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Sample records for 50-year committed effective

  1. The Josephson Effect: 50 Years of Science and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    The Josephson effect, the 50th anniversary of which will be celebrated in 2012, remains one of the most spectacular manifestations of quantum mechanics in all of experimental science. It was first predicted in 1962 and then experimentally verified in 1963. At its most fundamental level the Josephson effect is nothing more than the electronic…

  2. Effects of swimming training on blood pressure and vascular function in adults >50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Nualnim, Nantinee; Parkhurst, Kristin; Dhindsa, Mandeep; Tarumi, Takashi; Vavrek, Jackie; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2012-04-01

    Swimming is ideal for older adults because it includes minimum weight-bearing stress and decreased heat load. However, there is very little information available concerning the effects of regular swimming exercise on vascular risks. We determined if regular swimming exercise would decrease arterial blood pressure (BP) and improve vascular function. Forty-three otherwise healthy adults >50 years old (60 ± 2) with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension and not on any medication were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of swimming exercise or attention time controls. Before the intervention period there were no significant differences in any of the variables between groups. Body mass, adiposity, and plasma concentrations of glucose and cholesterol did not change in either group throughout the intervention period. Casual systolic BP decreased significantly from 131 ± 3 to 122 ± 4 mm Hg in the swimming training group. Significant decreases in systolic BP were also observed in ambulatory (daytime) and central (carotid) BP measurements. Swimming exercise produced a 21% increase in carotid artery compliance (p <0.05). Flow-mediated dilation and cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity improved after the swim training program (p <0.05). There were no significant changes in any measurements in the control group that performed gentle relaxation exercises. In conclusion, swimming exercise elicits hypotensive effects and improvements in vascular function in previously sedentary older adults.

  3. Effects of Growth Hormone Administration on Muscle Strength in Men over 50 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, A. B. W.; Micmacher, E.; Biesek, S.; Assumpção, R.; Redorat, R.; Veloso, U.; Vaisman, M.; Farinatti, P. T. V.; Conceição, F.

    2013-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) use has been speculated to improve physical capacity in subjects without GH deficiency (GHD) through stimulation of collagen synthesis in the tendon and skeletal muscle, which leads to better exercise training and increased muscle strength. In this context, the use of GH in healthy elderly should be an option for increasing muscle strength. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of GH therapy on muscle strength in healthy men over 50 years old. Fourteen healthy men aged 50–70 years were evaluated at baseline for body composition and muscle strength (evaluated by leg press and bench press exercises, which focus primarily on quadriceps—lower body part and pectoralis major—upper body part—muscles, resp.). Subjects were randomised into 2 groups: GH therapy (7 subjects) and placebo (7 subjects) and reevaluated after 6 months of therapy. Thirteen subjects completed the study (6 subjects in the placebo group and 7 subjects in the GH group). Subjects of both groups were not different at baseline. After 6 months of therapy, muscle strength in the bench press responsive muscles did not increase in both groups and showed a statistically significant increase in the leg press responsive muscles in the GH group. Our study demonstrated an increase in muscle strength in the lower body part after GH therapy in healthy men. This finding must be considered and tested in frail older populations, whose physical incapacity is primarily caused by proximal muscle weakness. The trial was registered with NCT01853566. PMID:24382963

  4. Effects of thinning intensities on transpiration and productivity of 50-year-old Pinus koraeinsis stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Juhan; Kim, Taekyu; Moon, Minkyu; Cho, Sungsik; Ryu, Daun; Kim, Hyun Seok

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of thinning intensities on stand transpiration and productivity of 50-year-old Korean pine forests for two years. Forest thinning, which removes some fraction of trees from stand, is widely conducted for reducing competition between remaining trees, improving tree productivity, reducing the risk of natural fire, and thus maintaining healthy forest. Forest thinning alters the microclimatic conditions such as radiation distribution within canopy, vapor pressure deficit, and amount of available soil water. These changes influence on the tree water use, and related productivity. Thinning was conducted on March, 2012 with two intensities (Control, Light-thinning (20%), and Heavy-thinning (40% of tree density)). Transpiration was estimated from sap flux density, which was measured with Granier-type thermal dissipation sensors. Tree diameter growth was measured with dendrometer, and converted to tree productivity using allometric equations developed specifically in our study sites. The climatic conditions showed little differences between two years. During the first growing season after thinning, stand transpiration was ca. 20% and 42% lower on light-thinning and heavy-thinning stand, respectively, even though sap flux density were higher in thinned stand. The difference in stand transpiration among treatments showed seasonal trends, so it was larger on summer when soil moisture was abundant due to monsoon, but was diminished on spring and autumn when soil moisture was limited. Tree-level productivity increased ca. 8% and 21% on light-thinning and heavy thinning stand, respectively. However, stand net primary production was ca. 20% lower on light-thinning stand, and ca. 31% on heavy-thinning stand. As a result, water use efficiency increased only in heavy-thinning stand. During the second growing season after thinning, stand transpiration was ca. 19% lower on light-thinning stand, and ca. 37% lower on heavy-thinning stand. The reduction

  5. [Social and professional effects of hip prosthetic replacment on people under 50 years of age].

    PubMed

    Xenard, J

    1996-12-01

    Although total hip prosthetic replacement is a common surgical procedure, it is not without social and professional consequences. In a certain number of cases, return to occupational activities is not possible. In others, it is difficult. Long-term work break repercussions can be major as they often go together with financial difficulties. The medical counsultant and the occupational doctor will have an important role to play at the time of the return to occupational activities or to determine the conditions of workplace adaptation or a vocational training program.Functional recovery after insertion of total hip prosthesis observes precise rules of articular mobilization, weight bearing and muscular strengthening.In the young patient, before 50 years old, objectives will be more accurate and progress not only will concern recovery of daily living, walking and do-it-yourself activities but also return to sports, play and occupational activities. Not only will reactivation be physical, muscular and articular but also behavioral and psychological.Disease and its consequences, surgery in particular, cause a psychological and a physical aggression which modifies the patient's self-concept. • Vulnerability and plastic wrong (limping, modifications of gesture and sports performanee as well as modifications of the living conditions). The patient unconsciously translates this physical affection into: * loneliness (taking away or exclusion from the usual surroundings of those who are in good health) * "blues" * lack of dynamism * uselessness, feeling of being incompetent "in those conditions, what's the use of fighting?" ٜ At the same time - loss of social status: "Colleagues get up to go to work, children go to school, all the others are productive, I'm good at nothing." - impression of uselessness, dependence; reinforcement of turning in on the self. •The undertaking by a surgeon and his team (anaesthetist, nurse, physiotherapist) which implies constraints, orders

  6. Effects of 50-years unmanaged water resource in Southern Tuscany coastal plains (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetto, R.; Debolini, M.; Galli, M. A.; Bonari, E.

    2012-04-01

    original 4 Mm3. Having a reduced access to water resources, most of the farms during the 90's moved to more efficient water uses (drip irrigation) to save crops from leaf burns or switched to less-water-demanding, but less profitable crops. As a consequence, less competitive areas in the production-distribution chain suffered aquifer' salinisation and were progressively abandoned. As far as drinking water supply, the area is facing water scarcity during the summer period; desalination plants are planned. In one of the plain the water utility pumps out salinised groundwater that is then desalinized with an obvious increase in energy consumption. Although water management needs have grown during the last 50 years and several studies outlined the importance of planning this resource, conflicts among stakeholders and political issues make such problems of difficult solution. Today large dam building seems to be quite unreliable both because of the construction time and the financial issues related. At the same time feasible projects, driven also by innovative and more profitable agricultural development, call for wastewater reuse and artificial aquifer recharge starting at least from pilot tests in priority areas.

  7. Greetings: 50 years of Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission-Radiation Effects Research Foundation studies.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, I

    1998-05-12

    The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission was established in Hiroshima in 1947 and in Nagasaki in 1948 under the auspices of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences to initiate a long-term and comprehensive epidemiological and genetic study of the atomic bomb survivors. It was replaced in 1975 by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation which is a nonprofit Japanese foundation binationally managed and supported with equal funding by the governments of Japan and the United States. Thanks to the cooperation of the survivors and the contributions of a multitude of scientists, these studies flourish to this day in what must be the most successful long-term research collaboration between the two countries. Although these studies are necessarily limited to the effects of acute, whole-body, mixed gamma-neutron radiation from the atom bombs, their comprehensiveness and duration make them the most definitive descriptions of the late effects of radiation in humans. For this reason, the entire world relies heavily on these data to set radiation standards. As vital as the study results are, they still represent primarily the effects of radiation on older survivors. Another decade or two should correct this deficiency and allow us to measure definitively the human risk of heritable mutation from radiation. We look to the worldwide radiation and risk community as well as to the survivors who have contributed so much to what has been done already to accomplish this goal.

