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Sample records for 50-mpa confining pressure

  1. Thermal properties of rock salt and quartz monzonite to 573{sup 0}K and 50-MPa confining pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-03-18

    Measurements of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal linear expansion have been made on two rock types, a rock salt and a quartz monzonite, at temperatures from 300 to 573{sup 0}K and confining pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. The samples were taken from deep rock formations under consideration as possible sites for a nuclear waste repository - the rock salt from a domal salt formation at Avery Island, Louisiana, and the quartz monzonite from the Climax Stock, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The testing temperature and pressures are meant to bracket conditions expected in the repository. In both rock types, the thermal properties show a strong dependence upon temperature and a weak or non-dependence upon confining pressure. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity both decrease with increasing temperature in approximately linear fashion for samples which have not been previously heated. At 50 MPa in both rocks this decrease closely matches the measured or expected intrinsic (crack-free) behavior of the material. Preliminary indications from the quartz monzonite suggest that conductivity and diffusivity at low pressure and temperature may decrease as a result of heat treatment above 400{sup 0}K.

  2. Projectile acceleration in a single-stage gun at breech pressures below 50 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasoh, A.; Ohba, S.; Takayama, K.

    Experimental studies were carried out to investigate projectile acceleration in a single-stage gun at breech pressures below 50 MPa. The gun was driven by firing either liquid or solid propellant. In-bore projectile velocity was continuously recorded using the well-known, precise VISAR interferometer technique so that accurate projectile acceleration data could be deduced. Both the attained projectile acceleration and muzzle exit velocity depend upon the charge-to-mass ratio and the pressure at which the blow-out disk ruptures. The results obtained from these experiments render information on the interplay between propellant combustion and projectile acceleration for low in-bore pressure regimes, and they provide the input data required for adequate numerical simulation.

  3. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Instantaneous-failure strengths and ductilities of water-saturated cylindrical specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, Mount Hood Andesite, and Cuerbio Basalt are determined at a strain rate of 10{sup -4}s{sup -1} and at effective confining pressures (Pe) of 0 and 50 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting. The data indicate: (1) at Pe = 0 and 50 MPa (Pc and Pp of 50 MPa and of 100 and 50 MPa, respectively) the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (2) at these same Pe the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (3) at Pe = 0 and 870-900{sup 0}C the andesite's wet strength averages 20 MPa compared to 100 MPa, dry; (4) at Pe = 50 MPa and 920{sup 0}C its wet strength is 45 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (5) at Pe = 0, the basalt appears to be water-weakened above 800{sup 0}C; (6) water-saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than T{sub m} exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2 percent shortening and then work-soften along faults; and (7) both dry and wet specimens deform primarily by brittle fracture. Extrapolations indicate: (1) crystalline rocks should be drillable because they remain brittle until partial melting occurs, and penetration rates should increase with temperature because there is a corresponding decrease in brittle fracture strength; (2) boreholes in ''water-filled'' holes will be stable to >10 km at temperatures 10 km; and (4) open boreholes in the andesite are apt to be much less stable, and at similar temperatures would fail at 2 to 5-km depth.

  4. Final report of EURAMET 1197: Supplementary bilateral comparison of hydraulic gauge pressure standards up to 50 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgut, Yasin; Petrovski, Nenad; Kacarski, Vanco

    2012-01-01

    Interlaboratory comparisons are important for the laboratories to assess their own measurement capability. It is equally important for the accreditation bodies and assessors during the audit process of a laboratory to judge whether the laboratory is doing well. As per accreditation rules, it is mandatory for the testing and calibration laboratories to participate in such comparisons from time to time. In this report, results of the bilateral interlaboratory comparison in pressure area in hydraulic media up to 50 MPa gauge between UME (Turkey) and BOM (The FYR of Macedonia) are presented. The artefact used for the comparison was a digital pressure calibrator and its drift was taken into account in the calculation. Results show that all En values lie in acceptable limits. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  5. Effects of water-saturation on strength and ductility of three igneous rocks at effective pressures to 50 MPA and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, S.J.; Friedman, M.; Handin, J.

    1981-01-01

    The short-term failure strengths and strains at failure of room-dry and water-saturated, cylindrical specimens (2 by 4 cm) of Charcoal Granodiorite (CG), Mt. Hood Andesite (MHA), and Cuerbio Basalt (CB) at a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa and at temperatures to partial melting were investigated. Data from water-saturated specimens of the granodiorite and andesite, compared to room-dry counterparts, indicate (1) the pore pressures are essentially communicated throughout each test specimen so that they are fully effective; (2) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 50 MPa the granodiorite does not water-weaken; (3) at these same effective pressures the more porous and finer-grained andesite begins to exhibit water-weakening at about 600/sup 0/C; (4) at P/sub e/ = 0 and 870 to 900/sup 0/C the andesite's strength averages 20 MPa while the strength of dry specimens at the same P and T exhibit a strength of 100 MPa; (5) at P/sub e/ = 50 MPa compared to 160 MPa dry; (6) the basalt at P/sub e/ = 0, appears to be water-weakened at 800/sup 0/C; (7) water saturated specimens deformed at temperatures less than that of melting exhibit ultimate strengths at less than 2% shortening and then work-soften along faults; (8) again as do the dry counterparts, the wet specimens deform primarily by microscopic fracturing that coalesces into one or more macroscopic faults; and (9) the temperature for incipient melting of the andesite is decreased >150/sup 0/C in the water-saturated tests.

  6. Final report on key comparison APMP.M.P-K13 in hydraulic gauge pressure from 50 MPa to 500 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajikawa, Hiroaki; Kobata, Tokihiko; Yadav, Sanjay; Jian, Wu; Changpan, Tawat; Owen, Neville; Yanhua, Li; Hung, Chen-Chuan; Ginanjar, Gigin; Choi, In-Mook

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the results of a key comparison of hydraulic high-pressure standards at nine National Metrology Institutes (NMIs: NMIJ/AIST, NPLI, NMC/A*STAR, NIMT, NMIA, NIM, CMS/ITRI, KIM-LIPI, and KRISS) within the framework of the Asia-Pacific Metrology Programme (APMP) in order to determine their degrees of equivalence in the pressure range from 50 MPa to 500 MPa in gauge mode. The pilot institute was the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ/AIST). All participating institutes used hydraulic pressure balances as their pressure standards. A set of pressure balance with a free-deformational piston-cylinder assembly was used as the transfer standard. Three piston-cylinder assemblies, only one at a time, were used to complete the measurements in the period from November 2010 to January 2013. Ten participants completed their measurements and reported the pressure-dependent effective areas of the transfer standard at specified pressures with the associated uncertainties. Since one of the participants withdrew its results, the measurement results of the nine participants were finally compared. The results were linked to the CCM.P-K13 reference values through the results of two linking laboratories, NMIJ/AIST and NPLI. The degrees of equivalence were evaluated by the relative deviations of the participants' results from the CCM.P-K13 key comparison reference values, and their associated combined expanded (k=2) uncertainties. The results of all the nine participating NMIs agree with the CCM.P-K13 reference values within their expanded (k=2) uncertainties in the entire pressure range from 50 MPa to 500 MPa. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Final report on key comparison EURAMET.M.P-K13 in the range 50 MPa to 500 MPa of hydraulic gauge pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocas, I.; Sabuga, W.; Bergoglio, M.; Eltaweel, A.; Korasie, C.; Farar, P.; Setina, J.; Waller, B.; Durgut, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The regional key comparison EURAMET.M.P-K13 for pressure measurements in liquid media from 50 MPa to 500 MPa was piloted by the TÜBİTAK UME Pressure Group Laboratories, Turkey. The transfer standard was a DH-Budenberg pressure balance with a free deformation piston-cylinder unit of 2 mm2 nominal effective area. Six laboratories from the EURAMET region, namely PTB, INRIM, SMU, IMT, NPL and UME, and two laboratories from the AFRIMETS region, NIS and NMISA participated in this comparison. Participant laboratories and countries are given in the bottom of the page. PTB participated in this comparison to provide a link to corresponding 500 MPa CCM key comparison CCM.P-K13. The results of all participants excepting NMISA and NPL were found to be consistent with the reference value of the actual comparison and of CCM.P-K13 within their claimed uncertainties (k = 2), at all pressures. Compared in pairs all laboratories with exception of NPL and NMISA demonstrate their agreement with each other within the expanded uncertainties (k = 2) at all pressures. The results are therefore considered to be satisfactory. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Correlation for the Viscosity of Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) from the Triple Point to 1000 K and Pressures to 50 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones-Cisneros, Sergio E.; Huber, Marcia L.; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2012-06-01

    A wide-ranging correlation for the viscosity surface of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) has been developed that incorporates generalized friction theory (GFT). The approach requires, as the core thermodynamic model, a reference-quality equation of state (EoS). Here the EoS of Guder and Wagner has been selected for that purpose. All available experimental data, to the extent of our knowledge, were considered in the development of the model. The correlation performs best in the low-pressure (less than 0.33 MPa) region from 300 K to 700 K where the estimated uncertainty (considered to be combined expanded uncertainty with a coverage factor of two) is 0.3%. In the region from 300 K to 425 K for pressures less than 20 MPa, the estimated uncertainty is less than 1%. Where there were data available for validation at temperatures from 230 K to 575 K for pressures up to 50 MPa, the estimated uncertainty is 2%. The correlation extrapolates in a physically reasonable manner and may be used at pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures from the triple point to 1000 K.

  9. Time-dependent Brittle Creep in Rock: The Influence of Confining Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2009-12-01

    The characterization of time-dependent brittle creep deformation is fundamental to understanding the long-term evolution and dynamics of the Earth’s crust. The presence of water promotes environment-dependent stress corrosion cracking that allows rock to deform at a constant stress below its short-term failure stress over extended periods of time. Here we report illustrative results from an experimental study of the influence of an elevated temperature on time-dependent brittle creep in water-saturated samples of Bentheim sandstone (initial porosity, Φ = 23%), Darley Dale sandstone (Φ = 13%) and Crab Orchard sandstones (Φ = 4%). We present data obtained from both conventional, constant stress creep experiments and from stress-stepping creep experiments performed under effective confining pressures in the range 10 MPa to 50 MPa and at temperatures from 20° to 75°C. Deformation was monitored throughout each experiment by measuring simultaneously three proxies for evolving crack damage: (1) axial strain, (2) porosity change and (3) the output of acoustic emission (AE) energy, all as functions of time. Results from conventional creep experiments demonstrate that the primary control on creep strain rate and time-to-failure is the applied differential stress. They also suggest the existence of a critical level of crack damage beyond which deformation accelerates and ultimately leads to sample failure on a localized fault. The influence of effective confining pressure was investigated in stress-stepping experiments. In addition to the expected mechanical influence of elevated effective pressure, our results also demonstrate that stress corrosion cracking is inhibited at higher effective confining pressures, with creep strain rates reduced by about 3 orders of magnitude as effective confining pressure is increased from 10 to 50MPa. We have used the same technique to investigate the influence of an elevated temperature. Our results show that, for the same applied

  10. Modulus-pressure equation for confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gor, Gennady Y.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Shen, Vincent K.; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasonic experiments allow one to measure the elastic modulus of bulk solid or fluid samples. Recently such experiments have been carried out on fluid-saturated nanoporous glass to probe the modulus of a confined fluid. In our previous work [G. Y. Gor et al., J. Chem. Phys., 143, 194506 (2015)], using Monte Carlo simulations we showed that the elastic modulus K of a fluid confined in a mesopore is a function of the pore size. Here we focus on the modulus-pressure dependence K(P), which is linear for bulk materials, a relation known as the Tait-Murnaghan equation. Using transition-matrix Monte Carlo simulations we calculated the elastic modulus of bulk argon as a function of pressure and argon confined in silica mesopores as a function of Laplace pressure. Our calculations show that while the elastic modulus is strongly affected by confinement and temperature, the slope of the modulus versus pressure is not. Moreover, the calculated slope is in a good agreement with the reference data for bulk argon and experimental data for confined argon derived from ultrasonic experiments. We propose to use the value of the slope of K(P) to estimate the elastic moduli of an unknown porous medium.

  11. Pressure-confined Lyman-alpha clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, E.; Carswell, R.F.; Hogan, C.J.; Weymann, R.J.

    1989-02-01

    Results are presented of numerical models of pressure-confined spherical gas clouds which produce absorption resembling the low to intermediate atomic column density lines found in high-redshift QSO spectra. One-dimensional hydrodynamical models including electron conduction are described, and the rate equations are solved to find ionization and excitation states. Results are presented for both static and adiabatically expanding confining media covering a range of initial pressures. It is found that Ly-alpha lines are very similar over a wide range of conditions and that the most promising diagnostic of pressure is to compare the column density in H I to that in He I and He II. No single-pressure model can explain the wide range of observed H I column densities. 18 references.

  12. Rheology of ice I at low stress and elevated confining pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    Triaxial compression testing of pure, polycrystalline water ice I at conditions relevant to planetary interiors and near-surface environments (differential stresses 0.45 to 10 MPa, temperatures 200 to 250 K, confining pressure 50 MPa) reveals that a complex variety of rheologies and grain structures may exist for ice and that rheology of ice appears to depend strongly on the grain structures. The creep of polycrystalline ice I with average grain size of 0.25 mm and larger is consistent with previously published dislocation creep laws, which are now extended to strain rates as low as 2 ?? 10-8s-1. When ice I is reduced to very fine and uniform grain size by rapid pressure release from the ice II stability field, the rheology changes dramatically. At 200 and 220 K the rheology matches the grain-size-sensitive rheology measured by Goldsby and Kohlstedt [1997, this issue] at 1 atm. This finding dispels concerns that the Goldsby and Kohlstedt results were influenced by mechanisms such as microfracturing and cavitation, processes not expected to operate at elevated pressures in planetary interiors. At 233 K and above, grain growth causes the fine-grained ice to become more creep resistant. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of some of these deformed samples shows that grains have markedly coarsened and the strain hardening can be modeled by normal grain growth and the Goldsby and Kohlstedt rheology. Several samples also displayed very heterogeneous grain sizes and high aspect ratio grain shapes. Grain-size-sensitive creep and dislocation creep coincidentally contribute roughly equal amounts of strain rate at conditions of stress, temperature, and grain size that are typical of terrestrial and planetary settings, so modeling ice dynamics in these settings must include both mechanisms. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Lassila, David H [Aptos, CA; Bonner, Brian P [Livermore, CA

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  14. Rock Deformation at High Confining Pressure and Temperature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    debugged, delivered and installed to the contracting agency. Clay specimens of illite, kaolinite and montmorillonite were deformed in tri-axial compression...at 25 and 3000C at a constant confining pressure of 2 kb and a constant strain rate of .0001 sec. The illite and kaolinite are stronger under these...conditions than montmorillonite . Cores from dolomite single crystals were deformed at a confining pressure of 7 kb and temperatures of 300 and 500C

  15. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  16. The Pressure induced by salt crystallization in confinement

    PubMed Central

    Desarnaud, J.; Bonn, D.; Shahidzadeh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Salt crystallization is a major cause of weathering of rocks, artworks and monuments. Damage can only occur if crystals continue to grow in confinement, i.e. within the pore space of these materials, thus generating mechanical stress. We report the direct measurement, at the microscale, of the force exerted by growing alkali halide salt crystals while visualizing their spontaneous nucleation and growth. The experiments reveal the crucial role of the wetting films between the growing crystal and the confining walls for the development of the pressure. Our results suggest that the measured force originates from repulsion between the similarly charged confining wall and the salt crystal separated by a ~1.5 nm liquid film. Indeed, if the walls are made hydrophobic, no film is observed and no repulsive forces are detected. We also show that the magnitude of the induced pressure is system specific explaining why different salts lead to different amounts of damage to porous materials. PMID:27493020

  17. Negative Pressure Vitrification of the Isochorically Confined Liquid in Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrjanowicz, K.; Kaminski, K.; Koperwas, K.; Paluch, M.

    2015-12-01

    Dielectric relaxation studies for model glass-forming liquids confined to nanoporous alumina matrices were examined together with high-pressure results. For confined liquids which show the deviation from bulk dynamics upon approaching the glass transition (the change from the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann to the Arrhenius law), we have observed a striking agreement between the temperature dependence of the α -relaxation time in the Arrhenius-like region and the isochoric relaxation times extrapolated from the positive range of pressure to the negative pressure domain. Our finding provides strong evidence that glass-forming liquid confined to native nanopores enters the isochoric conditions once the mobility of the interfacial layer becomes frozen in. This results in the negative pressure effects on cooling. We also demonstrate that differences in the sensitivity of various glass-forming liquids to the "confinement effects" can be rationalized by considering the relative importance of thermal energy and density contributions in controlling the α -relaxation dynamics (the Ev/Ep ratio).

  18. Microscopic pressure-cooker model for studying molecules in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Rosas-Acevedo, Hortensia

    2015-04-01

    A model for a system of a finite number of molecules in confinement is presented and expressions for determining the temperature, pressure, and volume of the system are derived. The present model is a generalisation of the Zwanzig-Langevin model because it includes pressure effects in the system. It also has general validity, preserves the ergodic hypothesis, and provides a formal framework for previous studies of hydrogen clusters in confinement. The application of the model is illustrated by an investigation of a set of prebiotic compounds exposed to varying pressure and temperature. The simulations performed within the model involve the use of a combination of molecular dynamics and density functional theory methods implemented on a computer system with a mixed CPU-GPU architecture.

  19. Dependency of hydromechanical properties of monzonitic granite on confining pressure and fluid pressure under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Lui, Zaobao; Chao, Zhiming; Meng, Qingxiang

    2016-05-01

    Monzonitic granite is a low-permeability rock. Monzonitic granite formations are ideal for underground storage of oil due to their low permeability and high mechanical strength. In this study, a series of coupled hydromechanical triaxial tests are carried out using monzonitic granite specimens. The influence of confining and fluid pressures on stress, strain, and permeability is investigated. Failure characteristics under different confining and fluid pressures are discussed based on the analysis of macro fracture planes and micro scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The test results show that the change of permeability with stress and strain reflects the deformation stages of compaction, compression, crack propagation, coalesce, and failure of cracks. Due to the low porosity, the change of permeability is small in the initial phases of compaction and compression, whereas there is a significant increase in permeability when new cracks start to develop and coalesce. Confining pressures have a significant impact on the strength and permeability, particularly the crack damage stress of the rock. Compared with confining pressure, the effect of fluid pressure on rock strength and crack damage stress is small. For the monzonitic granite specimens tested, changing the confining pressure results in different failure modes, whereas the fluid pressure has a relatively small effect on the failure modes.

  20. Pressure and size effects in endohedrally confined hydrogen clusters.

    PubMed

    Soullard, Jacques; Santamaria, Ruben; Jellinek, Julius

    2008-02-14

    Density functional theory is used to carry out a systematic study of zero-temperature structural and energy properties of endohedrally confined hydrogen clusters as a function of pressure and the cluster size. At low pressures, the most stable structural forms of (H(2))(n) possess rotational symmetry that changes from C(4) through C(5) to C(6) as the cluster grows in size from n=8 through n=12 to n=15. The equilibrium configurational energy of the clusters increases with an increase of the pressure. The rate of this increase, however, as gauged on the per atom basis is different for different clusters sizes. As a consequence, the size dependencies of the configurational energies per atom at different fixed values of pressure are nonmonotonic functions. At high pressures, the molecular (H(2))(n) clusters gradually become atomic or dominantly atomic. The pressure-induced changes in the HOMO-LUMO gap of the clusters indicate a finite-size analog of the pressure-driven metallization of the bulk hydrogen. The ionization potentials of the clusters decrease with the increase of pressure on them.

  1. Pressure confinement effect in MoS2 monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yan, Yalan; Han, Bo; Li, Liang; Huang, Xiaoli; Yao, Mingguang; Gong, Yuanbo; Jin, Xilian; Liu, Baoli; Zhu, Chuanrui; Zhou, Qiang; Cui, Tian

    2015-05-01

    With ever increasing interest in layered materials, molybdenum disulfide has been widely investigated due to its unique optoelectronic properties. Pressure is an effective technique to tune the lattice and electronic structure of materials such that high pressure studies can disclose new structural and optical phenomena. In this study, taking MoS2 as an example, we investigate the pressure confinement effect on monolayer MoS2 by in situ high pressure Raman and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Our results reveal a structural deformation of monolayer MoS2 starting from 0.84 GPa, which is evidenced by the splitting of E12g and A1g modes. A further compression leads to a transition from the 1H-MoS2 phase to a novel structure evidenced by the appearance of two new peaks located at 200 and 240 cm-1. This is a distinct feature of monolayer MoS2 compared with bulk MoS2. The new structure is supposed to have a distorted unit with the S atoms slided within a single layer like that of metastable 1T'-MoS2. However, unlike the non-photoluminescent 1T'-MoS2 structure, our monolayer shows a remarkable PL peak and a pressure-induced blue shift up to 13.1 GPa. This pressure-dependent behavior might enable the development of novel devices with multiple phenomena involving the strong coupling of the mechanical, electrical and optical properties of layered nanomaterials.With ever increasing interest in layered materials, molybdenum disulfide has been widely investigated due to its unique optoelectronic properties. Pressure is an effective technique to tune the lattice and electronic structure of materials such that high pressure studies can disclose new structural and optical phenomena. In this study, taking MoS2 as an example, we investigate the pressure confinement effect on monolayer MoS2 by in situ high pressure Raman and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Our results reveal a structural deformation of monolayer MoS2 starting from 0.84 GPa, which is evidenced by the

  2. Pressure-confined clumps in magnetized molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoldi, Frank; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1992-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the mass of a giant molecular cloud (GMC) in the Galaxy is confined to clumps which occupy a small fraction of the volume of the cloud. A majority of the clumps in several well-studied GMCs (Ophiuchus, Orion G, Rosette, Cepheus OB3) are not in gravitational virial equilibrium, but instead are confined by the pressure of the surrounding medium. These clumps thus violate one of 'Larson's (1981) laws'. Generalizing the standard virial analysis for spherical clouds to spheroidal clouds, we determine the Jeans mass and the magnetic critical mass for the clumps in these clouds. The Alfven Mach number, which is proportional to the internal velocity dispersion of the clumps divided by the Alfven velocity, is estimated to be of order unity for all the clumps. The more massive clumps, which are in gravitational virial equilibrium, are too massive to be supported by magnetic fields alone (i.e., they are magnetically supercritical). Internally generated turbulence must play a key role in supporting these clumps.

  3. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-01-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems. PMID:26832445

  4. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-02-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%—samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems.

  5. Confinement Correction to Mercury Intrusion Capillary Pressure of Shale Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Javadpour, Farzam; Feng, Qihong

    2016-02-01

    We optimized potential parameters in a molecular dynamics model to reproduce the experimental contact angle of a macroscopic mercury droplet on graphite. With the tuned potential, we studied the effects of pore size, geometry, and temperature on the wetting of mercury droplets confined in organic-rich shale nanopores. The contact angle of mercury in a circular pore increases exponentially as pore size decreases. In conjunction with the curvature-dependent surface tension of liquid droplets predicted from a theoretical model, we proposed a technique to correct the common interpretation procedure of mercury intrusion capillary pressure (MICP) measurement for nanoporous material such as shale. Considering the variation of contact angle and surface tension with pore size improves the agreement between MICP and adsorption-derived pore size distribution, especially for pores having a radius smaller than 5 nm. The relative error produced in ignoring these effects could be as high as 44%--samples that contain smaller pores deviate more. We also explored the impacts of pore size and temperature on the surface tension and contact angle of water/vapor and oil/gas systems, by which the capillary pressure of water/oil/gas in shale can be obtained from MICP. This information is fundamental to understanding multiphase flow behavior in shale systems.

  6. ON THE COAGULATION AND SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF PRESSURE CONFINED CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Xu; Zhou Tingtao; Lin, D. N. C.

    2013-05-20

    Observations of the Pipe Nebula have led to the discovery of dense starless cores. The mass of most cores is too small for their self-gravity to hold them together. Instead, they are thought to be pressure confined. The observed dense cores' mass function (CMF) matches well with the initial mass function of stars in young clusters. Similar CMFs are observed in other star forming regions such as the Aquila Nebula, albeit with some dispersion. The shape of these CMF provides important clues to the competing physical processes which lead to star formation and its feedback on the interstellar media. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical origin of the mass function of starless cores which are confined by a warm, less dense medium. In order to follow the evolution of the CMF, we construct a numerical method to consider the coagulation between the cold cores and their ablation due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by their relative motion through the warm medium. We are able to reproduce the observed CMF among the starless cores in the Pipe Nebula. Our results indicate that in environment similar to the Pipe Nebula: (1) before the onset of their gravitational collapse, the mass distribution of the progenitor cores is similar to that of the young stars, (2) the observed CMF is a robust consequence of dynamical equilibrium between the coagulation and ablation of cores, and (3) a break in the slope of the CMF is due to the enhancement of collisional cross section and suppression of ablation for cores with masses larger than the cores' Bonnor-Ebert mass.

  7. Design of hydrodynamically confined microfluidics: controlling flow envelope and pressure.

    PubMed

    Christ, Kevin V; Turner, Kevin T

    2011-04-21

    Closed-channel microfluidic devices are widely used in a number of chemical and biological applications; however, it is often difficult to interact with samples, such as cells, that are enclosed inside them. Hydrodynamically confined microflows (HCMs) allow microfluidic-type flows to be generated in open liquid environments, such as Petri dishes, thus greatly increasing the flexibility of microfluidic approaches. HCMs have previously been used for protein patterning and selective cell treatment applications, but the underlying fluid mechanics is not fully understood. Here, we examine the effect of device geometry and flow parameters on the properties of the flow envelope and pressure drop of several two-port HCM devices using a combination of experiments and modeling. A three-port device, which allows for different flow envelope shapes to be generated, is also analyzed. The experimental results agree well with the 3-D computational fluid dynamics simulations, with the majority of the measurements within 10% of the simulations. The results presented provide a framework for understanding the fluid mechanics of HCMs and will aid in the design of HCM devices for a broad range of applications.

  8. Radiation pressure confinement - IV. Application to broad absorption line outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Alexei; Laor, Ari; Stern, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    A fraction of quasars present broad absorption lines, produced by outflowing gas with typical velocities of 3000-10 000 km s-1. If the outflowing gas fills a significant fraction of the volume where it resides, then it will be highly ionized by the quasar due to its low density, and will not produce the observed UV absorption. The suggestion that the outflow is shielded from the ionizing radiation was excluded by recent observations. The remaining solution is a dense outflow with a filling factor f < 10-3. What produces such a small f? Here, we point out that radiation pressure confinement (RPC) inevitably leads to gas compression and the formation of dense thin gas sheets/filaments, with a large gradient in density and ionization along the line of sight. The total column of ionized dustless gas is a few times 1022 cm-2, consistent with the observed X-ray absorption and detectable P V absorption. The predicted maximal columns of various ions show a small dependence on the system parameters, and can be used to test the validity of RPC as a solution for the overionization problem. The ionization structure of the outflow implies that if the outflow is radiatively driven, then broad absorption line quasars should have L/L_Eddgtrsim 0.1.

  9. Direct measurement of osmotic pressure via adaptive confinement of quasi hard disc colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian; Oğuz, Erdal C.; Bartlett, Paul; Löwen, Hartmut; Royall, C. Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Confining a system in a small volume profoundly alters its behaviour. Hitherto, attention has focused on static confinement where the confining wall is fixed such as in porous media. However, adaptive confinement where the wall responds to the interior has clear relevance in biological systems. Here we investigate this phenomenon with a colloidal system of quasi hard discs confined by a ring of particles trapped in holographic optical tweezers, which form a flexible elastic wall. This elasticity leads to quasi-isobaric conditions within the confined region. By measuring the displacement of the tweezed particles, we obtain the radial osmotic pressure. We further find a novel bistable state of a hexagonal structure and concentrically layered fluid mimicking the shape of the confinement. The hexagonal configurations are found at lower pressure than those of the fluid, thus the bistability is driven by the higher entropy of disordered arrangements, unlike bulk hard systems.

  10. Volumetric Properties of Dilute Aqueous Solutions of 1- and 2-propanol to 50 MPa and 373.15 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, J.; Bahramian, J.; Blackwell, R.; Inaki, T.; York, D.; Schulte, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The need to accurately model and understand reactions among organic compounds and biomolecules in solution is necessary to develop realistic chemical models for the reactions leading to the emergence of life and metabolic processes of extremophiles under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. Unfortunately, the scarcity of experimentally determined volumetric (and other) properties for important compounds at high temperatures and pressures leads to uncertainty in the calculation of reaction properties. Experimentally determined volumetric properties of aqueous solutions at non-standard conditions provide direct tests of current estimation methods and aid in the refinement of these methods. The goal of our research is to provide a database of experimentally determined volumetric properties. In previous studies, we have examined important organic molecules and biomolecules such as adenosine, coenzyme M and D-ribose. In this study, we investigate the volumetric properties of the structural isomers 1- and 2-propanol. 1-propanol (n-propanol) is a primary alcohol (CH3CH2CH2OH) and 2-propanol (isopropanol) is the simplest example of a secondary alcohol (CH3CHOHCH3). These compounds differ slightly in structure depending on to which carbon atom the hydroxyl group is bonded and will provide a sensitive test of current estimation methods and lead to more accurate predictions of the properties of complex aqueous systems at elevated temperatures and pressures. We obtained the densities of aqueous solutions of the alchohols using an Anton Paar DMA HP vibrating tube densimeter. Pressure was measured (pressure transducer) to an accuracy of ±0.01% and temperature was measured (integrated platinum thermometer) with an accuracy of ±0.05 K. Experimental uncertainty of density measurements is less than ±0.0001 g·cm-3. The partial molar volumes at infinite dilution (V∞) for 1- and 2-propanol were calculated from the measured densities and are shown in the figure at 0

  11. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    PubMed Central

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  12. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells.

  13. Passive confining pressure SHPB test method for materials under quasi-one-dimensional strain state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Shaochiu; Wang, Lili

    2002-05-01

    An improved quasi-1D strain SHPB method was used to study the dynamic mechanical behavior of materials under passive confining pressure state. The effects of mechanical behavior of the confining jacket material and its geometrical sizes on the experimental results are discussed. Thus the dynamical Poisson's ratio s dynamical Young's modulus Es and dynamical compressive yield strength Y of the material at high strain rate can be obtained. The frictional force between the specimen and jacket and its effects on the axial stress-strain relationship under passive confining pressure are further analyzed. The correction to the elastic constants of the material was given.

  14. Water Pressure Effects on Strength and Deformability of Fractured Rocks Under Low Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noorian Bidgoli, Majid; Jing, Lanru

    2015-05-01

    The effect of groundwater on strength and deformation behavior of fractured crystalline rocks is one of the important issues for design, performance and safety assessments of surface and subsurface rock engineering problems. However, practical difficulties make the direct in situ and laboratory measurements of these properties of fractured rocks impossible at present, since effects of complex fracture system hidden inside the rock masses cannot be accurately estimated. Therefore, numerical modeling needs to be applied. The overall objective of this paper is to deepen our understanding on the validity of the effective stress concept, and to evaluate the effects of water pressure on strength and deformation parameters. The approach adopted uses discrete element methods to simulate the coupled stress-deformation-flow processes in a fractured rock mass with model dimensions at a representative elementary volume (REV) size and realistic representation of fracture system geometry. The obtained numerical results demonstrate that water pressure has significant influence on the strength, but with minor effects on elastic deformation parameters, compared with significant influence by the lateral confining pressure. Also, the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock can be quite different with that applied in soil mechanics. Therefore, one should be cautious when applying the classical effective stress concept to fractured rock media.

  15. Strength and ductility of room-dry and water-saturated igneous rocks at low pressures and temperatures to partial melting. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Higgs, N.G.; Lantz, J.R.; Bauer, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    Rock types that are likely candidates for drilling were tested. Reported herein are the short-time ultimate strengths and ductilities determined at temperatures of 25/sup 0/ to 1050/sup 0/C and a strain rate of 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/ of (a) room-dry Mt. Hood Andesite, Cuerbio Basalt, and Charcoal (St. Cloud Gray) Granodiorite at confining pressures of 0, 50, and 100 MPa, (b) water-saturated specimens of the same three rocks at zero effective pressure (both pore and confining pressures of 50 MPa), and (c) room-dry Newberry Rhyolite Obsidian at 0 and 50 MPa. These strengths are then compared with the stresses developed at the wall of a borehole in an elastic medium at the appropriate temperatures and mean pressures to assess the problem of borehole stability. (MHR)

  16. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10-4 millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (˜pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  17. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Seepage Properties of Fractured Rocks Under Different Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Miao, X. X.; Chen, Z. Q.; Mao, X. B.

    2013-09-01

    The effectiveness of transmitting underground water in rock fractures is strongly influenced by the widths of the fractures and their interconnections. However, the geometries needed for water flow in fractured rock are also heavily controlled by the confining pressure conditions. This paper is intended to study the seepage properties of fractured rocks under different confining pressures. In order to do this, we designed and manufactured a water flow apparatus that can be connected to the electro-hydraulic servo-controlled test system MTS815.02, which provides loading and exhibits external pressures in the test. Using this apparatus, we tested fractured mudstone, limestone and sandstone specimens and obtained the relationship between seepage properties and variations in confining pressure. The calculation of the seepage properties based on the collection of water flow and confining pressure differences is specifically influenced by non-Darcy flow. The results show that: (1) The seepage properties of fractured rocks are related to confining pressure, i.e. with the increase of confining pressure, the permeability decreases and the absolute value of non-Darcy flow coefficient increases. (2) The sandstone coefficients and range from to m2 and to m-1, respectively, and exhibit a greater change compared to coefficients of mudstone and limestone. (3) From the regression analysis of experimental data, it is concluded that the polynomial function is a better fit than the power and logarithmic functions. The results obtained can provide an important reference for understanding the stability of rock surrounding roadways toward prevention of underground water gushing-out, and for developing underground resources (e.g. coal).

  19. The effects of confining pressure and stress difference on static fatigue of granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Samples of Barre granite were creep tested at room temperature at confining pressures up to 2 kilobars. The time to fracture increased with decreasing stress difference at every pressure, but the rate of change of fracture time with respect to the stress difference increased with pressure. At 87% of the short-term fracture strength, the time to fracture increased from about 4 minutes at atmospheric pressure to longer than one day at 2 Kb of pressure. The inelastic volumetric strain at the onset of tertiary creep, delta, was constant within 25% at any particular pressure but increased with pressure in a manner analogous to the increase of strength with pressure. At the onset of tertiary creep, the number of cracks and their average length increased with pressure. The crack angle and crack length spectra were quite similar, however, at each pressure at the onset of tertiary creep.

  20. The Effect of Confining Pressure on the Chemical Osmotic Property of Sedimentary Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Manaka, M.; Ito, K.

    2011-12-01

    In coastal, sedimentary formations, salinity gradients may induce chemical osmosis, leading to fluid pressure anomalies from hydrostatic pressures. For the precise characterization of the groundwater flow and mass transport systems with heterogeneous salinity distributions, the possibility of chemical osmosis needs to be identified. In order to test the ability of rock to generate pressure anomalies under salinity gradient, the authors developed a laboratory apparatus for measuring the chemically induced osmotic pressure within a rock sample under confining pressure. A series of experiments were performed on a disc-shaped siliceous mudstone, taken from Horonobe area in Hokkaido, under confining pressures ranging from 1 to 20 MPa. The salinity differences between the boundaries of sample are almost consistent in the experiments, and range from 0.110 to 0.118 M NaCl. The differential pressures between the boundaries of sample reached the quasi-steady state within 3 hours in each experiment, and their averaged values range from 9.1 to 26.4 kPa. The reflection coefficients approximated from the salinity and pressure differences using van't Hoff equation range from 0.020 to 0.049, and show the correlation with the confining pressure.

  1. Adsorption and disjoining pressure isotherms of confined polymers using dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goicochea, A Gama

    2007-11-06

    The adsorption and disjoining pressure isotherms of polymers confined by planar walls are obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in the Grand Canonical (GC) ensemble in combination with the mesoscopic technique known as dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Two models of effective potentials for the confining surfaces are used: one with both an attractive and a repulsive term and one with a purely repulsive term. As for the polymer, seven-bead linear model of polyethylene glycol (PEG) dissolved in water is used. The results indicate remarkably good agreement between the trends shown by our adsorption isotherms and those obtained from experiments of PEG on oxide surfaces. Additionally, the disjoining pressure isotherm of water shows oscillations, while those of PEG display the same trend for both wall models. Moreover, it is found that the disjoining pressure isotherms are in qualitative agreement with those from experiments on confined linear polymers.

  2. Effects of Thermal Damage and Confining Pressure on the Mechanical Properties of Coarse Marble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mengdi; Rong, Guan; Zhou, Chuangbing; Peng, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Heating treatment generally causes thermal damage inside rocks, and the influence of thermal damage on mechanical properties of rocks is an important topic in rock mechanics. The coarse marble specimens drilled out from a rock block were first heated to a specific temperature level of 200, 400 and 600 °C except the control group left at 20 °C. A series of triaxial compression tests subjected to the confining pressure of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 MPa were conducted. Coupling effects of thermal damage and confining pressure on the mechanical properties of marbles including post-peak behaviors and failure modes, strength and deformation parameters, characteristic stresses in the progressive failure process had been investigated. Meanwhile, accompanied tests of physical properties were carried out to study the effect of thermal damage on microstructure, porosity and P-wave velocity. Finally, the degradation parameter was defined and a strength-degradation model to describe the peak strength was proposed. Physical investigations show that porosity increases slowly and P-wave velocity reduces dramatically, which could be re-demonstrated by the microscopy results. As for the post-peak behaviors and the failure modes, there is a brittle to ductile transition trend with increasing confining pressure and thermal effect reinforces the ductility to some degree. The comparative study on strength and deformation parameters concludes that heating causes damage and confining pressure inhibits the damage to develop. Furthermore, crack damage stress and crack initiation stress increase, while the ratios of crack damage stress to peak strength and crack initiation stress to peak strength show a decreasing trend with the increase of confining pressure; the magnitude of crack damage stress or crack initiation stress shows a tendency of decrease with the increasing heating temperature and the tendency vanishes subjected to high confinement.

  3. Competition between pressure and gravity confinement in Lyman Alpha forest observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.; Salpeter, Edwin E.; Linder, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    A break in the distribution function of Lyman Alpha clouds (at a typical redshift of 2.5) has been reported by Petit-jean et al. (1993). This feature is what would be expected from a transition between pressure confinement and gravity confinement (as predicted in Charlton, Salpeter & Hogan 1993). The column density at which the feature occurs has been used to determine the external confining pressure approximately 10 per cu cm K, which could be due to a hot, intergalactic medium. For models that provide a good fit to the data, the contribution of the gas in clouds to omega is small. The specific shape of the distribution function at the transition (predicted by models to have a nonmonotonic slope) can serve as a diagnostic of the distribution of dark matter around Lyman Alpha forest clouds, and the present data already eliminate certain models.

  4. Sustained spheromaks with ideal n = 1 kink stability and pressure confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Victor, B. S. Jarboe, T. R.; Hansen, C. J.; Akcay, C.; Morgan, K. D.; Hossack, A. C.; Nelson, B. A.

    2014-08-15

    Increasing the helicity injector drive frequency up to 68.5 kHz on the Helicity Injected Torus-Steady Inductive (HIT-SI) experiment has produced spheromaks with current amplifications of 3.8, ideal n = 1 kink stability, improved toroidal symmetry and pressure confinement. Current centroid calculations from surface magnetic probes show an outward shift in the magnetic field at frequencies above 50 kHz. Grad-Shafranov equilibria indicate pressure confinement at higher injector operating frequencies. The minimum characteristic frequency needed to achieve this confining effect on HIT-SI plasmas is found to be approximately 30 kHz by analysis of the density fluctuations.

  5. The effects of confining pressure and stress difference on static fatigue of granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranz, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Samples of Barre granite have been creep tested at room temperature at confining pressures up to 2 kbar. Experimental procedures are described and the results of observations and analysis are presented. It is noted that the effect of pressure is to increase the amount of inelastic deformation the rock can sustain before becoming unstable. It is also shown that this increased deformation is due to longer and more numerous microcracks.

  6. The effect of confining pressure on specific energy in Nd:YAG laser perforating of rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadi, M.; Erfan, M. R.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2012-02-01

    For many years, the oil and gas industry were looking for an alternative method that could significantly reduce the primary drawbacks of using explosives. Perforating oil and gas wells using lasers as a new method is currently under research. In laser perforating, many parameters influence the essential factor of specific energy (i.e. the required energy to remove the unit weight of rock). One of these parameters is the confining pressure. Here, a core sample is placed in the Hoek cell and a new frame is designed to fix them. A small circular part of top side of the cylindrical sample is open in order to interact with the laser beam while the mechanical pressure exerted with the Hoek cell confines the other sides. The results show that the main disparity in specific energy and rate of penetration (ROP) occurs in the range 8-16 MPa of confining pressure. It is found that the amount of specific energy is constant at pressures higher than 16 MPa and consequently, micro cracks that appeared on sample surface at low pressure are absent at higher pressures.

  7. GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY OF ROTATING, PRESSURE-CONFINED, POLYTROPIC GAS DISKS WITH VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Young Min; Hong, Seung Soo E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: sshong@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2012-12-20

    We investigate the gravitational instability (GI) of rotating, vertically stratified, pressure-confined, polytropic gas disks using a linear stability analysis as well as analytic approximations. The disks are initially in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium and bounded by a constant external pressure. We find that the GI of a pressure-confined disk is in general a mixed mode of the conventional Jeans and distortional instabilities, and is thus an unstable version of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. The Jeans mode dominates in weakly confined disks or disks with rigid boundaries. On the other hand, when the disk has free boundaries and is strongly pressure confined, the mixed GI is dominated by the distortional mode that is surface-gravity waves driven unstable under their own gravity and thus incompressible. We demonstrate that the Jeans mode is gravity-modified acoustic waves rather than inertial waves and that inertial waves are almost unaffected by self-gravity. We derive an analytic expression for the effective sound speed c{sub eff} of acoustic-surface-gravity waves. We also find expressions for the gravity reduction factors relative to a razor-thin counterpart that are appropriate for the Jeans and distortional modes. The usual razor-thin dispersion relation, after correcting for c{sub eff} and the reduction factors, closely matches the numerical results obtained by solving a full set of linearized equations. The effective sound speed generalizes the Toomre stability parameter of the Jeans mode to allow for the mixed GI of vertically stratified, pressure-confined disks.

  8. Effects of strain rate and confining pressure on the deformation and failure of shale

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M. ); Sheppard, M.C. ); Houwen, O.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous work on shale mechanical properties has focused on the slow deformation rates appropriate to wellbore deformation. Deformation of shale under a drill bit occurs at a very high rate, and the failure properties of the rock under these conditions are crucial in determining bit performance and in extracting lithology and pore-pressure information from drilling parameters. Triaxial tests were performed on two nonswelling shales under a wide range of strain rates and confining and pore pressures. At low strain rates, when fluid is relatively free to move within the shale, shale deformation and failure are governed by effective stress or pressure (i.e., total confining pressure minus pore pressure), as is the case for ordinary rock. If the pore pressure in the shale is high, increasing the strain rate beyond about 0.1%/sec causes large increases in the strength and ductility of the shale. Total pressure begins to influence the strength. At high stain rates, the influence of effective pressure decreases, except when it is very low (i.e., when pore pressure is very high); ductility then rises rapidly. This behavior is opposite that expected in ordinary rocks. This paper briefly discusses the reasons for these phenomena and their impact on wellbore and drilling problems.

  9. Pressure Profile for an Associating Lennard-Jones Fluid Confined in a Spherical Cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Yuan; Gu, Fang; Wang, Hai-Jun; Sun, Zong-Li

    2017-03-09

    We present the pressure tensor of an associating Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid confined in a spherical cavity of hard wall, where a high-order density correlation has been taken into account. To give the two-body association potential for calculating the pressure tensor, an angle-average of site-site attraction over all orientations of two particles is performed. Furthermore, the classical density functional theory is employed to obtain the density profile of the confined fluid, by which the normal and tangential pressure profiles are illustrated under various conditions to show the dependence of the pressure tensor on the association strength, number of associating sites, radius of cavity, and bulk density. As an application, the corresponding surface tension is calculated. It is shown that under a strong association interaction (both association strength and the number of associating sites are large), the pressure profiles are depleted from the wall of the cavity instead of the oscillatory behavior under a weak association interaction. Such a tendency is mainly determined by the competition between association interaction and excluded volume interaction. Therefore, the aggregation state and related properties of an associating LJ fluid within a confinement of nanoscale can be efficiently regulated by the association interaction.

  10. Influence of confining pressure and impact loading on mechanical properties of amphibolite and sericite-quartz schist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi; Xu, Jinyu; Lv, Xiaocong

    2014-06-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of amphibolite and sericite-quartz schist under confining pressure, two rocks are subjected to impact loadings with different strain rates and confining pressures by using split Hopkinson pressure bar equipment with a confining pressure device. Based on the experimental results, the stress-strain curves are analyzed and the effects of confining pressure and strain rates on the dynamic compressive strength, peak strain and failure mode are summarized. The results show that: (1) The characteristics of two rocks in the ascent stage of the stress-strain curve are basically the same, but in the descent stage, the rocks gradually show plastic deformation characteristics as the confining pressure increases. (2) The dynamic compressive strength and peak strain of two rocks increase as the strain rate increases and the confining pressure effects are obvious. (3) Due to the effect of confining pressure, the normal stress on the damage surface of the rock increases correspondingly, the bearing capacity of the crack friction exceeds the material cohesion and the slippage of the fractured rock is controlled, which all lead to the compression and shear failure mode of rock. The theoretical analysis and experimental methods to study the dynamic failure mode and other related characteristics of rock are useful in developing standards for engineering practice.

  11. High pressure induced phase transition and superdiffusion in anomalous fluid confined in flexible nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Bordin, José Rafael; Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2014-10-14

    The behavior of a confined spherical symmetric anomalous fluid under high external pressure was studied with Molecular Dynamics simulations. The fluid is modeled by a core-softened potential with two characteristic length scales, which in bulk reproduces the dynamical, thermodynamical, and structural anomalous behavior observed for water and other anomalous fluids. Our findings show that this system has a superdiffusion regime for sufficient high pressure and low temperature. As well, our results indicate that this superdiffusive regime is strongly related with the fluid structural properties and the superdiffusion to diffusion transition is a first order phase transition. We show how the simulation time and statistics are important to obtain the correct dynamical behavior of the confined fluid. Our results are discussed on the basis of the two length scales.

  12. Effect of nanoscale confinement on freezing of modified water at room temperature and ambient pressure.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-06-06

    Understanding the phase behavior of confined water is central to fields as diverse as heterogeneous catalysis, corrosion, nanofluidics, and to emerging energy technologies. Altering the state points (temperature, pressure, etc.) or introduction of a foreign surface can result in the phase transformation of water. At room temperature, ice nucleation is a very rare event and extremely high pressures in the GPa-TPa range are required to freeze water. Here, we perform computer experiments to artificially alter the balance between electrostatic and dispersion interactions between water molecules, and demonstrate nucleation and growth of ice at room temperature in a nanoconfined environment. Local perturbations in dispersive and electrostatic interactions near the surface are shown to provide the seed for nucleation (nucleation sites), which lead to room temperature liquid-solid phase transition of confined water. Crystallization of water occurs over several tens of nanometers and is shown to be independent of the nature of the substrate (hydrophilic oxide vs. hydrophobic graphene and crystalline oxide vs. amorphous diamond-like carbon). Our results lead us to hypothesize that the freezing transition of confined water can be controlled by tuning the relative dispersive and electrostatic interaction.

