flow of a power law fluid in narrow confinements with nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    We study the coupled effect of electrokinetic phenomena and fluid rheology in altering the induced streaming potential in narrow fluidic confinements, which is manifested by establishing a time periodic pressure-driven flow in presence of electrical double layer phenomenon. However, in sharp contrast with reported literature, we take into account nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions toward estimating the same in addition to electrostatic interactions and steric effects. We employ power law based rheological model for estimating the induced streaming potential. We bring out an intricate interaction between nonelectrostatic interactions and fluid rheology on the concerned electrokinetic phenomena, bearing immense consequences toward designing of integrated lab-on-a-chip-based microdevices and nanodevices. PMID:24132646

  8. Negative ion density in magnetically confined low-pressure argon-acetylene plasmas using laser-induced photodetachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Joelle; Al Makdessi, Georges; Hamdan, Ahmad; Clergereaux, Richard

    2015-09-01

    In plasmas generated in reactive gases such as silane and acetylene, dust particles can spontaneously form provided the residence time of the precursors is large enough for allowing volume interactions to dominate over surface interactions. In discharges at intermediate pressure (e.g. 100 mTorr), anions are considered to be the most likely precursors to dust particles formation. In the present work, we examine the negative ion density in very low pressure conditions, namely 1-10 mTorr. For this purpose, we investigate magnetized dusty plasmas produced in argon-acetylene mixtures in which dust particles have been observed. The negative ion density is measured using a laser photodetachment technique. It is is observed to increase with the magnetic field intensity and to slightly decrease with increasing C2H2 percentage in argon. In addition, it decreases with increasing gas pressure. The photodetachment cross section deduced from the photodetachment signal as a function of laser energy is found to be significantly higher than the value expected for the C2H- ion, which may be explained by the presence in the plasma of negatively charged dust particles.

  9. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  10. E-H mode transition of a high-power inductively coupled plasma torch at atmospheric pressure with a metallic confinement tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberend, Jochen; Chichignoud, Guy; Delannoy, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma torches need high ignition voltages for the E-H mode transition and are therefore difficult to operate. In order to reduce the ignition voltage of an RF plasma torch with a metallic confinement tube the E-H mode transition was studied. A Tesla coil was used to create a spark discharge and the E-H mode transition of the plasma was then filmed using a high-speed camera. The electrical potential of the metallic confinement tube was measured using a high-voltage probe. It was found that an arc between the grounded injector and the metallic confinement tube is maintained by the electric field (E-mode). The transition to H-mode occurred at high magnetic fields when the arc formed a loop. The ignition voltage could be reduced by connecting the metallic confinement tube with a capacitor to the RF generator.

  11. Nitridation of silicon under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, J. )

    1987-07-01

    The microstructure of reaction-bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was changed by nitriding Si powder compacts at 0, 1, and 50 MPa. The microstructural parameters were analyzed using light and scanning electron microscopy, XRD, and mercury pressure porosimetry. The influence of the nitriding gas pressure on the ratio of the crystallographic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} phases {alpha} and {beta}, the pore size distribution, and the resulting mechanical properties has been investigated. High nitrogen pressure promotes the formation of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and leads to a fine-grained homogeneous microstructure, with improved fracture strength and fracture toughness.

  12. Effects of pressure and temperature on the thermal properties of a salt and a quartz monzonite

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-03-27

    Measurements have been made of thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and linear expansion as a function of temperature (to 573 K) and hydrostatic pressure (to 50 MPa) on two rocks, Avery Island domal salt and Climax Stock quartz monzonite. For Avery Island salt the thermal properties do not show any pressure dependence and are approximately the same values as for single crystal halite at 0.1 MPa. The lack of pressure dependence is attributed to the high symmetry of halite (cubic) and to its low strength, both of which inhibit brittle fracturing. For Climax Stock quartz monzonite no pressure dependence of thermal diffusivity has been resolved, but conductivity does show a drop of approximately 10% with decreasing pressure from 50 to 3 MPa. The pressure dependence is not measurably altered by heating the rock to as high as 473 K under 50 MPa. Our measurements so far on the thermal conductivity of quartz monzonite vs temperature and pressure are in agreement with predictions of the Walsh and Decker (1966) model of thermal conductivity vs crack porosity based on independent measurements of crack porosity vs temperature and pressure for the same quartz monzonite. Heating to temperatures greater than 473 K at 50 MPa, or heating to lower temperatures at lower pressures, should substantially reduce thermal conductivity of the quart monzonite.

  13. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results. PMID:25732054

  14. The effects of confining pressure on the strength and elastic properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes USW NRG-6 and USW NRG-7/7A: Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.J.; Noel, J.S.; Boyd, P.J.

    1997-09-01

    Experimental results are presented for bulk and mechanical properties measurements on specimens of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from the USW NRG-6 and USW NRG-7/7A borehole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Measurements have been performed on five thermal/mechanical units: TCw, PTn, TSw2, and TSw3. The following bulk properties are reported for each specimen: dry bulk density, saturated bulk density, average grain density and porosity. Confined compression to failure tests were performed on selected specimens recovered from the boreholes at confining pressures of 5 and 10 MPa. In addition, compressional and shear wave velocities were measured on the specimens prior to testing. Measurements were conducted under drained conditions at room temperature on nominally water saturated specimens. The nominal strain rate for the experiments was 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}.

  15. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  16. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  17. Confined vortex scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards using a cleanup technology appropriate to small scale coal combustors. This to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber (CVS), which consists of a cylindrical vortex chamber with tangential flue gas inlets. The clean gas exit is via vortex finder outlets, one at either end of the tube. Liquid is introduced into the chamber and is confined within the vortex chamber by the centrifugal force generated by the gas flow itself. This confined liquid forms a layer through which the flue gas is then forced to bubble, producing a strong gas/liquid interaction, high inertial separation forces and efficient particulate cleanup. During this quarter a comprehensive series of cleanup experiments have been made for three CVS configurations. The first CVS configuration tested gave very efficient fine particulate removal at the design air mass flow rate (1 MM BUT/hr combustor exhaust flow), but had over 20{double prime}WC pressure drop. The first CVS configuration was then re-designed to produce the same very efficient particulate collection performance at a lower pressure drop. The current CVS configuration produces 99.4 percent cleanup of ultra-fine fly ash at the design air mass flow at a pressure drop of 12 {double prime}WC with a liquid/air flow ratio of 0.31/m{sup 3}. Unlike venturi scrubbers, the collection performance of the CVS is insensitive to dust loading and to liquid/air flow ratio.

  18. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2013-08-14

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation. PMID:23947875

  19. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-03

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker - henceforth cited as SW - in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell. The

  20. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  1. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  2. Fracture propagation, stable sliding and stick slip by pore pressurizing a fault gouge analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnel, A.; Thompson, B.; Fortin, J.; Young, R.

    2004-12-01

    Thermal pressurization of pore fluid has recently been proposed as a mechanism for velocity weakening of fault gouge materials (Mase et al., [1984]). Rice [1992] and Miller [2003] have also suggested the earthquake cycle is mainly a pore pressure cycle. A Fontainebleau sandstone sample of 14% porosity was deformed tri-axially at the Laboratoire de Géologie of ENS Paris. A confining pressure of 100 MPa was used, in saturated conditions. Acoutic properties were monitored through 14 compressional wave piezoceramic transducers (PZT) which were directly glued onto the sample cylindrical surface. During the first cycle, differential stress was slowly raised to 250 MPa. Subsequently, an increase in pore pressure induced brittle failure at Pp=72MPa, with a stress drop of 150 MPa. In addition to triggered Acoustic Emissions (AE), the entire conitinuous ultrasonic waveform of the rupture was recorded. Over 10 000 AE were located, demonstrating the evolution of a fracture nucleation patch of order 1cc. Measured permeability showed that the nucleation of a damage/fault zone induced a drastic reduction in permeability, which could explain the many aftershocks that were observed after the main fracture propagation. Elastic wave velocities also show the extent of permanent damage in the rock. During the second cycle, we re-loaded the fractured sample up to a differential stress of 150 MPa. An initial slow pore pressurization induced stable sliding from 65 to 70 MPa. The pore pressure was then reduced, and a fast pore pressure pulse applied, (from 0 to 80 MPa in two seconds) inducing major stick slip (with an associated stress drop of 50 MPa). Again, in this cycle, more than 15 000 AE were located and aftershocks due to pore pressure re-equilibration were observed, post failure. In this preliminary study, we present a non-exhaustive compilation of data obtained during this pore pressure cycling experiment, including AE locations, continuous ultrasonic waveform summaries

  3. How does yeast respond to pressure?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P M B

    2005-08-01

    The brewing and baking yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used as a model for stress response studies of eukaryotic cells. In this review we focus on the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on S. cerevisiae. HHP exerts a broad effect on yeast cells characteristic of common stresses, mainly associated with protein alteration and lipid bilayer phase transition. Like most stresses, pressure induces cell cycle arrest. Below 50 MPa (500 atm) yeast cell morphology is unaffected whereas above 220 MPa wild-type cells are killed. S. cerevisiae cells can acquire barotolerance if they are pretreated with a sublethal stress due to temperature, ethanol, hydrogen peroxide, or pressure. Nevertheless, pressure only leads to protection against severe stress if, after pressure pretreatment, the cells are also re-incubated at room pressure. We attribute this effect to the inhibition of the protein synthesis apparatus under HHP. The global genome expression analysis of S. cerevisiae cells submitted to HHP revealed a stress response profile. The majority of the up-regulated genes are involved in stress defense and carbohydrate metabolism while most repressed genes belong to the cell cycle progression and protein synthesis categories. However, the signaling pathway involved in the pressure response is still to be elucidated. Nitric oxide, a signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions, confers baroprotection. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae cells in the early exponential phase submitted to 50-MPa pressure show induction of the expression level of the nitric oxide synthase inducible isoform. As pressure becomes an important biotechnological tool, studies concerning this kind of stress in microorganisms are imperative. PMID:16082465

  4. Stiffness and Confinement Ratios of SMA Wire Jackets for Confining Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Youn, Heejung

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of shape memory alloy (SMA) wire jackets on the behavior of confined concrete. SMA wire jackets are an effective confining material to improve concrete behavior; for example, by increasing peak strength and failure strain. The stiffness and confinement ratios of fiber-reinforced polymer jackets have been extensively discussed and their effects are well known. However, assessment of the stiffness and confinement ratios of SMA wire jackets has not previously been conducted. In this study, we investigate the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of steel jackets, and then compare the results with those of SMA wire jackets. In general, the stiffness ratios of SMA wire jackets are relatively smaller than those of steel jackets, and most of them have lower stiffness ratios because the Young's moduli of the SMAs are relatively small. The active confining pressure of the SMA wires does not improve the lower stiffness-ratio effect since the amount of active confining pressure is not sufficiently large.

  5. Confinement-induced vitrification of aqueous sodium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lishan; Pan, Liqing; Cao, Zexian; Wang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Bulk aqueous solution of NaCl is a poor glass former, it vitrifies only under high pressure. Here we report the investigation of glass transition of NaCl solutions confined in nanopores. By inspecting the dependence of glass transition temperature and heat flow jump at transition it is concluded that vitrification of confined NaCl solutions involves only the eutectic phase and the precipitated ice core may help furnish the demanded confinement strength. Ion-water interaction still plays a dominant role in determining vitrification of solutions even under nano-confinement, as under exactly the same confinement conditions vitrification of aqueous KCl solutions was not detected.

  6. Thermostating highly confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Stefano; Todd, B D; Searles, Debra J

    2010-06-28

    In this work we show how different use of thermostating devices and modeling of walls influence the mechanical and dynamical properties of confined nanofluids. We consider a two dimensional fluid undergoing Couette flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Because the system is highly inhomogeneous, the density shows strong fluctuations across the channel. We compare the dynamics produced by applying a thermostating device directly to the fluid with that obtained when the wall is thermostated, considering also the effects of using rigid walls. This comparison involves an analysis of the chaoticity of the fluid and evaluation of mechanical properties across the channel. We look at two thermostating devices with either rigid or vibrating atomic walls and compare them with a system only thermostated by conduction through vibrating atomic walls. Sensitive changes are observed in the xy component of the pressure tensor, streaming velocity, and density across the pore and the Lyapunov localization of the fluid. We also find that the fluid slip can be significantly reduced by rigid walls. Our results suggest caution in interpreting the results of systems in which fluid atoms are thermostated and/or wall atoms are constrained to be rigid, such as, for example, water inside carbon nanotubes. PMID:20590213

  7. Confinement of block copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The following were studied: confinement of block copolymers, free surface confinement, effects of substrate interactions, random copolymers at homopolymer interfaces, phase separation in thin film polymer mixtures, buffing of polymer surfaces, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  8. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  9. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence. PMID:26139194

  10. Note: A micro-perfusion system for use during real-time physiological studies under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltas, Jeff; Long, Zac; Huff, Alison; Maloney, Ryan; Ryan, Jordan; Urayama, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We construct a micro-perfusion system using piston screw pump generators for use during real-time, high-pressure physiological studies. Perfusion is achieved using two generators, with one generator being compressed while the other is retracted, thus maintaining pressurization while producing fluid flow. We demonstrate control over perfusion rates in the 10-μl/s range and the ability to change between fluid reservoirs at up to 50 MPa. We validate the screw-pump approach by monitoring the cyanide-induced response of UV-excited autofluorescence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pressurization.

  11. Magnetic confinement of cosmic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azar, Michel; Thompson, W. B.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the magnetic field in the confinement or compression of interstellar gas clouds is reconsidered. The virial theorem for an isolated magnetized cloud in the presence of distant magnetic sources is reformulated in terms of moments of the internal and external currents, and an equilibrium condition is derived. This condition is applied to the interaction between isolated clouds for the simple- and artificial-case in which the field of each cloud is a dipole. With the simplest of statistical assumptions, the probability of any given cloud being compressed is calculated as about 10 percent, the magnetic field acting as a medium which transmits the kinetic pressure between clouds. Even when compression occurs the magnetic pressure 1/2 B-squared may decrease on leaving the cloud surface.

  12. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  13. Confinement of Coulomb balls

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, O.; Block, D.; Klindworth, M.; Piel, A.

    2005-12-15

    A model for the confinement of the recently discovered Coulomb balls is proposed. These spherical three-dimensional plasma crystals are trapped inside a rf discharge under gravity conditions and show an unusual structural order in complex plasmas. Measurements of the thermophoretic force acting on the trapped dust particles and simulations of the plasma properties of the discharge are presented. The proposed model of confinement considers thermophoretic, ion-drag, and electric field forces, and shows excellent agreement with the observations. The findings suggest that self-confinement does not significantly contribute to the structural properties of Coulomb balls.

  14. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  15. Bacteria in Confined Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilking, Connie; Weitz, David

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells can display differentiation between several developmental pathways, from planktonic to matrix-producing, depending upon the colony conditions. We study the confinement of bacteria in hydrogels as well as in liquid-liquid double emulsion droplets and observe the growth and morphology of these colonies as a function of time and environment. Our results can give insight into the behavior of bacterial colonies in confined spaces that can have applications in the areas of food science, cosmetics, and medicine.

  16. Effect of high pressure on green pea seeds germination and plantlets development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Elisabete M. C.; Carvalho, Andreia M.; Saraiva, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of high pressure (50 MPa, 10 min) on germination of pea seeds with different imbibition times (0, 12 and 36 h). The parameters analysed were the percentage of germinated seeds, length of roots and stems, number of leaves developed and the weight of young plantlets. Peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), pectin methylesterase (PME) and total proteolytic activity were analysed in seeds after the pressure treatment and in leaves after the germination period. Results showed that 50 MPa applied during 10 min retarded the germination onset and inhibited seeds to germinate. The pressure treatment increased and decreased the length of roots and stems, respectively. The number of leaves per germinated seed decreased with the pressure treatment. Enzymatic activities of seeds showed that only total proteolytic activity was significantly reduced by pressure and only for 0 h of imbibition. POD and PPO activities determined in leaves of the plantlets increased with the pressure treatment, while PME activity also increased but only for 12 h of imbibition and total proteolytic activity decreased.

  17. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  18. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  19. Confining collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Denis; Bricard, Antoine; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Savoie, Charles; Das, Debasish; Chepizhko, Oleskar; Peruani, Fernando; Saintillan, David

    2014-11-01

    It is well established that geometrical confinement have a significant impact on the structure and the flow properties of complex fluids. Prominent examples include the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals, and the flow instabilities of viscoelastic fluids in curved geometries. In striking contrast very little is known about the macroscopic behavior of confined active fluids. In this talk we show how to motorize plastic colloidal beads and turn them into self-propelled particles. Using microfluidic geometries we demonstrate how confinement impacts their collective motion. Combining quantitative experiments, analytical theory and numerical simulations we show how a population of motile bodies interacting via alignement and repulsive interactions self-organizes into a single heterogeneous macroscopic vortex that lives on the verge of a phase separation.

  20. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ..delta..W/..delta..P is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ..nu../sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Order, Disorder and Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, M.; Di Giacomo, A.; Pica, C.

    2006-01-12

    Studying the order of the chiral transition for Nf = 2 is of fundamental importance to understand the mechanism of color confinement. We present results of a numerical investigation on the order of the transition by use of a novel strategy in finite size scaling analysis. The specific heat and a number of susceptibilities are compared with the possible critical behaviours. A second order transition in the O(4) and O(2) universality classes are excluded. Substantial evidence emerges for a first order transition. Results are in agreement with those found by studying the scaling properties of a disorder parameter related to the dual superconductivity mechanism of color confinement.

  2. Static current profile control and RFP confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Jan; Schnack, Dalton D.; Mirza, Ahmed A.

    2013-11-01

    Static current profile control (CPC) is shown numerically to substantially enhance plasma confinement in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). By suitable application of an auxiliary electric field and adjustment of its internal location, width and amplitude, strongly decreased levels of dynamo fluctuations are obtained. The simulations are performed using a fully non-linear, resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, including the effects of ohmic heating as well as parallel and perpendicular heat conduction along stochastic field lines. The importance of controlling the parallel current profile in the core plasma to minimize the effects of tearing modes on confinement is thus confirmed. A near three-fold increase in energy confinement is found and poloidal plasma beta increases by 30% from 0.20 to 0.27. The edge heat flux is reduced to a third of that of the conventional RFP. The high-confinement phase is interrupted here by a crash, characterized by a rapid decrease in confinement. A detailed study of the crash phase is carried out by the standard Δ‧ theory and a fully resistive linearized time-spectral method; the generalized weighted residual method. The analysis suggests that the instability is caused by pressure-driven, resistive g-modes. Inclusion of anisotropic thermal conduction reduces the linear growth rates. As compared with our earlier numerical studies of CPC in the RFP, employing feedback control, the present static control scheme should be more easily implemented experimentally.

  3. Shear Relaxations of Confined Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, George Amos, Jr.

    Ultrathin (<40 A) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s^{-1} were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celsius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes (~80 nm ^3) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long -time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7nm^3) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10^4 Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  4. Shear relaxations of confined liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, G.A. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrathin (<40 [angstrom]) films of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS), hexadecane, and dodecane were subjected to linear and non-linear oscillatory shear between flat plates. Shearing frequencies of 0.1 to 800 s[sup [minus]1] were applied at pressures from zero to 0.8 MPa using a surface rheometer only recently developed. In most cases the plates were atomically smooth mica surfaces; the role of surface interactions was examined by replacing these with alkyl chain monolayers. OMCTS and hexadecane were examined at a temperature about 5 Celcius degrees above their melting points and tended to solidify. Newtonian plateaus having enormous viscosities were observed at low shear rates. The onset of shear thinning implied relaxation times of about 0.1 s in the linear structure of the confined liquids. Large activation volumes ([approximately]80 nm[sup 3]) suggested that shear involved large-scale collective motion. Dodecane was studied at a much higher temperature relative to its melting point and showed no signs of impending solidification though it exhibited well-defined regions of Newtonian response and power law shear thinning. When treated with molecular sieves before use, dodecane had relaxation times which were short (0.02 s) compared to hexadecane, but still exhibited large-scale collective motion. When treated with silica gel, an unexplained long-time relaxation (10 s) was seen in the Newtonian viscosity of dodecane. The relaxation time of the linear structure, 0.005 s was very small, and the storage modulus was unresolvable. The small activation volume (7 nm[sup 3]) indicated a much lower level of collective motion. The activation volume remained small when dodecane was confined between tightly bound, low energy, alkyl monolayers. At low strains the storage and loss moduli became very large (>10[sup 4] Pa), probably due to interactions with flaws in the monolayers. Dramatic signs of wall slip were observed at large strains even at low pressures.

  5. Fractional statistics and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, P.; Wotzasek, C.

    2005-02-01

    It is shown that a pointlike composite having charge and magnetic moment displays a confining potential for the static interaction while simultaneously obeying fractional statistics in a pure gauge theory in three dimensions, without a Chern-Simons term. This result is distinct from the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory that shows a screening nature for the potential.

  6. Electrofreezing of confined water.

    PubMed

    Zangi, Ronen; Mark, Alan E

    2004-04-15

    We report results from molecular dynamics simulations of the freezing transition of TIP5P water molecules confined between two parallel plates under the influence of a homogeneous external electric field, with magnitude of 5 V/nm, along the lateral direction. For water confined to a thickness of a trilayer we find two different phases of ice at a temperature of T=280 K. The transformation between the two, proton-ordered, ice phases is found to be a strong first-order transition. The low-density ice phase is built from hexagonal rings parallel to the confining walls and corresponds to the structure of cubic ice. The high-density ice phase has an in-plane rhombic symmetry of the oxygen atoms and larger distortion of hydrogen bond angles. The short-range order of the two ice phases is the same as the local structure of the two bilayer phases of liquid water found recently in the absence of an electric field [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 1694 (2003)]. These high- and low-density phases of water differ in local ordering at the level of the second shell of nearest neighbors. The results reported in this paper, show a close similarity between the local structure of the liquid phase and the short-range order of the corresponding solid phase. This similarity might be enhanced in water due to the deep attractive well characterizing hydrogen bond interactions. We also investigate the low-density ice phase confined to a thickness of 4, 5, and 8 molecular layers under the influence of an electric field at T=300 K. In general, we find that the degree of ordering decreases as the distance between the two confining walls increases. PMID:15267616

  7. Waveforms Measured in Confined Thermobaric Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2007-05-04

    Experiments with 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges have been conducted in six different chambers. Both flake Aluminum and TNT were used as the fuel. Static pressure gauges on the chamber wall were the main diagnostic. Waveforms for explosions in air were significantly larger than those in nitrogen - thereby demonstrating a strong thermobaric (combustion) effect. This effect increases as the confinement volume decreases and the mixture richness approaches 1.

  8. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  9. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A; Batista, Cristian D

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  10. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  11. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  12. Confined Vortex Scrubber

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate efficient removal of fine particulates to sufficiently low levels to meet proposed small scale coal combustor emission standards. This is to be accomplished using a novel particulate removal device, the Confined Vortex Scrubber. This is the first quarterly technical progress report under this contract. Accordingly, a summary of the cleanup concept and the structure of the program is given here.

  13. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston.

  14. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  15. Confined compression of dental composites for Class I restorations

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Amol S.; Vural, Murat; Gosz, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the mechanical response of a particle-reinforced restorative dental composite (Renew™) under proportional transverse confinement to understand the effects of stress multiaxiality on its mechanical and failure behaviors. We describe the confining ring technique as an experimental tool to introduce multiaxial compressive stress states in dental composites that realistically mimic three-dimensional stress states commonly experienced by dental restorations in the oral cavity. Effect of initial radial misfit between confining ring and specimen is analyzed through computational finite element simulations, and an analytical treatment of problem is also provided to compute the confining stress during elasto-plastic expansion of confining ring. Experimental results suggest that inelastic response of Renew composite is significantly influenced by hydrostatic stress component, and pressure-dependent yield functions are required to analyze plastic deformations and internal damage accumulation process. PMID:21857744

  16. Thermodynamics of Combustion in a Confined Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Oppenheim, A.K.; Ferguson, R.E.

    2000-02-05

    Considered here are explosions from condensed TNT charges--where the expanded detonation products gases are rich in C and CO [1]. Mixing with air causes oxidation/combustion [2], which dramatically increases the pressure in confined systems (vid. Fig. 1). We treat this as an Inverse Problem: infer fuel consumption from the measured pressure P {triple_bond} {bar p}(t)/p{sub i}. The Model expounded here represents a valuable tool for extracting the evolution of combustion system from a readily measurable quantity (pressure). The Model establishes the fuel consumption history as well as the evolution of thermodynamic solution (specific volumes, energies and densities) of the components that will generate the observed pressure profile. This solution in Thermodynamic (State) Space provides extraordinarily clear insight into the combustion process, which is normally clouded by a myriad of transport processes that occur in physical space.

  17. Interplay of explosive thermal reaction dynamics and structural confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, W. Lee; Zucker, Jonathan; Dickson, Peter M.; Parker, Gary R.; Asay, Blaine W.

    2007-04-01

    Explosives play a significant role in human affairs; however, their behavior in circumstances other than intentional detonation is poorly understood. Accidents may have catastrophic consequences, especially if additional hazardous materials are involved. Abnormal ignition stimuli, such as impact, spark, friction, and heat may lead to a very violent outcome, potentially including detonation. An important factor influencing the behavior subsequent to abnormal ignition is the strength and inertia of the vessel confining the explosive, i.e., the near-field structural/mechanical environment, also known as confinement (inertial or mechanical). However, a comprehensive and quantified understanding of how confinement affects reaction violence does not yet exist. In the research discussed here, we have investigated a wide range of confinement conditions and related the explosive response to the fundamentals of the combustion process in the explosive. In our experiments, a charge of an octahydrotetranitrotetrazine-based plastic bonded explosive (PBX 9501) was loaded into a gun assembly having variable confinement conditions and subjected to a heating profile. The exploding charge breached the confinement and accelerated a projectile down the gun barrel. High bandwidth pressure and volume measurements were made and a first-law analysis was used to obtain enthalpy and power from the raw data. These results were then used to quantify reaction violence. Enthalpy change and power ranged from 0-1.8 kJ and 0-12 MW for 300 mg charges, respectively. Below a confinement strength of 20 MPa, violence was found to decline precipitously with decreasing confinement, while the violence for the heaviest confinement experiments was found to be relatively constant. Both pressure and pressurization rate were found to have critical values to induce and sustain violent reaction.

  18. Investigation of failure mode transition in ceramics under confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, G.; Chen, W.; Ortiz, M.

    1995-12-31

    A newly developed experimental technique is used to investigate the failure behavior of ceramics in multi-axial compression. The axial loading is provided by a split Kolsky (Hopkinson) compression bar and the radial confinement is provided by shrink fit sleeves on the cylindrical specimens. Confinement pressures on the order of 1 GPa have been achieved. As the confinement is increased on the specimen, the failure mode changes from axial splitting under no confinement to conical faulting under moderate confinement. Experimental data have been obtained for several engineering ceramics in the strain rate range of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The peak or failure strength increases with increasing confinement. The increase in strength over its unconfined strength for a given level of confinement remains independent of the strain rate. The data from multiaxial loading experiments suggest that the engineering ceramics follow the Drucker-Prager model for pressure sensitive dilatant materials. This model is used to predict the localization modes in axi-symmetric geometries. The predictions are compared with experimental results for the limit load and the geometry of the fault. The implications of the proposed constitutive and failure model for the performance of engineering ceramics under multi-axial loading are discussed.

  19. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  20. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  1. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    at least 65 MPa. No ethanol was detected at 100 MPa. From these data, the pressure at which ethanol fermentation stops in yeast was calculated to be 87±7 MPa. These results indicate that the activity of one or several enzymes of the glycolytic pathway is enhanced at low pressure. At higher pressure, they become progressively repressed, and are completely inhibited above 87 MPa. Our in situ monitoring constitutes a direct demonstration of yeast metabolism in situ under pressure up to 100 MPa. Our data agree with previous ex-situ data by Abe and Horikoshi (4). However, we observed that ethanol production is not completely inhibited around 50 MPa as predicted, but could be detected at significantly higher pressures (up to 87 MPa). QSR is a powerful method to monitor microbial activities, since almost any organic molecule with a carbon chain ranging from 1 to 6 carbon can be detected and quantified. The only limitation of QSR is that the Raman spectrum of the molecule exhibits at least one peak not masked by the spectrum of the growth medium. 1 Pelletier M J Appl Spectr 57:20A-42A, 2003 2 Daniel I, Oger P, Picard A, Cardon H and Chervin J-C (submitted to Rev Sci Instr) 3 Picard A, Daniel I, Montagnac G and Oger P (submitted to Extremophiles) 4 Abe F and Horikoshi K Extremophiles 1: 89-93, 1997

  2. Tgermonuclear Ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Comparison with Magnetic Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Chang, P.Y.; Spears, B.K.; Anderson, K.S.; Edwards, J.; Fatenejad, M.; Lindl, J.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Nora, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2010-04-23

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptau ~ 1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptau ~ 1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (T ~ 2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chi ~ 0.02–0.03 is ~5X lower than in JET (chi ~ 0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  3. Thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion and comparison with magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Chang, P. Y.; Anderson, K. S.; Nora, R.; Spears, B. K.; Edwards, J.; Lindl, J. D.; Fatenejad, M.; McCrory, R. L.; Shvarts, D.

    2010-05-15

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA[T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptauapprox1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptauapprox1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (Tapprox2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chiapprox0.02-0.03 is approx5x lower than in JET (chiapprox0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  4. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  5. Deforming baryons into confining strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Portugues, Rubén

    2004-09-01

    We find explicit probe D3-brane solutions in the infrared of the Maldacena-Nuñez background. The solutions describe deformed baryon vertices: q external quarks are separated in spacetime from the remaining N-q. As the separation is taken to infinity we recover known solutions describing infinite confining strings in N=1 gauge theory. We present results for the mass of finite confining strings as a function of length. We also find probe D2-brane solutions in a confining type IIA geometry, the reduction of a G2 holonomy M theory background. The relation between these deformed baryons and confining strings is not as straightforward.

  6. Statistical Contact Model for Confined Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; de la Paz, Antonio Alvarez; Roskop, Luke; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-06-01

    A theory that describes in a realistic form a system of atoms under the effects of temperature and confinement is presented. The theory departs from a Lagrangian of the Zwanzig type and contains the main ingredients for describing a system of atoms immersed in a heat bath that is also formed by atoms. The equations of motion are derived according to Lagrangian mechanics. The application of statistical mechanics to describe the bulk effects greatly reduces the complexity of the equations. The resultant equations of motion are of the Langevin type with the viscosity and the temperature of the heat reservoir able to influence the trajectories of the particles. The pressure effects are introduced mechanically by using a container with an atomic structure immersed in the heat bath. The relevant variables that determine the equation of state are included in the formulation. The theory is illustrated by the derivation of the equation of state for a system with 76 atoms confined inside of a 180-atom fullerene-like cage that is immersed in fluid forming the heat bath at a temperature of 350 K and with the friction coefficient of 3.0 {ps}^{-1} . The atoms are of the type believed to form the cores of the Uranus and Neptune planets. The dynamic and the static pressures of the confined system are varied in the 3-5 KBar and 2-30 MBar ranges, respectively. The formulation can be equally used to analyze chemical reactions under specific conditions of pressure and temperature, determine the structure of clusters with their corresponding equation of state, the conditions for hydrogen storage, etc. The theory is consistent with the principles of thermodynamics and it is intrinsically ergodic, of general use, and the first of this kind.