  8. Lucid dreaming incidence: A quality effects meta-analysis of 50years of research.

    PubMed

    Saunders, David T; Roe, Chris A; Smith, Graham; Clegg, Helen

    2016-07-01

    We report a quality effects meta-analysis on studies from the period 1966-2016 measuring either (a) lucid dreaming prevalence (one or more lucid dreams in a lifetime); (b) frequent lucid dreaming (one or more lucid dreams in a month) or both. A quality effects meta-analysis allows for the minimisation of the influence of study methodological quality on overall model estimates. Following sensitivity analysis, a heterogeneous lucid dreaming prevalence data set of 34 studies yielded a mean estimate of 55%, 95% C. I. [49%, 62%] for which moderator analysis showed no systematic bias for suspected sources of variability. A heterogeneous lucid dreaming frequency data set of 25 studies yielded a mean estimate of 23%, 95% C. I. [20%, 25%], moderator analysis revealed no suspected sources of variability. These findings are consistent with earlier estimates of lucid dreaming prevalence and frequent lucid dreaming in the population but are based on more robust evidence.

  9. The Effect of Obesity on Incidence of Disability and Mortality in Mexicans Aged 50 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Karmarkar, Amol M.; Tan, Alai; Graham, James E.; Arcari, Christine M.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Snih, Soham Al

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of obesity on incidence of disability and mortality among non-disabled older Mexicans at baseline. Material and Methods The sample included 8,415 Mexicans aged ≥50 years from the Mexican Health and Aging Study (2001-2012), who reported no limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) at baseline and have complete data on all covariates. Socio-demographics, smoking status, comorbidities, ADL activities, and body mass index (BMI) were collected. Results The lowest hazard ratio (HR) for disability was at BMI of 25 to <30 (HR=0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85-1.12). The lowest HR for mortality were seen among participants with BMIs 25 to <30 (HR=0.85; 95% CI, 075-0.97), 30 to <35 (HR=0.86; 95 % CI, 0.72-1.02), and ≥35 (HR=0.92; 95 % CI, 0.70-1.22). Conclusion Mexican older adults with a BMI of 25 to <30 were at less risk for both disability and mortality. PMID:26172232

  10. Detecting and Attributing the Effects of Climate Change on the Distributions of Snake Species Over the Past 50 Years.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether the distributions of snakes have changed in association with climate change over the past years. We detected the distribution changes of snakes over the past 50 years and determined whether the changes could be attributed to recent climate change in China. Long-term records of the distribution of nine snake species in China, grey relationship analysis, fuzzy sets classification techniques, the consistency index, and attributed methods were used. Over the past 50 years, the distributions of snake species have changed in multiple directions, primarily shifting northwards, and most of the changes were related to the thermal index. Driven by climatic factors over the past 50 years, the distribution boundary and distribution centers of some species changed with the fluctuations. The observed and predicted changes in distribution were highly consistent for some snake species. The changes in the northern limits of distributions of nearly half of the species, as well as the southern and eastern limits, and the distribution centers of some snake species can be attributed to climate change.

  11. Detecting and Attributing the Effects of Climate Change on the Distributions of Snake Species Over the Past 50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether the distributions of snakes have changed in association with climate change over the past years. We detected the distribution changes of snakes over the past 50 years and determined whether the changes could be attributed to recent climate change in China. Long-term records of the distribution of nine snake species in China, grey relationship analysis, fuzzy sets classification techniques, the consistency index, and attributed methods were used. Over the past 50 years, the distributions of snake species have changed in multiple directions, primarily shifting northwards, and most of the changes were related to the thermal index. Driven by climatic factors over the past 50 years, the distribution boundary and distribution centers of some species changed with the fluctuations. The observed and predicted changes in distribution were highly consistent for some snake species. The changes in the northern limits of distributions of nearly half of the species, as well as the southern and eastern limits, and the distribution centers of some snake species can be attributed to climate change.

  12. 50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narlesky, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

  13. Effects of Team and Organizational Commitment--A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neininger, Alexandra; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Kauffeld, Simone; Henschel, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Retention management, i.e., keeping qualified employees, is a top priority for contemporary organizations. Commitment, and especially team commitment, can be the key to mastering this challenge. There is a lack of longitudinal research concerning the development and the direction of the effects of team commitment over time. In a longitudinal…

  14. Effects of Gender on Engineering Career Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Anne M.

    Engineering has been one of the most difficult fields for 'women to enter and in which to succeed. Although the percentage of female engineers has Increased, women are still seriously underrcpresented in the workforce. This study examined the effect offender on career commitment, success, satisfaction, and involvement in engineering, and the effect of personality and work environment on these variables. Alumni from an engineering school in the northeastern United States were surveyed. The questionnaire was analyzed using statistical and descriptive methods to determine relationships among these variables. Women's commitment scores were lower than men's when controlled for other variables, including satisfaction and involvement. Men had longer tenure as engineers than women, even when controlled for year of graduation, professional engineering status, and number of children. Women did not leave engineering in different proportions than men, but they did earn significantly less despite controlling for year of graduation and number of hours worked weekly. Some gender differences in workplace experience were also found, including having colleagues act protectively, being mistaken for secretaries, and seeing men progress faster in their careers than equally qualified women.

  15. 50 years of JETP Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, V. P.

    2015-04-01

    This paper briefly traces the 50-year history of the journal Pis'ma v Zhurnal Eksperimental'noi i Teoreticheskoi Fiziki (JETP Letters), whose first issue was published on 1 April 1965. The journal is intended for a wide circle of physicists-readers as a fast publication channel for short communications on new results from research of the highest significance and highest priority in all areas of experimental and theoretical physics. Today, the journal celebrates numerous important contributions to the development of physics both in Russia and worldwide. Over a historically short period, JETP Letters developed into a highly authoritative and influential source for physicists engaged in a wide range of fields. Due to the wise and well-timed editorial policy, the journal continues to retain its leadership position, despite the difficulties the entire science periodical literature - and indeed the whole of science - is currently experiencing in Russia.

  16. CTIO: The Next 50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. C.

    2015-05-01

    After 50 years of solid scientific productivity, CTIO has established a strong reputation as a world-leading international observatory. The next 50 years are filled with opportunities to build on this foundation, continuing to put CTIO at the forefront of astronomy. In the near term (the next 10 years) we will be taking advantage of the power of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to map the southern skies, both as part of Dark Energy Survey (DES) and as part of a wide variety of community projects spanning scientific areas from near-earth asteroids to the most distant gravitationally-lensed galaxies. In addition, we will add new spectroscopic capabilities, both in the optical, with COSMOS, and the near-infrared, with TripleSpec. With the combination of these new facilities with those coming to SOAR, including SAM, SIFS, and STELES, CTIO will provide a highly-efficient suite of capabilities to support astronomers for this decade. And of course we will be preparing for the next decade, which will be the decade of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). CTIO continues to play a central role in supporting the development of LSST during its construction on Cerro Pachón over the next 5 years. However, even more important will be the role CTIO facilities will play in the science of the LSST era. While astronomers will certainly be able to do many new and innovative projects with only the LSST database, a significant fraction of the scientific potential of LSST relies upon optical and infrared followup. The telescopes and instruments of CTIO, from the tenant 1m telescopes to the instruments on the Blanco and SOAR, will be a critical part of the newly rebalanced observing "system". Given that cutting-edge instrumentation can take 5-10 years to move from conception to first light, today is not too early to decide which new instruments we must start developing now in order to fulfill the needs of the community in the next decade.