  13. Rotational dynamics of confined C60 from near-infrared Raman studies under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yonggang; Liu, Bingbing; Wang, Liancheng; Liu, Dedi; Yu, Shidan; Wang, Peng; Wang, Tianyi; Yao, Mingguang; Li, Quanjun; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Zou, Guangtian; Wågberg, Thomas; Sundqvist, Bertil; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2009-12-29

    Peapods present a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained crystal structures, whose dynamical properties are very important. We have recently studied the rotational dynamics of C(60) molecules confined inside single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by analyzing the intermediate frequency mode lattice vibrations using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The rotation of C(60) was tuned to a known state by applying high pressure, at which condition C(60) first forms dimers at low pressure and then forms a single-chain, nonrotating, polymer structure at high pressure. In the latter state the molecules form chains with a 2-fold symmetry. We propose that the C(60) molecules in SWNT exhibit an unusual type of ratcheted rotation due to the interaction between C(60) and SWNT in the "hexagon orientation," and the characteristic vibrations of ratcheted rotation becomes more obvious with decreasing temperature.

  14. Design of a split Hopkinson pressure bar with partial lateral confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Andrew D.; Clarke, Sam D.; Rigby, Sam E.; Tyas, Andrew; Warren, James A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) where partial lateral confinement of the specimen is provided by the inertia of a fluid annulus contained in a long steel reservoir. In contrast to unconfined testing, or a constant cell pressure applied before axial loading, lateral restraint is permitted to develop throughout the axial loading: this enables the high-strain-rate shear behaviour of soils to be characterised under conditions which are more representative of buried explosive events. A pressure transducer located in the wall of the reservoir allows lateral stresses to be quantified, and a dispersion-correction technique is used to provide accurate measurements of axial stress and strain. Preliminary numerical modelling is utilised to inform the experimental design, and the capability of the apparatus is demonstrated with specimen results for a dry quartz sand.

  15. Nanocrystalline diamond: Effect of confinement, pressure, and heating on phonon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipp, Magnus J.; Baonza, Valentín García; Evans, William J.; Lorenzana, Hector E.

    1997-09-01

    Micro- and nanocrystalline systems exhibit properties that differ markedly from bulk systems. Diamond, a prototypical system, demonstrates a broadening, shift, and emergence of Raman phonon modes that are believed to originate from finite-size effects. Such information should be useful in constraining confinement models developed to describe the state of these mesoscopic systems. For example, previous investigations have analyzed crystallite size and stresses in scientifically and technologically relevant environments, including chemical-vapor-deposition diamond films and diamond nanocomposites. We have experimentally measured the effect on the diamond Raman phonon modes due to confinement, pressure, and heating effects. At ambient pressure, we present Raman measurements for diamond crystallites ranging from 6 nm to 10 μm, which were synthesized by both static and dynamic techniques. The Raman spectra obtained from the statically synthesized samples exhibit a characteristic strong and narrow diamond band, while those dynamically synthesized exhibit both diamond and graphiticlike features. A redshift of the diamond Raman band is observed for decreasing particle size. However, the pressure dependence of the phonon is about the same as that for the bulk system up to 30 kbar for crystallite sizes between 6 and 10 nm. Our measurements also indicate that heating effects from the incident laser dramatically affect the measured Raman spectra. This result leads us to an explanation for discrepancies among previously published results. We show that crystallite size and stress information cannot be determined without compensating for heating effects. Lastly, the phonon confinement model is able to explain the shifts of the Raman modes with size.

  16. Polymorphism and polyamorphism in bilayer water confined to slit nanopore under high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaeil; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2012-01-01

    A distinctive physical property of bulk water is its rich solid-state phase behavior, which includes 15 crystalline (ice I–ice XIV) and at least 3 glassy forms of water, namely, low-density amorphous, high-density amorphous, and very-high-density amorphous (VHDA). Nanoscale confinement adds a new physical variable that can result in a wealth of new quasi-2D phases of ice and amorphous ice. Previous computer simulations have revealed that when water is confined between two flat hydrophobic plates about 7–9 Å apart, numerous bilayer (BL) ices (or polymorphs) can arise [e.g., BL-hexagonal ice (BL-ice I)]. Indeed, growth of the BL-ice I through vapor deposition on graphene/Pt(111) substrate has been achieved experimentally. Herein, we report computer simulation evidence of pressure-induced amorphization from BL-ice I to BL-amorphous and then to BL-VHDA2 at 250 K and 3 GPa. In particular, BL-VHDA2 can transform into BL-VHDA1 via decompression from 3 to 1.5 GPa at 250 K. This phenomenon of 2D polyamorphic transition is akin to the pressure-induced amorphization in 3D ice (e.g., from hexagonal ice to HDA and then to VHDA via isobaric annealing). Moreover, when the BL-ice I is compressed instantly to 6 GPa, a new very-high-density BL ice is formed. This new phase of BL ice can be viewed as an array of square ice nanotubes. Insights obtained from pressure-induced amorphization and crystallization of confined water offer a guide with which to seek a thermodynamic path to grow a new form of methane clathrate whose BL ice framework exhibits the Archimedean 4⋅82 (square-octagon) pattern. PMID:23236178

  17. Equatorial disk formation around rotating stars due to ram pressure confinement by the stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, J. E.; Cassinelli, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The axisymmetric 2D supersonic solution of a rotating, radiation-driven stellar wind presently obtained by a simple approximation predicts the formation of a dense equatorial disk, when the star's rotation rate lies above a threshold value that depends on the ratio of the wind's terminal speed to the escape speed of the star. The disk is formed because the trajectories of the wind leaving the stellar surface at high latitudes carry it down to the equatorial plane; there, the material passes through a standing oblique shock atop the disk; it is therefore the ram pressure of the polar wind that compresses and confines the disk.

  18. Novel ice structures in carbon nanopores: pressure enhancement effect of confinement.

    PubMed

    Jazdzewska, Monika; Sliwinska-Bartkowiak, Małgorzata M; Beskrovnyy, Anatoly I; Vasilovskiy, Sergey G; Ting, Siu-Wa; Chan, Kwong-Yu; Huang, Liangliang; Gubbins, Keith E

    2011-05-21

    We report experimental results on the structure and melting behavior of ice confined in multi-walled carbon nanotubes and ordered mesoporous carbon CMK-3, which is the carbon replica of a SBA-15 silica template. The silica template has cylindrical mesopores with micropores connecting the walls of neighboring mesopores. The structure of the carbon replica material CMK-3 consists of carbon rods connected by smaller side-branches, with quasi-cylindrical mesopores of average pore size 4.9 nm and micropores of 0.6 nm. Neutron diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry have been used to determine the structure of the confined ice and the solid-liquid transition temperature. The results are compared with the behavior of water in multi-walled carbon nanotubes of inner diameters of 2.4 nm and 4 nm studied by the same methods. For D(2)O in CMK-3 we find evidence of the existence of nanocrystals of cubic ice and ice IX; the diffraction results also suggest the presence of ice VIII, although this is less conclusive. We find evidence of cubic ice in the case of the carbon nanotubes. For bulk water these crystal forms only occur at temperatures below 170 K in the case of cubic ice, and at pressures of hundreds or thousands of MPa in the case of ice VIII and IX. These phases appear to be stabilized by the confinement.

  19. Array of surface-confined glow discharges in atmospheric pressure helium: Modes and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Liu, D. X. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com; Nie, Q. Y.; Li, H. P.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G. E-mail: mglin5g@gmail.com

    2014-05-19

    Array of atmospheric pressure surface discharges confined by a two-dimensional hexagon electrode mesh is studied for its discharge modes and temporal evolution so as to a theoretical underpinning to their growing applications in medicine, aerodynamic control, and environmental remediation. Helium plasma surface-confined by one hexagon-shaped rim electrode is shown to evolve from a Townsend mode to a normal and abnormal glow mode, and its evolution develops from the rim electrodes as six individual microdischarges merging in the middle of the hexagon mesh element. Within one hexagon element, microdischarges remain largely static with the mesh electrode being the instantaneous cathode, but move towards the hexagon center when the electrode is the instantaneous anode. On the entire array electrode surface, plasma ignition is found to beat an unspecific hexagon element and then spreads to ignite surrounding hexagon elements. The spreading of microdischarges is in the form of an expanding circle at a speed of about 3 × 10{sup 4} m/s, and their quenching starts in the location of the initial plasma ignition. Plasma modes influence how input electrical power is used to generate and accelerate electrons and as such the reaction chemistry, whereas plasma dynamics are central to understand and control plasma instabilities. The present study provides an important aspect of plasma physics of the atmospheric surface-confined discharge array and a theoretical underpinning to its future technological innovation.

  20. Pressure dependence of confined liquid behavior subjected to boundary-driven shear.

    PubMed

    Heyes, D M; Smith, E R; Dini, D; Spikes, H A; Zaki, T A

    2012-04-07

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of boundary-driven sheared Lennard-Jones liquids at variable pressure up to 5 GPa (for argon) reveal a rich out-of-equilibrium phase behavior with a strong degree of shear localization. At the lowest apparent shear rate considered (wall speed ~1 m s(-1)) the confined region is an homogeneously sheared solid (S) with no slip at the walls. This transforms at higher shear rates to a non-flowing plug with slip at the walls, referred to as the plug slip (PS) state. At higher shear rate a central localized (CL) state formed in which the shear gradient was localized in the center of the film, with the rest of the confined sample in a crystalline state commensurate with the wall lattice. The central zone liquidlike region increased in width with shear rate. A continuous rounded temperature profile across the whole system reflects strong dynamical coupling between the wall and confined region. The temperature rise in the confined film is consistent with the Brinkman number. The transition from the PS to CL states typically occurred at a wall speed near where the shear stress approached a critical value of ~3% of the shear modulus, and also near the peak in the traction coefficient, μ. The peak traction coefficient values computed, ~0.12-0.14 at 1000 MPa agree with those found for traction fluids and occur when the confined liquid is in the PS and CL states. At low wall speeds slip can occur at one wall and stick at the other. Poorly wetting liquids manifest long-lived asymmetries in the confined liquid properties across the system, and a shift in solid-liquid phase co-existence to higher shear rates. A non-equilibrium phase diagram based on these results is proposed. The good agreement of the tribological response of the Lennard-Jones fluid with that of more complicated molecular systems suggests that a corresponding states scaling of the tribological behavior could apply.

  1. Scaling regimes of thermocapillarity-driven dynamics of confined long bubbles: Effects of disjoining pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    During thermocapillary transport of a confined long bubble, we unveil the existence of a contrary-to-the-conventional disjoining-pressure-dominant scaling regime characterizing the dynamics of the thin liquid film engulfed between the bubble interface and the channel surface. Such a regime is realized for the limitingly small magnitude of the Marangoni stress (surface tension gradient) when the separating liquid region reaches an ultrathin dimension. Over this regime, we witness a severe breakdown of the seemingly intuitive scaling arguments based on the balance of viscous and capillary forces. Starting from competent balance criteria, we uncover the characteristic length scales involved, leading towards obtaining the new consistent scaling laws of the disjoining-pressure-dominant regime, in a simple closed form analytical fashion. Our scaling estimations are substantiated by full-scale numerical simulations of the pertinent thin-film equations. These new scaling laws appear to be convenient for implementing as a fundamental design basis for multiphase microfluidic systems.

  2. Strength, Deformability and X-ray Micro-CT Observations of Deeply Buried Marble Under Different Confining Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Qi; Ju, Yang; Gao, Feng; Gui, Yi-Lin

    2016-11-01

    In this research, a series of triaxial compression experiments and X-ray observations were conducted to explore the strength, deformability and internal damage mechanism of deeply buried marble. The results show that an increase in confining pressure results in obvious brittle-ductile transition characteristics of deeply buried marble. The Young's modulus of the marble increased nonlinearly with increasing confining pressure. The peak and residual strength of the marble exhibit a clear linear relationship with the confining pressure, which can be described by the linear Mohr-Coulomb criterion. The sensitivity of the residual strength on the confining pressure was clearly higher than that of the peak strength. After uniaxial and triaxial compression failure, marble specimens were analyzed using a three-dimensional X-ray micro-CT scanning system. Based on horizontal and vertical cross-sections, the marble specimen is mainly dominated by axial splitting tensile cracks under uniaxial compression, but under confining pressure, the marble specimen is mainly dominated by a single shear crack. To quantitatively evaluate the internal damage of the marble material, the crack area and aperture extent for each horizontal cross-section were calculated by analyzing the binarized pictures. The system of crack planes under uniaxial compression is more complicated than that under triaxial compression, which is also supported by the evolution of the crack area and aperture extent. Finally, the brittle-ductile transition mechanism of the marble is discussed and interpreted according to the proposed conceptual models.

  3. Conformation and stretching of end-tethered polymers in pressure-driven flow under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tamal; Hardt, Steffen; InstituteNano-; Microfludics, Technische Universität Darmstadt Team

    2016-11-01

    Understanding of the conformation and dynamics of polymers under confinement is important for both fundamental studies and applications. We experimentally study the conformation and stretching of surface-tethered polymer chains confined between parallel surfaces and exposed to a pressure-driven flow. λ-DNA molecules are tethered to the wall of a microchannel of height smaller than the contour lengths of the molecules. The DNA molecules, stained with a fluorescent dye, are visualized by epifluorescence and laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). The effects of the channel height, flow rate and contour length on the extension of the molecules are determined from epifluorescence images. From LSCM images the complete conformation and orientation of the DNA molecules is inferred. We find that the fractional extension of the molecules is uniquely determined by the fluid shear stress at the tethering surface and the chain contour length. There is no explicit influence of the channel height in the range of contour lengths we consider. We also derive analytical scaling relationships (in the weak and strong extension limits) that explain the experimentally observed stretching characteristics. This work is supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (Grant No. HA 2696/33-1).

  4. Rotational dynamics of confined C60 from near-infrared Raman studies under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, L.; Liu, D.; Yu, S.; Wang, P.; Wang, T.; Yao, M.; Li, Q.; Zou, B.; Cui, T.; Zou, G.; Wagberg, T.; Sundqvist, B.; Mao, H.-K.

    2009-12-29

    Peapods present a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained crystal structures, whose dynamical properties are very important. We have recently studied the rotational dynamics of C60 molecules confined inside single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) by analyzing the intermediate frequency mode lattice vibrations using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. The rotation of C60 was tuned to a known state by applying high pressure, at which condition C60 first forms dimers at low pressure and then forms a single-chain, nonrotating, polymer structure at high pressure. In the latter state the molecules form chains with a 2-fold symmetry. We propose that the C60 molecules in SWNT exhibit an unusual type of ratcheted rotation due to the interaction between C60 and SWNT in the “hexagon orientation,” and the characteristic vibrations of ratcheted rotation becomes more obvious with decreasing temperature.

  5. The effect of artesian-pressure decline on confined aquifer systems and its relation to land subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, J.H.

    1964-01-01

    Ground water in the Southwestern United States is derived chiefly from unconsolidated to semiconsolidated alluvial deposits. Where these deposits contain confined water, they may be susceptible to compaction and related land- surface subsidence, if artesian pressures are reduced. Compaction of artesian-aquifer systems can be estimated from core tests if the artesian-pressure decline is known. Compaction occurs chiefly in the finer grained deposits ; porosity decrease is greater near the top of the confined aquifer than near the bottom. Because most of the compaction of these aquifer systems is permanent, the storage coefficient during the initial decline of artesian pressure greatly exceeds the storage coefficient during a subsequent pressure decline through the same depth range, after an intervening period of pressure recovery.

  6. Particle modelling of magnetically confined oxygen plasma in low pressure radio frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Benyoucef, Djilali; Yousfi, Mohammed

    2015-01-15

    The main objective of this paper is the modelling and simulation of a radio frequency (RF) discharge in oxygen at low pressure and at room temperature, including the effect of crossed electric and magnetic fields for generation and confinement of oxygen plasma. The particle model takes into account one axial dimension along the electric field axis and three velocity components during the Monte Carlo treatment of the collisions between charged particles and background gas. The simulation by this developed code allows us not only to determine the electrodynamics characteristics of the RF discharge, but also to obtain kinetics and energetic description of reactive oxygen plasma at low pressure. These information are very important for the control of the deep reactive-ion etching technology of the silicon to manufacture capacitors with high density and for the deposition thick insulating films or thick metal to manufacture micro-coils. The simulation conditions are as follows: RF peak voltage of 200 V, frequency of 13.56 MHz, crossed magnetic field varying from 0 to 50 Gauss, and oxygen pressure of 13.8 Pa. In the presence of magnetic field, the results show an increase of the plasma density, a decrease of the electron mean energy, and also a reduction of the ratio between electron density and positive ion density. Finally in order to validate, the results are successfully compared with measurements already carried out in the literature. The conditions of comparison are from 100 to 300 V of the peak voltage at 13.56 MHz under a pressure of 13.8 Pa and a gap distance of 2.5 cm.

  7. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Al, T; Mazurek, M

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I(-)) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax=12MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I(-) tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (±12%) suggesting that, for

  8. Effect of confining pressure on diffusion coefficients in clay-rich, low-permeability sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Y.; Al, T.; Mazurek, M.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of confining pressure (CP) on the diffusion of tritiated-water (HTO) and iodide (I-) tracers through Ordovician rocks from the Michigan Basin, southwestern Ontario, Canada, and Opalinus Clay from Schlattingen, Switzerland was investigated in laboratory experiments. Four samples representing different formations and lithologies in the Michigan Basin were studied: Queenston Formation shale, Georgian Bay Formation shale, Cobourg Formation limestone and Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone. Estimated in situ vertical stresses at the depths from which the samples were retrieved range from 12.0 to 17.4 MPa (Michigan Basin) and from 21 to 23 MPa (Opalinus Clay). Effective diffusion coefficients (De) were determined in through-diffusion experiments. With HTO tracer, applying CP resulted in decreases in De of 12.5% for the Queenston Formation shale (CPmax = 12 MPa), 30% for the Georgian Bay Formation shale (15 MPa), 34% for the Cobourg Formation limestone (17.4 MPa), 31% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone (17.4 MPa) and 43-46% for the Opalinus Clay (15 MPa). Decreases in De were larger for the I- tracer: 13.8% for the Queenston shale, 42% for the Georgian Bay shale, 50% for the Cobourg Formation limestone, 55% for the Cobourg Formation argillaceous limestone and 63-68% for the Opalinus Clay. The tracer-specific nature of the response is attributed to an increasing influence of anion exclusion as the pore size decreases at higher CP. Results from the shales (including Opalinus Clay) indicate that the pressure effect on De can be represented by a linear relationship between De and ln(CP), which provides valuable predictive capability. The nonlinearity results in a relatively small change in De at high CP, suggesting that it is not necessary to apply the exact in situ pressure conditions in order to obtain a good estimate of the in situ diffusion coefficient. Most importantly, the CP effect on shale is reversible (± 12%) suggesting that, for

  9. Thermal properties of Permian Basin evaporites to 493 K and 30 MPa confining pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, W.B.; Heard, H.C.; Boro, C.O.; Keller, K.T.; Ralph, W.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1987-01-26

    Laboratory measurements have been made of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of four rock salts, two anhydrites, and two dolomites bordering the Cycle 4 and Cycle 5 bedded salt formations in the Permian Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Measurement conditions ranged from 303 to 473 K in temperature, and 0.1 to 31.0 MPa in hydrostatic confining pressure. Within the +-5% measurement resolution neither conductivity nor diffusivity showed a dependence upon pressure in any of the rocks. Conductivity and diffusivity in all rocks had a negative temperature dependence. For the two Cycle 4 salt samples, conductivity over the temperature range explored fell from 5.5 to 3.75 W/m.K, and diffusivity fell from about 2.7 to 1.7 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s. One of the Cycle 5 salts was a single crystal which had anomalous results, but the other had a low conductivity, about 3.4 W/m.K, with very weak temperature dependence, and a high diffusivity, 3.8 to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s over the temperature range. In the nonsalts, conductivity and diffusivity decreased 10 to 20% over the temperature range explored, which was 308 < T < 373 K. Typical values at 308 K for conductivity were 5.4 W/m.K for both anhydrites and 3.4 and 2.6 W/m.K for the two different dolomite samples. Approximate values at 308 K for diffusivity were 2.3 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s for the anhydrites and 1.4 x 10/sup -6/ m/sup 2//s for both the dolomites. The coefficient of thermal linear expansion was measured for the Cycle 5 salt and nonsalts over 308 < T < 493 and 0.1 < P < 30.0 MPa. Typically, the coefficient varied from about 12 x 10/sup -6/ K/sup -1/ at P = 3.0 MPa to 4 x 10/sup -6/ K/sup -1/ at P = 30 MPa for both nonsalt rocks. In anhydrite, it decreased with increasing temperature at a rate of roughly 5 x 10/sup -8/ K/sup -2/ at all pressures. In dolomite, the coefficient increased at roughly the same rate. Expansion of the salt ranged from 33 to 38 x 10/sup -6/ K/sup -1/ and was independent of pressure

  10. Removal of volatile organic compounds in the confined space using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Toyoura, T.; Matsui, M.; Kishimoto, T.

    2013-10-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated as hazardous pollutants. Thus, the control of VOCs in the atmosphere is one of the most important environmental problems. Removal of VOCs has been generally carried out by conventional methods such as absorption, adsorption and incineration. There are some researches on development of removal system using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas. In this study, the plasma process is applied to removal of VOCs in the confined space such as an underwater vehicle because of low operating temperature and compact system. A copper wire is helically wound outside a glass tube, and a tungsten rod is inserted inside the glass tube. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced inside the glass tube by a high-voltage bipolar power supply for the removal of VOC. The DBD plasma decomposed hexane with the initial concentration of 30 ppm diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air. As the result, the removal efficiency of hexane diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air was 15%, 45% and 80%, respectively. Thus, it is considered that O and OH radicals are effective for removal of hexane. Optimization of the electrodes and the applied voltage waveforms for the enhancement of removal efficiency and the reduction of second products such as ozone will be investigated.

  11. Pressure and impulse scaling methods for wall impact in ICF (inertial confinement fusion)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Orth, C.D. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of the first structural wall (FSW) in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor requires some knowledge of the expected wall loading produced by x-ray and neutron deposition; specifically in the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) reactor, wall loading results from two sources -- gas shock and liquid impact. Gas shock is derived from x-ray deposition in the thin layers of exposed blanket material, producing ionized vapor, which will generate gas shock on the FSW. Liquid impact, on the other hand, results from the acceleration of liquid blanket material by two possible forces -- the drag from vapor expansion through the blanket material and the neutron-induced isochoric disassembly process. Both impacts, however, are coupled by the interaction of hot gas expanding through the liquid blanket. This paper discusses scaling methods for estimating pressure and impulse on the HYLIFE FSW from these impacts. In particular, this paper reviews simple analytical and numerical techniques, and the use of experimental results in the estimation of wall impacts for the HYLIFE blanket geometry. Considered important in the analyses are supersonic flow through jet arrays and isochoric disassembly. Given the same initial parameters as those used in previous HYLIFE studies, the techniques described here yield results comparable to the previous studies utilizing heavy numerical simulation.

  12. Analysis of reflected blast wave pressure profiles in a confined room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, P. E.; Sochet, I.; Trélat, S.

    2012-05-01

    To understand the blast effects of confined explosions, it is necessary to study the characteristic parameters of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and arrival time. In a previous study, experiments were performed using two different scales of a pyrotechnic workshop. The main purpose of these experiments was to compare the TNT equivalent for solid and gaseous explosives in terms of mass to define a TNT equivalent in a reflection field and to validate the similitude between real and small scales. To study the interactions and propagations of the reflected shock waves, the present study was conducted by progressively building a confined volume around the charge. In this way, the influence of each wall and the origins of the reflected shock waves can be determined. The purpose of this paper is to report the blast wave interactions that resulted from the detonation of a stoichiometric propane-oxygen mixture in a confined room.

  13. Experimental verification and theoretical prediction of cartilage interstitial fluid pressurization at an impermeable contact interface in confined compression.

    PubMed

    Soltz, M A; Ateshian, G A

    1998-10-01

    Interstitial fluid pressurization has long been hypothesized to play a fundamental role in the load support mechanism and frictional response of articular cartilage. However, to date, few experimental studies have been performed to verify this hypothesis from direct measurements. The first objective of this study was to investigate experimentally the hypothesis that cartilage interstitial fluid pressurization does support the great majority of the applied load, in the testing configurations of confined compression creep and stress relaxation. The second objective was to investigate the hypothesis that the experimentally observed interstitial fluid pressurization could also be predicted using the linear biphasic theory of Mow et al. (J. Biomech. Engng ASME, 102, 73-84, 1980). Fourteen bovine cartilage samples were tested in a confined compression chamber fitted with a microchip piezoresistive transducer to measure interstitial fluid pressure, while simultaneously measuring (during stress relaxation) or prescribing (during creep) the total stress. It was found that interstitial fluid pressure supported more than 90% of the total stress for durations as long as 725 +/- 248 s during stress relaxation (mean +/- S.D., n = 7), and 404 +/- 229 s during creep (n = 7). When comparing experimental measurements of the time-varying interstitial fluid pressure against predictions from the linear biphasic theory, nonlinear coefficients of determination r2 = 0.871 +/- 0.086 (stress relaxation) and r2 = 0.941 +/- 0.061 (creep) were found. The results of this study provide some of the most direct evidence to date that interstitial fluid pressurization plays a fundamental role in cartilage mechanics; they also indicate that the mechanism of fluid load support in cartilage can be properly predicted from theory.

  14. Growth of GaAs from a free surface melt under controlled arsenic pressure in a partially confined configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Lagowski, J.; Wu, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A partially confined configuration for the growth of GaAs from melt in space was developed, consisting of a triangular prism containing the seed crystal and source material in the form of a rod. It is suggested that the configuration overcomes two obstacles in the growth of GaAs in space: total confinement in a quartz crucible and lack of arsenic pressure control. Ground tests of the configuration show that it is capable of crystal growth in space and is useful for studying the growth of GaAs from a free-surface melt on earth. The resulting chemical composition, electrical property variations, and phenomenological models to account for the results are presented.

  15. High-pressure behavior of bromine confined in the one-dimensional channels of zeolite AlPO4-5 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaodong; Yao, Zhen; Yao, Mingguang; Lv, Jiayin; Chen, Shuanglong; Li, Quanjun; Lv, Hang; Wang, Tianyi; Lu, Shuangchen; Liu, Ran; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jing; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zou, Bo; Cui, Tian; Liu, Bingbing

    2016-09-01

    We present a joint experimental and theoretical study on the high-pressure behavior of bromine confined in the one-dimensional (1D) nanochannels of zeolite AlPO4-5 (AFI) single crystals. Raman scattering experiments indicate that loading bromine into AFI single crystals can lead to the formation of bromine molecular chains inside the nanochannels of the crystals. High-pressure Raman and X-ray diffraction studies demonstrate that high pressure can increase the length of the confined bromine molecular chains and modify the inter- and intramolecular interactions of the molecules. The confined bromine shows a considerably different high-pressure behavior to that of bulk bromine. The pressure-elongated bromine molecular chains can be preserved when the pressure is reduced to ambient pressure. Theoretical simulations explain the experimental results obtained from the Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. Furthermore, we find that the intermolecular distance between confined bromine molecules gradually becomes comparable to the intramolecular bond length in bromine molecules upon compression. This may result in the dissociation of the bromine molecules and the formation of 1D bromine atomic chains at pressures above 24 GPa. Our study suggests that the unique nanoconfinement has a considerable effect on the high-pressure behavior of bromine, and the confined bromine species concomitantly enhance the structural stability of the host AFI single crystals.

  16. Line broadening of confined CO gas: from molecule-wall to molecule-molecule collisions with pressure.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, J-M; Boulet, C; Auwera, J Vander; El Hamzaoui, H; Capoen, B; Bouazaoui, M

    2014-02-14

    The infrared absorption in the fundamental band of CO gas confined in porous silica xerogel has been recorded at room temperature for pressures between about 5 and 920 hPa using a high resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. The widths of individual lines are determined from fits of measured spectra and compared with ab initio predictions obtained from requantized classical molecular dynamics simulations. Good agreement is obtained from the low pressure regime where the line shapes are governed by molecule-wall collisions to high pressures where the influence of molecule-molecule interactions dominates. These results, together with those obtained with a simple analytical model, indicate that both mechanisms contribute in a practically additive way to the observed linewidths. They also confirm that a single collision of a molecule with a wall changes its rotational state. These results are of interest for the determination of some characteristics of the opened porosity of porous materials through optical soundings.

  17. Quantification of Viscosity and Capillary Pressure Anomalies for Polar Liquids in 2D Hydrophilic Nano-Confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. A.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Balhoff, M.

    2014-12-01

    Interest in liquid and interfacial behavior within nano-confinements spans many disciplines. Geophysical interest originates from a desire to understand flow mechanisms through hydrocarbon-rich nano-porous shale media, especially communication between fractures and the adjacent nano-porous matrix (imbibition). This work investigates the extent of boundary layer nucleation during polar liquid flows in hydrophilic nano-confinements via discrepancies seen in viscosity and capillary pressure from their bulk values. We perform our experiments in two-dimensional nanochannels of varying size and as small as 30 nm x 60 nm in cross section and still obtain visual data with reflected differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The simple geometry of the nanochannels enables the comparison against analytical transport solutions. By designing a nanochannel experiment that allows us to monitor the rate of fluid imbibition and volume loss of a trapped air pocket the liquid is imbibing into, we are able to decouple capillary pressure and viscosity from imbibition data, as well as gain information about gas partitioning at the meniscus interface. Our current experiments are performed with organic solvents within siliceous nanochannels and the results of the decoupling scheme indicate that for rectangular nanochannels with heights of 60 nm and varying widths, effective viscosity is consistently between 4-12 times higher than the bulk value and capillary pressure is around 50% less than the macroscopic Young-Laplace equation prediction. These results equate to the nucleation of wall boundary layers on the order of tens of molecular layers thick. Structured boundary layers have an inherently increased viscosity compared to the liquid bulk value, resulting in a significant reduction in imbibition efficacy. This presence of approximately 15 nm boundary layers in on the threshold of two different theories - thin bimolecular boundary layers and exclusion zones (thick boundary

  18. Characterization of magnetically confined low-pressure plasmas produced by an electromagnetic field in argon-acetylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdessi, G. Al; Margot, J.; Clergereaux, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles formation was investigated in magnetically confined low-pressure plasma produced in argon-acetylene mixtures. The plasma characteristics were measured in order to identify the species involved in the dust particles formation. Their dependence on the operating conditions including magnetic field intensity, acetylene fraction in the gas mixture and operating pressure was examined. In contrast with noble gases, in the presence of acetylene, the electron temperature increases with the magnetic field intensity, indicating additional charged particles losses in the plasma. Indeed, in these conditions, larger hydrocarbon ions are produced leading to the formation of dust particles in the plasma volume. The observed dependence of positive ion mass distribution and density and relative negative ion density on the operating parameters suggests that the dust particles are formed through different pathways, where negative and positive ions are both involved in the nucleation.

  19. Pressure Effect on the Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Transition

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Ito, Kanae; ...

    2015-12-03

    We studied the boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores in order to examine the liquid-liquid transition (LLT). Below ~180 K, the boson peaks at pressures P higher than ~3.5 kbar are evidently distinct from those at low pressures by higher mean frequencies and lower heights. Moreover, the higher-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a master curve while the lower-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a different one. Moreover, these phenomena agree with the existence of two liquid phases with different densities and local structures and the associated LLT in the measured (P, T) region. Additionally,more » the P dependence of the librational band also agrees with the above conclusion.« less

  20. Pressure Effect on the Boson Peak in Deeply Cooled Confined Water: Evidence of a Liquid-Liquid Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhe; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Ito, Kanae; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-12-03

    We studied the boson peak in deeply cooled water confined in nanopores in order to examine the liquid-liquid transition (LLT). Below ~180 K, the boson peaks at pressures P higher than ~3.5 kbar are evidently distinct from those at low pressures by higher mean frequencies and lower heights. Moreover, the higher-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a master curve while the lower-P boson peaks can be rescaled to a different one. Moreover, these phenomena agree with the existence of two liquid phases with different densities and local structures and the associated LLT in the measured (P, T) region. Additionally, the P dependence of the librational band also agrees with the above conclusion.

  1. An experimental model of episodic gas release through fracture of fluid confined within a pressurized elastic reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Stefano; Woods, Andrew W.; Harrington, Jon; Norris, Simon

    2017-01-01

    We present new experiments that identify a mechanism for episodic release of gas from a pressurized, deformable reservoir confined by a clay seal, as a result of the transition from bulk deformation to channel growth through the clay. Air is injected into the center of a thin cylindrical cell initially filled with a mixture of bentonite clay and water. For sufficiently dry mixtures, the pressure initially increases with little volume change. On reaching the yield stress of the clay-water mixture, the lid of the cell then deforms elastically and an air-filled void forms in the center of the cell as the clay is driven radially outward. With continued supply of air, the pressure continues to increase until reaching the fracture strength of the clay. A fracture-like channel then forms and migrates to the outer edge of the cell, enabling the air to escape. The pressure then falls, and the clay flows back toward the center of the cell and seals the channel so the cycle can repeat. The phenomena may be relevant at mud volcanoes.

  2. Effect of confining pressure due to external jacket of steel plate or shape memory alloy wire on bond behavior between concrete and steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dongkyun; Park, Kyoungsoo

    2014-12-01

    For external jackets of reinforced concrete columns, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are easy to install, and they provide active and passive confining pressure; steel plates, on the other hand, only provide passive confining pressure, and their installation on concrete is not convenient because of the requirement of a special device. To investigate how SMA wires distinctly impact bond behavior compared with steel plates, this study conducted push-out bond tests of steel reinforcing bars embedded in concrete confined by SMA wires or steel plates. For this purpose, concrete cylinders were prepared with dimensions of 100 mm x 200 mm, and D-22 reinforcing bars were embedded at the center of the concrete cylinders. External jackets of 1.0 mm and 1.5 mm thickness steel plates were used to wrap the concrete cylinders. Additionally, NiTiNb SMA wire with a diameter of 1.0 mm was wound around the concrete cylinders. Slip of the reinforcing bars due to pushing force was measured by using a displacement transducer, while the circumferential deformation of specimens was obtained by using an extensometer. The circumferential deformation was used to calculate the circumferential strains of the specimens. This study assessed the radial confining pressure due to the external jackets on the reinforcing bars at bond strength from bond stress-slip curves and bond stress-circumferential strain curves. Then, the effects of the radial confining pressure on the bond behavior of concrete are investigated, and an equation is suggested to estimate bond strength using the radial confining pressure. Finally, this study focused on how active confining pressure due to recovery stress of the SMA wires influences bond behavior.

  3. Water-biomolecule systems under extreme conditions: from confinement to pressure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Water is a unique liquid, many of whose properties are critical for the continued support of life. In living systems, essential water-related phenomena occur in restricted geometries in cells, and at active sites of proteins and membranes or at their surface. The effects of hydration on equilibrium protein structure and dynamics are fundamental to the relationship between structure and biological function. In particular, the configuration of water molecules near the hydrophilic-hydrophobic interfaces is of considerable relevance. The structure and dynamics of water confined in model systems developing hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by hydrophilic interactions are compared with that of bulk water as determined by neutron scattering. It is well known that hydration, internal dynamics, and function in proteins are intimately associated. Studies of dynamics of water molecules at surface of a C-phycocyanin protein are presented.

  4. Systematics of stretching of fluid inclusions I: fluorite and sphalerite at 1 atmosphere confining pressure.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodnar, R.J.; Bethke, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    Measured homogenization T of fluid inclusions in fluorite and sphalerite may be higher than the true homogenization T of samples that have been previously heated in the laboratory or naturally in post-entrapment events. As T and with it internal P is increased, the resulting volume increase may become inelastic. If the volume increase exceeds the precision of T measurement, the inclusion is said to have stretched. More than 1300 measurements on fluid inclusions in fluorite and sphalerite indicate that stretching is systematically related to P-V-T-X properties of the fluid, inclusion size and shape, physical properties of the host mineral, and the confining P. Experimental methods are detailed in an appendix. The mechanism of stretching is probably plastic deformation or - not observed - microfracturing. The systematic relationship between the internal P necessary to initiate stretching and the inclusion volume provides a means of recognizing previously stretched inclusions and estimating the magnitude of post-entrapment thermal events. -G.J.N.

  5. Surface Interactions and Confinement of Methane: A High Pressure Magic Angle Spinning NMR and Computational Chemistry Study

    DOE PAGES

    Ok, Salim; Hoyt, David W.; Andersen, Amity; ...

    2017-01-18

    Characterization and modeling of the molecular-level behavior of simple hydrocarbon gases, such as methane, in the presence of both nonporous and nanoporous mineral matrices allows for predictive understanding of important processes in engineered and natural systems. In this study, we observed changes in local electromagnetic environments of the carbon atoms in methane under conditions of high pressure (up to 130 bar) and moderate temperature (up to 346 K) with 13C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy while the methane gas was mixed with two model solid substrates: a fumed nonporous, 12 nm particle size silica and a mesoporous silica with 200more » nm particle size and 4 nm average pore diameter. Examination of the interactions between methane and the silica systems over temperatures and pressures that include the supercritical regime was allowed by a novel high pressure MAS sample containment system, which provided high resolution spectra collected under in situ conditions. There was no significant thermal effects were found for the observed 13C chemical shifts at all pressures studied here (28.2, 32.6, 56.4, 65.1, 112.7, and 130.3 bar) for pure methane. However, the 13C chemical shifts of resonances arising from confined methane changed slightly with changes in temperature in mixtures with mesoporous silica. The chemical shift values of 13C nuclides in methane change measurably as a function of pressure both in the pure state and in mixtures with both silica matrices, with a more pronounced shift when meso-porous silica is present. Molecular-level simulations utilizing GCMC, MD, and DFT confirm qualitatively that the experimentally measured changes are attributed to interactions of methane with the hydroxylated silica surfaces as well as densification of methane within nanopores and on pore surfaces.« less

  6. Effects of polymer stiffness on surface tension and pressure in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milchev, Andrey

    2015-08-01

    We study the effect of chain rigidity on the behavior of semiflexible polymers in the vicinity of flat walls in a slit, and of surfactants at the liquid-liquid interface between immiscible liquids. Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is demonstrated that the impact of bending angle forces is particularly strong within the depletion layer at the phase boundary whereas at distance Re away from the interface, where Re is the mean distance between the ends of a semiflexible chain, the contribution of these non-local triplet interactions to pressure tensor virtually disappears. The present study also demonstrates that growing stiffness of the macromolecules leads to an increase in surface tension and total pressure.

  7. Summary of results of frictional sliding studies, at confining pressures up to 6.98 kb, in selected rock materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Summers, R.; Byerlee, J.

    1977-01-01

    This report is a collection of stress-strain charts which were produced by deforming selected simuiated fault gouge materials. Several sets of samples consisted of intact cylinders, 1.000 inch in diameter and 2.500 inches long. The majority of the samples consisted of thin layers of the selected sample material, inserted within a diagonal sawcut in a 1.000-inch by 2.500-inch Westerly Granite cylinder. Two sorts of inserts were used. The first consisted of thin wafers cut from 1.000-inch-diameter cores of the rock being tested. The other consisted of thin layers of crushed material packed onto the sawcut surface. In several groups of tests using various thicknesses (0.010 inch to 0.160 inch) of a given type material there were variations in the stress level and/or stability of sliding as a function of the fault zone width. Because of this we elected to use a standard 0.025-inch width fault zone to compare the frictional properties of many of the different types of rock materials. This 0.025-inch thickness was chosen partially because this thickness of crushed granite behaves approximately the same as a fractured sample of initially intact granite, and also because this is near the lower limit at which we could cut intact wafers for those samples that were prepared from thin slices of rock. One series of tests was done with saw cut granite cylinders without fault gouge inserts. All of these tests were done in a hydraulically operated triaxial testing machine. The confining pressure (δ1, least principal stress) was applied by pumping petroleum ether into a pressure vessel. The differential stress (δ3-δ1) was applied by a hydraulically operated ram that could be advanced into the pressure vessel at any of several strain rates (10-4sec-1, 10-5sec-1, 10-6sec-1, 10-7sec-1, or 10-8sec-1). All samples were jacketed in polyurethane tubing to exclude the confining pressure medium from the samples. The majority of the samples, with the exception of some of the initially

  8. Multipole electrodynamic ion trap geometries for microparticle confinement under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalcea, Bogdan M.; Giurgiu, Liviu C.; Stan, Cristina; Vişan, Gina T.; Ganciu, Mihai; Filinov, Vladimir; Lapitsky, Dmitry; Deputatova, Lidiya; Syrovatka, Roman

    2016-03-01

    Trapping of microparticles and aerosols is of great interest for physics and chemistry. We report microparticle trapping in case of multipole linear Paul trap geometries, operating under standard ambient temperature and pressure conditions. An 8- and 12-electrode linear trap geometries have been designed and tested with an aim to achieve trapping for larger number of particles and to study microparticle dynamical stability in electrodynamic fields. We report emergence of planar and volume ordered structures of microparticles, depending on the a.c. trapping frequency and particle specific charge ratio. The electric potential within the trap is mapped using the electrolytic tank method. Particle dynamics is simulated using a stochastic Langevin equation. We emphasize extended regions of stable trapping with respect to quadrupole traps, as well as good agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  9. The bird: A pressure-confined explosion in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Helfand, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The non-thermal radio continuum source G5.3-1.0, mapped at 20 cm with the Very Large Array (VLA) by Becker and Helfand, has an unusual bird-like shape. In order to determine possible interaction of this source with adjacent cold gas, we have mapped this region in the J=1-0 line of CO using the AT and T Bell Laboratories 7m antenna and the FCRAO 14m antenna. The map shown contains 1859 spectra sampled on a 1.5 arcminute grid; each spectrum has an rms noise of 0.2 K in 1 MHz channels. There are several molecular clouds at different velocities along the line of sight. The outer regions of a previously unknown Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) at l=4.7 deg., b=-0.85 deg., v=200 km s(-1) appears to be interacting with G5.3-10: the molecular cloud has a bird-shaped hole at the position of the continuum source, except that the brightest continuum point (the bird's head) appears to be embedded in the cloud. The velocity of this GMC indicates it is within 2 kpc of the galactic center. The morphology suggests that a supernova or other explosive event occurred near the outside of the GMC, in a region where (n) is approximately 300 cm(-3), and expanded into a region of lower density and pressure. The pressures, densities, and velocity gradients of molecular clouds near the galactic center are on average higher than those of clouds near the Sun. We therefore expect that Type II supernovae near the galactic center would be distorted by their interactions with their parent molecular clouds.

  10. Self-diffusion of polycrystalline ice Ih under confining pressure: Hydrogen isotope analysis using 2-D Raman imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Naoki; Kubo, Tomoaki; Durham, William B.; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ichiko

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a high-resolution technique based on micro Raman spectroscopy to measure hydrogen isotope diffusion profiles in ice Ih. The calibration curve for quantitative analysis of deuterium in ice Ih was constructed using micro Raman spectroscopy. Diffusion experiments using diffusion couples composed of dense polycrystalline H2O and D2O ice were carried out under a gas confining pressure of 100 MPa (to suppress micro-fracturing and pore formation) at temperatures from 235 K to 245 K and diffusion times from 0.2 to 94 hours. Two-dimensional deuterium profiles across the diffusion couples were determined by Raman imaging. The location of small spots of frost from room air could be detected from the shapes of the Raman bands of OH and OD stretching modes, which change because of the effect of the molar ratio of deuterium on the molecular coupling interaction. We emphasize the validity for screening the impurities utilizing the coupling interaction. Some recrystallization and grain boundary migration occurred in recovered diffusion couples, but analysis of two-dimensional diffusion profiles of regions not affected by grain boundary migration allowed us to measure a volume diffusivity for ice at 100 MPa of (2.8 ± 0.4) ×10-3exp[ -57.0 ± 15.4kJ /mol/RT ] m2 /s (R is the gas constant, T is temperature). Based on ambient pressure diffusivity measurements by others, this value indicates a high (negative) activation volume for volume diffusivity of -29.5 cm3/mol or more. We can also constrain the value of grain boundary diffusivity in ice at 100 MPa to be <104 that of volume diffusivity.

  11. Electron and ion kinetics in three-dimensional confined microwave-induced microplasmas at low gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiali; Yu, Xinhai; Wang, Zhenyu; Tu, Shan-Tung; Wang, Zhengdong

    2016-04-01

    The effects of the gas pressure (pg), microcavity height (t), Au vapor addition, and microwave frequency on the properties of three-dimensional confined microwave-induced microplasmas were discussed in light of simulation results of a glow microdischarge in a three-dimensional microcavity (diameter dh = 1000 μm) driven at constant voltage loading on the drive electrode (Vrf) of 180 V. The simulation was performed using the PIC/MCC method, whose results were experimentally verified. In all the cases we investigated in this study, the microplasmas were in the γ-mode. When pg increased, the maximum electron (ne) or ion density (nAr+) distributions turned narrow and close to the discharge gap due to the decrease in the mean free path of the secondary electron emission (SEE) electrons (λSEE-e). The peak ne and nAr+ were not a monotonic function of pg, resulting from the two conflicting effects of pg on ne and nAr+. The impact of ions on the electrode was enhanced when pg increased. This was determined after comparing the results of ion energy distribution function (IEDFs) at various pg. The effects of t on the peaks and distributions of ne and nAr+ were negligible in the range of t from 1.0 to 3.0 mm. The minimum t of 0.6 mm for a steady glow discharge was predicted for pg of 800 Pa and Vrf of 180 V. The Au vapor addition increased the peaks of ne and nAr+, due to the lower ionization voltage of Au atom. The acceleration of ions in the sheaths was intensified with the addition of Au vapor because of the increased potential difference in the sheath at the drive electrode.

  12. Modeling Molecular Systems at Extreme Pressure by an Extension of the Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) Based on the Symmetry-Adapted Cluster-Configuration Interaction (SAC-CI) Method: Confined Electronic Excited States of Furan as a Test Case.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Cammi, Roberto

    2015-05-12

    Novel molecular photochemistry can be developed by combining high pressure and laser irradiation. For studying such high-pressure effects on the confined electronic ground and excited states, we extend the PCM (polarizable continuum model) SAC (symmetry-adapted cluster) and SAC-CI (SAC-configuration interaction) methods to the PCM-XP (extreme pressure) framework. By using the PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method, molecular systems in various electronic states can be confined by polarizable media in a smooth and flexible way. The PCM-XP SAC/SAC-CI method is applied to a furan (C4H4O) molecule in cyclohexane at high pressure (1-60 GPa). The relationship between the calculated free-energy and cavity volume can be approximately represented with the Murnaghan equation of state. The excitation energies of furan in cyclohexane show blueshifts with increasing pressure, and the extents of the blueshifts significantly depend on the character of the excitations. Particularly large confinement effects are found in the Rydberg states. The energy ordering of the lowest Rydberg and valence states alters under high-pressure. The pressure effects on the electronic structure may be classified into two contributions: a confinement of the molecular orbital and a suppression of the mixing between the valence and Rydberg configurations. The valence or Rydberg character in an excited state is, therefore, enhanced under high pressure.

  13. The effect of morphology and confinement on the high-pressure phase transition in ZnO nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Kotmool, Komsilp; Bovornratanaraks, Thiti; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2015-03-21

    The transition pressure (P{sub t}) of the B4-to-B1 phase transformation of zinc oxide nanoparticle (n-ZnO) structures was investigated in terms of their size and morphology. Nanorods, nanopencils, nanopyramids, nanowires, and nanotubes of the B4 phase in various sizes were directly built up by accounting for the atomic basis of the core and surface regions. The previously proposed transformation path was performed for constructing shapes and sizes compatible with B1 phases. Using systematic density functional theory, the surfaces were cleaved from the optimized crystal structures at different pressures in both the B4 and B1 phases. A method for calculating the surface energy at different pressures is proposed using an asymmetric slab model. Using the proposed model, the transition pressure of n-ZnO structures was found to significantly depend on their morphology and size, which is in good agreement with the available experimental reports.