  7. Statistical Contact Model for Confined Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; de la Paz, Antonio Alvarez; Roskop, Luke; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-08-01

    A theory that describes in a realistic form a system of atoms under the effects of temperature and confinement is presented. The theory departs from a Lagrangian of the Zwanzig type and contains the main ingredients for describing a system of atoms immersed in a heat bath that is also formed by atoms. The equations of motion are derived according to Lagrangian mechanics. The application of statistical mechanics to describe the bulk effects greatly reduces the complexity of the equations. The resultant equations of motion are of the Langevin type with the viscosity and the temperature of the heat reservoir able to influence the trajectories of the particles. The pressure effects are introduced mechanically by using a container with an atomic structure immersed in the heat bath. The relevant variables that determine the equation of state are included in the formulation. The theory is illustrated by the derivation of the equation of state for a system with 76 atoms confined inside of a 180-atom fullerene-like cage that is immersed in fluid forming the heat bath at a temperature of 350 K and with the friction coefficient of 3.0 {ps}^{-1}. The atoms are of the type believed to form the cores of the Uranus and Neptune planets. The dynamic and the static pressures of the confined system are varied in the 3-5 KBar and 2-30 MBar ranges, respectively. The formulation can be equally used to analyze chemical reactions under specific conditions of pressure and temperature, determine the structure of clusters with their corresponding equation of state, the conditions for hydrogen storage, etc. The theory is consistent with the principles of thermodynamics and it is intrinsically ergodic, of general use, and the first of this kind.

  8. Confined Water as Model of Supercooled Water.

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Silvina; Mallamace, Francesco; Swenson, Jan; Vogel, Michael; Xu, Limei

    2016-07-13

    Water in confined geometries has obvious relevance in biology, geology, and other areas where the material properties are strongly dependent on the amount and behavior of water in these types of materials. Another reason to restrict the size of water domains by different types of geometrical confinements has been the possibility to study the structural and dynamical behavior of water in the deeply supercooled regime (e.g., 150-230 K at ambient pressure), where bulk water immediately crystallizes to ice. In this paper we give a short review of studies with this particular goal. However, from these studies it is also clear that the interpretations of the experimental data are far from evident. Therefore, we present three main interpretations to explain the experimental data, and we discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Unfortunately, none of the proposed scenarios is able to predict all the observations for supercooled and glassy bulk water, indicating that either the structural and dynamical alterations of confined water are too severe to make predictions for bulk water or the differences in how the studied water has been prepared (applied cooling rate, resulting density of the water, etc.) are too large for direct and quantitative comparisons. PMID:26940794

  9. Inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  10. The virial theorem for the smoothly and sharply, penetrably and impenetrably confined hydrogen atom.

    PubMed

    Katriel, Jacob; Montgomery, H E

    2012-09-21

    Confinement of atoms by finite or infinite boxes containing sharp (discontinuous) jumps has been studied since the fourth decade of the previous century, modelling the effect of external pressure. Smooth (continuous) counterparts of such confining potentials, that depend on a parameter such that in an appropriate limit they coincide with the sharp confining potentials, are investigated, with an emphasis on deriving the corresponding virial and Hellmann-Feynman theorems. PMID:22998251

  11. 29 CFR 1910.146 - Permit-required confined spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employer can establish presents a profile small enough for the successful removal of the entrant. Wristlets... means the absolute closure of a pipe, line, or duct by the fastening of a solid plate (such as a... maximum pressure of the pipe, line, or duct with no leakage beyond the plate. Confined space means a...

  12. Improved mechanical stability of HKUST-1 in confined nanospace.

    PubMed

    Casco, M E; Fernández-Catalá, J; Martínez-Escandell, M; Rodríguez-Reinoso, F; Ramos-Fernández, E V; Silvestre-Albero, J

    2015-09-28

    One of the main concerns in the technological application of several metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) relates to their structural instability under pressure (after a conforming step). Here we report for the first time that mechanical instability can be highly improved via nucleation and growth of MOF nanocrystals in the confined nanospace of activated carbons. PMID:26256926

  13. Confinement & Stability in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, Rob

    2001-10-01

    Transition to H-mode has been achieved in the MAST spherical tokamak (ST) for both ohmically and neutral beam heated plasmas (P_NBI ~ 0.5-1.5MW), resulting in double-null diverted discharges containing both regular and irregular edge localised modes (ELMs). The observed L-H power threshold is ~10 times higher than predicted by established empirical scalings. L-H transition in MAST is accompanied by a sharp increase in edge density gradient, the efficient conversion of internal electron Bernstein waves into free space waves, the onset and saturation of edge poloidal rotation and a marked decrease in turbulence. During ELM free periods, a reduction in outboard power deposition width is observed using a Langmuir probe array. A novel divertor structure has been installed to counter the resulting increase in target heat-flux by applying a toroidally varying potential to the divertor plasma, theory suggesting that convective broadening of the scrape off layer will take place. Global confinement in H-mode is found to routinely exceed the international IPB(y,2) scaling, even for discharges approaching the Greenwald density. In an attempt to further extend the density range (densities in excess of Greenwald having been achieved for plasma currents up to 0.8MA) a multi-pellet injector has been installed at the low-field-side. In addition, high field side fuelling can be supplied via a gas-feed located at the centre-column mid-plane, this technique having been found to significantly enhance H-mode accessibility and quality. A range of stability issues will be discussed, including vertical displacement events, the rich variety of high frequency MHD seen in MAST and the physics of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode. This work was funded by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and by EURATOM. The NBI equipment is on loan from ORNL and the pellet injector was provided by FOM.

  14. Psychopathological effects of solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Grassian, S

    1983-11-01

    Psychopathological reactions to solitary confinement were extensively described by nineteenth-century German clinicians. In the United States there have been several legal challenges to the use of solitary confinement, based on allegations that it may have serious psychiatric consequences. The recent medical literature on this subject has been scarce. The author describes psychiatric symptoms that appeared in 14 inmates exposed to periods of increased social isolation and sensory restriction in solitary confinement and asserts that these symptoms form a major, clinically distinguishable psychiatric syndrome. PMID:6624990

  15. ITER EDA design confinement capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uckan, N. A.

    Major device parameters for ITER-EDA and CDA are given in this paper. Ignition capability of the EDA (and CDA) operational scenarios is evaluated using both the 1 1/2-D time-dependent transport simulations and 0-D global models under different confinement ((chi((gradient)(T)(sub e)(sub crit)), empirical global energy confinement scalings, chi(empirical), etc.) assumptions. Results from some of these transport simulations and confinement assessments are summarized in and compared with the ITER CDA results.

  16. Simulations of structural and dynamic anisotropy in nano-confined water between parallel graphite plates.

    PubMed

    Mosaddeghi, Hamid; Alavi, Saman; Kowsari, M H; Najafi, Bijan

    2012-11-14

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure, dynamics, and transport properties of nano-confined water between parallel graphite plates with separation distances (H) from 7 to 20 Å at different water densities with an emphasis on anisotropies generated by confinement. The behavior of the confined water phase is compared to non-confined bulk water under similar pressure and temperature conditions. Our simulations show anisotropic structure and dynamics of the confined water phase in directions parallel and perpendicular to the graphite plate. The magnitude of these anisotropies depends on the slit width H. Confined water shows "solid-like" structure and slow dynamics for the water layers near the plates. The mean square displacements (MSDs) and velocity autocorrelation functions (VACFs) for directions parallel and perpendicular to the graphite plates are calculated. By increasing the confinement distance from H = 7 Å to H = 20 Å, the MSD increases and the behavior of the VACF indicates that the confined water changes from solid-like to liquid-like dynamics. If the initial density of the water phase is set up using geometric criteria (i.e., distance between the graphite plates), large pressures (in the order of ~10 katm), and large pressure anisotropies are established within the water. By decreasing the density of the water between the confined plates to about 0.9 g cm(-3), bubble formation and restructuring of the water layers are observed. PMID:23163385

  17. Confined superadiabatic premixed flame-flow interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Najm, H.N.

    1995-12-31

    Laminar premixed unity-Lewis number flames are studied numerically, to examine flow-flame interaction in a two-dimensional closed domain. Two opposed planar flame fronts are perturbed sinusoidally and allowed to develop by consuming premixed reactants. Combustion heat release leads to global pressure and temperature rise in the domain, due to confinement. A superadiabatic condition, with products temperature rising with distance behind the flame front, is observed due to stagnation pressure rise. Variations in tangential strain rate behind the perturbed flame fronts, due to flame curvature and heat release, result in a modified local superadiabatic temperature gradient in the products. These variations in temperature gradients are shown to determine the net local confinement-heating rate in the products, leading to corresponding deviations in products temperature, and the local reaction rate along the flame front. These observations, which are not consistent with one-dimensional superadiabatic stagnation flame behavior, are a direct result of the unrestrained unsteady nature of two-dimensional flame-flow interaction.

  18. Static-stress analysis of dual-axis confinement vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultman, D. H.

    1992-11-01

    This study evaluates the static-pressure containment capability of a 6-ft-diameter, spherical vessel, made of HSLA-100 steel, to be used for high-explosive (HE) containment. The confinement vessel is designed for use with the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility (DARHT) being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two sets of openings in the vessel are covered with x-ray transparent covers to allow radiographic imaging of an explosion as it occurs inside the vessel. The confinement vessel is analyzed as a pressure vessel based on the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section 8, Division 1, and the Welding Research Council Bulletin, WRC-107. Combined stresses resulting from internal pressure and external loads on nozzles are calculated and compared with the allowable stresses for HSLA-100 steel. Results confirm that the shell and nozzles of the confinement vessel are adequately designed to safely contain the maximum residual pressure of 1675 psi that would result from an HE charge of 24.2 kg detonated in a vacuum. Shell stresses at the shell-to-nozzle interface, produced from external loads on the nozzles, were less than 400 psi. The maximum combined stress resulting from the internal pressure plus external loads was 16,070 psi, which is less than half the allowable stress of 42,375 psi for HSLA-100 steel.

  19. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  20. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  1. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The potential applications of fusion reactors, the desirable properties of reactors intended for various applications, and the limitations of the Tokamak concept are discussed. The principles and characteristics of 20 distinct alternative confinement concepts are described, each of which may be an alternative to the Tokamak. The devices are classed as Tokamak-like, stellarator-like, mirror machines, bumpy tori, electrostatically assisted, migma concept, and wall-confined plasma.

  2. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  3. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  4. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image

  5. Improvement of photocatalytic activity of tantalum nitride by ammonothermal treatment at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Kishida, Kazuhisa; Watanabe, Tomoaki

    2012-07-15

    Tantalum nitride (Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}) was treated under ammonothermal conditions with the ammonia pressure of 10 to 100 MPa at 823 K for 24 h to enhance the photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution from aqueous methanol solution under visible light irradiation. The rates of hydrogen evolution for all treated Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} were faster than those for untreated Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}. Treated Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} showed higher enhanced activity for hydrogen evolution when treated with high-pressure ammonia at more than 50 MPa. The photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution of treated Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}, related to the amount of defects, is due to reduced tantalum species. The enhancement in the activity is brought about by a decrease in surface defects, which contributes to improved electron transfer from the surface of Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} to the loaded Pt co-catalyst. - Graphical abstract: Time course of H{sub 2} evolution for 0.5 wt% Pt- loaded Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}. (a) As-synthesized Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}. (b)-(e) Samples treated at 823 K for 5 h with (b) 10 MPa of N{sub 2}, (c) 10 MPa of NH{sub 3}, (d) 50 MPa of NH{sub 3}, and (e) 100 MPa of NH{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} was treated with high-pressure N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3} to enhance photocatalytic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrogen evolution activity of Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5} was more enhanced with treatment with NH{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treatment with ammonia pressure above 50 MPa indicated a more improved activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results of UV-vis DRS suggested decreased surface defects of treated Ta{sub 3}N{sub 5}.

  6. Characteristics of pressure waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Air blast characteristics generated by most types of explosions are discussed. Data cover both negative and positive blast load phases and net transverse pressure as a function of time. The effects of partial or total confinement, atmospheric propagation, absorption of energy by ground shock or cratering, and transmission over irregular terrain on blast wave properties were also considered.

  7. PREFACE: Water in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Mauro

    2004-11-01

    The study of water confined in complex systems in solid or gel phases and/or in contact with macromolecules is relevant to many important processes ranging from industrial applications such as catalysis and soil chemistry, to biological processes such as protein folding or ionic transport in membranes. Thermodynamics, phase behaviour and the molecular mobility of water have been observed to change upon confinement depending on the properties of the substrate. In particular, polar substrates perturb the hydrogen bond network of water, inducing large changes in the properties upon freezing. Understanding how the connected random hydrogen bond network of bulk water is modified when water is confined in small cavities inside a substrate material is very important for studies of stability and the enzymatic activity of proteins, oil recovery or heterogeneous catalysis, where water-substrate interactions play a fundamental role. The modifications of the short-range order in the liquid depend on the nature of the water-substrate interaction, hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as well as on its spatial range and on the geometry of the substrate. Despite extensive study, both experimentally and by computer simulation, there remain a number of open problems. In the many experimental studies of confined water, those performed on water in Vycor are of particular interest for computer simulation and theoretical studies since Vycor is a porous silica glass characterized by a quite sharp distribution of pore sizes and a strong capability to absorb water. It can be considered as a good candidate for studying the general behaviour of water in hydrophilic nanopores. But there there have been a number of studies of water confined in more complex substrates, where the interpretation of experiments and computer simulation is more difficult, such as in zeolites or in aerogels or in contact with membranes. Of the many problems to consider we can mention the study of supercooled water. It is

  8. The VVER 440/230 confinement upgrade scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Ebeling-Koning, D.B.; Gresham, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The VVER 440/230 nuclear power stations are currently being examined for safety improvements to meet internationally accepted safety criteria. Westinghouse has performed scoping analyses to evaluate different conceptual designs for modernization of the confinement systems. These designs represent alternatives for maintaining the confinement pressure below the 1-bar gauge (0.1-MPa) design pressure following a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). These conceptual designs included the following: (1) adding a filtered vent to provide a release path to the atmosphere; (2) adding an auxiliary expansion volume to contain the mass and energy release; (3) adding an ice condenser unit to passively provide absorption of the energy released from the break. Each of these designs is intended to provide a means of handling the mass and energy released during the first 60 s of the LOCA. Thereafter, upgraded confinement spray and residual heat removal systems will provide the required pressure suppression and heat removal. Mass and energy release transients were generated for the VVER plant design for input into the confinement integrity evaluation. Three different hypothetical accidents were assumed: a 200- and 500-mm double-ended guillotine break and a 200-mm split break in the main reactor cooling piping. The transients were developed by scaling available best-estimate LOCA blowdown calculations and confirmed with RETRAN code calculations.

  9. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  10. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on matrix synthesis in articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, A.C.; Urban, J.P.; Gehl, K.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on matrix synthesis in articular cartilage can be studied independently of the other factors that change during loading. We have found that the influence of hydrostatic pressure on incorporation rates of {sup 35}SO{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)proline into adult bovine articular cartilage slices in vitro depends on the pressure level and on the time at pressure. Pressures in the physiological range (5-15 MPa) applied for 20 s or for 5 min could stimulate tracer incorporation (30-130%) during the following 2 h, but higher pressures (20-50 MPa) had no effect on incorporation rates. The degree of stimulation in cartilage obtained from different animals was found to vary; in some animals none was seen. Stimulation also varied with position along the joint. Physiological pressures (5-10 MPa) applied continuously for the 2-h incubation period also stimulated incorporation rates, but pressures greater than 20 MPa always produced a decrease that was related to the applied pressure and that was reversible. These results suggests that the hydrostatic pressure that occurs during loading is a signal that can stimulate matrix synthesis rates in articular cartilage.

  11. Polymer ejection from strong spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piili, J.; Linna, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the ejection of an initially strongly confined flexible polymer from a spherical capsid through a nanoscale pore. We use molecular dynamics for unprecedentedly high initial monomer densities. We show that the time for an individual monomer to eject grows exponentially with the number of ejected monomers. By measurements of the force at the pore we show this dependence to be a consequence of the excess free energy of the polymer due to confinement growing exponentially with the number of monomers initially inside the capsid. This growth relates closely to the divergence of mixing energy in the Flory-Huggins theory at large concentration. We show that the pressure inside the capsid driving the ejection dominates the process that is characterized by the ejection time growing linearly with the lengths of different polymers. Waiting time profiles would indicate that the superlinear dependence obtained for polymers amenable to computer simulations results from a finite-size effect due to the final retraction of polymers' tails from capsids.

  12. Confined Visible Optical Tamm States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, F.; Ouaret, K.; Portalupi, S.; Lafosse, X.; Nasilovski, M.; de Marcillac, W. Daney; Frigerio, J.-M.; Schwob, C.; Dubertret, B.; Maître, A.; Senellart, P.; Coolen, L.

    2016-05-01

    Optical Tamm states are two-dimensional (2D) electromagnetic modes propagating at the interface between a Bragg mirror and a metallic film. When a thin (a few tens of nm) metallic micron-radius disk is deposited on a Bragg mirror, optical Tamm states can be confined below the disk surface, creating a Tamm-states cavity. We describe here the photoluminescence properties of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals embedded in a Tamm cavity. Tamm states confinement effects are demonstrated and analysed as a function of the disk diameter, and compared with finite-elements simulations.

  13. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  14. Building solids inside nano-space: from confined amorphous through confined solvate to confined 'metastable' polymorph.

    PubMed

    Nartowski, K P; Tedder, J; Braun, D E; Fábián, L; Khimyak, Y Z

    2015-10-14

    The nanocrystallisation of complex molecules inside mesoporous hosts and control over the resulting structure is a significant challenge. To date the largest organic molecule crystallised inside the nano-pores is a known pharmaceutical intermediate - ROY (259.3 g mol(-1)). In this work we demonstrate smart manipulation of the phase of a larger confined pharmaceutical - indomethacin (IMC, 357.8 g mol(-1)), a substance with known conformational flexibility and complex polymorphic behaviour. We show the detailed structural analysis and the control of solid state transformations of encapsulated molecules inside the pores of mesoscopic cellular foam (MCF, pore size ca. 29 nm) and controlled pore glass (CPG, pore size ca. 55 nm). Starting from confined amorphous IMC we drive crystallisation into a confined methanol solvate, which upon vacuum drying leads to the stabilised rare form V of IMC inside the MCF host. In contrast to the pure form, encapsulated form V does not transform into a more stable polymorph upon heating. The size of the constraining pores and the drug concentration within the pores determine whether the amorphous state of the drug is stabilised or it recrystallises into confined nanocrystals. The work presents, in a critical manner, an application of complementary techniques (DSC, PXRD, solid-state NMR, N2 adsorption) to confirm unambiguously the phase transitions under confinement and offers a comprehensive strategy towards the formation and control of nano-crystalline encapsulated organic solids. PMID:26280634

  15. Broadband sound generation by confined turbulent jets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Mongeau, Luc; Frankel, Steven H

    2002-08-01

    Sound generation by confined stationary jets is of interest to the study of voice and speech production, among other applications. The generation of sound by low Mach number, confined, stationary circular jets was investigated. Experiments were performed using a quiet flow supply, muffler-terminated rigid uniform tubes, and acrylic orifice plates. A spectral decomposition method based on a linear source-filter model was used to decompose radiated nondimensional sound pressure spectra measured for various gas mixtures and mean flow velocities into the product of (1) a source spectral distribution function; (2) a function accounting for near field effects and radiation efficiency; and (3) an acoustic frequency response function. The acoustic frequency response function agreed, as expected, with the transfer function between the radiated acoustic pressure at one fixed location and the strength of an equivalent velocity source located at the orifice. The radiation efficiency function indicated a radiation efficiency of the order (kD)2 over the planar wave frequency range and (kD)4 at higher frequencies, where k is the wavenumber and D is the tube cross sectional dimension. This is consistent with theoretical predictions for the planar wave radiation efficiency of quadrupole sources in uniform rigid anechoic tubes. The effects of the Reynolds number, Re, on the source spectral distribution function were found to be insignificant over the range 20002.5. The influence of a reflective open tube termination on the source function spectral distribution was found to be insignificant, confirming the absence of a feedback mechanism. PMID:12186047

  16. Limiting Spectra from Confining Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Michael Martin; Simmons, L. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The author explains that, for confining potentials and large quantum numbers, the bound-state energies rise more rapidly as a function of n the more rapidly the potential rises with distance. However, the spectrum can rise no faster than n squared in the nonrelativistic case, or n in the relativistic case. (Author/GA)

  17. Dislocation dynamics in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, D.; Devincre, B.; Kubin, L.

    1999-05-01

    A simulation of dislocation dynamics has been used to calculate the critical stress for a threading dislocation moving in a confined geometry. The optimum conditions for conducting simulations in systems of various sizes, down to the nanometer range, are defined. The results are critically compared with the available theoretical and numerical estimates for the problem of dislocation motion in capped layers.

  18. Dirac equations with confining potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, J. H.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to a study of relativistic eigenstates of Dirac particles which are simultaneously bound by a static Coulomb potential and added linear confining potentials. Under certain conditions, despite the addition of radially symmetric, linear confining potentials, specific bound-state energies surprisingly preserve their exact Dirac-Coulomb values. The generality of the "preservation mechanism" is investigated. To this end, a Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is used to calculate the corrections to the spin-orbit coupling induced by the linear confining potentials. We find that the matrix elements of the effective operators obtained from the scalar, and time-like confining potentials mutually cancel for specific ratios of the prefactors of the effective operators, which must be tailored to the preservation mechanism. The result of the Foldy-Wouthuysen transformation is used to verify that the preservation is restricted (for a given Hamiltonian) to only one reference state, rather than traceable to a more general relationship among the obtained effective low-energy operators. The results derived from the nonrelativistic effective operators are compared to the fully relativistic radial Dirac equations. Furthermore, we show that the preservation mechanism does not affect antiparticle (negative-energy) states.

  19. Mirror Confinement Systems: project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This report contains descriptions of the projects supported by the Mirror Confinement Systems (MCS) Division of the Office of Fusion Energy. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators, in collaboration with MCS staff office, and include objectives and milestones for each project. In addition to project summaries, statements of Division objectives and budget summaries are also provided.

  20. Momentum Confinement at Low Torque

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W M; Burrell, K H; deGrassie, J S; Budny, R; Groebner, R J; Heidbrink, W W; Kinsey, J E; Kramer, G J; Makowski, M A; Mikkelsen, D; Nazikian, R; Petty, C C; Politzer, P A; Scott, S D; Van Zeeland, M A; Zarnstorff, M C

    2007-06-26

    Momentum confinement was investigated on DIII-D as a function of applied neutral beam torque at constant normalized {beta}{sub N}, by varying the mix of co (parallel to the plasma current) and counter neutral beams. Under balanced neutral beam injection (i.e. zero total torque to the plasma), the plasma maintains a significant rotation in the co-direction. This 'intrinsic' rotation can be modeled as being due to an offset in the applied torque (i.e. an 'anomalous torque'). This anomalous torque appears to have a magnitude comparable to one co-neutral beam source. The presence of such an anomalous torque source must be taken into account to obtain meaningful quantities describing momentum transport, such as the global momentum confinement time and local diffusivities. Studies of the mechanical angular momentum in ELMing H-mode plasmas with elevated q{sub min} show that the momentum confinement time improves as the torque is reduced. In hybrid plasmas, the opposite effect is observed, namely that momentum confinement improves at high torque/rotation. The relative importance of E x B shearing between the two is modeled using GLF23 and may suggest a possible explanation.

  1. The deflection of a jet by confining surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalano, G. D.; Morton, J. B.; Humphris, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thrust vectoring can be provided by the turning of a jet exhaust by the presence of confining surfaces. This approach is analogous to the upper surface blowing (USB) concept. Mean velocities, velocity autocorrelations, and pressure-velocity correlations are measured. From the autocorrelation curves, the Taylor microscales and the integral length scales are calculated. Convection velocities are calculated from the velocity space-time correlations. Two different confining surfaces (one flat, one with large curvature) are placed adjacent to the lip of a circular nozzle, and the resultant effects on the flow field are determined. In addition, two velocity ratios (exit plane velocity to ambient stream velocity) are examined. The velocity measurements were made with a laser Doppler velocimeter in conjunction with a phase locked-loop processor. Pressure measurements were made using a 1/8th inch condensor type microphone.

  2. Numerical modeling of two-dimensional confined flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of two-dimensional confined flows is presented. The flow in the duct is partitioned into finite streams. The difference equations are then obtained by applying conservation principles directly to the individual streams. A listing of a computer code based on this approach in FORTRAN 4 language is presented. The code computes two dimensional compressible turbulent flows in ducts when the duct area along the flow is specified and the pressure gradient is unknown.

  3. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  4. Influence of confinement on thermodiffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannaoui, Rachid; Galliero, Guillaume; Hoang, Hai; Boned, Christian

    2013-09-01

    This work focuses on a possible influence of a nanoporous medium on the thermodiffusion of a fluid "isotopic" mixture. To do so, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of confined Lennard-Jones binary equimolar mixtures using grand-canonical like and non-equilibrium approaches in sub- and super-critical conditions. The study was conducted in atomistic slit pore of three adsorbent natures for various widths (from 5 to 35 times the size of a molecule). The simulation results indicate that for all thermodynamic conditions and whatever the pore characteristics, the confinement has a negligible effect on the thermal diffusion factor/Soret coefficient. However, when considered separately, the mass diffusion and thermodiffusion coefficients have been found to be largely influenced by the pore characteristics. These two coefficients decrease noticeably when adsorption is stronger and pore width smaller, a behavior that is consistent with a simple hydrodynamic explanation.

  5. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems. PMID:27146955

  6. Confinement from spontaneous breaking of scale symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Guendelman, Eduardo

    2006-09-01

    We show that one can obtain naturally the confinement of static charges from the spontaneous symmetry breaking of scale invariance in a gauge theory. At the classical level a confining force is obtained and at the quantum level, using a gauge invariant but path-dependent variables formalism, the Cornell confining potential is explicitly obtained. Our procedure answers completely to the requirements by 't Hooft for "perturbative confinement".

  7. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-11-16

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  8. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  9. Confinement from constant field condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Guendelman, Eduardo; Spallucci, Euro

    2007-01-01

    For (2 + 1)- and (3 + 1)-dimensional reformulated SU (2) Yang-Mills theory, we compute the interaction potential within the framework of the gauge-invariant but path-dependent variables formalism. This reformulation is due to the presence of a constant gauge field condensate. Our results show that the interaction energy contains a linear term leading to the confinement of static probe charges. This result is equivalent to that of the massive Schwinger model.

  10. Diverging ion motion in an inertial electrostatic confinement discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Shrier, O.; Khachan, J.; Bosi, S.; Fitzgerald, M.; Evans, N.

    2006-01-15

    An inertial electrostatic confinement device operating in the gaseous discharge pressure regime (units to tens of mTorr) is shown to consist of a substantial flux of neutrals diverging from the cathode center. Using Doppler shift spectroscopy, it is shown that directional ion beams, originating from the center, increase in energy as they move away from the center. Moreover, through charge exchange, these ions become energetic neutrals and travel out of the cathode to the anode. Although naturally there are converging ions, it is shown that this is a lesser component of the energetic particle beams in this pressure range.

  11. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G.F.)

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  12. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G. F.)

    2016-05-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films.

  13. Nanoparticle Order through Entropic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Lee, Bongjoon; Stafford, Christopher; Douglas, Jack; Bockstaller, Michael; Karim, Alamgir

    As has been addressed in colloidal science, visual order transitions can be achieved with entropy contributions alone. Herein, entropy-driven ordering of nanoparticle (NP) structures is generated where entropy increase and visual order are achieved simultaneously. We study an ``athermal'' NP-polymer blends where NPs are densely grafted with polymer brush of the same chemical composition as the polymer matrix. Visual order of the NPs is induced by geometrically confining the thin film blends with meso-scale topographic patterns. When the residual layer thickness of the patterned blend films approaches the nanoparticle dimension, exclusive segregation of NPs to less confining imprinted mesa region occurs. This preferential segregation of NPs, defined by partition coefficient K = 0, is attributed to purely entropic penalty, where K denotes the particle density ratio at highly confined residual layer to that at mesa region. We further demonstrate K is fully tunable and even invertible with increasing matrix chain dimension. The associated entropic free energy change (ΔF = - ln K) is calculated to explain NP segregation preference. Accordingly, variation of residual layer thickness and polymer matrix molecule size can both affect NP distribution among patterned thick and thin regions.

  14. Holographic confinement in inhomogeneous backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Wien, Jason

    2016-08-01

    As noted by Witten, compactifying a d-dimensional holographic CFT on an S 1 gives a class of ( d - 1)-dimensional confining theories with gravity duals. The proto-typical bulk solution dual to the ground state is a double Wick rotation of the AdS d+1 Schwarzschild black hole known as the AdS soliton. We generalize such examples by allowing slow variations in the size of the S 1, and thus in the confinement scale. Coefficients governing the second order response of the system are computed for 3 ≤ d ≤ 8 using a derivative expansion closely related to the fluid-gravity correspondence. The primary physical results are that i) gauge-theory flux tubes tend to align orthogonal to gradients and along the eigenvector of the Hessian with the lowest eigenvalue, ii) flux tubes aligned orthogonal to gradients are attracted to gradients for d ≤ 6 but repelled by gradients for d ≥ 7, iii) flux tubes are repelled by regions where the second derivative along the tube is large and positive but are attracted to regions where the eigenvalues of the Hessian are large and positive in directions orthogonal to the tube, and iv) for d > 3, inhomogeneities act to raise the total energy of the confining vacuum above its zeroth order value.

  15. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems.

    PubMed

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A; Zhou, Guofu G F

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it's potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  16. Effects of rigid or adaptive confinement on colloidal self-assembly. Fixed vs. fluctuating number of confined particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PÈ©kalski, J.; Almarza, N. G.; Ciach, A.

    2015-05-01

    The effects of confinement on colloidal self-assembly in the case of fixed number of confined particles are studied in the one dimensional lattice model solved exactly in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) in Pȩkalski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 014903 (2015)]. The model considers a pair interaction defined by a short-range attraction plus a longer-range repulsion. We consider thermodynamic states corresponding to self-assembly into clusters. Both fixed and adaptive boundaries are studied. For fixed boundaries, there are particular states in which, for equal average densities, the number of clusters in the GCE is larger than in the canonical ensemble. The dependence of pressure on density has a different form when the system size changes with fixed number of particles and when the number of particles changes with fixed size of the system. In the former case, the pressure has a nonmonotonic dependence on the system size. The anomalous increase of pressure for expanding system is accompanied by formation of a larger number of smaller clusters. In the case of elastic confining surfaces, we observe a bistability, i.e., two significantly different system sizes occur with almost the same probability. The mechanism of the bistability in the closed system is different to that of the case of permeable walls, where the two equilibrium system sizes correspond to a different number of particles.

  17. Effects of rigid or adaptive confinement on colloidal self-assembly. Fixed vs. fluctuating number of confined particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pȩkalski, J.; Ciach, A.; Almarza, N. G.

    2015-05-28

    The effects of confinement on colloidal self-assembly in the case of fixed number of confined particles are studied in the one dimensional lattice model solved exactly in the grand canonical ensemble (GCE) in Pȩkalski et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 142, 014903 (2015)]. The model considers a pair interaction defined by a short-range attraction plus a longer-range repulsion. We consider thermodynamic states corresponding to self-assembly into clusters. Both fixed and adaptive boundaries are studied. For fixed boundaries, there are particular states in which, for equal average densities, the number of clusters in the GCE is larger than in the canonical ensemble. The dependence of pressure on density has a different form when the system size changes with fixed number of particles and when the number of particles changes with fixed size of the system. In the former case, the pressure has a nonmonotonic dependence on the system size. The anomalous increase of pressure for expanding system is accompanied by formation of a larger number of smaller clusters. In the case of elastic confining surfaces, we observe a bistability, i.e., two significantly different system sizes occur with almost the same probability. The mechanism of the bistability in the closed system is different to that of the case of permeable walls, where the two equilibrium system sizes correspond to a different number of particles.

  18. Effect of temperature and pressure on the protonation of glycine

    PubMed Central

    Izatt, R. M.; Oscarson, J. L.; Gillespie, S. E.; Grimsrud, H.; Renuncio, J. A. R.; Pando, C.