  17. Fission: The first 50 years

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenbosch, R.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of fission had been largely unanticipated prior to its discovery in 1938. This process, with its dramatically large energy release and its formation of previously unknown nuclides, immediately captured the imagination of the scientific community. Both theoretical and experimental developments occurred at a rapid pace. I will begin my discussion of fission with the far-reaching paper of Bohr and Wheeler, who in little more than half a year laid out a framework for understanding many features of the fission process. I will then turn to our current understanding of a number of aspects of fission. One of these is the pronounced tendency of many nuclear species to fission asymmetrically. In fact, the discovery of fission was based on the identification of barium isotopes produced in asymmetric fission. The dramatic changes in the preferred mass division and kinetic energy release with the addition of only a few neutrons to the spontaneously fissioning Fermium isotopes will be emphasized. The problem of the dynamics of saddle to scission will be discussed---this is one aspect of fission for which we do not have all the answers. Another dynamical effect to be discussed is the apparent failure of transition state theory at high excitation energies. The role of single particle (shell) effects in enriching the structure if the potential energy surface will be explored. Spontaneously fissioning isomers and intermediate structure resonances will be discussed. The recognition that short-lived fission isomers are superdeformed shape isomers has been followed by the recent observation of superdeformed shape isomers in the rare earth region. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  18. 50 years of radiation research: medicine.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Theodore L

    2002-10-01

    The advances brought about by research in radiation medicine over the past 50 years are presented. The era began with the atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the establishment of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission to understand what damage was caused by exposure of a large population to radiation. A better understanding of the effects of whole-body exposure led to the development of whole-body radiation treatment techniques and to bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of leukemias. The field of diagnostic imaging was revolutionized by a series of inventions that included angiography, mammography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and ultrasound imaging. The field of nuclear medicine came of age through new man-made radionuclides and the invention of scanning and imaging techniques including positron emission tomography. Radiotherapy, a minor sideline of radiology, developed into radiation oncology, an extremely important component of modern cancer therapy. The advances in clinical radiotherapy were made possible by discoveries and inventions in physics and engineering and by insights and discoveries in radiobiology. The result of the last 50 years of progress is a very powerful set of clinical tools.

  19. The effect of a senior jazz dance class on static balance in healthy women over 50 years of age: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wallmann, Harvey W; Gillis, Carrie B; Alpert, Patricia T; Miller, Sally K

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study is to assess the impact of a senior jazz dance class on static balance for healthy women over 50 years of age using the NeuroCom Smart Balance Master System (Balance Master). A total of 12 healthy women aged 54-88 years completed a 15-week jazz dance class which they attended 1 time per week for 90 min per class. Balance data were collected using the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) at baseline (pre), at 7 weeks (mid), and after 15 weeks (post). An equilibrium score measuring postural sway was calculated for each of six different conditions. The composite equilibrium score (all six conditions integrated to 1 score) was used as an overall measure of balance. Repeated measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to compare the means of each participant's SOT composite equilibrium score in addition to the equilibrium score for each individual condition (1-6) across the 3 time points (pre, mid, post). There was a statistically significant difference among the means, p < .0005. Pairwise (Bonferroni) post hoc analyses revealed the following statistically significant findings for SOT composite equilibrium scores for the pre (67.33 + 10.43), mid (75.25 + 6.97), and post (79.00 + 4.97) measurements: premid (p = .008); prepost (p < .0005); midpost (p = .033). In addition, correlational statistics were used to determine any relationship between SOT scores and age. Results indicated that administration of a 15-week jazz dance class 1 time per week was beneficial in improving static balance as measured by the Balance Master SOT.

  20. 50 years of membership in AGU recognized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recently seven members who joined the Union in 1941 received their gold pins in recognition of 50 years of membership in the Union. They join the distinguished ranks of the other 50-year members, all of whom are listed below by the year they joined. 1941 Max Bookman, Desmond F. Glynn, William F. Guyton, Kenneth E. Lohman, Charles Miron, Russell W. Revell, and Wilbur T. Stuart

  1. Comparison of 50-year and 70-year internal-dose-conversion factors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.T.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    The 50-year inhalation and ingestion dose commitments associated with an acute intake (of a radionuclide) of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq (1 ..mu..Ci) in one day were compared with the corresponding dose commitments calculated for a 70-year integration period resulting from a chronic intake of the same amount at a rate of 101 Bq/d (0.00274 ..mu..Ci/d) for one year. These values, known as dose conversion factors, estimate the dose accumulated during a given period of time following a unit of intake of a radionuclide. It was demonstrated that the acute intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq in one day and the chronic intake of 101 Bq/d for one year (a total intake of 3.7 x 10/sup 4/ Bq) result in essentially the same dose commitment for a relatively long integration period. Therefore, the comparison of 50-year acute dose conversion factors and 70-year chronic dose conversion factors is essentially only a measure of the additional dose accumulated in the 50 to 70 year period. It was found that for radionuclides with atomic mass less than 200 the percent difference in the 70-year and 50-year dose conversion factors was essentially zero in most cases. Differences of approximately 5 to 50% were obtained for dose conversion factors for most alpha emitters with atomic masses of greater than 200. Comparisons were made on the basis of both organ dose equivalent and effective dose equivalent. The implications and significance of these results are discussed.

  2. Climatic change effects on hydro-metereological variables in the Alps: a case study on the upper Arve catchment at Chamonix (France) over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, Alessandra; Condom, Thomas; Bacchi, Baldassare; Zin, Isabella; Six, Delphine; Gottardi, Frederic; Rabatel, Antoine; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological changes in partially glaciated catchments are expected under future climate scenarios, with consequences for water availability and management at catchment and regional scales. In order to correctly predict the magnitude of such changes and envisage adaptation and/or mitigation measures against water related hazards, a good understanding of the water cycle dynamics at different spatial and temporal scales is needed. The Upper Arve catchment in Chamonix (202 square kilometers), situated in the French Northern Alps, between the two massifs of Mont Blanc and Aiguilles Rouges, is a perfect case study for evaluating the sensitivity of the alpine water cycle to climate change. It is highly glaciated (32% of the total area in 2012) with three important glaciers: Glacier du Tour, Glacier d'Argentiere and Glacier de la Mer de Glace. Its elevation ranges from 1025 up to 4295 m a.s.l. and the exposure of the ice cover is generally north and east oriented. Long term time-series exist of (i) glacier mass balance, (ii) meteorological (in-situ and reanalyses) and (iii) hydrological data. The objectives of the presented study were: 1 - To characterize the inter-annual regimes of the different climatological and hydrological variables: precipitation, temperature and discharge; 2 - To estimate trends on the previous variables, at different temporal scales (annual and monthly) for different altitudes, and compare them to usually observed values in alpine regions; 3 - To infer from the previous statistical analyses and from a cross-analysis between the different considered variables the catchment's hydrological evolution during the last 50 years. Results showed precipitation, temperature and discharge regimes typical of high mountainous partially glaciated catchments. In the long term period, this catchment is characterized by an evident retreat of glacier. Long term trends over the past five decades show no significant change in the annual amount of precipitation. At the

  3. Quality in laboratory medicine: 50years on.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario

    2017-02-01

    The last 50years have seen substantial changes in the landscape of laboratory medicine: its role in modern medicine is in evolution and the quality of laboratory services is changing. The need to control and improve quality in clinical laboratories has grown hand in hand with the growth in technological developments leading to an impressive reduction of analytical errors over time. An essential cause of this impressive improvement has been the introduction and monitoring of quality indicators (QIs) such as the analytical performance specifications (in particular bias and imprecision) based on well-established goals. The evolving landscape of quality and errors in clinical laboratories moved first from analytical errors to all errors performed within the laboratory walls, subsequently to errors in laboratory medicine (including errors in test requesting and result interpretation), and finally, to a focus on errors more frequently associated with adverse events (laboratory-associated errors). After decades in which clinical laboratories have focused on monitoring and improving internal indicators of analytical quality, efficiency and productivity, it is time to shift toward indicators of total quality, clinical effectiveness and patient outcomes.

  4. [Medical research ethics 50 years after Nuremberg].

    PubMed

    Ruyter, K W

    1997-12-10

    50 years ago, in Nuremberg, 23 German doctors were accused of crimes against humanity. The anniversary is a solemn reminder of the dark origins of medical research ethics. Many researchers today believe that the medical experiments carried out under Hitler "vaccinated" postwar researchers against abuse. A review of the practices of postwar research shows that the "vaccination" had limited effect and that there is no reason to believe that the events which took place under Hitler were unique and will never happen again. After the war various measures were introduced to protect research subjects: informed consent, self regulation and independent research ethics committees. The measures have undoubtedly limited the abuse of subjects substantially. Nevertheless, in the Armed Forces, where abuse has been most rampant after the war, informed consent is not always practised and independent review is seldom carried out. With the support of grant institutions, journals and industry the protection of research subjects can be improved. It is recommended that medical faculties arrange an annual commemoration of the victims of medical research in order to raise consciousness and awareness among teachers and students.