  14. Elastic anisotropy and pore space geometry of schlieren granite: direct 3-D measurements at high confining pressure combined with microfabric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staněk, Martin; Géraud, Yves; Lexa, Ondrej; Špaček, Petr; Ulrich, Stanislav; Diraison, Marc

    2013-07-01

    Pore space geometry of granitic rocks and its evolution with depth are key factors in large-scale seismics or in projects of enhanced geothermal systems or of deep hazardous waste repositories. In this study, we studied macroscopically anisotropic schlieren-bearing granite by experimental P-wave velocity (VP) measurements on spherical sample in 132 directions at seven different confining pressures in the range 0.1-400 MPa. In order to discriminate the phenomena affecting the rock elastic properties we analysed the orientation of microcracks and of grain boundaries and we measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility of the rock. Three sets of microcracks were defined, with two of them linked to the massif exfoliation process and one to cooling contraction of the massif. During pressurization the measured mean VP and VP anisotropy degree at ambient pressure and at highest confinement (400 MPa) yielded 3.3 km s-1 and 24 per cent, and 6.2 km s-1 and 3 per cent, respectively. The associated VP anisotropy pattern was transversely isotropic and governed by the schlieren, with a minimum VP direction perpendicular to them and a girdle of high VP directions parallel to them. The highest change in VP was observed between 0.1 and 10 MPa, suggesting a significant closure of porosity below depths of 500 m. Change of the VP anisotropy pattern to orthorhombic together with increase of mean VP and VP anisotropy degree during depressurization was attributed to inelastic response of one of the sets of microcracks to the loading-unloading cycle.

  15. Alterations in streaming potential in presence of time periodic pressure-driven flow of a power law fluid in narrow confinements with nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Jayabrata; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-03-01

    We study the coupled effect of electrokinetic phenomena and fluid rheology in altering the induced streaming potential in narrow fluidic confinements, which is manifested by establishing a time periodic pressure-driven flow in presence of electrical double layer phenomenon. However, in sharp contrast with reported literature, we take into account nonelectrostatic ion-ion interactions toward estimating the same in addition to electrostatic interactions and steric effects. We employ power law based rheological model for estimating the induced streaming potential. We bring out an intricate interaction between nonelectrostatic interactions and fluid rheology on the concerned electrokinetic phenomena, bearing immense consequences toward designing of integrated lab-on-a-chip-based microdevices and nanodevices.

  16. The effect of the driving frequency on the confinement of beam electrons and plasma density in low-pressure capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, S.; Trieschmann, J.; Schulze, J.; Schuengel, E.; Brinkmann, R. P.; Derzsi, A.; Korolov, I.; Donkó, Z.; Mussenbrock, T.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of changing the driving frequency on the plasma density and the electron dynamics in a capacitive radio-frequency argon plasma operated at low pressures of a few Pa is investigated by particle-in-cell/Monte-Carlo collision simulations and analytical modeling. In contrast to previous assumptions, the plasma density does not follow a quadratic dependence on the driving frequency in this non-local collisionless regime. Instead, a step-like increase at a distinct driving frequency is observed. Based on an analytical power balance model, in combination with a detailed analysis of the electron kinetics, the density jump is found to be caused by an electron heating mode transition from the classical α-mode into a low-density resonant heating mode characterized by the generation of two energetic electron beams at each electrode per sheath expansion phase. These electron beams propagate through the bulk without collisions and interact with the opposing sheath. In the low-density mode, the second beam is found to hit the opposing sheath during its collapse. Consequently, a large number of energetic electrons is lost at the electrodes resulting in a poor confinement of beam electrons in contrast to the classical α-mode observed at higher driving frequencies. Based on the analytical model this modulated confinement quality and the related modulation of the energy lost per electron lost at the electrodes is demonstrated to cause the step-like change of the plasma density. The effects of a variation of the electrode gap, the neutral gas pressure, the electron sticking and secondary electron emission coefficients of the electrodes on this step-like increase of the plasma density are analyzed based on the simulation results.

  17. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  18. An accuracy statement for a facility used to calibrate static pressure transducers and differential pressure transducers at high base pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindt, C. F.; Labrecque, J. F.

    1982-06-01

    A facility was developed to calibrate pressure transducers that are used in a gas mass flow facility. Both static and differential pressure transducers can be calibrated. An air dead weight tester is the standard for static transducers in the range from 3.8 to 4.5 MPa. An air dead weight tester is also the standard for the differential pressure transducers in the range of 2.5 kPa to 50 MPa; a cistern manometer. This, plus the uncertainties in the high pressure corrections to the cistern manometer and measurement of the mercury temperature, contributes plus or minus 690 ppm to the uncertainty of the differential pressure transducer calibrations.

  19. Dependencies of pore pressure on elastic wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, K.; Uehara, S. I.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Marine seismic refraction have found that there are high Vp/Vs ratio regions in oceanic crusts at subducting oceanic plates (e.g, Cascadia subduction zone (2.0-2.8) (Audet et al., 2009)). Previous studies based on laboratory measurements indicated that Vp/Vs ratio is high when porosity and/or pore pressure is high (Christensen, 1984; Peacock et al., 2011). Although several studies have investigated the relationships between fracture distributions and Vp, Vs (e.g., Wang et al., 2012; Blake et al., 2013), the relationships for rocks (e.g., gabbro and basalt) composing oceanic crust are still unclear. This study reports the results of laboratory measurements of Vp, Vs (transmission method) at controlled confining and pore pressure and estimation of Vp/Vs ratio for thermally cracked gabbro which mimic highly fractured rocks in the high Vp/Vs ratio zone, in order to declare the dependence of fracture distributions on Vp/Vs. For the measurements, we prepared three type specimens; a non-heated intact specimen, specimens heated up to 500 °C and 700 °C for 24 hours. Porosities of intact, 500 °C and 700 °C specimens measured under the atmospheric pressure are 0.5, 3.4 and 3.5%, respectively. Measurements were conducted at a constant confining pressure of 50 MPa, with decreasing pore pressure from 49 to 0.1 MPa and then increasing to 49 MPa. While Vp/Vs for the intact specimen is almost constant at elevated pore pressure, the Vp/Vs values for the thermally cracked ones were 2.0~2.2 when pore pressure was larger than 30 MPa. In future, we will reveal the relationship between the measured elastic wave velocities and the characteristics of the microfracture distribution. This work was supported by JSPS Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Number 26400492).

  20. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results.

  1. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  2. The effects of confining pressure on the strength and elastic properties of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from boreholes USW NRG-6 and USW NRG-7/7A: Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.J.; Noel, J.S.; Boyd, P.J.

    1997-09-01

    Experimental results are presented for bulk and mechanical properties measurements on specimens of the Paintbrush tuff recovered from the USW NRG-6 and USW NRG-7/7A borehole at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Measurements have been performed on five thermal/mechanical units: TCw, PTn, TSw2, and TSw3. The following bulk properties are reported for each specimen: dry bulk density, saturated bulk density, average grain density and porosity. Confined compression to failure tests were performed on selected specimens recovered from the boreholes at confining pressures of 5 and 10 MPa. In addition, compressional and shear wave velocities were measured on the specimens prior to testing. Measurements were conducted under drained conditions at room temperature on nominally water saturated specimens. The nominal strain rate for the experiments was 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}.

  3. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2013-08-01

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation.

  4. High-pressure synthesis of lithium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howie, Ross T.; Narygina, Olga; Guillaume, Christophe L.; Evans, Shaun; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2012-08-01

    By compressing elemental lithium and hydrogen in a diamond anvil cell, we have synthesized lithium hydride (LiH) at pressures as low as 50 MPa at room temperature. Combined Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements reveal that, once synthesized, LiH remains stable at 300 K up to 160 GPa in the presence of molecular hydrogen. The mixture of lithium hydride and molecular hydrogen and application of pressure alone cannot form a higher H2 content hydride (LiHx, x>1) as was suggested from the theoretical ab initio calculations and therefore, cannot be considered as a route to low-pressure hydrogen rich material metallization.

  5. Semiflexible chains in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-01-01

    We develop an analytical method for studying the properties of a noninteracting wormlike chain (WLC) in confined geometries. The mean-field-like theory replaces the rigid constraints of confinement with average constraints, thus allowing us to develop a tractable method for treating a WLC wrapped on the surface of a sphere, and fully encapsulated within it. The efficacy of the theory is established by reproducing the exact correlation functions for a WLC confined to the surface of a sphere. In addition, the coefficients in the free energy are exactly calculated. We also describe the behavior of a surface-confined chain under external tension that is relevant for single molecule experiments on histone-DNA complexes. The force-extension curves display spatial oscillations, and the extension of the chain, whose maximum value is bounded by the sphere diameter, scales as f-1 at large forces, in contrast to the unconfined chain that approaches the contour length as f-1/2 . A WLC encapsulated in a sphere, that is relevant for the study of the viral encapsulation of DNA, can also be treated using the mean-field approach. The predictions of the theory for various correlation functions are in excellent agreement with Langevin simulations. We find that strongly confined chains are highly structured by examining the correlations using a local winding axis. The predicted pressure of the system is in excellent agreement with simulations but, as is known, is significantly lower than the pressures seen for DNA packaged in viral capsids.

  6. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-01

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker [1]—henceforth cited as SW—in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell

  7. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-03

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker - henceforth cited as SW - in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell. The

  8. Stiffness and Confinement Ratios of SMA Wire Jackets for Confining Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Youn, Heejung

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of shape memory alloy (SMA) wire jackets on the behavior of confined concrete. SMA wire jackets are an effective confining material to improve concrete behavior; for example, by increasing peak strength and failure strain. The stiffness and confinement ratios of fiber-reinforced polymer jackets have been extensively discussed and their effects are well known. However, assessment of the stiffness and confinement ratios of SMA wire jackets has not previously been conducted. In this study, we investigate the effects of the stiffness and confinement ratios of steel jackets, and then compare the results with those of SMA wire jackets. In general, the stiffness ratios of SMA wire jackets are relatively smaller than those of steel jackets, and most of them have lower stiffness ratios because the Young's moduli of the SMAs are relatively small. The active confining pressure of the SMA wires does not improve the lower stiffness-ratio effect since the amount of active confining pressure is not sufficiently large.

  9. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  10. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence.

  11. Capillary breakup of fluid threads within confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guoqing; Xue, Chundong; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    Fluid thread breakup is a widespread phenomenon in nature, industry, and daily life. Driven by surface tension (or capillarity) at low flow-rate condition, the breakup scenario is usually called capillary instability or Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Fluid thread deforms under confinement of ambient fluid to form a fluid neck. Thinning of the neck at low flow-rate condition is quasistatic until the interface becomes unstable and collapses to breakup. Underlying mechanisms and universalities of both the stable and unstable thinning remain, however, unclear and even contradictory. Here we conduct new numerical and experimental studies to show that confined interfaces are not only stabilized but also destabilized by capillarity at low flow-rate condition. Capillary stabilization is attributed to confinement-determined internal pressure that is higher than capillary pressure along the neck. Two origins of capillary destabilization are identified: one is confinement-induced gradient of capillary pressure along the interface; the other is the competition between local capillary pressure and internal pressure. This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402274, 11272321, and 11572334).

  12. Frictional Behavior of Anorthite and Quartz at High Pressure and High Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, T.; Masuda, K.; Fujimoto, K.; Shigematsu, N.; Ohtani, T.; Sumii, T.; Okuyama, Y.

    2002-12-01

    ). Therefore, results of frictional experiments under the dry and the wet conditions were compared. In the dry conditions, experiments were conducted under the confining pressure up to 150MPa. In the wet conditions, pore water pressure was applied up to 50MPa.

  13. Sheared magnetofluids and Bernoulli confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevado, H. J.; Bengtson, Roger; Mahajan, S. M.; Valanju, P. M.

    2001-10-01

    New magnetofluid states that differ qualitatively from those accessible to either neutral fluids or to conventional MHD plasmas have been predited theoretically. They are predicted to appear if plasmas with strong velocity shear flows (with large initial values of both magnetic and magnetofluid helicity) are created and allowed to relax. The dynamic invariance of these two helicities will force the plasma to self-organize and relax to a long-lived quasi equilibrium state away from thermal equilibrium. The investigation of these states bears critically upon basic plasma confinement and heating issues in both natural and laboratory plasmas. We have built a magnetic mirror device designed to create and investigate these theoretically predicted pressure-confining magnetofluid states. The primary experimental challenge is to create an initial plasma (with significant flows and currents) which is relatively isolated from walls and embedded in a modest magnetic external field. Our machine has a central bias rod to create a radial electric field for generating fast plasma flow, a large mirror ratio for good centrifugal confinement, and magnetic, Langmuir, and Mach probes to measure the evolution of plasma rotation profiles and fluctuations. Initial results will be presented demonstrating plasma rotation.

  14. The history of research into improved confinement regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the pressure by additional heating of magnetically confined plasmas had the consequence that turbulent processes became more violent and plasma confinement degraded. Since this experience from the early 1980ies, fusion research was dominated by the search for confinement regimes with improved properties. It was a gratifying experience that toroidally confined plasmas are able to self-organise in such a way that turbulence diminishes, resulting in a confinement with good prospects to reach the objectives of fusion R&D. The understanding of improved confinement regimes revolutionized the understanding of turbulent transport in high-temperature plasmas. In this paper the story of research into improved confinement regimes will be narrated starting with 1980.

  15. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  16. Structure of confined films of chain alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Mugele, Friedrich; Baldelli, Steven; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Salmeron, Miquel

    1999-09-30

    The structure of thin films of simple chain alcohols (1-octanol and 1-undecanol) confined between two atomically smooth mica surfaces has been investigated using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). In both systems, the substrate-molecule interaction leads to a strongly bound first layer on each surface. Additional liquid organizes into highly compressible bilayers, which could be expelled by applying sufficiently high pressure.

  17. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  18. Confinement and the Pomeron

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1989-09-25

    The importance of confinement for obtaining a unitary high-energy limit for QCD is discussed. Minijets'' are argued to build up non-unitary behavior{endash}when k{sub T} {gt} {Lambda} is imposed. For minijets to mix with low k{sub T} Pomeron Field Theory describing confinement, and give consistent asymptotic behavior, new quarks'' must enter the theory above the minijet transverse momentum scale. The Critical Pomeron is the resulting high-energy limit. 22 refs.

  19. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  20. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  1. Simulations of Enhanced Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorland, W.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Liu, Q. P.; Jones, C. S.; Beer, M. A.; Hammett, G. W.

    1996-11-01

    Most existing tokamaks routinely achieve enhanced confinement regimes. Designs for new, larger tokamaks therefore are typically predicated upon reliable enhanced confinement performance. However, most enhanced confinement regimes rely (to some degree) upon sheared E×B flows to stabilize the turbulence that otherwise limits the confinement. For example, the pedestal H-mode transport barrier is typically attributed to shear stabilization [Biglari, Diamond and Terry, Phys. Fl. B, 2 1 (1990)]. Unfortunately, it is easily shown that sheared E×B stabilization of microinstabilities such as the ITG mode does not scale favorably with machine size. Here, using nonlinear gyrofluid simulations in general geometry, we attempt to quantify the confinement enhancement that can be expected from velocity shear stabilization for conventional reactor plasmas. We also consider other microinstability stabilization mechanisms(See related presentations by Beer, Kotschenreuther, Manickam, and Ramos, this conference.) (strong density peaking, Shafranov shift stabilization, dots) and unconventional reactor configurations.^2 Experimental datasets from JET, DIII-D, C-Mod and TFTR are analyzed, and ITER operation is considered.

  2. Confined Brownian ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Rubi, J. Miguel

    2013-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of Brownian ratchets in a confined environment. The motion of the particles is described by a Fick-Jakobs kinetic equation in which the presence of boundaries is modeled by means of an entropic potential. The cases of a flashing ratchet, a two-state model, and a ratchet under the influence of a temperature gradient are analyzed in detail. We show the emergence of a strong cooperativity between the inherent rectification of the ratchet mechanism and the entropic bias of the fluctuations caused by spatial confinement. Net particle transport may take place in situations where none of those mechanisms leads to rectification when acting individually. The combined rectification mechanisms may lead to bidirectional transport and to new routes to segregation phenomena. Confined Brownian ratchets could be used to control transport in mesostructures and to engineer new and more efficient devices for transport at the nanoscale.

  3. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ..delta..W/..delta..P is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ..nu../sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Note: A micro-perfusion system for use during real-time physiological studies under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltas, Jeff; Long, Zac; Huff, Alison; Maloney, Ryan; Ryan, Jordan; Urayama, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We construct a micro-perfusion system using piston screw pump generators for use during real-time, high-pressure physiological studies. Perfusion is achieved using two generators, with one generator being compressed while the other is retracted, thus maintaining pressurization while producing fluid flow. We demonstrate control over perfusion rates in the 10-μl/s range and the ability to change between fluid reservoirs at up to 50 MPa. We validate the screw-pump approach by monitoring the cyanide-induced response of UV-excited autofluorescence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pressurization.

  5. Note: A micro-perfusion system for use during real-time physiological studies under high pressure.

    PubMed

    Maltas, Jeff; Long, Zac; Huff, Alison; Maloney, Ryan; Ryan, Jordan; Urayama, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We construct a micro-perfusion system using piston screw pump generators for use during real-time, high-pressure physiological studies. Perfusion is achieved using two generators, with one generator being compressed while the other is retracted, thus maintaining pressurization while producing fluid flow. We demonstrate control over perfusion rates in the 10-μl/s range and the ability to change between fluid reservoirs at up to 50 MPa. We validate the screw-pump approach by monitoring the cyanide-induced response of UV-excited autofluorescence from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pressurization.

  6. Structure of confined films of chain alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Mugele, F.; Baldelli, S.; Somorjai, G.A.; Salmeron, M.

    2000-04-13

    The structure of thin films of simple chain alcohols (1-octanol and 1-undecanol) confined between two atomically smooth mica surfaces has been investigated using a surface forces apparatus. Contact angle measurements and optical sum frequency generation were used for additional characterization. In both systems, the substrate-molecule interaction leads to a strongly bound first layer on each surface. Additional liquid organizes into highly compressible bilayers, which could be expelled by applying sufficiently high pressure.

  7. Waveforms Measured in Confined Thermobaric Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H; Neuwald, P; Kuhl, A L

    2007-05-04

    Experiments with 1.5-g Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) charges have been conducted in six different chambers. Both flake Aluminum and TNT were used as the fuel. Static pressure gauges on the chamber wall were the main diagnostic. Waveforms for explosions in air were significantly larger than those in nitrogen - thereby demonstrating a strong thermobaric (combustion) effect. This effect increases as the confinement volume decreases and the mixture richness approaches 1.

  8. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  9. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston.

  10. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  11. Confined Tube Crimp Using Portable Hand Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Joseph James; Pereyra, R. A.; Archuleta, Jeffrey Christopher; Martinez, Isaac P.; Nelson, A. M.; Allen, Ronald Scott; Page, R. L.; Freer, Jerry Eugene; Dozhier, Nathan Gus

    2016-04-04

    The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory developed handheld tools that crimp a 1/16 inch OD tube, forming a leak tight seal1 (see Figure 1). The leak tight seal forms by confining the 1/16 inch OD tubing inside a die while applying crimp pressure. Under confined pressure, the tube walls weld at the crimp. The purpose of this study was to determine conditions for fabricating a leak tight tube weld. The equipment was used on a trial-and-error basis, changing the conditions after each attempt until successful welds were fabricated. To better confine the tube, the die faces were polished. Polishing removed a few thousandths of an inch from the die face, resulting in a tighter grip on the tubing wall. Using detergent in an ultrasonic bath, the tubing was cleaned. Also, the time under crimp pressure was increased to 30 seconds. With these modifications, acceptable cold welds were fabricated. After setting the conditions for an acceptable cold weld, the tube was TIG welded across the crimped face.

  12. Cell Blebbing in Confined Microfluidic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ibo, Markela; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.; Gagnon, Zachary R.

    2016-01-01

    Migrating cells can extend their leading edge by forming myosin-driven blebs and F-actin-driven pseudopods. When coerced to migrate in resistive environments, Dictyostelium cells switch from using predominately pseudopods to blebs. Bleb formation has been shown to be chemotactic and can be influenced by the direction of the chemotactic gradient. In this study, we determine the blebbing responses of developed cells of Dictyostelium discoideum to cAMP gradients of varying steepness produced in microfluidic channels with different confining heights, ranging between 1.7 μm and 3.8 μm. We show that microfluidic confinement height, gradient steepness, buffer osmolarity and Myosin II activity are important factors in determining whether cells migrate with blebs or with pseudopods. Dictyostelium cells were observed migrating within the confines of microfluidic gradient channels. When the cAMP gradient steepness is increased from 0.7 nM/μm to 20 nM/μm, cells switch from moving with a mixture of blebs and pseudopods to moving only using blebs when chemotaxing in channels with confinement heights less than 2.4 μm. Furthermore, the size of the blebs increases with gradient steepness and correlates with increases in myosin-II localization at the cell cortex. Reduction of intracellular pressure by high osmolarity buffer or inhibition of myosin-II by blebbistatin leads to a decrease in bleb formation and bleb size. Together, our data reveal that the protrusion type formed by migrating cells can be influenced by the channel height and the steepness of the cAMP gradient, and suggests that a combination of confinement-induced myosin-II localization and cAMP-regulated cortical contraction leads to increased intracellular fluid pressure and bleb formation. PMID:27706201

  13. Effect of high pressure on green pea seeds germination and plantlets development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Elisabete M. C.; Carvalho, Andreia M.; Saraiva, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the impact of high pressure (50 MPa, 10 min) on germination of pea seeds with different imbibition times (0, 12 and 36 h). The parameters analysed were the percentage of germinated seeds, length of roots and stems, number of leaves developed and the weight of young plantlets. Peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), pectin methylesterase (PME) and total proteolytic activity were analysed in seeds after the pressure treatment and in leaves after the germination period. Results showed that 50 MPa applied during 10 min retarded the germination onset and inhibited seeds to germinate. The pressure treatment increased and decreased the length of roots and stems, respectively. The number of leaves per germinated seed decreased with the pressure treatment. Enzymatic activities of seeds showed that only total proteolytic activity was significantly reduced by pressure and only for 0 h of imbibition. POD and PPO activities determined in leaves of the plantlets increased with the pressure treatment, while PME activity also increased but only for 12 h of imbibition and total proteolytic activity decreased.

  14. Confined compression of dental composites for Class I restorations

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Amol S.; Vural, Murat; Gosz, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the mechanical response of a particle-reinforced restorative dental composite (Renew™) under proportional transverse confinement to understand the effects of stress multiaxiality on its mechanical and failure behaviors. We describe the confining ring technique as an experimental tool to introduce multiaxial compressive stress states in dental composites that realistically mimic three-dimensional stress states commonly experienced by dental restorations in the oral cavity. Effect of initial radial misfit between confining ring and specimen is analyzed through computational finite element simulations, and an analytical treatment of problem is also provided to compute the confining stress during elasto-plastic expansion of confining ring. Experimental results suggest that inelastic response of Renew composite is significantly influenced by hydrostatic stress component, and pressure-dependent yield functions are required to analyze plastic deformations and internal damage accumulation process. PMID:21857744

  15. Interplay of explosive thermal reaction dynamics and structural confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, W. Lee; Zucker, Jonathan; Dickson, Peter M.; Parker, Gary R.; Asay, Blaine W.

    2007-04-01

    Explosives play a significant role in human affairs; however, their behavior in circumstances other than intentional detonation is poorly understood. Accidents may have catastrophic consequences, especially if additional hazardous materials are involved. Abnormal ignition stimuli, such as impact, spark, friction, and heat may lead to a very violent outcome, potentially including detonation. An important factor influencing the behavior subsequent to abnormal ignition is the strength and inertia of the vessel confining the explosive, i.e., the near-field structural/mechanical environment, also known as confinement (inertial or mechanical). However, a comprehensive and quantified understanding of how confinement affects reaction violence does not yet exist. In the research discussed here, we have investigated a wide range of confinement conditions and related the explosive response to the fundamentals of the combustion process in the explosive. In our experiments, a charge of an octahydrotetranitrotetrazine-based plastic bonded explosive (PBX 9501) was loaded into a gun assembly having variable confinement conditions and subjected to a heating profile. The exploding charge breached the confinement and accelerated a projectile down the gun barrel. High bandwidth pressure and volume measurements were made and a first-law analysis was used to obtain enthalpy and power from the raw data. These results were then used to quantify reaction violence. Enthalpy change and power ranged from 0-1.8 kJ and 0-12 MW for 300 mg charges, respectively. Below a confinement strength of 20 MPa, violence was found to decline precipitously with decreasing confinement, while the violence for the heaviest confinement experiments was found to be relatively constant. Both pressure and pressurization rate were found to have critical values to induce and sustain violent reaction.

  16. Confinement studies in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.; Boyd, D.; Bretz, N.; Bush, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The paper describes the present (end of February 1985) status of the plasma confinement studies in the TFTR tokamak with emphasis on those with neutral beam injection (NBI). Recent improvements in the device capabilities have substantially extended operating parameters: B/sub T/ increased to 4.0 T, I/sub p/ to 2.0 MA, injection power (P/sub b/) to 5 MW with H/sup 0/ or D/sup 0/ beams anti n/sub e/ to 5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/, and Z/sub eff/ reduced to 1.4. With ohmic heating (OH) alone, the previously established scaling for gross energy confinement time (tau/sub E/ = anti n/sub e/q) has been confirmed at higher I/sub p/ and B/sub T/, and the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.4 sec has been achieved. With NBI at P/sub b/ substantially (by factor >2) higher than P/sub OH/, excellent power and particle accountability have been established. This suggests that the less-than-expected increase in stored energy with NBI is not due to problems of power delivery, but due to problems of confinement deterioration. tau/sub E/ is observed to scale approximately as I/sub p/ P/sub b//sup -0.5/ (independent of anti n/sub e/), consistent with previous L-mode scalings. With NBI we have achieved the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.2 sec and the maximum T/sub i/(o) of 4.4 keV in the normal operating regime, and even higher T/sub i/(o) in the energetic-ion regime with low-n/sub e/ and low-I/sub p/ operation.

  17. Quark confinement dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.J.; Olsson, M.G.; Veseli, S.; Williams, K. |

    1997-05-01

    Starting from Buchm{umlt u}ller{close_quote}s observation that a chromoelectric flux tube meson will exhibit only the Thomas-type spin-orbit interaction, we show that a model built upon the related assumption that a quark feels only a constant radial chromoelectric field in its rest frame implies a complete relativistic effective Hamiltonian that can be written explicitly in terms of quark canonical variables. The model yields linear Regge trajectories and exhibits some similarities to scalar confinement, but with the advantage of being more closely linked to QCD. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  19. Reproduction of Bacillus stearothermophilus as a Function of Temperature and Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yayanos, A. Aristides; Van Boxtel, R.; Dietz, Allan S.

    1983-01-01

    The colony-forming ability and the rate of reproduction of Bacillus stearothermophilus were determined as a function of temperature and pressure. Colonies were formed between 39 and 70°C at atmospheric pressure and between 54 and 67°C at 45 MPa. Colonies did not form at 55.9 MPa. The rate of reproduction in broth cultures decreased with increasing pressure at all temperatures. The rate of reproduction diminished rapidly with pressure above 10.4 MPa. Therefore, increased hydrostatic pressure was not sufficient to enable B. stearothermophilus to function beyond the temperature limiting growth and reproduction at atmospheric pressure, and B. stearothermophilus should grow in naturally or artificially warmed regions of the deep sea, where the pressure is less than approximately 50 MPa, although growth rates would be low above 10 MPa. PMID:16346444

  20. NMR studies of metallic tin confined within porous matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Charnaya, E. V.; Tien, Cheng; Lee, M. K.; Kumzerov, Yu. A.

    2007-04-01

    {sup 119}Sn NMR studies were carried out for metallic tin confined within synthetic opal and porous glass. Tin was embedded into nanoporous matrices in the melted state under pressure. The Knight shift for liquid confined tin was found to decrease with decreasing pore size. Correlations between NMR line shapes, Knight shift, and pore filling were observed. The melting and freezing phase transitions of tin under confinement were studied through temperature dependences of NMR signals upon warming and cooling. Melting of tin within the opal matrix agreed well with the liquid skin model suggested for small isolated particles. The influence of the pore filling on the melting process was shown.

  1. Experimental study on confined two-phase jets

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Y.; Albagli, D. )

    1991-09-01

    The basic mixing phenomena in confined, coaxial, particle-laden turbulent flows are studied within the scope of ram combustor research activities. Cold-flow experiments in a relatively simple configuration of confined, coaxial two-phase jets provided both qualitative and quantitative insight on the multiphase mixing process. Pressure, tracer gas concentration, and two-phase velocity measurements revealed that unacceptably long ram combustors are needed for complete confined jet mixing. Comparison of the experimental results with a previous numerical simulation displayed a very good agreement, indicating the potential of the experimental facility for validation of computational parametric studies. 38 refs.

  2. Quark Confinement and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerardus

    QCD was proposed as a theory for the strong interactions long before we had any idea as to how it could be that its fundamental constituents, the quarks, are never seen as physical particles. Massless gluons also do not exist as free particles. How can this be explained? The first indication that this question had to be considered in connection with the topological structure of a gauge theory came when Nielsen and Olesen observed the occurrence of stable magnetic vortex structures [1] in the Abelian Higgs model. Expanding on such ideas, the magnetic monopole solution was found [2]. Other roundabout attempts to understand confinement involve instantons. Today, we have better interpretations of these topological structures, including a general picture of the way they do lead to unbound potentials confining quarks. It is clear that these unbound potentials can be ascribed to a string-like structure of the vortices formed by the QCD field lines. Can string theory be used to analyze QCD? Many researchers think so. The leading expert on this is Sacha Polyakov. In his instructive account he adds how he experienced the course of events in Gauge Theory, emphasizing the fact that quite a few discoveries often ascribed to researchers from the West, actually were made independently by scientists from the Soviet Union…

  3. Tgermonuclear Ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Comparison with Magnetic Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Chang, P.Y.; Spears, B.K.; Anderson, K.S.; Edwards, J.; Fatenejad, M.; Lindl, J.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Nora, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2010-04-23

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptau ~ 1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptau ~ 1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (T ~ 2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chi ~ 0.02–0.03 is ~5X lower than in JET (chi ~ 0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  4. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  5. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M; Hu, W-F; Farutin, A; Rafaï, S; Lai, M-C; Peyla, P; Misbah, C

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  6. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  7. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  8. Statistical Contact Model for Confined Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamaria, Ruben; de la Paz, Antonio Alvarez; Roskop, Luke; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2016-08-01

    A theory that describes in a realistic form a system of atoms under the effects of temperature and confinement is presented. The theory departs from a Lagrangian of the Zwanzig type and contains the main ingredients for describing a system of atoms immersed in a heat bath that is also formed by atoms. The equations of motion are derived according to Lagrangian mechanics. The application of statistical mechanics to describe the bulk effects greatly reduces the complexity of the equations. The resultant equations of motion are of the Langevin type with the viscosity and the temperature of the heat reservoir able to influence the trajectories of the particles. The pressure effects are introduced mechanically by using a container with an atomic structure immersed in the heat bath. The relevant variables that determine the equation of state are included in the formulation. The theory is illustrated by the derivation of the equation of state for a system with 76 atoms confined inside of a 180-atom fullerene-like cage that is immersed in fluid forming the heat bath at a temperature of 350 K and with the friction coefficient of 3.0 {ps}^{-1}. The atoms are of the type believed to form the cores of the Uranus and Neptune planets. The dynamic and the static pressures of the confined system are varied in the 3-5 KBar and 2-30 MBar ranges, respectively. The formulation can be equally used to analyze chemical reactions under specific conditions of pressure and temperature, determine the structure of clusters with their corresponding equation of state, the conditions for hydrogen storage, etc. The theory is consistent with the principles of thermodynamics and it is intrinsically ergodic, of general use, and the first of this kind.

  9. Confined Selective Withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelio, Alvaro; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that the controlled production of monodisperse simple and composite emulsions possesses uncountable applications in medicine, pharmacy, materials science and industry. Here we present both experiments and slender-body theory regarding the generation of simple emulsions using a configuration that we have called Confined Selective Withdrawal, since it is an improved configuration of the classical Selective Withdrawal. We consider two different situations, namely, the cases when the outer flow Reynolds number is high and low, respectively. Several geometrical configurations and a wide range of viscosity ratios are analyzed so that the physics behind the phenomenon can be fully understood. In addition, we present both experiments and theory regarding the generation of composite emulsions. This phenomenon is only feasible when the outer flow Reynolds number is low enough. In this case, we propose a more complex theory which requires the simultaneous resolution of two interfaces in order to predict the shape of the jet and the sizes of the drops formed. The excellent agreement between our slender-body approximation and the experimental evidence fully validates our theories.

  10. Inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  11. MHD Stability of Centrifugally Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min

    2003-10-01

    Centrifugally confined plasmas utilize centrifugal forces from plasma rotation to augment magnetic confinement, as an alternative approach to fusion. One magnetic geometry is mirror-type, with rotation about the axis induced from a central, biased core conductor. The outward centrifugal forces from the rotation have a component along the field lines, thus confining ions to the center. The immediate concern, of course, is that the system could be flute unstable to the interchange. The antidote here is that the radial shear in the rotation could stabilize the flute. Our 2D simulations show, first, that plasma pressure is highly peaked at the center away from the mirror end coils. Next, 3D simulations show unequivocally that velocity shear is providing the stability. Further study indicates that the flute stability is sensitive to the density profile. A favorable density profile could be achieved by judiciously placing the particle source, also necessary for a steady state centrifuge. As flows approach the Alfven speed, electromagnetic modes could be involved. The latter is motivated by the question of whether magnetorotational instability, thought to be an angular momentum transporter in accretion disks, could be found in centrifugal plasmas, since all the ingredients are there. We show that the MRI as understood should be stable; however, a related astrophysical instability, the Parker instability, could arise. The Parker instability results in plasma accumulating in regions of bent field lines, further accentuating the bending.

  12. Beam ion confinement on NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hao, G. Z.; Podesta, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.

    2016-10-01

    A second and more tangential neutral beam line is a major upgrade component of the National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade (NSTX-U) with the purpose of improving neutral beam current drive efficiency and providing more flexibility in current/pressure profile control. Good beam ion confinement is essential to achieve the anticipated improvements in performance. In the planned beam ion confinement experiment, various short and long (relative to fast ion slowing-down time) neutral beam (NB) pulses from six neutral beam sources will be injected into center-stack limited L-mode plasmas to characterize the beam ion confinement and distribution function produced by the new and the existing NBI lines. The neutron rate decay after the turn-off of short NB pulses will be used to estimate the beam ion confinement time and to investigate its dependence on NB source/geometry, injection energy, and plasma current. The tangential and vertical Fast-Ion D-Alpha (FIDA) diagnostics and multi-view Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) arrays will be used to measure beam ion slowing-down distribution function and spatial profile during the injection of relatively long NB pulses. Beam ion prompt losses will be monitored with a scintillator Fast Lost Ion Probe (sFLIP) diagnostic. The experimental data and comparisons with classical predictions from NUBEAM modeling will be presented. Work supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC0209CH11466, DE-FG02-06ER54867, and DE-FG03-02ER54681.

  13. Estimation of Confined Peak Strength of Crack-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrani, Navid; Kaiser, Peter K.

    2017-02-01

    It is known that the unconfined compressive strength of rock decreases with increasing density of geological features such as micro-cracks, fractures, and veins both at the laboratory specimen and rock block scales. This article deals with the confined peak strength of laboratory-scale rock specimens containing grain-scale strength dominating features such as micro-cracks. A grain-based distinct element model, whereby the rock is simulated with grains that are allowed to deform and break, is used to investigate the influence of the density of cracks on the rock strength under unconfined and confined conditions. A grain-based specimen calibrated to the unconfined and confined strengths of intact and heat-treated Wombeyan marble is used to simulate rock specimens with varying crack densities. It is demonstrated how such cracks affect the peak strength, stress-strain curve and failure mode with increasing confinement. The results of numerical simulations in terms of unconfined and confined peak strengths are used to develop semi-empirical relations that relate the difference in strength between the intact and crack-damaged rocks to the confining pressure. It is shown how these relations can be used to estimate the confined peak strength of a rock with micro-cracks when the unconfined and confined strengths of the intact rock and the unconfined strength of the crack-damaged rock are known. This approach for estimating the confined strength of crack-damaged rock specimens, called strength degradation approach, is then verified by application to published laboratory triaxial test data.

  14. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    at least 65 MPa. No ethanol was detected at 100 MPa. From these data, the pressure at which ethanol fermentation stops in yeast was calculated to be 87±7 MPa. These results indicate that the activity of one or several enzymes of the glycolytic pathway is enhanced at low pressure. At higher pressure, they become progressively repressed, and are completely inhibited above 87 MPa. Our in situ monitoring constitutes a direct demonstration of yeast metabolism in situ under pressure up to 100 MPa. Our data agree with previous ex-situ data by Abe and Horikoshi (4). However, we observed that ethanol production is not completely inhibited around 50 MPa as predicted, but could be detected at significantly higher pressures (up to 87 MPa). QSR is a powerful method to monitor microbial activities, since almost any organic molecule with a carbon chain ranging from 1 to 6 carbon can be detected and quantified. The only limitation of QSR is that the Raman spectrum of the molecule exhibits at least one peak not masked by the spectrum of the growth medium. 1 Pelletier M J Appl Spectr 57:20A-42A, 2003 2 Daniel I, Oger P, Picard A, Cardon H and Chervin J-C (submitted to Rev Sci Instr) 3 Picard A, Daniel I, Montagnac G and Oger P (submitted to Extremophiles) 4 Abe F and Horikoshi K Extremophiles 1: 89-93, 1997

  15. Flexible confinement leads to multiple relaxation regimes in glassy colloidal liquids.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ian; Oğuz, Erdal C; Bartlett, Paul; Löwen, Hartmut; Royall, C Patrick

    2015-01-14

    Understanding relaxation of supercooled fluids is a major challenge and confining such systems can lead to bewildering behaviour. Here, we exploit an optically confined colloidal model system in which we use reduced pressure as a control parameter. The dynamics of the system are "Arrhenius" at low and moderate pressure, but at higher pressures relaxation is faster than expected. We associate this faster relaxation with a decrease in density adjacent to the confining boundary due to local ordering in the system enabled by the flexible wall.

  16. Psychopathological effects of solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Grassian, S

    1983-11-01

    Psychopathological reactions to solitary confinement were extensively described by nineteenth-century German clinicians. In the United States there have been several legal challenges to the use of solitary confinement, based on allegations that it may have serious psychiatric consequences. The recent medical literature on this subject has been scarce. The author describes psychiatric symptoms that appeared in 14 inmates exposed to periods of increased social isolation and sensory restriction in solitary confinement and asserts that these symptoms form a major, clinically distinguishable psychiatric syndrome.

  17. Spatial confinement of muonium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaw, K. S.; Antognini, A.; Prokscha, T.; Kirch, K.; Liszkay, L.; Salman, Z.; Crivelli, P.

    2016-08-01

    We report the achievement of spatial confinement of muonium atoms (the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Muonium emitted into a vacuum from mesoporous silica reflects between two SiO2 confining surfaces separated by 1 mm. From the data, one can extract that the reflection probability on the confining surfaces kept at 100 K is about 90% and the reflection process is well described by a cosine law. This technique enables new experiments with this exotic atomic system and is a very important step towards a measurement of the 1 S -2 S transition frequency using continuous-wave laser spectroscopy.

  18. Assessing confinement in coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Canu, Donata Melaku; Solidoro, Cosimo; Umgiesser, Georg; Cucco, Andrea; Ferrarin, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Measures of transport scale in aquatic systems can contribute to the formulation of definitions of indicators of the system's ecological properties. This paper addresses confinement, a specific transport scale proposed by biological scientists as a parameter that can capture and synthesize the principal properties that determine the spatial structure of biological communities in transitional environments. Currently, there is no direct experimental measure of confinement. In this study, a methodology based on the accumulation rate within a lagoon of a passive tracer of marine origin is proposed, the influences of different factors in the calculation of confinement are analyzed, and general recommendations are derived. In particular, we analyze the spatial and the temporal variability of confinement and its sensitivity to the seasonal variability of climatic forcing, the inputs from rivers and the parameterization of the tidal exchanges. The Lagoon of Venice is used as a case study.

  19. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  20. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  1. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The potential applications of fusion reactors, the desirable properties of reactors intended for various applications, and the limitations of the Tokamak concept are discussed. The principles and characteristics of 20 distinct alternative confinement concepts are described, each of which may be an alternative to the Tokamak. The devices are classed as Tokamak-like, stellarator-like, mirror machines, bumpy tori, electrostatically assisted, migma concept, and wall-confined plasma.

  2. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image

  3. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  4. PREFACE: Water in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Mauro

    2004-11-01

    The study of water confined in complex systems in solid or gel phases and/or in contact with macromolecules is relevant to many important processes ranging from industrial applications such as catalysis and soil chemistry, to biological processes such as protein folding or ionic transport in membranes. Thermodynamics, phase behaviour and the molecular mobility of water have been observed to change upon confinement depending on the properties of the substrate. In particular, polar substrates perturb the hydrogen bond network of water, inducing large changes in the properties upon freezing. Understanding how the connected random hydrogen bond network of bulk water is modified when water is confined in small cavities inside a substrate material is very important for studies of stability and the enzymatic activity of proteins, oil recovery or heterogeneous catalysis, where water-substrate interactions play a fundamental role. The modifications of the short-range order in the liquid depend on the nature of the water-substrate interaction, hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as well as on its spatial range and on the geometry of the substrate. Despite extensive study, both experimentally and by computer simulation, there remain a number of open problems. In the many experimental studies of confined water, those performed on water in Vycor are of particular interest for computer simulation and theoretical studies since Vycor is a porous silica glass characterized by a quite sharp distribution of pore sizes and a strong capability to absorb water. It can be considered as a good candidate for studying the general behaviour of water in hydrophilic nanopores. But there there have been a number of studies of water confined in more complex substrates, where the interpretation of experiments and computer simulation is more difficult, such as in zeolites or in aerogels or in contact with membranes. Of the many problems to consider we can mention the study of supercooled water. It is

  5. Pressure-Induced Confined Metal from the Mott Insulator Sr3Ir2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yang; Yang, Liuxiang; Chen, Cheng-Chien; Kim, Heung-Sik; Han, Myung Joon; Luo, Wei; Feng, Zhenxing; Upton, Mary; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Zeng, Zhidan; Cao, Gang; Mao, Ho-kwang; van Veenendaal, Michel

    2016-05-24

    The spin-orbit Mott insulator Sr3Ir2O7 provides a fascinating playground to explore insulator-metal transition driven by intertwined charge, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom. Here, we report high-pressure electric resistance and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on single-crystal Sr3Ir2O7 up to 63-65 GPa at 300 K. The material becomes a confined metal at 59.5 GPa, showing metallicity in the ab plane but an insulating behavior along the c axis. Such an unusual phenomenon resembles the strange metal phase in cuprate superconductors. Since there is no sign of the collapse of spin-orbit or Coulomb interactions in x-ray measurements, this novel insulator-metal transition is potentially driven by a first-order structural change at nearby pressures. Our discovery points to a new approach for synthesizing functional materials.

  6. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  7. Nanoscopic Cellular Imaging: Confinement Broadens Understanding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen A; Ponjavic, Aleks; Siv, Chanrith; Lee, Steven F; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-09-27

    In recent years, single-molecule fluorescence imaging has been reconciling a fundamental mismatch between optical microscopy and subcellular biophysics. However, the next step in nanoscale imaging in living cells can be accessed only by optical excitation confinement geometries. Here, we review three methods of confinement that can enable nanoscale imaging in living cells: excitation confinement by laser illumination with beam shaping; physical confinement by micron-scale geometries in bacterial cells; and nanoscale confinement by nanophotonics.

  8. Acoustic confinement in superlattice cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Déleglise, Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Atkinson, Paola; Lagoin, Camille; Perrin, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    The large coupling rate between the acoustic and optical fields confined in GaAs/AlAs superlattice cavities makes them appealing systems for cavity optomechanics. We have developed a mathematical model based on the scattering matrix that allows the acoustic guided modes to be predicted in nano and micropillar superlattice cavities. We demonstrate here that the reflection at the surface boundary considerably modifies the acoustic quality factor and leads to significant confinement at the micropillar center. Our mathematical model also predicts unprecedented acoustic Fano resonances on nanopillars featuring small mode volumes and very high mechanical quality factors, making them attractive systems for optomechanical applications.

  9. Special topics in plasma confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. B.; Newton, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    > These notes are based on lectures given by one of us (J.B.T.) at the University of Texas in Austin in 1991. Part I concerns some basic features of plasma confinement by magnetic fields as an introduction to an account of plasma relaxation in Part II. Part III discusses confinement by magnetic mirrors, especially minimum- systems. It also includes a general discussion of adiabatic invariants and of the principle of maximal ordering in perturbation theory. Part IV is devoted to the analysis of perturbations in toroidal plasmas and the stability of ballooning modes.

  10. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  11. Building solids inside nano-space: from confined amorphous through confined solvate to confined 'metastable' polymorph.

    PubMed

    Nartowski, K P; Tedder, J; Braun, D E; Fábián, L; Khimyak, Y Z

    2015-10-14

    The nanocrystallisation of complex molecules inside mesoporous hosts and control over the resulting structure is a significant challenge. To date the largest organic molecule crystallised inside the nano-pores is a known pharmaceutical intermediate - ROY (259.3 g mol(-1)). In this work we demonstrate smart manipulation of the phase of a larger confined pharmaceutical - indomethacin (IMC, 357.8 g mol(-1)), a substance with known conformational flexibility and complex polymorphic behaviour. We show the detailed structural analysis and the control of solid state transformations of encapsulated molecules inside the pores of mesoscopic cellular foam (MCF, pore size ca. 29 nm) and controlled pore glass (CPG, pore size ca. 55 nm). Starting from confined amorphous IMC we drive crystallisation into a confined methanol solvate, which upon vacuum drying leads to the stabilised rare form V of IMC inside the MCF host. In contrast to the pure form, encapsulated form V does not transform into a more stable polymorph upon heating. The size of the constraining pores and the drug concentration within the pores determine whether the amorphous state of the drug is stabilised or it recrystallises into confined nanocrystals. The work presents, in a critical manner, an application of complementary techniques (DSC, PXRD, solid-state NMR, N2 adsorption) to confirm unambiguously the phase transitions under confinement and offers a comprehensive strategy towards the formation and control of nano-crystalline encapsulated organic solids.

  12. Guard cell volume and pressure measured concurrently by confocal microscopy and the cell pressure probe.

    PubMed

    Franks, P J; Buckley, T N; Shope, J C; Mott, K A

    2001-04-01

    Guard cell turgor pressures in epidermal peels of broad bean (Vicia faba) were measured and controlled with a pressure probe. At the same time, images of the guard cell were acquired using confocal microscopy. To obtain a clear image of guard cell volume, a fluorescent dye that labels the plasma membrane was added to the solution bathing the epidermal peel. At each pressure, 17 to 20 optical sections (each 2 microm thick) were acquired. Out-of-focus light in these images was removed using blind deconvolution, and volume was estimated using direct linear integration. As pressure was increased from as low as 0.3 MPa to as high as 5.0 MPa, guard cell volume increased in a saturating fashion. The elastic modulus was calculated from these data and was found to range from approximately 2 to 40 MPa. The data allow inference of guard cell osmotic content from stomatal aperture and facilitate accurate mechanistic modeling of epidermal water relations and stomatal functioning.