    1992-01-01

    Flow calorimetry has been used to study the interaction of glycine with protons in water at temperatures of 298.15, 323.15, and 348.15 K and pressures up to 12.50 MPa. By combining the measured heat for glycine solutions titrated with NaOH with the heat of ionization for water, the enthalpy of protonation of glycine is obtained. The reaction is exothermic at all temperatures and pressures studied. The effect of pressure on the enthalpy of reaction is very small. The experimental heat data are analyzed to yield equilibrium constant (K), enthalpy change (ΔH), and entropy change (ΔS) values for the protonation reaction as a function of temperature. These values are compared with those reported previously at 298.15 K. The ΔH and ΔS values increase (become more positive), whereas log K values decrease, as temperature increases. The trends for ΔH and ΔS with temperature are opposite to those reported previously for the protonation of several alkanolamines. However, log K values for proton interaction with both glycine and the alkanolamines decrease with increasing temperature. The effect of the nitrogen atom substituent on log K for protonation of glycine and alkanolamines is discussed in terms of changes in long-range and short-range solvent effects. These effects are used to explain the difference in ΔH and ΔS trends between glycine protonation and those found earlier for alkanolamine protonation. PMID:19431832

  19. Hydrogen confinement in carbon nanopores: extreme densification at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-09-01

    In-situ small-angle neutron scattering studies of H(2) confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon at room temperature have provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H(2) at pressures up to 200 bar. The data were used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure and is comparable to the density of liquid H(2) in narrow nanopores at ∼200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of H(2) within the pores create internal pressures that exceed the external gas pressure by a factor of up to ∼50, confirming the benefits of adsorptive storage over compressive storage. These results can be used to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum H(2) storage capacities at near-ambient temperatures. PMID:21819066

  20. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Gallego, Nidia C; He, Lilin; Saha, Dipendu; Contescu, Cristian I; Melnichenko, Yuri B

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  1. Towards assessing the violence of reaction during cookoff of confined energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Kipp, M.E.; Schmitt, R.G.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1996-11-01

    An analysis of post-ignition events in a variable confinement cookoff test (VCCT) geometry is presented aimed toward predicting the level of violence during cookoff of confined thermally-degraded energetic materials. This study focuses on the dynamic events following thermal initiation whereby accelerated combustion interacts with confinement. Numerical simulations, based on a model of reactive multiphase mixtures, indicate that the response of energetic material is highly dependent upon thermal/mechanical damage states prior to ignition. These damaged states affect the rate of pressurization, dynamic compaction behavior and subsequent growth to detonation. Variations of the specific surface area and porosity produced by decomposition of the energetic material causes different responses ranging from pressure burst to detonation. Calculated stress histories are used in estimating breakup of the VCCT confinement based on Grady-Kipp fragmentation theory.

  2. The effect of high pressures on the yoghurt from milk with the stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, A.; Jankowska, A.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The effect of high pressures on the microbiological and physio-chemical properties of yoghurt was investigated. The best results were obtained when the yoghurt was manufactured from milk with the addition of MYO 752 stabilizer (starch, gelatin, pectin) selected from 10 stabilizers. Yoghurt manufactured with the addition of 0, 6% MYO 752 stabilizer was processed at the pressure of 400-600 MPa/15 min. in the range of 50 MPa. Pressurization caused a total reduction of number of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. Bulgaricus and reduced the number of Streptococcus thermophilus by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Pressurized and non-pressurized yoghurts characterized of a homogenous consistency and typical plain yoghurt taste. The decrease of the number of living bacteria was observed in yoghurts during the storage. The acidity of pressurized yoghurts remained on the some level at the temperature of 4°C and 20°C. The more intensive antibacterial activity of microflora was observed in yoghurts storaged at 20°C in comparison with yoghurts storaged at 4°C. Disadvantageous changes of the pressurized yoghurts consistency were not found. The taste and aroma of yoghurts remained without any changes.

  3. Laboratory-scale uranium RF plasma confinement experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater facilities to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into argon-confined, steady-state, RF-heated plasmas in different uranium plasma confinement tests to investigate the characteristics of plamas core nuclear reactors. The objectives were: (1) to confine as high a density of uranium vapor as possible within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition; (2) to develop and test materials and handling techniques suitable for use with high-temperature, high-pressure gaseous UF6; and (3) to develop complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma and residue deposited on the test chamber components. In all tests, the plasma was a fluid-mechanically-confined vortex-type contained within a fused-silica cylindrical test chamber. The test chamber peripheral wall was 5.7 cm ID by 10 cm long.

  4. Nanoscale Trapping and Squeeze-Out of Confined Alkane Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gosvami, N N; O'Shea, S J

    2015-12-01

    We present combined force curve and conduction atomic force microscopy (AFM) data for the linear alkanes CnH2n+2 (n = 10, 12, 14, 16) confined between a gold-coated AFM tip and a graphite surface. Solvation layering is observed in the force curves for all liquids, and conduction AFM is used to study in detail the removal of the confined (mono)layer closest to the graphite surface. The squeeze-out behavior of the monolayer can be very different depending upon the temperature. Below the monolayer melting transition temperatures the molecules are in an ordered state on the graphite surface, and fast and complete removal of the confined molecules is observed. However, above the melting transition temperature the molecules are in a disordered state, and even at large applied pressure a few liquid molecules are trapped within the tip-sample contact zone. These findings are similar to a previous study for branched alkanes [ Gosvami Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 076101 ], but the observation for the linear alkane homologue series demonstrates clearly the dependence of the squeeze-out and trapping on the state of the confined material. PMID:26529283

  5. Effect of confinement during cookoff of TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, M. L.; Kaneshige, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    In practical scenarios, cookoff of explosives is a three-dimensional transient phenomenon where the rate limiting reactions may occur either in the condensed or gas phase. The effects of confinement are more dramatic when the rate-limiting reactions occur in the gas phase. Explosives can be self-confined, where the decomposing gases are contained within non-permeable regions of the explosive, or confined by a metal or composite container. In triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based explosives, self-confinement is prevalent in plastic bonded explosives at full density. The time-to-ignition can be delayed by orders of magnitude if the reactive gases leave the confining apparatus. Delays in ignition can also occur when the confining apparatus has excess gas volume or ullage. Understanding the effects of confinement is required to accurately model explosive cookoff at various scales ranging from small laboratory experiments to large real systems.

  6. The role of correlation in the ground state energy of confined helium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, N.

    2014-01-14

    We analyze the ground state energy of helium atom confined by spherical impenetrable walls, and the role of the correlation energy in the total energy. The confinement of an atom in a cavity is one way in which we can model the effect of the external pressure on an atom. The calculations of energy of the system are carried out by the variational method. We find that the correlation energy remains almost constant for a range values of size of the boxes analyzed.

  7. Coupled effects of hydrostatic pressure and bipolar electric field on the FE-AFE phase transformation in 95/5 PZT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadez, J. C.; Pisani, David M.; Lynch, C. S.

    2013-04-01

    The behavior of 95/5 PZT subjected to bipolar electrical loading and hydrostatic pressure is studied experimentally. When 95/5 PZT is subjected to high enough hydrostatic pressure it undergoes a ferroelectric to antiferroelectric (FEAFE) phase transformation. Specimens were subjected to two pressure cycles from 0 to 550 MPa at a rate of 50 MPa/min under short circuit conditions. It was found that under the first pressure cycle the specimens undergo a FEAFE phase transformation at 330 MPa indicated by an abrupt compression of 2500 microstrain. Under the second pressure cycle, the transformation no longer occurs at a single pressure level, but is smoothed throughout loading. In another set of experiments, bipolar electric fields were applied up to 3 MV/m at discrete pressure levels. At low pressures, electric displacement-electric field plots exhibited open loop behavior characteristic of soft ferroelectrics. As the pressure was increased past the FE-AFE phase transformation threshold, the open loops closed to nearly linear dielectric. When the driving pressure was decreased the open loop behavior returned at a notably lower pressure level. The transformation pressure is therefore path dependent and is evidence of a pressure hysteresis.

  8. Transitions Out of High-Confinement Mode to Lower Confinement Regimes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, David

    A high-resolution edge Thomson Scattering (TS) system was developed and installed on the DIII-D tokamak, and was then used to study the back transition from High Confinement (H-mode) to Low Confinement (L-mode) in DIII-D. The transient event seen to initiate some back transition sequences is superficially similar to a large type-I ELM, which is described by the linear ideal MHD theory of peeling-ballooning modes. Detailed edge pedestal profile evolution studies during the back transition show that the plasma does not exceed this linear stability limit during the back transition, indicating that the transient is not a type-I ELM event. The E x B shearing rate oE x B and turbulence decorrelation rate oT were then compared before the H-L sequence. The results show that the back transition sequence begins while oE x B is still well above oT, indicating that the sequences observed in these experiments are not triggered by the collapse of the E x B shear layer. Further investigation is made to characterize a coherent density fluctuation whose behavior is linked to back transition sequences. Strategies for avoiding the transient are tested and a reliable method for producing a "soft'' back transition is identified. Such cases are compared to the class of "hard'' transitions in which the pedestal pressure gradient rapidly relaxes.

  9. Investigation of some well known bulk fluid regularities for Lennard-Jones confined fluid in nanoslit pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, Ezat; Namdari, Fatemeh; Jildani, Sediqeh Rabiei

    2016-04-01

    The modified fundamental measure theory has been employed to investigate some well known regularities of bulk fluid for the Lennard-Jones fluid confined in nanoslit pore. The regularities investigated include common compression point, common bulk modulus point, Tait-Murnaghan equation, and the linear regularity between pressure and temperature for each isochore. All these regularities have been investigated for two different components of pressure for confined fluid. Our results show that the common compression and common bulk modulus point remain valid for fluids confined in nanoslit pores of different sizes and with different wall-fluid potentials. The density of the common compression and common bulk modulus point are different from corresponding ones for the bulk fluid. Our observations also show that the Tait-Murnaghan equation and pressure-temperature linear regularity also hold for confined fluid. The sign of the intercept of pressure-temperature regularity is determined by the difference between attraction and repulsion terms in the compressibility factor.

  10. Cylindrical confinement of semiflexible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Montejo, Pablo; McDargh, Zachary; Deserno, Markus; Guven, Jemal

    2015-06-01

    Equilibrium states of a closed semiflexible polymer binding to a cylinder are described. This may be either by confinement or by constriction. Closed completely bound states are labeled by two integers: the number of oscillations, n , and the number of times it winds the cylinder, p , the latter being a topological invariant. We examine the behavior of these states as the length of the loop is increased by evaluating the energy, the conserved axial torque, and the contact force. The ground state for a given p is the state with n =1 ; a short loop with p =1 is an elliptic deformation of a parallel circle; as its length increases it elongates along the cylinder axis with two hairpin ends. Excited states with n ≥2 and p =1 possess n -fold axial symmetry. Short (long) loops possess energies ≈p E0 (n E0 ), with E0 the energy of a circular loop with same radius as the cylinder; in long loops the axial torque vanishes. Confined bound excited states are initially unstable; however, above a critical length each n -fold state becomes stable: The folded hairpin cannot be unfolded. The ground state for each p is also initially unstable with respect to deformations rotating the loop off the surface into the interior. A closed planar elastic curve aligned along the cylinder axis making contact with the cylinder on its two sides is identified as the ground state of a confined loop. Exterior bound states behave very differently, if free to unbind, as signaled by the reversal in the sign of the contact force. If p =1 , all such states are unstable. If p ≥2 , however, a topological obstruction to complete unbinding exists. If the loop is short, the bound state with p =2 and n =1 provides a stable constriction of the cylinder, partially unbinding as the length is increased. This motif could be relevant to an understanding of the process of membrane fission mediated by dynamin rings.

  11. Electromelting of Confined Monolayer Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-05-01

    In sharp contrast to the prevailing view that electric fields promote water freezing, here we show by molecular dynamics simulations that monolayer ice confined between two parallel plates can melt into liquid water under a perpendicularly applied electric field. The melting temperature of the monolayer ice decreases with the increasing strength of the external field due to the field-induced disruption of the water-wall interaction induced well-ordered network of the hydrogen bond. This electromelting process should add an important new ingredient to the physics of water.

  12. Electromelting of confined monolayer ice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-05-10

    In sharp contrast to the prevailing view that electric fields promote water freezing, here we show by molecular dynamics simulations that monolayer ice confined between two parallel plates can melt into liquid water under a perpendicularly applied electric field. The melting temperature of the monolayer ice decreases with the increasing strength of the external field due to the field-induced disruption of the water-wall interaction induced well-ordered network of the hydrogen bond. This electromelting process should add an important new ingredient to the physics of water. PMID:23705718

  13. Thermoelectricity in Confined Liquid Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Mathias; Hardt, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    The electric field in an extended phase of a liquid electrolyte exposed to a temperature gradient is attributed to different thermophoretic mobilities of the ion species. As shown herein, such Soret-type ion thermodiffusion is not required to induce thermoelectricity even in the simplest electrolyte if it is confined between charged walls. The space charge of the electric double layer leads to selective ion diffusion driven by a temperature-dependent electrophoretic ion mobility, which-for narrow channels-may cause thermovoltages larger in magnitude than for the classical Soret equilibrium. PMID:27314730

  14. Thermoelectricity in Confined Liquid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietzel, Mathias; Hardt, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    The electric field in an extended phase of a liquid electrolyte exposed to a temperature gradient is attributed to different thermophoretic mobilities of the ion species. As shown herein, such Soret-type ion thermodiffusion is not required to induce thermoelectricity even in the simplest electrolyte if it is confined between charged walls. The space charge of the electric double layer leads to selective ion diffusion driven by a temperature-dependent electrophoretic ion mobility, which—for narrow channels—may cause thermovoltages larger in magnitude than for the classical Soret equilibrium.

  15. Confined Space Imager (CSI) Software

    SciTech Connect

    Karelilz, David

    2013-07-03

    The software provides real-time image capture, enhancement, and display, and sensor control for the Confined Space Imager (CSI) sensor system The software captures images over a Cameralink connection and provides the following image enhancements: camera pixel to pixel non-uniformity correction, optical distortion correction, image registration and averaging, and illumination non-uniformity correction. The software communicates with the custom CSI hardware over USB to control sensor parameters and is capable of saving enhanced sensor images to an external USB drive. The software provides sensor control, image capture, enhancement, and display for the CSI sensor system. It is designed to work with the custom hardware.

  16. Laboratory tests to study the influence of rock stress confinement on the performances of TBM discs in tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innaurato, N.; Oggeri, C.; Oreste, P.; Vinai, R.

    2011-06-01

    To clarify some aspects of rock destruction with a disc acting on a high confined tunnel face, a series of tests were carried out to examine fracture mechanisms under an indenter that simulates the tunnel boring machine (TBM) tool action, in the presence of an adjacent groove, when a state of stress (lateral confinement) is imposed on a rock sample. These tests proved the importance of carefully establishing the optimal distance of grooves produced by discs acting on a confined surface, and the value (as a mere order of magnitude) of the increase of the thrust to produce the initiation of chip formation, as long as the confinement pressure becomes greater.

  17. Confinement free energy of flexible polyelectrolytes in spherical cavities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Muthukumar, M

    2008-05-14

    A weakly charged flexible polyelectrolyte chain in a neutral spherical cavity is analyzed by using self-consistent field theory within an explicit solvent model. Assuming the radial symmetry for the system, it is found that the confinement of the chain leads to creation of a charge density wave along with the development of a potential difference across the center of cavity and the surface. We show that the solvent entropy plays an important role in the free energy of the confined system. For a given radius of the spherical cavity and fixed charge density along the backbone of the chain, solvent and small ion entropies dominate over all other contributions when chain lengths are small. However, with the increase in chain length, chain conformational entropy and polymer-solvent interaction energy also become important. Our calculations reveal that energy due to electrostatic interactions plays a minor role in the free energy. Furthermore, we show that the total free energy under spherical confinement is not extensive in the number of monomers. Results for the osmotic pressure and mean activity coefficient for monovalent salt are presented. We demonstrate that fluctuations at one-loop level lower the free energy and corrections to the osmotic pressure and mean activity coefficient of the salt are discussed. Finite size corrections are shown to widen the range of validity of the fluctuation analysis. PMID:18532843

  18. Bacterial adaptation to high pressure: a respiratory system in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella violacea DSS12.

    PubMed

    Chikuma, Sayaka; Kasahara, Ryota; Kato, Chiaki; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2007-02-01

    Shewanella violacea DSS12 is a psychrophilic facultative piezophile isolated from the deep sea. In a previous study, we have shown that the bacterium adapted its respiratory components to alteration in growth pressure. This appears to be one of the bacterial adaptation mechanisms to high pressures. In this study, we measured the respiratory activities of S. violacea grown under various pressures. There was no significant difference between the cells grown under atmospheric pressure and a high pressure of 50 MPa relative to oxygen consumption of the cell-free extracts and inhibition patterns in the presence of KCN and antimycin A. Antimycin A did not inhibit the activity completely regardless of growth pressure, suggesting that there were complex III-containing and -eliminating pathways operating in parallel. On the other hand, there was a difference in the terminal oxidase activities. Our results showed that an inhibitor- and pressure-resistant terminal oxidase was expressed in the cells grown under high pressure. This property should contribute to the high-pressure adaptation mechanisms of S. violacea. PMID:17166225

  19. Are polymers glassier upon confinement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Simone; Spiece, Jean; Martinez-Tong, Daniel E.; Sferrazza, Michele; Nogales, Aurora

    Glass forming systems are characterized by a stability against crystallization upon heating and by the easiness with which their liquid phase can be transformed into a solid lacking of long-range order upon cooling (glass forming ability). Here, we discuss on the the thickness dependence of the thermal phase transition temperatures of poly(L-lactide acid) thin films supported onto solid substrates. The determination of the glass transition (Tg), cold crystallization (TCC) and melting (Tm) temperatures down to a thickness of 6 nm via ellipsometry, permitted us to build up parameters describing glass stability and glass forming ability. We observed a strong influence of the film thickness on the latter, while the former is not affected by 1D confinement. Remarkably, the increase in Tg/Tm ratio, a parameter related to glass forming ability, is not accompanied by an increase in TCC-Tg, as observed on the contrary, in bulk metallic glasses. We explained this peculiar behavior of soft matter in confinement considering the impact of irreversible adsorption on local free volume content.

  20. Soft confinement for polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yutaka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2014-07-01

    As a model of soft confinement for polymers, we investigated equilibrium shapes of a flexible vesicle that contains a phase-separating polymer solution. To simulate such a system, we combined the phase field theory (PFT) for the vesicle and the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) for the polymer solution. We observed a transition from a symmetric prolate shape of the vesicle to an asymmetric pear shape induced by the domain structure of the enclosed polymer solution. Moreover, when a non-zero spontaneous curvature of the vesicle is introduced, a re-entrant transition between the prolate and the dumbbell shapes of the vesicle is observed. This re-entrant transition is explained by considering the competition between the loss of conformational entropy and that of translational entropy of polymer chains due to the confinement by the deformable vesicle. This finding is in accordance with the recent experimental result reported by Terasawa et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 5249).

  1. High-Pressure Equipment for Growing Methanogenic Microorganisms on Gaseous Substrates at High Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Günther; Jaenicke, Rainer; Lüdemann, Hans-Dietrich

    1987-01-01

    High-pressure, high-temperature investigations on thermophilic microorganisms that grow on hydrogen or other gaseous substrates require instrumentation which provides sufficient substrate for cell proliferation up to 2 × 108 to 3 × 108 cells per ml under isothermal and isobaric conditions. To minimize H2 leakage and to optimize reproducibility at high pressure and high temperature, 10-ml nickel tubes with a liquid/gas ratio of 1:2 were used in a set of autoclaves connected in series. By applying a hydraulic pump and a 2.5-kW heating device, fast changes in temperature (up to 400°C) and pressure (up to 400 MPa) can be accomplished within less than 10 min. To quantify bacterial growth, determinations of cell numbers per unit volume yielded optimum accuracy. Preliminary experiments with the thermophilic, methanogenic archaebacterium Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus showed that bacterial growth depends on both temperature and pressure. At the optimum temperature, increased hydrostatic pressure up to 50 MPa enhanced the growth yield; at a pressure of >75 MPa, cell lysis dominated. Changes in cell proliferation were accompanied by changes in morphology. PMID:16347413

  2. Behavior of oil in interactions with aqueous solutions under elevated and high temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balitskii, V. S.; Penteley, S. V.; Balitskaya, L. V.; Bublikova, T. M.; Bondarenko, G. V.

    2009-06-01

    The behavior of oil was studied, and the solubility of its light and heavy fractions in hydrothermal solutions was evaluated at 260-700°C and pressures of 30-200 MPa. The experiments were accompanied with simultaneous growth of quartz crystals containing fluid inclusions (in the same solutions). These inclusions allowed one to trace, by means of thermobaric geochemistry, the in situ behavior of oil within a wide range of temperatures and pressures. It was shown that the oil undergoes pronounced transformations under the interactions with hydrothermal solutions. Even at 260-300°C (pressures of 30-50 MPa), the oil was enriched in light fractions. The content of these fractions was pronouncedly increased at 330-350°C (70-80 MPa pressure). This process was accompanied by the appearance of mazut-like, semisolid, and solid bitumoids in amounts that increased manifold within the 400-700°C temperature range (up to 200 MPa pressure). The oil transformations were accompanied by an ample emission of methane. At 260-300°C, the oil in the hydrothermal solution occurred mainly as liquid drops. However, at temperatures near 400°C (about 100-150 MPa pressure), the solubility of light fractions increased to about 5-6 vol % which pointed to the ability to transfer significant amounts of oil not only in the liquid-drop form but also in the dissolved form.

  3. Mixed confinement regimes during equilibrium confinement spectroscopy of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Damini; Sheats, Julian; Muralidhar, Abhiram; Miller, Jeremy J.; Huang, Derek E.; Mahshid, Sara; Dorfman, Kevin D.; Reisner, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We have used a combination of fluorescence microscopy experiments and Pruned Enriched Rosenbluth Method simulations of a discrete wormlike chain model to measure the mean extension and the variance in the mean extension of λ-DNA in 100 nm deep nanochannels with widths ranging from 100 nm to 1000 nm in discrete 100 nm steps. The mean extension is only weakly affected by the channel aspect ratio. In contrast, the fluctuations of the chain extension qualitatively differ between rectangular channels and square channels with the same cross-sectional area, owing to the “mixing” of different confinement regimes in the rectangular channels. The agreement between experiment and simulation is very good, using the extension due to intercalation as the only adjustable parameter. PMID:24908035

  4. Studies of global energy confinement in TFTR supershots

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.

    1993-08-01

    The global energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, from TFTR supershot plasmas has been correlated with the hydrogen recycling and the pressure anisotropy. An expression for the global confinement was obtained that describes its value at the time of peak neutron emission for all TFTR supershots obtained in the 1990 campaign, and simultaneously describes the time evolution of {tau}{sub E} for an extensive subset of the 1990 data. The obtained expression is probably not unique and it can be written with different variables. An analysis of the energy balance for many of these supershots indicates that the primary effect of larger {tau}{sub E} is that the central particle diffusivity is lower.

  5. Development of a Confined Plasma Armature Design (CPAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Moreno; Jacobson, Dan; Barker, Christine; Goldman, Edward

    1993-01-01

    Plasma driven railguns show excellent promise. Experimental data to date have shown an apparent velocity barrier at 5-7 km/sec. It is believed that this is caused by increasing viscous drag and arc restrike at higher velocities. One way to overcome the viscous drag/restrike of the plasma is to confine the plasma in a region directly behind the projectile. To investigate this concept, programs have been undertaken to design, fabricate, and test a Confined Plasma Armature Design (CPAD) which would physically contain the high pressure plasma in an area directly behind the EM projectile. This paper summarizes the efforts to date for analysis, design, fabrication, and full scale testing of a CPAD projectile.

  6. An Experiment to study sheared magnetofluids and Bernoulli confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtson, Roger D.; Valanju, P. M.; Mahajan, S. M.; Hazeltine, R. D.; Chatterjee, R.; Queredo, H. J.; Meintanis, Evangelos

    2000-10-01

    Dynamically stable magnetofluid states with strong velocity shear and good Bernoulli confinement result from the relaxation process in which total magnetic and generalized helicities are both conserved [1].Because of the extra invariant these states can sustain a large pressure gradient without requiring the existence of closed flux surfaces. Their investigation bears upon fundamental issues of plasma confinement. We are building a small mirror machine with high radial electric fields to create a rotating, self-organizing, detached toroidal plasma ring. Under some conditions, we expect the plasma to relax through a turbulent process to a nearby megnetofluid state which deponds only on the initial values of the two helicity invariants set by the initial flows and currents. The evolution of the plasma profiles will be measured by magnetic, Langmuir, and Mach probes, spectroscopic techniques, and by interferometry. Initial measurements will be shown. [S. M. Mahajan and Z. Yoshida, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4863 (1998)

  7. THERMAL COOK-OFF EXPERIMENTS OF THE HMX BASED HIGH EXPLOSIVE LX-04 TO CHARACTERIZE VIOLENCE WITH VARYING CONFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Greenwood, D

    2005-07-25

    Thermal cook-off experiments were carried out using LX-04 explosive (85% HMX and 15% Viton by weight) with different levels of confinement to characterize the effect of confinement on the reaction violence. These experiments involved heating a porous LX-04 sample in a stainless steel container with varying container end plate thickness and assembly bolt diameter to control overall confinement. As expected, detonation did not occur and reducing the overall confinement lowered the reaction violence. This is consistent with modeling results that predict that a lower confinement will act to lower the cook-off pressure and thus the overall burn rate which lowers the overall violence. These results suggest that controlling the overall system confinement can modify the relative safety in a given scenario.

  8. Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device

    DOEpatents

    Owen, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

  9. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-07-11

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell-substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  10. Resonant entrainment of a confined pulsed jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Moffat, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports the discovery of a new resonant entrainment phenomenon associated with a confined, pulsed jet flow. It was found that a confined jet, when pulsed at an organ-pipe resonant frequency of the confinement tube, experiences greatly enhanced entrainment and mixing near the exit end of the confinement tube compared to a steady confined jet. The mixing and entrainment rates for the resonantly pulsed confined jet approach, and in some cases slightly exceed, those for an unconfined pulsed jet. Both visual and quantitative evidence of this phenomenon is presented. The new effect should be of considerable interest in ejector and combustor design, both of which benefit from any enhancement in mixing between a primary and a secondary flow

  11. Planar geometry inertial electrostatic confinement fusion device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    In the classic gridded inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion reactor, ion bombardment of the grid leads to heating, thermionic electron emission, significant power loss, and ultimately melting of the grid. Gridless IEC devices have sought to overcome these limitations. Klein reported a gridless device in which ions are circulated as a linear beam in an electrostatic analogue of an optical resonator. To overcome limits of stored ions due to space charge effects at the turning regions, the device employed multiple overlapping traps. The work reported here seeks to further increase the turning region space in a gridless trap by employing a planar geometry. Ion trapping in the planar device was examined by simulating trajectories of 2H+ ions with SIMION 8.1 software. Simulations were carried out using multiple potentials as in Klein's device and for a single potential trap as a planar analogue of the anharmonic ion trap. Scattering by background gas was simulated using a hard sphere collision model, and the results suggested the device will require operation at low pressure with a separate ion source.

  12. Human Adaptation to Isolated and Confined Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary W.; Stokols, Daniel; Carrere, Sybil

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted over seven months in a winter Antarctic isolated and confined environment (ICE). Physiological and psychological data was collected several times a week. Information was collected on a monthly basis on behavior and the use of physical facilities. Adaptation and information indicated that there was a significant decrease in epinephrine and norepinephrine during the middle trimester of the winter. No vital changes were found for blood pressure. Self reports of hostility and anxiety show a linear increase. There were no significant changes in depression during ICE. The physiological and psychological data do not move in a synchronous fashion over time. The data also suggest that both ambient qualities of an ICE and discrete social environmental events, such as the arrival of the summer crew, have an impact on the outcome measures used. It may be most appropiate to develop a model for ICE's that incorporates not only global chronic stressors common to all ICE's but also the role of discrete environmental effects which can minimize or enhance the influence of more chronic stressors. Behavioral adjustment information highlight the importance of developing schedules which balance work and recreational activities.

  13. Heterogeneities in confined water and protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Kumar, P.; Han, S.; Mazza, M. G.; Stokely, K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Mallamace, F.; Xu, L.

    2009-12-01

    We report recent efforts to understand a broad range of experiments on confined water and protein hydration water, many initiated by a collaboration between workers at the University of Messina and MIT—the editors of this special issue. Preliminary calculations are not inconsistent with one tentative interpretation of these experiments as resulting from the system passing from the high-temperature high-pressure 'HDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display non-Arrhenius behavior) to the low-temperature low-pressure 'LDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display Arrhenius behavior). The Widom line—defined to be the line in the pressure-temperature plane where the correlation length has its maximum—arises if there is a critical point. Hence, interpreting the Messina-MIT experiments in terms of a Widom line is of potential relevance to testing, experimentally, the hypothesis that water displays a liquid-liquid critical point.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamics equilibrium of a self-confined elliptical plasma ball

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H. P. O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 and Institute of Mechanics, Academia Sinica, Beijing, People's Republic of China ); Oakes, M.E. )

    1991-08-01

    A variational principle is applied to the problem of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium of a self-contained elliptical plasma ball, such as elliptical ball lightning. The principle is appropriate for an approximate solution of partial differential equations with arbitrary boundary shape. The method reduces the partial differential equation to a series of ordinary differential equations and is especially valuable for treating boundaries with nonlinear deformations. The calculations conclude that the pressure distribution and the poloidal current are more uniform in an oblate self-confined plasma ball than that of an elongated plasma ball. The ellipticity of the plasma ball is obviously restricted by its internal pressure, magnetic field, and ambient pressure. Qualitative evidence is presented for the absence of sighting of elongated ball lightning.

  15. A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-09-01

    Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement over pressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region.

  16. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  17. DNA statics and dynamics in nanoscale confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Walter W.; Morton, Keith; Riehn, Robert; Wang, Yan Mei; Chou, Stephen; Austin, Robert H.

    2005-01-01

    We present, along with theoretical scaling arguments, measurements of the equilibrium and dynamic properties of λ and T2 phage DNA molecules confined in quartz nanochannels. Such measurements serve a two-fold purpose: (1) we hope to assist in the design of future nanofluidic devices by quantifying the behavior of semiflexible polymers in confined environments and (2) we hope to test existing theories for confined semiflexible polymers.

  18. Field-induced confined states in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, Satoshi; Morita, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Tsuya, Daiju

    2014-02-03

    We report an approach to confine the carriers in single-layer graphene, which leads to quantum devices with field-induced quantum confinement. We demonstrated that the Coulomb-blockade effect evolves under a uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the graphene device. Our experimental results show that field-induced quantum dots are realized in graphene, and a quantum confinement-deconfinement transition is switched by the magnetic field.