  5. Ned Greenberg: 50 Years and Counting | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Can you imagine working for the same company for 50 years? Nathaniel “Ned” Greenberg has accomplished just that, having recently received his 50-year service award from NIH, and he has no immediate plans for retirement. “I don’t look upon my job as a chore, it’s more of an avocation than a vocation,” said Greenberg, a chemist in the Biological Testing Branch (BTB), under Branch Chief Melinda Hollingshead, DVM, Ph.D. “I am lucky that I found something that I enjoy doing.”

  6. 50 years of membership in AGU recognized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recently, 14 AGU members who joined the Union in 1937 received their recognition pins for 50 years of membership in the Union. They join the distinguished ranks of the 50- year AGU members, who are listed below by the year that they joined:1937 A.B. Bryan, Leonard B. Corwin, Tate Dalrymple, Richard H. Fleming, Harry L. Frauenthal, Konrad B. Krauskopf, J. Stuart Meyers, Brian O'Brien, Joseph F. Poland, Edward J. Rutter, Noel H. Stearn, John P. Tully, Victor Vacquier, G.H. Westby, and Harvey O. Westby.

  7. Multimedia environmental monitoring: 50 years at Hanford.

    PubMed

    Gray, R H

    1993-07-01

    Environmental monitoring has been an ongoing activity on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington for almost 50 years. Objectives are to detect and assess potential impacts of Site operations on air, surface and ground waters, foodstuffs, fish, wildlife, soil and vegetation. Data from monitoring effects are used to calculate the overall radiological dose to humans working onsite or residing in nearby communities. In 1989, measured Hanford Site perimeter concentrations of airborne radionuclides were below applicable guidelines. Concentrations of radionuclides and nonradiological water quality in the Columbia River were in compliance with applicable standards. Foodstuffs irrigated with river water taken downstream of the Site showed radionuclide levels that were similar to those found in foodstuffs from control areas. Low levels of (137)Cs and (90)Sr in most onsite wildlife samples and concentrations of radionuclides in soils and vegetation from on- and offsite locations were typical of those attributable to worldwide fallout. The calculated dose potentially received by a maximally exposed individual (i.e., based on hypothetical, worst-case assumptions for all routes of exposure) in 1989 (0.05 mrem/yr) was similar to those calculated for 1985 through 1988.In addition to monitoring radioactivity in fish and wildlife, population numbers of key species are determined. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) spawning in the Columbia River at Hanford has increased in recent years with a concomitant increase in winter roosting activity of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). An elk (Cervus elaphus) herd, established by immigration in 1972, is also increasing. The Hanford Site currently serves as a refuge for Canada goose (Branta canadensis), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), and various plants and other animals, e.g., mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and coyotes (Canis latrans).

  8. Teacher Commitment and Its Effects on Student Achievement in American High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Insim

    2005-01-01

    This study explored the effects of teacher commitment on student achievement. Three teacher commitment dimensions of organizational, professional, and student commitment were derived. The three-dimensional teacher commitment measurement model was tested by a confirmatory factor analysis. Then, the relationships among individual and organizational…

  9. Effects of parental divorce on marital commitment and confidence.

    PubMed

    Whitton, Sarah W; Rhoades, Galena K; Stanley, Scott M; Markman, Howard J

    2008-10-01

    Research on the intergenerational transmission of divorce has demonstrated that compared with offspring of nondivorced parents, those of divorced parents generally have more negative attitudes toward marriage as an institution and are less optimistic about the feasibility of a long-lasting, healthy marriage. It is also possible that when entering marriage themselves, adults whose parents divorced have less personal relationship commitment to their own marriages and less confidence in their own ability to maintain a happy marriage with their spouse. However, this prediction has not been tested. In the current study, we assessed relationship commitment and relationship confidence, as well as parental divorce and retrospectively reported interparental conflict, in a sample of 265 engaged couples prior to their first marriage. Results demonstrated that women's, but not men's, parental divorce was associated with lower relationship commitment and lower relationship confidence. These effects persisted when controlling for the influence of recalled interparental conflict and premarital relationship adjustment. The current findings suggest that women whose parents divorced are more likely to enter marriage with relatively lower commitment to, and confidence in, the future of those marriages, potentially raising their risk for divorce.

  10. 50 years of snow stratigraphy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, C.; Pohjola, V.; Jonasson, C.; Challagan, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    With start in autumn 1961 the Abisko Scientific Research Station (ASRS) located in the Swedish sub Arctic has performed snow stratigraphy observations, resulting in a unique 50 year long time series of data. The data set contains grain size, snow layer hardness, grain compactness and snow layer dryness, observed every second week during the winter season. In general snow and snow cover are important factors for the global radiation budget, and the earth's climate. On a more local scale the layered snowpack creates a relatively mild microclimate for Arctic plants and animals, and it also determines the water content of the snowpack (snow water equivalent) important for e.g. hydrological applications. Analysis of the snow stratigraphy data, divided into three consecutive time periods, show that there has been a change in the last time period. The variable most affected is the snow layer hardness, which shows an increase in hardness of the snowpack. The number of observations with a very hard snow layer/ice at ground level increased three-fold between the first two time periods and the last time period. The thickness of the bottom layer in the snowpack is also highly affected. There has been a 60% increase in layers thinner than 10 cm in the last time period, resulting in a mean reduction in the thickness of the bottom layer from 14 cm to 11 cm. Hence the living conditions for plants and animals at the ground surface have been highly changed. The changes in the snowpack are correlated to an increased mean winter air temperature. Thus, continued increasing, or temperatures within the same ranges as in the last time period, is likely to create harder snow condition in the future. These changes are likely to affect animals that live under the snow such as lemmings and voles or animals that graze sub-Arctic vegetation in winter (e.g. reindeer that would potentially require increased supplementary feeding that incurs financial costs to Sami reindeer herders). Any decrease

  11. Committed effective dose determination in southern Brazilian cereal flours.

    PubMed

    Scheibel, V; Appoloni, C R

    2013-01-01

    The health impact of radionuclide ingestion from foodstuffs was evaluated by the committed effective doses determined in eight commercial samples of South-Brazilian cereal flours (soy, wheat, cornmeal, cassava, rye, oat, barley and rice flours). The radioactivity traces of (228)Th, (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (40)K, (7)Be and (137)Cs were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry employing an HPGe detector of 66 % relative efficiency. The efficiency curve has taken into account the differences in densities and chemical composition between the matrix and the certified sample. The highest concentration levels of (228)Th and (40)K were 3.5±0.4 and 1469±17 Bq kg(-1) for soy flour, respectively, within the 95 % confidence level. The lower limit of detection for (137)Cs ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 Bq kg(-1). The highest committed effective dose was 0.36 μSv.y(-1) for (228)Ra in cassava flour (adults). All committed effective doses determined at the present work were lower than the International Atomic Energy Agency dose limit of 1 mSv.y(-1), to the public exposure.

  12. Performance and retention of professional employees who work in teams: the effects of commitment and support.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J W

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of support and commitment on job performance and turnover intentions of professionals working in a team environment. As hypothesized, the results indicated that job performance was influenced positively by both professional and team commitment as well as by perceived organizational and team support. Intention to quit the organization went down as organizational support and commitment went up, and intention to leave the profession similarly was related to team support and commitment Interestingly, professional commitment had a deleterious effect on intention to quit the organization, whereas organizational support had a positive effect on professional commitment.

  13. 50 years of transonic aircraft design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameson, Antony; Ou, Kui

    2011-07-01

    This article traces the evolution of long range jet transport aircraft over the 50 years since Kuechemann founded the journal Progress in Aerospace Sciences. The article is particularly focused on transonic aerodynamics. During Kuechemann's life time a good qualitative understanding had been achieved of transonic flow and swept wing design, but transonic flow remained intractable to quantitative prediction. During the last 50 years this situation has been completely transformed by the introduction of sophisticated numerical algorithms and an astonishing increase in the available computational power, with the consequence that aerodynamic design is now carried out largely by computer simulation. Moreover developments in aerodynamic shape optimization based on control theory enable a competitive swept wing to be designed in just two simulations, as illustrated in the article. While the external appearance of long range jet aircraft has not changed much, advances in information technology have actually transformed the entire design and manufacturing process through parallel advances in computer aided design (CAD), computational structural mechanics (CSM) and multidisciplinary optimization (MDO). They have also transformed aircraft operations through the adoption of digital fly-by-wire and advanced navigational techniques.

  14. Effects of organizational justice on organizational citizenship behaviors: mediating effects of institutional trust and affective commitment.