  13. Confinement and lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M

    1980-06-01

    The motivation for formulating gauge theories on a lattice to study non-perturbative phenomena is reviewed, and recent progress supporting the compatibility of asymptotic freedom and quark confinement in the standard SU(3) Yang-Mills theory of the strong interaction is discussed.

  14. Permit-Required Confined Spaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Permit-Required Confined Spaces U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA 3138 1998 (Revised) Report Documentation...Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration 200 Constitution Avenue Washington, DC 20210 Performing Organization Report Number OSHA 3138...determine compliance responsibili- ties, which are set forth in OSHA standards themselves and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Moreover, because

  15. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

    1996-03-01

    During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

  16. Dynamical conductivity of confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The electrodynamic response of water confined in nanoporous MCM-41 is measured in the frequency range 1 MHz-3 THz at room temperature. The results are analyzed in the context of a recently proposed ionic model of water. We found an increase in dc-conductivity of confined water by 3 orders of magnitude (3.3 · 10-3 Ω-1 · m-1) compared to bulk water (5.5 · 10-6 Ω-1 · m-1). This is attributed to the increase of H3O+ and OH- ion mobility, due to a decrease of the effective potential amplitude by walls of the confining environment. We found that the absorption in the microwave frequency range is much smaller in the medium with confined water than in the bulk water, and the quadratic dependence of the conductivity (σ) on frequency (ω) becomes less steep and tends to σ ~ ω. The results are of fundamental importance and can be used for understanding of the proton transport in systems with water in the nanoconfined state.

  17. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  18. The deflection of a jet by confining surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalano, G. D.; Morton, J. B.; Humphris, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thrust vectoring can be provided by the turning of a jet exhaust by the presence of confining surfaces. This approach is analogous to the upper surface blowing (USB) concept. Mean velocities, velocity autocorrelations, and pressure-velocity correlations are measured. From the autocorrelation curves, the Taylor microscales and the integral length scales are calculated. Convection velocities are calculated from the velocity space-time correlations. Two different confining surfaces (one flat, one with large curvature) are placed adjacent to the lip of a circular nozzle, and the resultant effects on the flow field are determined. In addition, two velocity ratios (exit plane velocity to ambient stream velocity) are examined. The velocity measurements were made with a laser Doppler velocimeter in conjunction with a phase locked-loop processor. Pressure measurements were made using a 1/8th inch condensor type microphone.

  19. Effects of confinement between attractive and repulsive walls on the thermodynamics of an anomalous fluid.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2016-12-01

    We study via molecular-dynamics simulations the thermodynamics of an anomalous fluid confined in a slit pore with one wall structured and attractive and another unstructured and repulsive. We find that the phase diagram of the homogeneous part of the confined fluid is shifted to higher temperatures, densities, and pressures with respect to the bulk, but it can be rescaled on the bulk case. We calculate a moderate increase of mobility of the homogeneous confined fluid that we interpret as a consequence of the layering due to confinement and the collective modes due to long-range correlations. We show that, as in bulk, the confined fluid has structural, diffusion, and density anomalies that order in the waterlike hierarchy, and a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). The overall anomalous region moves to higher temperatures, densities, and pressure, and the LLCP displaces to higher temperature compared to bulk. Motivated by experiments, we calculate also the phase diagram not just for the homogeneous part of the confined fluid but for the entire fluid in the pore, and we show that it is shifted toward higher pressures but preserves the thermodynamics, including the LLCP. Because our model has waterlike properties, we argue that in experiments with supercooled water confined in slit pores with a width of >3 nm if hydrophilic and of >1.5 nm if hydrophobic, the existence of the LLCP could be easier to test than in bulk, where it is not directly accessible.

  20. Effects of confinement between attractive and repulsive walls on the thermodynamics of an anomalous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2016-12-01

    We study via molecular-dynamics simulations the thermodynamics of an anomalous fluid confined in a slit pore with one wall structured and attractive and another unstructured and repulsive. We find that the phase diagram of the homogeneous part of the confined fluid is shifted to higher temperatures, densities, and pressures with respect to the bulk, but it can be rescaled on the bulk case. We calculate a moderate increase of mobility of the homogeneous confined fluid that we interpret as a consequence of the layering due to confinement and the collective modes due to long-range correlations. We show that, as in bulk, the confined fluid has structural, diffusion, and density anomalies that order in the waterlike hierarchy, and a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP). The overall anomalous region moves to higher temperatures, densities, and pressure, and the LLCP displaces to higher temperature compared to bulk. Motivated by experiments, we calculate also the phase diagram not just for the homogeneous part of the confined fluid but for the entire fluid in the pore, and we show that it is shifted toward higher pressures but preserves the thermodynamics, including the LLCP. Because our model has waterlike properties, we argue that in experiments with supercooled water confined in slit pores with a width of >3 nm if hydrophilic and of >1.5 nm if hydrophobic, the existence of the LLCP could be easier to test than in bulk, where it is not directly accessible.

  1. Numerical modeling of two-dimensional confined flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of two-dimensional confined flows is presented. The flow in the duct is partitioned into finite streams. The difference equations are then obtained by applying conservation principles directly to the individual streams. A listing of a computer code based on this approach in FORTRAN 4 language is presented. The code computes two dimensional compressible turbulent flows in ducts when the duct area along the flow is specified and the pressure gradient is unknown.

  2. Theoretical model of fishbone oscillations in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Porcelli, F.

    1986-11-03

    The onset of electromagnetic oscillations that are observed in magnetically confined plasmas where beams of fast neutrals are injected is associated with the excitation of a mode with poloidal wave number m/sup 0/ = 1 and phase velocity equal to the core-ion diamagnetic velocity. The resonant interaction of the mode with the beam ions is viewed as a form of dissipation that allows the release of the mode excitation energy, related to the gradient of the plasma pressure.

  3. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  4. Theory of rheology in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerov, Artem A.; Krüger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The viscosity of fluids is generally understood in terms of kinetic mechanisms, i.e., particle collisions, or thermodynamic ones as imposed through structural distortions upon, e.g., applying shear. Often the latter are more relevant, which allows a simpler theoretical description, and, e.g., (damped) Brownian particles can be considered good fluid model systems. We formulate a general theoretical approach for rheology in confinement, based on microscopic equations of motion and classical density functional theory. Specifically, we discuss the viscosity for the case of two parallel walls in relative motion as a function of the wall-to-wall distance, analyzing its relation to the slip length found for a single wall. The previously observed [A. A. Aerov and M. Krüger, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094701 (2014)., 10.1063/1.4866450] deficiency of inhomogeneous (unphysical) stresses under naive application of shear in confinement is healed when hydrodynamic interactions are included.

  5. Theory of rheology in confinement.

    PubMed

    Aerov, Artem A; Krüger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The viscosity of fluids is generally understood in terms of kinetic mechanisms, i.e., particle collisions, or thermodynamic ones as imposed through structural distortions upon, e.g., applying shear. Often the latter are more relevant, which allows a simpler theoretical description, and, e.g., (damped) Brownian particles can be considered good fluid model systems. We formulate a general theoretical approach for rheology in confinement, based on microscopic equations of motion and classical density functional theory. Specifically, we discuss the viscosity for the case of two parallel walls in relative motion as a function of the wall-to-wall distance, analyzing its relation to the slip length found for a single wall. The previously observed [A. A. Aerov and M. Krüger, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094701 (2014).] deficiency of inhomogeneous (unphysical) stresses under naive application of shear in confinement is healed when hydrodynamic interactions are included.

  6. Confined aquifers as viral reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee J; Jeffries, Thomas C; Roudnew, Ben; Seymour, Justin R; Fitch, Alison J; Simons, Keryn L; Speck, Peter G; Newton, Kelly; Brown, Melissa H; Mitchell, James G

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about viral diversity and abundance in deep groundwater reserves is limited. We found that the viral community inhabiting a deep confined aquifer in South Australia was more similar to reclaimed water communities than to the viral communities in the overlying unconfined aquifer community. This similarity was driven by high relative occurrence of the single-stranded DNA viral groups Circoviridae, Geminiviridae and Microviridae, which include many known plant and animal pathogens. These groups were present in a 1500-year-old water situated 80 m below the surface, which suggests the potential for long-term survival and spread of potentially pathogenic viruses in deep, confined groundwater. Obtaining a broader understanding of potentially pathogenic viral communities within aquifers is particularly important given the ability of viruses to spread within groundwater ecosystems.

  7. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  8. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  9. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-11-16

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  10. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G. F.)

    2016-05-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films.

  11. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G.F.)

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  12. Holographic confinement in inhomogeneous backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Wien, Jason

    2016-08-01

    As noted by Witten, compactifying a d-dimensional holographic CFT on an S 1 gives a class of ( d - 1)-dimensional confining theories with gravity duals. The proto-typical bulk solution dual to the ground state is a double Wick rotation of the AdS d+1 Schwarzschild black hole known as the AdS soliton. We generalize such examples by allowing slow variations in the size of the S 1, and thus in the confinement scale. Coefficients governing the second order response of the system are computed for 3 ≤ d ≤ 8 using a derivative expansion closely related to the fluid-gravity correspondence. The primary physical results are that i) gauge-theory flux tubes tend to align orthogonal to gradients and along the eigenvector of the Hessian with the lowest eigenvalue, ii) flux tubes aligned orthogonal to gradients are attracted to gradients for d ≤ 6 but repelled by gradients for d ≥ 7, iii) flux tubes are repelled by regions where the second derivative along the tube is large and positive but are attracted to regions where the eigenvalues of the Hessian are large and positive in directions orthogonal to the tube, and iv) for d > 3, inhomogeneities act to raise the total energy of the confining vacuum above its zeroth order value.

  13. Nanoparticle Order through Entropic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Lee, Bongjoon; Stafford, Christopher; Douglas, Jack; Bockstaller, Michael; Karim, Alamgir

    As has been addressed in colloidal science, visual order transitions can be achieved with entropy contributions alone. Herein, entropy-driven ordering of nanoparticle (NP) structures is generated where entropy increase and visual order are achieved simultaneously. We study an ``athermal'' NP-polymer blends where NPs are densely grafted with polymer brush of the same chemical composition as the polymer matrix. Visual order of the NPs is induced by geometrically confining the thin film blends with meso-scale topographic patterns. When the residual layer thickness of the patterned blend films approaches the nanoparticle dimension, exclusive segregation of NPs to less confining imprinted mesa region occurs. This preferential segregation of NPs, defined by partition coefficient K = 0, is attributed to purely entropic penalty, where K denotes the particle density ratio at highly confined residual layer to that at mesa region. We further demonstrate K is fully tunable and even invertible with increasing matrix chain dimension. The associated entropic free energy change (ΔF = - ln K) is calculated to explain NP segregation preference. Accordingly, variation of residual layer thickness and polymer matrix molecule size can both affect NP distribution among patterned thick and thin regions.

  14. Vorticity confinement technique for drag prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povitsky, Alex; Snyder, Troy

    2011-11-01

    This work couples wake-integral drag prediction and vorticity confinement technique (VC) for the improved prediction of drag from CFD simulations. Induced drag computations of a thin wing are shown to be more accurate than the more widespread method of surface pressure integration when compared to theoretical lifting-line value. Furthermore, the VC method improves trailing vortex preservation and counteracts the shift from induced drag to numerical entropy drag with increasing distance of Trefftz plane downstream of the wing. Accurate induced drag prediction via the surface integration of pressure barring a sufficiently refined surface grid and increased computation time. Furthermore, the alternative wake-integral technique for drag prediction suffers from numerical dissipation. VC is shown to control the numerical dissipation with very modest computational overhead. The 2-D research code is used to test specific formulations of the VC body force terms and illustrate the computational efficiency of the method compared to a ``brute force'' reduction in spatial step size. For the 3-D wing simulation, ANSYS FLUENT is employed with the VC body force terms added to the solver with user-defined functions (UDFs). VC is successfully implemented to highly unsteady flows typical for Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) producing oscillative drag force either by natural vortex shedding at high angles of attack or by flapping wing motion.

  15. Damage Development in Confined Borosilicate and Soda-Lime Glasses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-11

    Page. ’’Inelastic Response of Confined Aluminum Oxide under Dynamic Loading Conditions". J. Materials Science. 33(6): 1619-1625, 1998. 2. S.C... Composition * of BoroOoat® and Starphire® Glass l201 Material SiOz Na20 CaO BzOJ Ah03 MgO KzO Fez OJ Borot1oat ®33 80.54 3.54 0.02 12.70 2.54 ɘ.01...and other brittle materials increases with pressure. This pressure dependency is well documented for various materials . ranging from ceramics [1] to

  16. Discrete element simulation of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing with low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Nosewicz, Szymon; Jurczak, Kamila; Chmielewski, Marcin; Bochenek, Kamil; Pietrzak, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents numerical studies of powder compaction in cold uniaxial pressing. The powder compaction in this work is considered as an initial stage of a hot pressing process so it is realized with relatively low pressure (up to 50 MPa). Hence the attention has been focused on the densification mechanisms at this range of pressure and models suitable for these conditions. The discrete element method employing spherical particles has been used in the numerical studies. Numerical simulations have been performed for two different contact models—the elastic Hertz-Mindlin-Deresiewicz model and the plastic Storåkers model. Numerical results have been compared with the results of laboratory tests of the die compaction of the NiAl powder. Comparisons have shown that the discrete element method is capable to represent properly the densification mechanisms by the particle rearrangement and particle deformation.

  17. Effects of high-pressure CO2 processing on flavor, texture, and color of foods.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Linyan; Bi, Xiufang; Xu, Zenghui; Yang, Yingjie; Liao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    High-pressure CO2 (HPCD) is a pasteurization method that inactivates microorganism and enzymes through molecular effects of CO2 under pressures below 50 MPa without exposing foods to adverse effects of heat. Thermal pasteurization can impart undesirable changes on organoleptic and nutritional quality of the foods, which can reduce sensory perception and consumer acceptance of the foods. As a novel nonthermal processing technique, HPCD does avoid drawbacks such as loss of flavor, denaturation of nutrients, production of side toxic reactions, as well as changes in physical, mechanical, and optical properties of the food materials involved in the processing. This review gives a survey and analysis of recent publications regarding the effects of HPCD on the flavor, texture and color of processed foods, and possible mechanisms explaining HPCD technique on the flavor, texture, and color of the foods were discussed.

  18. Van der waals-like isotherms in a confined electrolyte by spherical and cylindrical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pineda, Gabriel E; Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Yu, Jiang; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    Electrolytes confined by spherical, cylindrical, and slit-like charged nanopores are studied. Results for ionic distribution profiles, pressures of the confined fluid, and absorption isotherms are obtained through the hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (HNC/MSA) integral equations theory. In spherical and cylindrical geometries, an inward, non-monotonic behavior of the pressure is found as confinement increases, implying a negative compressibility. The pressure vs volume isotherms resemble liquid-vapor van der Waals-like phase transition diagrams. This effect is correlated with a charge separation inside a spherical pore previously reported (Phys. Rev. Lett., 79, 3656, 1997). Here, the mechanism of charge separation and negative compressibility are explored in detail. When compared with the slit-like pore pressure, important qualitative differences are found.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of a complex fluid confined to a pore with nanoscopically rough walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcheron, Fabien; Schoen, Martin; Fuchs, Alain H.

    2002-04-01

    Understanding the properties of fluid films of nanometer scale thickness confined between two solid substrates is of fundamental interest as well as of practical importance for engineering applications such as lubrication, adhesion, and friction. We address here the question of the effect of the wall corrugation on the confined fluid structure. We report configurational bias grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations for model butane confined between planar and nonplanar walls. Furrowed walls have been used to model surface roughness effects on the nanometer length scale, while the confining walls remain smooth on the atomic scale. It is shown that the fluid confined between planar walls exhibits a damped oscillatory solvation pressure profile. A transition from an oscillatory to a nonoscillatory behavior is observed when the characteristic length of the furrow reaches the typical dimensions of a butane molecule. It is inferred from these simulations that disrupted oscillatory forces observed in the experiments may reflect the coupling between molecular and nanoscopic roughness length scales.

  20. Towards assessing the violence of reaction during cookoff of confined energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Kipp, M.E.; Schmitt, R.G.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1996-11-01

    An analysis of post-ignition events in a variable confinement cookoff test (VCCT) geometry is presented aimed toward predicting the level of violence during cookoff of confined thermally-degraded energetic materials. This study focuses on the dynamic events following thermal initiation whereby accelerated combustion interacts with confinement. Numerical simulations, based on a model of reactive multiphase mixtures, indicate that the response of energetic material is highly dependent upon thermal/mechanical damage states prior to ignition. These damaged states affect the rate of pressurization, dynamic compaction behavior and subsequent growth to detonation. Variations of the specific surface area and porosity produced by decomposition of the energetic material causes different responses ranging from pressure burst to detonation. Calculated stress histories are used in estimating breakup of the VCCT confinement based on Grady-Kipp fragmentation theory.

  1. Laboratory-scale uranium RF plasma confinement experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater facilities to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into argon-confined, steady-state, RF-heated plasmas in different uranium plasma confinement tests to investigate the characteristics of plamas core nuclear reactors. The objectives were: (1) to confine as high a density of uranium vapor as possible within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition; (2) to develop and test materials and handling techniques suitable for use with high-temperature, high-pressure gaseous UF6; and (3) to develop complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma and residue deposited on the test chamber components. In all tests, the plasma was a fluid-mechanically-confined vortex-type contained within a fused-silica cylindrical test chamber. The test chamber peripheral wall was 5.7 cm ID by 10 cm long.

  2. The effects of hydrostatic pressure on matrix synthesis in articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, A.C.; Urban, J.P.; Gehl, K.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on matrix synthesis in articular cartilage can be studied independently of the other factors that change during loading. We have found that the influence of hydrostatic pressure on incorporation rates of {sup 35}SO{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)proline into adult bovine articular cartilage slices in vitro depends on the pressure level and on the time at pressure. Pressures in the physiological range (5-15 MPa) applied for 20 s or for 5 min could stimulate tracer incorporation (30-130%) during the following 2 h, but higher pressures (20-50 MPa) had no effect on incorporation rates. The degree of stimulation in cartilage obtained from different animals was found to vary; in some animals none was seen. Stimulation also varied with position along the joint. Physiological pressures (5-10 MPa) applied continuously for the 2-h incubation period also stimulated incorporation rates, but pressures greater than 20 MPa always produced a decrease that was related to the applied pressure and that was reversible. These results suggests that the hydrostatic pressure that occurs during loading is a signal that can stimulate matrix synthesis rates in articular cartilage.

  3. Color Confinement from Fluctuating Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    QCD possesses a compact gauge group, and this implies a non-trivial topological structure of the vacuum. In this contribution to the Gribov-85 Memorial volume, we first discuss the origin of Gribov copies and their interpretation in terms of fluctuating topology in the QCD vacuum. We then describe the recent work with E. Levin that links the confinement of gluons and color screening to the fluctuating topology, and discuss implications for spin physics, high energy scattering, and the physics of quark-gluon plasma.

  4. Color confinement from fluctuating topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-10-01

    QCD possesses a compact gauge group, and this implies a non-trivial topological structure of the vacuum. In this contribution to the Gribov-85 Memorial volume, we first discuss the origin of Gribov copies and their interpretation in terms of fluctuating topology in the QCD vacuum. We then describe the recent work with E. Levin that links the confinement of gluons and color screening to the fluctuating topology, and discuss implications for spin physics, high energy scattering, and the physics of quark-gluon plasma.

  5. Thermoelectricity in Confined Liquid Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Mathias; Hardt, Steffen

    2016-06-03

    The electric field in an extended phase of a liquid electrolyte exposed to a temperature gradient is attributed to different thermophoretic mobilities of the ion species. As shown herein, such Soret-type ion thermodiffusion is not required to induce thermoelectricity even in the simplest electrolyte if it is confined between charged walls. The space charge of the electric double layer leads to selective ion diffusion driven by a temperature-dependent electrophoretic ion mobility, which-for narrow channels-may cause thermovoltages larger in magnitude than for the classical Soret equilibrium.

  6. Confined Space Imager (CSI) Software

    SciTech Connect

    Karelilz, David

    2013-07-03

    The software provides real-time image capture, enhancement, and display, and sensor control for the Confined Space Imager (CSI) sensor system The software captures images over a Cameralink connection and provides the following image enhancements: camera pixel to pixel non-uniformity correction, optical distortion correction, image registration and averaging, and illumination non-uniformity correction. The software communicates with the custom CSI hardware over USB to control sensor parameters and is capable of saving enhanced sensor images to an external USB drive. The software provides sensor control, image capture, enhancement, and display for the CSI sensor system. It is designed to work with the custom hardware.

  7. Electromelting of confined monolayer ice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hu; Guo, Wanlin

    2013-05-10

    In sharp contrast to the prevailing view that electric fields promote water freezing, here we show by molecular dynamics simulations that monolayer ice confined between two parallel plates can melt into liquid water under a perpendicularly applied electric field. The melting temperature of the monolayer ice decreases with the increasing strength of the external field due to the field-induced disruption of the water-wall interaction induced well-ordered network of the hydrogen bond. This electromelting process should add an important new ingredient to the physics of water.

  8. Walking droplets in confined domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Pedro; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    A millimetric liquid drop can walk spontaneously along the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, propelled by a resonant interaction with its own wave field. These walking droplets exhibit features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. We here explore experimentally the dynamics and statistics of this macroscopic wave-particle system in confined domains, or 'corrals'. Particular attention is given to characterizing the influence of the corral geometry on the emergent probability distributions. The relation to analogous quantum systems (specifically, quantum corrals, the quantum mirage and scarring in Bose-Einstein condensates) is discussed. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  9. Transitions Out of High-Confinement Mode to Lower Confinement Regimes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, David

    A high-resolution edge Thomson Scattering (TS) system was developed and installed on the DIII-D tokamak, and was then used to study the back transition from High Confinement (H-mode) to Low Confinement (L-mode) in DIII-D. The transient event seen to initiate some back transition sequences is superficially similar to a large type-I ELM, which is described by the linear ideal MHD theory of peeling-ballooning modes. Detailed edge pedestal profile evolution studies during the back transition show that the plasma does not exceed this linear stability limit during the back transition, indicating that the transient is not a type-I ELM event. The E x B shearing rate oE x B and turbulence decorrelation rate oT were then compared before the H-L sequence. The results show that the back transition sequence begins while oE x B is still well above oT, indicating that the sequences observed in these experiments are not triggered by the collapse of the E x B shear layer. Further investigation is made to characterize a coherent density fluctuation whose behavior is linked to back transition sequences. Strategies for avoiding the transient are tested and a reliable method for producing a "soft'' back transition is identified. Such cases are compared to the class of "hard'' transitions in which the pedestal pressure gradient rapidly relaxes.

  10. The role of correlation in the ground state energy of confined helium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, N.

    2014-01-14

    We analyze the ground state energy of helium atom confined by spherical impenetrable walls, and the role of the correlation energy in the total energy. The confinement of an atom in a cavity is one way in which we can model the effect of the external pressure on an atom. The calculations of energy of the system are carried out by the variational method. We find that the correlation energy remains almost constant for a range values of size of the boxes analyzed.

  11. Confinement-Induced Supercriticality and Phase Equilibria of Hydrocarbons in Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L; Nasrabadi, Hadi

    2016-11-08

    For over a century, the phase behavior of bulk fluids has been described as PVT (pressure-volume-temperature) three-dimensional properties, but it has become increasingly clear that the liquid-vapor phase behavior in confined geometries is significantly altered from the bulk. Efforts have been devoted to accessing confined phase transitions using sorption, molecular simulations, and theoretical methods. However, a comprehensive picture of PVT relationships for confined hydrocarbons remains uncertain. Herein, we introduce d (confining pore diameter) as a fourth dimension, and we present PVT-d behavior of confined fluids in nanopores. For the first time, a T-d phase diagram is presented for n-hexane, n-octane, and n-decane under multiple confinement scales (37.9, 14.8, 9.8, 6.0, 4.1, 3.3, and 2.2 nm cylindrical pore diameter) using experimental differential scanning calorimetry and PVT-d equation of state theory at atmospheric pressure. As pore diameter decreases from 37.9 to 4.1 nm, the bubble point increases by as much as 15 K above bulk, until we observe behavior consistent with a supercritical state, pointing to confinement-induced supercriticality. Remarkably, experimental and theoretical findings overlap very well, showing that this approach effectively captures the phase boundaries between the liquid, vapor, and supercritical fluid regions. The model and completed EOS are additionally extended to calculation of isothermal capillary adsorption, and its validity is discussed.

  12. Are polymers glassier upon confinement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitano, Simone; Spiece, Jean; Martinez-Tong, Daniel E.; Sferrazza, Michele; Nogales, Aurora

    Glass forming systems are characterized by a stability against crystallization upon heating and by the easiness with which their liquid phase can be transformed into a solid lacking of long-range order upon cooling (glass forming ability). Here, we discuss on the the thickness dependence of the thermal phase transition temperatures of poly(L-lactide acid) thin films supported onto solid substrates. The determination of the glass transition (Tg), cold crystallization (TCC) and melting (Tm) temperatures down to a thickness of 6 nm via ellipsometry, permitted us to build up parameters describing glass stability and glass forming ability. We observed a strong influence of the film thickness on the latter, while the former is not affected by 1D confinement. Remarkably, the increase in Tg/Tm ratio, a parameter related to glass forming ability, is not accompanied by an increase in TCC-Tg, as observed on the contrary, in bulk metallic glasses. We explained this peculiar behavior of soft matter in confinement considering the impact of irreversible adsorption on local free volume content.

  13. Soft confinement for polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Yutaka; Kawakatsu, Toshihiro

    2014-07-01

    As a model of soft confinement for polymers, we investigated equilibrium shapes of a flexible vesicle that contains a phase-separating polymer solution. To simulate such a system, we combined the phase field theory (PFT) for the vesicle and the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) for the polymer solution. We observed a transition from a symmetric prolate shape of the vesicle to an asymmetric pear shape induced by the domain structure of the enclosed polymer solution. Moreover, when a non-zero spontaneous curvature of the vesicle is introduced, a re-entrant transition between the prolate and the dumbbell shapes of the vesicle is observed. This re-entrant transition is explained by considering the competition between the loss of conformational entropy and that of translational entropy of polymer chains due to the confinement by the deformable vesicle. This finding is in accordance with the recent experimental result reported by Terasawa et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108 (2011) 5249).

  14. Laboratory tests to study the influence of rock stress confinement on the performances of TBM discs in tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innaurato, N.; Oggeri, C.; Oreste, P.; Vinai, R.

    2011-06-01

    To clarify some aspects of rock destruction with a disc acting on a high confined tunnel face, a series of tests were carried out to examine fracture mechanisms under an indenter that simulates the tunnel boring machine (TBM) tool action, in the presence of an adjacent groove, when a state of stress (lateral confinement) is imposed on a rock sample. These tests proved the importance of carefully establishing the optimal distance of grooves produced by discs acting on a confined surface, and the value (as a mere order of magnitude) of the increase of the thrust to produce the initiation of chip formation, as long as the confinement pressure becomes greater.

  15. Studies of global energy confinement in TFTR supershots

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.

    1993-08-01

    The global energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, from TFTR supershot plasmas has been correlated with the hydrogen recycling and the pressure anisotropy. An expression for the global confinement was obtained that describes its value at the time of peak neutron emission for all TFTR supershots obtained in the 1990 campaign, and simultaneously describes the time evolution of {tau}{sub E} for an extensive subset of the 1990 data. The obtained expression is probably not unique and it can be written with different variables. An analysis of the energy balance for many of these supershots indicates that the primary effect of larger {tau}{sub E} is that the central particle diffusivity is lower.

  16. Spatially confined assembly of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lin; Chen, Xiaodong; Lu, Nan; Chi, Lifeng

    2014-10-21

    an increasingly important role in the controllable assembly of NPs. In this Account, we summarize our approaches and progress in fabricating spatially confined assemblies of NPs that allow for the positioning of NPs with high resolution and considerable throughput. The spatially selective assembly of NPs at the desired location can be achieved by various mechanisms, such as, a controlled dewetting process, electrostatically mediated assembly of particles, and confined deposition and growth of NPs. Three nanofabrication techniques used to produce prepatterns on a substrate are summarized: the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) patterning technique, e-beam lithography (EBL), and nanoimprint lithography (NPL). The particle density, particle size, or interparticle distance in NP assemblies strongly depends on the geometric parameters of the template structure due to spatial confinement. In addition, with smart design template structures, multiplexed NPs can be assembled into a defined structure, thus demonstrating the structural and functional complexity required for highly integrated and multifunction applications.

  17. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell–substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  18. Methods for two-dimensional cell confinement.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, Maël; Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Bonazzi, Daria; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Protocols described in this chapter relate to a method to dynamically confine cells in two dimensions with various microenvironments. It can be used to impose on cells a given height, with an accuracy of less than 100 nm on large surfaces (cm(2)). The method is based on the gentle application of a modified glass coverslip onto a standard cell culture. Depending on the preparation, this confinement slide can impose on the cells a given geometry but also an environment of controlled stiffness, controlled adhesion, or a more complex environment. An advantage is that the method is compatible with most optical microscopy technologies and molecular biology protocols allowing advanced analysis of confined cells. In this chapter, we first explain the principle and issues of using these slides to confine cells in a controlled geometry and describe their fabrication. Finally, we discuss how the nature of the confinement slide can vary and provide an alternative method to confine cells with gels of controlled rigidity.

  19. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  20. Human Adaptation to Isolated and Confined Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary W.; Stokols, Daniel; Carrere, Sybil

    1987-01-01

    A study was conducted over seven months in a winter Antarctic isolated and confined environment (ICE). Physiological and psychological data was collected several times a week. Information was collected on a monthly basis on behavior and the use of physical facilities. Adaptation and information indicated that there was a significant decrease in epinephrine and norepinephrine during the middle trimester of the winter. No vital changes were found for blood pressure. Self reports of hostility and anxiety show a linear increase. There were no significant changes in depression during ICE. The physiological and psychological data do not move in a synchronous fashion over time. The data also suggest that both ambient qualities of an ICE and discrete social environmental events, such as the arrival of the summer crew, have an impact on the outcome measures used. It may be most appropiate to develop a model for ICE's that incorporates not only global chronic stressors common to all ICE's but also the role of discrete environmental effects which can minimize or enhance the influence of more chronic stressors. Behavioral adjustment information highlight the importance of developing schedules which balance work and recreational activities.

  1. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  2. An Experimental Study of Dynamic Tensile Failure of Rocks Subjected to Hydrostatic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangbiao; Yao, Wei; Xia, Kaiwen

    2016-10-01

    It is critical to understand the dynamic tensile failure of confined rocks in many rock engineering applications, such as underground blasting in mining projects. To simulate the in situ stress state of underground rocks, a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system is utilized to load Brazilian disc (BD) samples hydrostatically, and then exert dynamic load to the sample by impacting the striker on the incident bar. The pulse shaper technique is used to generate a slowly rising stress wave to facilitate the dynamic force balance in the tests. Five groups of Laurentian granite BD samples (with static BD tensile strength of 12.8 MPa) under the hydrostatic confinement of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 MPa were tested with different loading rates. The result shows that the dynamic tensile strength increases with the hydrostatic confining pressure. It is also observed that under the same hydrostatic pressure, the dynamic tensile strength increases with the loading rate, revealing the so-called rate dependency for engineering materials. Furthermore, the increment of the tensile strength decreases with the hydrostatic confinement, which resembles the static tensile behavior of rock under confining pressure, as reported in the literature. The recovered samples are examined using X-ray micro-computed tomography method and the observed crack pattern is consistent with the experimental result.

  3. Molecular Motion and Confined Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynin, Andrey V.; Jeon, Junhwan

    2004-03-01

    Microorganisms such as myxobacteria, cyanobacteria, and flexibacteria move by gliding. The gliding has been described by two quite different mechanisms: social (S) motility and adventurous (A) motility. Though retraction of type 4-pili provides the force for the S motility, extrusion of slime, which may be associated with the A motility, is not well known. Nozzle-like structures recently found in cyanobacteria can support the A motility. However, complete understaning A motility is still lacking. To describe the A motility, we use molecular dynamics simulations of a polymer growing inside a cylindrically shaped tube with one end capped. Confined polymers provide a driving force for a tube motion as if a rocket flew with emitting gas. It is seen from the mean-squared displacement of a tube that its motion is ballistic under constant applied force.

  4. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reaction accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  5. Multishell inertial confinement fusion target

    DOEpatents

    Holland, James R.; Del Vecchio, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A method of fabricating multishell fuel targets for inertial confinement fusion usage. Sacrificial hemispherical molds encapsulate a concentric fuel pellet which is positioned by fiber nets stretched tautly across each hemispherical mold section. The fiber ends of the net protrude outwardly beyond the mold surfaces. The joint between the sacrificial hemispheres is smoothed. A ceramic or glass cover is then deposited about the finished mold surfaces to produce an inner spherical surface having continuously smooth surface configuration. The sacrificial mold is removed by gaseous reactions accomplished through the porous ceramic cover prior to enclosing of the outer sphere by addition of an outer coating. The multishell target comprises the inner fuel pellet concentrically arranged within a surrounding coated cover or shell by fiber nets imbedded within the cover material.

  6. THERMAL COOK-OFF EXPERIMENTS OF THE HMX BASED HIGH EXPLOSIVE LX-04 TO CHARACTERIZE VIOLENCE WITH VARYING CONFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Greenwood, D

    2005-07-25

    Thermal cook-off experiments were carried out using LX-04 explosive (85% HMX and 15% Viton by weight) with different levels of confinement to characterize the effect of confinement on the reaction violence. These experiments involved heating a porous LX-04 sample in a stainless steel container with varying container end plate thickness and assembly bolt diameter to control overall confinement. As expected, detonation did not occur and reducing the overall confinement lowered the reaction violence. This is consistent with modeling results that predict that a lower confinement will act to lower the cook-off pressure and thus the overall burn rate which lowers the overall violence. These results suggest that controlling the overall system confinement can modify the relative safety in a given scenario.

  7. Heterogeneities in confined water and protein hydration water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. E.; Kumar, P.; Han, S.; Mazza, M. G.; Stokely, K.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Franzese, G.; Mallamace, F.; Xu, L.

    2009-12-01

    We report recent efforts to understand a broad range of experiments on confined water and protein hydration water, many initiated by a collaboration between workers at the University of Messina and MIT—the editors of this special issue. Preliminary calculations are not inconsistent with one tentative interpretation of these experiments as resulting from the system passing from the high-temperature high-pressure 'HDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display non-Arrhenius behavior) to the low-temperature low-pressure 'LDL' side of the Widom line (where the liquid might display Arrhenius behavior). The Widom line—defined to be the line in the pressure-temperature plane where the correlation length has its maximum—arises if there is a critical point. Hence, interpreting the Messina-MIT experiments in terms of a Widom line is of potential relevance to testing, experimentally, the hypothesis that water displays a liquid-liquid critical point.

  8. Effects of confinement on the thermodynamics of supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekalova, Elena G.

    The main focus of this thesis is to understand how confinement alters the phase diagram of supercooled liquid water by employing methods of statistical mechanics and numerical simulations. Water is very complex and anomalous when compared to simple liquids. For example, experimental data for liquid water reveals the presence of a temperature of maximum density (TMD) below which the density decreases under isobaric cooling. Another anomaly is the hypothesized liquid--liquid phase transition (LLPT) between two types of liquid water with different densities. In this thesis we study how confinement affects such anomalies as TMD and LLPT in supercooled liquid water. This thesis is separated into three parts: (i) Monte Carlo simulations of a 2D coarse-grained model of a water layer confined in a fixed disordered matrix of hydrophobic nanoparticles, (ii) molecular dynamics simulations of a Jagla ramp model of liquid confined in fixed ordered and disordered matrices of hydrophobic nanoparticles, and (iii) all-atom simulations of trehalose and maltose in aqueous solution of lysozyme. In Part (i), we perform Monte Carlo simulations and find that a nanoparticle concentration as small as 2.4% is enough to destroy the LLPT for pressure P > 0.14 GPa. Moreover, we find a substantial (more than 90%) decrease of compressibility, thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat at high P and low temperature T upon increase of nanoparticle concentration from 0% to 25%. In Part (ii), we ask how, for single component systems interacting via a soft-core isotropic potential with two characteristic length scales, the geometry of hydrophobic confinement affects the phase diagram. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study particles interacting through a ramp potential and a shoulder potential, each confined in a fixed matrix of nanoscopic particles with a fixed volume fraction. We find a substantial weakening of the LLPT and the disappearance of TMD upon the increase of disorder in the

  9. Rheology of red blood cells under flow in highly confined microchannels. II. Effect of focusing and confinement.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Guillermo R; Hernández-Machado, Aurora; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2014-10-07

    We study the focusing of red blood cells and vesicles in pressure-driven flows in highly confined microchannels (10-30 μm), identifying the control parameters that dictate the cell distribution along the channel. Our results show that an increase in the flow velocity leads to a sharper cell distribution in a lateral position of the channel. This position depends on the channel width, with cells flowing at outer (closer to the walls) positions in thicker channels. We also study the relevance of the object shape, exploring the different behaviour of red blood cells and different vesicles. We also analyze the implications of these phenomena in the cell suspension rheology, highlighting the crucial role of the wall confinement in the rheological properties of the suspension.

  10. A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-09-01

    Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement over pressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region.

  11. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Stabilization and Confinement Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Fowler, T K; Bulmer, R; Byers, J; Hua, D; Tung, L

    2004-07-15

    The 'Kinetic Stabilizer' has been proposed as a means of MHD stabilizing an axisymmetric tandem mirror system. The K-S concept is based on theoretical studies by Ryutov, confirmed experimentally in the Gas Dynamic Trap experiment in Novosibirsk. In the K-S beams of ions are directed into the end of an 'expander' region outside the outer mirror of a tandem mirror. These ions, slowed, stagnated, and reflected as they move up the magnetic gradient, produce a low-density stabilizing plasma. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we have been conducting theoretical and computational studies of the K-S Tandem Mirror. These studies have employed a low-beta code written especially to analyze the beam injection/stabilization process, and a new code SYMTRAN (by Hua and Fowler) that solves the coupled radial and axial particle and energy transport in a K-S TM. Also, a 'legacy' MHD stability code, FLORA, has been upgraded and employed to benchmark the injection/stabilization code and to extend its results to high beta values. The FLORA code studies so far have confirmed the effectiveness of the K-S in stabilizing high-beta (40%) plasmas with stabilizer plasmas the peak pressures of which are several orders of magnitude smaller than those of the confined plasma. Also the SYMTRAN code has shown D-T plasma ignition from alpha particle energy deposition in T-M regimes with strong end plugging. Our studies have confirmed the viability of the K-S-T-M concept with respect to MHD stability and radial and axial confinement. We are continuing these studies in order to optimize the parameters and to examine means for the stabilization of possible residual instability modes, such as drift modes and 'trapped-particle' modes. These modes may in principle be controlled by tailoring the stabilizer plasma distribution and/or the radial potential distribution. In the paper the results to date of our studies are summarized and projected to scope out possible fusion-power versions of the K

  12. Properties of immobile hydrogen confined in microporous carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Bahadur, Jitendra; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre; Contescu, Cristian I.; ...

    2017-03-06

    The mobility of H2 confined in microporous carbon was studied as a function of temperature and pressure using inelastic neutron scattering, and the translational and rotational motion of H2 molecules has been probed. At low loading, rotation of H2 molecules adsorbed in the smallest carbon pores (~6 ) is severely hindered, suggesting that the interaction between H2 and the host matrix is anisotropic. At higher loading, H2 molecules behave as nearly free rotor, implying lower anisotropic interactions with adsorption sites. At supercritical temperatures where bulk H2 is a gas, the inelastic spectrum of confined H2 provides evidence of a significantmore » fraction of immobile, solid-like hydrogen. The onset temperature for molecular mobility depends strongly on the loaded amount. The fraction of immobile molecules increases with pressure and attains a plateau at high pressures. Surprisingly, immobile H2 is present even at temperatures as high as ~110 K. This research at ORNL s Spallation Neutron Source was sponsored by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U. S. Department of Energy. This research was supported in part by the ORNL Postdoctoral Research Associates Program, administered jointly by the ORNL and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. CIC and NCG acknowledge support from the Materials Science and Engineering Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.« less

  13. Plasma confinement. [Physics for magnetic geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1985-03-01

    The physics of plasma confinement by a magnetic field is developed from the basic properties of plasmas through the theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport in toroidal and open-ended configurations. The close relationship between the theory of plasma confinement and Hamiltonian mechanics is emphasized, and the modern view of macroscopic instabilities as three-dimensional equilibria is given.

  14. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  15. Climate conditions in bedded confinement buildings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confinement buildings are utilized for finishing cattle to allow more efficient collection of animal waste and to buffer animals against adverse climatic conditions. Environmental data were obtained from a 29 m wide x 318 m long bedded confinement building with the long axis oriented east to west. T...

  16. Inertial Confinement Fusion Materials Science

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A V

    2004-06-01

    Demonstration of thermonuclear ignition and gain on a laboratory scale is one of science's grand challenges. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is committed to achieving inertial confinement fusion (ICF) by 2010. Success in this endeavor depends on four elements: the laser driver performance, target design, experimental diagnostics performance, and target fabrication and target materials performance. This article discusses the current state of target fabrication and target materials performance. The first three elements will only be discussed insofar as they relate to target fabrication specifications and target materials performance. Excellent reviews of the physics of ICF are given by Lindl [Lindl 1998] and Lindl et al. [Lindl 2004]. To achieve conditions under which inertial confinement is sufficient to achieve thermonuclear burn, an imploded fuel capsule is compressed to conditions of high density and temperature. In the laboratory a driver is required to impart energy to the capsule to effect an implosion. There are three drivers currently being considered for ICF in the laboratory: high-powered lasers, accelerated heavy ions, and x rays resulting from pulsed power machines. Of these, high-powered lasers are the most developed, provide the most symmetric drive, and provide the most energy. Laser drive operates in two configurations. The first is direct drive where the laser energy impinges directly on the ICF capsule and drives the implosion. The second is indirect drive, where the energy from the laser is first absorbed in a high-Z enclosure or hohlraum surrounding the capsule, and the resulting x-rays emitted by the hohlraum material drives the implosion. Using direct drive the laser beam energy is absorbed by the electrons in the outer corona of the target. The electrons transport the energy to the denser shell region to provide the ablation and the resulting implosion. Laser direct drive is generally less efficient and more hydrodynamically unstable than

  17. Effect of temperature and pressure on the protonation of glycine

    PubMed Central

    Izatt, R. M.; Oscarson, J. L.; Gillespie, S. E.; Grimsrud, H.; Renuncio, J. A. R.; Pando, C.

    1992-01-01

    Flow calorimetry has been used to study the interaction of glycine with protons in water at temperatures of 298.15, 323.15, and 348.15 K and pressures up to 12.50 MPa. By combining the measured heat for glycine solutions titrated with NaOH with the heat of ionization for water, the enthalpy of protonation of glycine is obtained. The reaction is exothermic at all temperatures and pressures studied. The effect of pressure on the enthalpy of reaction is very small. The experimental heat data are analyzed to yield equilibrium constant (K), enthalpy change (ΔH), and entropy change (ΔS) values for the protonation reaction as a function of temperature. These values are compared with those reported previously at 298.15 K. The ΔH and ΔS values increase (become more positive), whereas log K values decrease, as temperature increases. The trends for ΔH and ΔS with temperature are opposite to those reported previously for the protonation of several alkanolamines. However, log K values for proton interaction with both glycine and the alkanolamines decrease with increasing temperature. The effect of the nitrogen atom substituent on log K for protonation of glycine and alkanolamines is discussed in terms of changes in long-range and short-range solvent effects. These effects are used to explain the difference in ΔH and ΔS trends between glycine protonation and those found earlier for alkanolamine protonation. PMID:19431832

  18. Density of hydrophobically confined deeply cooled water investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Zhang, Yang; Jeng, U-Ser; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-09-07

    Water’s behavior near hydrophobic surfaces has attracted great attention due to chemical and geological applications. Here, we report small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of water confined in the hydrophobic nanoporous carbon material, CMK-1-14, from ambient to deeply cooled temperatures. By monitoring the scattering intensity of the first Bragg peak, which is directly related to the scattering length density contrast between the carbon matrix and the confined water, the average density of the hydrophobically confined water was determined from 300 K to 150 K at ambient pressure. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the majority of such hydrophobically confined water did not crystallize in the investigated temperature range. By exploiting the fast speed of SAXS measurements and the continuous temperature ramping, the average density profile and the deduced thermal expansion coefficient (α{sub p}) were obtained. We found that the well-known density maximum of water at 277 K downshifted to 260 K, and the density minimum which has been observed in hydrophilic confinement disappeared. In addition, the previously measured large density decreasing of 18% at low temperature was recalibrated to a more reasonable 10% instead. Consequently, the recalculated α{sub p} peak was found to be quite similar to that of the water confined in hydrophilic MCM-41-S-15 suggesting an intrinsic property of water, which does not sensitively depend on the confinement surface.

  19. Composite mesostructures by nano-confinement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiying; Cheng, Guosheng; Katsov, Kirill; Sides, Scott W; Wang, Jianfang; Tang, Jing; Fredrickson, Glenn H; Moskovits, Martin; Stucky, Galen D

    2004-11-01

    In a physically confined environment, interfacial interactions, symmetry breaking, structural frustration and confinement-induced entropy loss can play dominant roles in determining molecular organization. Here we present a systematic study of the confined assembly of silica-surfactant composite mesostructures within cylindrical nanochannels of varying diameters. Using exactly the same precursors and reaction conditions that form the two-dimensional hexagonal SBA-15 mesostructured thin film, unprecedented silica mesostructures with chiral mesopores such as single- and double-helical geometries spontaneously form inside individual alumina nanochannels. On tightening the degree of confinement, a transition is observed in the mesopore morphology from a coiled cylindrical to a spherical cage-like geometry. Self-consistent field calculations carried out to account for the observed mesostructures accord well with experiment. The mesostructures produced by confined syntheses are useful as templates for fabricating highly ordered mesostructured nanowires and nanowire arrays.

  20. Bimetallic Microswimmers Speed Up in Confining Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Zhou, Chao; Wang, Wei; Zhang, H. P.

    2016-11-01

    Synthetic microswimmers are envisioned to be useful in numerous applications, many of which occur in tightly confined spaces. It is therefore important to understand how confinement influences swimmer dynamics. Here we study the motility of bimetallic microswimmers in linear and curved channels. Our experiments show swimmer velocities increase, up to 5 times, with the degree of confinement, and the relative velocity increase depends weakly on the fuel concentration and ionic strength in solution. Experimental results are reproduced in a numerical model which attributes the swimmer velocity increase to electrostatic and electrohydrodynamic boundary effects. Our work not only helps to elucidate the confinement effect of phoretic swimmers, but also suggests that spatial confinement may be used as an effective control method for them.

  1. Size Dependant Nucleation of Confined 2-Decanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanuel, Samuel; Bauer, Hillary; Safiq, Alexandrea; Dulmaa, Jargalsaikhan; Khraisat, Amer

    2012-02-01

    We have studied freezing and melting of physically confined 2-decanol in nano porous silica using a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). Both melting and freezing temperatures are suppressed for physically confined 2-decanol. In the presence of bulk, freezing of the confined system is triggered by freezing of the bulk where nucleation is heterogeneous. There is, however, a cutoff size between 100 nm and 300 nm where phase transition is no longer initiated through heterogeneous nucleation. Below the cutoff size, nucleation is homogeneous where the confined system has to be supercooled further before any phase transition can occur. Melting of the confined system, on the other hand, is not influenced by the presence or absence of the bulk.