  19. Glasses and Melts under Compression and Surface Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Upon compression and confinement (near surfaces), glasses are expected to be subject to successive structural transitions with multiple densification and confinement mechanisms. Experimental verification of these phenomena remain a major target of glass-melt studies. Here, we provide an overview of the recent progress by solid-state NMR and inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) into structures of multi-component silicate and oxide glasses with varying pressure, composition (with fluid contents), and confinement [e.g., Lee et al. Rev. Min. Geochem. 2014, 78, 139; Lee and Ahn, Sci. Report, 2014, 4, 4200; Lee and Kim, J. Phys. Chem. C. 2015, 119 748]. O-17 NMR studies reveal the presence of metal-bridging oxygen in orthosilicate glasses (an analogue to peridotite melts) and allow direct quantification of the degree of Metal/Si disorder with composition and pressure. Despite the pronounced paramagnetic effect, detailed structural changes in iron-bearing silicate glasses can now be probed using solid-state NMR techniques. NMR results for the multi-component silicate glasses melts at high pressure highlight the moderate deviation from the degree of Al avoidance among framework cations (Si and Al) and preferential proximity between non-network cations and non-bridging oxygen. In contrast to an expected complexity in densification, experimental NMR and IXS results for glasses demonstrate that the pressure-induced changes in melt structures show a simple trend where the effect composition and pressure can be predicted with network flexibility. Solid-state NMR techniques revealed the unknown structural details of oxide glasses and melts near surfaces and interfaces: the coordination environments in the surface confined oxide glasses are distinct from those of bulk, highlighted by a decrease in the fractions of high-energy clusters (and thus the degree of disorder) near interface. The structure of glass surfaces is also affected by the types of interfaces (e.g. crystalline vs

  20. Anisotropic de Gennes Narrowing in Confined Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2016-04-01

    The collective diffusion of dense fluids in spatial confinement is studied by combining high-energy (21 keV) x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering from colloid-filled microfluidic channels. We find the structural relaxation in confinement to be slower compared to the bulk. The collective dynamics is wave vector dependent, akin to the de Gennes narrowing typically observed in bulk fluids. However, in stark contrast to the bulk, the structure factor and de Gennes narrowing in confinement are anisotropic. These experimental observations are essential in order to develop a microscopic theoretical description of collective diffusion of dense fluids in confined geometries.

  1. Confined Space Imager (CSI) Software

    2013-07-03

    The software provides real-time image capture, enhancement, and display, and sensor control for the Confined Space Imager (CSI) sensor system The software captures images over a Cameralink connection and provides the following image enhancements: camera pixel to pixel non-uniformity correction, optical distortion correction, image registration and averaging, and illumination non-uniformity correction. The software communicates with the custom CSI hardware over USB to control sensor parameters and is capable of saving enhanced sensor images to anmore » external USB drive. The software provides sensor control, image capture, enhancement, and display for the CSI sensor system. It is designed to work with the custom hardware.« less

  2. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  3. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  4. Are polymers glassier upon confinement?

    PubMed

    Spièce, Jean; Martínez-Tong, Daniel E; Sferrazza, Michele; Nogales, Aurora; Napolitano, Simone

    2015-08-21

    Glass forming systems are characterized by a stability against crystallization upon heating and by the easiness with which their liquid phase can be transformed into a solid lacking of long-range order upon cooling (glass forming ability). Here, we report the thickness dependence of the thermal phase transition temperatures of poly(l-lactide acid) thin films supported onto solid substrates. The determination of the glass transition, cold crystallization and melting temperatures down to a thickness of 6 nm, permitted us to build up parameters describing glass stability and glass forming ability. We observed a strong influence of the film thickness on the latter, while the former is not affected by 1D confinement. Further experiments permitted us to highlight key structural morphology features giving insights to our ellipsometric results via a physical picture based on the changes in the free volume content in proximity of the supporting interfaces. PMID:26086889

  5. Fingering in Confined Elastic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John; Mahadevan, L.; Wei, Z.; Saintyves, Baudouin; Bouchaud, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Fingering has recently been observed in soft highly elastic layers that are confined between and bonded to two rigid bodies. In one case an injected fluid invades the layer in finger-like protrusions at the layer's perimeter, a solid analogue of Saffman-Taylor viscous fingering. In a second case, separation of the rigid bodies (with maintained adhesion to the layer) leads air to the formation of similar fingers at the layer's perimeter. In both cases the finger formation is reversible: if the fluid is removed or the separation reduced, the fingers vanish. In this talk I will discuss a theoretical model for such elastic fingers that shows that the origin of the fingers is large-strain geometric non-linearity in the elasticity of soft solids. Our simplified elastic model unifies the two types of fingering and accurately estimates the thresholds and wavelengths of the fingers.

  6. A simple model of a vesicle drop in a confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owczarek, A. L.; Prellberg, T.

    2010-08-01

    We present the exact solution of a two-dimensional directed walk model of a drop, or half-vesicle, confined between two walls, and attached to one wall. This model is also a generalization of a polymer model of steric stabilization recently investigated. We explore the competition between a sticky potential on the two walls and the effect of a pressure-like term in the system. We show that a negative pressure ensures the drop/polymer is unaffected by confinement when the walls are a macroscopic distance apart.

  7. Plasmons under extreme dimensional confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitering, Hanno

    2012-02-01

    In our studies, we explore how surface and bulk plasmons emerge under extreme dimensional confinement, i.e., dimensions that are orders of magnitude smaller than those employed in `nanoplasmonics'. Atomically-smooth ultrathin Mg films were epitaxially grown on Si(111), allowing for atomically-precise tuning of the plasmon response.ootnotetextM.M. "Ozer, E.J. Moon, A.G. Eguiluz, and H.H. Weitering, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 197601 (2011). While the single-particle states in these 3-12 monolayer (ML) thick films consist of a series of two-dimensional subbands, the bulk-plasmon response is like that of a thin slice carved from bulk Mg subject to quantum-mechanical boundary conditions. Remarkably, this bulk-like behavior persists all the way down to 3 ML. In the 3-12 ML thickness range, bulk loss spectra are dominated by the n=1 and n=2 normal modes, consistent with the excitation of plasmons involving quantized electronic subbands. The collective response of the thinnest films is furthermore characterized by a thickness-dependent spectral weight transfer from the high-energy collective modes to the low-energy single-particle excitations, until the bulk plasmon ceases to exist below 3 ML. Surface- and multipole plasmon modes even persist down to 2 ML. These results are striking manifestations of the role of quantum confinement on plasmon resonances in precisely controlled nanostructures. They furthermore suggest the intriguing possibility of tuning resonant plasmon frequencies via precise dimensional control.

  8. Structure and solvation forces in confined films: Linear and branched alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Luedtke, W.D.; Landman, U.

    1997-03-01

    Equilibrium structures, solvation forces, and conformational dynamics of thin confined films of n-hexadecane and squalane are investigated using a new grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics method for simulations of confined liquids. The method combines constant pressure simulations with a computational cell containing solid surfaces and both bulk and confined liquid regions in equilibrium with each other. Layered density oscillations in the confined films are found for various widths of the confining gap. The solvation force oscillations as a function of the gap width for the straight chain n-hexadecane liquid are more pronounced exhibiting attractive and repulsive regions, while for the branched alkane the solvation forces are mostly repulsive, with the development of shallow local attractive regions for small values of the gap width. Furthermore, the nature of the transitions between well-formed layered configurations is different in the two systems. The n-hexadecane film exhibits solid-like characteristics portrayed by step-like variations in the number of confined segments occurring in response to a small decrease in the gap width, starting from well-layered states of the film; the behavior of the squalane film is liquid-like, exhibiting a monotonic continuous decrease in the number of confined segments as the gap width is decreased. These characteristics are correlated with structural properties of the confined films which, for n-hexadecane, exhibit enhanced layered ordering and in-plane ordered molecular arrangements, as well as with the relatively high tendency for interlayer molecular interdigitation in the squalane films. Reduced conformational (trans-guache) transition rates in the confined films, compared to their bulk values, are found, and their oscillatory dependence on the degree of confinement is analyzed, showing smaller transition rates for the well-formed layered states of the films. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Stabilization and Confinement Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Fowler, T K; Bulmer, R; Byers, J; Hua, D; Tung, L

    2004-07-15

    The 'Kinetic Stabilizer' has been proposed as a means of MHD stabilizing an axisymmetric tandem mirror system. The K-S concept is based on theoretical studies by Ryutov, confirmed experimentally in the Gas Dynamic Trap experiment in Novosibirsk. In the K-S beams of ions are directed into the end of an 'expander' region outside the outer mirror of a tandem mirror. These ions, slowed, stagnated, and reflected as they move up the magnetic gradient, produce a low-density stabilizing plasma. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we have been conducting theoretical and computational studies of the K-S Tandem Mirror. These studies have employed a low-beta code written especially to analyze the beam injection/stabilization process, and a new code SYMTRAN (by Hua and Fowler) that solves the coupled radial and axial particle and energy transport in a K-S TM. Also, a 'legacy' MHD stability code, FLORA, has been upgraded and employed to benchmark the injection/stabilization code and to extend its results to high beta values. The FLORA code studies so far have confirmed the effectiveness of the K-S in stabilizing high-beta (40%) plasmas with stabilizer plasmas the peak pressures of which are several orders of magnitude smaller than those of the confined plasma. Also the SYMTRAN code has shown D-T plasma ignition from alpha particle energy deposition in T-M regimes with strong end plugging. Our studies have confirmed the viability of the K-S-T-M concept with respect to MHD stability and radial and axial confinement. We are continuing these studies in order to optimize the parameters and to examine means for the stabilization of possible residual instability modes, such as drift modes and 'trapped-particle' modes. These modes may in principle be controlled by tailoring the stabilizer plasma distribution and/or the radial potential distribution. In the paper the results to date of our studies are summarized and projected to scope out possible fusion-power versions of the K

  10. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Stabilization and Confinement Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.F.; Fowler, T.K.; Bulmer, R.; Byers, J.; Hua, D.; Tung, L.

    2005-01-15

    The 'Kinetic Stabilizer' has been proposed as a means of MHD stabilizing an axisymmetric tandem mirror system. The K-S concept is based on theoretical studies by Ryutov, confirmed experimentally in the Gas Dynamic Trap experiment in Novosibirsk. In the K-S beams of ions are directed into the end of an 'expander' region outside the outer mirror of a tandem mirror. These ions, slowed, stagnated, and reflected as they move up the magnetic gradient, produce a low-density stabilizing plasma.At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we have been conducting theoretical and computational studies of the K-S Tandem Mirror. These studies have employed a low-beta code written especially to analyze the beam injection/stabilization process,and a new code SYMTRAN (by Hua and Fowler)that solves the coupled radial and axial particle and energy transport in a K-S T-M. Also, a 'legacy' MHD stability code, FLORA, has been upgraded and employed to benchmark the injection/stabilization code and to extend its results to high beta values.The FLORA code studies so far have confirmed the effectiveness of the K-S in stabilizing high-beta (40%) plasmas with stabilizer plasmas the peak pressures of which are several orders of magnitude smaller than those of the confined plasma.Also the SYMTRAN code has shown D-T plasma ignition from alpha particle energy deposition in T-M regimes with strong end plugging.Our studies have confirmed the viability of the K-S T-M concept with respect to MHD stability and radial and axial confinement. We are continuing these studies in order to optimize the parameters and to examine means for the stabilization of possible residual instability modes, such as drift modes and 'trapped-particle' modes. These modes may in principle be controlled by tailoring the stabilizer plasma distribution and/or the radial potential distribution.In the paper the results to date of our studies are summarized and projected to scope out possible fusion-power versions of the K-S T-M.

  11. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the physiology of Manila mango.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ortiz, M A; De la Cruz-Medina, J; de Los Monteros, J J Espinosa; Oliart-Ros, R M; Rebolledo-Martinez, A; Ramírez, J A; García, H S

    2013-06-01

    Manila mangoes (Mangifera indica L.) have sensory characteristics that make them attractive for consumption as a fresh fruit. A large portion of the annual yield of this fruit is infested by the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens), adversely impacting the quality of the crop. Hence, it is necessary to develop economically viable postharvest treatments to reduce the damage caused by this insect. Currently, high hydrostatic pressures are used to guarantee the safety of many processed foods. The objective of this work was to assess the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on mangoes at their physiological maturity. High hydrostatic pressures were applied to mangoes at three levels: 50, 100 and 200 megapascals applied for four different time periods (0, 5, 10 and 20 min). Physiologically mature mangoes were more resistant to changes in response to the pressure of 50 MPa. Reduction of physiological activity by application of high hydrostatic pressure opens a new avenue for the research on treatments intended to enhance preservation of whole fresh fruit. PMID:23504511

  12. Equilibrium helical order in radially confined superfluid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiman, Joshua; Sauls, J. A.

    An exciting prediction of confined superfluid 3He is the presence of spontaneously broken translational symmetry, resulting in a superfluid phase that has a different translational symmetry than that of the confining geometry. Such phases have been described theoretically in films, cylinders, and ribbons. We predict an inhomogeneous superfluid phase with helical order that is energetically stable within cylindrical channels of radius comparable to the Cooper pair coherence length. By incorporating extensions to standard Ginzburg-Landau (GL) strong-coupling theory that accurately reproduce the bulk phase diagram at high pressures and allow tuneable boundary conditions, we find this new phase to be stable at both high and low pressures and favored by boundary conditions with strong pairbreaking. We present superfluid phase diagrams as functions of pressure, temperature, and channel radius showing the regions of stability for this ``spiral'' phase relative to those phases previously predicted for the channel. Transverse NMR frequency shifts are a possible experimental signature of this phase, and we present calculations of these shifts as functions of rf pulse tipping angle, field orientation, and temperature. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-1508730.

  13. Confinement and flow of microscopic defects in layered liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojaei-Zadeh, Shahab

    The term layered liquid applies to a broad range of materials containing anisotropic molecules that arrange themselves in parallel stacks. Examples are concentrated surfactant solutions, block copolymers, bio-membranes, liquid crystalline polymers, and liquid crystals. Due to the solid-like nature of these materials, microscopic defects form when their parallel layer structure is disturbed by external forces, surface interactions, or geometrical confinement. Unlike in solid crystals, defects formed here can flow and we show that the presence of defects changes the flow characteristics of these materials. In this work, we first introduce three different methods for using surface treatments to control the size and ordering of a particular class of defects known as focal conics: within closed PDMS microchannels, on PDMS surfaces covered with nanoscale cracks, and within ordered microcavities formed in PDMS films. We then examine the flow behavior of these defects in microchannels, using both surface tension differences and pressure gradients to drive the flow. A microfluidic network is designed and developed to enable more precise control over the pressure driven flow. Driving flow within this microfluidic network enables simultaneous visualization of the defect texture evolution and measurement of the pressure gradient-flow rate relationship. Our measurements show that the flow properties of layered liquids under confinement are different from their bulk, possibly due to the interaction of defects with each other and with the flow itself.

  14. The effects of confinement and temperature on the shock sensitivity of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, Garcia, F

    1998-08-17

    The effects of heavy steel confinement on the shock sensitivity of pressed solid high explosives heated to temperatures close to thermal explosion conditions were quantitatively measured. Cylindrical flyer plates accelerated by a 101 mm diameter gas gun impacted preheated explosive charges containing multiple embedded manganin pressure gauges. The high explosive compositions tested were LX-04-01 (85 wt.% HMX and 15 wt.% Viton A) heated to 170 ° C and LX-17 (92.5 wt.% TATB and 7.5 wt.% Kel-F) heated to 250 ° C. Ignition and Growth reactive flow models for heated, heavily confined LX-04-01 and LX-17 were formulated based on the measured pressure histories. LX-17 at 250 ° C is considerably less shock sensitive when confined by steel than when confined by aluminum or unconfined. LX-04-01 at 170 ° C is only slightly less shock sensitive when confined by steel than when it is unconfined. The confinement effect is smaller in LX-04-01, because HMX particle growth i s much less than that of TATB.

  15. Pressure sensitivity of low permeability sandstones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilmer, N.H.; Morrow, N.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed core analysis has been carried out on 32 tight sandstones with permeabilities ranging over four orders of magnitude (0.0002 to 4.8 mD at 5000 psi confining pressure). Relationships between gas permeability and net confining pressure were measured for cycles of loading and unloading. For some samples, permeabilities were measured both along and across bedding planes. Large variations in stress sensitivity of permeability were observed from one sample to another. The ratio of permeability at a nominal confining pressure of 500 psi to that at 5000 psi was used to define a stress sensitivity ratio. For a given sample, confining pressure vs permeability followed a linear log-log relationship, the slope of which provided an index of pressure sensitivity. This index, as obtained for first unloading data, was used in testing relationships between stress sensitivity and other measured rock properties. Pressure sensitivity tended to increase with increase in carbonate content and depth, and with decrease in porosity, permeability and sodium feldspar. However, scatter in these relationships increased as permeability decreased. Tests for correlations between pressure sensitivity and various linear combinations of variables are reported. Details of pore structure related to diagenetic changes appears to be of much greater significance to pressure sensitivity than mineral composition. ?? 1987.

  16. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Water's behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (αp) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated αp peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  17. Computational modeling of human head under blast in confined and open spaces: primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, A; Salimi Jazi, M; Karami, G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a computational modeling for biomechanical analysis of primary blast injuries is presented. The responses of the brain in terms of mechanical parameters under different blast spaces including open, semi-confined, and confined environments are studied. In the study, the effect of direct and indirect blast waves from the neighboring walls in the confined environments will be taken into consideration. A 50th percentile finite element head model is exposed to blast waves of different intensities. In the open space, the head experiences a sudden intracranial pressure (ICP) change, which vanishes in a matter of a few milliseconds. The situation is similar in semi-confined space, but in the confined space, the reflections from the walls will create a number of subsequent peaks in ICP with a longer duration. The analysis procedure is based on a simultaneous interaction simulation of the deformable head and its components with the blast wave propagations. It is concluded that compared with the open and semi-confined space settings, the walls in the confined space scenario enhance the risk of primary blast injuries considerably because of indirect blast waves transferring a larger amount of damaging energy to the head. PMID:23996897

  18. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    The behavior of water near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. Moreover, by monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (alpha(p)) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. Additionally, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated ap peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  19. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    The behavior of water near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. Moreover, by monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed thatmore » the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (alpha(p)) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. Additionally, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated ap peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.« less

  20. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    Water’s behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub p}) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated α{sub p} peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  1. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Water's behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (αp) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated αp peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface. PMID:26342380

  2. A numerical and experimental study of confined swirling jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Mcdonell, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of a confined strong swirling flow is presented. Detailed velocity measurements are made using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) technique. Computations are performed using a differential second-moment (DSM) closure. The effect of inlet dissipation rate on calculated mean and turbulence fields is investigated. Various model constants are employed in the pressure-strain model to demonstrate their influences on the predicted results. Finally, comparison of the DSM calculations with the algebraic second-monent (ASM) closure results shows that the DSM is better suited for complex swirling flow analysis.

  3. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  4. Sintering of nanocrystalline silicon carbide in plasma pressure compaction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothara, Manish G.

    Nanostructured ceramics offer significant improvements in properties over the corresponding materials with grain sizes on the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Silicon carbide (SiC) is an important structural ceramic whose properties can potentially be enhanced due to nanoscale microstructures. It has been suggested that SiC samples with grain sizes on the order of a few hundred nanometers can result in significant improvements in flexural strength, chemical resistance, thermal stability and electrical resistivity. To realize these properties, it is important to be able to sinter SiC powder to full density while avoiding exaggerated grain growth. Hence, sintering behavior and microstructural evolution in nanocrystalline SiC has been investigated in this study. Nanocrystalline SiC samples (average size ˜ 70 nm) were fabricated in a plasma pressure compaction (P2C) system, a novel sintering technique. Master Sintering Curve (MSC) analysis was used to correlate the densification in SiC to the amount of work put into the system. MSC as a function of pressure for were generated. The activation energy, Q, for sintering was determined for three different pressures of 10, 30 and 50 MPa and found to be 1666, 1034 and 1162 kJ/mol, respectively. The variation of Q with pressure was reasoned to be an effect of various competing mechanisms. Taguchi analysis was used to study the effect of sintering parameters such as time, temperature, pressure and heating rate on the properties of the sintered part such as density, hardness and fracture toughness. Optimal operating conditions were determined and it was also found that each parameter affected the final properties almost equally. Complete densification of SiC samples was achieved at 1600°C which is ˜150°C lower than reported in the literature for other sintering techniques.

  5. Electron Energy Confinement For HHFW Heating and Current Drive Phasing on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.C.; Bernabei, S.; Biewer, T.; LeBlanc, B.; Phillips, C.K.; Wilson, J.R.; Stutman, D.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.W.

    2005-09-26

    Thomson scattering laser pulses are synchronized relative to modulated HHFW power to permit evaluation of the electron energy confinement time during and following HHFW pulses for both heating and current drive antenna phasing. Profile changes resulting from instabilities require that the total electron stored energy, evaluated by integrating the midplane electron pressure Pe(R) over the magnetic surfaces prescribed by EFIT analysis, be used to derive the electron energy confinement time. Core confinement is reduced during a sawtooth instability but, although the electron energy is distributed outward by the sawtooth, the bulk electron energy confinement time is essentially unaffected. The radial deposition of energy into the electrons is noticeably more peaked for current drive phasing (longer wavelength excitation) relative to that for heating phasing (shorter wavelength excitation) as is expected theoretically. However, the power delivered to the core plasma is reduced considerably for the current drive phasing, indicating that surface/peripheral damping processes play a more important role for this case.

  6. Structural bistability in quasi-hard-discs under adaptive circular confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian; Oguz, Erdal C.; Bartlett, Paul; Loewen, Hartmut; Royall, C. Patrick

    2014-03-01

    The behaviour of materials under spatial confinement is dramatically different from that in the bulk. The exact nature of behavioural modification in confined systems is strongly dependent on the boundary enclosing the system with soft walls inducing different phenomena than similar hard walls. Here we present a quasi-two-dimensional colloidal model system confined by an adaptive circular boundary defined using holographic optical tweezers. The adaptive boundary is deformable, enabling mechanical measurements of pressure and leading to the observation of a novel structural bistability between concentric particle layering and locally hexagonal configurations at high density. These findings are reproduced in analogous Monte Carlo simulations. Additionally, shearing the confined system drives the this bistability resulting in the observation of a novel oscillatory state characterised by periodically self-similar structural organisation. Under varying conditions, both shear melted and rigid-body-like flow behaviour is observed.

  7. Macromolecular crowding induced elongation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ce; Shao, Pei Ge; van Kan, Jeroen A.; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of dextran nanoparticles on the conformation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel was investigated with fluorescence microscopy. It was observed that the DNA molecules elongate and eventually condense into a compact form with increasing volume fraction of the crowding agent. Under crowded conditions, the channel diameter is effectively reduced, which is interpreted in terms of depletion in DNA segment density in the interfacial region next to the channel wall. Confinement in a nanochannel also facilitates compaction with a neutral crowding agent at low ionic strength. The threshold volume fraction for condensation is proportional to the size of the nanoparticle, due to depletion induced attraction between DNA segments. We found that the effect of crowding is not only related to the colligative properties of the agent and that confinement is also important. It is the interplay between anisotropic confinement and osmotic pressure which gives the elongated conformation and the possibility for condensation at low ionic strength. PMID:19805352

  8. Velocity shear stabilization of centrifugally confined plasma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y M; Hassam, A B

    2001-12-01

    A magnetized, centrifugally confined plasma is subjected to a 3D MHD stability test. Ordinarily, the system is expected to be grossly unstable to "flute" interchanges of field lines. Numerical simulation shows though that the system is stable on account of velocity shear. This allows consideration of a magnetically confined plasma for thermonuclear fusion that has a particularly simple coil configuration. PMID:11736455

  9. Climate conditions in bedded confinement buildings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confinement buildings are utilized for finishing cattle to allow more efficient collection of animal waste and to buffer animals against adverse climatic conditions. Environmental data were obtained from a 29 m wide x 318 m long bedded confinement building with the long axis oriented east to west. T...

  10. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  11. Effects of confinement on anomalies and phase transitions of core-softened fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.; Bordin, José Rafael

    2015-04-07

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study how the confinement affects the dynamic, thermodynamic, and structural properties of a confined anomalous fluid. The fluid is modeled using an effective pair potential derived from the ST4 atomistic model for water. This system exhibits density, structural, and dynamical anomalies, and the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points similar to the quantities observed in bulk water. The confinement is modeled both by smooth and structured walls. The temperatures of extreme density and diffusion for the confined fluid show a shift to lower values while the pressures move to higher amounts for both smooth and structured confinements. In the case of smooth walls, the critical points and the limit between fluid and amorphous phases show a non-monotonic change in the temperatures and pressures when the nanopore size is increase. In the case of structured walls, the pressures and temperatures of the critical points varies monotonically with the pore size. Our results are explained on basis of the competition between the different length scales of the fluid and the wall-fluid interaction.

  12. Inertial Confinement Fusion Materials Science

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A V

    2004-06-01

    Demonstration of thermonuclear ignition and gain on a laboratory scale is one of science's grand challenges. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is committed to achieving inertial confinement fusion (ICF) by 2010. Success in this endeavor depends on four elements: the laser driver performance, target design, experimental diagnostics performance, and target fabrication and target materials performance. This article discusses the current state of target fabrication and target materials performance. The first three elements will only be discussed insofar as they relate to target fabrication specifications and target materials performance. Excellent reviews of the physics of ICF are given by Lindl [Lindl 1998] and Lindl et al. [Lindl 2004]. To achieve conditions under which inertial confinement is sufficient to achieve thermonuclear burn, an imploded fuel capsule is compressed to conditions of high density and temperature. In the laboratory a driver is required to impart energy to the capsule to effect an implosion. There are three drivers currently being considered for ICF in the laboratory: high-powered lasers, accelerated heavy ions, and x rays resulting from pulsed power machines. Of these, high-powered lasers are the most developed, provide the most symmetric drive, and provide the most energy. Laser drive operates in two configurations. The first is direct drive where the laser energy impinges directly on the ICF capsule and drives the implosion. The second is indirect drive, where the energy from the laser is first absorbed in a high-Z enclosure or hohlraum surrounding the capsule, and the resulting x-rays emitted by the hohlraum material drives the implosion. Using direct drive the laser beam energy is absorbed by the electrons in the outer corona of the target. The electrons transport the energy to the denser shell region to provide the ablation and the resulting implosion. Laser direct drive is generally less efficient and more hydrodynamically unstable than

  13. Protein Folding in Confined and Crowded Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Confinement and crowding are two major factors that can potentially impact protein folding in cellular environments. Theories based on considerations of excluded volumes predict disparate effects on protein folding stability for confinement and crowding: confinement can stabilize proteins by over 10kBT but crowding has a very modest effect on stability. On the other hand, confinement and crowding are both predicted to favor conformations of the unfolded state which are compact, and consequently may increase the folding rate. These predictions are largely borne out by experimental studies of protein folding under confined and crowded conditions in the test tube. Protein folding in cellular environments is further complicated by interactions with surrounding surfaces and other factors. Concerted theoretical modeling and test-tube and in vivo experiments promise to elucidate the complexity of protein folding in cellular environments. PMID:17719556

  14. Boundaries Matter for Confined Colloidal Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary L.; Edmond, Kazem V.; Weeks, Eric R.

    2012-02-01

    We confine dense colloidal suspensions within emulsion droplets to examine how confinement and properties of the confining medium affect the colloidal glass transition. Samples are imaged via fast confocal microscopy. By observing a wide range of droplet sizes and varying the viscosity of the external continuous phase, we separate finite size and boundary effects on particle motions within the droplet. Suspensions are composed of binary PMMA spheres in organic solvents while the external phases are simple mixtures of water and glycerol. In analogy with molecular super-cooled liquids and thin-film polymers, we find that confinement effects in colloidal systems are not merely functions of the finite size of the system, but are strongly dependent on the viscosity of the confining medium and interactions between particles and the interface of the two phases.

  15. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  16. Universal behavior of hydrogels confined to narrow capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Sarıyer, Ozan S.; Ramachandran, Arun; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Flow of soft matter objects through one-dimensional environments is important in industrial, biological and biomedical systems. Establishing the underlying principles of the behavior of soft matter in confinement can shed light on its performance in many man-made and biological systems. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study of translocation of micrometer-size hydrogels (microgels) through microfluidic channels with a diameter smaller than an unperturbed microgel size. For microgels with different dimensions and mechanical properties, under a range of applied pressures, we established the universal principles of microgel entrance and passage through microchannels with different geometries, as well as the reduction in microgel volume in confinement. We also show a non-monotonic change in the flow rate of liquid through the constrained microgel, governed by its progressive confinement. The experimental results were in agreement with the theory developed for non-linear biaxial deformation of unentangled polymer gels. Our work has implications for a broad range of phenomena, including occlusion of blood vessels by thrombi and needle-assisted hydrogel injection in tissue engineering. PMID:26596468

  17. Universal behavior of hydrogels confined to narrow capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Sarıyer, Ozan S.; Ramachandran, Arun; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-11-01

    Flow of soft matter objects through one-dimensional environments is important in industrial, biological and biomedical systems. Establishing the underlying principles of the behavior of soft matter in confinement can shed light on its performance in many man-made and biological systems. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study of translocation of micrometer-size hydrogels (microgels) through microfluidic channels with a diameter smaller than an unperturbed microgel size. For microgels with different dimensions and mechanical properties, under a range of applied pressures, we established the universal principles of microgel entrance and passage through microchannels with different geometries, as well as the reduction in microgel volume in confinement. We also show a non-monotonic change in the flow rate of liquid through the constrained microgel, governed by its progressive confinement. The experimental results were in agreement with the theory developed for non-linear biaxial deformation of unentangled polymer gels. Our work has implications for a broad range of phenomena, including occlusion of blood vessels by thrombi and needle-assisted hydrogel injection in tissue engineering.

  18. Two flavor QCD and confinement

    SciTech Connect

    D'Elia, Massimo; Di Giacomo, Adriano; Pica, Claudio

    2005-12-01

    We argue that the order of the chiral transition for N{sub f}=2 is a sensitive probe of the QCD vacuum, in particular, of the mechanism of color confinement. A strategy is developed to investigate the order of the transition by use of finite size scaling analysis. An in-depth numerical investigation is performed with staggered fermions on lattices with L{sub t}=4 and L{sub s}=12, 16, 20, 24, 32 and quark masses am{sub q} ranging from 0.01335 to 0.307036. The specific heat and a number of susceptibilities are measured and compared with the expectations of an O(4) second order and of a first order phase transition. A detailed comparison with previous works, which all use similar techniques as ours, is performed. A second order transition in the O(4) and O(2) universality classes are incompatible with our data, which seem to prefer a first order transition. However we have L{sub t}=4 and unimproved action, so that a check with improved techniques (algorithm and action) and possibly larger L{sub t} will be needed to assess this issue on a firm basis.

  19. Cell Migration in Confined Environments

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration. PMID:24560508

  20. High-Beta, Improved Confinement Reversed-Field Pinch Plasmas at High Density

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, M.; Chapman, B. E.; Ahn, J. W.; Almagri, A.; Anderson, J.; Bonomo, F.; Brower, D. L.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Craig, D.; Hartog, D. J. Den; Deng, B.; Ding, W. X.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ennis, D.; Fiksel, G.; Foust, Charles R; Franz, P.; Goetz, J.; O'Connell, R,; Oliva, S.; Prager, S. C.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Yates, T.

    2008-01-01

    In Madison Symmetric Torus Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 1991 discharges where improved confinement is brought about by modification of the current profile, pellet injection has quadrupled the density, reaching ne=41019 m 3. Without pellet injection, the achievable density in improved confinement discharges had been limited by edge-resonant tearing instability. With pellet injection, the total beta has been increased to 26%, and the energy confinement time is comparable to that at low density. Pressure-driven local interchange and global tearing are predicted to be linearly unstable. Interchange has not yet been observed experimentally, but there is possible evidence of pressure-driven tearing, an instability usually driven by the current gradient in the reversed-field pinch.

  1. High-{beta}, improved confinement reversed-field pinch plasmas at high density

    SciTech Connect

    Wyman, M. D.; Chapman, B. E.; Ahn, J. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; Ennis, D. A.; Fiksel, G.; Gangadhara, S.; Goetz, J. A.; O'Connell, R.; Oliva, S. P.; Prager, S. C.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Brower, D. L.

    2008-01-15

    In Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] discharges where improved confinement is brought about by modification of the current profile, pellet injection has quadrupled the density, reaching n{sub e}=4x10{sup 19} m{sup -3}. Without pellet injection, the achievable density in improved confinement discharges had been limited by edge-resonant tearing instability. With pellet injection, the total beta has been increased to 26%, and the energy confinement time is comparable to that at low density. Pressure-driven local interchange and global tearing are predicted to be linearly unstable. Interchange has not yet been observed experimentally, but there is possible evidence of pressure-driven tearing, an instability usually driven by the current gradient in the reversed-field pinch.