    PubMed

    Guh, Wei-Yuan; Lin, Shang-Ping; Fan, Chwei-Jen; Yang, Chin-Fang

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the mediating role of institutional trust and affective commitment on the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behaviors. The study participants were 315 faculty members at 67 public/private universities of technology and vocational colleges in Taiwan. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the relationships between the variables and assess the goodness of fit of the overall model. Organizational justice was positively related to institutional trust and there was an indirect effect of organizational justice on affective commitment through institutional trust. In addition, the relation between institutional trust and affective commitment was positive and affective commitment was shown to have a positive relation to organizational citizenship behaviors. Institutional trust was found to indirectly affect organizational citizenship behaviors through affective commitment. Most importantly, this study suggested a mediating effect of institutional trust and affective commitment on the relation between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behaviors. Implications, limitations, and future research were also discussed.

  15. Paediatric nephrology: the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Y; Powell, Harley R

    2015-01-01

    In 1965, the specialty of paediatric nephrology was in its infancy. Following the development of a landmark collaborative research study, the International Study of Kidney Disease in Childhood in the mid-1960s, the first specialist societies were formed: the European Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1967 and the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology in 1969. The extraordinary improvements in care delivered to children with kidney disease over the past 50 years are too broad to cover in any one paper. They traverse the spectrum of diagnosis, classification, therapeutics, social well-being and transition to adult care. We have selected four case scenarios to highlight these changes in key areas of paediatric nephrology: post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome, haemolytic uraemic syndrome and neonatal dialysis and childhood transplantation.

  16. A Meta-Analysis: Exploring the Effects of Gender on Organisational Commitment of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalgiç, Gülay

    2014-01-01

    The consequences of organisational commitment (OC) are of great importance to organisations. Considering the effect of teacher commitment on student success and the increasing teacher turnover rates in the world, studies focusing on the organisational commitment of teachers gained more importance. However there is still a significant gap about the…

  17. The Effect of Gender on Organizational Commitment of Teachers: A Meta Analytic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Ayhan; Sarier, Yilmaz; Uysal, Sengul

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of gender on the organizational commitment of teachers. In this respect, the levels of organizational commitment were also investigated with organizational commitment. Fifteen master and doctorate theses done between 2005-2009 were analyzed using meta analysis. At the end of the research study,…

  18. 50 years of Global Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Butler, R.; Berger, J.; Davis, P.; Derr, J.; Gee, L.; Hutt, C. R.; Leith, W. S.; Park, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Seismological recordings have been made on Earth for hundreds of years in some form or another, however, global monitoring of earthquakes only began in the 1890's when John Milne created 40 seismic observatories to measure the waves from these events. Shortly after the International Geophysical Year (IGY), a concerted effort was made to establish and maintain a more modern standardized seismic network on the global scale. In the early 1960's, the World-Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN) was established through funding from the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and was installed and maintained by the USGS's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (then a part of the US Coast and Geodetic Survey). This network of identical seismic instruments consisted of 120 stations in 60 countries. Although the network was motivated by nuclear test monitoring, the WWSSN facilitated numerous advances in observational seismology. From the IGY to the present, the network has been upgraded (High-Gain Long-Period Seismograph Network, Seismic Research Observatories, Digital WWSSN, Global Telemetered Seismograph Network, etc.) and expanded (International Deployment of Accelerometers, US National Seismic Network, China Digital Seismograph Network, Joint Seismic Project, etc.), bringing the modern day Global Seismographic Network (GSN) to a current state of approximately 150 stations. The GSN consists of state-of-the-art very broadband seismic transducers, continuous power and communications, and ancillary sensors including geodetic, geomagnetic, microbarographic, meteorological and other related instrumentation. Beyond the GSN, the system of global network observatories includes contributions from other international partners (e.g., GEOSCOPE, GEOFON, MEDNET, F-Net, CTBTO), forming an even larger backbone of permanent seismological observatories as a part of the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks. 50 years of seismic network operations have provided

  19. Proportional mortality of 50 years and above

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, S.; Uemura, K.

    1957-01-01

    In 1954 the United Nations Committee of Experts on International Definition and Measurement of Standards and Levels of Living suggested that for the measurement of levels of living quantifiable or potentially quantifiable components should be considered separately. An attempt is made in the present paper to evolve a single, comprehensive numerical indicator to quantify the component “health, including demographic conditions”. The use of an objective statistical technique as a guide in the selection of such an indicator is suggested. From the application of this technique, it is concluded that the percentage of deaths at the ages 50 years and over to total deaths (proportional mortality) affords a fairly suitable yardstick by which broad inter-country comparisons may be made. This indicator has the advantages of simplicity of calculation, comprehensiveness, availability of data, possibility of international comparability despite the varying quality of basic statistical information, sensitivity for the purpose of inter-country comparisons, and validity for studying levels and trends. PMID:13500159

  20. School-Based Management and Its Effect on Teacher Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nir, Adam E.

    2002-01-01

    Report of a study from Israel that reveals that SBM positively affects teachers' commitment to the profession and students' academic achievement, and negatively affects their commitment to the school and students' social well-being. Further, teachers' autonomy remained unchanged after SBM was introduced. (Contains 4 figures, a questionnaire, and…

  1. Ease of Retrieval Effects on Relationship Commitment: The Role of Future Plans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kenneth; Agnew, Christopher R

    2016-02-01

    How do perceptions of future romantic plans affect close relationships? In three studies, we examined the effects of ease of retrieval of future plans on romantic relationship commitment. We hypothesized that greater ease of retrieval would be associated with greater relationship commitment among those who were high in need for cognition. Study 1 participants listed either two or 10 future plans and completed a measure assessing need for cognition. Results showed that high need for cognition individuals asked to list two instead of 10 future plans reported greater commitment, but those low in need for cognition showed the opposite pattern. Study 2 replicated this effect while controlling for plan substitutability. Study 3 examined the mediational role of commitment doubt. Those high in need for cognition listing more plans had more doubts and reported lower commitment. These findings suggest that perceptions of future plans can influence relationship commitment under specific conditions.

  2. The Mediation of Performance in the Relationship of Organizational Commitment to University Faculty's Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jing, Lizhen; Zhang, Deshan

    2014-01-01

    To provide more insights into inconsistent findings on the relationship of organizational commitment to effectiveness, this study conducted a questionnaire survey among 188 academics in Beijing. Analysis of survey responses suggested that organizational commitment presented significant relationships to performance and effectiveness. These…

  3. Internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment: moderating effects of work status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Meiju; Chen, Mei-Yen

    2013-08-01

    Associations among internal marketing, customer orientation, and organizational commitment were examined, particularly with regard to the moderating effects of work status on the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation or organizational commitment, in a cross-sectional design with structural equation modeling. Two studies (Ns = 119 and 251) were conducted among full- and part-time service employees at Taipei Sports Centers. Internal marketing was associated with organizational commitment and customer orientation. Customer orientation was associated with organizational commitment and partially mediated the relation between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Furthermore, work status significantly moderated the relationships between internal marketing and customer orientation but not between internal marketing and organizational commitment. Implications and directions for future research were discussed.

  4. Strategic effects of future environmental policy commitments: climate change, solar radiation management and correlated air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jingwen; Silva, Emilson Caputo Delfino

    2015-03-15

    We study the effects of environmental policy commitments in a futuristic world in which solar radiation management (SRM) can be utilized to reduce climate change damages. Carbon and sulfur dioxide emissions (correlated pollutants) can be reduced through tradable permits. We show that if nations simultaneously commit to carbon permit policies, national SRM levels rise with carbon quotas. Alternatively, if they simultaneously commit to SRM policies, the global temperature falls with each unit increase in the global SRM level. A nation always wishes to be a leader in policymaking, but prefers carbon to SRM policymaking. The globe prefers SRM policy commitments.