  2. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  3. A numerical and experimental study of confined swirling jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Mcdonell, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of a confined strong swirling flow is presented. Detailed velocity measurements are made using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) technique. Computations are performed using a differential second-moment (DSM) closure. The effect of inlet dissipation rate on calculated mean and turbulence fields is investigated. Various model constants are employed in the pressure-strain model to demonstrate their influences on the predicted results. Finally, comparison of the DSM calculations with the algebraic second-monent (ASM) closure results shows that the DSM is better suited for complex swirling flow analysis.

  4. Mechanics and stability of vesicles and droplets in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benet, Eduard; Vernerey, Franck J.

    2016-12-01

    The permeation and trapping of soft colloidal particles in the confined space of porous media are of critical importance in cell migration studies, design of drug delivery vehicles, and colloid separation devices. Our current understanding of these processes is however limited by the lack of quantitative models that can relate how the elasticity, size, and adhesion properties of the vesicle-pore complex affect colloid transport. We address this shortcoming by introducing a semianalytical model that predicts the equilibrium shapes of a soft vesicle driven by pressure in a narrow pore. Using this approach, the problem is recast in terms of pressure and energy diagrams that characterize the vesicle stability and permeation pressures in different conditions. We particularly show that the critical permeation pressure for a vesicle arises from a compromise between the critical entry pressure and exit pressure, both of which are sensitive to geometrical features, mechanics, and adhesion. We further find that these results can be leveraged to rationally design microfluidic devices and diodes that can help characterize, select, and separate colloids based on physical properties.

  5. Macromolecular crowding induced elongation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ce; Shao, Pei Ge; van Kan, Jeroen A.; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of dextran nanoparticles on the conformation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel was investigated with fluorescence microscopy. It was observed that the DNA molecules elongate and eventually condense into a compact form with increasing volume fraction of the crowding agent. Under crowded conditions, the channel diameter is effectively reduced, which is interpreted in terms of depletion in DNA segment density in the interfacial region next to the channel wall. Confinement in a nanochannel also facilitates compaction with a neutral crowding agent at low ionic strength. The threshold volume fraction for condensation is proportional to the size of the nanoparticle, due to depletion induced attraction between DNA segments. We found that the effect of crowding is not only related to the colligative properties of the agent and that confinement is also important. It is the interplay between anisotropic confinement and osmotic pressure which gives the elongated conformation and the possibility for condensation at low ionic strength. PMID:19805352

  6. Macromolecular crowding induced elongation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ce; Shao, Pei Ge; van Kan, Jeroen A; van der Maarel, Johan R C

    2009-09-29

    The effect of dextran nanoparticles on the conformation and compaction of single DNA molecules confined in a nanochannel was investigated with fluorescence microscopy. It was observed that the DNA molecules elongate and eventually condense into a compact form with increasing volume fraction of the crowding agent. Under crowded conditions, the channel diameter is effectively reduced, which is interpreted in terms of depletion in DNA segment density in the interfacial region next to the channel wall. Confinement in a nanochannel also facilitates compaction with a neutral crowding agent at low ionic strength. The threshold volume fraction for condensation is proportional to the size of the nanoparticle, due to depletion induced attraction between DNA segments. We found that the effect of crowding is not only related to the colligative properties of the agent and that confinement is also important. It is the interplay between anisotropic confinement and osmotic pressure which gives the elongated conformation and the possibility for condensation at low ionic strength.

  7. Fluid viscosity under confined conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya.; Belkin, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Closed equations of fluid transfer in confined conditions are constructed in this study using ab initio methods of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown that the fluid viscosity is not determined by the fluid properties alone, but becomes a property of the "fluid-nanochannel walls" system as a whole. Relations for the tensor of stresses and the interphase force, which specifies the exchange by momentum of fluid molecules with the channel-wall molecules, are derived. It is shown that the coefficient of viscosity is now determined by the sum of three contributions. The first contribution coincides with the expression for the coefficient of the viscosity of fluid in the bulk being specified by the interaction of fluid molecules with each other. The second contribution has the same structure as the first one but is determined by the interaction of fluid molecules with the channel-wall molecules. Finally, the third contribution has no analog in the usual statistical mechanics of transport processes of a simple fluid. It is associated with the correlation of intermolecular forces of the fluid and the channel walls. Thus, it is established that the coefficient of viscosity of fluid in sufficiently small channels will substantially differ from its bulk value.

  8. Cell migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration.

  9. Effects of confinement on anomalies and phase transitions of core-softened fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Krott, Leandro B. Barbosa, Marcia C.; Bordin, José Rafael

    2015-04-07

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study how the confinement affects the dynamic, thermodynamic, and structural properties of a confined anomalous fluid. The fluid is modeled using an effective pair potential derived from the ST4 atomistic model for water. This system exhibits density, structural, and dynamical anomalies, and the vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid critical points similar to the quantities observed in bulk water. The confinement is modeled both by smooth and structured walls. The temperatures of extreme density and diffusion for the confined fluid show a shift to lower values while the pressures move to higher amounts for both smooth and structured confinements. In the case of smooth walls, the critical points and the limit between fluid and amorphous phases show a non-monotonic change in the temperatures and pressures when the nanopore size is increase. In the case of structured walls, the pressures and temperatures of the critical points varies monotonically with the pore size. Our results are explained on basis of the competition between the different length scales of the fluid and the wall-fluid interaction.

  10. Universal behavior of hydrogels confined to narrow capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Sarıyer, Ozan S.; Ramachandran, Arun; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Flow of soft matter objects through one-dimensional environments is important in industrial, biological and biomedical systems. Establishing the underlying principles of the behavior of soft matter in confinement can shed light on its performance in many man-made and biological systems. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study of translocation of micrometer-size hydrogels (microgels) through microfluidic channels with a diameter smaller than an unperturbed microgel size. For microgels with different dimensions and mechanical properties, under a range of applied pressures, we established the universal principles of microgel entrance and passage through microchannels with different geometries, as well as the reduction in microgel volume in confinement. We also show a non-monotonic change in the flow rate of liquid through the constrained microgel, governed by its progressive confinement. The experimental results were in agreement with the theory developed for non-linear biaxial deformation of unentangled polymer gels. Our work has implications for a broad range of phenomena, including occlusion of blood vessels by thrombi and needle-assisted hydrogel injection in tissue engineering. PMID:26596468

  11. Mapping out Min protein patterns in fully confined fluidic chambers

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Yaron; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial Min protein system provides a major model system for studying reaction-diffusion processes in biology. Here we present the first in vitro study of the Min system in fully confined three-dimensional chambers that are lithography-defined, lipid-bilayer coated and isolated through pressure valves. We identify three typical dynamical behaviors that occur dependent on the geometrical chamber parameters: pole-to-pole oscillations, spiral rotations, and traveling waves. We establish the geometrical selection rules and show that, surprisingly, Min-protein spiral rotations govern the larger part of the geometrical phase diagram. Confinement as well as an elevated temperature reduce the characteristic wavelength of the Min patterns, although even for confined chambers with a bacterial-level viscosity, the patterns retain a ~5 times larger wavelength than in vivo. Our results provide an essential experimental base for modeling of intracellular Min gradients in bacterial cell division as well as, more generally, for understanding pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19271.001 PMID:27885986

  12. Universal behavior of hydrogels confined to narrow capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Sarıyer, Ozan S.; Ramachandran, Arun; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2015-11-01

    Flow of soft matter objects through one-dimensional environments is important in industrial, biological and biomedical systems. Establishing the underlying principles of the behavior of soft matter in confinement can shed light on its performance in many man-made and biological systems. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study of translocation of micrometer-size hydrogels (microgels) through microfluidic channels with a diameter smaller than an unperturbed microgel size. For microgels with different dimensions and mechanical properties, under a range of applied pressures, we established the universal principles of microgel entrance and passage through microchannels with different geometries, as well as the reduction in microgel volume in confinement. We also show a non-monotonic change in the flow rate of liquid through the constrained microgel, governed by its progressive confinement. The experimental results were in agreement with the theory developed for non-linear biaxial deformation of unentangled polymer gels. Our work has implications for a broad range of phenomena, including occlusion of blood vessels by thrombi and needle-assisted hydrogel injection in tissue engineering.

  13. The effect of high pressures on the yoghurt from milk with the stabilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reps, A.; Jankowska, A.; Wiśniewska, K.

    2008-07-01

    The effect of high pressures on the microbiological and physio-chemical properties of yoghurt was investigated. The best results were obtained when the yoghurt was manufactured from milk with the addition of MYO 752 stabilizer (starch, gelatin, pectin) selected from 10 stabilizers. Yoghurt manufactured with the addition of 0, 6% MYO 752 stabilizer was processed at the pressure of 400-600 MPa/15 min. in the range of 50 MPa. Pressurization caused a total reduction of number of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. Bulgaricus and reduced the number of Streptococcus thermophilus by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Pressurized and non-pressurized yoghurts characterized of a homogenous consistency and typical plain yoghurt taste. The decrease of the number of living bacteria was observed in yoghurts during the storage. The acidity of pressurized yoghurts remained on the some level at the temperature of 4°C and 20°C. The more intensive antibacterial activity of microflora was observed in yoghurts storaged at 20°C in comparison with yoghurts storaged at 4°C. Disadvantageous changes of the pressurized yoghurts consistency were not found. The taste and aroma of yoghurts remained without any changes.

  14. Transport properties of supercooled confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, F.; Branca, C.; Broccio, M.; Corsaro, C.; Gonzalez-Segredo, N.; Spooren, J.; Stanley, H. E.; Chen, S.-H.

    2008-07-01

    This article presents an overview of recent experiments performed on transport properties of water in the deeply supercooled region, a temperature region of fundamental importance in the science of water. We report data of nuclear magnetic resonance, quasi-elastic neutron scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, studying water confined in nanometer-scale environments. When contained within small pores, water does not crystallise, and can be supercooled well below its homogeneous nucleation temperature Th. On this basis it is possible to carry out a careful analysis of the well known thermodynamical anomalies of water. Studying the temperature and pressure dependencies of water dynamics, we show that the liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) hypothesis represents a reliable model for describing liquid water. In this model, water in the liquid state is a mixture of two different local structures, characterised by different densities, namely the low density liquid (LDL) and the high-density liquid (HDL). The LLPT line should terminate at a special transition point: a low-T liquid-liquid critical point. We discuss the following experimental findings on liquid water: (i) a crossover from non-Arrhenius behaviour at high T to Arrhenius behaviour at low T in transport parameters; (ii) a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation; (iii) the existence of a Widom line, which is the locus of points corresponding to maximum correlation length in the p-T phase diagram and which ends in the liquid-liquid critical point; (iv) the direct observation of the LDL phase; (v) a minimum in the density at approximately 70 K below the temperature of the density maximum. In our opinion these results represent the experimental proofs of the validity of the LLPT hypothesis.

  15. Pattern formation in confined chemical gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wit, Anne; Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; Cartwright, Julyan

    2014-05-01

    Chemical gardens are plant-like mineral structures first described in the seventeenth century and popularly known from chemistry sets for children. They are classically grown in three-dimensional containers by placing a solid metal-salt seed into a silicate solution. When the metal salt starts dissolving in the silicate solution, a semi-permeable membrane forms by precipitation across which water is pumped by osmosis from the silicate solution into the metal salt solution, further dissolving the salt. Above a given pressure, the membrane breaks. The dissolved metal salt solution being generally less dense than the reservoir silicate solution, it rises as a buoyant jet through the broken membrane and further precipitates in contact with the silicate solution, producing a collection of mineral forms that resemble a garden. Such gardens are the subject of increased interest as a model system to understand pattern formation in sea-ice brinicles and hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, among others. All these self-organized precipitation structures at the interface between chemistry, fluid dynamics and mechanics share indeed common chemical, mechanical and electrical properties. In this framework, we study experimentally spatial patterns resulting from the growth of chemical gardens in confined quasi-two-dimensional (2D) geometries upon radial injection of a metallic salt solution into a silicate solution in a horizontal Hele-Shaw cell. We find a large variety of patterns including spirals, fingers, worms, filiform tubes, and flower-like patterns. By exploring the phase space of reactant concentrations and injection flow rates, we observe transitions between these spatio-temporal structures resulting from a coupling between the precipitation reaction, mechanical effects and hydrodynamic instabilities.

  16. Density Limits in Toroidal Magnetic Confinement Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2001-10-01

    The density limit represents one of the fundamental operating boundaries for magnetic confinement devices - one with practical importance to the goal of fusion power. With fusion reactivity maximized at a plasma temperature on the order of 10 keV and a reaction rate scaling as n^2, an optimum density can be calculated which is not guaranteed to be achievable in any given device. Unlike operational limits for plasma current or pressure, the density limit cannot be explained by magneto-hydrodynamics alone. There is general agreement that the proximate cause for the disruptive limit in the tokamak is cooling of the plasma edge and subsequent current profile shrinkage. The edge cooling may be dominated by atomic physics processes or as suggested in recent experiments, by anomalous transport. A similar picture is emerging for the reversed field pinch (RFP), while the limit in stellarators is apparently due to loss of thermal equilibrium from radiation. Empirical scaling laws in which the maximum plasma density is proportional to the average current density have been fairly successful in predicting the limit for subsequent experiments. Surprisingly, the density limits found in tokamaks and RFPs are virtually identical. Currentless stellarators reach similar density limits, though the expression needs to be recast in terms of the rotational transform. While scaling laws have done a reasonable job in describing data from many recent experiments, they can only give hints at the underlying physics. Understanding the mechanism for the density limit is crucial for extrapolating machine performance into untested regimes and so far, a completely satisfactory theory has not emerged. It seems likely that robust, reliable predictions will only come from the development of a first-principles theory backed up by detailed experimental observations. The extensive work already accomplished and reviewed here should provide a solid basis for such development.

  17. Improved confinement in JET hybrid discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobirk, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Crisanti, F.; Buratti, P.; Challis, C. D.; Joffrin, E.; Alper, B.; Andrew, Y.; Beaumont, P.; Beurskens, M.; Boboc, A.; Botrugno, A.; Brix, M.; Calabro', G.; Coffey, I.; Conroy, S.; Ford, O.; Frigione, D.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Howell, D.; Jenkins, I.; Keeling, D.; Kempenaars, M.; Leggate, H.; Lotte, P.; de la Luna, E.; Maddison, G. P.; Mantica, P.; Mazzotta, C.; McDonald, D. C.; Meigs, A.; Nunes, I.; Rachlew, E.; Rimini, F.; Schneider, M.; Sips, A. C. C.; Stober, J. K.; Studholme, W.; Tala, T.; Tsalas, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; de Vries, P. C.; EFDA contributors, JET

    2012-09-01

    A new technique has been developed to produce plasmas with improved confinement relative to the H98,y2 scaling law (ITER Physics Expert Groups on Confinement and Transport and Confinement Modelling and Database ITER Physics Basics Editors and ITER EDA 1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 2175) on the JET tokamak. In the mid-size tokamaks ASDEX upgrade and DIII-D heating during the current formation is used to produce a flat q-profile with a minimum close to 1. On JET this technique leads to q-profiles with similar minimum q but opposite to the other tokamaks not to an improved confinement state. By changing the method utilizing a faster current ramp with temporary higher current than in the flattop (current overshoot) plasmas with improved confinement (H98,y2 = 1.35) and good stability (βN ≈ 3) have been produced and extended to many confinement times only limited by technical constraints. The increase in H98,y2-factor is stronger with more heating power as can be seen in a power scan. The q-profile development during the high power phase in JET is reproduced by current diffusion calculated by TRANSP and CRONOS. Therefore the modifications produced by the current overshoot disappear quickly from the edge but the confinement improvement lasts longer, in some cases up to the end of the heating phase.

  18. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-02

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion.

  19. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  20. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, Roger D.; Newmark, Robin L.

    1997-01-01

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders.

  1. Active cooling-based surface confinement system for thermal soil treatment

    DOEpatents

    Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1997-10-28

    A thermal barrier is disclosed for surface confinement with active cooling to control subsurface pressures during thermal remediation of shallow (5-20 feet) underground contaminants. If steam injection is used for underground heating, the actively cooled thermal barrier allows the steam to be injected into soil at pressures much higher (20-60 psi) than the confining strength of the soil, while preventing steam breakthrough. The rising steam is condensed to liquid water at the thermal barrier-ground surface interface. The rapid temperature drop forced by the thermal barrier drops the subsurface pressure to below atmospheric pressure. The steam and contaminant vapors are contained by the thermal blanket, which can be made of a variety of materials such as steel plates, concrete slabs, membranes, fabric bags, or rubber bladders. 1 fig.

  2. Propagating confined states in phase dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, Helmut R.; Deissler, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Theoretical treatment is given to the possibility of the existence of propagating confined states in the nonlinear phase equation by generalizing stationary confined states. The nonlinear phase equation is set forth for the case of propagating patterns with long wavelengths and low-frequency modulation. A large range of parameter values is shown to exist for propagating confined states which have spatially localized regions which travel on a background with unique wavelengths. The theoretical phenomena are shown to correspond to such physical systems as spirals in Taylor instabilities, traveling waves in convective systems, and slot-convection phenomena for binary fluid mixtures.

  3. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  4. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  5. Fast imaging of laser-blow-off plume: Lateral confinement in ambient environment

    SciTech Connect

    George, Sony; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Kumar, Ajai; Singh, R. K.

    2009-04-06

    The dynamics of plasma plume, formed by the laser-blow-off of multicomponent LiF-C thin film under various ambient pressures ranging from high vacuum to argon pressure of 3 Torr, has been studied using fast imaging technique. In vacuum, the plume has ellipsoidal shape. With the increase in the ambient pressure, sharp plume boundary is developed showing a focusing-like (confinement in the lateral space) behavior in the front end, which persists for long times. At higher ambient pressure (>10{sup -1} Torr), structures are developed in the plasma plume due to hydrodynamic instability/turbulences.

  6. Non-dissipative energy capture of confined liquid in nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Baoxing; Chen, Xi; Lu, Weiyi; Zhao, Cang; Qiao, Yu

    2014-05-19

    In the past, energy absorption of protection/damping materials is mainly based on energy dissipation, which causes a fundamental conflict between the requirements of safety/comfort and efficiency. In the current study, a nanofluidic “energy capture” system is reported, which is based on nanoporous materials and nonwetting liquid. Both molecular dynamics simulations and experiments show that as the liquid overcomes the capillary effect and infiltrates into the nanopores, the mechanical energy of a stress wave could be temporarily stored by the confined liquid phase and isolated from the wave energy transmission path. Such a system can work under a relatively low pressure for mitigating high-pressure stress waves, not necessarily involved in any energy dissipation processes.

  7. Fault gouge rheology under confined, high-velocity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.; Madden, A. S.; Chen, X.

    2012-12-01

    We recently developed the experimental capability to investigate the shear properties of fine-grain gouge under confined conditions and high-velocity. The experimental system includes a rotary apparatus that can apply large displacements of tens of meters, slip velocity of 0.001- 2.0 m/s, and normal stress of 35 MPa (Reches and Lockner, 2010). The key new component is a Confined ROtary Cell (CROC) that can shear a gouge layer either dry or under pore-pressure. The pore pressure is controlled by two syringe pumps. CROC includes a ring-shape gouge chamber of 62.5 mm inner diameter, 81.25 mm outer diameter, and up to 3 mm thick gouge sample. The lower, rotating part of CROC contains the sample chamber, and the upper, stationary part includes the loading, hollow cylinder and setting for temperature, and dilation measurements, and pore-pressure control. Each side of the gouge chamber has two pairs of industrial, spring-energized, self-lubricating, teflon-graphite seals, built for particle media and can work at temperature up to 250 ded C. The space between each of the two sets of seals is pressurized by nitrogen. This design generates 'zero-differential pressure' on the inner seal (which is in contact with the gouge powder), and prevents gouge leaks. For the preliminary dry experiments, we used ~2.0 mm thick layers of room-dry kaolinite powder. Total displacements were on the order of meters and normal stress up to 4 MPa. The initial shear was accommodated by multiple internal slip surfaces within the kaolinite layer accommodated as oriented Riedel shear structures. Later, the shear was localized within a thin, plate-parallel Y-surface. The kaolinite layer was compacted at a quasi-asymptotic rate, and displayed a steady-state friction coefficient of ~ 0.5 with no clear dependence on slip velocity up to 0.15 m/s. Further experiments with loose quartz sand (grain size ~ 125 micron) included both dry runs and pore-pressure (distilled water) controlled runs. The sand was

  8. Microchannel membrane separation applied to confined thin film desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thorud, Jonathan D.; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.

    2006-08-15

    The concept of a confined thin film to enhance the desorption process is based on a reduced mass diffusion resistance. A wide thin film is formed into a microchannel by using a porous membrane as one wall of the channel enabling vapor extraction along the flow. Heat added to the channel results in vapor generation and subsequent extraction through the membrane. This experimental study investigates the performance of vapor extraction as a function of confined thin film thickness, pressure difference across the membrane and inlet concentration to the microchannel. In addition, heat added to the system was varied and results are presented in terms of the wall superheat temperature relative to the inlet saturated conditions of the binary fluid. The test section was equipped with a transparent window to observe bubble formation and vapor extraction. Results show that the performance, measured by the vapor release rate, increases for reduced channel thickness, for increased pressure difference across the membrane, and for lower inlet concentration. Results show that lower wall superheat correspond to higher heat transfer coefficients. Trends of Nusselt number and Sherwood number versus both channel Reynolds number and the product of the Reynolds number and Schmidt number are presented. Bubble formation in the channel does not degrade overall performance provided a critical heat flux condition does not occur. (author)

  9. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  10. Evaluation of confinement effects in zeolites under Henry's adsorption regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pera-Titus, Marc; Llorens, Joan

    2010-06-01

    This paper provides a detailed thermodynamic analysis of gas/vapour adsorption in zeolites at low pressures. At these conditions, we show first that Henry's isotherm can be conveniently rewritten using the thermodynamic isotherm model developed in a previous study [J. Llorens, M. Pera-Titus, Description of gas adsorption on microporous materials: evaluation of energy heterogeneity, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 331, 2009, 302-311], linking the integral free energy of adsorption relative to saturation, Ψ/ RT, expressed as a Kiselev integral, with the variable Z = 1/-ln( Π), being Π the relative pressure. Relevant information about sorbate confinement effects in zeolites can be inferred using strong sorbates under Henry's adsorption regime using the thermodynamic formulation provided here. The confining level of zeolites can be characterized by a parameter ( m1), whose value depends on the zeolite framework, but remains essentially unchanged with the sorbate probe molecule and temperature. We illustrate the application of these concepts using a collection of MFI and MTW-type zeolites as model systems.

  11. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  12. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Erin; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume is a rich, largely unexplored problem, with applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. We report simulation results for dense clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to N = 60 constituent particles. We discuss similarities between clusters in terms of symmetry, a connection to spherical codes, and generally the interplay between isotropic geometrical confinement and anisotropic particle shape. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the problem of packing in confinement. E.T. acknowledges support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE 1256260.

  13. The Physics Basis of ITER Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.

    2009-02-19

    ITER will be the first fusion reactor and the 50 year old dream of fusion scientists will become reality. The quality of magnetic confinement will decide about the success of ITER, directly in the form of the confinement time and indirectly because it decides about the plasma parameters and the fluxes, which cross the separatrix and have to be handled externally by technical means. This lecture portrays some of the basic principles which govern plasma confinement, uses dimensionless scaling to set the limits for the predictions for ITER, an approach which also shows the limitations of the predictions, and describes briefly the major characteristics and physics behind the H-mode--the preferred confinement regime of ITER.

  14. Communication: Folding of glycosylated proteins under confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shental-Bechor, Dalit; Levy, Yaakov

    2011-10-01

    Conjugating flexible polymers (such as oligosaccharides) to proteins or confining a protein in a restricted volume often increases protein thermal stability. In this communication, we investigate the interplay between conjugation and confinement which is not trivial as the magnitude and the mechanism of stabilization are different in each instance. Using coarse-grained computational approach the folding biophysics is studied when the protein is placed in a sphere of variable radius and is conjugated to 0-6 mono- or penta-saccharides. We observe a synergistic effect on thermal stability when short oligosaccharides are attached and the modified protein is confined in a small cage. However, when large oligosaccharides are added, a conflict between confinement and glycosylation arises as the stabilizing effect of the cage is dramatically reduced and it is almost impossible to further stabilize the protein beyond the mild stabilization induced by the sugars.

  15. Model for melting of confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, E.; Reiter-Schad, M.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-06-01

    When DNA molecules are heated they denature. This occurs locally so that loops of molten single DNA strands form, connected by intact double-stranded DNA pieces. The properties of this "melting" transition have been intensively investigated. Recently there has been a surge of interest in this question, in part caused by experiments determining the properties of partially bound DNA confined to nanochannels. But how does such confinement affect the melting transition? To answer this question we introduce and solve a model predicting how confinement affects the melting transition for a simple model system by first disregarding the effect of self-avoidance. We find that the transition is smoother for narrower channels. By means of Monte Carlo simulations we then show that a model incorporating self-avoidance shows qualitatively the same behavior and that the effect of confinement is stronger than in the ideal case.

  16. Controlling the Electromagnetic Field Confinement with Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bonache, Jordi; Zamora, Gerard; Paredes, Ferran; Zuffanelli, Simone; Aguilà, Pau; Martín, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    The definition of a precise illumination region is essential in many applications where the electromagnetic field should be confined in some specific volume. By using conventional structures, it is difficult to achieve an adequate confinement distance (or volume) with negligible levels of radiation leakage beyond it. Although metamaterial structures and metasurfaces are well-known to provide high controllability of their electromagnetic properties, this feature has not yet been applied to solve this problem. We present a method of electromagnetic field confinement based on the generation of evanescent waves by means of metamaterial structures. With this method, the confinement volume can be controlled, namely, it is possible to define a large area with an intense field without radiation leakage. A prototype working in the microwave region has been implemented, and very good agreement between the measurements and the theoretical prediction of field distribution has been obtained. PMID:27886230

  17. Computer simulations of charged colloids in confinement.

    PubMed

    Puertas, Antonio M; de las Nieves, F Javier; Cuetos, Alejandro

    2015-02-15

    We study by computer simulations the interaction between two similarly charged colloidal particles confined between parallel planes, in salt free conditions. Both the colloids and ions are simulated explicitly, in a fine-mesh lattice, and the electrostatic interaction is calculated using Ewald summation in two dimensions. The internal energy is measured by setting the colloidal particles at a given position and equilibrating the ions, whereas the free energy is obtained introducing a bias (attractive) potential between the colloids. Our results show that upon confining the system, the internal energy decreases, resulting in an attractive contribution to the interaction potential for large charges and strong confinement. However, the loss of entropy of the ions is the dominant mechanism in the interaction, irrespective of the confinement of the system. The interaction potential is therefore repulsive in all cases, and is well described by the DLVO functional form, but effective values have to be used for the interaction strength and Debye length.

  18. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  19. Human Adaptation To Isolated And Confined Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Gary W.; Stokols, Daniel; Carrere, Sna Sybil

    1992-01-01

    Data from Antarctic research station analyzed. Report describes study of physiology and psychology of humans in isolated and confined environment. Suggests ways in which such environments made more acceptable to human inhabitants.

  20. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  1. Controlling the Electromagnetic Field Confinement with Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonache, Jordi; Zamora, Gerard; Paredes, Ferran; Zuffanelli, Simone; Aguilà, Pau; Martín, Ferran

    2016-11-01

    The definition of a precise illumination region is essential in many applications where the electromagnetic field should be confined in some specific volume. By using conventional structures, it is difficult to achieve an adequate confinement distance (or volume) with negligible levels of radiation leakage beyond it. Although metamaterial structures and metasurfaces are well-known to provide high controllability of their electromagnetic properties, this feature has not yet been applied to solve this problem. We present a method of electromagnetic field confinement based on the generation of evanescent waves by means of metamaterial structures. With this method, the confinement volume can be controlled, namely, it is possible to define a large area with an intense field without radiation leakage. A prototype working in the microwave region has been implemented, and very good agreement between the measurements and the theoretical prediction of field distribution has been obtained.

  2. Confinement and Transport in a Laboratory Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ethan; Clark, Michael; Cooper, Christopher; Endrizzi, Douglass; Wallace, John; Weisberg, David; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of density, temperature, diamagnetic currents, and ion flows throughout a dipole magnetosphere immersed in a homogeneous plasma are presented. A 1-D ambipolar diffusion transport model developed for multi-cusp confinement systems is adapted for a dipole magnetosphere geometry and compared to measurements. In addition, differential azimuthal flow is imposed on the magnetosphere through electrically driven flow at the boundary of the machine. Modifications to the transport and confinement due to differential rotation are presented as well.

  3. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized.

  4. A dynamical model of color confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, S.; Biró, T. S.; Mosel, U.; Thoma, M. H.

    1996-02-01

    A dynamical model of confinement based on a transport theoretical description of the Friedberg-Lee model is extended to explicit color degrees of freedom. The string tension is reproduced by an adiabatic string formation from the nucleon ground state. Color isovector oscillation modes of a qq¯-system are investigated for a wide range of relative qq¯-momenta and the dynamical impact of color confinement on the quark motion is shown.

  5. Confined Space Evaluation Student Manual, #19613

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    2016-08-29

    Many workplaces contain spaces that are considered to be “confined” because their configuration hinders the activities of employees who must enter into, work in, and exit from them. In general, the permit-required confined spaces (PRCSs) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard requires that Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) evaluate the workplace to determine if any spaces are PRCSs. The standard specifies strict procedures for the evaluation and atmospheric testing of a space before and during an entry by workers. The OSHA PRCS standard provides for alternative (less stringent than full-permit) entry procedures in cases where the only hazard in a space is atmospheric and the hazard can be controlled by forced air. At LANL, all confined spaces or potential confined spaces on LANL-owned or -operated property must be identified and evaluated by a confined space evaluator accompanied by a knowledgeable person. This course provides the information needed by confined space evaluators to make judgements about whether a space is a confined space, and if so, whether the space will require a permit for entry.

  6. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water transport through carbon nanotube membranes at low pressure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Dumont, Randall S; Dickson, James M

    2012-07-28

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are used to investigate pressure-driven water flow passing through carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at low pressures (5.0 MPa) typical of real nanofiltration (NF) systems. The CNT membrane is modeled as a simplified NF membrane with smooth surfaces, and uniform straight pores of typical NF pore sizes. A NEMD simulation system is constructed to study the effects of the membrane structure (pores size and membrane thickness) on the pure water transport properties. All simulations are run under operating conditions (temperature and pressure difference) similar to a real NF processes. Simulation results are analyzed to obtain water flux, density, and velocity distributions along both the flow and radial directions. Results show that water flow through a CNT membrane under a pressure difference has the unique transport properties of very fast flow and a non-parabolic radial distribution of velocities which cannot be represented by the Hagen-Poiseuille or Navier-Stokes equations. Density distributions along radial and flow directions show that water molecules in the CNT form layers with an oscillatory density profile, and have a lower average density than in the bulk flow. The NEMD simulations provide direct access to dynamic aspects of water flow through a CNT membrane and give a view of the pressure-driven transport phenomena on a molecular scale.

  7. Magnetic Inertial Confinement Fusion (MICF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Feng; Zheng, Xianjun; Deng, Baiquan; Liu, Wei; Ou, Wei; Huang, Yi

    2016-11-01

    Based on the similarity in models of the early Sun and the 3-D common focal region of the micro-pinch in X-pinch experiments, a novel hybrid fusion configuration by continuous focusing of multiple Z-pinched plasma beams on spatially symmetric plasma is proposed. By replacing gravity with Lorentz force with subsequent centripetal spherical pinch, the beam-target fusion reactivity is enhanced in a quasi-spherical converging region, thus achieving MICF. An assessment, presented here, suggests that a practical fusion power source could be achieved using deuterium alone. Plasma instabilities can be suppressed by fast rotation resulting from an asymmetric tangential torsion in the spherical focal region of this configuration. Mathematical equivalence with the Sun allows the development of appropriate equations for the focal region of MICF, which are solved numerically to provide density, temperature and pressure distributions that produce net fusion energy output. An analysis of MICF physics and a preliminary experimental demonstration of a single beam are also carried out. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11374217 and 11176020)

  8. The Effect of Melt Pressure on the Rheology of Compacting, Partially Molten Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demartin, B.; Hirth, G.; Evans, B.

    2004-12-01

    The rheology of partially molten rock controls rock strength beneath spreading centers, deformation of the mantle wedge under subduction zones, and migration of melt to hot spots and volcanic arcs. Our understanding of these regions has been predominately shaped by chemical analyses of rocks and by remotely collected geophysical data. To interpret these data, however, requires knowledge of the relationships among deformation, melt topology, and melt migration. Most previous experimental studies of these relationships in partially molten rocks were conducted using undrained experiments, i.e., where melt cannot leave the matrix during deformation. For this configuration, melt pressure is inferred to roughly equal the minimum principle stress, but is actually unknown. By contrast, we have performed drained tests in which both melt pressure and compaction rates were measured independently. First, samples were synthesized by hot-isostatic pressing (HIP) fine-grained olivine power (10-38 μ m) with a prescribed amount of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) powder (< 15 μ m) in a gas-medium apparatus at 1200° C and 300 MPa for 10 hours. Melt fractions (MORB contents) ranged from 0-30 %. Subsequently, samples were reinserted into the apparatus and deformed in the standard triaxial configuration. Melt flow out of the sample was accommodated by a glassy carbon bead reservoir (grain size 80-200 μ m) located above the sample. A small alumina cylinder centered within the reservoir transferred the load from the pistons to the sample. Melt pressure was controlled by regulating the pressure of argon gas in contact with the melt in the reservoir. Sample compaction was measured by recording the position of a piston with the pore pressure generator. Variations of melt fraction on the strength of drained samples at Pm = 30 or 50 MPa, where Pm is the melt pressure, affect strength in the same way as previously observed under undrained conditions. Within the uncertainty of our measurements

  9. The effect of a metal wall on confinement in JET and ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Schweinzer, J.; Angioni, C.; Burckhart, A.; Challis, C. D.; Chapman, I.; Fischer, R.; Flanagan, J.; Frassinetti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Kallenbach, A.; Kempenaars, M.; Leyland, M.; Lomas, P.; Maddison, G.; Maslov, M.; McDermott, R.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I.; Osborne, T.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Schneider, P. A.; Snyder, P.; Tardini, G.; Viezzer, E.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-12-01

    In both JET and ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) the plasma energy confinement has been affected by the presence of a metal wall by the requirement of increased gas fuelling to avoid tungsten pollution of the plasma. In JET with a beryllium/tungsten wall the high triangularity baseline H-mode scenario (i.e. similar to the ITER reference scenario) has been the strongest affected and the benefit of high shaping to give good normalized confinement of H98 ˜ 1 at high Greenwald density fraction of fGW ˜ 0.8 has not been recovered to date. In AUG with a full tungsten wall, a good normalized confinement H98 ˜ 1 could be achieved in the high triangularity baseline plasmas, albeit at elevated normalized pressure βN > 2. The confinement lost with respect to the carbon devices can be largely recovered by the seeding of nitrogen in both JET and AUG. This suggests that the absence of carbon in JET and AUG with a metal wall may have affected the achievable confinement. Three mechanisms have been tested that could explain the effect of carbon or nitrogen (and the absence thereof) on the plasma confinement. First it has been seen in experiments and by means of nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations (with the GENE code), that nitrogen seeding does not significantly change the core temperature profile peaking and does not affect the critical ion temperature gradient. Secondly, the dilution of the edge ion density by the injection of nitrogen is not sufficient to explain the plasma temperature and pressure rise. For this latter mechanism to explain the confinement improvement with nitrogen seeding, strongly hollow Zeff profiles would be required which is not supported by experimental observations. The confinement improvement with nitrogen seeding cannot be explained with these two mechanisms. Thirdly, detailed pedestal structure analysis in JET high triangularity baseline plasmas have shown that the fuelling of either deuterium or nitrogen widens the pressure pedestal. However, in JET-ILW this

  10. Colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ramírez, Allan; Figueroa-Gerstenmaier, Susana; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2017-03-14

    We report a NVT molecular dynamic study of colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement. For this purpose, we are employing the Asakura-Oosawa model for studying colloidal particles, polymer coils, and hard walls as the external confining field. The colloid-polymer size ratio, q, is varied in the range 1⩾q⩾0.4 and the confinement distance, H, in 10σc⩾H⩾3σc, σc being the colloidal diameter. Vapor-liquid coexistence properties are assessed, from which phase diagrams are built. The obtained data fulfill the corresponding states law for a constant H when q is varied. The shift of the polymer and colloidal chemical potentials of coexistence follows a linear relationship with (H-σc)(-1) for H≳4σc. The confined vapor-liquid interfaces can be fitted with a semicircular line of curvature (H-σc)(-1), from which the contact angle can be obtained. We observe complete wetting of the confining walls for reservoir polymer concentrations above and close to the critical value, and partial wetting for reservoir polymer concentrations above and far from it.

  11. Colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Allan; Figueroa-Gerstenmaier, Susana; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2017-03-01

    We report a NVT molecular dynamic study of colloid-polymer mixtures under slit confinement. For this purpose, we are employing the Asakura-Oosawa model for studying colloidal particles, polymer coils, and hard walls as the external confining field. The colloid-polymer size ratio, q, is varied in the range 1 ⩾q ⩾0.4 and the confinement distance, H, in 10 σc ⩾H ⩾3 σc , σc being the colloidal diameter. Vapor-liquid coexistence properties are assessed, from which phase diagrams are built. The obtained data fulfill the corresponding states law for a constant H when q is varied. The shift of the polymer and colloidal chemical potentials of coexistence follows a linear relationship with (H-σc ) -1 for H ≳4 σc . The confined vapor-liquid interfaces can be fitted with a semicircular line of curvature (H-σc ) -1, from which the contact angle can be obtained. We observe complete wetting of the confining walls for reservoir polymer concentrations above and close to the critical value, and partial wetting for reservoir polymer concentrations above and far from it.

  12. Effects of confinement on nanoparticle flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jacinta

    The transport properties of nanoparticles that are dispersed in complex fluids and flowed through narrow confining geometries affect a wide range of materials shaping and forming processes, including three-dimensional printing and nanocomposite processing. Here, I will describe two sets of experiments in which we use optical microscopy to probe the structure and transport properties of suspensions of particles that are confined geometrically. First, we investigate the structure and flow properties of dense suspensions of submicron particles, in which the particles interact via an entropic depletion attraction, that are confined in thin films and microchannels. Second, we characterize the transport properties of nanoparticles, dispersed at low concentration in water or in aqueous solutions of high-molecular weight polymers, that are confined in regular arrays of nanoposts or in disordered porous media. I will discuss our results and their practical implications for materials processing as well as for other applications that require confined transport of nanomaterials through complex media. Welch Foundation (E-1869) and NSF (CBET-1438204).

  13. Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Kanehiro, B.Y.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-03-10

    The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot directly estimate S/sub s/from earth tide response. Except for the fact that barometric changes act both on the water surface in the well and on the aquifer as a whole while stress changes associated with earth tides act only in the aquifer, the two phenomena influence the confined aquifer in much the same way. In other words, barometric response contains only as much information on the elastic properties of the aquifer as the earth tide response does. Factors such as well bore storage, aquifer transmissivity, and storage coefficient contribute to time lag and damping of the aquifer response as observed in the well. Analysis shows that the observation of fluid pressure changes alone, without concurrent measurement of external stress changes, is sufficient to interpret uniquely earth tide response. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from dilatation by assuming a reasonable value for bulk modulus. Earth tide response of geothermal aquifers from Marysville, Montana. East Mesa, California; and Raft River Valley, Idaho, were analyzed, and the ratio of S/sub 3/ to porosity was estimated. Comparison of these estimates with independent pumping tests show reasonable agreement.

  14. Progress in toroidal confinement and fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    During the past 30 years, the characteristic T/sub i/n tau/sub E/-value of toroidal-confinement experiments has advanced by more than seven orders of magnitude. Part of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of the advance is associated with improvements in the ''quality of plasma confinement.'' The combined evidence of spherator and tokamak research clarifies the role of magnetic-field geometry in determining confinement and points to the importance of shielding out plasma edge effects. A true physical understanding of anomalous transport remains to be achieved. 39 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I.; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-07-13

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of {le}100-g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

  16. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  17. Properties of Water Confined in Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Saihara, Koji; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Ohta, Soichi; Shimizu, Akio

    2015-01-01

    The varying states of water confined in the nano-domain structures of typical room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by 1H NMR and by measurements of self-diffusion coefficients while systematically varying the IL cations and anions. The NMR peaks for water in BF4-based ILs were clearly split, indicating the presence of two discrete states of confined water (H2O and HOD). Proton and/or deuterium exchange rate among the water molecules was very slowly in the water-pocket. Notably, no significant changes were observed in the chemical shifts of the ILs. Self-diffusion coefficient results showed that water molecules exhibit a similar degree of mobility, although their diffusion rate is one order of magnitude faster than that of the IL cations and anions. These findings provide information on a completely new type of confinement, that of liquid water in soft matter. PMID:26024339

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biopolymer organization upon confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenduzzo, D.; Micheletti, C.; Orlandini, E.

    2010-07-01

    Biopolymers in vivo are typically subject to spatial restraints, either as a result of molecular crowding in the cellular medium or of direct spatial confinement. DNA in living organisms provides a prototypical example of a confined biopolymer. Confinement prompts a number of biophysics questions. For instance, how can the high level of packing be compatible with the necessity to access and process the genomic material? What mechanisms can be adopted in vivo to avoid the excessive geometrical and topological entanglement of dense phases of biopolymers? These and other fundamental questions have been addressed in recent years by both experimental and theoretical means. A review of the results, particularly of those obtained by numerical studies, is presented here. The review is mostly devoted to DNA packaging inside bacteriophages, which is the best studied example both experimentally and theoretically. Recent selected biophysical studies of the bacterial genome organization and of chromosome segregation in eukaryotes are also covered.

  19. Two particle system in spherically confined plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munjal, Dipti; Sen, K. D.; Prasad, Vinod

    2017-03-01

    Energy eigenvalues of Harmonium atom are reported for the first time under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential. Energy of different states of Harmonium is analyzed as a function of confinement radius and Debye screening length. Comparison of radial matrix elements of Harmonium atom under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential is done. Interesting results are obtained.

  20. Phase transition of physically confined 2-decanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Harrisonn; Amanuel, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    We have studied phase transition of physically confined 2-decanol in nano porous silica using power compensated differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Like bulk, the physically confined also exhibit hysteresis between its melting and freezing temperature. However, its thermal history plays significant role in determining its freezing temperature. The melting temperature, on the other hand, did not show similar changes with respect to thermal history, suggesting that it is truly driven thermodynamically rather than kinetically. In addition, there seems to be a cutoff in size where crystallization front could not proceed.

  1. Coordinated Water Under Confinement Eases Sliding Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defante, Adrian; Dhopotkar, Nishad; Dhinojwala, Ali

    Water is essential to a number of interfacial phenomena such as the lubrication of knee joints, protein folding, mass transport, and adsorption processes. We have used a biaxial friction cell to quantify underwater friction between a hydrophobic elastomeric lens and a hydrophobic self-assembled monolayer in the presence of surfactant solutions. To gain an understanding of the role of water in these processes we have coupled this measurement with surface sensitive sum frequency generation to directly probe the molecular constitution of the confined contact interface. We observe that role of confined coordinated water between two hydrophobic substrates covered with surfactants is the key to obtaining a low coefficient of friction.

  2. Screening effects on structure and diffusion in confined charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Kittner, Madeleine; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-04-21

    Using molecular dynamics computer simulations we investigate structural and dynamic (diffusion) properties of charged colloidal suspension confined to narrow slit pores with structureless, uncharged walls. The system is modeled on an effective level involving only the macroions, which interact via a combination of a soft-sphere and a screened Coulomb potential. The aim of our study is to identify the role of the range of the macroion-macroion interaction controlled by the inverse Debye screening length, kappa. We also compare to bulk properties at the same chemical potential as determined in parallel grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Our results reveal a significant influence of the interaction range which competes, however, with the influence of density. At liquidlike densities a decrease of range yields a decreasing mobility (and a corresponding enhancement of local structure) in the bulk system, whereas the reverse effect occurs in narrow slits with thickness of a few particle diameter. These differences can be traced back to the confinement-induced, and kappa-dependent, reduction of overall density compared to the bulk reservoir. We also show that an increase of kappa softens the oscillations in the normal pressure as function of the wall separation, which is consistent with experimental observations concerning the influence of addition of salt.

  3. High-Performance of Gas Hydrates in Confined Nanospace for Reversible CH4 /CO2 Storage.

    PubMed

    Casco, Mirian E; Jordá, José L; Rey, Fernando; Fauth, François; Martinez-Escandell, Manuel; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco; Ramos-Fernández, Enrique V; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín

    2016-07-11

    The molecular exchange of CH4 for CO2 in gas hydrates grown in confined nanospace has been evaluated for the first time using activated carbons as a host structure. The nano-confinement effects taking place inside the carbon cavities and the exceptional physicochemical properties of the carbon structure allows us to accelerate the formation and decomposition process of the gas hydrates from the conventional timescale of hours/days in artificial bulk systems to minutes in confined nanospace. The CH4 /CO2 exchange process is fully reversible with high efficiency at practical temperature and pressure conditions. Furthermore, these activated carbons can be envisaged as promising materials for long-distance natural gas and CO2 transportation because of the combination of a high storage capacity, a high reversibility, and most important, with extremely fast kinetics for gas hydrate formation and release.

  4. Predictive modelling of the impact of a radiative divertor on pedestal confinement on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Mike; Potzel, Steffen; Wischmeier, Marco; Wolfrum, Elisabeth; Frassinetti, Lorenzo; Reimold, Felix; Eurofusion Mst1 Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-11-01

    In future devices, tailoring of the edge density profile and radiation profile for power exhaust control via a deuterium gas puff and extrinsic impurity seeding will be necessary. It has been observed on present day machines that high D fuelling can reduce the plasma stored energy while adding impurity seeding can act to improve confinement by up to 40%. This study presents a combination of observations and modelling completed on AUG with the aim of determining the mechanisms behind the confinement degradation with a gas puff and improvement with impurity seeding. In particular, predictive modelling, based on the EPED pedestal model, has been extensively used. Alterations of the temperature and density at the separatrix are found to have large impacts on pedestal stability. Measured changes in divertor properties are used to inform the direction and magnitude of these alterations, with experimentally relevant confinement changes being recovered via pressure profile shifts. http://www.euro-fusionscipub.org/mst1

  5. Glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, V. I.; Metel, A. S.

    2015-06-01

    This review presents a unified treatment of glow discharges with electrostatic confinement of fast electrons. These discharges include hollow cathode discharges, wire and cage discharges, reflect discharges with brush and multirod cathodes, and discharges in crossed electric and magnetic fields. Fast electrons bouncing inside electrostatic traps provide efficient ionization of gas at very low gas pressures. The electrostatic trap effect (ETE) was first observed by Paschen in hollow cathode discharges almost a century ago. The key parameters that define fundamental characteristics of ETE discharges are the ionization length λN, the penetration range, Λ, and the diffusion length λ of the fast electrons, and two universal geometric parameters of the traps: effective width a and length L. Peculiarities of electron kinetics and ion collection mechanism explain experimental observations for different trap geometries. The ETE is observed only at Λ > a, when the penetration range of the γ-electrons emitted by the cathode exceeds the trap width. In the optimal pressure range, when λN > a, and Λ < L, the cathode potential fall Uc is independent of gas pressure p. With increasing current, Uc tends to its upper limit W/eβγ, where β is the percentage of ions arriving at the cathode and W is the gas ionization cost. In the low-pressure range, Λ > L, Uc rises from hundreds to thousands of volts. The sign of the anode potential fall, Ua, depends on the anode surface Sa and its position. When Sa is large compared to a critical value S*, Ua is negative and small. At Sa < S*, the value of Ua becomes positive and rises up to 0.5-1 kV with decreasing p ultimately causing discharge extinction. Scaling laws indicate common physics between vacuum discharges and atmospheric pressure micro-discharges. We discuss peculiarities of electron kinetics under different conditions using semi-analytical models. Recent experimental results and applications of glow

  6. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation in serpentine-water and talc-water systems from 250 to 450 °C, 50 MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccocia, Peter J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation factors in the talc–water and serpentine–water systems have been determined by laboratory experiment from 250 to 450 °C at 50 MPa using the partial exchange technique. Talc was synthesized from brucite + quartz, resulting in nearly 100% exchange during reaction at 350 and 450 °C. For serpentine, D–H exchange was much more rapid than 18O–16O exchange when natural chrysotile fibers were employed in the initial charge. In experiments with lizardite as the starting charge, recrystallization to chrysotile enhanced the rate of 18O–16O exchange with the coexisting aqueous phase. Oxygen isotope fractionation factors in both the talc–water and serpentine–water systems decrease with increasing temperature and can be described from 250 to 450 °C by the relationships: 1000 ln  = 11.70 × 106/T2 − 25.49 × 103/T + 12.48 and 1000 ln  = 3.49 × 106/T2 − 9.48 where T is temperature in Kelvin. Over the same temperature interval at 50 MPa, talc–water D–H fractionation is only weakly dependent on temperature, similar to brucite and chlorite, and can be described by the equation: 1000 ln  = 10.88 × 106/T2 − 41.52 × 103/T + 5.61 where T is temperature in Kelvin. Our D–H serpentine–water fractionation factors calibrated by experiment decrease with temperature and form a consistent trend with fractionation factors derived from lower temperature field calibrations. By regression of these data, we have refined and extended the D–H fractionation curve from 25 to 450 °C, 50 MPa as follows: 1000 ln  = 3.436 × 106/T2 − 34.736 × 103/T + 21.67 where T is temperature in Kelvin. These new data should improve the application of D–H and 18O–16O isotopes to constrain the temperature and origin of hydrothermal fluids responsible for serpentine formation in a variety of geologic settings.