  2. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.

    1997-01-01

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

  3. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1997-10-28

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

  4. Detecting the vulnerability of groundwater in semi-confined aquifers using barometric response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odling, N. E.; Perulero Serrano, R.; Hussein, M. E. A.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of barometric response functions (BRFs) for detecting the presence of fully penetrating, highly conductive bodies within aquifer confining layers that present potential pathways for contaminants is explored. BRFs are determined from borehole water level (WL) and barometric pressure (Bp) records. Past studies have shown that confining layer properties can be estimated from BRFs, providing a potential link between BRFs and the concept of groundwater vulnerability. Existing analytical models that predict the BRF from system properties assume homogeneity within the aquifer and its confining layer, conditions which are seldom satisfied in nature. The impact of partially and fully penetrating, high diffusivity heterogeneities within a confining layer (representing potential high flow pathways for contaminants) on the BRF is investigated through a suite of three-dimensional, transient numerical simulations of the confining layer-aquifer system. The results are interpreted through comparison with a modified pre-existing analytical model for the BRF. Comparison of numerically and analytically calculated BRFs reveals that the key effect of a localised, fully penetrating, high diffusivity heterogeneity within a low diffusivity confining layer is to reduce the BRF gain with only minor changes to the phase. This impact on the BRF decreases with increasing distance from the heterogeneity. The importance of heterogeneity size is secondary to distance from the borehole and partially penetrating heterogeneities affect the BRF to only a minor extent. Data from a study of the Chalk Aquifer (E. Yorkshire, England) which is semi-confined by heterogeneous glacial sediments display variations in BRFs which are qualitatively similar to those shown by the numerical results. It is suggested that the variation in BRFs estimated from borehole records across a semi-confined aquifer could be used to assess the degree of spatial continuity of low diffusivity lithologies within the

  5. Phase diagram of water confined in MCM-41 up to 700 MPa.

    PubMed

    Pajzderska, A; Bilski, P; Wąsicki, J

    2015-02-28

    On the basis of measurements of NMR signal intensity and T1 and T2(*) relaxation times as a function of temperature (290 K-170 K) and pressure (0.1 MPa-700 MPa), the p-T phase diagram was made for the sample containing water inside and outside MCM-41 pores of 1.81 nm in radius. The temperature of nucleation of water confined in nanopores under normal pressure was 230 K. With increasing pressure this temperature decreased to 200 K under 300 MPa, but with further increase in pressure it did not change. PMID:25725743

  6. Phase diagram of water confined in MCM-41 up to 700 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajzderska, A.; Bilski, P.; Wąsicki, J.

    2015-02-01

    On the basis of measurements of NMR signal intensity and T1 and T2* relaxation times as a function of temperature (290 K-170 K) and pressure (0.1 MPa-700 MPa), the p-T phase diagram was made for the sample containing water inside and outside MCM-41 pores of 1.81 nm in radius. The temperature of nucleation of water confined in nanopores under normal pressure was 230 K. With increasing pressure this temperature decreased to 200 K under 300 MPa, but with further increase in pressure it did not change.

  7. Transport properties of supercooled confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, F.; Branca, C.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Gonzalez-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Stanley, H. E.; Chen, S.-H.

    2008-07-01

    This article presents an overview of recent experiments performed on transport properties of water in the deeply supercooled region, a temperature region of fundamental importance in the science of water. We report data of nuclear magnetic resonance, quasi-elastic neutron scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, studying water confined in nanometer-scale environments. When contained within small pores, water does not crystallise, and can be supercooled well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature Th. On this basis it is possible to carry out a careful analysis of the well known thermodynamical anomalies of water. Studying the temperature and pressure dependencies of water dynamics, we show that the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis represents a reliable model for describing liquid water. In this model, water in the liquid state is a mixture of two different local structures, characterised by different densities, namely the low density liquid (LDL) and the high-density liquid (HDL). The LLPT line should terminate at a special transition point: a low-T liquid-liquid critical point. We discuss the following experimental findings on liquid water: (i) a crossover from non-Arrhenius behaviour at high T to Arrhenius behaviour at low T in transport parameters; (ii) a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation; (iii) the existence of a Widom line, which is the locus of points corresponding to maximum correlation length in the p-T phase diagram and which ends in the liquid-liquid critical point; (iv) the direct observation of the LDL phase; (v) a minimum in the density at approximately 70 K below the temperature of the density maximum. In our opinion these results represent the experimental proofs of the validity of the LLPT hypothesis.

  8. Density Limits in Toroidal Magnetic Confinement Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2001-10-01

    The density limit represents one of the fundamental operating boundaries for magnetic confinement devices - one with practical importance to the goal of fusion power. With fusion reactivity maximized at a plasma temperature on the order of 10 keV and a reaction rate scaling as n^2, an optimum density can be calculated which is not guaranteed to be achievable in any given device. Unlike operational limits for plasma current or pressure, the density limit cannot be explained by magneto-hydrodynamics alone. There is general agreement that the proximate cause for the disruptive limit in the tokamak is cooling of the plasma edge and subsequent current profile shrinkage. The edge cooling may be dominated by atomic physics processes or as suggested in recent experiments, by anomalous transport. A similar picture is emerging for the reversed field pinch (RFP), while the limit in stellarators is apparently due to loss of thermal equilibrium from radiation. Empirical scaling laws in which the maximum plasma density is proportional to the average current density have been fairly successful in predicting the limit for subsequent experiments. Surprisingly, the density limits found in tokamaks and RFPs are virtually identical. Currentless stellarators reach similar density limits, though the expression needs to be recast in terms of the rotational transform. While scaling laws have done a reasonable job in describing data from many recent experiments, they can only give hints at the underlying physics. Understanding the mechanism for the density limit is crucial for extrapolating machine performance into untested regimes and so far, a completely satisfactory theory has not emerged. It seems likely that robust, reliable predictions will only come from the development of a first-principles theory backed up by detailed experimental observations. The extensive work already accomplished and reviewed here should provide a solid basis for such development.

  9. Pattern formation in confined chemical gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, Anne; Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; Cartwright, Julyan

    2014-05-01

    Chemical gardens are plant-like mineral structures first described in the seventeenth century and popularly known from chemistry sets for children. They are classically grown in three-dimensional containers by placing a solid metal-salt seed into a silicate solution. When the metal salt starts dissolving in the silicate solution, a semi-permeable membrane forms by precipitation across which water is pumped by osmosis from the silicate solution into the metal salt solution, further dissolving the salt. Above a given pressure, the membrane breaks. The dissolved metal salt solution being generally less dense than the reservoir silicate solution, it rises as a buoyant jet through the broken membrane and further precipitates in contact with the silicate solution, producing a collection of mineral forms that resemble a garden. Such gardens are the subject of increased interest as a model system to understand pattern formation in sea-ice brinicles and hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, among others. All these self-organized precipitation structures at the interface between chemistry, fluid dynamics and mechanics share indeed common chemical, mechanical and electrical properties. In this framework, we study experimentally spatial patterns resulting from the growth of chemical gardens in confined quasi-two-dimensional (2D) geometries upon radial injection of a metallic salt solution into a silicate solution in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. We find a large variety of patterns including spirals, fingers, worms, filiform tubes, and flower-like patterns. By exploring the phase space of reactant concentrations and injection flow rates, we observe transitions between these spatio-temporal structures resulting from a coupling between the precipitation reaction, mechanical effects and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  10. Polyhydric alcohol protective effect on Rhizomucor miehei lipase deactivation enhanced by pressure and temperature treatment.

    PubMed

    Noël, Marilyne; Lozano, Pedro; Combes, Didier

    2005-10-01

    The influence of polyhydric alcohols (sorbitol, xylitol, erythritol, glycerol) on the thermal stability of Rhizomucor miehei lipase has been studied at high hydrostatic pressure (up to 500 MPa). In the absence of additives, a protective effect (PE) (the ratio between the residual activities determined at 480 MPa for the enzyme in the presence or absence of polyhydric alcohols) of low-applied pressures (from 50 MPa to 350 MPa) against thermal deactivations (at 50 degrees C and 55 degrees C) has been noticed. In the presence of additives, a strong correlation between PE and the total hydroxyl group concentration has been obtained, for the first time, under treatments of combining denaturing temperatures and high hydrostatic pressures. This relationship does not seem to be dependent on the nature polyhydric alcohols as the same effect could be observed with 1 M sorbitol and 2 M glycerol. This PE, against thermal and high pressure combined lipase deactivation, increases with polyhydric alcohol concentrations, and when temperature increases from 25 degrees C to 55 degrees C. PMID:16044285

  11. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples. PMID:22822404

  12. Integrated diagnostic analysis of inertial confinement fusion capsule performancea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerjan, Charles; Springer, Paul T.; Sepke, Scott M.

    2013-05-01

    A conceptual model is developed for typical inertial confinement fusion implosion conditions that integrates available diagnostic information to determine the stagnation properties of the interior fill and surrounding shell. Assuming pressure equilibrium at peak compression and invoking radiative and equation-of-state relations, the pressure, density, and electron temperature are obtained by optimized fitting of the experimental output to smooth, global functional forms. Typical observational data that may be used includes x-ray self-emission, directional neutron time-of-flight signals, neutron yield, high-resolution x-ray spectra, and radiographic images. This approach has been validated by comparison with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, producing semi-quantitative agreement. Model results implicate poor kinetic energy coupling to the hot core as the primary cause of the observed low thermonuclear burn yields.

  13. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  14. Review of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. G.

    The physics of inertial confinement fusion is reviewed. The trend to short-wavelength lasers is argued, and the distinction between direct and indirect (soft X-ray) drive is made. Key present issues include the non-linear growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities, the seeding of this instability by the initial laser imprint, the relevance of self-generated magnetic fields, and the importance of parametric instabilities (stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering) in gas-filled hohlraums. Experiments are reviewed which explore the R-T instability in both planar and converging geometry. The employment of various optical smoothing techniques is contrasted with the overcoating of the capsule by gold coated plastic foams to reduce considerably the imprint problem. The role of spontaneously generated magnetic fields in non-symmetric plasmas is discussed. Recent hohlraum compression results are presented together with gas bag targets which replicate the long-scale-length low density plasmas expected in NIF gas filled hohlraums. The onset of first Brillouin and then Raman scattering is observed. The fast ignitor scheme is a proposal to use an intense short pulse laser to drill a hole through the coronal plasma and then, with laser excited fast electrons, create a propagating thermonuclear spark in a dense, relatively cold laser-compressed target. Some preliminary results of laser hole drilling and 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations of this and the > 10^8 Gauss self-generated magnetic fields are presented. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described.

  15. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  16. Fluid-driven fingering instability of a confined elastic meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggins, John S.; Wei, Z.; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-05-01

    When a fluid is pumped into a cavity in a confined elastic layer, at a critical pressure, destabilizing fingers of fluid invade the elastic solid along its meniscus (Saintyves B. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 111 (2013) 047801). These fingers occur without fracture or loss of adhesion and are reversible, disappearing when the pressure is decreased. We develop an asymptotic theory of pressurized highly elastic layers trapped between rigid bodies in both rectilinear and circular geometries, with predictions for the critical fluid pressure for fingering, and the finger wavelength. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations of this elastic interfacial instability in a radial geometry. Our theory also shows that, perhaps surprisingly, this lateral-pressure-driven instability is analogous to a transverse-displacement-driven instability of the elastic layer. We verify these predictions by using non-linear finite-element simulations on the two systems which show that in both cases the fingering transition is first order (sudden) and hence has a region of bistability.

  17. High-pressure mechanical instability in rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.; Brace, W.F.

    1969-01-01

    At a confining pressure of a few kilobars, deformation of many sedimentary rocks, altered mafic rocks, porous volcanic rocks, and sand is ductile, in that instabilities leading to audible elastic shocks are absent. At pressures of 7 to 10 kilobars, however, unstable faulting and stick-slip in certain of these rocks was observed. This high pressure-low temperature instability might be responsible for earthquakes in deeply buried sedimentary or volcanic sequences.

  18. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically. PMID:26465512

  19. DNA Partitioning in Confining Nanofluidic Slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenier, Madeline; Levy, Stephen

    We measure the partitioning of double stranded DNA molecules in moderately and strongly confining nanofluidic slit-like structures. Using fluorescent microscopy, the free energy penalty of confinement is inferred by comparing the concentration of DNA molecules in adjoining slits of different depths. These depths range in size from several persistence lengths to the DNA molecule's radius of gyration. The partition coefficient is determined as a function of the slit depth, DNA contour length, and DNA topology. We compare our results to theory and Monte Carlo simulations that predict the loss of free energy for ideal and semiflexible excluded volume polymers confined between parallel plates.

  20. Propagating confined states in phase dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Helmut R.; Deissler, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical treatment is given to the possibility of the existence of propagating confined states in the nonlinear phase equation by generalizing stationary confined states. The nonlinear phase equation is set forth for the case of propagating patterns with long wavelengths and low-frequency modulation. A large range of parameter values is shown to exist for propagating confined states which have spatially localized regions which travel on a background with unique wavelengths. The theoretical phenomena are shown to correspond to such physical systems as spirals in Taylor instabilities, traveling waves in convective systems, and slot-convection phenomena for binary fluid mixtures.

  1. Confinement of translated field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W. T.; Chrien, R. E.; Klingner, P. L.; McKenna, K. F.; Rej, D. J.; Sherwood, E. G.; Siemon, R. E.

    1986-03-01

    The confinement properties of translating field-reversed configurations (FRC) in the FRX-C/T device [Phys. Fluids 29, (1986)] are analyzed and compared to previous data without translation and to available theory. Translation dynamics do not appear to appreciably modify the FRC confinement. Some empirical scaling laws with respect to various plasma parameters are extracted from the data. These are qualitatively similar to those obtained in the TRX-1 device [Phys. Fluids 28, 888 (1985)] without translation and with a different formation method. Translation with a static gas fill offers new opportunities such as improved particle confinement or refueling of the FRC particle inventory.

  2. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  3. Virial pressure in systems of spherical active Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Roland G; Wysocki, Adam; Gompper, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    The pressure of suspensions of self-propelled objects is studied theoretically and by simulation of spherical active Brownian particles (ABPs). We show that for certain geometries, the mechanical pressure as force/area of confined systems can be equally expressed by bulk properties, which implies the existence of a nonequilibrium equation of state. Exploiting the virial theorem, we derive expressions for the pressure of ABPs confined by solid walls or exposed to periodic boundary conditions. In both cases, the pressure comprises three contributions: the ideal-gas pressure due to white-noise random forces, an activity-induced pressure ("swim pressure"), which can be expressed in terms of a product of the bare and a mean effective particle velocity, and the contribution by interparticle forces. We find that the pressure of spherical ABPs in confined systems explicitly depends on the presence of the confining walls and the particle-wall interactions, which has no correspondence in systems with periodic boundary conditions. Our simulations of three-dimensional ABPs in systems with periodic boundary conditions reveal a pressure-concentration dependence that becomes increasingly nonmonotonic with increasing activity. Above a critical activity and ABP concentration, a phase transition occurs, which is reflected in a rapid and steep change of the pressure. We present and discuss the pressure for various activities and analyse the contributions of the individual pressure components. PMID:26221908

  4. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Erin; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume is a rich, largely unexplored problem, with applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. We report simulation results for dense clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to N = 60 constituent particles. We discuss similarities between clusters in terms of symmetry, a connection to spherical codes, and generally the interplay between isotropic geometrical confinement and anisotropic particle shape. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the problem of packing in confinement. E.T. acknowledges support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1256260.

  5. Anisotropic de Gennes Narrowing in Confined Fluids.

    PubMed

    Nygård, Kim; Buitenhuis, Johan; Kagias, Matias; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zontone, Federico; Chushkin, Yuriy

    2016-04-22

    The collective diffusion of dense fluids in spatial confinement is studied by combining high-energy (21 keV) x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering from colloid-filled microfluidic channels. We find the structural relaxation in confinement to be slower compared to the bulk. The collective dynamics is wave vector dependent, akin to the de Gennes narrowing typically observed in bulk fluids. However, in stark contrast to the bulk, the structure factor and de Gennes narrowing in confinement are anisotropic. These experimental observations are essential in order to develop a microscopic theoretical description of collective diffusion of dense fluids in confined geometries. PMID:27152823

  6. Diblock Copolymers under Nano-Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Dong; Yin, Yuhua; Wang, Qiang

    2009-03-01

    Nano-confinement strongly affects and can thus be used to control the self-assembled morphology of block copolymers. Understanding such effects is of both fundamental and practical interest. In this work, we use real-space self-consistent field calculations with high accuracy to study the self-assembled morphology of diblock copolymers (DBC) under nano-confinement for several systems, including 1D lamellae-forming DBC confined between two homogeneous and parallel surfaces, in nano-pores, and on topologically patterned substrates; 2D cylinder-forming DBC on chemically strip-patterned substrates; and 3D gyroid- forming DBC confined between two homogeneous and parallel surfaces. The stable phases are identified through free-energy comparison, and our SCF results are compared with available experiments and Monte Carlo simulations in each case.

  7. Longitudinal response of confined semiflexible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüroff, Florian; Obermayer, Benedikt; Frey, Erwin

    2011-02-01

    The longitudinal response of single semiflexible polymers to sudden changes in externally applied forces is known to be controlled by the propagation and relaxation of backbone tension. Under many experimental circumstances, realized, for example, in nanofluidic devices or in polymeric networks or solutions, these polymers are effectively confined in a channel- or tubelike geometry. By means of heuristic scaling laws and rigorous analytical theory, we analyze the tension dynamics of confined semiflexible polymers for various generic experimental setups. It turns out that in contrast to the well-known linear response, the influence of confinement on the nonlinear dynamics can largely be described as that of an effective prestress. We also study the free relaxation of an initially confined chain, finding a surprising superlinear ~t9/8 growth law for the change in end-to-end distance at short times.

  8. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  9. Human Adaptation To Isolated And Confined Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary W.; Stokols, Daniel; Carrere, Sna Sybil

    1992-01-01

    Data from Antarctic research station analyzed. Report describes study of physiology and psychology of humans in isolated and confined environment. Suggests ways in which such environments made more acceptable to human inhabitants.

  10. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  11. Speeding up of sedimentation under confinement.

    PubMed

    Heitkam, S; Yoshitake, Y; Toquet, F; Langevin, D; Salonen, A

    2013-04-26

    We show an increase of the sedimentation velocity as small particles are confined in circular capillaries. In general, confinement slows down sedimentation. But, we show that at low Reynolds numbers and in 1D confinement this is not the case. Particle sedimentation velocity is not homogeneous, which can lead to the formation of structures. These structures are enhanced and stabilized in the presence of walls and in the absence of other dissipative mechanisms. As a consequence, it is possible to achieve sedimentation velocities that even exceed the Stokes velocity. The segregation at critical capillary diameters has been directly observed using a large scale model. These simple experiments offer a new insight into the old problem of sedimentation under confinement. PMID:23679787

  12. The Physics Basis of ITER Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.

    2009-02-19

    ITER will be the first fusion reactor and the 50 year old dream of fusion scientists will become reality. The quality of magnetic confinement will decide about the success of ITER, directly in the form of the confinement time and indirectly because it decides about the plasma parameters and the fluxes, which cross the separatrix and have to be handled externally by technical means. This lecture portrays some of the basic principles which govern plasma confinement, uses dimensionless scaling to set the limits for the predictions for ITER, an approach which also shows the limitations of the predictions, and describes briefly the major characteristics and physics behind the H-mode--the preferred confinement regime of ITER.

  13. Experimental deformation of polycrystalline H2O ice at high pressure and low temperature - Preliminary results. [implications for Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Heard, H. C.; Kirby, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary study is carried out of involving 70 constant strain deformation tests on pure polycrystalline H2O ice under conditions covering most of the stability field of ice I sub h. Brittle failure of I sub h is found to be promoted by lower P, lower T, and higher strain rates. Ductile flow is found to be promoted by higher P, higher T, and lower strain rates. The brittle failure of ice I sub h is found to be most unusual. The fracture strength is a positive function of P only below 50 MPa. At pressures greater than this, the fracture strength is independent of P, and the fracture plane lies approximately 45 deg from the load axis. It is believed that existing extrapolation based on existing experimental data to Ganymede and Callisto may be badly in error.

  14. Programmed environment management of confined microsocieties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emurian, Henry H.

    1988-01-01

    A programmed environment is described that assists the implementation and management of schedules governing access to all resources and information potentially available to members of a confined microsociety. Living and work schedules are presented that were designed to build individual and group performance repertoires in support of study objectives and sustained adaptation by participants. A variety of measurement requirements can be programmed and standardized to assure continuous assessment of the status and health of a confined microsociety.

  15. Quark propagators in confinement and deconfinement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Masatoshi; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kouno, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Saito, Takuya

    2010-05-01

    We study quark propagators near the confinement/deconfinement phase transition temperature in quenched-lattice simulation of QCD. We find that there is no qualitative change for the quark propagators in both phases. In the confinement phase, those effective quark masses in units of the critical temperature behave as a constant as a function of the temperature, while above the critical temperature, the value of the effective quark mass drops to circa half value.

  16. Monotonic and cyclic bond behavior of confined concrete using NiTiNb SMA wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Chung, Young-Soo; Kim, Yeon-Wook; Kim, Joo-Woo

    2011-07-01

    This study conducts bond tests of reinforced concrete confined by shape memory alloy (SMA) wires which provide active and passive confinement of concrete. This study uses NiTiNb SMA which usually shows wide temperature hysteresis; this is a good advantage for the application of shape memory effects. The aims of this study are to investigate the behavior of SMA wire under residual stress and the performance of SMA wire jackets in improving bond behavior through monotonic-loading tests. This study also conducts cyclic bond tests and analyzes cyclic bond behavior. The use of SMA wire jackets transfers the bond failure from splitting to pull-out mode and satisfactorily increases bond strength and ductile behavior. The active confinement provided by the SMA plays a major role in providing external pressure on the concrete because the developed passive confinement is much smaller than the active confinement. For cyclic behavior, slip and circumferential strain are recovered more with larger bond stress. This recovery of slip and circumferential strain are mainly due to the external pressure of the SMA wires since cracked concrete cannot provide any elastic recovery.

  17. Fast particle confinement with optimized coil currents in the W7-X stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drevlak, M.; Geiger, J.; Helander, P.; Turkin, Y.

    2014-07-01

    One of the principal goals of the W7-X stellarator is to demonstrate good confinement of energetic ions at finite β. This confinement, however, is sensitive to the magnetic field configuration and is thus vulnerable to design modifications of the coil geometry. The collisionless drift orbit losses for 60 keV protons in W7-X are studied using the ANTS code. Particles in this energy range will be produced by the neutral beam injection (NBI) system being constructed for W7-X, and are particularly important because protons at this energy accurately mimick the behaviour of 3.5 MeV α-particles in a HELIAS reactor. To investigate the possibility of improved fast particle confinement, several approaches to adjust the coil currents (5 main field coil currents +2 auxiliary coil currents) were explored. These strategies include simple rules of thumb as well as computational optimization of various properties of the magnetic field. It is shown that significant improvement of collisionless fast particle confinement can be achieved in W7-X for particle populations similar to α particles produced in fusion reactions. Nevertheless, the experimental goal of demonstrating confinement improvement with rising plasma pressure using an NBI-generated population appears to be difficult based on optimization of the coil currents only. The principal reason for this difficulty is that the NBI deposition profile is broader than the region of good fast-ion confinement around the magnetic axis.

  18. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  19. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body’s organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both ...

  20. Bifurcated equilibria in centrifugally confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, I.; Teodorescu, C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Hassam, A. B.; Clary, R.; Ellis, R.; Lunsford, R.

    2008-12-15

    A bifurcation theory and associated computational model are developed to account for abrupt transitions observed recently on the Maryland Centrifugal eXperiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al. Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)], a supersonically rotating magnetized plasma that relies on centrifugal forces to prevent thermal expansion of plasma along the magnetic field. The observed transitions are from a well-confined, high-rotation state (HR-mode) to a lower-rotation, lesser-confined state (O-mode). A two-dimensional time-dependent magnetohydrodynamics code is used to simulate the dynamical equilibrium states of the MCX configuration. In addition to the expected viscous drag on the core plasma rotation, a momentum loss term is added that models the friction of plasma on the enhanced level of neutrals expected in the vicinity of the insulators at the throats of the magnetic mirror geometry. At small values of the external rotation drive, the plasma is not well-centrifugally confined and hence experiences the drag from near the insulators. Beyond a critical value of the external drive, the system makes an abrupt transition to a well-centrifugally confined state in which the plasma has pulled away from the end insulator plates; more effective centrifugal confinement lowers the plasma mass near the insulators allowing runaway increases in the rotation speed. The well-confined steady state is reached when the external drive is balanced by only the viscosity of the core plasma. A clear hysteresis phenomenon is shown.

  1. Spin-Orbit Activated Confinement Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, David; Manson, Steven; Deshmukh, Pranawa

    2016-05-01

    At high enough Z relativistic effects become important contributors to even the qualitative nature of atomic properties. This is likely to be true for confined atoms as well. One relativistic effect of interest is the spin-orbit activated interchannel coupling of a pair of spin-orbit doublet channels. This interaction is possible owing to the spin-orbit interaction breaking the degenerancy among the electrons of a subshell allowing, for example, the 5p3/2 and 5p1/2 subshells of mercury (Z = 80) and the 6p3/2 and 6p1/2 of radon (Z = 86), to interact. To explore the effect confinement has on spin-orbit activated interchannel coupling, a theoretical study of the 5p subshell of mercury and the 6p subshell of radon both confined in a C60 cage has been performed using the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA) methodology. The effects of the C60 potential modeled by a static spherical well which is reasonable in the energy region well above the C60 plasmons. It is found in the photoionization cross sections of the 5p3/2 of confined mercury and the 6p3/2 of confined radon an extra confinement resonance due to spin-orbit activated interchannel coupling with the respective np1/2 photoionization channels.

  2. First Observation of the High Field Side Sawtooth Crash and Heat Transfer during Driven Reconnection Processes in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HK; Luhmann, NC; Donne, AJH; Classen, IGJ; Domier, CW; Mazzucato, E; Munsat, T; van de Pol, MJ; Xia, Z

    2005-12-01

    High resolution (temporal and spatial), two-dimensional images of electron temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations were employed to study driven reconnection processes in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. The combination of kink and local pressure driven instabilities leads to an "X-point" reconnection process that is localized in the toroidal and poloidal planes. The reconnection is not always confined to the magnetic surfaces with minimum energy. The heat transport process from the core is demonstrated to be highly collective rather than stochastic.

  3. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation in serpentine-water and talc-water systems from 250 to 450 °C, 50 MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccocia, Peter J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation factors in the talc–water and serpentine–water systems have been determined by laboratory experiment from 250 to 450 °C at 50 MPa using the partial exchange technique. Talc was synthesized from brucite + quartz, resulting in nearly 100% exchange during reaction at 350 and 450 °C. For serpentine, D–H exchange was much more rapid than 18O–16O exchange when natural chrysotile fibers were employed in the initial charge. In experiments with lizardite as the starting charge, recrystallization to chrysotile enhanced the rate of 18O–16O exchange with the coexisting aqueous phase. Oxygen isotope fractionation factors in both the talc–water and serpentine–water systems decrease with increasing temperature and can be described from 250 to 450 °C by the relationships: 1000 ln  = 11.70 × 106/T2 − 25.49 × 103/T + 12.48 and 1000 ln  = 3.49 × 106/T2 − 9.48 where T is temperature in Kelvin. Over the same temperature interval at 50 MPa, talc–water D–H fractionation is only weakly dependent on temperature, similar to brucite and chlorite, and can be described by the equation: 1000 ln  = 10.88 × 106/T2 − 41.52 × 103/T + 5.61 where T is temperature in Kelvin. Our D–H serpentine–water fractionation factors calibrated by experiment decrease with temperature and form a consistent trend with fractionation factors derived from lower temperature field calibrations. By regression of these data, we have refined and extended the D–H fractionation curve from 25 to 450 °C, 50 MPa as follows: 1000 ln  = 3.436 × 106/T2 − 34.736 × 103/T + 21.67 where T is temperature in Kelvin. These new data should improve the application of D–H and 18O–16O isotopes to constrain the temperature and origin of hydrothermal fluids responsible for serpentine formation in a variety of geologic settings.

  4. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  5. Confinement effects of polymers in porous glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, V.; Majolino, D.; Migliardo, P.; Venuti, V.

    1998-07-01

    Recently, confinement effects on dynamical properties of liquids inside restricted volumes have been extensively studied, either from a theoretical or technological point of view, thanks to the large possibility of industrial applications (building of optical switches, membrane separation, catalysis). We performed depolarized light scattering measurements on propylene glycol (PG) and its oligomers poly(propylene glycols) (PPG) having different molecular weights ( Mw, 425, 725 and 4000 Da), in the bulk state and confined in a silica glass having 25 Å pores. Mainly, two relevant effects are responsible for the dynamical response of liquids that diffuse and reorient in a confined geometry: (a) the 'physical traps', related to both dead-end groups and the tortuosity of the percolated channels for diffusion; and (b) the 'chemical traps', related to the degree of the absorption of molecules on the active surface sites. Hence, by comparing the behaviour of bulk polymers with confined polymers we were able to analyse the confinement influence on the molecular mobility of hydrogen-bonded liquids with different steric hindrance. The experimental results showed a frustration of molecular mobility in the confined samples owing to chemical and physical traps whose main role was highlighted thanks to the opportunity to substitute the active silanol groups (SiOH) in the inner surfaces with the non-active groups in the surfaces (treatment with methanol). In particular, we found that, in the case of low molecular weight samples, the relevant retardation process is connected to the chemical traps while for long chain polymers the physical traps play the main role. Further, the fitting procedure provided a distribution of relaxation times in the bulk systems and in short chain systems when confined in modified glass showing, in particular in the first case, that the distribution of relaxation times increases with polymers weights, occurrence related to a variety of molecular

  6. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms ... do to help pressure sores heal: Relieving the pressure that caused the sore Treating the sore itself Improving nutrition and other conditions to help the sore heal ...

  7. Contact area and static pressure profile at the plate-bone interface in the nonluted and luted bone plate.

    PubMed

    Staller, G S; Richardson, D W; Nunamaker, D M; Provost, M

    1995-01-01

    Contact area and pressure between 6-hole broad dynamic compression plates and 20 pairs of equine third metatarsal bones were measured using nonluted and luted plating techniques. Pressure-sensitive film (pressure ranges 10 to 50 MPa and 50 to 130 MPa) was used as the static pressure transducer. Nonluted and one of two luting techniques were tested on each pair of bones; each luting technique was tested on 20 bones. Quantitative determinations of contact area and pressure were made using computerized image processing techniques. Mean (+/- SD) total contact area for nonluted plates was 18.49% +/- 3.5% of the potential plate-bone contact area. Luting increased (P < .05) total contact area to 25.56% +/- 4.0% and 31.29% +/- 6.6% for the respective luting techniques. The effects of luting on contact area were dependent on the contact pressure. At contact pressure ranges 10 to 20 and 21 to 35 MPa, luting increased contact area. In contact pressure ranges 36 to 45 and 50 to 65 MPa, plate-bone contact was inherently greatest and plate luting had no significant effect on contact area. In contact pressure ranges 66 to 99 and 100 to 126 MPa, luting decreased contact area. Contact area was increased at lower contact pressures at the expense of higher pressure contact. Contact in the middle third of the plate was 20% to 40% of the contact at either end of the plate. Plate luting increased contact area best where plate-bone contour was most similar. PMID:7571381

  8. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-01

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile - each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  9. Circularly confined microswimmers exhibit multiple global patterns.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Geometric confinement plays an important role in the dynamics of natural and synthetic microswimmers from bacterial cells to self-propelled particles in high-throughput microfluidic devices. However, little is known about the effects of geometric confinement on the emergent global patterns in such self-propelled systems. Recent experiments on bacterial cells report that, depending on the cell concentration, cells either spontaneously organize into vortical motion in thin cylindrical and spherical droplets or aggregate at the inner boundary of the droplets. Our goal in this paper is to investigate, in the context of an idealized physical model, the interplay between geometric confinement and level of flagellar activity on the emergent collective patterns. We show that decreasing flagellar activity induces a hydrodynamically triggered transition in confined microswimmers from swirling to global circulation (vortex) to boundary aggregation and clustering. These results highlight that the complex interplay between confinement, flagellar activity, and hydrodynamic flows in concentrated suspensions of microswimmers could lead to a plethora of global patterns that are difficult to predict from geometric consideration alone. PMID:25974581

  10. Circularly confined microswimmers exhibit multiple global patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Geometric confinement plays an important role in the dynamics of natural and synthetic microswimmers from bacterial cells to self-propelled particles in high-throughput microfluidic devices. However, little is known about the effects of geometric confinement on the emergent global patterns in such self-propelled systems. Recent experiments on bacterial cells report that, depending on the cell concentration, cells either spontaneously organize into vortical motion in thin cylindrical and spherical droplets or aggregate at the inner boundary of the droplets. Our goal in this paper is to investigate, in the context of an idealized physical model, the interplay between geometric confinement and level of flagellar activity on the emergent collective patterns. We show that decreasing flagellar activity induces a hydrodynamically triggered transition in confined microswimmers from swirling to global circulation (vortex) to boundary aggregation and clustering. These results highlight that the complex interplay between confinement, flagellar activity, and hydrodynamic flows in concentrated suspensions of microswimmers could lead to a plethora of global patterns that are difficult to predict from geometric consideration alone.