  5. Commitment of Cultural Minorities in Organizations: Effects of Leadership and Pressure to Conform.

    PubMed

    Rupert, Joyce; Jehn, Karen A; van Engen, Marloes L; de Reuver, Renée S M

    2010-03-01

    PURPOSE: In this study, we investigated the commitment of cultural minorities and majorities in organizations. We examined how contextual factors, such as pressure to conform and leadership styles, affect the commitment of minority and majority members. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A field study was conducted on 107 employees in a large multinational corporation. FINDINGS: We hypothesize and found that cultural minorities felt more committed to the organization than majority members, thereby challenging the existing theoretical view that cultural minorities will feel less committed. We also found that organizational pressure to conform and effective leadership increased the commitment of minorities. IMPLICATIONS: Our findings indicate that organizational leaders and researchers should not only focus on increasing and maintaining the commitment of minority members, but should also consider how majority members react to cultural socialization and integration processes. The commitment of minority members can be further enhanced by effective leadership. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: In this study, we challenge the existing theoretical view based on similarity attraction theory and relational demography theory, that cultural minorities would feel less committed to the organization. Past research has mainly focused on minority groups, thereby ignoring the reaction of the majority to socialization processes. In this study, we show that cultural minorities can be more committed than majority members in organizations. Therefore, the perceptions of cultural majority members of socialization processes should also be considered in research on cultural diversity and acculturation.

  6. Ochratoxin A: 50 Years of Research

    PubMed Central

    Malir, Frantisek; Ostry, Vladimir; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Malir, Jan; Toman, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Since ochratoxin A (OTA) was discovered, it has been ubiquitous as a natural contaminant of moldy food and feed. The multiple toxic effects of OTA are a real threat for human beings and animal health. For example, OTA can cause porcine nephropathy but can also damage poultries. Humans exposed to OTA can develop (notably by inhalation in the development of acute renal failure within 24 h) a range of chronic disorders such as upper urothelial carcinoma. OTA plays the main role in the pathogenesis of some renal diseases including Balkan endemic nephropathy, kidney tumors occurring in certain endemic regions of the Balkan Peninsula, and chronic interstitial nephropathy occurring in Northern African countries and likely in other parts of the world. OTA leads to DNA adduct formation, which is known for its genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. The present article discusses how renal carcinogenicity and nephrotoxicity cause both oxidative stress and direct genotoxicity. Careful analyses of the data show that OTA carcinogenic effects are due to combined direct and indirect mechanisms (e.g., genotoxicity, oxidative stress, epigenetic factors). Altogether this provides strong evidence that OTA carcinogenicity can also occur in humans. PMID:27384585

  7. Ketamine: 50 Years of Modulating the Mind

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linda; Vlisides, Phillip E.

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine was introduced into clinical practice in the 1960s and continues to be both clinically useful and scientifically fascinating. With considerably diverse molecular targets and neurophysiological properties, ketamine’s effects on the central nervous system remain incompletely understood. Investigators have leveraged the unique characteristics of ketamine to explore the invariant, fundamental mechanisms of anesthetic action. Emerging evidence indicates that ketamine-mediated anesthesia may occur via disruption of corticocortical information transfer in a frontal-to-parietal (“top down”) distribution. This proposed mechanism of general anesthesia has since been demonstrated with anesthetics in other pharmacological classes as well. Ketamine remains invaluable to the fields of anesthesiology and critical care medicine, in large part due to its ability to maintain cardiorespiratory stability while providing effective sedation and analgesia. Furthermore, there may be an emerging role for ketamine in treatment of refractory depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. In this article, we review the history of ketamine, its pharmacology, putative mechanisms of action and current clinical applications. PMID:27965560

  8. Blood groups: the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Geoff; Reid, Marion E

    2010-02-01

    Since the first issue of TRANSFUSION in 1961, there has been a tremendous expansion in not only the number of blood group antigens identified but also in our knowledge of their biochemical basis, function, and more recently, associated DNA changes. As certain techniques became available, our ability to discover and elucidate blood group antigens and appreciate their contribution to biology became possible. In particular, Western blotting, monoclonal antibodies, cloning, and polymerase chain reaction-based assays have led to an explosion of our knowledge base. The study of blood groups has had a significant effect on human genetics where they serve as useful markers in genetic linkage analyses. Indeed blood groups have provided several "firsts" in certain aspects of genetics. Blood group-null phenotypes, as natural human knockouts, have provided valuable insights into the importance of red blood cell membrane components. This review summarizes key aspects of the discovery of blood groups; the inconsistent terminology that has arisen; and the contribution of blood groups to genetics, safe transfusion, transplantation, evolution, and biology.

  9. Teachers' Organizational Commitment: Examining the Mediating Effects of Distributed Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devos, Geert; Tuytens, Melissa; Hulpia, Hester

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relation between principals' leadership and teachers' organizational commitment, mediated by distributed leadership. Data were collected from 1,495 teachers in 46 secondary schools. Structural equation modeling indicated that the effect of principals' leadership on teachers' organizational commitment is…

  10. Exploring the Effects of Empowerment, Innovation, Professionalism, Conflict, and Participation on Teacher Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliman, Stephanie Layne

    2012-01-01

    Improved understanding of teacher retention depends on systematic research on working conditions, teachers' perceptions of their work environments, and the effect of condition-of-work variables on organizational commitment. The examination of organizational commitment in K-12 teachers is a construct with implications for long-term relationships in…

  11. Direct and indirect effects of commitment on interdependence and satisfaction in married couples.

    PubMed

    Givertz, Michelle; Segrin, Chris; Woszidlo, Alesia

    2016-03-01

    This study tested the prediction that an individual's marital commitment would be positively associated with their own and their partner's marital satisfaction, and that one's own marital interdependence would be associated with one's own marital satisfaction. It also tested the prediction that there would be an indirect effect of marital commitment on marital satisfaction through higher marital interdependence for both the individual and the partner. Predictions were tested on 628 married couples. Overall, results were consistent with predictions. Tests of actor-partner interdependence mediation models revealed direct effects of marital commitment on marital satisfaction for both husbands and wives. Wives' commitment was also directly associated with husbands' marital interdependence and marital satisfaction, but husbands' commitment was not significantly associated with wives' interdependence or satisfaction. For both husbands and wives, their own marital interdependence was significantly associated with their own marital satisfaction. These same tests revealed indirect effects of marital commitment on marital satisfaction through higher marital interdependence for both husbands and wives individually. There was also an indirect effect of wives' commitment on husbands' marital satisfaction through wives' higher marital interdependence. These results are consistent with interdependence theory and the investment model of commitment.

  12. Organizational Commitment of Teachers in Urban Schools: Examining the Effects of Team Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Jay R.; Henkin, Alan B.; Singleton, Carole A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the effects of four team-based structures on the organizational commitment of elementary teachers in an urban school district. The study model focuses on organizational commitment and includes three intervening, endogenous variables: teacher empowerment, school communication, and work autonomy. Team teaching had both direct and…

  13. Evidence for decreasing quality of semen during past 50 years.

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, E.; Giwercman, A.; Keiding, N.; Skakkebaek, N. E.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate whether semen quality has changed during the past 50 years. DESIGN--Review of publications on semen quality in men without a history of infertility selected by means of Cumulated Index Medicus and Current List (1930-1965) and MEDLINE Silver Platter database (1966-August 1991). SUBJECTS--14,947 men included in a total of 61 papers published between 1938 and 1991. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Mean sperm density and mean seminal volume. RESULTS--Linear regression of data weighted by number of men in each study showed a significant decrease in mean sperm count from 113 x 10(6)/ml in 1940 to 66 x 10(6)/ml in 1990 (p < 0.0001) and in seminal volume from 3.40 ml to 2.75 ml (p = 0.027), indicating an even more pronounced decrease in sperm production than expressed by the decline in sperm density. CONCLUSIONS--There has been a genuine decline in semen quality over the past 50 years. As male fertility is to some extent correlated with sperm count the results may reflect an overall reduction in male fertility. The biological significance of these changes is emphasised by a concomitant increase in the incidence of genitourinary abnormalities such as testicular cancer and possibly also cryptorchidism and hypospadias, suggesting a growing impact of factors with serious effects on male gonadal function. PMID:1393072

  14. Naegleria fowleri after 50 Years: Is it a neglected pathogen?

    PubMed

    Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; Cárdenas-Zúñiga, Roberto; Coronado-Velázquez, Daniel; Debnath, Anjan; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Shibayama, Mineko

    2016-07-04

    It has been 50 years since the first case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) an acute and rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) was reported in Australia. It is now known that the etiological agent of PAM is Naegleria fowleri, an amoeba that is commonly known as "the brain-eating amoeba". N. fowleri infects humans of different ages which are in contact with contaminated water with this microorganism. N. fowleri is distributed worldwide and is found growing in bodies of freshwater in tropical and subtropical environments. The number of PAM cases has recently increased, and the rate of recovery from PAM has been estimated at only 5%. Amphotericin B has been used to treat patients with PAM. However, it is important to note that there is no specific treatment for PAM. Moreover, this amoeba is considered a neglected microorganism. Researchers have exerted great effort to design effective drugs to treat PAM and to understand the pathogenesis on PAM over the last 50 years, such as its pathology, molecular and cellular biology, diagnosis and prevention, and its biological implications, including its pathogenic genotypes, its distribution, and its ecology. Given the rapid progression of PAM and its high mortality rate, it is important that investigations continue and that researchers collaborate to gain better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and, consequently, to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this devastating infection of the CNS.