  7. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples. PMID:22822404

  8. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench.

    PubMed

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples.

  9. Electric fatigue process in lead-free alkali niobate ceramics at various pressures and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Alexander; Kakimoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-10-01

    Electric fatigue tests are important for evaluating the reliability of piezoceramics. However, these tests have not been the focus of studies of lead-free alkali niobate (NKN) ceramics so far. For this purpose, two different materials, Li0.06Na0.47K0.47NbO3 (LNKN6) and Na0.55K0.45NbO3 + 0.25% MnO (Mn-NKN), have been examined at various uniaxial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 100 MPa and various temperatures ranging from room temperature to 150 °C. It was shown that the harder ferroelectric Mn-NKN could maintain its piezoelectric properties at pressures up to 25 MPa. When bipolar fatigue occurred under pressures over the coercive stress of ∼30 MPa, the sample depolarized and formed microcracks. In contrast, the softer LNKN6 did not show fatigue at higher pressures between 25 and 50 MPa. However, in both materials, higher temperatures enhanced domain wall and charge carrier movements and conclusively domain wall pinning.

  10. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Teens > Peer Pressure A A A ... for the school play. previous continue When the Pressure's On Sometimes, though, the stresses in your life ...

  11. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  12. Adiabat-shaping in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K. L.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Casey, D. T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Pak, A.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Landen, O. L.; Peterson, J. L.; Berzak-Hopkins, L. F.; Weber, C. R.; Haan, S. W.; Döppner, T. D.; Dixit, S.; Hamza, A. V.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Kroll, J. J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Adiabat-shaping techniques were investigated in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments on the National Ignition Facility as a means to improve implosion stability, while still maintaining a low adiabat in the fuel. Adiabat-shaping was accomplished in these indirect drive experiments by altering the ratio of the picket and trough energies in the laser pulse shape, thus driving a decaying first shock in the ablator. This decaying first shock is designed to place the ablation front on a high adiabat while keeping the fuel on a low adiabat. These experiments were conducted using the keyhole experimental platform for both three and four shock laser pulses. This platform enabled direct measurement of the shock velocities driven in the glow-discharge polymer capsule and in the liquid deuterium, the surrogate fuel for a DT ignition target. The measured shock velocities and radiation drive histories are compared to previous three and four shock laser pulses. This comparison indicates that in the case of adiabat shaping the ablation front initially drives a high shock velocity, and therefore, a high shock pressure and adiabat. The shock then decays as it travels through the ablator to pressures similar to the original low-adiabat pulses when it reaches the fuel. This approach takes advantage of initial high ablation velocity, which favors stability, and high-compression, which favors high stagnation pressures.

  13. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S.X.; Militzer, B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Skupsky, S.

    2010-06-10

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of rho = 0.002–1596 g/cm^3 and T = 1.35 eV–5.5 keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density, and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  14. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion using Helicon Injected Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Ahern, Drew; Bowman, Jaerd

    2016-10-01

    The use of an external plasma source with the IEC has the advantage that the background pressure in the IEC chamber can be low. This then enables a deep potential well formation for ion confinement. Also unit efficiency is increase due to minimization of ion losses through charge exchange. This technique is under study experimentally for use in a plasma jet propulsion unit and as an IEC type neutron source. Current work has studied the effect of locating the IEC grids off-center in the vacuum chamber, near the plasma entrance from the Helicon. With double grids, the relative potentials employed are also key factors in device performance. Electron emitters are added for space charge neutralization in the case of plasma jet propulsion. Plasma simulations are used to supplement the experiments. Specifically, the electric field and the magnetic field effects on energetic ion trajectories are examined for varying configurations. Funding by NASA, Air Force Research Lab and NPL Associates.

  15. Combustion of TNT products in a confined explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, R E; Kuhl, A L; Oppenheim, A K

    1999-06-18

    The effects of turbulent combustion of detonation products gases in a confined explosion are explored via laboratory experiments and high-resolution numerical simulations. The expanded products from the detonation of a TNT charge are rich in C and CO, which act as a fuel. When these hot gases mix with air, they are oxidized to CO2--thereby releasing 2482 Cal/g in addition to the 1093 Cal/g deposited by the detonation wave. In this case, the exothermic power is controlled by the turbulent mixing rate, rather than by chemistry. A kinetic law of turbulent combustion is suggested for this process. Pressure histories from the numerical simulations were in good agreement with the experimental measurements--demonstrating that the numerical model contains the fundamental mechanism that controls the exothermic process.

  16. Methane hydrate formation in confined nanospace can surpass nature

    DOE PAGES

    Casco, Mirian E.; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Ramírez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; ...

    2015-03-02

    Natural methane hydrates are believed to be the largest source of hydrocarbons on Earth. These structures are formed in specific locations such as deep-sea sediments and the permafrost based on demanding conditions of high pressure and low temperature. We report that, by taking advantage of the confinement effects on nanopore space, synthetic methane hydrates grow under mild conditions (3.5 MPa and 2 degrees C), with faster kinetics (within minutes) than nature, fully reversibly and with a nominal stoichiometry that mimics nature. Furthermore, the formation of the hydrate structures in nanospace and their similarity to natural hydrates is confirmed using inelasticmore » neutron scattering experiments and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. Our findings may be a step towards the application of a smart synthesis of methane hydrates in energy-demanding applications (for example, transportation).« less

  17. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.; Militzer, B.

    2010-06-11

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of {rho}=0.002-1596 g/cm{sup 3} and T=1.35 eV-5.5 keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density ({rho}R), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  18. Strong coupling and degeneracy effects in inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Militzer, B; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2010-06-11

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of ρ=0.002-1596  g/cm3 and T=1.35  eV-5.5  keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density (ρR), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  19. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Militzer, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of ρ=0.002-1596g/cm3 and T=1.35eV-5.5keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density (ρR), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  20. Methane hydrate formation in confined nanospace can surpass nature

    SciTech Connect

    Casco, Mirian E.; Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Ramírez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Rey, Fernando; Jordá, Jose L.; Bansode, Atul; Urakawa, Atsushi; Peral, Inma; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Kaneko, Katsumi; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2015-03-02

    Natural methane hydrates are believed to be the largest source of hydrocarbons on Earth. These structures are formed in specific locations such as deep-sea sediments and the permafrost based on demanding conditions of high pressure and low temperature. We report that, by taking advantage of the confinement effects on nanopore space, synthetic methane hydrates grow under mild conditions (3.5 MPa and 2 degrees C), with faster kinetics (within minutes) than nature, fully reversibly and with a nominal stoichiometry that mimics nature. Furthermore, the formation of the hydrate structures in nanospace and their similarity to natural hydrates is confirmed using inelastic neutron scattering experiments and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. Our findings may be a step towards the application of a smart synthesis of methane hydrates in energy-demanding applications (for example, transportation).

  1. Bubble confinement in flow boiling of FC-72 in a ''rectangular'' microchannel of high aspect ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Jacqueline; Brutin, David; Tadrist, Lounes; Sefiane, Khellil

    2010-11-15

    Boiling in microchannels remains elusive due to the lack of full understanding of the mechanisms involved. A powerful tool in achieving better comprehension of the mechanisms is detailed imaging and analysis of the two-phase flow at a fundamental level. Boiling is induced in a single microchannel geometry (hydraulic diameter 727 {mu}m), using a refrigerant FC-72, to investigate the effect of channel confinement on bubble growth. A transparent, metallic, conductive deposit has been developed on the exterior of the rectangular microchannel, allowing simultaneous uniform heating and visualisation to be achieved. The data presented in this paper is for a particular case with a uniform heat flux applied to the microchannel and inlet liquid mass flowrate held constant. In conjunction with obtaining high-speed images and videos, sensitive pressure sensors are used to record the pressure drop across the microchannel over time. Bubble nucleation and growth, as well as periodic slug flow, are observed in the microchannel test section. The periodic pressure fluctuations evidenced across the microchannel are caused by the bubble dynamics and instances of vapour blockage during confined bubble growth in the channel. The variation of the aspect ratio and the interface velocities of the growing vapour slug over time, are all observed and analysed. We follow visually the nucleation and subsequent both 'free' and 'confined' growth of a vapour bubble during flow boiling of FC-72 in a microchannel, from analysis of our results, images and video sequences with the corresponding pressure data obtained. (author)

  2. Quantification of reaction violence and combustion enthalpy of plastic bonded explosive 9501 under strong confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, W. Lee; Dickson, Peter M.; Parker, Gary R.; Asay, B. W.

    2005-01-01

    The confinement experienced by an explosive during thermal self-initiation can substantially affect performance in terms of deflagration-to-detonation characteristics and explosion/detonation violence. To this end, we have developed an experiment to quantitatively observe enthalpy change and reaction violence in thermally initiated plastic bonded explosive (PBX) 9501. Traditionally, researchers attempt to quantify violence using terminal observations of fragment size, fragment velocity, and through subjective observations. In the work presented here, the explosive was loaded into a heated gun assembly where we subjected a 300 mg charge to a cook-off schedule and a range of static and inertial confinements. Static confinement was controlled using rupture disks calibrated at 34.5 and 138 MPa. The use of 3.15 and 6.3 g projectile masses provided a variation in inertial confinement. This was a regime of strong confinement; a significant fraction of the explosive energy was required to rupture the disk, and the projectile mass was large compared to the charge mass. The state variables pressure and volume were measured in the breech. From these data, we quantified both the reaction enthalpy change and energy release rate of the explosive on a microsecond time scale using a thermodynamic analyisis. We used these values to unambiguously quantify explosion violence as a function of confinement at a fixed cook-off schedule of 190 C for 1 h. P2τ, a measure of critical shock energy required for shock ignition of an adjacent explosive was also computed. We found variations in this confinement regime to have a weak effect on enthalpy change, power, violence and shock energy. Violence was approximately 100 times lower than detonating trinitrotoluene, but the measured shock energy approached the critical shock energy for initiating secondary high explosives.

  3. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field

  4. National Ignition Facility for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Paisner, J.A.; Murray, J.R.

    1997-10-08

    The National Ignition Facility for inertial confinement fusion will contain a 1.8 MJ, 500 TW frequency-tripled neodymium glass laser system that will be used to explore fusion ignition and other problems in the physics of high temperature and density. We describe the facility briefly. The NIF is scheduled to be completed in 2003.

  5. Analysis of thermally-degrading, confined HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Schmitt, R.G.; Renlund, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    The response of a thermally-degrading, confined HMX pellet is analyzed using a Reactive Elastic-Plastic (REP) constitutive model which is founded on the collapse and growth of internal inclusions resulting from physical and chemical processes such as forced displacement, thermal expansion, and/or decomposition. Axial stress predictions compare adequately to data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  6. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Erin G.; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2016-01-01

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume remains a rich, largely unexplored problem, despite applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. Here, we report densest found clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to N=60 constituent polyhedral particles. We examine the interplay between anisotropic particle shape and isotropic 3D confinement. Densest clusters exhibit a wide variety of symmetry point groups and form in up to three layers at higher N. For many N values, icosahedra and dodecahedra form clusters that resemble sphere clusters. These common structures are layers of optimal spherical codes in most cases, a surprising fact given the significant faceting of the icosahedron and dodecahedron. We also investigate cluster density as a function of N for each particle shape. We find that, in contrast to what happens in bulk, polyhedra often pack less densely than spheres. We also find especially dense clusters at so-called magic numbers of constituent particles. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the packing in confinement problem. PMID:26811458

  7. Clusters of polyhedra in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Teich, Erin G; van Anders, Greg; Klotsa, Daphne; Dshemuchadse, Julia; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2016-02-09

    Dense particle packing in a confining volume remains a rich, largely unexplored problem, despite applications in blood clotting, plasmonics, industrial packaging and transport, colloidal molecule design, and information storage. Here, we report densest found clusters of the Platonic solids in spherical confinement, for up to [Formula: see text] constituent polyhedral particles. We examine the interplay between anisotropic particle shape and isotropic 3D confinement. Densest clusters exhibit a wide variety of symmetry point groups and form in up to three layers at higher N. For many N values, icosahedra and dodecahedra form clusters that resemble sphere clusters. These common structures are layers of optimal spherical codes in most cases, a surprising fact given the significant faceting of the icosahedron and dodecahedron. We also investigate cluster density as a function of N for each particle shape. We find that, in contrast to what happens in bulk, polyhedra often pack less densely than spheres. We also find especially dense clusters at so-called magic numbers of constituent particles. Our results showcase the structural diversity and experimental utility of families of solutions to the packing in confinement problem.

  8. Monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis and prolonged solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, M; Burnett, F

    1994-10-01

    A man previously imprisoned for 11 years developed unremitting and treatment-resistant monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis following a period in excess of 12 months in solitary confinement. We are unaware of any other reported incidences of this disorder arising in such circumstances.

  9. Non-resonant Nanoscale Extreme Light Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian; Huber, Dale L.

    2014-09-01

    A wide spectrum of photonics activities Sandia is engaged in such as solid state lighting, photovoltaics, infrared imaging and sensing, quantum sources, rely on nanoscale or ultrasubwavelength light-matter interactions (LMI). The fundamental understanding in confining electromagnetic power and enhancing electric fields into ever smaller volumes is key to creating next generation devices for these programs. The prevailing view is that a resonant interaction (e.g. in microcavities or surface-plasmon polaritions) is necessary to achieve the necessary light confinement for absorption or emission enhancement. Here we propose new paradigm that is non-resonant and therefore broadband and can achieve light confinement and field enhancement in extremely small areas [~(λ/500)^2 ]. The proposal is based on a theoretical work[1] performed at Sandia. The paradigm structure consists of a periodic arrangement of connected small and large rectangular slits etched into a metal film named double-groove (DG) structure. The degree of electric field enhancement and power confinement can be controlled by the geometry of the structure. The key operational principle is attributed to quasistatic response of the metal electrons to the incoming electromagnetic field that enables non-resonant broadband behavior. For this exploratory LDRD we have fabricated some test double groove structures to enable verification of quasistatic electronic response in the mid IR through IR optical spectroscopy. We have addressed some processing challenges in DG structure fabrication to enable future design of complex sensor and detector geometries that can utilize its non-resonant field enhancement capabilities.].

  10. Crystallization of carbon tetrachloride in confined geometries.

    PubMed

    Meziane, Adil; Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; Baba, Mohamed; Nedelec, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of carbon tetrachloride confined in silica gels of different porosities was studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Both the melting point and the low temperature phase transition were measured and found to be inextricably dependant on the degree of confinement. The amount of solvent was varied through two sets of experiments, sequential addition and original progressive evaporation allowing the measurement of DSC signals for the various transitions as a function of the amount of CCl4. These experiments allowed the determination of the transition enthalpies in the confined state, which in turn allowed the determination of the exact quantities of solvent undergoing these transitions. A clear correlation was found between the amounts of solvent (both free and confined) undergoing the two transitions, demonstrating that the formation of the adsorbed layer t does not interfere with the second transition. The thickness of this layer and the porous volumes of the two silica samples were measured and found to be in very close agreement with the values determined by gas sorption.

  11. Glycerol in micellar confinement with tunable rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannert, Michael; Müller, Allyn; Gouirand, Emmanuel; Talluto, Vincenzo; Rosenstihl, Markus; Walther, Thomas; Stühn, Bernd; Blochowicz, Thomas; Vogel, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the glassy dynamics of glycerol in the confinement of a microemulsion system, which is stable on cooling down to the glass transition of its components. By changing the composition, we vary the viscosity of the matrix, while keeping the confining geometry intact, as is demonstrated by small angle X-ray scattering. By means of 2H NMR, differential scanning calorimetry, and triplet solvation dynamics we, thus, probe the dynamics of glycerol in confinements of varying rigidity. 2H NMR results show that, at higher temperatures, the dynamics of confined glycerol is unchanged compared to bulk behavior, while the reorientation of glycerol molecules becomes significantly faster than in the bulk in the deeply supercooled regime. However, comparison of different 2H NMR findings with data from calorimetry and solvation dynamics reveals that this acceleration is not due to the changed structural relaxation of glycerol, but rather due to the rotational motion of essentially rigid glycerol droplets or of aggregates of such droplets in a more fluid matrix. Thus, independent of the matrix mobility, the glycerol dynamics remains unchanged except for the smallest droplets, where an increase of Tg and, thus, a slowdown of the structural relaxation is observed even in a fluid matrix.

  12. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-11-01

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used.

  13. Wellhead protection in confined, semi-confined, fractured and karst aquifer settings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Protection areas around wells producing from confined, fractured, and karst aquifers are, because of their complex hydrogeology, more difficult to define than protection areas for wells in porous media settings. The factsheet provides background information explaining the need to define protection areas for wells that draw public drinking water from several complex hydrogeologic settings: confined, semi-confined, fractured, and karst aquifers. These settings include aquifers in which the ground water is not open to the atmosphere, or the aquifer does not consist of unconsolidated porous media. Several figures illustrate these settings in a general way.

  14. Two-dimensional material confined water.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-01-20

    CONSPECTUS: The interface between water and other materials under ambient conditions is of fundamental importance due to its relevance in daily life and a broad range of scientific research. The structural and dynamic properties of water at an interface have been proven to be significantly difference than those of bulk water. However, the exact nature of these interfacial water adlayers at ambient conditions is still under debate. Recent scanning probe microscopy (SPM) experiments, where two-dimensional (2D) materials as ultrathin coatings are utilized to assist the visualization of interfacial water adlayers, have made remarkable progress on interfacial water and started to clarify some of these fundamental scientific questions. In this Account, we review the recently conducted research exploring the properties of confined water between 2D materials and various surfaces under ambient conditions. Initially, we review the earlier studies of water adsorbed on hydrophilic substrates under ambient conditions in the absence of 2D coating materials, which shows the direct microscopic results. Subsequently, we focus on the studies of water adlayer growth at both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in the presence of 2D coating materials. Ice-like water adlayers confined between hydrophobic graphene and hydrophilic substrates can be directly observed in detail by SPM. It was found that the packing structure of the water adlayer was determined by the hydrophilic substrates, while the orientation of intercalation water domains was directed by the graphene coating. In contrast to hydrophilic substrates, liquid-like nanodroplets confined between hydrophobic graphene and hydrophobic substrates appear close to step edges and atomic-scale surface defects, indicating that atomic-scale surface defects play significant roles in determining the adsorption of water on hydrophobic substrates. In addition, we also review the phenomena of confined water between 2D hydrophilic MoS2 and

  15. An EQT-cDFT approach to determine thermodynamic properties of confined fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Mashayak, S. Y.; Motevaselian, M. H.; Aluru, N. R.

    2015-06-28

    We present a continuum-based approach to predict the structure and thermodynamic properties of confined fluids at multiple length-scales, ranging from a few angstroms to macro-meters. The continuum approach is based on the empirical potential-based quasi-continuum theory (EQT) and classical density functional theory (cDFT). EQT is a simple and fast approach to predict inhomogeneous density and potential profiles of confined fluids. We use EQT potentials to construct a grand potential functional for cDFT. The EQT-cDFT-based grand potential can be used to predict various thermodynamic properties of confined fluids. In this work, we demonstrate the EQT-cDFT approach by simulating Lennard-Jones fluids, namely, methane and argon, confined inside slit-like channels of graphene. We show that the EQT-cDFT can accurately predict the structure and thermodynamic properties, such as density profiles, adsorption, local pressure tensor, surface tension, and solvation force, of confined fluids as compared to the molecular dynamics simulation results.

  16. Structure, thermodynamic properties, and phase diagrams of few colloids confined in a spherical pore.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Iván E; Pastorino, Claudio; Urrutia, Ignacio

    2015-06-28

    We study a system of few colloids confined in a small spherical cavity with event driven molecular dynamics simulations in the canonical ensemble. The colloidal particles interact through a short range square-well potential that takes into account the basic elements of attraction and excluded-volume repulsion of the interaction among colloids. We analyze the structural and thermodynamic properties of this few-body confined system in the framework of inhomogeneous fluids theory. Pair correlation function and density profile are used to determine the structure and the spatial characteristics of the system. Pressure on the walls, internal energy, and surface quantities such as surface tension and adsorption are also analyzed for a wide range of densities and temperatures. We have characterized systems from 2 to 6 confined particles, identifying distinctive qualitative behavior over the thermodynamic plane T - ρ, in a few-particle equivalent to phase diagrams of macroscopic systems. Applying the extended law of corresponding states, the square well interaction is mapped to the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures. We link explicitly the temperature of the confined square-well fluid to the equivalent packing fraction of polymers in the Asakura-Oosawa model. Using this approach, we study the confined system of few colloids in a colloid-polymer mixture.

  17. Structure, thermodynamic properties, and phase diagrams of few colloids confined in a spherical pore

    SciTech Connect

    Paganini, Iván E.; Pastorino, Claudio Urrutia, Ignacio

    2015-06-28

    We study a system of few colloids confined in a small spherical cavity with event driven molecular dynamics simulations in the canonical ensemble. The colloidal particles interact through a short range square-well potential that takes into account the basic elements of attraction and excluded-volume repulsion of the interaction among colloids. We analyze the structural and thermodynamic properties of this few-body confined system in the framework of inhomogeneous fluids theory. Pair correlation function and density profile are used to determine the structure and the spatial characteristics of the system. Pressure on the walls, internal energy, and surface quantities such as surface tension and adsorption are also analyzed for a wide range of densities and temperatures. We have characterized systems from 2 to 6 confined particles, identifying distinctive qualitative behavior over the thermodynamic plane T − ρ, in a few-particle equivalent to phase diagrams of macroscopic systems. Applying the extended law of corresponding states, the square well interaction is mapped to the Asakura-Oosawa model for colloid-polymer mixtures. We link explicitly the temperature of the confined square-well fluid to the equivalent packing fraction of polymers in the Asakura-Oosawa model. Using this approach, we study the confined system of few colloids in a colloid-polymer mixture.

  18. An experimental study of a self-confined flow with ring-vorticity distribution. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. M.; Moore, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    A new form of self-confined flow was investigated in which a recirculation zone forms away from any solid boundary. An inviscid flow analysis indicated that in a purely meridional axisymmetric flow a stationary, spherical, self-confined region should occur in the center of a streamlined divergent-convergent enlargement zone. The spherical confinement region would be at rest and at constant pressure. Experimental investigations were carried out in a specially built test apparatus to establish the desired confined flow. The streamlined divergent-convergent interior shape of the test section was fabricated according to the theoretical calculation for a particular streamline. The required inlet vorticity distribution was generated by producing a velocity profile with a shaped gauze screen in the straight pipe upstream of the test section. Fluid speed and turbulence intensity were measured with a constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer system. The measured results indicated a very orderly and stable flow field.

  19. Measurements of Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Helium Near its Transition Temperature T(sub lambda) in a 2D Confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jerebets, Sergei

    2004-01-01

    We report our recent experiments on thermal conductivity measurements of superfluid He-4 near its phase transition in a two-dimensional (2D) confinement under saturated vapor pressure. A 2D confinement is created by 2-mm- and 1-mm-thick glass capillary plates, consisting of densely populated parallel microchannels with cross-sections of 5 x 50 and 1 x 10 microns, correspondingly. A heat current (2 < Q < 400 nW/sq cm) was applied along the channels long direction. High-resolution measurements were provided by DC SQUID-based high-resolution paramagnetic salt thermometers (HRTs) with a nanokelvin resolution. We might find that thermal conductivity of confined helium is finite at the bulk superfluid transition temperature. Our 2D results will be compared with those in a bulk and 1D confinement.

  20. Microbial iron reduction under deep subsurface pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Hazemann, J.; Oger, P.

    2009-12-01

    limits for growth (0-50 MPa) and consequently that considering only the ability to grow in the conditions of the deep subsurface as a proof of metabolic activity may lead to an underestimation of the impact of the biosphere in deep environments. Even if some experimental factors prevent the exact reproduction of subsurface conditions, we show here that the metabolic activity of a surface microbe potentially brought to the deep subsurface can affect important biogeochemical cycles as those of iron and carbon.

  1. Experimental deformation of polycrystalline H2O ice at high pressure and low temperature - Preliminary results. [implications for Ganymede and Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Heard, H. C.; Kirby, S. H.

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary study is carried out of involving 70 constant strain deformation tests on pure polycrystalline H2O ice under conditions covering most of the stability field of ice I sub h. Brittle failure of I sub h is found to be promoted by lower P, lower T, and higher strain rates. Ductile flow is found to be promoted by higher P, higher T, and lower strain rates. The brittle failure of ice I sub h is found to be most unusual. The fracture strength is a positive function of P only below 50 MPa. At pressures greater than this, the fracture strength is independent of P, and the fracture plane lies approximately 45 deg from the load axis. It is believed that existing extrapolation based on existing experimental data to Ganymede and Callisto may be badly in error.

  2. Experimental Evidence for a Liquid-Liquid Crossover in Deeply Cooled Confined Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  3. Exceptionally stiff two-dimensional molecular crystal by substrate-confinement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yuan, Bingkai; Chen, Pengcheng; Cheng, Zhihai; Ji, Wei; Qiu, Xiaohui

    2014-11-25

    We demonstrated an approach to effectively apply in-plane pressures to molecular layers by utilizing the substrate confinement effect. The compressed crystal structure and mechanical behaviors of carbon monoxide (CO) monolayer subjected to the confinement of Cu(100) substrate were jointly investigated by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy experiments and first-principles density functional theory calculations. By increasing molecular coverage, an exceptionally large Young's modulus of 33 GPa was derived for the constrained CO monolayer film. This extreme in-plane pressure leads to site-specific tilting geometries, polymeric-like electronic states, and vibrational behaviors of CO molecules in the compressed phases. These results provide an extended understanding of the physical and chemical properties of intermolecular interactions in this fundamental system.

  4. Guiding and confinement of interface acoustic waves in solid-fluid pillar-based phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razip Wee, M. F. Mohd; Addouche, Mahmoud; Siow, Kim S.; Zain, A. R. Md; Elayouch, Aliyasin; Chollet, Franck; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2016-12-01

    Pillar-based phononic crystals exhibit some unique wave phenomena due to the interaction between surface acoustic modes of the substrate and local resonances supported by pillars. In this paper, we extend the investigations by taking into account the presence of a liquid medium. We particularly demonstrate that local resonances dramatically decrease the phase velocity of Scholte-Stoneley wave, which leads to a slow wave at the solid/fluid interface. Moreover, we show that increasing the height of pillars introduces a new set of branches of interface modes and drastically affects the acoustic energy localization. Indeed, while some modes display a highly confined pressure between pillars, others exponentially decay in the fluid or only propagate in the solid without disturbing the fluid pressure. These theoretical results, performed by finite element method, highlight a new acoustic wave confinement suitable in various applications such as acoustophoresis, lab on chip and microfluidics.

  5. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  6. DNA Confined in Nanochannels and Nanoslits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tree, Douglas R.

    It has become increasingly apparent in recent years that next-generation sequencing (NGS) has a blind spot for large scale genomic variation, which is crucial for understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship. Genomic mapping methods attempt to overcome the weakesses of NGS by providing a coarse-grained map of the distances between restriction sites to aid in sequence assembly. From such methods, one hopes to realize fast and inexpensive de novo sequencing of human and plant genomes. One of the most promising methods for genomic mapping involves placing DNA inside a device only a few dozen nanometers wide called a nanochannel. A nanochannel stretches the DNA so that the distance between fluorescently labeled restriction sites can be measured en route to obtaining an accurate genome map. Unfortunately for those who wish to design devices, the physics of how DNA stretches when confined in a nanochannel is still an active area of research. Indeed, despite decades old theories from polymer physics regarding weakly and strongly stretched polymers, seminal experiments in the mid-2000s have gone unexplained until very recently. With a goal of creating a realistic engineering model of DNA in nanochannels, this dissertation addresses a number of important outstanding research topics in this area. We first discuss the physics of dilute solutions of DNA in free solution, which show distinctive behavior due to the stiff nature of the polymer. We then turn our attention to the equilibrium regimes of confined DNA and explore the effects of stiff chains and weak excluded volume on the confinement free energy and polymer extension. We also examine dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient and the characteristic relaxation time. Finally, we discuss a sister problem related to DNA confined in nanoslits, which shares much of the same physics as DNA confined in channels. Having done this, we find ourselves with a well-parameterized wormlike chain model that is

  7. Detection of the liquid-liquid transition in the deeply cooled water confined in MCM-41 with elastic neutron scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Ito, Kanae; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present a review on our recent experimental investigations into the phase behavior of the deeply cooled water confined in a nanoporous silica material, MCM-41, with elastic neutron scattering technique. Under such strong confinement, the homogeneous nucleation process of water is avoided, which allows the confined water to keep its liquid state at temperatures and pressures that are inaccessible to the bulk water. By measuring the average density of the confined heavy water, we observe a likely first-order low-density liquid (LDL) to high-density liquid (HDL) transition in the deeply cooled region of the confined heavy water. The phase separation starts from 1.12±0.17{ kbar} and 215±1{ K} and extends to higher pressures and lower temperatures in the phase diagram. This starting point could be the liquid-liquid critical point of the confined water. The locus of the Widom line is also estimated. The observation of the liquid-liquid transition in the confined water has potential to explain the mysterious behaviors of water at low temperatures. In addition, it may also have impacts on other disciplines, because the confined water system represents many biological and geological systems in which water resides in nanoscopic pores or in the vicinity of hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces.

  8. Improved confinement in JET high β plasmas with an ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, C. D.; Garcia, J.; Beurskens, M.; Buratti, P.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Keeling, D.; King, D. B.; Maggi, C. F.; Mailloux, J.; Marchetto, C.; McDonald, D.; Nunes, I.; Pucella, G.; Saarelma, S.; Simpson, J.; Contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes. It was found that the power degradation of thermal energy confinement was weak with the ILW; much weaker than the IPB98(y,2) scaling and resulting in an increase in normalized confinement from H98 ˜ 0.9 at βN ˜ 1.5 to H98 ˜ 1.2-1.3 at βN ˜ 2.5 - 3.0 as the power was increased (where H98 = τE/τIPB98(y,2) and βN = βTBT/aIP in % T/mMA). This reproduces the general trend in JET of higher normalized confinement in the so-called ‘hybrid’ domain, where normalized β is typically above 2.5, compared with ‘baseline’ ELMy H-mode plasmas with βN ˜ 1.5 - 2.0. This weak power degradation of confinement, which was also seen with the C-wall experiments at low triangularity, is due to both increased edge pedestal pressure and core pressure peaking at high power. By contrast, the high triangularity C-wall plasmas exhibited elevated H98 over a wide power range with strong, IPB98(y,2)-like, power degradation. This strong power degradation of confinement appears to be linked to an increase in the source of neutral particles from the wall as the power increased, an effect that was not reproduced with the ILW. The reason for the loss of improved confinement domain at low power with the ILW is yet to be clarified, but contributing factors may include changes in the rate of gas injection, wall recycling, plasma composition and radiation. The results presented in this paper show that the choice of wall materials can strongly affect plasma performance, even changing confinement scalings that are relied upon for extrapolation to future devices.

  9. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  10. Deformation mechanisms in granodiorite at effective pressures to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, M.; Handin, J.; Bauer, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    Deformation mechanisms in room-dry and water-saturated specimens of Charcoal Granodiorite, shortened at 10/sup -4/s/sup -1/, at effective pressures (Pe) to 100 MPa and temperatures to partial melting (less than or equal to 1050/sup 0/C) are documented with a view toward providing criteria to recognize and characterize the deformation for geological and engienering applications. Above 800/sup 0/C strength decreases dramatically at effective pressures greater than or equal to 50 MPa and water-weakening reduces strength an additional 30 to 40% at Pe = 100 MPa. Strains at failure are only 0.1 to 2.2% with macroscopic ductility (within this range) increasing as the effective pressures are increased and in wet versus dry tests. Shattering (multiple faulting) gives way to faulting along a single zone to failure without macroscopic faulting as ductility increases. Microscopically, cataclasis (extension microfracturing and thermal cracking with rigid-body motions) predominates at all conditions. Dislocation gliding contributes little to the strain. Precursive extension microfractures coalesce to produce the throughgoing faults with gouge zones exhibiting possible Riedel shears. Incipient melting, particularly in wet tests, produces a distinctive texture along feldspar grain boundaries that suggests a grain-boundary-softening effect contributes to the weakening. In addition, it is demonstrated that the presence of water does not lead to more microfractures, but to a reduction in the stresses required to initiate and propagate them.

  11. Thermal Hysteresis of MEMS Packaged Capacitive Pressure Sensor (CPS) Based 3C-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsi, N.; Majlis, B. Y.; Mohd-Yasin, F.; Hamzah, A. A.; Mohd Rus, A. Z.

    2016-11-01

    Presented herein are the effects of thermal hysteresis analyses of the MEMS packaged capacitive pressure sensor (CPS). The MEMS CPS was employed on Si-on-3C-SiC wafer that was performed using the hot wall low-pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) reactors at the Queensland Micro and Nanotechnology Center (QMNC), Griffith University and fabricated using the bulk-micromachining process. The MEMS CPS was operated at an extreme temperature up to 500°C and high external pressure at 5.0 MPa. The thermal hysteresis phenomenon that causes the deflection, strain and stress on the 3C-SiC diaphragm spontaneously influence the MEMS CPS performances. The differences of temperature, hysteresis, and repeatability test were presented to demonstrate the functionality of the MEMS packaged CPS. As expected, the output hysteresis has a low hysteresis (less than 0.05%) which has the hardness greater than the traditional silicon. By utilizing this low hysteresis, it was revealed that the MEMS packaged CPS has high repeatability and stability of the sensor.

  12. The polymer physics of single DNA confined in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Dai, Liang; Renner, C Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, applications and experimental studies of DNA in nanochannels have stimulated the investigation of the polymer physics of DNA in confinement. Recent advances in the physics of confined polymers, using DNA as a model polymer, have moved beyond the classic Odijk theory for the strong confinement, and the classic blob theory for the weak confinement. In this review, we present the current understanding of the behaviors of confined polymers while briefly reviewing classic theories. Three aspects of confined DNA are presented: static, dynamic, and topological properties. The relevant simulation methods are also summarized. In addition, comparisons of confined DNA with DNA under tension and DNA in semidilute solution are made to emphasize universal behaviors. Finally, an outlook of the possible future research for confined DNA is given.

  13. System Description for the Double Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System

    SciTech Connect

    ROSSI, H.

    2000-01-12

    This document provides a description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System. This description will provide a basis for developing functional, performance and test requirements (i.e., subsystem specification), as necessary, for the DST Confinement System.

  14. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  15. Inertial-confinement fusion with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2016-05-01

    The quest for controlled fusion energy has been ongoing for over a half century. The demonstration of ignition and energy gain from thermonuclear fuels in the laboratory has been a major goal of fusion research for decades. Thermonuclear ignition is widely considered a milestone in the development of fusion energy, as well as a major scientific achievement with important applications in national security and basic sciences. The US is arguably the world leader in the inertial confinement approach to fusion and has invested in large facilities to pursue it, with the objective of establishing the science related to the safety and reliability of the stockpile of nuclear weapons. Although significant progress has been made in recent years, major challenges still remain in the quest for thermonuclear ignition via laser fusion. Here, we review the current state of the art in inertial confinement fusion research and describe the underlying physical principles.

  16. Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Florence; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Brau, Fabian; De Wit, A

    2014-12-09

    Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nanoscale tubes, brinicles, or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy, and reaction-diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom, and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze 2D patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space.

  17. Size scaling of microtubule asters in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, James; Field, Christine; Krutkramelis, Kaspars; Fakhri, Nikta; Oakey, John; Gatlin, Jay; Mitchison, Timothy

    Microtubule asters are radial arrays of microtubules (MTs) nucleated around organizing centers (MTOCs). Across a wide range of cell types and sizes, aster positioning influences cellular organization. To investigate aster size and positioning, we reconstituted dynamic asters in Xenopus cytoplasmic extract, confined in fluorous oil microfluidic emulsions. In large droplets, we observed centering of MTOCs. In small droplets, we observed a breakdown in natural positioning, with MTOCs at the droplet edge and buckled or bundled MTs along the interface. In different systems, asters are positioned by different forces, such as pushing due to MT polymerization, or pulling due to bulk or cortical dynein. To estimate different contributions to aster positioning, we biochemically perturbed dynactin function, or MT or actin polymerization. We used carbon nanotubes to measure molecular motions and forces in asters. These experimental results inform quantitative biophysical models of aster size and positioning in confinement. JFP was supported by a Fannie and John Hertz Graduate Fellowship.

  18. The confined space-hypoxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zugibe, F T; Costello, J T; Breithaupt, M K; Zappi, E; Allyn, B

    1987-03-01

    Two meter readers of a local water company were found dead in an underground water meter pit. Studies revealed a decrease in oxygen and an increase in carbon dioxide in the pit as a result of aerobic microorganisms present in the pit. Such an atmosphere may be rapidly fatal to the unwary worker who frequents such an environment. It is of paramount importance that this occupational hazard be recognized so that preventative measures may be established. We propose that the term "Confined Space-Hypoxia Syndrome" be adopted to all such confined space accidents occurring in water meter pits, tanks, holds of ships, mines, underground storage bins, and so forth, resulting from oxygen-deficient atmospheres. A series of recommended preventative procedures is included.

  19. Anomalous structural transition of confined hard squares.

    PubMed

    Gurin, Péter; Varga, Szabolcs; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2016-11-01

    Structural transitions are examined in quasi-one-dimensional systems of freely rotating hard squares, which are confined between two parallel walls. We find two competing phases: one is a fluid where the squares have two sides parallel to the walls, while the second one is a solidlike structure with a zigzag arrangement of the squares. Using transfer matrix method we show that the configuration space consists of subspaces of fluidlike and solidlike phases, which are connected with low probability microstates of mixed structures. The existence of these connecting states makes the thermodynamic quantities continuous and precludes the possibility of a true phase transition. However, thermodynamic functions indicate strong tendency for the phase transition and our replica exchange Monte Carlo simulation study detects several important markers of the first order phase transition. The distinction of a phase transition from a structural change is practically impossible with simulations and experiments in such systems like the confined hard squares.

  20. Confinement and stability of a Crystalline Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, A.G.

    1993-05-10

    This technical report defines and describes a Crystalline Beam. This is an ordered state of matter made of electrically charged ions which are moving together in a storage ring with very high density and small velocity spread. In particular, the paper analyses the requirements for the confinement and the stability of the Beam. It is demonstrated that a storage ring made of one circular weak-focusing magnet, similar to a Betatron, is the most suitable for the confinement and stability of the Crystalline Beam. The disruptive effects of drift insertions have also been investigated. Requirements on final densities and velocity spreads are also calculated and reported. A matrix formalism is developed for the design of the storage ring. The important issue of the disruption caused by the curvature of the closed trajectory is not here discussed; it is the subject of a subsequent paper.

  1. Atypical quantum confinement effect in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Pavel B; Avramov, Pavel V; Chernozatonskii, Leonid A; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G

    2008-10-09

    The quantum confinement effect (QCE) of linear junctions of silicon icosahedral quantum dots (IQD) and pentagonal nanowires (PNW) was studied using DFT and semiempirical AM1 methods. The formation of complex IQD/PNW structures leads to the localization of the HOMO and LUMO on different parts of the system and to a pronounced blue shift of the band gap; the typical QCE with a monotonic decrease of the band gap upon the system size breaks down. A simple one-electron one-dimensional Schrodinger equation model is proposed for the description and explanation of the unconventional quantum confinement behavior of silicon IQD/PNW systems. On the basis of the theoretical models, the experimentally discovered deviations from the typical QCE for nanocrystalline silicon are explained.

  2. Nonlinear adhesion dynamics of confined lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, Tung; Le Goff, Thomas; Pierre-Louis, Olivier

    Lipid membranes, which are ubiquitous objects in biological environments are often confined. For example, they can be sandwiched between a substrate and the cytoskeleton between cell adhesion, or between other membranes in stacks, or in the Golgi apparatus. We present a study of the nonlinear dynamics of membranes in a model system, where the membrane is confined between two flat walls. The dynamics derived from the lubrication approximation is highly nonlinear and nonlocal. The solution of this model in one dimension exhibits frozen states due to oscillatory interactions between membranes caused by the bending rigidity. We develope a kink model for these phenomena based on the historical work of Kawasaki and Otha. In two dimensions, the dynamics is more complex, and depends strongly on the amount of excess area in the system. We discuss the relevance of our findings for experiments on model membranes, and for biological systems. Supported by the grand ANR Biolub.

  3. Multiphase flows in confinement with complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymard, Benjamin; Pradas, Marc; Vaes, Urbain; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the dynamics of immiscible fluids in confinement is crucial in numerous applications such as oil recovery, fuel cells and the rapidly growing field of microfluidics. Complexities such as microstructures, chemical-topographical heterogeneities or porous membranes, can often induce non-trivial effects such as critical phenomena and phase transitions . The dynamics of confined multiphase flows may be efficiently described using diffuse-interface theory, leading to the Cahn-Hilliard-Navier-Stokes(CHNS) equations with Cahn wetting boundary conditions. Here we outline an efficient numerical method to solve the CHNS equations using advanced geometry-capturing mesh techniques both in two and three dimensional scenarios. The methodology is applied to two different systems: a droplet on a spatially chemical-topographical heterogeneous substrateand a microfluidic separator.

  4. Spiral precipitation patterns in confined chemical gardens

    PubMed Central

    Haudin, Florence; Brau, Fabian; De Wit, A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical gardens are mineral aggregates that grow in three dimensions with plant-like forms and share properties with self-assembled structures like nanoscale tubes, brinicles, or chimneys at hydrothermal vents. The analysis of their shapes remains a challenge, as their growth is influenced by osmosis, buoyancy, and reaction–diffusion processes. Here we show that chemical gardens grown by injection of one reactant into the other in confined conditions feature a wealth of new patterns including spirals, flowers, and filaments. The confinement decreases the influence of buoyancy, reduces the spatial degrees of freedom, and allows analysis of the patterns by tools classically used to analyze 2D patterns. Injection moreover allows the study in controlled conditions of the effects of variable concentrations on the selected morphology. We illustrate these innovative aspects by characterizing quantitatively, with a simple geometrical model, a new class of self-similar logarithmic spirals observed in a large zone of the parameter space. PMID:25385581

  5. Neoclassical transport in enhanced confinement toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    It has recently been reported that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas have been observed to fall below the irreducible minimum level predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system.

  6. Confinement scaling and ignition in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

    1985-10-01

    A drift wave turbulence model is used to compute the scaling and magnitude of central electron temperature and confinement time of tokamak plasmas. The results are in accord with experiment. Application to ignition experiments shows that high density (1 to 2) . 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, high field, B/sub T/ > 10 T, but low temperature T approx. 6 keV constitute the optimum path to ignition.

  7. Effective string description of confining flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Meineri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We review the current knowledge about the theoretical foundations of the effective string theory for confining flux tubes and the comparison of the predictions to pure gauge lattice data. A concise presentation of the effective string theory is provided, incorporating recent developments. We summarize the predictions for the spectrum and the profile/width of the flux tube and their comparison to lattice data. The review closes with a short summary of open questions for future research.

  8. LDV Measurement of Confined Parallel Jet Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    R.F. Kunz; S.W. D'Amico; P.F. Vassallo; M.A. Zaccaria

    2001-01-31

    Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements were taken in a confinement, bounded by two parallel walls, into which issues a row of parallel jets. Two-component measurements were taken of two mean velocity components and three Reynolds stress components. As observed in isolated three dimensional wall bounded jets, the transverse diffusion of the jets is quite large. The data indicate that this rapid mixing process is due to strong secondary flows, transport of large inlet intensities and Reynolds stress anisotropy effects.

  9. [Ethics and solitary confinement in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The decision to treat a patient in solitary confinement in psychiatry does not follow any protocol and is not made on a case-by-case basis. Team deliberation opens discussion and enables the group as a whole to take responsibility for clarifying what is to be supported by the team and implemented by the carer during treatment. When presented with complex situations, uncertainty can be a force when it calls upon an ethical dilemma.

  10. Statistical Mechanics of Confined Quantum Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannur, Vishnu M.; Udayanandan, K. M.

    We develop statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of Bose and Fermi systems in relativistic harmonic oscillator (RHO) confining potential, which is applicable in quark gluon plasma (QGP), astrophysics, Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) etc. Detailed study of QGP system is carried out and compared with lattice results. Furthermore, as an application, our equation of state (EoS) of QGP is used to study compact stars like quark star.

  11. Laser driven instabilities in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1990-06-04

    Parametric instabilities excited by an intense electromagnetic wave in a plasma is a fundamental topic relevant to many applications. These applications include laser fusion, heating of magnetically-confined plasmas, ionospheric modification, and even particle acceleration for high energy physics. In laser fusion, these instabilities have proven to play an essential role in the choice of laser wavelength. Characterization and control of the instabilities is an ongoing priority in laser plasma experiments. Recent progress and some important trends will be discussed. 8 figs.

  12. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Girotto, Matheus Levin, Yan; Santos, Alexandre P. dos; Colla, Thiago

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  13. Status of global energy confinement studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Bell, M.G. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Barnes, C.W. ); DeBoo, J.C.; Waltz, R. ); Greenwald, M.; Sigmar, D. . Plasma Fusion Center); Riedel, K. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Uckan, N. (Oak Ridge National L

    1990-02-01

    Empirical scaling expressions, reflecting the parametric dependence of the L-mode energy confinement time, have been used not only as benchmarks for tokamak operation and theories of energy transport, but for predicting the performance of proposed tokamak devices. Several scaling expressions based on data from small-and medium-sized devices have done well in predicting performance in larger devices, although great uncertainty exists in extrapolating yet farther, into the ignition regime. Several approaches exist for developing higher confidence scaling expressions. These include reducing the statistical uncertainty by identifying and filling in gaps in the present database, making use of more sophisticated statistical techniques, and developing scalings for confinement regimes within which future devices will operate. Confidence in the scaling expressions will be increased still if the expressions can be more directly tied to transport physics theory. This can be done through the use of dimensionless parameters, better describing the edge and core confinement regimes separately, and by incorporating transport models directly into the scaling expressions. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Counterpropagating Rossby waves in confined plane wakes

    PubMed Central

    Biancofiore, L.; Gallaire, F.