  11. Effects of confinement on nanoparticle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jacinta

    The transport properties of nanoparticles that are dispersed in complex fluids and flowed through narrow confining geometries affect a wide range of materials shaping and forming processes, including three-dimensional printing and nanocomposite processing. Here, I will describe two sets of experiments in which we use optical microscopy to probe the structure and transport properties of suspensions of particles that are confined geometrically. First, we investigate the structure and flow properties of dense suspensions of submicron particles, in which the particles interact via an entropic depletion attraction, that are confined in thin films and microchannels. Second, we characterize the transport properties of nanoparticles, dispersed at low concentration in water or in aqueous solutions of high-molecular weight polymers, that are confined in regular arrays of nanoposts or in disordered porous media. I will discuss our results and their practical implications for materials processing as well as for other applications that require confined transport of nanomaterials through complex media. Welch Foundation (E-1869) and NSF (CBET-1438204).

  12. Measuring DNA Confinement and Excluded Volume Parameters: Scaling with confinement and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Alexander; Duong, Lyndon; Coursol, Laurence; Reisner, Walter

    2014-03-01

    Using nanofluidic devices for genomic mapping requires an understanding of the underlying polymer physics of confined DNA. Despite many years of study, there are still aspects that are poorly understood, including the role that excluded volume and semiflexibility play under confinement. Here, a hybrid nanofluidic device consisting of a narrow slit embedded with a lattice of square pits was used to study confined DNA. At equilibrium, molecules tend to occupy one or more pits. The partitioning of molecular contour between the pits and the slit is dependent on maximizing entropy by removing contour from the highly confining slit while reducing excess free energy due to excluded volume interactions from increased concentration in the pit. Measurements of the average number of occupied pits as a function of pit dimension, slit height, and ionic strength serves as a probe of the underlying polymer physics. In particular, the free energy of slit-like confinement and the effective molecular width were measured across a range of slit heights and ionic strengths. It was found that effective width scales with ionic strength according to Stigter's charged rod theory, and that the Chen-Sullivan interpolation formula for the slit-like energy of confinement describes the data well for narrow slits. Unexpected scaling of the confinement free energy with ionic strength indicates that excluded volume effects are relevant for confined DNA.

  13. Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Kanehiro, B.Y.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-03-10

    The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot directly estimate S/sub s/from earth tide response. Except for the fact that barometric changes act both on the water surface in the well and on the aquifer as a whole while stress changes associated with earth tides act only in the aquifer, the two phenomena influence the confined aquifer in much the same way. In other words, barometric response contains only as much information on the elastic properties of the aquifer as the earth tide response does. Factors such as well bore storage, aquifer transmissivity, and storage coefficient contribute to time lag and damping of the aquifer response as observed in the well. Analysis shows that the observation of fluid pressure changes alone, without concurrent measurement of external stress changes, is sufficient to interpret uniquely earth tide response. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from dilatation by assuming a reasonable value for bulk modulus. Earth tide response of geothermal aquifers from Marysville, Montana. East Mesa, California; and Raft River Valley, Idaho, were analyzed, and the ratio of S/sub 3/ to porosity was estimated. Comparison of these estimates with independent pumping tests show reasonable agreement.

  14. Energy Confinement of both Ohmic and LHW Plasma on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao; Gao, Xiang; EAST Team

    2011-06-01

    Study on the characters of energy confinement in both Ohmic and lower hybrid wave (LHW) discharges on EAST is conducted and the linear Ohmic confinement (LOC), saturated ohmic confinement (SOC) and improved Ohmic confinement (IOC) regimes are investigated in this paper. It is observed that an improved confinement mode characterized by both a drop of Dα line intensity and an increase in line average density can be triggered by a gas puffing pulse.

  15. Progress in toroidal confinement and fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    During the past 30 years, the characteristic T/sub i/n tau/sub E/-value of toroidal-confinement experiments has advanced by more than seven orders of magnitude. Part of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of the advance is associated with improvements in the ''quality of plasma confinement.'' The combined evidence of spherator and tokamak research clarifies the role of magnetic-field geometry in determining confinement and points to the importance of shielding out plasma edge effects. A true physical understanding of anomalous transport remains to be achieved. 39 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Properties of Water Confined in Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Saihara, Koji; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Ohta, Soichi; Shimizu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The varying states of water confined in the nano-domain structures of typical room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by 1H NMR and by measurements of self-diffusion coefficients while systematically varying the IL cations and anions. The NMR peaks for water in BF4-based ILs were clearly split, indicating the presence of two discrete states of confined water (H2O and HOD). Proton and/or deuterium exchange rate among the water molecules was very slowly in the water-pocket. Notably, no significant changes were observed in the chemical shifts of the ILs. Self-diffusion coefficient results showed that water molecules exhibit a similar degree of mobility, although their diffusion rate is one order of magnitude faster than that of the IL cations and anions. These findings provide information on a completely new type of confinement, that of liquid water in soft matter. PMID:26024339

  17. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container. PMID:25340992

  18. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I.; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-07-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le}100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

  19. INERT Atmosphere confinement operability test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    1999-02-22

    This Operability Test Procedure (OTP) provides instructions for testing operability of the Inert Atmosphere Confinement (IAC). The Inert Atmosphere Confinement was designed and built for opening cans of metal items that might have hydrided surfaces. Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) PFP-97-005 addresses the discovery of suspected plutonium hydride forming on plutonium metal currently stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant vaults. Plutonium hydride reacts quickly with air, liberating energy. The Inert Atmosphere Confinement was designed to prevent this sudden liberation of energy by opening the material in an inert argon atmosphere instead of the normal glovebox atmosphere. The IAC is located in glovebox HC-21A, room 230B of the 234-5Z Building at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in the 200-West Area of the Hanford Site.

  20. Predictive modelling of the impact of a radiative divertor on pedestal confinement on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Mike; Potzel, Steffen; Wischmeier, Marco; Wolfrum, Elisabeth; Frassinetti, Lorenzo; Reimold, Felix; Eurofusion Mst1 Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-11-01

    In future devices, tailoring of the edge density profile and radiation profile for power exhaust control via a deuterium gas puff and extrinsic impurity seeding will be necessary. It has been observed on present day machines that high D fuelling can reduce the plasma stored energy while adding impurity seeding can act to improve confinement by up to 40%. This study presents a combination of observations and modelling completed on AUG with the aim of determining the mechanisms behind the confinement degradation with a gas puff and improvement with impurity seeding. In particular, predictive modelling, based on the EPED pedestal model, has been extensively used. Alterations of the temperature and density at the separatrix are found to have large impacts on pedestal stability. Measured changes in divertor properties are used to inform the direction and magnitude of these alterations, with experimentally relevant confinement changes being recovered via pressure profile shifts. http://www.euro-fusionscipub.org/mst1

  1. Generation and confinement of microwave gas-plasma in photonic dielectric microstructure.

    PubMed

    Debord, B; Jamier, R; Gérôme, F; Leroy, O; Boisse-Laporte, C; Leprince, P; Alves, L L; Benabid, F

    2013-10-21

    We report on a self-guided microwave surface-wave induced generation of ~60 μm diameter and 6 cm-long column of argon-plasma confined in the core of a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. At gas pressure of 1 mbar, the micro-confined plasma exhibits a stable transverse profile with a maximum gas-temperature as high as 1300 ± 200 K, and a wall-temperature as low as 500 K, and an electron density level of 10¹⁴ cm⁻³. The fiber guided fluorescence emission presents strong Ar⁺ spectral lines in the visible and near UV. Theory shows that the observed combination of relatively low wall-temperature and high ionisation rate in this strongly confined configuration is due to an unprecedentedly wide electrostatic space-charge field and the subsequent ion acceleration dominance in the plasma-to-gas power transfer. PMID:24150390

  2. Nanoscopic Confinement through Self-Assembly: Crystallization within Micellar Cores Exhibits Simple Gibbs-Thomson Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinn, Thomas; Willner, Lutz; Lund, Reidar

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that liquids confined to small nanoscopic pores and droplets exhibit thermal behavior very different from bulk samples. Less is known about liquids spontaneously confined through self-assembly into micellar structures. Here we demonstrate, using a very well-defined n-alkyl-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer system with a tunable structure, that n -alkane(s) forming 2-3 nm small micellar cores are affected considerably by confinement in the form of melting point depressions. Moreover, comparing the reduction in melting points, Δ Tm, determined through volumetric and calorimetric methods with the micellar core radius, Rc, obtained from small-angle x-ray scattering, we find excellent agreement with the well-known Gibbs-Thomson equation, Δ Tm˜Rc-1 . This demonstrates that the reduced size, i.e., the Laplace pressure, is the dominant parameter governing the melting point depression in micellar systems.

  3. Confinement of the hydrogen molecular ion H2+ under a magnetic field inside a spheroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinar, Martin

    2010-03-01

    A study of the confinement of the hydrogen molecular ion H2+ is done. The molecular ion is subject to the action of a magnetic field. In the Born -- Oppenheimer approximation, we solve numerically the Schr"odinger's equation, using trial functions and one algorithm that allows us to calculate the energies for different given values of the confinement parameters. We use the variational method in order to estimate the energy of the ground state. Some properties of the system as the pressure exerted by the confinement, the polarizability in the approximations of Kirkwood and Buckingham and the energies of the vibrational states are calculated. The behavior of the internuclear separation is analyzed for the geometry considered.

  4. High-Performance of Gas Hydrates in Confined Nanospace for Reversible CH4 /CO2 Storage.

    PubMed

    Casco, Mirian E; Jordá, José L; Rey, Fernando; Fauth, François; Martinez-Escandell, Manuel; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Ramos-Fernández, Enrique V; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín

    2016-07-11

    The molecular exchange of CH4 for CO2 in gas hydrates grown in confined nanospace has been evaluated for the first time using activated carbons as a host structure. The nano-confinement effects taking place inside the carbon cavities and the exceptional physicochemical properties of the carbon structure allows us to accelerate the formation and decomposition process of the gas hydrates from the conventional timescale of hours/days in artificial bulk systems to minutes in confined nanospace. The CH4 /CO2 exchange process is fully reversible with high efficiency at practical temperature and pressure conditions. Furthermore, these activated carbons can be envisaged as promising materials for long-distance natural gas and CO2 transportation because of the combination of a high storage capacity, a high reversibility, and most important, with extremely fast kinetics for gas hydrate formation and release. PMID:27273454

  5. Electronic quantum confinement in cylindrical potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, Arkadiy S.; Msezane, Alfred Z.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of quantum confinement on the momentum distribution of electrons confined within a cylindrical potential well have been analyzed. The motivation is to understand specific features of the momentum distribution of electrons when the electron behavior is completely controlled by the parameters of a non-isotropic potential cavity. It is shown that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries have been considered and the corresponding wave functions have been calculated; the behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well has been analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states have been calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H and its radius R0 have been considered; when the cylinder length H significantly exceeds its radius R0 and when the cylinder radius is much greater than its length. The cylindrical quantum confinement effects on the momentum distribution of electrons in these potential wells have been analyzed. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by Gerardo Delgado Barrio, Andrey Solov'Yov, Pablo Villarreal, Rita Prosmiti.

  6. Experimental Achievements on Plasma Confinement and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, A.

    2009-02-19

    This article presents a brief review of the experimental studies on turbulence and resultant transport in toroidal plasmas. The article focuses on two topics, physics of transport barrier and the role of mesoscale structure on plasma confinement, i.e. zonal flows. The two topics show the important roles of the mutual interactions between sheared flows, zonal flows and drift waves for plasma turbulence and transport. The findings can lead us to further generalized concept of the disparate scale interactions which could give a fundamental understanding of the plasma confinement from the first principle.

  7. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  8. On the Dirac Structure of Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Adam P. Szczepaniak; Eric S. Swanson

    1997-04-01

    The Dirac structure of confinement is shown to be of time like-vector nature in the heavy quark limit of QCD. This stands in contradiction with the phenomenological success of the Dirac scalar confining potential. A resolution is achieved through the demonstration that an effective scalar interaction is dynamically generated by nonperturbative mixing between ordinary and hybrid Q {bar Q} states. The resolution depends crucially on the collective nature of the gluonic degrees of freedom. This implies that dynamical gluonic effects are vital when attempting to incorporate fine structure in models of the Q {bar Q} interaction.

  9. Neutral Beam Ion Confinement in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S.S. Medley; and A.L. Roquemore

    2001-07-24

    Neutral-beam (NB) heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) began in September 2000 using up to 5 MW of 80 keV deuterium (D) beams. An initial assessment of beam ion confinement has been made using neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer (NPA), and a Faraday cup beam ion loss probe. Preliminary neutron results indicate that confinement may be roughly classical in quiescent discharges, but the probe measurements do not match a classical loss model. MHD activity, especially reconnection events (REs) causes substantial disturbance of the beam ion population.

  10. Spontaneous Circulation of Confined Active Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Francis; Goldstein, Raymond

    2012-11-01

    Many active fluid systems encountered in biology are set in total geometric confinement; cytoplasmic streaming is a prominent and ubiquitous example. Using the simple paradigm of a dilute dipolar swimmer suspension, we demonstrate that the two key constraints of circular confinement and fluid incompressibility yield qualitatively new dynamics, effectively quantizing the behaviour regimes. We show analytically that there is an activity threshold for spontaneous auto-circulation and verify this numerically. Long-time non-linear behaviour is investigated via simulations, which reveal steady states displaying nematic defect separation and a high-activity bifurcation to an oscillatory regime.

  11. Anomalous thermal confinement in ohmically heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Romanelli, F.; Tang, W.M.; White, R.B.

    1986-02-01

    A model is proposed to explain the behavior of the gross energy confinement time in ohmically heated tokamak plasmas. The analysis takes into account the effect of the anomalous thermal conductivity due to small scale turbulence and of the macroscopic MHD behavior, which provides some constraints on the temperature profile. Results indicate that the thermal conductivity associated with the dissipative trapped-electron mode and with the ion temperature gradient (eta/sub i/) mode can account, respectively, for the Neo-Alcator scaling and the saturation of the energy confinement time with density. Comparisons with experimental results show reasonable agreement. 32 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Bubble confinement in flow boiling of FC-72 in a ''rectangular'' microchannel of high aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Jacqueline; Brutin, David; Tadrist, Lounes; Sefiane, Khellil

    2010-11-15

    Boiling in microchannels remains elusive due to the lack of full understanding of the mechanisms involved. A powerful tool in achieving better comprehension of the mechanisms is detailed imaging and analysis of the two-phase flow at a fundamental level. Boiling is induced in a single microchannel geometry (hydraulic diameter 727 {mu}m), using a refrigerant FC-72, to investigate the effect of channel confinement on bubble growth. A transparent, metallic, conductive deposit has been developed on the exterior of the rectangular microchannel, allowing simultaneous uniform heating and visualisation to be achieved. The data presented in this paper is for a particular case with a uniform heat flux applied to the microchannel and inlet liquid mass flowrate held constant. In conjunction with obtaining high-speed images and videos, sensitive pressure sensors are used to record the pressure drop across the microchannel over time. Bubble nucleation and growth, as well as periodic slug flow, are observed in the microchannel test section. The periodic pressure fluctuations evidenced across the microchannel are caused by the bubble dynamics and instances of vapour blockage during confined bubble growth in the channel. The variation of the aspect ratio and the interface velocities of the growing vapour slug over time, are all observed and analysed. We follow visually the nucleation and subsequent both 'free' and 'confined' growth of a vapour bubble during flow boiling of FC-72 in a microchannel, from analysis of our results, images and video sequences with the corresponding pressure data obtained. (author)

  13. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Giraldez, E.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; Lafortune, K. N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moody, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Widmayer, C. C.

    2015-05-01

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  14. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  15. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field

  16. Improved confinement with reversed magnetic shear in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1995-07-01

    Highly peaked density and pressure profiles in a new operating regime have been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The q-profile has a region of reversed magnetic shear extending from the magnetic axis to r/a {approximately}0.3-0.4. The central electron density rises from 0.45 x 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} to nearly 1.2 x 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3} during neutral beam injection. The electron particle diffusivity drops precipitously in the plasma core with the onset of the improved confinement mode and can be reduced by a factor of {approximately}50 to near the neoclassical particle diffusivity level.

  17. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.X.; Militzer, B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Skupsky, S.

    2010-06-10

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of rho = 0.002–1596 g/cm^3 and T = 1.35 eV–5.5 keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density, and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  18. Thermodynamics of an exactly solvable confining quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintz, Bruno W.

    2016-04-01

    The grand partition function of a model of confined quarks is exactly calculated at arbitrary temperatures and quark chemical potentials. The model is inspired by a version of QCD where the usual (perturbative) BRST symmetry is broken in the infrared, while possessing a quark mass function compatible with nonperturbative analyses of lattice simulations and Dyson-Schwinger equations. Even though the model is defined at tree level, we show that it produces a non-trivial and stable thermodynamic behaviour at any temperature or chemical potential. Results for the pressure, the entropy and the trace anomaly as a function of the temperature are qualitatively compatible with the effect of non-perturbative interactions as observed in lattice simulations. The finite density thermodynamics is also shown to contain non-trivial features, being far away from an ideal gas picture.

  19. Combustion of TNT products in a confined explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, R E; Kuhl, A L; Oppenheim, A K

    1999-06-18

    The effects of turbulent combustion of detonation products gases in a confined explosion are explored via laboratory experiments and high-resolution numerical simulations. The expanded products from the detonation of a TNT charge are rich in C and CO, which act as a fuel. When these hot gases mix with air, they are oxidized to CO2--thereby releasing 2482 Cal/g in addition to the 1093 Cal/g deposited by the detonation wave. In this case, the exothermic power is controlled by the turbulent mixing rate, rather than by chemistry. A kinetic law of turbulent combustion is suggested for this process. Pressure histories from the numerical simulations were in good agreement with the experimental measurements--demonstrating that the numerical model contains the fundamental mechanism that controls the exothermic process.

  20. Methane hydrate formation in confined nanospace can surpass nature.

    PubMed

    Casco, Mirian E; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Ramírez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Rey, Fernando; Jordá, Jose L; Bansode, Atul; Urakawa, Atsushi; Peral, Inma; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Kaneko, Katsumi; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Natural methane hydrates are believed to be the largest source of hydrocarbons on Earth. These structures are formed in specific locations such as deep-sea sediments and the permafrost based on demanding conditions of high pressure and low temperature. Here we report that, by taking advantage of the confinement effects on nanopore space, synthetic methane hydrates grow under mild conditions (3.5 MPa and 2 °C), with faster kinetics (within minutes) than nature, fully reversibly and with a nominal stoichiometry that mimics nature. The formation of the hydrate structures in nanospace and their similarity to natural hydrates is confirmed using inelastic neutron scattering experiments and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. These findings may be a step towards the application of a smart synthesis of methane hydrates in energy-demanding applications (for example, transportation). PMID:25728378

  1. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time". PMID:25463787

  2. Quantification of reaction violence and combustion enthalpy of plastic bonded explosive 9501 under strong confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, W. Lee; Dickson, Peter M.; Parker, Gary R.; Asay, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The confinement experienced by an explosive during thermal self-initiation can substantially affect performance in terms of deflagration-to-detonation characteristics and explosion/detonation violence. To this end, we have developed an experiment to quantitatively observe enthalpy change and reaction violence in thermally initiated plastic bonded explosive (PBX) 9501. Traditionally, researchers attempt to quantify violence using terminal observations of fragment size, fragment velocity, and through subjective observations. In the work presented here, the explosive was loaded into a heated gun assembly where we subjected a 300 mg charge to a cook-off schedule and a range of static and inertial confinements. Static confinement was controlled using rupture disks calibrated at 34.5 and 138 MPa. The use of 3.15 and 6.3 g projectile masses provided a variation in inertial confinement. This was a regime of strong confinement; a significant fraction of the explosive energy was required to rupture the disk, and the projectile mass was large compared to the charge mass. The state variables pressure and volume were measured in the breech. From these data, we quantified both the reaction enthalpy change and energy release rate of the explosive on a microsecond time scale using a thermodynamic analyisis. We used these values to unambiguously quantify explosion violence as a function of confinement at a fixed cook-off schedule of 190 C for 1 h. P2τ, a measure of critical shock energy required for shock ignition of an adjacent explosive was also computed. We found variations in this confinement regime to have a weak effect on enthalpy change, power, violence and shock energy. Violence was approximately 100 times lower than detonating trinitrotoluene, but the measured shock energy approached the critical shock energy for initiating secondary high explosives.

  3. Sintering Behavior of Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Using a Plasma Pressure Compaction System: Master Sintering Curve Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothara, Manish G.; Atre, Sundar V.; Park, Seong-Jin; German, Randall M.; Sudarshan, T. S.; Radhakrishnan, R.

    2010-12-01

    Nanostructured ceramics offer significant improvements in properties over corresponding materials with larger grain sizes on the order of tens to hundreds of micrometers. Silicon carbide (SiC) samples with grain sizes on the order of 100 nm can result in improved strength, chemical resistance, thermal stability, and tailored electrical resistivity. In this study, nanocrystalline SiC was processed in a plasma pressure compaction (P2C) system at a temperature of 1973 K (1700 °C) that was much lower than the temperatures reported for other sintering techniques. Microstructure of the resulting samples was studied and the hardness and the fracture toughness were measured. The grain sizes were on the order of 700 nm, the hardness between 22 and 24 GPa, and the toughness between 5 and 6.5 MPa·m1/2. The master sintering curve (MSC) analysis was used to model the densification behavior of SiC powder sintered by the P2C method. The apparent activation energies for three different pressures of 10, 30, and 50 MPa were obtained to be 1666, 1034, and 1162 kJ/mol, respectively. Although densification occurs via diffusion, the activation energies were higher than those associated with self-diffusion in SiC (between 570 and 920 kJ/mol). A validation study of the MSC was also conducted and the variation in observed density from the density predicted by the MSC was found to range from 1 to 10 pct.

  4. Pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Deborah

    2016-04-13

    My nursing experience is in acute care. Acute medical nurses are well placed to assess skin integrity, identify patients at risk of pressure ulcer development, and commence appropriate interventions to prevent or treat pressure ulcers. PMID:27073966

  5. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  6. Structure, thermodynamic properties, and phase diagrams of few colloids confined in a spherical pore.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Iván E; Pastorino, Claudio; Urrutia, Ignacio

    2015-06-28

    We study a system of few colloids confined in a small spherical cavity with event driven molecular dynamics simulations in the canonical ensemble. The colloidal particles interact through a short range square-well potential that takes into account the basic elements of attraction and excluded-volume repulsion of the interaction among colloids. We analyze the structural and thermodynamic properties of this few-body confined system in the framework of inhomogeneous fluids theory. Pair correlation function and density profile are used to determine the structure and the spatial characteristics of the system. Pressure on the walls, internal energy, and surface quantities such as surface tension and adsorption are also analyzed for a wide range of densities and temperatures. We have characterized systems from 2 to 6 confined particles, identifying distinctive qualitative behavior over the thermodynamic plane T - ρ, in a few-particle equivalent to phase diagrams of macroscopic systems. Applying the extended law of corresponding states, the square well interaction is mapped to the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures. We link explicitly the temperature of the confined square-well fluid to the equivalent packing fraction of polymers in the Asakura-Oosawa model. Using this approach, we study the confined system of few colloids in a colloid-polymer mixture. PMID:26133449

  7. An EQT-cDFT approach to determine thermodynamic properties of confined fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mashayak, S. Y.; Motevaselian, M. H.; Aluru, N. R.

    2015-06-28

    We present a continuum-based approach to predict the structure and thermodynamic properties of confined fluids at multiple length-scales, ranging from a few angstroms to macro-meters. The continuum approach is based on the empirical potential-based quasi-continuum theory (EQT) and classical density functional theory (cDFT). EQT is a simple and fast approach to predict inhomogeneous density and potential profiles of confined fluids. We use EQT potentials to construct a grand potential functional for cDFT. The EQT-cDFT-based grand potential can be used to predict various thermodynamic properties of confined fluids. In this work, we demonstrate the EQT-cDFT approach by simulating Lennard-Jones fluids, namely, methane and argon, confined inside slit-like channels of graphene. We show that the EQT-cDFT can accurately predict the structure and thermodynamic properties, such as density profiles, adsorption, local pressure tensor, surface tension, and solvation force, of confined fluids as compared to the molecular dynamics simulation results.

  8. Structure, thermodynamic properties, and phase diagrams of few colloids confined in a spherical pore

    SciTech Connect

    Paganini, Iván E.; Pastorino, Claudio Urrutia, Ignacio

    2015-06-28

    We study a system of few colloids confined in a small spherical cavity with event driven molecular dynamics simulations in the canonical ensemble. The colloidal particles interact through a short range square-well potential that takes into account the basic elements of attraction and excluded-volume repulsion of the interaction among colloids. We analyze the structural and thermodynamic properties of this few-body confined system in the framework of inhomogeneous fluids theory. Pair correlation function and density profile are used to determine the structure and the spatial characteristics of the system. Pressure on the walls, internal energy, and surface quantities such as surface tension and adsorption are also analyzed for a wide range of densities and temperatures. We have characterized systems from 2 to 6 confined particles, identifying distinctive qualitative behavior over the thermodynamic plane T − ρ, in a few-particle equivalent to phase diagrams of macroscopic systems. Applying the extended law of corresponding states, the square well interaction is mapped to the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures. We link explicitly the temperature of the confined square-well fluid to the equivalent packing fraction of polymers in the Asakura-Oosawa model. Using this approach, we study the confined system of few colloids in a colloid-polymer mixture.

  9. High-pressure mechanical and sonic properties of a Devonian shale from West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, H.C.; Lin, W.

    1986-01-01

    Static mechanical properties and sonic velocities were determined on each of four members of the Devonian shale from Columbia Gas Transmission's well 20403, Huntington, West Virginia. They were: Pressure - volume data to 4.0 GPa; Compressive strength at confining pressures up to 300 MPa, both parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Extensile strength at 100 to 700 MPa confining pressure, both parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Loading and unloading path in uniaxial strain at 20 to 500 MPa confining pressure, both parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Tensile strength at ambient pressure, parallel and perpendicular to bedding. Shear and compressional wave velocities at confining pressures up to 1000 MPa parallel, at 45/sup 0/, and perpendicular to bedding. Results are presented and discussed. 32 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Effects of high sound speed confiners on ANFO detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanda, Charles; Jackson, Scott; Short, Mark

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between high explosive (HE) detonations and high sound speed confiners, where the confiner sound speed exceeds the HE's detonation speed, has not been thoroughly studied. The subsonic nature of the flow in the confiner allows stress waves to travel ahead of the main detonation front and influence the upstream HE state. The interaction between the detonation wave and the confiner is also no longer a local interaction, so that the confiner thickness now plays a significant role in the detonation dynamics. We report here on larger scale experiments in which a mixture of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil (ANFO) is detonated in aluminium confiners with varying charge diameter and confiner thickness. The results of these large-scale experiments are compared with previous large-scale ANFO experiments in cardboard, as well as smaller-scale aluminium confined ANFO experiments, to characterize the effects of confiner thickness.

  11. Molecular simulations of confined liquids: an alternative to the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Morineau, Denis; Lefort, Ronan; Hureau, Ivanne; Hennous, Leila; Zhu, Haochen; Szymczyk, Anthony; Malfreyt, Patrice; Maurin, Guillaume

    2011-02-21

    Commonly, the confinement effects are studied from the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations from the computation of the density of liquid in the confined phase. The GCMC modeling and chemical potential (μ) calculations are based on the insertion/deletion of the real and ghost particle, respectively. At high density, i.e., at high pressure or low temperature, the insertions fail from the Widom insertions while the performing methods as expanded method or perturbation approach are not efficient to treat the large and complex molecules. To overcome this problem we use a simple and efficient method to compute the liquid's density in the confined medium. This method does not require the precalculation of μ and is an alternative to the GCMC simulations. From the isothermal-isosurface-isobaric statistical ensemble we consider the explicit framework/liquid external interface to model an explicit liquid's reservoir. In this procedure only the liquid molecules undergo the volume changes while the volume of the framework is kept constant. Therefore, this method is described in the Np(n)AV(f)T statistical ensemble, where N is the number of particles, p(n) is the normal pressure, V(f) is the volume of framework, A is the surface of the solid/fluid interface, and T is the temperature. This approach is applied and validated from the computation of the density of the methanol and water confined in the mesoporous cylindrical silica nanopores and the MIL-53(Cr) metal organic framework type, respectively. PMID:21341825

  12. Molecular simulations of confined liquids: An alternative to the grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoufi, Aziz; Morineau, Denis; Lefort, Ronan; Hureau, Ivanne; Hennous, Leila; Zhu, Haochen; Szymczyk, Anthony; Malfreyt, Patrice; Maurin, Guillaume

    2011-02-01

    Commonly, the confinement effects are studied from the grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations from the computation of the density of liquid in the confined phase. The GCMC modeling and chemical potential (μ) calculations are based on the insertion/deletion of the real and ghost particle, respectively. At high density, i.e., at high pressure or low temperature, the insertions fail from the Widom insertions while the performing methods as expanded method or perturbation approach are not efficient to treat the large and complex molecules. To overcome this problem we use a simple and efficient method to compute the liquid's density in the confined medium. This method does not require the precalculation of μ and is an alternative to the GCMC simulations. From the isothermal-isosurface-isobaric statistical ensemble we consider the explicit framework/liquid external interface to model an explicit liquid's reservoir. In this procedure only the liquid molecules undergo the volume changes while the volume of the framework is kept constant. Therefore, this method is described in the NpnAVfT statistical ensemble, where N is the number of particles, pn is the normal pressure, Vf is the volume of framework, A is the surface of the solid/fluid interface, and T is the temperature. This approach is applied and validated from the computation of the density of the methanol and water confined in the mesoporous cylindrical silica nanopores and the MIL-53(Cr) metal organic framework type, respectively.

  13. Role of the confinement of a root canal on jet impingement during endodontic irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, B.; Boutsioukis, C.; Heijnen, G. L.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; Versluis, M.