  15. Effects of Commitment and Psychological Centrality on Fathering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasley, Kay; Furtis, Ted G.; Skinner, Martie L.

    2002-01-01

    Identity theory model was tested with fathers (N=186) to assess whether commitment to the fathering role identity affected the psychological centrality of that role. Results showed that fathers who perceived that their wives evaluated them positively as fathers were more likely to report higher levels of involvement in child-related activities and…

  16. The Effects of Organizational Training on Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulut, Cagri; Culha, Osman

    2010-01-01

    This empirical study investigated the impact of organizational training on employee commitment focusing on employees' emotional and affective responses towards their organization. Organizational training is conceptualized within a multidimensional framework consisting of motivation for training, access to training, benefits from training and…

  17. Commitment and Consistency Can Promote Student Course Scheduling Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfield, Jacob A.; Bernstein, Michael J.; Shultz, Norah

    2016-01-01

    Using social psychological theory, the authors demonstrate in two studies, one cross sectional and one experimental, commitment interventions for timely course scheduling can significantly hasten course-scheduling behavior. Using a simple intervention, the authors were able to alter a regularly occurring student behavior tied to both retention and…

  18. Moderating effects of nurses' organizational support on the relationship between job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to investigate whether job satisfaction enhances organizational commitment among nursing personnel while exploring whether organizational support perception has a moderating effect on the relationship between their job satisfaction and organizational commitment. A cross-sectional survey was sent to 400 nurses; 386 valid questionnaires were collected, with a valid response rate of 96.5%. According to the research findings, nurses' job satisfaction has a positive and significant influence on organizational commitment. Results also indicated that the moderating effect of nurses' organizational support perception on the relationship between their job satisfaction and organizational commitment was stronger for high organizational support perception than it was for low organizational support perception. This study suggests that organizational support perception will develop a sense of belonging, and this will help improve nurses' job satisfaction and organizational commitment. This kind of relationship is rarely discussed in the research literature, and it can be applied for human resources management of nursing staff.

  19. Committed effective dose from naturally occuring radionuclides in shellfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Wahib, Norfadira Binti; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Bradley, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    Recognizing their importance in the average Malaysian daily diet, the radioactivity concentrations in mollusc- and crustacean-based food have been determined for key naturally occuring radionuclides. Fresh samples collected from various maritime locations around peninsular Malaysia have been processed using standard procedures; the radionuclide concentrations being determined using an HPGe γ-ray spectrometer. For molluscs, assuming secular equilibrium, the range of activities of 238U (226Ra), 232Th (228Ra) and 40K were found to be 3.28±0.35 to 5.34±0.52, 1.20±0.21 to 2.44±0.21 and 118±6 to 281±14 Bq kg-1 dry weight, respectively. The respective values for crustaceans were 3.02±0.57 to 4.70±0.52, 1.38±0.21 to 2.40±0.35 and 216±11 to 316±15 Bq kg-1. The estimated average daily intake of radioactivity from consumption of molluscs are 0.37 Bq kg-1 for 238U (226Ra), 0.16 Bq kg-1 for 232Th (228Ra) and 18 Bq kg-1 for 40K; the respective daily intake values from crustaceans are 0.36 Bq kg-1, 0.16 Bq kg-1 and 23 Bq kg-1. Associated annual committed effective doses from molluscs are estimated to be in the range 21.3 to 34.7 μSv for 226Ra, 19.3 to 39.1 μSv for 228Ra and 17.0 to 40.4 μSv for 40K. For crustaceans, the respective dose ranges are 19.6 to 30.5 μSv, 22.0 to 38.4 μSv and 31.1 to 45.5 μSv, being some several times world average values.

  20. The effects of mortality salience on escalation of commitment.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chih-Long; Lin, Chun-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Based on propositions derived from terror management theory (TMT), the current study proposes that people who are reminded of their mortality exhibit a higher degree of self-justification behavior to maintain their self-esteem. For this reason, they could be expected to stick with their previous decisions and invest an increasing amount of resources in those decisions, despite the fact that negative feedback has clearly indicated that they might be on a course toward failure (i.e., "escalation of commitment"). Our experiment showed that people who were reminded of their mortality were more likely to escalate their level of commitment by maintaining their current course of action. Two imaginary scenarios were tested. One of the scenarios involved deciding whether to send additional troops into the battlefield when previous attempts had failed; the other involved deciding whether to continue developing an anti-radar fighter plane when the enemy had already developed a device to detect it. The results supported our hypothesis that mortality salience increases the tendency to escalate one's level of commitment.

  1. Case of lupus vulgaris diagnosed 50 years after onset.

    PubMed

    Uttawichai, Pattanawadee; Igarashi, Tsukasa; Kawana, Seiji

    2009-02-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, but is a symptom that can lead to diagnosis of tuberculosis. We describe a case of lupus vulgaris in a 79-year-old woman who had a 50-year history of a slowly growing plaque on her right cheek. She visited many hospitals without resolution and the plaque gradually enlarged. Recently, she was misdiagnosed with eczema and prescribed topical steroids that had no effect, and she subsequently visited our outpatient clinic. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on histopathology, culture and polymerase chain reaction, and isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol were administered as antituberculosis treatment. Although the incidence of cutaneous tuberculosis has decreased significantly in developed countries, knowledge and awareness of the disease are still of importance for proper diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Marshall Space Flight Center: 50 Years, 50 Seconds

    NASA Video Gallery

    Talk about time flying! Take a look at this super-fast review of highlights from the past 50 years at the Marshall Center. This year, Marshall is celebrating its 50th anniversary, highlighting its ...

  3. 50 years of hurdles and hope in anxiolytic drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Griebel, Guy; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent group of psychiatric diseases, and have high personal and societal costs. The search for novel pharmacological treatments for these conditions is driven by the growing medical need to improve on the effectiveness and the side effect profile of existing drugs. A huge volume of data has been generated by anxiolytic drug discovery studies, which has led to the progression of numerous new molecules into clinical trials. However, the clinical outcome of these efforts has been disappointing, as promising results with novel agents in rodent studies have very rarely translated into effectiveness in humans. Here, we analyse the major trends from preclinical studies over the past 50 years conducted in the search for new drugs beyond those that target the prototypical anxiety-associated GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)–benzodiazepine system, which have focused most intensively on the serotonin, neuropeptide, glutamate and endocannabinoid systems. We highlight various key issues that may have hampered progress in the field, and offer recommendations for how anxiolytic drug discovery can be more effective in the future. PMID:23989795

  4. Defense Intelligence Agency: 50 Years Committed to Excellence in Defense of the Nation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    C E studies. Often, this open source intelligence OSINT provides such basic information as population statistics, military maneuvers, and...intelligence challenges, such as the growth of China’s atomic bomb program, the Six Day War between Egypt , Syria, Jordan, and Israel, and North Korea’s

  5. Aflatoxin: A 50-Year Odyssey of Mechanistic and Translational Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Kensler, Thomas W.; Roebuck, Bill D.; Wogan, Gerald N.; Groopman, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery 50 years ago, the aflatoxins have become recognized as ubiquitous contaminants of the human food supply throughout the economically developing world. The adverse toxicological consequences of these compounds in populations are quite varied because of a wide range of exposures leading to acute effects, including rapid death, and chronic outcomes such as hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, emerging studies describe a variety of general adverse health effects associated with aflatoxin, such as impaired growth in children. Aflatoxin exposures have also been demonstrated to multiplicatively increase the risk of liver cancer in people chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) illustrating the deleterious impact that even low toxin levels in the diet can pose for human health. The public health impact of aflatoxin exposure is pervasive. Aflatoxin biomarkers of internal and biologically effective doses have been integral to the establishment of the etiologic role of this toxin in human disease through better estimates of exposure, expanded knowledge of the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis, and as tools for implementing and evaluating preventive interventions. PMID:20881231

  6. The effects of organizational commitment and structural empowerment on patient safety culture.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Sujin K; Horwitz, Irwin B