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we revisit the temporal and the spatio-temporal stability of confined plane wakes under the perspective of the counterpropagating Rossby waves (CRWs). Within the context of broken line velocity profiles, each vorticity discontinuity can be associated to a counterpropagating Rossby wave. In the case of a wake modeled by a broken line profile, the interaction of two CRWs is shown to originate in a shear instability. Following this description, we first recover the stability results obtained by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 590, 163–185 (2007)]10.1017/S0022112007007975 and Biancofiore and Gallaire [Phys. Fluids 23, 034103 (2011)]10.1063/1.3554764 by means of the classical normal mode analysis. In this manner, we propose an explanation of the stabilizing influence of the confinement on the temporal stability properties. The CRW description further allows us to propose a new interpretation of the counterintuitive spatio-temporal destabilization in wake flows at moderate confinement noticed by Juniper [J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171–195 (2006)]10.1017/S0022112006001558: it is well predicted by the mean group velocity of the uncoupled CRWs. PMID:22865998

  15. Density Shock Waves in Confined Microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior, from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from "subsonic" with compression at the back to "supersonic" with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a nontrivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and it is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechanisms for controlling the emergent density distribution and the average population speed, with potentially profound implications on various processes in industry and biotechnology, such as the transport and sorting of cells in flow channels.

  16. Fast ion JET diagnostics: confinement and losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Syme, D. B.; Cecconello, M.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Yavorskij, V.; Johnson, T.; Murari, A.; Reich, M.; Gorini, G.; Zoita, V.

    2008-03-12

    A study of magnetically confined fast ions in tokamaks plays an important role in burning plasma research. To reach ignition and steady burning of a reactor plasma an adequate confinement of energetic ions produced by NBI heating, accelerated with ICRF and born in fusion reactions is essential to provide efficient heating of the bulk plasma. Thus, investigation of the fast ion behaviour is an immediate task for present-day large machines, such as JET, in order to understand the main mechanisms of slowing down, redistribution and losses, and to develop optimal plasma scenarios. Today's JET has an enhanced suite of fast ion diagnostics both of confined and lost ions that enable to significantly contribute to this important area of research. Fast ion populations of p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, made with ICRF, NBI, and fusion reactions have been investigated in experiments on JET with sophisticated diagnostics in conventional and shear-reversed plasmas, exploring a wide range of effects. This paper will introduce to the JET fast-ion diagnostic techniques and will give an overview of recent observations. A synergy of the unique diagnostic set was utilised in JET, and studies of the response of fast ions to MHD modes (e.g. tornado modes, sawtooth crashes), fast {sup 3}He-ions behaviour in shear-reversed plasmas are impressive examples of that. Some results on fast ion losses in JET experiments with various levels of the toroidal field ripple will be demonstrated.

  17. Effect of Confinement on Suspension Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Meera; Leahy, Brian; Lin, Yen-Chih; Cohen, Itai

    Confined systems are ubiquitous in nature and occur at widely separated length scales from the atomic to granular. While the flow properties of both atomic and granular systems has been well studied, examining the rheology of the intermediate length scale in colloidal suspensions is challenging. We use a confocal rheoscope to image the particle configuration in a suspension of silica microspheres while simultaneously measuring its stress responses. The confocal rheoscope has two precisely-aligned parallel plates that can confine the suspension with a variable gap size ranging from 3 to 30 particle diameters, allowing us to measure the response of the system as a function of the gap size. We find that the viscosity of the system decreases with confinement in sharp contrast to the increase reported in atomic and granular systems. The microscopy images indicate that this decrease in viscosity is due to the formation of particle layers in this shear regime where hydrodynamic forces dominate particle interactions. We discuss these results and their implications.

  18. Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-03-20

    The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 Å and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm(2)), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 Å. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50 kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm(2)) than by the smaller (1 nm(2)) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube.

  19. Electrostatic Confinement of Charged Particle Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Weathers, Duncan; Ordonez, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    Many experiments rely on the confinement of charged particles. Examples of these experiments range from fusion studies to antiproton-positron studies for antihydrogen production. Researchers have already developed a variety of techniques for controlling and trapping charged particles. Examples of systems devised for such purposes include electrostatic traps in the form of a cavity [1],[2] or in the form of a storage ring like ELISA [3]. For this project, we are pursuing a different approach [4], which relies on a purely electrostatic environment for ion confinement. This system consists of a periodic electrode configuration of cylindrical symmetry that acts to confine an ion beam in the radial direction. In this manner, it is expected that long particle lifetimes inside the trap will be achieved, and that the system will have an inherent scalability to different ion energy. Results obtained from simulation of the proposed system will be presented and discussed along with a brief overview of the steps taken to develop a laboratory prototype. [1] M. Dahan et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 69 (1998) 76. [2] H. F. Krause et al., American Institute of Physics. CAARI 16^th Int'l Conf. (2001). [3] S.P. Moller et al., Proc. of the 1997 Particle Accelerator Conference. vol 1. pp 1027-1029. Vancouver, Canada. May 1997. [4] J.R. Correa et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. In Phys. Res. B 241 (2005) 909-912.

  20. Positron confinement in embedded lithium nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kuriplach, J.

    2002-02-01

    Quantum confinement of positrons in nanoclusters offers the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the electronic structure of nanoclusters by application of positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques. In this work, positron confinement is investigated in lithium nanoclusters embedded in monocrystalline MgO. These nanoclusters were created by means of ion implantation and subsequent annealing. It was found from the results of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis that approximately 92% of the implanted positrons annihilate in lithium nanoclusters rather than in the embedding MgO, while the local fraction of lithium at the implantation depth is only 1.3 at. %. The results of two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation confirm the presence of crystalline bulk lithium. The confinement of positrons is ascribed to the difference in positron affinity between lithium and MgO. The nanocluster acts as a potential well for positrons, where the depth of the potential well is equal to the difference in the positron affinities of lithium and MgO. These affinities were calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method. This yields a positronic potential step at the MgO||Li interface of 1.8 eV using the generalized gradient approximation and 2.8 eV using the insulator model.

  1. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  2. Chain-like molecules confined in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Patrick; Soprunyuk, Viktor; Hofmann, Tommy; Knorr, Klaus

    2004-03-01

    We present an x-ray diffraction study on chain-like molecules, i.e. a selection of n-alkane molecules, embedded in the pores of nanoporous silica matrices. The lengths of the hydrocarbon chains are comparable to the mean diameter ( 7nm) of the tubular like nanopores which leads to drastic geometric restrictions. Diffraction patterns, recorded on heating and cooling between 200 K and 310 K, elucidate how the structure and phase behavior of the molecules is affected by the random substrate disorder and the confinement. The confined n-alkanes form close-packed structures by aligning parallel to the pore axis. In the case of the medium-length hydrocarbon chains one basic ordering principle known from the bulk crystalline state, i.e. the lamellar ordering of the molecules, is quenched[1], whereas for shorter n-alkanes this ordering principle survives[2]. The confined solids mimic the orientational order-disorder transitions known from the 3D unconfined crystals albeit in a modified fashion. 1. P. Huber, D. Wallacher, J. Albers, K. Knorr, Europhysics Letters, in press; 2. P. Huber, D. Wallacher, J. Albers, K. Knorr, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 15, 309 (2003).

  3. Combinational concentration gradient confinement through stagnation flow.

    PubMed

    Alicia, Toh G G; Yang, Chun; Wang, Zhiping; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-21

    Concentration gradient generation in microfluidics is typically constrained by two conflicting mass transport requirements: short characteristic times (τ) for precise temporal control of concentration gradients but at the expense of high flow rates and hence, high flow shear stresses (σ). To decouple the limitations from these parameters, here we propose the use of stagnation flows to confine concentration gradients within large velocity gradients that surround the stagnation point. We developed a modified cross-slot (MCS) device capable of feeding binary and combinational concentration sources in stagnation flows. We show that across the velocity well, source-sink pairs can form permanent concentration gradients. As source-sink concentration pairs are continuously supplied to the MCS, a permanently stable concentration gradient can be generated. Tuning the flow rates directly controls the velocity gradients, and hence the stagnation point location, allowing the confined concentration gradient to be focused. In addition, the flow rate ratio within the MCS rapidly controls (τ ∼ 50 ms) the location of the stagnation point and the confined combinational concentration gradients at low flow shear (0.2 Pa < σ < 2.9 Pa). The MCS device described in this study establishes the method for using stagnation flows to rapidly generate and position low shear combinational concentration gradients for shear sensitive biological assays.

  4. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  5. Coronal electron confinement by double layers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2013-12-01

    In observations of flare-heated electrons in the solar corona, a longstanding problem is the unexplained prolonged lifetime of the electrons compared to their transit time across the source. This suggests confinement. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which explored the transport of pre-accelerated hot electrons through ambient cold plasma, showed that the formation of a highly localized electrostatic potential drop, in the form of a double layer (DL), significantly inhibited the transport of hot electrons. The effectiveness of confinement by a DL is linked to the strength of the DL as defined by its potential drop. In this work, we investigate the scaling of the DL strength with the hot electron temperature by PIC simulations and find a linear scaling. We demonstrate that the strength is limited by the formation of parallel shocks. Based on this, we analytically determine the maximum DL strength, and also find a linear scaling with the hot electron temperature. The DL strength obtained from the analytic calculation is comparable to that from the simulations. At the maximum strength, the DL is capable of confining a significant fraction of hot electrons in the source.

  6. Cosmic Ray Self-Confinement, Escape and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, Mikhail

    2014-10-01

    Propagation of cosmic rays (CR) in a self-confinement regime is discussed. A self-similar solution for a CR-cloud expansion along the magnetic field strongly deviates from test-particle results. The normalized CR partial pressure is close to P (p , z , t) = 2 [ | z |5/3 +zdif5 / 3 (p , t) ]- 3 / 5 exp [ -z2 / 4DB (p) t ] , where p is the momentum of CR and z is directed along the field. The core of the cloud expands as zdif ~√{DNL p t } and decays in time as P ~ 2zdif- 1 (t) . The diffusion coefficient DNL is strongly suppressed compared to its background value DB: DNL ~DB exp - Π <pressure, Π. When Π >> 1 , the CRs drive Alfven waves efficiently enough to build a transport barrier (P ~ 2 / | z | -``pedestal'') that strongly reduces the leakage. The solution has a spectral break in momentum spectrum at p =pbr , where pbr satisfies the following equation DNLpbr ~=z2 / t . Magnetic focusing effects in CR transport are briefly discussed. Partially supported by NASA through ATP NNX14AH36G.

  7. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  8. Confinement time and energy balance in the CTX spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    The multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic on CTX allows measurement of electron plasma pressure. The pressure correlates well with the poloidal flux function. Analysis using equilibrium models allows the (..beta..)/sub vol/ to be calculated from over 100 Thomson scattering profiles taken under standard conditions of spheromak operation where the plasma parameters vary widely within the discharge. The calculated tau/sub E/ increases with central core temperature and with density. The global magnetic energy decay time tau/sub B/2 is consistent with Spitzer-Harm resistivity, but with an anomaly factor of 2 to 4 which may decrease at small ratios of B/n. The n tau/sub E/ product reaches 4 x 10/sup 9/ s cm/sup -3/ during the hottest part of the discharge. A zero-dimensional energy balance code, which accurately includes all the major atomic physics processes and whose parameters have been constrained by comparision to experimental data, is used to identify the causes of energy loss that contribute to the observed confinement time. The most important power loss is that needed to replace the particles being lost and to maintain the constant density of the plateau.

  9. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  10. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  11. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  12. Confined Turbulent Swirling Recirculating Flow Predictions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow, the STARPIC computer code, turbulence modeling of turbulent flows, the k-xi turbulence model and extensions, turbulence parameters deduction from swirling confined flow measurements, extension of the k-xi to confined swirling recirculating flows, and general predictions for confined turbulent swirling flow are discussed.

  13. 25 CFR 141.21 - Trade confined to premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trade confined to premises. 141.21 Section 141.21 Indians... NAVAJO, HOPI AND ZUNI RESERVATIONS General Business Practices § 141.21 Trade confined to premises. The licensee shall confine all trade on the reservation to the premises specified in the license, except,...

  14. 46 CFR 148.86 - Confined space entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confined space entry. 148.86 Section 148.86 Shipping... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.86 Confined space entry. (a) Except in an emergency, no person may enter a confined space unless that space has been tested...

  15. Stability of magnetohydrodynamic Dean Flow as applied to centrifugally confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, A.B.

    1999-10-01

    Dean Flow is the azimuthal flow of fluid between static concentric cylinders. In a magnetized plasma, there may also be radial stratification of the pressure. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of such a flow in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and an added radial gravitational force is examined. It is shown that both the Kelvin{endash}Helmholtz instability and pressure-gradient-driven interchanges can be stabilized if the flow is driven by a unidirectional external force and if the plasma annulus is sufficiently thin (large aspect ratio). These results find application in schemes using centrifugal confinement of plasma for fusion. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Investigating the effects of high pressure upon the selective enrichment of bacteria from deep-sea sediments: Results from Loihi Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrenk, M. O.; Sisley, C. R.; Edwards, K. J.

    2009-12-01

    High hydrostatic pressures relative to the Earth’s surface are a “fact of life” for microorganisms living in the deep-sea and in particular for those inhabiting the underlying subseafloor biosphere. Pioneering studies of deep-sea microbial populations by Zobell and colleagues in the 1950’s documented differences in the abundance and the physiological properties of microbial populations enriched at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) versus those at in situ hydrostatic pressures. However, recently most studies of deep-sea microorganisms have either overlooked the importance of pressure as an enrichment parameter, or have focused on the isolation of pure cultures of piezophiles. Due to the low percentages of culturable bacteria commonly obtained from environmental samples, we investigated the use of in situ hydrostatic pressures (50 MPa) in the selective enrichment of bacterial populations from deep-sea sediments. Iron oxide rich microbial mats were collected from the seafloor at 5000 m depth near Loihi Seamount (FeMO Deep region, Ula Nui mat) in October 2008. Following homogenization, samples were inoculated into three different types of media designed for the enrichment of heterotrophic, oligotrophic, and lithoautotrophic microbial populations. Batch cultures were incubated at deep-sea temperatures of 4 degrees Celsius, at either in situ (50 MPa) or atmospheric (0.1 MPa) for up to 6 months. Following incubation, cell densities and phylogenetic diversity of microbial populations were compared in the various treatments. Growth was observed in each of the treatments, with the growth rates of the heterotrophic microcosms slightly elevated compared to the oligotrophic and lithotrophic cultures. In all cases, the growth rates and overall cell yields (approximately 10^7 cells per ml) were significantly lower than typically observed in room temperature incubations. The phylogenetic diversity of the enrichment cultures was also significantly different between treatments

  17. 77 FR 49277 - Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Confined Blasting Operations by the U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... area which is in a channel, which may carry sound and pressure farther and/or in a more concentrated.... Response: The ACOE has agreed to collect sound recordings of drilling operations during the confined... stock of bottlenose dolphins (i.e., Haulover Inlet and Card Sound bridge boundaries) corresponds to...

  18. Pressure-driven opening of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2016-03-01

    The closing and opening of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is essential for their applications in nanoscale chemistry and biology. We report reactive molecular dynamics simulations of CNT opening triggered by internal pressure of encapsulated gas molecules. Confined argon generates 4000 bars of pressure inside capped CNT and lowers the opening temperature by 200 K. Chemical interactions greatly enhance the efficiency of CNT opening: fluorine-filled CNTs open by fluorination of carbon bonds at temperature and pressure that are 700 K and 1000 bar lower than for argon-filled CNTs. Moreover, pressure induced CNT opening by confined gases leaves the CNT cylinders intact and removes only the fullerene caps, while the empty CNT decomposes completely. In practice, the increase in pressure can be achieved by near-infrared light, which penetrates through water and biological tissues and is absorbed by CNTs, resulting in rapid local heating. Spanning over a thousand of bars and Kelvin, the reactive and non-reactive scenarios of CNT opening represent extreme cases and allow for a broad experimental control over properties of the CNT interior and release conditions of the confined species. The detailed insights into the thermodynamic conditions and chemical mechanisms of the pressure-induced CNT opening provide practical guidelines for the development of novel nanoreactors, catalysts, photo-catalysts, imaging labels and drug delivery vehicles.

  19. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  20. Thermodynamics of water confined in porous calcium-silicate-hydrates.

    PubMed

    Bonnaud, P A; Ji, Q; Coasne, B; Pellenq, R J-M; Van Vliet, K J

    2012-08-07

    Water within pores of cementitious materials plays a crucial role in the damage processes of cement pastes, particularly in the binding material comprising calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H). Here, we employed Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the properties of water confined at ambient temperature within and between C-S-H nanoparticles or "grains" as a function of the relative humidity (%RH). We address the effect of water on the cohesion of cement pastes by computing fluid internal pressures within and between grains as a function of %RH and intergranular separation distance, from 1 to 10 Å. We found that, within a C-S-H grain and between C-S-H grains, pores are completely filled with water for %RH larger than 20%. While the cohesion of the cement paste is mainly driven by the calcium ions in the C-S-H, water facilitates a disjoining behavior inside a C-S-H grain. Between C-S-H grains, confined water diminishes or enhances the cohesion of the material depending on the intergranular distance. At very low %RH, the loss of water increases the cohesion within a C-S-H grain and reduces the cohesion between C-S-H grains. These findings provide insights into the behavior of C-S-H in dry or high-temperature environments, with a loss of cohesion between C-S-H grains due to the loss of water content. Such quantification provides the necessary baseline to understand cement paste damaging upon extreme thermal, mechanical, and salt-rich environments.

  1. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  2. Laser opto-acoustic study of phase transitions in metals confined by transparent dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivochkin, A. Yu.; Kaptilniy, A. G.; Karabutov, A. A.; Ksenofontov, D. M.

    2012-07-01

    First-order phase transitions in metal induced by nanosecond laser pulse are studied here. The metal surface is irradiated through a layer of transparent dielectric—an optical glass. Such confinement considerably increases the efficiency of pressure generation at the metal surface. This technique allows to obtain near-critical states of metals—with temperatures ˜104 K and pressures ˜104 atm with table-top equipment. At the same time the glass prevents the ablation plume formation—so the surface temperature can be measured using thermal radiation data. An experimental setup for simultaneous measurements of pressure, temperature and reflectivity was assembled based on the elaborated method of experimental research. The processes of melting of lead and boiling of mercury were studied. The onset of the phase transition process led to a considerable tightening of the pressure pulse. A substantial drop of surface reflectivity due to increase of temperature and decrease of density was observed.

  3. Global and pedestal confinement in JET with a Be/W metallic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Saarelma, S.; Alper, B.; Angioni, C.; Bilkova, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Brezinsek, S.; Buratti, P.; Calabro, G.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giovannozzi, E.; Groth, M.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Leyland, M. J.; Lomas, P.; de la Luna, E.; Kempenaars, M.; Maddison, G.; Maggi, C.; Mantica, P.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I.; Osborne, T.; Rimini, F.; Scannell, R.; Solano, E. R.; Snyder, P. B.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; de Vries, Peter; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2014-04-01

    Type I ELMy H-mode operation in JET with the ITER-like Be/W wall (JET-ILW) generally occurs at lower pedestal pressures compared to those with the full carbon wall (JET-C). The pedestal density is similar but the pedestal temperature where type I ELMs occur is reduced and below to the so-called critical type I-type III transition temperature reported in JET-C experiments. Furthermore, the confinement factor H98(y,2) in type I ELMy H-mode baseline plasmas is generally lower in JET-ILW compared to JET-C at low power fractions Ploss/Pthr,08 < 2 (where Ploss is (Pin - dW/dt), and Pthr,08 the L-H power threshold from Martin et al 2008 (J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 123 012033)). Higher power fractions have thus far not been achieved in the baseline plasmas. At Ploss/Pthr,08 > 2, the confinement in JET-ILW hybrid plasmas is similar to that in JET-C. A reduction in pedestal pressure is the main reason for the reduced confinement in JET-ILW baseline ELMy H-mode plasmas where typically H98(y,2) = 0.8 is obtained, compared to H98(y,2) = 1.0 in JET-C. In JET-ILW hybrid plasmas a similarly reduced pedestal pressure is compensated by an increased peaking of the core pressure profile resulting in H98(y,2) ⩽ 1.25. The pedestal stability has significantly changed in high triangularity baseline plasmas where the confinement loss is also most apparent. Applying the same stability analysis for JET-C and JET-ILW, the measured pedestal in JET-ILW is stable with respect to the calculated peeling-ballooning stability limit and the ELM collapse time has increased to 2 ms from typically 200 µs in JET-C. This indicates that changes in the pedestal stability may have contributed to the reduced pedestal confinement in JET-ILW plasmas. A comparison of EPED1 pedestal pressure prediction with JET-ILW experimental data in over 500 JET-C and JET-ILW baseline and hybrid plasmas shows a good agreement with 0.8 < (measured pped)/(predicted pped,EPED) < 1.2, but that the role of triangularity is generally

  4. PKL reactor tank bottom pressures in accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Tudor, A.A.

    1987-03-10

    Nuclear Engineering Division requested estimates of the maximum PKL reactor tank pressures associated with postulated reactor accidents. Tank bottom pressures calculated in establishing confinement protection limits (CPL) in Mark 16B-31 and Mark 22 reactor charges are given in this document.

  5. Role of Confinement on Adsorption and Dynamics of Ethane and an Ethane–CO 2 Mixture in Mesoporous CPG Silica

    DOE PAGES

    Patankar, Sumant; Gautam, Siddharth; Rother, Gernot; ...

    2016-02-10

    It was found that ethane is confined to mineral and organic pores in certain shale formations. Effects of confinement on structural and dynamic properties of ethane in mesoporous controlled pore glass (CPG) were studied by gravimetric adsorption and quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements. The obtained isotherms and scattering data complement each other by quantifying the relative strength of the solid–fluid interactions and the transport properties of the fluid under confinement, respectively. We used a magnetic suspension balance to measure the adsorption isotherms at two temperatures and over a range of pressures corresponding to a bulk density range of 0.01–0.35 g/cm3.more » Key confinement effects were highlighted through differences between isotherms for the two pore sizes. A comparison was made with previously published isotherms for CO2 on the same CPG materials. Behavior of ethane in the smaller pore size was probed further using quasi-elastic neutron scattering. By extracting the self-diffusivity and residence time, we were able to study the effect of pressure and transition from gaseous to supercritical densities on the dynamics of confined ethane. Moreover, a temperature variation QENS study was also completed with pure ethane and a CO2–ethane mixture. Activation energies extracted from the Arrhenius plots show the effects of CO2 addition on ethane mobility.« less

  6. Confinement-induced resonance in quasi-one-dimensional systems under transversely anisotropic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Bohloul, Seyyed S.; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui; Drummond, Peter D.

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the confinement-induced resonance for quasi-one-dimensional quantum systems under transversely anisotropic confinement, using a two-body s-wave-scattering model in the zero-energy collision limit. We predict a single resonance for any transverse anisotropy, whose position shows a slight downshift with increasing anisotropy. We compare our prediction with the recent experimental result by Haller [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.153203 104, 153203 (2010)], in which two resonances are observed in the presence of transverse anisotropy. The discrepancy between theory and experiment remains to be resolved.

  7. Structural characteristics of liquid nitromethane at the nanoscale confinement in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingzhe; Lai, Weipeng; Yu, Tao; Ge, Zhongxue; Kang, Ying

    2014-10-01

    The stability of energetic materials confined in the carbon nanotubes can be improved at ambient pressure and room temperature, leading to potential energy storage and controlled energy release. However, the microscopic structure of confined energetic materials and the role played by the confinement size are still fragmentary. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the structural characteristics of liquid nitromethane (NM), one of the simplest energetic materials, confined in a series of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) changing from (5,5) to (16,16) at ambient conditions. The simulation results show that the size-dependent ordered structures of NM with preferred orientations are formed inside the tubular cavities driven by the van der Waals attractions between NM and SWNT together with the dipole-dipole interactions of NM, giving rise to a higher local mass density than that of bulk NM. The NM dipoles prefer to align parallel along the SWNT axis in an end-to-end fashion inside all the nanotubes except the (7,7) SWNT where a unique staggered orientation of NM dipoles perpendicular to the SWNT axis is observed. As the SWNT radius increases, the structural arrangements and dipole orientations of NM become disordered as a result of the weakening of van der Waals interactions between NM and SWNT.

  8. Phase change of a confined subcooled simple liquid in a nanoscale cavity.

    PubMed

    Schoen, P A E; Poulikakos, D; Arcidiacono, S

    2005-04-01

    The phase transition of a simple liquid bounded between two parallel walls a few nanometers apart is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. Vapor nucleation in a liquid confined in a microchannel of only a few nanometers in size cannot be achieved by increasing the temperature at the wall. Already small changes in temperature cause a large rise in pressure, in terms of orders of magnitude. On the other hand, using the fact that some fluids thermally contract on cooling, e.g., the argon liquid investigated here, reducing the temperature places the fluid in the liquid-vapor coexistence regime. If the bottom wall temperature is further reduced, the fluid will crystallize starting from the bottom surface, creating a "frozen" bubble in the crystallized state. It was found that the confining walls and not the quenching rate primarily affect the crystallization process. However, the fastest cooling rate investigated herein led to a decrease of the boiling initiation temperature. At a lower cooling rate, the vapor nucleation temperature was the same as the equilibrium boiling temperature for the confined liquid. Small temperatures in the confined system result in dominating attraction forces at the fluid-wall interface exposing the fluid to tensile stress. The increased influence of the walls results in a significant decrease of the boiling as well as freezing temperatures.

  9. The dependence of Ammonium-Nitrate Fuel-Oil (ANFO) detonation on confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Scott I.

    2016-11-17

    As detonation is a coupled fluid-chemical process, flow divergence inside the detonation reaction zone can strongly influence detonation velocity and energy release. Such divergence is responsible for the diameter-effect and failure-diameter phenomena in condensed-phase explosives and particularly dominant in detonation of nonideal explosives such as Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil (ANFO). In this study, the effect of reaction zone flow divergence on ANFO detonation was explored through variation of the inert confinement and explosive diameter in the rate-stick geometry with cylinder expansion experiments. New tests are discussed and compared to prior experiments. Presented results include the detonation velocity as amore » function of diameter and confinement, reaction zone times, detonation product isentropes and energies, as well as sonic surface pressures and velocities. Product energy densities and isentropes were found to increase with detonation velocity, indicating more complete chemical reaction with increased detonation velocity. In addition, detonation reaction zone times were found to scale with the acoustic transit time of the confiner wall and used to show that the ANFO diameter effect scaled with the reaction zone time for a particle along the flow centerline, regardless of the confinement. Such a result indicates that the ANFO reaction mechanisms are sufficiently slow that the centerline fluid expansion timescale is a limiting factor controlling detonation velocity and energy release.« less

  10. The dependence of Ammonium-Nitrate Fuel-Oil (ANFO) detonation on confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I.

    2016-11-17

    As detonation is a coupled fluid-chemical process, flow divergence inside the detonation reaction zone can strongly influence detonation velocity and energy release. Such divergence is responsible for the diameter-effect and failure-diameter phenomena in condensed-phase explosives and particularly dominant in detonation of nonideal explosives such as Ammonium Nitrate and Fuel Oil (ANFO). In this study, the effect of reaction zone flow divergence on ANFO detonation was explored through variation of the inert confinement and explosive diameter in the rate-stick geometry with cylinder expansion experiments. New tests are discussed and compared to prior experiments. Presented results include the detonation velocity as a function of diameter and confinement, reaction zone times, detonation product isentropes and energies, as well as sonic surface pressures and velocities. Product energy densities and isentropes were found to increase with detonation velocity, indicating more complete chemical reaction with increased detonation velocity. In addition, detonation reaction zone times were found to scale with the acoustic transit time of the confiner wall and used to show that the ANFO diameter effect scaled with the reaction zone time for a particle along the flow centerline, regardless of the confinement. Such a result indicates that the ANFO reaction mechanisms are sufficiently slow that the centerline fluid expansion timescale is a limiting factor controlling detonation velocity and energy release.

  11. Observation of sub-detonative responses in confined high density HMX-based PBXs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumming, Andrew; Wood, Andrew; Steward, Paul; Ottley, Philip; Gould, Peter; Lewtas, Ian

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes experiments and modelling aimed at understanding the behaviour of highly loaded (90%-95%) pressed HMX-based PBXs, when subjected to shock compression and ignition by means of distinct mechanical and thermal insults under confinement. In order to separate the role of the stimuli, a test has been designed where a metal impactor is propelled at test samples using a well characterised propellant over a range of velocities to produce various levels of mechanical damage. The impactor is then heated using a characterised pyrotechnic composition which ignites the mechanically damaged explosive. Tubes have been designed to examine the effect of confinement at burst pressures of 218.5MPa and 120MPa. The high confinement tubes employ polycarbonate windows and the low confinement tubes are manufactured from polycarbonate blocks to allow the reaction of the energetic material to be captured using high-speed video. Tests carried out using these tubes have given a good insight into the processes occurring. Modelling runs have predicted an oscillating compressive wave in the explosive and considerable damage at either end of the explosive column. The latter leads to potential deconsolidation once the donor charge has burnt out allowing increased burning and violence.

  12. Isolation and confinement - Considerations for colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses three types of isolation (sensory/perceptual, temporal, and social) that could adversely affect mankind in space. The literature dealing with laboratory and field experiments relevant to these areas is summarized and suggestions are given for dealing with these problems within the space colony community. Also, consideration is given to the potential effects of physical confinement and the need for usable space. Finally, a modification of Maslow's hierarchy of needs is proposed as a theoretical framework to understand and investigate mankind's psychological needs in space.

  13. Central cell confinement in MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1981-05-05

    The point code TANDEM has been used to survey the range of plasma parameters which can be attained in MFTF-B. The code solves for the electron and ion densities and temperatures in the central cell, yin-yang, barrier, and A-cell regions as well as the plasma potential in each region. In these studies, the A-cell sloshing ion beams were fixed while the neutral beams in the yin-yang and central cell, the gas feed in the central cell, and the applied ECRH power ..beta.., central cell ion density and temperature, and the confining potential are discussed.

  14. Confined kinematics of suspended rigid fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, A.; Perez, M.; Abisset-Chavanne, E.; Chinesta, F.; Keunings, R.

    2016-10-01

    We address the extension of Jeffery's model, governing the orientation of rods immersed in a Newtonian fluid, to confined regimes occurring when the thickness of the flow domain is narrower than the rod length. The main modelling ingredients concern: (i) the consideration of the rod interactions with one or both gap walls and their effects on the rod orientation kinematics; (ii) the consideration of non-uniform strain rates at the scale of the rod, requiring higher-order descriptions. Such scenarios are very close to those encountered in real composites forming processes and have never been appropriately addressed from a microstructural point of view.

  15. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-12-31

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  16. Summary of progress in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been very rapid over the past two years. Significant advances have been made in the production of smooth laser beams, the focusing of light ions beams, and the development of heavy ion accelerators. The availability of advanced target diagnostics on several major drivers has resulted in an extensive database of target performance over a wide range of conditions. Theoretical models of ICF targets are approaching the predictive level with two and even three dimensional calculations becoming routine. Within the next several years information should be available to allow confident extrapolation to ignition on the next generation driver.

  17. Effective diffusion of confined active Brownian swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Mario; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    We find theoretically the effect of confinement and thermal fluctuations, on the diffusivity of a spherical active swimmer moving inside a two-dimensional narrow cavity of general shape. The explicit formulas for the effective diffusion coefficient of a swimmer moving inside two particular cavities are presented. We also compare our analytical results with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement. L.D. thanks Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACyT) Mexico, for partial support by Grant No. 176452. M. S. thanks CONACyT and Programa de Mejoramiento de Profesorado (PROMEP) for partially funding this work under Grant No. 103.5/13/6732.

  18. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  19. Anomalous diffusion in confined turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, G; De Lillo, F; Musacchio, S

    2012-06-01

    Turbulent convection in quasi-one-dimensional geometry is studied by means of high-resolution direct numerical simulations within the framework of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence. Geometrical confinement has dramatic effects on the dynamics of the turbulent flow, inducing a transition from superdiffusive to subdiffusive evolution of the mixing layer and arresting the growth of kinetic energy. A nonlinear diffusion model is shown to reproduce accurately the above phenomenology. The model is used to predict, without free parameters, the spatiotemporal evolution of the heat flux profile and the dependence of the Nusselt number on the Rayleigh number.

  20. Particle dispersion in confined turbulent swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1986-06-01

    This paper reports a numerical investigation of confined swirling flows of gas-particle mixtures. A recently developed two-fluid, multiple-scale mixing model is applied to study the influence of particles on the intensity of the reverse flows of the gas phase and the effects of swirl on the particle dispersion in an annular expanding chamber under isothermal condition. The calculations were made for different swirl strength of injection of the annular jet into the mixing chamber. Results agree well qualitatively with experimental information available. It is also found that the calculated flow fields depend heavily on the prescription of the inlet flow conditions.

  1. Particle dispersion in confined turbulent swirling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports a numerical investigation of confined swirling flows of gas-particle mixtures. A recently developed two-fluid, multiple-scale mixing model is applied to study the influence of particles on the intensity of the reverse flows of the gas phase and the effects of swirl on the particle dispersion in an annular expanding chamber under isothermal condition. The calculations were made for different swirl strength of injection of the annular jet into the mixing chamber. Results agree well qualitatively with experimental information available. It is also found that the calculated flow fields depend heavily on the prescription of the inlet flow conditions.

  2. Confined systems within arbitrary enclosed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, B. L.; Cohen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of electronic confinement in atoms and molecules is presented. This is based on the electronic flux J which is assumed to vanish on some notional bounding surface of arbitrary shape. J is necessarily calculated using an approximate wave-function, whose parameters are chosen to satisfy the required surface conditions. This model embraces the results of all previous calculations for which the wave-functions or their derivatives vanish on conveniently shaped surfaces, but now extends the theory to more general surfaces. Examples include one-centre hydrogen-like atoms, the valence state of Li and the two centre molecular systems {{{H}}}2+ and {{HeH}}++.

  3. Pressurized pyrolysis of rice husk in an inert gas sweeping fixed-bed reactor with a focus on bio-oil deoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yangyang; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The pyrolysis of rice husk was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor with a sweeping nitrogen gas to investigate the effects of pressure on the pyrolytic behaviors. The release rates of main gases during the pyrolysis, the distributions of four products (char, bio-oil, water and gas), the elemental compositions of char, bio-oil and gas, and the typical compounds in bio-oil were determined. It was found that the elevation of pressure from 0.1MPa to 5.0MPa facilitated the dehydration and decarboxylation of bio-oil, and the bio-oils obtained under the elevated pressures had significantly less oxygen and higher calorific value than those obtained under atmospheric pressure. The former bio-oils embraced more acetic acid, phenols and guaiacols. The elevation of pressure increased the formation of CH4 partially via the gas-phase reactions. An attempt is made in this study to clarify "the pure pressure effect" and "the combined effect with residence time".

  4. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

  5. Hierarchical wrinkling in a confined permeable biogel

    PubMed Central

    Leocmach, Mathieu; Nespoulous, Mathieu; Manneville, Sébastien; Gibaud, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Confined thin surfaces may wrinkle as a result of the growth of excess material. Elasticity or gravity usually sets the wavelength. We explore new selection mechanisms based on hydrodynamics. First, inspired by yoghurt-making processes, we use caseins (a family of milk proteins) as pH-responsive building blocks and the acidulent glucono-δ-lactone to design a porous biogel film immersed in a confined buoyancy-matched viscous medium. Under specific boundary conditions yet without any external stimulus, the biogel film spontaneously wrinkles in cascade. Second, using a combination of titration, rheology, light microscopy, and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that, during continuous acidification, the gel first shrinks and then swells, inducing wrinkling. Third, taking into account both Darcy flow through the gel and Poiseuille flow in the surrounding solvent, we develop a model that correctly predicts the wrinkling wavelength. Our results should be universal for acid-induced protein gels because they are based on pH-induced charge stabilization/destabilization and therefore could set a benchmark to gain fundamental insights into wrinkled biological tissues, to texture food, or to design surfaces for optical purposes. PMID:26601296

  6. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ikonen, Timo; Jónsson, Hannes; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2014-02-07

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  7. Fire Risk Analysis for Armenian NPP Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Poghosyan, Shahen; Malkhasyan, Albert; Bznuni, Surik; Amirjanyan, Armen

    2006-07-01

    Major fire occurred at Armenian NPP (ANPP) in October 1982 showed that fire-induced initiating events (IE) can have dominant contribution in overall risk of core damage. Probabilistic Safety Assessment study for fire-induced initiating events for ANPP was initiated in 2002. Analysis was performed for compartments fires in which could result in failure of components which are necessary for reactor cold shutdown. Analysis shows that main risk from fire at ANPP is conditioned by fire in cable tunnels 61-64. Meanwhile fire in confinement compartments don't have significant contribution to overall risk of core damage. The exception is so called 'confinement valves compartment' (room no.A-013/2) fire (more than 7.5% of CDF) in which fire could result in the loss of coolant accident with unavailability of primary makeup system, which directly leads to core damage. Detailed analysis of this problem that is common for typical WWER-440/230 reactors with no hermetic MCPs and recommendations for solution are presented in this paper. (authors)

  8. Congestion and communication in confined ant traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Gold, Gregory; Zangwill, Andrew; Goodisman, Michael A. D.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-03-01

    Many social animals move and communicate within confined spaces. In subterranean fire ants Solenopsis invicta, mobility within crowded nest tunnels is important for resource and information transport. Within confined tunnels, communication and traffic flow are at odds: trafficking ants communicate through tactile interactions while stopped, yet ants that stop to communicate impose physical obstacles on the traffic. We monitor the bi-directional flow of fire ant workers in laboratory tunnels of varied diameter D. The persistence time of communicating ant aggregations, τ, increases approximately linearly with the number of participating ants, n. The sensitivity of traffic flow increases as D decreases and diverges at a minimum diameter, Dc. A cellular automata model incorporating minimal traffic features--excluded volume and communication duration--reproduces features of the experiment. From the model we identify a competition between information transfer and the need to maintain jam-free traffic flow. We show that by balancing information transfer and traffic flow demands, an optimum group strategy exists which maximizes information throughput. We acknowledge funding from NSF PoLS #0957659 and #PHY-1205878.

  9. Edge states in confined active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souslov, Anton; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    Recently, topologically protected edge modes have been proposed and realized in both mechanical and acoustic metamaterials. In one class of such metamaterials, Time-Reversal Symmetry is broken, and, to achieve this TRS breaking in mechanical and acoustic systems, an external energy input must be used. For example, motors provide a driving force that uses energy and, thus, explicitly break TRS. As a result, motors have been used as an essential component in the design of topological metamaterials. By contrast, we explore the design of topological metamaterials that use a class of far-from-equilibrium liquids, called polar active liquids, that spontaneously break TRS. We thus envision the confinement of a polar active liquid to a prescribed geometry in order to realize topological order with broken time-reversal symmetry. We address the design of the requisite geometries, for example a regular honeycomb lattice composed of annular channels, in which the active liquid may be confined. We also consider the physical character of the active liquid that, when introduced into the prescribed geometry, will spontaneously form the flow pattern of a metamaterial with topologically protected edge states. Finally, we comment on potential experimental realizations of such metamaterials.

  10. Confined PBX 9501 gap reinitiation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, Terry R; Hill, Larry G; Lam, Kin

    2009-01-01

    For explosive systems that exhibit gaps or cracks between their internal components (either by design or mechanical failure), measurable time delays exist for detonation waves crossing them. Reinitiation across such gaps is dependent on the type of explosive, gap width, gap morphology, confinement, and temperature effects. To examine this reinitiation effect, a series of tests has been conducted to measure the time delay across a prescribed gap within an 'infinitely' confined PBX 9501 system. Detonation breakout along the explosive surface is measured with a streak camera, and flow features are examined during reinitiation near the gap. Such tests allow for quantitative determination of the time delay corresponding to the time of initiation across a given gap oriented normal to the direction of the detonation wave. Measured time delays can be compared with numerical calculations, making it possible to validate initiation models as well as estimate detonation run-up distances. Understanding this reinitiation behavior is beneficial for the design and evaluation of explosive systems that require precision timing and performance.

  11. Instability and Fracture of Confined Elastic Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Rebecca; Shull, Kenneth; Roos, Alexandra; Creton, Costantino

    2002-03-01

    During adhesive failure in confined elastic systems, crack propagation occurs in an unstable manner. The arising instabilities can be classified as either bulk or interfacial. Both types of instabilities have been observed in a variety of systems. However, a quantitative understanding of the phenomena has yet to be achieved. In this work, both interfacial and bulk instabilities, as well as the transition between these two categories, has been investigated using a thermoreversible triblock copolymer gel. Experiments to study the failure modes of confined elastic layers were performed using an axisymmetric adhesion test. In these tests, a rigid glass punch was brought into contact with a thin gel layer. Load and displacement data were collected as the punch was retracted from the sample surface. Images of the interface between the probe and sample, displaying the deformation morphology, were also collected during testing. These tests allowed exploration of interfacial phenomena. For some experiments, the punch was further bonded to the sample by heating, resulting in a change in the mode of deformation experienced by the thin gel layer.

  12. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-11-01

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (TL ≃ 225 K). The second, T* ˜ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility KT(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient αP(T, P) in the P-T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (TL) and the onset of the unfolding process (T*).

  13. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ≃ 225 K). The second, T{sup *} ∼ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient α{sub P}(T, P) in the P–T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  14. Regimes of DNA confined in a nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Scaling regimes for polymers confined to tubular channels are well established when the channel cross-sectional dimension is either very small (Odjik regime) or large (classic de Gennes regime) relative to the polymer Kuhn length. In the literature, there is no clear consensus regarding the intermediate region and if subregimes even exist to connect these two classic bounding regimes. The confluence of emerging single DNA mapping technologies and a resurged interest in the fundamental properties of confined polymers has led to extensive research in this area using DNA as a model system. Due to the DNA molecule's properties and limitations of nanofabrication, most experiments are performed in this intermediate regime with channel dimensions of a few Kuhn lengths. Here we use simulations and theory to reconcile conflicting theories and show that there are indeed extended de Gennes, partial alignment and hairpin regimes located between the two classic regimes. Simulations results for both chain extension and free energy support the existence of these regimes. This research was supported by the National Research Foundation Singapore through the Singapore MIT Alliance for Research and Technology's research program in BioSystems and Micromechanics, the National Science Foundation (CBET-1335938).

  15. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  16. Quantum chromodynamics near the confinement limit

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1985-09-01

    These nine lectures deal at an elementary level with the strong interaction between quarks and its implications for the structure of hadrons. Quarkonium systems are studied as a means for measuring the interquark interaction. This is presumably (part of) the answer a solution to QCD must yield, if it is indeed the correct theory of the strong interactions. Some elements of QCD are reviewed, and metaphors for QCD as a confining theory are introduced. The 1/N expansion is summarized as a way of guessing the consequences of QCD for hadron physics. Lattice gauge theory is developed as a means for going beyond perturbation theory in the solution of QCD. The correspondence between statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and field theory is made, and simple spin systems are formulated on the lattice. The lattice analog of local gauge invariance is developed, and analytic methods for solving lattice gauge theory are considered. The strong-coupling expansion indicates the existence of a confining phase, and the renormalization group provides a means for recovering the consequences of continuum field theory. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of lattice theories give evidence for the phase structure of gauge theories, yield an estimate for the string tension characterizing the interquark force, and provide an approximate description of the quarkonium potential in encouraging good agreement with what is known from experiment.

  17. Nematode locomotion in unconfined and confined fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilbao, Alejandro; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Vanapalli, Siva A.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2013-08-01

    The millimeter-long soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans propels itself by producing undulations that propagate along its body and turns by assuming highly curved shapes. According to our recent study [V. Padmanabhan et al., PLoS ONE 7, e40121 (2012), 10.1371/journal.pone.0040121] all these postures can be accurately described by a piecewise-harmonic-curvature model. We combine this curvature-based description with highly accurate hydrodynamic bead models to evaluate the normalized velocity and turning angles for a worm swimming in an unconfined fluid and in a parallel-wall cell. We find that the worm moves twice as fast and navigates more effectively under a strong confinement, due to the large transverse-to-longitudinal resistance-coefficient ratio resulting from the wall-mediated far-field hydrodynamic coupling between body segments. We also note that the optimal swimming gait is similar to the gait observed for nematodes swimming in high-viscosity fluids. Our bead models allow us to determine the effects of confinement and finite thickness of the body of the nematode on its locomotion. These effects are not accounted for by the classical resistive-force and slender-body theories.

  18. Modeling the interaction of microbubbles: Effects of proximity, confinement, and excitation amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemair, W.; Tukovic, Z.; Jasak, H.; Poulikakos, D.; Kurtcuoglu, V.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of closely spaced microbubbles (MBs) exposed to a transient external pressure field is relevant for a variety of industrial and medical applications. We present a computational framework employing an interface tracking approach to model the transient dynamics of multiple, interacting, insonated MBs in arbitrary settings. In particular, this technique allows studying the effects of mutual proximity, confinement, and variations in excitation amplitude on the translatory motion of pairs of differently sized MBs. Domains of mutual repulsion or attraction are observed for closely spaced MBs in the investigated range of excitation frequencies. The repulsion domain widens and shifts to lower frequencies with increasing excitation pressure amplitude. When the MBs are confined in rigid tubes of decreasing diameters, we observe a shift of the translatory patterns towards lower frequencies, accompanied by a change in relative strength of the two translation modes. This effect is correlated to a decrease of the resonance frequency due to confinement which causes changes in oscillation amplitude and phase shift between the bubble vibrations. Coupling to the viscous host liquid gives rise to phenomena such as collective MB drift, non-symmetric attraction or repulsion, and reversal of translation direction. A system comprising six MBs inside a narrow tube highlights the potential of the computational framework to treat complex setups with multiple bubbles.

  19. Basis set effects on the Hartree-Fock description of confined many-electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, Jorge; Hernández-Pérez, Julio M.; Ramírez, José-Zeferino; Vargas, Rubicelia

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the basis sets designed by Clementi, Bunge and Thakkar, for atomic systems, have been used to obtain the electronic structure of confined many-electron atoms by using Roothaan's approach in the Hartree-Fock context with a new code written in C, which uses the message-passing interface library. The confinement was imposed as Ludeña suggested to simulate walls with infinity potential. For closed-shell atoms, the Thakkar basis set functions give the best total energies (TE) as a function of the confinement radius, obtaining the following ordering: TE(Thakkar) < TE(Bunge) < TE(Clementi). However, for few open-shell atoms this ordering is not preserved and a trend, for the basis sets, is not observed. Although there are differences between the TE predicted by these basis set functions, the corresponding pressures are similar to each other; it means that changes in the total energy are described almost in the same way by using any of these basis sets. By analysing the total energy as a function of the inverse of the volume we propose an equation of state; for regions of small volumes, this equation predicts that the pressure is inversely proportional to the square of the volume.

  20. From Pauli's birthday to 'Confinement Resonances' - a potted history of Quantum Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, J. P.