    2012-12-01

    During a root canal treatment the root canal is irrigated with an antimicrobial fluid, commonly performed with a needle and a syringe. Irrigation of a root canal with two different types of needles can be modeled as an impinging axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric jet. These jets are investigated experimentally with high-speed Particle Imaging Velocimetry, inside and outside the confinement (concave surface) of a root canal, and compared to theoretical predictions for these jets. The efficacy of irrigation fluid refreshment with respect to the typical reaction time of the antimicrobial fluid with a biofilm is characterized with a non-dimensional Damköhler number. The pressure that these jets induce on a wall or at the apex of the root canal is also measured. The axisymmetric jet is found to be stable and its velocity agrees with the theoretical prediction for this type of jet, however, a confinement causes instabilities to the jet. The confinement of the root canal has a pronounced influence on the flow, for both the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric jet, by reducing the velocities by one order of magnitude and increasing the pressure at the apex. The non-axisymmetric jet inside the confinement shows a cascade of eddies with decreasing velocities, which at the apex does not provide adequate irrigation fluid refreshment.

  14. Pressure Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-01-01

    EPIC is Electronic Pressure Indicating Controller produced by North American Manufacturing Company. It is a high-sensitivity device for improving combustion efficiency in industrial furnaces that interprets a signal from a pressure transducer on a furnace and regulates furnace pressure accordingly. A controller can provide savings of from five to 25 percent of an industrial user's annual furnace fuel bill.

  15. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  16. Effective diffusion of confined active Brownian swimmers.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Mario; Dagdug, Leornardo

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically find the effect of confinement and thermal fluctuations on the diffusivity of a spherical active swimmer moving inside a two-dimensional narrow cavity of general shape. The explicit formulas for the effective diffusion coefficient of a swimmer moving inside two particular cavities are presented. We also compare our analytical results with Brownian dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement. PMID:25615133

  17. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Erin G.; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2016-01-01

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume remains a rich, largely unexplored problem, despite applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. Here, we report densest found clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to N=60 constituent polyhedral particles. We examine the interplay between anisotropic particle shape and isotropic 3D confinement. Densest clusters exhibit a wide variety of symmetry point groups and form in up to three layers at higher N. For many N values, icosahedra and dodecahedra form clusters that resemble sphere clusters. These common structures are layers of optimal spherical codes in most cases, a surprising fact given the significant faceting of the icosahedron and dodecahedron. We also investigate cluster density as a function of N for each particle shape. We find that, in contrast to what happens in bulk, polyhedra often pack less densely than spheres. We also find especially dense clusters at so-called magic numbers of constituent particles. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the packing in confinement problem. PMID:26811458

  18. Morphology of diblock copolymers under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, David; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    The structure adopted by polymer chains is of particular intrest for materials design. In particular, a great deal of effort has been made to study diblock polymers due to the importance they have in industrial applications. The bulk structure of most systems has been the most widely studied. However, when under the effect of confinement, the polymer chains are forced to adopt structures differing from the familiar bulk phases. As many applications utilize polymers in sizes and shapes that lead to these non bulk structures, the confinement effects are important. A commonly used tool for computationally determining structures is the continuum self consistant field theory (SCFT). We discuss our highly scalable parallel framework for SCFT using real space methods (finite element) that is especially well suited to modelling complex geometries. This framework is capable of modeling both Gaussian and worm like chains. We illustate the use of the software framework in determining structures under varying degrees of confinement. We detail the method used and present selected results from a systematic study of confinement using arbitrary structures.

  19. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-11-01

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used.

  20. Visualizing chemical reactions confined under graphene.

    PubMed

    Mu, Rentao; Fu, Qiang; Jin, Li; Yu, Liang; Fang, Guangzong; Tan, Dali; Bao, Xinhe

    2012-05-14

    An undercover agent: graphene has been used as an imaging agent to visualize interfacial reactions under its cover, and exhibits a strong confinement effect on the chemistry of molecules underneath. In a CO atmosphere, CO penetrates into the graphene/Pt(111) interface and reacts with O(2) therein, whereas intercalated CO desorbs from the Pt surface. PMID:22492473

  1. Holographic thermalization in a quark confining background

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, D. S. Aref’eva, I. Ya.

    2015-03-15

    We study holographic thermalization of a strongly coupled theory inspired by two colliding shock waves in a vacuum confining background. Holographic thermalization means a black hole formation, in fact, a trapped surface formation. As the vacuum confining background, we considered the well-know bottom-up AdS/QCD model that provides the Cornell potential and reproduces the QCD β-function. We perturb the vacuum background by colliding domain shock waves that are assumed to be holographically dual to heavy ions collisions. Our main physical assumption is that we can make a restriction on the time of trapped surface formation, which results in a natural limitation on the size of the domain where the trapped surface is produced. This limits the intermediate domain where the main part of the entropy is produced. In this domain, we can use an intermediate vacuum background as an approximation to the full confining background. We find that the dependence of the multiplicity on energy for the intermediate background has an asymptotic expansion whose first term depends on energy as E{sup 1/3}, which is very similar to the experimental dependence of particle multiplicities on the colliding ion energy obtained from the RHIC and LHC. However, this first term, at the energies where the approximation of the confining metric by the intermediate background works, does not saturate the exact answer, and we have to take the nonleading terms into account.

  2. Monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis and prolonged solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, M; Burnett, F

    1994-10-01

    A man previously imprisoned for 11 years developed unremitting and treatment-resistant monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis following a period in excess of 12 months in solitary confinement. We are unaware of any other reported incidences of this disorder arising in such circumstances. PMID:7830522

  3. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Teich, Erin G; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2016-02-01

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume remains a rich, largely unexplored problem, despite applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. Here, we report densest found clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to [Formula: see text] constituent polyhedral particles. We examine the interplay between anisotropic particle shape and isotropic 3D confinement. Densest clusters exhibit a wide variety of symmetry point groups and form in up to three layers at higher N. For many N values, icosahedra and dodecahedra form clusters that resemble sphere clusters. These common structures are layers of optimal spherical codes in most cases, a surprising fact given the significant faceting of the icosahedron and dodecahedron. We also investigate cluster density as a function of N for each particle shape. We find that, in contrast to what happens in bulk, polyhedra often pack less densely than spheres. We also find especially dense clusters at so-called magic numbers of constituent particles. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the packing in confinement problem. PMID:26811458

  4. Reactions over catalysts confined in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiulian; Bao, Xinhe

    2008-12-21

    We review a new concept for modifying the redox properties of transition metals via confinement within the channels of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and thus tuning their catalytic performance. Attention is also devoted to novel techniques for homogeneous dispersion of metal nanoparticles inside CNTs since these are essential for optimization of the catalytic activity. PMID:19048128

  5. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young’s modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces. PMID:26286234

  6. Energy confinement and profile consistency in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.; Arunasalan, V.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; bush, C.E.; Callen, J.D.; Cohen, S.A.

    1987-04-01

    A new regime of enhanced energy confinement has been observed on TFTR with neutral beam injection at low plasma current. It is characterized by extremely peaked electron density profiles and broad electron temperature profiles. The electron temperature profile shapes violate the concept of profile consistency in which T/sub e/(O)//sub v/ is assumed to be a tightly constrained function of q/sub a/, but they are in good agreement with a form of profile consistency based on examining the temperature profile shape outside the plasma core. The enhanced confinement regime is only obtained with a highly degassed limiter; in discharges with gas-filled limiters convective losses are calculated to dominate the edge electron power balance. Consistent with the constraint of profile consistency, global confinement is degraded in these cases. The best heating results in the enhanced confinement regime are obtained with nearly balanced co- and counter-injection. Much of the difference between balanced and co-only injection can be explained on the basis of classically predicted effects associated with plasma rotation.

  7. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments.

    PubMed

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young's modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces. PMID:26286234

  8. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-08-01

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young’s modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces.

  9. Chirally symmetric but confining dense, cold matter

    SciTech Connect

    Glozman, L. Ya.; Wagenbrunn, R. F.

    2008-03-01

    The folklore tradition about the QCD phase diagram is that at the chiral restoration phase transition at finite density hadrons are deconfined and there appears the quark matter. We address this question within the only known exactly solvable confining and chirally symmetric model. It is postulated within this model that there exists linear Coulomb-like confining interaction. The chiral symmetry breaking and the quark Green function are obtained from the Schwinger-Dyson (gap) equation while the color-singlet meson spectrum results from the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We solve this model at T=0 and finite chemical potential {mu} and obtain a clear chiral restoration phase transition at the critical value {mu}{sub cr}. Below this value the spectrum is similar to the previously obtained one at {mu}=0. At {mu}>{mu}{sub cr} the quarks are still confined and the physical spectrum consists of bound states which are arranged into a complete set of exact chiral multiplets. This explicitly demonstrates that a chirally symmetric matter consisting of confined but chirally symmetric hadrons at finite chemical potential is also possible in QCD. If so, there must be nontrivial implications for astrophysics.

  10. Chirally symmetric but confining dense, cold matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glozman, L. Ya.; Wagenbrunn, R. F.

    2008-03-01

    The folklore tradition about the QCD phase diagram is that at the chiral restoration phase transition at finite density hadrons are deconfined and there appears the quark matter. We address this question within the only known exactly solvable confining and chirally symmetric model. It is postulated within this model that there exists linear Coulomb-like confining interaction. The chiral symmetry breaking and the quark Green function are obtained from the Schwinger-Dyson (gap) equation while the color-singlet meson spectrum results from the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We solve this model at T=0 and finite chemical potential μ and obtain a clear chiral restoration phase transition at the critical value μcr. Below this value the spectrum is similar to the previously obtained one at μ=0. At μ>μcr the quarks are still confined and the physical spectrum consists of bound states which are arranged into a complete set of exact chiral multiplets. This explicitly demonstrates that a chirally symmetric matter consisting of confined but chirally symmetric hadrons at finite chemical potential is also possible in QCD. If so, there must be nontrivial implications for astrophysics.

  11. National Ignition Facility for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Murray, J.R.

    1997-10-08

    The National Ignition Facility for inertial confinement fusion will contain a 1.8 MJ, 500 TW frequency-tripled neodymium glass laser system that will be used to explore fusion ignition and other problems in the physics of high temperature and density. We describe the facility briefly. The NIF is scheduled to be completed in 2003.

  12. Condensation of topological defects and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaete, Patricio; Wotzasek, Clovis

    2004-11-01

    We study the static quantum potential for a theory of antisymmetric tensor fields that results from the condensation of topological defects, within the framework of the gauge-invariant but path-dependent variables formalism. Our calculations show that the interaction energy is the sum of a Yukawa and a linear potentials, leading to the confinement of static probe charges.

  13. Myoglobin unfolding in crowding and confinement.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ashima; Kundu, Jayanta; Mukherjee, Sanjib K; Chowdhury, Pramit K

    2012-11-01

    Crowding and confinement have often been used synonymously with regard to their effect on the structure and dynamics of proteins. In this work, we have investigated the unfolding of the protein myoglobin (Mb) entrapped in the confinement of the water pool of AOT reverse micelles and in the presence of some commonly used macromolecular crowding agents (Ficoll 70, Dextran 70, and Dextran 40). Our results reveal that confinement effects can be quite destabilizing in nature for Mb with the extent of distortion depending on a host of factors apart from the size of the confining cage. Effects of the crowding agents on myoglobin also show a deviation from the general notion that synthetic macromolecular crowding agents are always stabilizing in nature. Ficoll 70 was observed to be particularly destabilizing in its influence on Mb unfolding. Moreover, tryptophan lifetime studies point to the fact that the Trp-heme distance in Mb might not always be a reliable probe of the secondary structural dissolution of the protein. PMID:23025527

  14. Wellhead protection in confined, semi-confined, fractured and karst aquifer settings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Protection areas around wells producing from confined, fractured, and karst aquifers are, because of their complex hydrogeology, more difficult to define than protection areas for wells in porous media settings. The factsheet provides background information explaining the need to define protection areas for wells that draw public drinking water from several complex hydrogeologic settings: confined, semi-confined, fractured, and karst aquifers. These settings include aquifers in which the ground water is not open to the atmosphere, or the aquifer does not consist of unconsolidated porous media. Several figures illustrate these settings in a general way.

  15. Pressure-driven opening of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2016-03-01

    The closing and opening of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is essential for their applications in nanoscale chemistry and biology. We report reactive molecular dynamics simulations of CNT opening triggered by internal pressure of encapsulated gas molecules. Confined argon generates 4000 bars of pressure inside capped CNT and lowers the opening temperature by 200 K. Chemical interactions greatly enhance the efficiency of CNT opening: fluorine-filled CNTs open by fluorination of carbon bonds at temperature and pressure that are 700 K and 1000 bar lower than for argon-filled CNTs. Moreover, pressure induced CNT opening by confined gases leaves the CNT cylinders intact and removes only the fullerene caps, while the empty CNT decomposes completely. In practice, the increase in pressure can be achieved by near-infrared light, which penetrates through water and biological tissues and is absorbed by CNTs, resulting in rapid local heating. Spanning over a thousand of bars and Kelvin, the reactive and non-reactive scenarios of CNT opening represent extreme cases and allow for a broad experimental control over properties of the CNT interior and release conditions of the confined species. The detailed insights into the thermodynamic conditions and chemical mechanisms of the pressure-induced CNT opening provide practical guidelines for the development of novel nanoreactors, catalysts, photo-catalysts, imaging labels and drug delivery vehicles.

  16. An experimental study of a self-confined flow with ring-vorticity distribution. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. M.; Moore, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A new form of self-confined flow was investigated in which a recirculation zone forms away from any solid boundary. An inviscid flow analysis indicated that in a purely meridional axisymmetric flow a stationary, spherical, self-confined region should occur in the center of a streamlined divergent-convergent enlargement zone. The spherical confinement region would be at rest and at constant pressure. Experimental investigations were carried out in a specially built test apparatus to establish the desired confined flow. The streamlined divergent-convergent interior shape of the test section was fabricated according to the theoretical calculation for a particular streamline. The required inlet vorticity distribution was generated by producing a velocity profile with a shaped gauze screen in the straight pipe upstream of the test section. Fluid speed and turbulence intensity were measured with a constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer system. The measured results indicated a very orderly and stable flow field.

  17. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Helium Near its Transition Temperature T(sub lambda) in a 2D Confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerebets, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We report our recent experiments on thermal conductivity measurements of superfluid He-4 near its phase transition in a two-dimensional (2D) confinement under saturated vapor pressure. A 2D confinement is created by 2-mm- and 1-mm-thick glass capillary plates, consisting of densely populated parallel microchannels with cross-sections of 5 x 50 and 1 x 10 microns, correspondingly. A heat current (2 < Q < 400 nW/sq cm) was applied along the channels long direction. High-resolution measurements were provided by DC SQUID-based high-resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers (HRTs) with a nanokelvin resolution. We might find that thermal conductivity of confined helium is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Our 2D results will be compared with those in a bulk and 1D confinement.

  18. Experimental evidence for a liquid-liquid crossover in deeply cooled confined water.

    PubMed

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-21

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis. PMID:25479506

  19. Effect of temperature and pressure on the dynamics of nanoconfined propane

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Siddharth Liu, Tingting Welch, Susan; Cole, David; Rother, Gernot; Jalarvo, Niina; Mamontov, Eugene

    2014-04-24

    We report the effect of temperature and pressure on the dynamical properties of propane confined in nanoporous silica aerogel studied using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). Our results demonstrate that the effect of a change in the pressure dominates over the effect of temperature variation on the dynamics of propane nano-confined in silica aerogel. At low pressures, most of the propane molecules are strongly bound to the pore walls, only a small fraction is mobile. As the pressure is increased, the fraction of mobile molecules increases. A change in the mechanism of motion, from continuous diffusion at low pressures to jump diffusion at higher pressures has also been observed.

  20. Energy Confinement of High-Density Pellet-Fueled Plasmas in the Alcator C Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, M.; Gwinn, D.; Milora, S.; Parker, J.; Parker, R.; Wolfe, S.; Besen, M.; Camacho, F.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Foord, M.; Gandy, R.; Gomez, C.; Granetz, R.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Lloyd, B.; Marmar, E.; McCool, S.; Pappas, D.; Petrasso, R.; Pribyl, P.; Rice, J.; Schuresko, D.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Watterson, R.

    1984-07-01

    A series of pellet-fueling experiments has been carried out on the Alcator C tokamak. High-speed hydrogen pellets penetrate to within a few centimeters of the magnetic axis, raise the plasma density, and produce peaked density profiles. Energy confinement is observed to increase over similar discharges fueled only by gas puffing. In this manner record values of electron density, plasma pressure, and Lawson number (n τ) have been achieved.

  1. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  2. The Interplay of Quantum Confinement and Hydrogenation in Amorphous Silicon Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Askari, Sadegh; Svrcek, Vladmir; Maguire, Paul; Mariotti, Davide

    2015-12-22

    Hydrogenation in amorphous silicon quantum dots (QDs) has a dramatic impact on the corresponding optical properties and band energy structure, leading to a quantum-confined composite material with unique characteristics. The synthesis of a-Si:H QDs is demonstrated with an atmospheric-pressure plasma process, which allows for accurate control of a highly chemically reactive non-equilibrium environment with temperatures well below the crystallization temperature of Si QDs. PMID:26523743

  3. Numerical simulation of forced convection of nanofluid in a confined jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Esbo, M.; Ranjbar, A. A.; Ramiar, A.; Rahgoshay, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper two-dimensional incompressible water-Al2O3 nanofluid flow in a confined jet in the laminar flow regime is numerically investigated. A finite volume technique on a collocated grid is employed for discretizing the governing equations by applying the SIMPLE algorithm to link the pressure and velocity fields. The present computations are in a very good agreement with experimental results in open literature.

  4. High hydrostatic pressure activates gene expression that leads to ethanol production enhancement in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae distillery strain

    PubMed Central

    Bravim, Fernanda; Lippman, Soyeon I.; da Silva, Lucas F.; Souza, Diego T.; Fernandes, A. Alberto R.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Broach, James R.

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a stress that exerts broad effects on microorganisms with characteristics similar to those of common environmental stresses. In this study, we aimed to identify genetic mechanisms that can enhance alcoholic fermentation of wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Brazilian spirit fermentation vats. Accordingly, we performed a time course microarray analysis on a S. cerevisiae strain submitted to mild sublethal pressure treatment of 50 MPa for 30 min at room temperature, followed by incubation for 5, 10 and 15 min without pressure treatment. The obtained transcriptional profiles demonstrate the importance of post-pressurisation period on the activation of several genes related to cell recovery and stress tolerance. Based on these results, we over-expressed genes strongly induced by HHP in the same wild yeast strain and identified genes, particularly SYM1, whose over-expression results in enhanced ethanol production and stress tolerance upon fermentation. The present study validates the use of HHP as a biotechnological tool for the fermentative industries. PMID:22915193

  5. DNA Confined in Nanochannels and Nanoslits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, Douglas R.

    It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that next-generation sequencing (NGS) has a blind spot for large scale genomic variation, which is crucial for understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship. Genomic mapping methods attempt to overcome the weakesses of NGS by providing a coarse-grained map of the distances between restriction sites to aid in sequence assembly. From such methods, one hopes to realize fast and inexpensive de novo sequencing of human and plant genomes. One of the most promising methods for genomic mapping involves placing DNA inside a device only a few dozen nanometers wide called a nanochannel. A nanochannel stretches the DNA so that the distance between fluorescently labeled restriction sites can be measured en route to obtaining an accurate genome map. Unfortunately for those who wish to design devices, the physics of how DNA stretches when confined in a nanochannel is still an active area of research. Indeed, despite decades old theories from polymer physics regarding weakly and strongly stretched polymers, seminal experiments in the mid-2000s have gone unexplained until very recently. With a goal of creating a realistic engineering model of DNA in nanochannels, this dissertation addresses a number of important outstanding research topics in this area. We first discuss the physics of dilute solutions of DNA in free solution, which show distinctive behavior due to the stiff nature of the polymer. We then turn our attention to the equilibrium regimes of confined DNA and explore the effects of stiff chains and weak excluded volume on the confinement free energy and polymer extension. We also examine dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient and the characteristic relaxation time. Finally, we discuss a sister problem related to DNA confined in nanoslits, which shares much of the same physics as DNA confined in channels. Having done this, we find ourselves with a well-parameterized wormlike chain model that is

  6. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  7. In-core pressure tube rupture at N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McLaren, J.M.

    1989-07-01

    A double-ended guillotine break in a pressure tube while the reactor was at full power was analyzed. The analysis showed that the reactor scrams on high pressure tube flow. The released coolant escapes into the reactor graphite moderator where the reactor gas system vents direct the flow to the confinement. There was no fuel damage. 10 refs., 31 figs.

  8. PKL reactor tank bottom pressures in accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tudor, A.A.

    1987-03-10

    Nuclear Engineering Division requested estimates of the maximum PKL reactor tank pressures associated with postulated reactor accidents. Tank bottom pressures calculated in establishing confinement protection limits (CPL) in Mark 16B-31 and Mark 22 reactor charges are given in this document.

  9. The polymer physics of single DNA confined in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang; Renner, C Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, applications and experimental studies of DNA in nanochannels have stimulated the investigation of the polymer physics of DNA in confinement. Recent advances in the physics of confined polymers, using DNA as a model polymer, have moved beyond the classic Odijk theory for the strong confinement, and the classic blob theory for the weak confinement. In this review, we present the current understanding of the behaviors of confined polymers while briefly reviewing classic theories. Three aspects of confined DNA are presented: static, dynamic, and topological properties. The relevant simulation methods are also summarized. In addition, comparisons of confined DNA with DNA under tension and DNA in semidilute solution are made to emphasize universal behaviors. Finally, an outlook of the possible future research for confined DNA is given. PMID:26782150

  10. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  11. Institutional games played by confined juveniles.

    PubMed

    Bartollas, C; Sieverdes, C M

    1983-01-01

    This study examined the games played by 561 juvenile offenders confined in six coeducational correctional facilities in one state. The types of games these residents used against staff and peers within the confines of the institution varied considerably. The study documented nineteen games used by males and females, twelve to deal with staff and seven to deal with peers. The games were defined as therapeutic games, material games, psychological games, and physical games. Peer-oriented games included attention-seeking activities and a variety of dominance games. Additionally, these games were described and tabulated according to the sex and race of the residents. The conclusion was that game-playing behavior was no less frequent in coeducational institutions than it was in single-sex institutions. PMID:6650271

  12. Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens

    PubMed Central

    Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; De Wit, A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nanoscale tubes, brinicles, or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy, and reaction–diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom, and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze 2D patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space. PMID:25385581

  13. Nonlinear adhesion dynamics of confined lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Tung; Le Goff, Thomas; Pierre-Louis, Olivier

    Lipid membranes, which are ubiquitous objects in biological environments are often confined. For example, they can be sandwiched between a substrate and the cytoskeleton between cell adhesion, or between other membranes in stacks, or in the Golgi apparatus. We present a study of the nonlinear dynamics of membranes in a model system, where the membrane is confined between two flat walls. The dynamics derived from the lubrication approximation is highly nonlinear and nonlocal. The solution of this model in one dimension exhibits frozen states due to oscillatory interactions between membranes caused by the bending rigidity. We develope a kink model for these phenomena based on the historical work of Kawasaki and Otha. In two dimensions, the dynamics is more complex, and depends strongly on the amount of excess area in the system. We discuss the relevance of our findings for experiments on model membranes, and for biological systems. Supported by the grand ANR Biolub.

  14. Confinement of Fractional Quantum Hall States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Robert; Manfra, Michael; West, Ken; Pfeiffer, Loren

    2008-03-01

    Confinement of small-gapped fractional quantum Hall states facilitates quasiparticle manipulation and is an important step towards quasiparticle interference measurements. Demonstrated here is conduction through top gate defined, narrow channels in high density, ultra-high mobility heterostructures. Transport evidence for the persistence of a correlated state at filling fraction 5/3 is shown in channels of 2μm length but gated to near 0.3μm in width. The methods employed to achieve this confinement hold promise for interference devices proposed for studying potential non-Abelian statistics at filling fraction 5/2. R.L. Willett, M.J. Manfra, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W. West, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 052105 (2007).

  15. Spontaneous circulation of confined active suspensions.

    PubMed

    Woodhouse, Francis G; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2012-10-19

    Many active fluid systems encountered in biology are set in total geometric confinement. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells is a prominent and ubiquitous example, in which cargo-carrying molecular motors move along polymer filaments and generate coherent cell-scale flow. When filaments are not fixed to the cell periphery, a situation found both in vivo and in vitro, we observe that the basic dynamics of streaming are closely related to those of a nonmotile stresslet suspension. Under this model, it is demonstrated that confinement makes possible a stable circulating state; a linear stability analysis reveals an activity threshold for spontaneous autocirculation. Numerical analysis of the longtime behavior reveals a phenomenon akin to defect separation in nematic liquid crystals and a high-activity bifurcation to an oscillatory regime. PMID:23215137

  16. Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Florence; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Brau, Fabian; De Wit, A

    2014-12-01

    Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nanoscale tubes, brinicles, or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy, and reaction-diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom, and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze 2D patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space. PMID:25385581

  17. Charge transport in confined ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangoro, Joshua; Iacob, Ciprian; Kipnusu, Wycliffe; Kremer, Friedrich

    2011-03-01

    Charge transport and glassy dynamics in neat and polymerized ionic liquids confined in nanoporous silica are investigated in a wide frequency and temperature ranges by a combination of Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy and Pulsed Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR). By applying the Einstein-Smoluchowski relations to the dielectric spectra, diffusion coefficients are obtained in quantitative agreement with independent PFG NMR. The impact of geometrical confinement as well as the pore wall-ionic liquid interactions on the overall ionic mobility is explored for diverse categories of ionic liquids. The results are discussed within the framework of dynamic glass transition assisted charge transport in ionic liquids. Financial support from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under the DFG SPP 1191 Priority Program on Ionic Liquids is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Size scaling of microtubule asters in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, James; Field, Christine; Krutkramelis, Kaspars; Fakhri, Nikta; Oakey, John; Gatlin, Jay; Mitchison, Timothy

    Microtubule asters are radial arrays of microtubules (MTs) nucleated around organizing centers (MTOCs). Across a wide range of cell types and sizes, aster positioning influences cellular organization. To investigate aster size and positioning, we reconstituted dynamic asters in Xenopus cytoplasmic extract, confined in fluorous oil microfluidic emulsions. In large droplets, we observed centering of MTOCs. In small droplets, we observed a breakdown in natural positioning, with MTOCs at the droplet edge and buckled or bundled MTs along the interface. In different systems, asters are positioned by different forces, such as pushing due to MT polymerization, or pulling due to bulk or cortical dynein. To estimate different contributions to aster positioning, we biochemically perturbed dynactin function, or MT or actin polymerization. We used carbon nanotubes to measure molecular motions and forces in asters. These experimental results inform quantitative biophysical models of aster size and positioning in confinement. JFP was supported by a Fannie and John Hertz Graduate Fellowship.

  19. Spontaneous Circulation of Confined Active Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Francis G.; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2012-10-01

    Many active fluid systems encountered in biology are set in total geometric confinement. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells is a prominent and ubiquitous example, in which cargo-carrying molecular motors move along polymer filaments and generate coherent cell-scale flow. When filaments are not fixed to the cell periphery, a situation found both in vivo and in vitro, we observe that the basic dynamics of streaming are closely related to those of a nonmotile stresslet suspension. Under this model, it is demonstrated that confinement makes possible a stable circulating state; a linear stability analysis reveals an activity threshold for spontaneous autocirculation. Numerical analysis of the longtime behavior reveals a phenomenon akin to defect separation in nematic liquid crystals and a high-activity bifurcation to an oscillatory regime.

  20. Confinement and stability of a Crystalline Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1993-05-10

    This technical report defines and describes a Crystalline Beam. This is an ordered state of matter made of electrically charged ions which are moving together in a storage ring with very high density and small velocity spread. In particular, the paper analyses the requirements for the confinement and the stability of the Beam. It is demonstrated that a storage ring made of one circular weak-focusing magnet, similar to a Betatron, is the most suitable for the confinement and stability of the Crystalline Beam. The disruptive effects of drift insertions have also been investigated. Requirements on final densities and velocity spreads are also calculated and reported. A matrix formalism is developed for the design of the storage ring. The important issue of the disruption caused by the curvature of the closed trajectory is not here discussed; it is the subject of a subsequent paper.

  1. Inertial-confinement fusion with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-05-01

    The quest for controlled fusion energy has been ongoing for over a half century. The demonstration of ignition and energy gain from thermonuclear fuels in the laboratory has been a major goal of fusion research for decades. Thermonuclear ignition is widely considered a milestone in the development of fusion energy, as well as a major scientific achievement with important applications in national security and basic sciences. The US is arguably the world leader in the inertial confinement approach to fusion and has invested in large facilities to pursue it, with the objective of establishing the science related to the safety and reliability of the stockpile of nuclear weapons. Although significant progress has been made in recent years, major challenges still remain in the quest for thermonuclear ignition via laser fusion. Here, we review the current state of the art in inertial confinement fusion research and describe the underlying physical principles.

  2. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Girotto, Matheus Levin, Yan; Santos, Alexandre P. dos; Colla, Thiago

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  3. Effective string description of confining flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Meineri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We review the current knowledge about the theoretical foundations of the effective string theory for confining flux tubes and the comparison of the predictions to pure gauge lattice data. A concise presentation of the effective string theory is provided, incorporating recent developments. We summarize the predictions for the spectrum and the profile/width of the flux tube and their comparison to lattice data. The review closes with a short summary of open questions for future research.

  4. Confinement scaling and ignition in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

    1985-10-01

    A drift wave turbulence model is used to compute the scaling and magnitude of central electron temperature and confinement time of tokamak plasmas. The results are in accord with experiment. Application to ignition experiments shows that high density (1 to 2) . 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, high field, B/sub T/ > 10 T, but low temperature T approx. 6 keV constitute the optimum path to ignition.

  5. [Ethics and solitary confinement in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The decision to treat a patient in solitary confinement in psychiatry does not follow any protocol and is not made on a case-by-case basis. Team deliberation opens discussion and enables the group as a whole to take responsibility for clarifying what is to be supported by the team and implemented by the carer during treatment. When presented with complex situations, uncertainty can be a force when it calls upon an ethical dilemma. PMID:25335218

  6. Neoclassical transport in enhanced confinement toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    It has recently been reported that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas have been observed to fall below the irreducible minimum level predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system.

  7. LDV Measurement of Confined Parallel Jet Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    R.F. Kunz; S.W. D'Amico; P.F. Vassallo; M.A. Zaccaria

    2001-01-31

    Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements were taken in a confinement, bounded by two parallel walls, into which issues a row of parallel jets. Two-component measurements were taken of two mean velocity components and three Reynolds stress components. As observed in isolated three dimensional wall bounded jets, the transverse diffusion of the jets is quite large. The data indicate that this rapid mixing process is due to strong secondary flows, transport of large inlet intensities and Reynolds stress anisotropy effects.

  8. Freezing of fluids confined between mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ayappa, K G; Mishra, Ratan K

    2007-12-27

    Using grand ensemble simulations, we show that octamethyl-cyclo-tetra-siloxane (OMCTS) confined between two mica surfaces can form a variety of frozen phases which undergo solid-solid transitions as a function of the separation between the surfaces. For atomically smooth mica surfaces, the following sequence of transitions 1[triangle up] --> 1[triangle up]b --> 2B --> 2 square --> 2[triangle up] are observed in the one- and two-layered regimes, where n[triangle up], n[square], and nB denote triangular, square, and buckled phases, respectively, with the prefix n denoting the number of confined layers. The presence of potassium on mica is seen to have a strong influence on the degree of order induced in the fluid. The sequence of solid-solid transitions that occurs with the smooth mica surface is no longer observed. When equilibrated with a state point near the liquid-solid transition, a counterintuitive freezing scenario is observed in the presence of potassium. Potassium disrupts in-plane ordering in the fluid in contact with the mica surface, and freezing is observed only in the inner confined layers. The largest mica separations at which frozen phases were observed ranged from separations that could accommodate six to seven fluid layers. The extent of freezing and the square-to-triangular lattice transition was found to be sensitive to the presence of potassium as well as the thermodynamic conditions of the bulk fluid. The implications of our results on interpretation of surface force experiments as well as the generic phase behavior of confined soft spheres is discussed. PMID:18092763

  9. Cosmic Ray Self-Confinement, Escape and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays (CR) in a self-confinement regime is discussed. A self-similar solution for a CR-cloud expansion along the magnetic field strongly deviates from test-particle results. The normalized CR partial pressure is close to P (p , z , t) = 2 [ | z |5/3 +zdif5 / 3 (p , t) ]- 3 / 5 exp [ -z2 / 4DB (p) t ] , where p is the momentum of CR and z is directed along the field. The core of the cloud expands as zdif ~√{DNL p t } and decays in time as P ~ 2zdif- 1 (t) . The diffusion coefficient DNL is strongly suppressed compared to its background value DB: DNL ~DB exp - Π <pressure, Π. When Π >> 1 , the CRs drive Alfven waves efficiently enough to build a transport barrier (P ~ 2 / | z | -``pedestal'') that strongly reduces the leakage. The solution has a spectral break in momentum spectrum at p =pbr , where pbr satisfies the following equation DNLpbr ~=z2 / t . Magnetic focusing effects in CR transport are briefly discussed. Partially supported by NASA through ATP NNX14AH36G.

  10. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations. PMID:25493746

  11. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  12. Confinement time and energy balance in the CTX spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    The multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic on CTX allows measurement of electron plasma pressure. The pressure correlates well with the poloidal flux function. Analysis using equilibrium models allows the (..beta..)/sub vol/ to be calculated from over 100 Thomson scattering profiles taken under standard conditions of spheromak operation where the plasma parameters vary widely within the discharge. The calculated tau/sub E/ increases with central core temperature and with density. The global magnetic energy decay time tau/sub B/2 is consistent with Spitzer-Harm resistivity, but with an anomaly factor of 2 to 4 which may decrease at small ratios of B/n. The n tau/sub E/ product reaches 4 x 10/sup 9/ s cm/sup -3/ during the hottest part of the discharge. A zero-dimensional energy balance code, which accurately includes all the major atomic physics processes and whose parameters have been constrained by comparision to experimental data, is used to identify the causes of energy loss that contribute to the observed confinement time. The most important power loss is that needed to replace the particles being lost and to maintain the constant density of the plateau.

  13. Fast ion JET diagnostics: confinement and losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Syme, D. B.; Cecconello, M.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Yavorskij, V.; Johnson, T.; Murari, A.; Reich, M.; Gorini, G.; Zoita, V.

    2008-03-12

    A study of magnetically confined fast ions in tokamaks plays an important role in burning plasma research. To reach ignition and steady burning of a reactor plasma an adequate confinement of energetic ions produced by NBI heating, accelerated with ICRF and born in fusion reactions is essential to provide efficient heating of the bulk plasma. Thus, investigation of the fast ion behaviour is an immediate task for present-day large machines, such as JET, in order to understand the main mechanisms of slowing down, redistribution and losses, and to develop optimal plasma scenarios. Today's JET has an enhanced suite of fast ion diagnostics both of confined and lost ions that enable to significantly contribute to this important area of research. Fast ion populations of p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, made with ICRF, NBI, and fusion reactions have been investigated in experiments on JET with sophisticated diagnostics in conventional and shear-reversed plasmas, exploring a wide range of effects. This paper will introduce to the JET fast-ion diagnostic techniques and will give an overview of recent observations. A synergy of the unique diagnostic set was utilised in JET, and studies of the response of fast ions to MHD modes (e.g. tornado modes, sawtooth crashes), fast {sup 3}He-ions behaviour in shear-reversed plasmas are impressive examples of that. Some results on fast ion losses in JET experiments with various levels of the toroidal field ripple will be demonstrated.

  14. Active nematics confined within a shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; de Pablo, Juan; dePablo Team

    Active fluids exhibit many striking flow patterns when confined within complex geometries. For example, recent work has demonstrated that when a thin film of extensile microtubules is confined within a vesicle, the four + 1 / 2 defects periodically oscillate between a tetrahedral and a planar configuration (Keber, et al. Science (2014). Here we employ hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations to study the dynamics of active nematics confined between two concentric spherical surfaces. We find that in both extensile and contractile systems, the four defects are coupled with noticeable macroscopic velocities and they move along their symmetry axes, eventhough in different patterns. We observe that in extensile systems with moderate activity, defects repel each other due to elastic forces, and their collective motion leads to the same patterned dynamics as observed in the above experiment. We further show that this periodic dynamics is accompanied by oscillations of the defect velocity, system's elastic energy, and the emergence and annihilation of vortices. We also observe that with stronger activity, the extensile system evolves to chaos. In contrast, the contractile system remains passive for the entire activity range, with defects being attracted to each other in pairs.

  15. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biancofiore, L.; Gallaire, F.

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163-185 (2007)], 10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006)], 10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs.

  16. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors. PMID:27301444

  17. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels.

  18. Entanglement as a probe of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klebanov, Igor R.; Kutasov, David; Murugan, Arvind

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the entanglement entropy in gravity duals of confining large N gauge theories using the proposal of [S. Ryu, T. Takayanagi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 181602, hep-th/0603001; S. Ryu, T. Takayanagi, JHEP 0608 (2006) 045, hep-th/0605073]. Dividing one of the directions of space into a line segment of length l and its complement, the entanglement entropy between the two subspaces is given by the classical action of the minimal bulk hypersurface which approaches the endpoints of the line segment at the boundary. We find that in confining backgrounds there are generally two such surfaces. One consists of two disconnected components localized at the endpoints of the line segment. The other contains a tube connecting the two components. The disconnected surface dominates the entropy for l above a certain critical value l while the connected one dominates below that value. The change of behavior at l=l is reminiscent of the finite temperature deconfinement transition: for ll as Nc0. We argue that a similar transition should occur in any field theory with a Hagedorn spectrum of non-interacting bound states. The requirement that the entanglement entropy has a phase transition may be useful in constraining gravity duals of confining theories.

  19. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes

    PubMed Central

    Biancofiore, L.; Gallaire, F.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163–185 (2007)]10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)]10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171–195 (2006)]10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs. PMID:22865998

  20. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevertz, Jana L.; Gillies, George T.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2008-09-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics.

  1. Random Matrices in Non-confining Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allez, Romain; Dumaz, Laure

    2015-08-01

    We consider invariant matrix processes diffusing in non-confining cubic potentials of the form . We construct the trajectories of such processes for all time by restarting them whenever an explosion occurs, from a new (well chosen) initial condition, insuring continuity of the eigenvectors and of the non exploding eigenvalues. We characterize the dynamics of the spectrum in the limit of large dimension and analyze the stationary state of this evolution explicitly. We exhibit a sharp phase transition for the limiting spectral density at a critical value . If , then the potential presents a well near deep enough to confine all the particles inside, and the spectral density is supported on a compact interval. If however, the steady state is in fact dynamical with a macroscopic stationary flux of particles flowing across the system. We prove that this flux displays a second order phase transition at the critical value such that when where is an explicit constant. In the subcritical regime, the eigenvalues allocate according to a stationary density profile with full support in , flanked with heavy tails such that as . Our method applies to other non-confining potentials and we further investigate a family of quartic potentials, which were already studied in (Brezin et al. in Commun Math Phys 59:35-51, 1978) to count planar diagrams.

  2. Dynamics of Hyperbranched Polymers under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androulaki, Krystallenia; Chrissopoulou, Kiriaki; Anastasiadis, Spiros H.; Prevosto, Daniele; Labardi, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    The effect of severe confinement on the dynamics of three different generations of hyperbranched polyesters (Boltorns) is investigated by Dielectric Spectroscopy. The polymers are intercalated within the galleries of natural Na+-MMT, thus, forming 1nm polymer films confined between solid walls. The Tg's of the polymers determined by DSC show a clear dependence on the generation whereas the transition is completely suppressed when all the polymer chains are intercalated. The dynamic investigation of the bulk polymers reveals two sub-Tg processes, with similar behavior for the three polymers with the segmental relaxation observed above the Tg of each. For the nanocomposites, where all polymers are severely confined, the dynamics show significant differences compared to that of the bulk polymers. The sub-Tg processes are similar for the three generations but significantly faster and with weaker temperature dependence than those in the bulk. The segmental process appears at temperatures below the bulk polymer Tg, it exhibits an Arrhenius temperature dependence and shows differences for the three generations. A slow process that appears at higher temperatures is due to interfacial polarization. Co-financed by the EU and Greek funds through the Operational Program ``Education and Lifelong Learning'' of the NSRF-Research Funding Program: THALES-Investing in knowledge society through the Eur. Social Fund (MIS 377278) and COST Action MP0902-COINAPO.

  3. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  4. Coronal Electron Confinement by Double Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2013-12-01

    In observations of flare-heated electrons in the solar corona, a longstanding problem is the unexplained prolonged lifetime of the electrons compared to their transit time across the source. This suggests confinement. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which explored the transport of pre-accelerated hot electrons through ambient cold plasma, showed that the formation of a highly localized electrostatic potential drop, in the form of a double layer (DL), significantly inhibited the transport of hot electrons. The effectiveness of confinement by a DL is linked to the strength of the DL as defined by its potential drop. In this work, we investigate the scaling of the DL strength with the hot electron temperature by PIC simulations and find a linear scaling. We demonstrate that the strength is limited by the formation of parallel shocks. Based on this, we analytically determine the maximum DL strength, and also find a linear scaling with the hot electron temperature. The DL strength obtained from the analytic calculation is comparable to that from the simulations. At the maximum strength, the DL is capable of confining a significant fraction of hot electrons in the source.

  5. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-29

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels. PMID:26871357

  6. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, L; Gallaire, F

    2012-07-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163-185 (2007)]10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)]10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006)]10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs. PMID:22865998

  7. Confined Turbulent Swirling Recirculating Flow Predictions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow, the STARPIC computer code, turbulence modeling of turbulent flows, the k-xi turbulence model and extensions, turbulence parameters deduction from swirling confined flow measurements, extension of the k-xi to confined swirling recirculating flows, and general predictions for confined turbulent swirling flow are discussed.

  8. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  9. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  10. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  11. 25 CFR 141.21 - Trade confined to premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Trade confined to premises. 141.21 Section 141.21 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.21 Trade confined to premises. The licensee shall confine all trade on the reservation to the premises specified in the license, except,...

  12. 25 CFR 141.21 - Trade confined to premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trade confined to premises. 141.21 Section 141.21 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.21 Trade confined to premises. The licensee shall confine all trade on the reservation to the premises specified in the license, except,...

  13. 25 CFR 141.21 - Trade confined to premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Trade confined to premises. 141.21 Section 141.21 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.21 Trade confined to premises. The licensee shall confine all trade on the reservation to the premises specified in the license, except,...

  14. 25 CFR 141.21 - Trade confined to premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Trade confined to premises. 141.21 Section 141.21 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.21 Trade confined to premises. The licensee shall confine all trade on the reservation to the premises specified in the license, except,...

  15. 25 CFR 141.21 - Trade confined to premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Trade confined to premises. 141.21 Section 141.21 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.21 Trade confined to premises. The licensee shall confine all trade on the reservation to the premises specified in the license, except,...

  16. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  17. Pressure enhanced penetration with shaped charge perforators

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, Lewis A.

    2001-01-01

    A downhole tool, adapted to retain a shaped charge surrounded by a superatmospherically pressurized light gas, is employed in a method for perforating a casing and penetrating reservoir rock around a wellbore. Penetration of a shaped charge jet can be enhanced by at least 40% by imploding a liner in the high pressure, light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. The light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is employed to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse.

  18. Interfacial thermodynamics of confined water near molecularly rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Jeetain; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of nanoscopic roughness on the interfacial free energy of water confined between solid surfaces. SPC/E water is simulated in confinement between two infinite planar surfaces that differ in their physical topology: one is smooth and the other one is physically rough on a nanometer length scale. The two thermodynamic ensembles considered, with constant pressure either normal or parallel to the walls, correspond to different experimental conditions. We find that molecular-scale surface roughness significantly increases the solid-liquid interfacial free energy compared to the smooth surface. For our surfaces with a water-wall interaction energy minimum of −1.2 kcal/mol, we observe a transition from a hydrophilic surface to a hydrophobic surface at a roughness amplitude of about 3 Å and a wave length of 11.6 Å, with the interfacial free energy changing sign from negative to positive. In agreement with previous studies of water near hydrophobic surfaces, we find an increase in the isothermal compressibility of water with increasing surface roughness. Interestingly, average measures of the water density and hydrogen-bond number do not contain distinct signatures of increased hydrophobicity. In contrast, a local analysis indicates transient dewetting of water in the valleys of the rough surface, together with a significant loss of hydrogen bonds, and a change in the dipole orientation toward the surface. These microscopic changes in the density, hydrogen bonding, and water orientation contribute to the large increase in the interfacial free energy, and the change from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic character of the surface. PMID:21043431

  19. Confinement of pure ion plasma in a cylindrical current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Stephen F.; Chao, Edward H.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.

    1999-12-01

    A novel method for containing a pure ion plasma at thermonuclear densities and temperatures has been modeled. The method combines the confinement principles of a Penning-Malmberg trap and a pulsed theta-pinch. A conventional Penning trap can confine a uniform-density plasma of about 5×1011cm-3 with a 30-Tesla magnetic field. However, if the axial field is ramped, a much higher local ion density can be obtained. Starting with a 107cm-3 trapped deuterium plasma at the Brillouin limit (B=0.6 Tesla), the field is ramped to 30 Tesla. Because the plasma is comprised of particles of only one sign of charge, transport losses are very low, i.e., the conductivity is high. As a result, the ramped field does not penetrate the plasma and a diamagnetic surface current is generated, with the ions being accelerated to relativistic velocities. To counteract the inward j×B forces from this induced current, additional ions are injected into the plasma along the axis to increase the density (and mutual electrostatic repulsion) of the target plasma. In the absence of the higher magnetic field in the center, the ions drift outward until a balance is established between the outward driving forces (centrifugal, electrostatic, pressure gradient) and the inward j×B force. An equilibrium calculation using a relativistic, 1-D, cold-fluid model shows that a plasma can be trapped in a hollow, 49-cm diameter, 0.2-cm thick cylinder with a density exceeding 4×1014cm-3.

  20. Laser opto-acoustic study of phase transitions in metals confined by transparent dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivochkin, A. Yu.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Karabutov, A. A.; Ksenofontov, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    First-order phase transitions in metal induced by nanosecond laser pulse are studied here. The metal surface is irradiated through a layer of transparent dielectric—an optical glass. Such confinement considerably increases the efficiency of pressure generation at the metal surface. This technique allows to obtain near-critical states of metals—with temperatures ˜104 K and pressures ˜104 atm with table-top equipment. At the same time the glass prevents the ablation plume formation—so the surface temperature can be measured using thermal radiation data. An experimental setup for simultaneous measurements of pressure, temperature and reflectivity was assembled based on the elaborated method of experimental research. The processes of melting of lead and boiling of mercury were studied. The onset of the phase transition process led to a considerable tightening of the pressure pulse. A substantial drop of surface reflectivity due to increase of temperature and decrease of density was observed.

  1. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.; Morgan, John P.; Marchant, Norman J.; Bolton, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  2. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  3. Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pressure Systems, Inc.'s DPT 6400 is a system designed to increase productivity in industrial processes where there is a need for making multiple pressure measurements quickly and with high accuracy. It is applicable in controlling industrial processes in plants that are being upgraded to automated status. In order to automate such plants the pressures at the many loops must be measured, converted to digital information and transmitted to the plant's process control computer. The DPT 6400 serves that function. By employing solid-state pressure sensing transducers whose errors are automatically corrected by a microprocessor, it is capable of highly accurate pressure measurements. Basic DPT 6400 has 64 channels, but the system can be expanded to 256 channels by the addition of "slave" units.

  4. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing evidence for the presence of a large number of microbes in the oceanic subsurface. Such a habitat has a very low energy input because it is deprived of light. A few meters below the sediment surface, conditions are already anoxic in most cases, sulfate reduction and/or methanogenesis becoming thus the primary respiratory reactions of organic matter. Neither the fate of methanogenesis, nor the fate of Dissimilatory Metal-Reduction (DMR) has been investigated so far as a function of pressure. For this reason, we measured experimentally the pressure limits of microbial anaerobic energetic metabolism. In practice, we measured in situ the kinetics of selenite respiration by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) between 0 and 150 MPa at 30°C. MR-1 stationary-phase cells were used in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium amended with lactate as an additional electron donor and sodium selenite as an electron acceptor. In situ measurements were performed by X- ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy in both a diamond-anvil cell and an autoclave. A red precipitate of amorphous Se(0) was virtually observed at any pressure to 150 MPa. A progressive reduction of selenite Se(IV) into selenium Se(0) was also observed in the evolution of XANES spectra with time. All kinetics between 0.1 and 150 MPa can be adjusted to a first order kinetic law. MR-1 respires all available selenite up to 60 MPa. Above 60 MPa, the respiration yield decreases linearly as a function of pressure and reaches 0 at 155 ±5 MPa. This indicates that selenite respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 stops at about 155 MPa, whereas its growth is arrested at 50 MPa. Hence, the present results show that the respiration of selenium by the strain MR-1 occurs efficiently up to 60 MPa and 30°C, i.e. from the surface of a continental sediment to an equivalent depth of about 2 km, or beneath a 5-km water column and

  5. Role of Confinement on Adsorption and Dynamics of Ethane and an Ethane–CO 2 Mixture in Mesoporous CPG Silica

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Patankar, Sumant; Gautam, Siddharth; Rother, Gernot; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, Georg; Liu, Tingting; Cole, David R.; Tomasko, David L.

    2016-02-10

    It was found that ethane is confined to mineral and organic pores in certain shale formations. Effects of confinement on structural and dynamic properties of ethane in mesoporous controlled pore glass (CPG) were studied by gravimetric adsorption and quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. The obtained isotherms and scattering data complement each other by quantifying the relative strength of the solid–fluid interactions and the transport properties of the fluid under confinement, respectively. We used a magnetic suspension balance to measure the adsorption isotherms at two temperatures and over a range of pressures corresponding to a bulk density range of 0.01–0.35 g/cm3.more » Key confinement effects were highlighted through differences between isotherms for the two pore sizes. A comparison was made with previously published isotherms for CO2 on the same CPG materials. Behavior of ethane in the smaller pore size was probed further using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. By extracting the self-diffusivity and residence time, we were able to study the effect of pressure and transition from gaseous to supercritical densities on the dynamics of confined ethane. Moreover, a temperature variation QENS study was also completed with pure ethane and a CO2–ethane mixture. Activation energies extracted from the Arrhenius plots show the effects of CO2 addition on ethane mobility.« less

  6. Materials self-assembly and fabrication in confined spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Ji, Dr. Qingmin; Hill, Dr. Jonathan P; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Molecular assemblies have been mainly researched in open spaces for long time. However, recent researches have revealed that there are many interesting aspects remained in self-assemblies in confined spaces. Molecular association within nanospaces such as mesoporous materials provide unusual phenomena based on highly restricted molecular motions. Current research endeavors in materials science and technology are focused on developing either new class of materials or materials with novel/multiple functionalities which is often achived via molecular assembly in confined spaces. Template synthesis and guided assemblies are distinguishable examples for molecular assembly in confined spaces. So far, different aspects of molecular confinements are discussed separately. In this review, the focus is specifically to bring some potential developments in various aspects of confined spaces for molecular self-assembly under one roof. We arrange the sections in this review based on the nature of the confinements; accordingly the topological/geometrical confinements, chemical and biological confinements, and confinements within thin film, respectively. Following these sections, molecular confinements for practical applications are shortly described in order to show connections of these scientific aspects with possible practical uses. One of the most important facts is that the self-assembly in confined spaces stands at meeting points of top-down and bottom-up fabrications, which would be an ultimate key to push the limits of nanotechnology and nanoscience.

  7. Balancing Accuracy and Cost of Confinement Simulations by Interpolation and Extrapolation of Confinement Energies.

    PubMed

    Villemot, François; Capelli, Riccardo; Colombo, Giorgio; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2016-06-14

    Improvements to the confinement method for the calculation of conformational free energy differences are presented. By taking advantage of phase space overlap between simulations at different frequencies, significant gains in accuracy and speed are reached. The optimal frequency spacing for the simulations is obtained from extrapolations of the confinement energy, and relaxation time analysis is used to determine time steps, simulation lengths, and friction coefficients. At postprocessing, interpolation of confinement energies is used to significantly reduce discretization errors in the calculation of conformational free energies. The efficiency of this protocol is illustrated by applications to alanine n-peptides and lactoferricin. For the alanine-n-peptide, errors were reduced between 2- and 10-fold and sampling times between 8- and 67-fold, while for lactoferricin the long sampling times at low frequencies were reduced 10-100-fold. PMID:27120438

  8. Electron Energy Confinement for HHFW Heating and Current Drive Phasing on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    J.C. Hosea; S. Bernabei; T. Biewer; B. LeBlanc; C.K. Phillips; J.R. Wilson; D. Stutman; P. Ryan; D.W. Swain

    2005-05-03

    Thomson scattering laser pulses are synchronized relative to modulated HHFW power to permit evaluation of the electron energy confinement time during and following HHFW pulses for both heating and current drive antenna phasing. Profile changes resulting from instabilities require that the total electron stored energy, evaluated by integrating the midplane electron pressure P(sub)e(R) over the magnetic surfaces prescribed by EFIT analysis, be used to derive the electron energy confinement time. Core confinement is reduced during a sawtooth instability but, although the electron energy is distributed outward by the sawtooth, the bulk electron energy confinement time is essentially unaffected. The radial deposition of energy into the electrons is noticeably more peaked for current drive phasing (longer wavelength excitation) relative to that for heating phasing (shorter wavelength excitation) as is expected theoretically. However, the power delivered to the core plasma is reduced consider ably for the current drive phasing, indicating that surface/peripheral damping processes play a more important role for this case.

  9. Observation of sub-detonative responses in confined high density HMX-based PBXs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew; Wood, Andrew; Steward, Paul; Ottley, Philip; Gould, Peter; Lewtas, Ian

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes experiments and modelling aimed at understanding the behaviour of highly loaded (90%-95%) pressed HMX-based PBXs, when subjected to shock compression and ignition by means of distinct mechanical and thermal insults under confinement. In order to separate the role of the stimuli, a test has been designed where a metal impactor is propelled at test samples using a well characterised propellant over a range of velocities to produce various levels of mechanical damage. The impactor is then heated using a characterised pyrotechnic composition which ignites the mechanically damaged explosive. Tubes have been designed to examine the effect of confinement at burst pressures of 218.5MPa and 120MPa. The high confinement tubes employ polycarbonate windows and the low confinement tubes are manufactured from polycarbonate blocks to allow the reaction of the energetic material to be captured using high-speed video. Tests carried out using these tubes have given a good insight into the processes occurring. Modelling runs have predicted an oscillating compressive wave in the explosive and considerable damage at either end of the explosive column. The latter leads to potential deconsolidation once the donor charge has burnt out allowing increased burning and violence.

  10. Block copolymers confined in a nanopore: Pathfinding in a curving and frustrating flatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevink, G. J. A.; Zvelindovsky, A. V.

    2008-02-01

    We have studied structure formation in a confined block copolymer melt by means of dynamic density functional theory. The confinement is two dimensional, and the confined geometry is that of a cylindrical nanopore. Although the results of this study are general, our coarse-grained molecular model is inspired by an experimental lamella-forming polysterene-polybutadiene diblock copolymer system [K. Shin et al., Science 306, 76 (2004)], in which an exotic toroidal structure was observed upon confinement in alumina nanopores. Our computational study shows that a zoo of exotic structures can be formed, although the majority, including the catenoid, helix, and double helix that were also found in Monte Carlo nanopore studies, are metastable states. We introduce a general classification scheme and consider the role of kinetics and elongational pressure on stability and formation pathway of both equilibrium and metastable structures in detail. We find that helicity and threefold connections mediate structural transitions on a larger scale. Moreover, by matching the remaining parameter in our mesoscopic method, the Flory-Huggins parameter χ, to the experimental system, we obtain a structure that resembles the experimental toroidal structure in great detail. Here, the most important factor seems to be the roughness of the pore, i.e., small variations of the pore radius on a scale that is larger than the characteristic size in the system.

  11. Swim pressure: stress generation in active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, S C; Yan, W; Brady, J F

    2014-07-11

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries-this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton. PMID:25062240

  12. Pathways to dewetting in hydrophobic confinement

    PubMed Central

    Remsing, Richard C.; Xi, Erte; Vembanur, Srivathsan; Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G.; Garde, Shekhar; Patel, Amish J.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid water can become metastable with respect to its vapor in hydrophobic confinement. The resulting dewetting transitions are often impeded by large kinetic barriers. According to macroscopic theory, such barriers arise from the free energy required to nucleate a critical vapor tube that spans the region between two hydrophobic surfaces—tubes with smaller radii collapse, whereas larger ones grow to dry the entire confined region. Using extensive molecular simulations of water between two nanoscopic hydrophobic surfaces, in conjunction with advanced sampling techniques, here we show that for intersurface separations that thermodynamically favor dewetting, the barrier to dewetting does not correspond to the formation of a (classical) critical vapor tube. Instead, it corresponds to an abrupt transition from an isolated cavity adjacent to one of the confining surfaces to a gap-spanning vapor tube that is already larger than the critical vapor tube anticipated by macroscopic theory. Correspondingly, the barrier to dewetting is also smaller than the classical expectation. We show that the peculiar nature of water density fluctuations adjacent to extended hydrophobic surfaces—namely, the enhanced likelihood of observing low-density fluctuations relative to Gaussian statistics—facilitates this nonclassical behavior. By stabilizing isolated cavities relative to vapor tubes, enhanced water density fluctuations thus stabilize novel pathways, which circumvent the classical barriers and offer diminished resistance to dewetting. Our results thus suggest a key role for fluctuations in speeding up the kinetics of numerous phenomena ranging from Cassie–Wenzel transitions on superhydrophobic surfaces, to hydrophobically driven biomolecular folding and assembly. PMID:26100866

  13. Spherical microwave confinement and ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, William Richard

    This dissertation presents the results of research done on unconventional energy technologies from 1995 to 2009. The present civilization depends on an infrastructure that was constructed and is maintained almost entirely using concentrated fuels and ores, both of which will run out. Diffuse renewable energy sources rely on this same infrastructure, and hence face the same limitations. I first examined sonoluminescence directed toward fusion, but demonstrated theoretically that this is impossible. I next studied Low Energy Nuclear Reactions and developed methods for improving results, although these have not been implemented. In 2000, I began Spherical Microwave Confinement (SMC), which confines and heats plasma with microwaves in a spherical chamber. The reactor was designed and built to provide the data needed to investigate the possibility of achieving fusion conditions with microwave confinement. A second objective was to attempt to create ball lightning (BL). The reactor featured 20 magnetrons, which were driven by a capacitor bank and operated in a 0.2 s pulse mode at 2.45 GHz. These provided 20 kW to an icosahedral array of 20 antennas. Video of plasmas led to a redesign of the antennas to provide better coupling of the microwaves to the plasma. A second improvement was a grid at the base of the antennas, which provided corona electrons and an electric field to aid quick formation of plasmas. Although fusion conditions were never achieved and ball lightning not observed, experience gained from operating this basic, affordable system has been incorporated in a more sophisticated reactor design intended for future research. This would use magnets that were originally planned. The cusp geometry of the magnetic fields is suitable for electron cyclotron resonance in the same type of closed surface that in existing reactors has generated high-temperature plasmas. Should ball lightning be created, it could be a practical power source with nearly ideal

  14. [Individual pressure tolerance--a "target" pressure?].

    PubMed

    Bogdănici, C; Vancea, P P

    1999-01-01

    In literature there are many meanings for the limit between normal and pathological intraocular pressure: "normative pressure", "critic pressure", "individual tolerance pressure" and "target pressure". The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that these terms are synonymous. PMID:10756882

  15. Equilibrium of an elastically confined liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Kim, Ho-Young; Puëll, Jérôme; Mahadevan, L.

    2008-05-01

    When a liquid drop is confined between an elastic plate and a rigid substrate, it spreads spontaneously due to the effects of interfacial forces, eventually reaching an equilibrium shape determined by the balance between elastic and capillary effects. We provide an analytical theory for the static shape of the sheet and the extent of liquid spreading and show that our experiments are quantitatively consistent with the theory. The theory is relevant for the first step of painting when a brush is brought down on to canvas. More mundanely, it allows us to understand the stiction of microcantilevers to wafer substrates occurring in microelectromechanical fabrication processes.

  16. Plasma Confinement in the UCLA Electric Tokamak.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert J.

    2001-10-01

    The main goal of the newly constructed large Electric Tokamak (R = 5 m, a = 1 m, BT < 0.25 T) is to access an omnigeneous, unity beta(S.C. Cowley, P.K. Kaw, R.S. Kelly, R.M. Kulsrud, Phys. fluids B 3 (1991) 2066.) plasma regime. The design goal was to achieve good confinement at low magnetic fields, consistent with the high beta goal. To keep the program cost down, we adopted the use of ICRF as the primary heating source. Consequently, antenna surfaces covering 1/2 of the surface of the tokamak has been prepared for heating and current drive. Very clean hydrogenic plasmas have been achieved with loop voltage below 0.7 volt and densities 3 times above the Murakami limit, n(0) > 8 x 10^12 cm-3 when there is no MHD activity. The electron temperature, derived from the plasma conductivity is > 250 eV with a central electron energy confinement time > 350 msec in ohmic conditions. The sawteeth period is 50 msec. Edge plasma rotation is induced by plasma biasing via electron injection in an analogous manner to that seen in CCT(R.J. Taylor, M.L. Brown, B.D. Fried, H. Grote, J.R. Liberati, G.J. Morales, P. Pribyl, D. Darrow, and M. Ono. Phys. Rev Lett. 63 2365 1989.) and the neoclassical bifurcation is close to that described by Shaing et al(K.C. Shaing and E.C. Crume, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 2369 (1989).). In the ohmic phase the confinement tends to be MHD limited. The ICRF heating eliminates the MHD disturbances. Under second harmonic heating conditions, we observe an internal confinement peaking characterized by doubling of the core density and a corresponding increase in the central electron temperature. Charge exchange data, Doppler data in visible H-alpha light, and EC radiation all indicate that ICRF heating works much better than expected. The major effort is focused on increasing the power input and controlling the resulting equilibrium. This task appears to be easy since our current pulses are approaching the 3 second mark without RF heating or current drive. Our

  17. Effective diffusion of confined active Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Mario; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    We find theoretically the effect of confinement and thermal fluctuations, on the diffusivity of a spherical active swimmer moving inside a two-dimensional narrow cavity of general shape. The explicit formulas for the effective diffusion coefficient of a swimmer moving inside two particular cavities are presented. We also compare our analytical results with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement. L.D. thanks Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACyT) Mexico, for partial support by Grant No. 176452. M. S. thanks CONACyT and Programa de Mejoramiento de Profesorado (PROMEP) for partially funding this work under Grant No. 103.5/13/6732.

  18. Oscillatory dissipation of a simple confined liquid.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Cohen-Bouhacina, Touria; Couturier, Gérard; Aimé, Jean-Pierre

    2006-03-01

    We present a sensitive measurement of the dissipation and the effective viscosity of a simple confined liquid (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) using an atomic force microscope. The experimental data show that the damping and the effective viscosity increase and present oscillations as the gap between the cantilever tip and the surface is diminished. To our knowledge, the damping and the viscosity modulation are reported here with such good accuracy for the first time. Such an experimental result is different from what has been reported earlier where only a continuous increase of the damping and the viscosity are observed. PMID:16606201

  19. Magnetohydrodynamically generated velocities in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Jorge A. Bos, Wouter J. T.; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C.

    2015-04-15

    We investigate by numerical simulation the rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid in which a current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. The computation involves no microscopic instabilities and is purely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described.

  20. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.