    2013-06-01

    Quantum Confinement is in some sense a new subject. International meetings dedicated to Quantum Confinement have occurred only recently in Mexico City (the first in 2010 and the second, in September 2011). However, at least in principle, the subject has existed since a very long time. Surprisingly perhaps, it lay dormant for many years, for want of suitable experimental examples. However, when one looks carefully at its origin, it turns out to have a long and distinguished history. In fact, the problem of quantum confinement raises a number of very interesting issues concerning boundary conditions in elementary quantum mechanics and how they should be applied to real problems. Some of these issues were missed in the earliest papers, but are implicit in the structure of quantum mechanics, and lead to the notion of Confinement Resonances, the existence of which was predicted theoretically more than ten years ago. Although, for several reasons, these resonances remained elusive for a very long time, they have now been observed experimentally, which puts the whole subject in much better shape and, together with the advent of metallofullerenes, has contributed to its revival.

  1. Block copolymer morphologies confined by square-shaped particle: Hard and soft confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiyi; Yang, Wenyan; Hu, Kaiyan

    2016-11-01

    The self-assembly of diblock copolymers confined around one square-shaped particle is studied systematically within two-dimensional self-consistent field theory (SCFT). In this model, we assume that the thin block copolymer film is confined in the vicinity of a square-shaped particle by a homopolymer melt, which is equivalent to the poor solvents. Multiple sequences of square-shaped particle-induced copolymer aggregates with different shapes and self-assembled internal morphologies are predicted as functions of the particle size, the structural portion of the copolymer, and the volume fraction of the copolymer. A rich variety of aggregates are found with complex internal self-assembled morphologies including complex structures of the vesicle, with one or several inverted micelle surrounded by the outer monolayer with the particle confined in the core. These results demonstrate that the assemblies of diblock copolymers formed around the square-shaped particle in poor solvents are of immediate interest to the assembly of copolymer and the morphology of biomembrane in the confined environment, as well as to the transitions of vesicles to micelles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 20804060) and the Research Foundation of Chongqing University of Science and Technology, China (Grant No. CK2013B16).

  2. Laser absorption spectroscopy of water vapor confined in nanoporous alumina: wall collision line broadening and gas diffusion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Tomas; Lewander, Märta; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-08-02

    We demonstrate high-resolution tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) of water vapor confined in nanoporous alumina. Strong multiple light scattering results in long photon pathlengths (1 m through a 6 mm sample). We report on strong line broadening due to frequent wall collisions (gas-surface interactions). For the water vapor line at 935.685 nm, the HWHM of confined molecules are about 4.3 GHz as compared to 2.9 GHz for free molecules (atmospheric pressure). Gas diffusion is also investigated, and in contrast to molecular oxygen (that moves rapidly in and out of the alumina), the exchange of water vapor is found very slow.

  3. Pressure gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, S.

    1985-04-02

    A pressure receiving element for receiving an external pressure is attached to one end of a body and a temperature compensating diaphragm is attached to the other end of the body. A coupling shaft disposed in the body is fixed at both ends to the pressure receiving element and the diaphragm, respectively. A liquid is sealed in the body and means is provided for detecting displacement or force applied to the coupling shaft in accordance with a pressure received by the pressure receiving element. The diaphragm has corrugations of concentric circles and the crests of a plurality of them are made flat and one of the flat crests is fixed to the body. The effective area of the diaphragm inside of the flat crest that is fixed to the body is selected substantially to be equal to the effective area of the pressure receiving element.

  4. Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without edge localized modes on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, B. A. Nazikian, R. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Belli, E. A.; Staebler, G. M.; Evans, T. E.; Smith, S. P.; Chrobak, C.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McKee, G. R.; Orlov, D. M.; Chrystal, C.

    2015-05-15

    Impurity transport in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] is investigated in stationary high confinement (H-mode) regimes without edge localized modes (ELMs). In plasmas maintained by resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), ELM-suppression, and QH-mode, the confinement time of fluorine (Z = 9) is equivalent to that in ELMing discharges with 40 Hz ELMs. For selected discharges with impurity injection, the impurity particle confinement time compared to the energy confinement time is in the range of τ{sub p}/τ{sub e}≈2−3. In QH-mode operation, the impurity confinement time is shown to be smaller for intense, coherent magnetic, and density fluctuations of the edge harmonic oscillation than weaker fluctuations. Transport coefficients are derived from the time evolution of the impurity density profile and compared to neoclassical and turbulent transport models NEO and TGLF. Neoclassical transport of fluorine is found to be small compared to the experimental values. In the ELMing and RMP ELM-suppressed plasma, the impurity transport is affected by the presence of tearing modes. For radii larger than the mode radius, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is smaller than the experimental value by a factor of 2–3, while the convective velocity is within error estimates. Low levels of diffusion are observed for radii smaller than the tearing mode radius. In the QH-mode plasma investigated, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is higher inside of ρ=0.4 and lower outside of 0.4 than the experiment, and the TGLF convective velocity is more negative by a factor of approximately 1.7.

  5. Pressure enhanced penetration with shaped charge perforators

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, Lewis A.

    2001-01-01

    A downhole tool, adapted to retain a shaped charge surrounded by a superatmospherically pressurized light gas, is employed in a method for perforating a casing and penetrating reservoir rock around a wellbore. Penetration of a shaped charge jet can be enhanced by at least 40% by imploding a liner in the high pressure, light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. The light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is employed to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse.

  6. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  7. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOEpatents

    Piper, Thomas C.; Morgan, John P.; Marchant, Norman J.; Bolton, Steven M.

    1994-01-01

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum florescent display.

  8. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, T. C.; Morgan, J. P.; Marchant, N. J.; Bolton, S. M.

    A high precision pressure transducer system for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank is presented. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in a battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on-board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display.

  9. Production and study of high-beta plasma confined by a superconducting dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, D.T.; Hansen, A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ortiz, E.; Boxer, A.C.; Ellsworth, J.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.; Mahar, S.; Roach, A.

    2006-05-15

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [J. Kesner et al., in Fusion Energy 1998, 1165 (1999)] is a new research facility that is exploring the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. Unlike other configurations in which stability depends on curvature and magnetic shear, magnetohydrodynamic stability of a dipole derives from plasma compressibility. Theoretically, the dipole magnetic geometry can stabilize a centrally peaked plasma pressure that exceeds the local magnetic pressure ({beta}>1), and the absence of magnetic shear allows particle and energy confinement to decouple. In initial experiments, long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 s have been produced that are consistent with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Detailed measurements have been made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. In these initial experiments, the high-field superconducting floating coil was supported by three thin supports. The plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 and 6.4 GHz, and a population of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV, dominates the plasma pressure. Creation of high-pressure, high-beta plasma is possible only when intense hot electron interchange instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. A dramatic transition from a low-density, low-beta regime to a more quiescent, high-beta regime is observed when the plasma fueling rate and confinement time become sufficiently large.

  10. Solid-liquid critical behavior of a cylindrically confined Lennard-Jones fluid.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kenji; Koga, Kenichiro

    2015-07-28

    Extensive molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the phase behavior of Lennard-Jones particles confined in a quasi-one-dimensional hydrophobic nanopore. We provide unambiguous evidence for a solid-liquid critical point by investigating (i) isotherms in the pressure-volume plane, (ii) the spontaneous solid-liquid phase separation below a certain temperature, (iii) diverging heat capacity and isothermal compressibility as a certain point is approached, (iv) continuous change of dynamical and structural properties above the point, (v) the finite-size scaling analysis of the density distribution below and above the point. The result combined with earlier studies of confined water suggests that the solid-liquid critical point is not uncommon in quasi-one- and quasi-two-dimensional fluids.

  11. Electron Temperature and Density Measurements by the Unicity of Particle Confinement Time on the TCABR Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Machida, M.; Nascimento, I. C.; Severo, J. H. F.; Sanada, E. K.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Daltrini, A. M.

    2006-12-04

    The electron temperature Te and density ne at inner border side of plasma on TCABR tokamak are determined using the unicity of particle confinement time {tau}p. In this method, the signals from hydrogen Balmer series emissions like H alfa, beta and gama are measured with an absolutely intensity calibrated spectrometer during the discharge and the particle confinement time then is evaluated using these three emissions for large range of electron temperature and density, until the unique value of {tau}p is achieved. The results show that during the current plateau, the values of the edge electron density and temperature in high fill density discharge, present much strong variations compared to the low fill pressure because of larger edge turbulence activity.

  12. Influence of boundary conditions and confinement on nonlocal effects in flows of wormlike micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Masselon, Chloé; Colin, Annie; Olmsted, Peter D

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we report on the influence of different geometric and boundary constraints on nonlocal (spatially inhomogeneous) effects in wormlike micellar systems. In a previous paper, nonlocal effects were observable by measuring the local rheological flow curves of micelles flowing in a microchannel under different pressure drops, which appeared to differ from the flow curve measured using conventional rheometry. Here we show that both the confinement and the boundary conditions can influence those nonlocal effects. The role of the nature of the surface is analyzed in detail using a simple scalar model that incorporates inhomogeneities, which captures the flow behavior in both wide and confined geometries. This leads to an estimate for the nonlocal "diffusion" coefficient (i.e., the shear curvature viscosity) which corresponds to a characteristic length from 1 to 10 microm.

  13. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Faraone, Antonio; Kamitakahara, William; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Leao, Juscelino B; Chang, Sung C; Chen, Sow-hsin H

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We inter- pret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved.

  14. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Si and Ge Nanocrystals in the Quantum Confinement Regime*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcoxon, J. P.; Newcomer, P. P.; Samara, G. A.

    1997-03-01

    Size-selected, crystalline nanoclusters of Si and Ge down to about 2 nm in size were grown in solution inside inverse micellar cages, purified using high pressure liquid chromatography and their optical properties studied. These properties, which reflect the effects of quantum confinement, differ considerably from those obtained on Si and Ge clusters prepared by other methods. Tailorable, visible (red to blue) room temperature photoluminescence due to both near band edge recombination and surface recombination is observed. The optical absorption spectra of the smaller clusters exhibit structure which provides insight into the electronic structure of these clusters. The present results will be compared with results on Si and Ge clusters in glass matrices and on porous Si and will be discussed in terms of recent models of quantum confinement for these materials *This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94Al85000.

  15. Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Faraone, Antonio; Kamitakahara, William A.; Liu, Kao-Hsiang; Mou, Chung-Yuan; Leão, Juscelino B.; Chang, Sung; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    A neutron scattering technique was developed to measure the density of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K and from 1 to 2,900 bars, where bulk water will crystalize. We observed a prominent hysteresis phenomenon in the measured density profiles between warming and cooling scans above 1,000 bars. We interpret this hysteresis phenomenon as support (although not a proof) of the hypothetical existence of a first-order liquid–liquid phase transition of water that would exist in the macroscopic system if crystallization could be avoided in the relevant phase region. Moreover, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under these conditions are valuable to large communities in biology and earth and planetary sciences interested in phenomena in which nanometer-sized water layers are involved. PMID:21746898

  16. The stability of confined radio jets - The role of reflection modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payne, D. G.; Cohn, H.

    1985-01-01

    The linear stability of a confined radio jet is reinvestigated. The roles of both absolute (temporal) and convected (spatial) instability are considered, and it is demonstrated that the two are related through the group velocity. The dispersion relation is analyzed asymptotically for the fundamental and reflection modes. Numerical results are presented for pinching modes. A geometrical interpretation of the modes is presented in terms of the propagation angle and is visualized by contour plots of the pressure perturbation. A confined jet theta M = arc sine (1 + sq rt eta)/M, where eta is the ratio of the internal to the external gas density and M is the Mach number of the jet. The connection between these linear modes and the cross-shaped shock patterns which are seen in laboratory jets, and the implications of these calculations for the development of large-scale features in extragalactic radio jets, are discussed.

  17. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C; Bourne, Mark M; Crooks, William J; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R; Miko, David K; Salazar, William R; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I; Vigil, Georgiana M

    2012-07-13

    Waste will be removed from confinement vessels remaining from 1970s-era experiments. Los Alamos has 9+ spherical confinement vessels remaining from experiments. Each vessel contains {approx} 500 lbs of radioactive debris such as actinide metals and oxides, metals, powdered silica, graphite, and wires and hardware. In order to dispose of the vessels, debris and contamination must be removed. Neutron assay system was designed to assay vessels before and after cleanout. System requirements are: (1) Modular and moveable; (2) Capable of detecting {approx}100g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a 2-inch thick steel sphere with 6 foot diameter; and (3) Capable of safeguards-quality assays. Initial design parameters arethe use of 4-atm {sup 3}He tubes with length of 6 feet, and {sup 3}He tubes embedded in polyethelene for moderation. This paper describes the calibration of the Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) and quantification of its uncertainties. Assay uncertainty depends on five factors: (1) Statistical uncertainty in the assay measurement; (2) Statistical uncertainty in the background measurement; (3) Statistical uncertainty in the isotopics determination - This should be much smaller than the other uncertainties; (4) Systematic uncertainty due to position bias; and (5) Systematic uncertainty due to fluctuations in cosmic ray spallation. This one can be virtually eliminated by performing the background measurement with an empty vessel - but that may not be possible. We used modeling and experiments to quantify the systematic uncertainties. The calibration assumes a uniform distribution of material, but reality will be different. MCNPX modeling was used to quantify the positional bias. The model was benchmarked to build confidence in its results. Material at top of vessel is 44% greater than amount assayed, according to singles. Material near 19-tube detector is 38% less than amount assayed, according to singles. Cosmic ray spallation contributes significantly to the

  18. Diffusion of micrometer-sized soft particles in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Benjamin; Aptowicz, Kevin

    We investigate the diffusion of micrometer sized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) gel particles in confinement. The influence of confinement on the transport of small particles is becoming increasingly important for microfluidics and bio-fluidics. Analytical solutions to this problem are limited to very unique geometries or gross approximations. Computational methods have provided more insight into the problem as well as experimental investigations. However, most research has focused on the hard-sphere problem. In this work, we will explore the diffusion of soft particles in confinement. The dynamics of the particles confined between two parallel walls is captured with video-microscopy. In addition, we use a recently developed technique to measurement confinement of particles in-situ with a precision of 1%. This poster will present some preliminary results of how confinement affects the diffusion of these soft particles. We acknowledge support from Grant DMR-1206231.

  19. Confining individual DNA molecules in an axisymmetric entropy gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Robert D.; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2010-03-01

    Many asymmetric and discontinuous confining environments have been used to study the properties of confined DNA. We have developed a unique method for studying DNA in micropipettes, resulting in a confining environment that is axisymmetric with a continuously changing entropy gradient. An applied electric field forces the chain into sub-micron confinement and fluorescence microscopy is used to track the effect of confinement on the entropy of individual DNA chains. Releasing the electric field, we probe the dynamics of the DNA chain in a continuously changing confinement, yielding a comprehensive study of the entropic force. This technique provides a novel method for studying the effect of polymer chain architecture on entropy. These architectures include knots in polymer chains, cyclic chains, or the presence of histones amongst DNA molecules.

  20. Confined-unconfined changes above longwall coal mining due to increases in fracture porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.J.

    2007-11-15

    Subsidence and strata movement above longwall (total extraction) coal mines produce complex hydrologic responses that can occur independently of drainage to the mine. One response is dewatering from confined to unconfined conditions in bedrock aquifers as a result of loss of water into new void space created by fracture and bedding separations. This dewatering process has been little studied but accounts for several hydraulic and geochemical effects of longwall mining. This article presents a conceptual model of the process and reviews evidence from case studies. Confined bedrock aquifers in subsiding zones exhibit dramatically steep head drops because of the low value of confined storage coefficients relative to the volume of water drained into the new fracture void space. The aquifer changes rapidly to an unconfined condition. Tight units to which air entry is restricted may even develop negative water pressures. In the unconfined state, sulfide minerals present in the strata readily oxidize to soluble hydrated sulfates. When the aquifer re-saturates, these salts are rapidly mobilized and produce a flush of increased sulfate and total dissolved solids (TDS) levels. Observations made in our previous studies in Illinois are consistent with the confined-unconfined model and include rapid head drops, changes to unconfined conditions, and increases in sulfate and TDS during re-saturation of a sandstone aquifer. Studies reported from the Appalachian coalfield show aspects consistent with the model, but in this high-relief fractured setting it is often difficult to distinguish aquifers from aquitards, confined from unconfined states, and the fracture-porosity cause of head drops from several others that occur during mine subsidence.

  1. In-situ air sparging under confined aquifer conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Breeding, L.B.; Swartz, T.E.; Pringle, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    In the summer of 1993, an effort to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air sparging (IAS) and soil vapor extraction (SVE) to remedy jet fuel condition found in Colorado River Terrace deposits was initiated by the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence. Preliminary field tests were performed to develop air injection flow rates, IAS radius of influence, air entry pressure requirements, SVE radii of influence, SVE well head vacuum requirements, and SVE air extraction flow rates. In addition to the field tests, soil samples were, collected for formal geotechnical laboratory analysis. The information gathered from these preliminary field investigations were then used to design and install a pilot scale ground-water remediation system. The pilot scale system represents a modified version of the traditional IAS/SVE approach. Due to the presence of an overlying low permeability confining layer, the system was modified to inject and extract air from the phreatic zone. The vapor extraction wells are screened down into the saturated interval to provide an escape route for the air injected by the sparging system. This system is intended to trigger two remedial processes. The first is the physical stripping of dissolved phase volatile petroleum constituents as ground water contacts air channels forming around each sparge point. The second remedial process which may be activated by this system is enhanced aerobic biodegradation of organics due to the oxygenation of the saturated interval.

  2. Performance analysis of vortex based mixers for confined flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschhagen, Timo

    The hybrid rocket is still sparsely employed within major space or defense projects due to their relatively poor combustion efficiency and low fuel grain regression rate. Although hybrid rockets can claim advantages in safety, environmental and performance aspects against established solid and liquid propellant systems, the boundary layer combustion process and the diffusion based mixing within a hybrid rocket grain port leaves the core flow unmixed and limits the system performance. One principle used to enhance the mixing of gaseous flows is to induce streamwise vorticity. The counter-rotating vortex pair (CVP) mixer utilizes this principle and introduces two vortices into a confined flow, generating a stirring motion in order to transport near wall media towards the core and vice versa. Recent studies investigated the velocity field introduced by this type of swirler. The current work is evaluating the mixing performance of the CVP concept, by using an experimental setup to simulate an axial primary pipe flow with a radially entering secondary flow. Hereby the primary flow is altered by the CVP swirler unit. The resulting setup therefore emulates a hybrid rocket motor with a cylindrical single port grain. In order to evaluate the mixing performance the secondary flow concentration at the pipe assembly exit is measured, utilizing a pressure-sensitive paint based procedure.

  3. Developing one-dimensional implosions for inertial confinement fusion science

    DOE PAGES

    Kline, John L.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; ...

    2016-12-12

    Experiments on the National Ignition Facility show that multi-dimensional effects currently dominate the implosion performance. Low mode implosion symmetry and hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by capsule mounting features appear to be two key limiting factors for implosion performance. One reason these factors have a large impact on the performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions is the high convergence required to achieve high fusion gains. To tackle these problems, a predictable implosion platform is needed meaning experiments must trade-off high gain for performance. LANL has adopted three main approaches to develop a one-dimensional (1D) implosion platform where 1D means measured yield overmore » the 1D clean calculation. A high adiabat, low convergence platform is being developed using beryllium capsules enabling larger case-to-capsule ratios to improve symmetry. The second approach is liquid fuel layers using wetted foam targets. With liquid fuel layers, the implosion convergence can be controlled via the initial vapor pressure set by the target fielding temperature. The last method is double shell targets. For double shells, the smaller inner shell houses the DT fuel and the convergence of this cavity is relatively small compared to hot spot ignition. However, double shell targets have a different set of trade-off versus advantages. As a result, details for each of these approaches are described.« less

  4. Developing one-dimensional implosions for inertial confinement fusion science

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L.; Yi, Sunghwan A.; Simakov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Olson, Richard Edward; Wilson, Douglas Carl; Kyrala, George Amine; Perry, Theodore Sonne; Batha, Steven H.; Dewald, Eddie L.; Ralph, Joe E.; Strozzi, David J.; MacPhee, Andy G.; Callahan, Debbie A.; Hinkel, Denise; Hurricane, Omar A.; Leeper, Ramon J.; Zylstra, Alex B.; Peterson, Robert Ross; Haines, Brian Michael; Yin, Lin; Bradley, Paul Andrew; Shah, Rahul C.; Braun, Tom; Biener, Jorgan; Kozioziemski, Bernie J.; Sater, Jim D.; Biener, Monika M.; Hamza, Alex V.; Nikroo, Abbas; Berzak Hopkins, Laura F.; Ho, Darwin; LePape, Sebastian; Meezan, Nathan B.; Montgomery, David S.; Daughton, William Scott; Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine; Cardenas, Tana; Dodd, Evan S.

    2016-12-12

    Experiments on the National Ignition Facility show that multi-dimensional effects currently dominate the implosion performance. Low mode implosion symmetry and hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by capsule mounting features appear to be two key limiting factors for implosion performance. One reason these factors have a large impact on the performance of inertial confinement fusion implosions is the high convergence required to achieve high fusion gains. To tackle these problems, a predictable implosion platform is needed meaning experiments must trade-off high gain for performance. LANL has adopted three main approaches to develop a one-dimensional (1D) implosion platform where 1D means measured yield over the 1D clean calculation. A high adiabat, low convergence platform is being developed using beryllium capsules enabling larger case-to-capsule ratios to improve symmetry. The second approach is liquid fuel layers using wetted foam targets. With liquid fuel layers, the implosion convergence can be controlled via the initial vapor pressure set by the target fielding temperature. The last method is double shell targets. For double shells, the smaller inner shell houses the DT fuel and the convergence of this cavity is relatively small compared to hot spot ignition. However, double shell targets have a different set of trade-off versus advantages. As a result, details for each of these approaches are described.

  5. Computation of confined coflow jets with three turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J.; Shih, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of confined jets in a cylindrical duct is carried out to examine the performance of two recently proposed turbulence models: an RNG-based K-epsilon model and a realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. The former is of the same form as the standard K-epsilon model but has different model coefficients. The latter uses an explicit quadratic stress-strain relationship to model the turbulent stresses and is capable of ensuring the positivity of each turbulent normal stress. The flow considered involves recirculation with unfixed separation and reattachment points and severe adverse pressure gradients, thereby providing a valuable test of the predictive capability of the models for complex flows. Calculations are performed with a finite-volume procedure. Numerical credibility of the solutions is ensured by using second-order accurate differencing schemes and sufficiently fine grids. Calculations with the standard K-epsilon model are also made for comparison. Detailed comparisons with experiments show that the realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model consistently works better than does the standard K-epsilon model in capturing the essential flow features, while the RNG-based K-epsilon model does not seem to give improvements over the standard K-epsilon model under the flow conditions considered.

  6. Colliding Winds and Infall Confinement of Protostellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkin, F. P.; Stahler, S. W.

    1996-12-01

    We consider the hydrodynamic influence of the protostellar environment on the confinement of protostellar winds by modeling the collision of a stellar wind with anisotropic infall from a rotating cloud core. The stellar wind and infall collide supersonically, yielding a thin, radiative shocked shell. We calculate the structure of the shocked layer using a quasi-steady formulation similar to that used for stellar-wind bow shocks. At any time the shell structure is determined by simple conservation laws involving the fluxes of mass, momentum, and angular momentum of the incident wind and infall material, and including the effects of rotation and the stellar gravity. The gravitational forces are critical to the shell structure because in order for the infall ram pressure to be comparable to the wind ram pressure and allow normal force balance, the shell must be deep inside the gravitational well. We find that self-consistent, bowshock-like steady-state solutions only exist when the stellar gravity is included. There are two solution families (an inner and an outer solution), which both move outward in quasi-steady fashion with time due to the evolving infall structure. These solutions will be described and compared to new analytic solutions for bow shocks[1] and colliding winds[2] from spherically-symmetric sources. Fully non-steady calculations of the evolution will be presented in the future. [1] Wilkin, F.P. 1996, ApJ, 459, L31. [2] Canto, J., Raga, A.C., & Wilkin, F.P. 1996, ApJ, 469, 729

  7. FINAL REPORT: Room Temperature Hydrogen Storage in Nano-Confined Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    VAJO, JOHN

    2014-06-12

    DOE continues to seek solid-state hydrogen storage materials with hydrogen densities of ≥6 wt% and ≥50 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at room temperature and moderate pressures enabling widespread use in transportation applications. Meanwhile, development including vehicle engineering and delivery infrastructure continues for compressed-gas hydrogen storage systems. Although compressed gas storage avoids the materials-based issues associated with solid-state storage, achieving acceptable volumetric densities has been a persistent challenge. This project examined the possibility of developing storage materials that would be compatible with compressed gas storage technology based on enhanced hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquid solvents. These materials would store hydrogen in molecular form eliminating many limitations of current solid-state materials while increasing the volumetric capacity of compressed hydrogen storage vessels. Experimental methods were developed to study hydrogen solubility in nano-confined liquids. These methods included 1) fabrication of composites comprised of volatile liquid solvents for hydrogen confined within the nano-sized pore volume of nanoporous scaffolds and 2) measuring the hydrogen uptake capacity of these composites without altering the composite composition. The hydrogen storage capacities of these nano-confined solvent/scaffold composites were compared with bulk solvents and with empty scaffolds. The solvents and scaffolds were varied to optimize the enhancement in hydrogen solubility that accompanies confinement of the solvent. In addition, computational simulations were performed to study the molecular-scale structure of liquid solvent when confined within an atomically realistic nano-sized pore of a model scaffold. Confined solvent was compared with similar simulations of bulk solvent. The results from the simulations were used to formulate a mechanism for the enhanced solubility and to guide the

  8. Confinement and Tritium Stripping Systems for APT Tritium Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.; Heung, L.K.

    1997-10-20

    This report identifies functions and requirements for the tritium process confinement and clean-up system (PCCS) and provides supporting technical information for the selection and design of tritium confinement, clean-up (stripping) and recovery technologies for new tritium processing facilities in the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT). The results of a survey of tritium confinement and clean-up systems for large-scale tritium handling facilities and recommendations for the APT are also presented.

  9. High hydrostatic pressure activates gene expression that leads to ethanol production enhancement in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae distillery strain

    PubMed Central

    Bravim, Fernanda; Lippman, Soyeon I.; da Silva, Lucas F.; Souza, Diego T.; Fernandes, A. Alberto R.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Broach, James R.

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a stress that exerts broad effects on microorganisms with characteristics similar to those of common environmental stresses. In this study, we aimed to identify genetic mechanisms that can enhance alcoholic fermentation of wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Brazilian spirit fermentation vats. Accordingly, we performed a time course microarray analysis on a S. cerevisiae strain submitted to mild sublethal pressure treatment of 50 MPa for 30 min at room temperature, followed by incubation for 5, 10 and 15 min without pressure treatment. The obtained transcriptional profiles demonstrate the importance of post-pressurisation period on the activation of several genes related to cell recovery and stress tolerance. Based on these results, we over-expressed genes strongly induced by HHP in the same wild yeast strain and identified genes, particularly SYM1, whose over-expression results in enhanced ethanol production and stress tolerance upon fermentation. The present study validates the use of HHP as a biotechnological tool for the fermentative industries. PMID:22915193

  10. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  11. Fabrication issues of oxide-confined VCSELs

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, K.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Hammons, B.E.

    1997-04-01

    To insert high-performance oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface- emitting lasers (VCSELs) into the manufacturing arena, we have examined the critical parameters that must be controlled to establish a repeatable and uniform wet thermal oxidation process for AlGaAs. These parameters include the AlAs mole fraction, sample temperature, carrier gas flow, and bubbler water temperature. Knowledge of these parameters has enable the compilation of oxidation rate data for AlGaAs which exhibits an Arrhenius rate dependence. The compositionally dependent activation energies for Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As layers of x=1.00, 0.98, and 0.92 are found to be 1.24, 1.75, and 1.88 eV, respectively. 7 figs, 1 tab, 14 refs.

  12. Fueling of magnetic-confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    A general overview of the fueling of magnetic confinement devices is presented, with particular emphasis on recent experimental results. Various practical fueling mechanisms are considered, such as cold gas inlet (or plasma edge fueling), neutral beam injection, and injection of high speed cryogenic hydrogen pellets. The central role played by charged particle transport and recycle of plasma particles from material surfaces in contact with the plasma is discussed briefly. The various aspects of hydrogen pellet injection are treated in detail, including applications to the production of high purity startup plasmas for stellarators and other devices, refueling of tokamak plasmas, pellet ablation theory, and the technology and performance characteristics of low and high speed pellet injectors.

  13. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  14. Generalized Lawson Criteria for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, Robert E.

    2015-08-27

    The Lawson Criterion was proposed by John D. Lawson in 1955 as a general measure of the conditions necessary for a magnetic fusion device to reach thermonuclear ignition. Over the years, similar ignition criteria have been proposed which would be suitable for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. This paper will compare and contrast several ICF ignition criteria based on Lawson’s original ideas. Both analytical and numerical results will be presented which will demonstrate that although the various criteria differ in some details, they are closely related and perform similarly as ignition criteria. A simple approximation will also be presented which allows the inference of each ignition parameter directly from the measured data taken on most shots fired at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with a minimum reliance on computer simulations. Evidence will be presented which indicates that the experimentally inferred ignition parameters on the best NIF shots are very close to the ignition threshold.

  15. Relativistic constituent quark model with infrared confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-02-01

    We refine the relativistic constituent quark model developed in our previous papers to include the confinement of quarks. It is done, first, by introducing the scale integration in the space of {alpha} parameters, and, second, by cutting this scale integration on the upper limit which corresponds to an infrared cutoff. In this manner one removes all possible thresholds present in the initial quark diagram. The cutoff parameter is taken to be the same for all physical processes. We adjust other model parameters by fitting the calculated quantities of the basic physical processes to available experimental data. As an application, we calculate the electromagnetic form factors of the pion and the transition form factors of the {omega} and {eta} Dalitz decays.

  16. Statistical Mechanics of Confined Biological Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kinani, R.; Benhamou, M.; Kaïdi, H.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we propose a model to study the Statistical Mechanics of a confined bilayer-membrane that fluctuates between two interactive flat substrates. From the scaling laws point of view, the bilayer-membranes and strings are very similar. Therefore, it is sufficient to consider only the problem of a string. We assume that the bilayer-membrane (or string) interact with the substrate via a Double Morse potential that reproduces well the characteristics of the real interaction. We show that the Statistical Mechanic of the string can be adequately described by the Schrödinger equation approach that we solve exactly using the Bethe method. Finally, from the exact value of the energy of the ground state, we extract the expression of the free energy density as well as the specific heat.

  17. Simulations of artificial swimmers in confined flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Luca; Zhu, Lailai; Gjølberg, Eerik

    2012-11-01

    Miniature swimmming robots are potentially powerful for microobject manipulation, such as flow control in lab-on-a-chip, localized drug delivery and screening for diseases. Magnetically driven artificial bacterial flagella (ABF) performing helical motion is advantegous due to high swimming speed and accurate control. Using boundary element method, we numerically investigate the propulsion of ABF in free space and near solid boundaries. Step-out at high actuation frequencies, wobbling and near-wall drifting are documented, in qualitative agreement with recent experiments. We aim to explore the effect of swimmer shape on the performance, thus benefiting design of efficient microswimmers. Propulsion of ABF confined by a solid wall with and without background shear flow is also studied, with a focus on wall-induced hydrodynamic interaction and its influence on the stability of the motion. Funding by VR (the Swedish Research Council) and Linne flow centre at KTH is acknowledged.

  18. Coaxial Compound Helicopter for Confined Urban Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne; Elmore, Joshua F.; Keen, Ernest B.; Gallaher, Andrew T.; Nunez, Gerardo F.

    2016-01-01

    A rotorcraft was designed for military operations in a confined urban environment. The specifications included major increases in useful load, range, and speed relative current aircraft capabilities, with a size constraint based on the dimensions of urban streets and intersections. Analysis showed that this combination of requirements is best satisfied by a coaxial main-rotor configuration, with lift compounding to off-load the rotors at high speed, and ducted fans under the rotor disk for propulsion. The baseline design is described, and the aircraft performance is summarized for utility, attack, MEDEVAC, and cargo delivery missions. The impact on size and performance is examined for a number of excursions, including lift-offset main rotors. Technology development required to achieve this advance in capability is recommended.

  19. Confinement of test particles in warped spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Suman; Kar, Sayan; Nandan, Hemwati

    2010-07-15

    We investigate test particle trajectories in warped spacetimes with a thick brane warp factor, a cosmological on-brane line element, and a time dependent extra dimension. The geodesic equations are reduced to a first order autonomous dynamical system. Using analytical methods, we arrive at some useful general conclusions regarding possible trajectories. Oscillatory motion, suggesting confinement about the location of the thick brane, arises for a growing warp factor. On the other hand, we find runaway trajectories (exponential-like) for a decaying warp factor. Variations of the extra dimensional scale factor yield certain quantitative differences. Results obtained from explicit numerical evaluations match well with the qualitative conclusions obtained from the dynamical systems analysis.

  20. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  1. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  2. Highly confined photonic nanojet from elliptical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, T.; Erni, D.

    2014-07-01

    Elliptically shaped particles with different size and refractive indices have been studied under plane wave illumination using simulation tools such as 2D-FDTD, 2D-MMP, and 3D-MMP. Owing to careful manipulation, the power distribution in the vicinity of the particles opposite boundary resulted in a tightly focused photonic nanojet. Their waists are significantly smaller than the diffraction limit while propagating over several optical wavelengths without significant divergence. In this paper, we report on the manipulation of the particles elliptical shapes and the underlying refractive indices with respect to a maximally confined power distribution in the resulting nanojet which has been parameterized according to both, the beam waist and the beam divergence. The result that elliptical particles (i.e. oblate spheroids) turned out to be superior to spherical ones was underpinned within a highly accurate and fast 3D-MMP simulation using ring multipoles.

  3. High beta and confinement studies on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, G.A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Iacono, R.; Mauel, M.E.; Sabbagh, S.A. ); Kesner, J. )

    1992-01-01

    A new regime of high poloidal beta operation in TFTR was developed in the course of the first two years of this project (9/25/89 to 9/24/91). Our proposal to continue this successful collaboration between Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for a three year period (9/25/91 to 9/24/94) to continue to investigate improved confinement and tokamak performance in high poloidal beta plasmas in TFTR through the DT phase of operation was approved by the DOE and this is a report of our progress during the first 9 month budget period of the three year grant (9/25/91 to 6/24/92). During the approved three year project period we plan to (1) extend and apply the low current, high QDD discharges to the operation of TFTR using Deuterium and Tritium plasma; (2) continue the analysis and plan experiments on high poloidal beta phenomena in TFTR including: stability properties, enhanced global confinement, local transport, bootstrap current, and divertor formation; (3) plan and carry out experiments on TFTR which attempt to elevate the central q to values > 2 where entry to the second stability regime is predicted to occur; and (4) collaborate on high beta experiments using bean-shaped plasmas with a stabilizing conducting shell in PBX-M. In the seven month period covered by this report we have made progress in each of these four areas through the submission of 4 TFTR Experimental Proposals and the partial execution of 3 of these using a total of 4.5 run days during the August 1991 to February 1992 run.

  4. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-19

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. Furthermore, the physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  5. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-01

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. The physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  6. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-19

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativisticmore » energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. Furthermore, the physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.« less

  7. Confinement dynamics of a semiflexible chain inside nano-spheres.

    PubMed

    Fathizadeh, A; Heidari, Maziar; Eslami-Mossallam, B; Ejtehadi, M R

    2013-07-28

    We study the conformations of a semiflexible chain, confined in nano-scaled spherical cavities, under two distinct processes of confinement. Radial contraction and packaging are employed as two confining procedures. The former method is performed by gradually decreasing the diameter of a spherical shell which envelopes a confined chain. The latter procedure is carried out by injecting the chain inside a spherical shell through a hole on the shell surface. The chain is modeled with a rigid body molecular dynamics simulation and its parameters are adjusted to DNA base-pair elasticity. Directional order parameter is employed to analyze and compare the confined chain and the conformations of the chain for two different sizes of the spheres are studied in both procedures. It is shown that for the confined chains in the sphere sizes of our study, they appear in spiral or tennis-ball structures, and the tennis-ball structure is more likely to be observed in more compact confinements. Our results also show that the dynamical procedure of confinement and the rate of the confinement are influential parameters of the structure of the chain inside spherical cavities.

  8. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis. PMID:27909339

  9. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis.

  10. Electrons Confined with an Axially Symmetric Magnetic Mirror Field

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, H.; Ito, K.; Kira, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2008-08-08

    Low energy non-neutral electron plasmas were confined with an axially symmetric magnetic mirror field and an electrostatic potential to investigate the basic confinement properties of a simple magnetic mirror trap. As expected the confinement time became longer as a function of the mirror ratio. The axial electrostatic oscillations of a confined electron plasma were also observed. Obtained results suggested an improved scheme to accumulate low energy charged particles with the use of a magnetic mirror field, which would enable the investigation of electron-positron plasmas.

  11. The cruel and unusual phenomenology of solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    What happens when subjects are deprived of intersubjective contact? This paper looks closely at the phenomenology and psychology of one example of that deprivation: solitary confinement. It also puts the phenomenology and psychology of solitary confinement to use in the legal context. Not only is there no consensus on whether solitary confinement is a "cruel and unusual punishment," there is no consensus on the definition of the term "cruel" in the use of that legal phrase. I argue that we can find a moral consensus on the meaning of "cruelty" by looking specifically at the phenomenology and psychology of solitary confinement.

  12. Mechanical behavior of concrete columns confined by basalt FRP windings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciniņa, I.; Zīle, E.; Zīle, O.

    2012-11-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of round concrete columns confined by a wound basalt filament yarn are presented. Basalt is an attractive material for strengthening purposes due to its low cost coupled with a good mechanical performance, especially at high temperatures. It is shown that the basalt FRP confinement provides a considerable strengthening effect. The winding equipment employed in this study has the ability to set a desired pretension force of the yarn and thereby to produce a prestressed confinement. It is found that the prestressed confinement notably delays the onset of intense internal cracking of concrete.

  13. The cruel and unusual phenomenology of solitary confinement

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Shaun

    2014-01-01

    What happens when subjects are deprived of intersubjective contact? This paper looks closely at the phenomenology and psychology of one example of that deprivation: solitary confinement. It also puts the phenomenology and psychology of solitary confinement to use in the legal context. Not only is there no consensus on whether solitary confinement is a “cruel and unusual punishment,” there is no consensus on the definition of the term “cruel” in the use of that legal phrase. I argue that we can find a moral consensus on the meaning of “cruelty” by looking specifically at the phenomenology and psychology of solitary confinement. PMID:24971072

  14. Adsorption and diffusion of argon confined in ordered and disordered microporous carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joshua D.; Palmer, Jeremy C.; Liu, Ying-Chun; Roussel, Thomas J.; Brennan, John K.; Gubbins, Keith E.

    2010-06-01

    We use a combination of grand canonical Monte Carlo and microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations to study the adsorption and diffusion of argon at 77 K and 120 K confined in previously generated models of a disordered bituminous coal-based carbon, BPL, and an ordered carbon replica of Faujasite zeolite (C-FAU). Both materials exhibit a maximum in the diffusion coefficient as well as anomalous (sub-diffusive) behavior in the mean-squared displacements at short times at some relative pressures. In BPL, the anomalous diffusion occurs at low relative pressures, due to the trapping of argon atoms in small pores. In C-FAU, the anomalous diffusion occurs at high relative pressures, due to competitive diffusion of atoms traveling through windows and constrictions which interconnect the pores. All diffusion eventually tends to Fickian diffusion at longer times.

  15. Geochemical changes and fracture development in Woodford Shale cores following hydrous pyrolysis under uniaxial confinement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Lewan, Michael D.; Miller, Michael; Baez, Luis; Beeney, Ken; Sonnenberg, Steve

    2013-01-01

    A uniaxial confinement clamp was used on Woodford Shale cores in hydrous pyrolysis experiments to study fracture development during thermal maturation. The clamp simulates overburden in that it prevents cores from expanding perpendicular to bedding fabric during the volume-increasing reactions associated with petroleum generation. Cores were cut from a slab of immature Woodford Shale and subjected to hydrous pyrolysis under confinement at 300, 330, and 365 °C for 72 hours to induce thermal maturities ranging from early bitumen to maximum expelled-oil generation. Two additional cores were used as experimental controls: (1) a confined core was saturated with water by heating it to 100 °C under hydrous pyrolysis conditions for 72 hours to use for characterization of the original rock, and (2) an unconfined core was heated at 365 °C for 72 hours to evaluate the effects of confinement on petroleum generation and expulsion. X-ray computed tomography (X-CT) imaging and other analyses identified five distinct beds within the cored interval. Using a tentative classification system, beds 1, 2, and 3 are described as dolomitic marlstone (DM) with total organic carbon (TOC) contents of 7.7, 5.8, and 7.7 wt. %, respectively; bed 4 is a cherty quartzose claystone (CQC) with TOC content of 5.5 wt. %; and bed 5 is a quartzose claystone with TOC content of 10.9 wt. %. Bed samples all had similar Rock-Eval hydrogen indices (600 ± 46 mg S2/g-TOC) and Tmax values (433 ± 2 °C), demonstrating organic matter uniformity and low thermal maturity. The X-CT scan of the core heated to 100 °C showed preexisting fractures that were nearly perpendicular to the bedding fabric primarily in the low-TOC DM bed 2 and CQC bed 4. Heating led to enhancement of preexisting fractures in the confined cores with the greatest enhancement occurring in CQC bed 4. The fractures increased in size and intensity with temperature. This is attributed to the internal pressure generated by volume

  16. Swim pressure: stress generation in active matter.

    PubMed

    Takatori, S C; Yan, W; Brady, J F

    2014-07-11

    We discover a new contribution to the pressure (or stress) exerted by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. Through their self-motion, all active matter systems generate a unique swim pressure that is entirely athermal in origin. The origin of the swim pressure is based upon the notion that an active body would swim away in space unless confined by boundaries-this confinement pressure is precisely the swim pressure. Here we give the micromechanical basis for the swim stress and use this new perspective to study self-assembly and phase separation in active soft matter. The swim pressure gives rise to a nonequilibrium equation of state for active matter with pressure-volume phase diagrams that resemble a van der Waals loop from equilibrium gas-liquid coexistence. Theoretical predictions are corroborated by Brownian dynamics simulations. Our new swim stress perspective can help analyze and exploit a wide class of active soft matter, from swimming bacteria to catalytic nanobots to molecular motors that activate the cellular cytoskeleton.

  17. Free Energy of a Polymer in Slit-Like Confinement across the Odijk, moderate confinement, and Bulk Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamanzi, Albert; Leith, Jason S.; Sean, David; Berard, Daniel; Guthrie, Andrew C.; McFaul, Christopher M. J.; Slater, Gary W.; de Haan, Hendrick W.; Leslie, Sabrina R.; McGill University Team; University of Ottawa, University of Ontario Collaboration

    We directly measure the free energy of confinement for semi-flexible polymers from the nanoscale to bulk regimes in slit-like confinement. We use Convex Lens-induced Confinement (CLiC) microscopy of DNA to load and directly count molecules at equilibrium in a single chamber of smoothly increasing height. CLiC microscopy allows for direct visualization of polymers in free solution over long periods, as a function of tunable vertical confinement - from the millimeter to the nanometer scale, and within a single device. Our direct characterization of the free energy of confinement, across several orders of magnitude of applied confinement, agree with new simulations established in this work. We compare experimental results to the ``de Gennes blob model'', to theory published by Casassa, as well as to simulations by Chen and Sullivan, in appropriate regimes. This work establishes a robust platform for understanding and manipulating polymers at the nanoscale, with a wide range of applications to biomedical technologies.

  18. Measuring the structure of thin soft matter films under confinement: A surface-force type apparatus for neutron reflection, based on a flexible membrane approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Wiebe M.; Mears, Laura L. E.; Richardson, Robert M.; Cosgrove, Terence; Dalgliesh, Robert M.; Prescott, Stuart W.

    2012-11-01

    A unique surface force type apparatus that allows the investigation of a confined thin film using neutron reflection is described. The central feature of the setup consists of a solid substrate (silicon) and a flexible polymer membrane (Melinex®). We show that inflation of the membrane against the solid surface provides close and even contact between the interfaces over a large surface area. Both heavy water and air can be completely squeezed out from between the flexible film and the solid substrate, leaving them in molecular contact. The strength of confinement is controlled by the pressure used to inflate the membrane. Dust provides a small problem for this approach as it can get trapped between membrane and substrate to prevent a small part of the membrane from making good contact with the substrate. This results in the measured neutron reflectivity containing a small component of an unwanted reflection, between 10% and 20% at low confining pressures (1 bar) and between 1% and 5% at high confining pressures (5 bar). However, we show that this extra signal does not prevent good and clear information on the structure of thin films being extracted from the neutron reflectivity. The effects of confinement are illustrated with data from a poly(vinyl pyrollidone) gel layer in water, a polyelectrolyte multilayer in water, and with data from a stack of supported lipid-bilayers swollen with D2O vapor. The data demonstrates the potential of this apparatus to provide information on the structure of thin films under confinement for a known confining pressure.

  19. Measuring the structure of thin soft matter films under confinement: A surface-force type apparatus for neutron reflection, based on a flexible membrane approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, Wiebe M. de; Mears, Laura L. E.; Richardson, Robert M.; Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W.; Dalgliesh, Robert M.

    2012-11-15

    A unique surface force type apparatus that allows the investigation of a confined thin film using neutron reflection is described. The central feature of the setup consists of a solid substrate (silicon) and a flexible polymer membrane (Melinex{sup Registered-Sign }). We show that inflation of the membrane against the solid surface provides close and even contact between the interfaces over a large surface area. Both heavy water and air can be completely squeezed out from between the flexible film and the solid substrate, leaving them in molecular contact. The strength of confinement is controlled by the pressure used to inflate the membrane. Dust provides a small problem for this approach as it can get trapped between membrane and substrate to prevent a small part of the membrane from making good contact with the substrate. This results in the measured neutron reflectivity containing a small component of an unwanted reflection, between 10% and 20% at low confining pressures (1 bar) and between 1% and 5% at high confining pressures (5 bar). However, we show that this extra signal does not prevent good and clear information on the structure of thin films being extracted from the neutron reflectivity. The effects of confinement are illustrated with data from a poly(vinyl pyrollidone) gel layer in water, a polyelectrolyte multilayer in water, and with data from a stack of supported lipid-bilayers swollen with D{sub 2}O vapor. The data demonstrates the potential of this apparatus to provide information on the structure of thin films under confinement for a known confining pressure.

  20. Plasma confinement regimes and collective modes characterizing them

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-10-15

    A unified theory is presented for the modes that are excited at the edge of the plasma column and are important signatures of the advanced confinement regimes into which magnetically confined plasmas can be driven. In particular, the so-called EDA H-Regime, the Elmy H-Regime, and the I-Regime are considered. The modes that are identified theoretically have characteristics that are consistent with or have anticipated those of the modes observed experimentally for each of the investigated regimes. The phase velocities, the produced transport processes, the frequencies, the wavelengths, and the consistency with the direction of spontaneous rotation are the factors considered for comparison with the relevant experiments. The quasi-coherent mode [I. Cziegler, Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2011] that is present in the EDA H-Regime has a phase velocity in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma reference frame. Consequently, this is identified as a ballooning mode near finite Larmor radius marginal stability involving the effects of transverse ion viscosity and other dissipative effects. In this regime, impurities are driven outward by the combined effects of the local temperature gradients of the impurities and their thermal conductivity, while in the Elmy H-Regime impurities are driven toward the center of the plasma column. In the I-Regimes, the excited 'Heavy Particle' modes [B. Coppi and T. Zhou, Phys. Plasmas 19, 012302 (2012); Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)] are not of the ballooning kind and are shown to expel the impurities toward the plasma edge in the presence of significant fluctuations. These modes can have a finite frequency of oscillation with a phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity or they can be nearly purely growing, explaining why there are I-Regimes where fluctuations are not observed. Instead, the modes considered for the Elmy H-Regime are of the ballooning