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between patient safety culture and two attitudinal constructs: affective organizational commitment and structural empowerment. In doing so, the main and interaction effects of the two constructs on the perception of patient safety culture were assessed using a cohort of physicians. Design/methodology/approach Affective commitment was measured with the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire, whereas structural empowerment was assessed with the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II. The abbreviated versions of these surveys were administered to a cohort of 71 post-doctoral medical residents. For the data analysis, hierarchical regression analyses were performed for the main and interaction effects of affective commitment and structural empowerment on the perception of patient safety culture. Findings A total of 63 surveys were analyzed. The results revealed that both affective commitment and structural empowerment were positively related to patient safety culture. A potential interaction effect of the two attitudinal constructs on patient safety culture was tested but no such effect was detected. Research limitations/implications This study suggests that there are potential benefits of promoting affective commitment and structural empowerment for patient safety culture in health care organizations. By identifying the positive associations between the two constructs and patient safety culture, this study provides additional empirical support for Kanter's theoretical tenet that structural and organizational support together helps to shape the perceptions of patient safety culture. Originality/value Despite the wide recognition of employee empowerment and commitment in organizational research, there has still been a paucity of empirical studies specifically assessing their effects on patient safety culture in health care organizations. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first

  7. Advance market commitments for vaccines against neglected diseases: estimating costs and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Ernst R; Glennerster, Rachel; Kremer, Michael R; Lee, Jean; Levine, Ruth; Weizsäcker, Georg; Williams, Heidi

    2007-05-01

    The G8 is considering committing to purchase vaccines against diseases concentrated in low-income countries (if and when desirable vaccines are developed) as a way to spur research and development on vaccines for these diseases. Under such an 'advance market commitment,' one or more sponsors would commit to a minimum price to be paid per person immunized for an eligible product, up to a certain number of individuals immunized. For additional purchases, the price would eventually drop to close to marginal cost. If no suitable product were developed, no payments would be made. We estimate the offer size which would make revenues similar to the revenues realized from investments in typical existing commercial pharmaceutical products, as well as the degree to which various model contracts and assumptions would affect the cost-effectiveness of such a commitment. We make adjustments for lower marketing costs under an advance market commitment and the risk that a developer may have to share the market with subsequent developers. We also show how this second risk could be reduced, and money saved, by introducing a superiority clause to a commitment. Under conservative assumptions, we document that a commitment comparable in value to sales earned by the average of a sample of recently launched commercial products (adjusted for lower marketing costs) would be a highly cost-effective way to address HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis. Sensitivity analyses suggest most characteristics of a hypothetical vaccine would have little effect on the cost-effectiveness, but that the duration of protection conferred by a vaccine strongly affects potential cost-effectiveness. Readers can conduct their own sensitivity analyses employing a web-based spreadsheet tool.

  8. 50 years of computer simulation of the human thermoregulatory system.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Daniel W; Mark, Andrew E; Abella, Jayvee R; Netscher, George M; Wissler, Eugene H; Diller, Kenneth R

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents an updated and augmented version of the Wissler human thermoregulation model that has been developed continuously over the past 50 years. The existing Fortran code is translated into C with extensive embedded commentary. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed in Python to facilitate convenient user designation of input and output variables and formatting of data presentation. Use of the code with the GUI is described and demonstrated. New physiological elements were added to the model to represent the hands and feet, including the unique vascular structures adapted for heat transfer associated with glabrous skin. The heat transfer function and efficacy of glabrous skin is unique within the entire body based on the capacity for a very high rate of blood perfusion and the novel capability for dynamic regulation of blood flow. The model was applied to quantify the absolute and relative contributions of glabrous skin flow to thermoregulation for varying levels of blood perfusion. The model also was used to demonstrate how the unique features of glabrous skin blood flow may be recruited to implement thermal therapeutic procedures. We have developed proprietary methods to manipulate the control of glabrous skin blood flow in conjunction with therapeutic devices and simulated the effect of these methods with the model.

  9. 50 years of space science (Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Roger-Maurice

    2013-04-01

    The launch of Sputnik-1 triggered my fascination for space at the age of 20. The past 50 years have allowed me to study the Sun with sounding rockets and satellites, revealing the complexity of our star, contributing to the understanding of its physics, and offering surprising manifestations of its behavior and of its effects on Earth. Building instruments for space astronomy, managing teams of space scientists and engineers, led me to become the science director of the European space agency between 1983 and 2001 where I formulated and managed the Horizon 2000 program, which led Europe to occupy the front row of world space science. The Jean Dominique Cassini Medal Lecture offers me an opportunity, to describe the most spectacular achievements of this long-term plan and to outline some basic principles for reaching success, including the essential role of international cooperation with shared partnership. The Lecture also identifies key problems and controversial issues that space astronomy and exploration will face in the 21st century.

  10. Tritium in Australian precipitation: A 50 year record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadros, Carol V.; Hughes, Catherine E.; Crawford, Jagoda; Hollins, Suzanne E.; Chisari, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Tritium in precipitation has been measured in Australia over the past 50 years, as an essential research tool in hydro-climate studies, and to contribute to the Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (GNIP). Tritium, a component of the water molecule (HTO), is the only true age tracer for waters. The elevated level of tritium in the environment as a result of last century’s atmospheric thermonuclear testing delivers the benefit of tracing groundwater systems over a 100 year timeframe. The concentration of tritium in Australian precipitation reached a maximum of 160 Tritium Units (TU) in 1963, during one of the most intense periods of nuclear weapons testing. From 1963 to present we observe a rapid drop in the concentration of tritium, more than expected from natural decay, and this can be attributed to the wash out of tritium into the oceans and groundwater. Spikes in the tritium level are superimposed over this general trend; the first around 1969, with levels ranging from 39.4 to 84.4 TU was due to French atmospheric weapon testing, and again in 1990, levels peaked between 6.6 and 12.9 TU, which is attributed to tritium leaking from underground tests in the French Pacific. Since 1990 the levels of tritium have declined globally and regionally. Currently the levels of tritium in Australia are stabilising to around 2-3 TU increasing with latitude across the continent, suggesting that today the tritium in precipitation is predominantly natural. The spatial distribution of tritium is presented and found to be dominated by the annual stratosphere-troposphere exchange in combination with latitude and continental effects. A precipitation amount effect is also observed for inland sites.

  11. My 50 years of research in particle physics.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    Some of my work of the last 50 years in the field of theoretical particle physics is described with particular emphasis on the motivation, the process of investigation, relationship to the work of others, and its impact. My judgment is unavoidably subjective, although I do present the comments of other researchers as much as possible.

  12. My 50 years of research in particle physics

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    Some of my work of the last 50 years in the field of theoretical particle physics is described with particular emphasis on the motivation, the process of investigation, relationship to the work of others, and its impact. My judgment is unavoidably subjective, although I do present the comments of other researchers as much as possible. PMID:20431257

  13. Assessing What Matters: Improving College Readiness 50 Years beyond "Brown"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; Bush, V. Barbara

    2006-01-01

    50 years after the "Brown v. Board of Education" decision, a high-stakes testing movement, significantly boosted by provisions contained in No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, has emerged with the potential of both positive and negative implications. This paper argues that assessment generally is not tied to the 3 positive outcomes of…

  14. [50 years ago: documentation concerning Bernburg's "euthanasia"-action program].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, W

    1990-07-15

    50 years ago within a so-called "euthanasia" action programme several killing institutions were founded, in which nearly 100,000 patients suffering from mental diseases were brought to death. At the instance of the Bernburg mental hospital the involvements of the political psychiatry and the murdering mechanism are described.

  15. Affective Organizational Commitment and Citizenship Behavior: Linear and Non-linear Moderating Effects of Organizational Tenure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing a meta-analytical approach for testing moderating effects, the current study investigated organizational tenure as a moderator in the relation between affective organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). We observed that, across 40 studies (N = 11,416 respondents), the effect size for the relation between…

  16. The effects of transformational and change leadership on employees' commitment to a change: a multilevel study.

    PubMed

    Herold, David M; Fedor, Donald B; Caldwell, Steven; Liu, Yi

    2008-03-01

    The effects of transformational leadership on the outcomes of specific change initiatives are not well understood. Conversely, organizational change studies have examined leader behaviors during specific change implementations yet have failed to link these to broader leadership theories. In this study, the authors investigate the relationship between transformational and change leadership and followers' commitment to a particular change initiative as a function of the personal impact of the changes. Transformational leadership was found to be more strongly related to followers' change commitment than change-specific leadership practices, especially when the change had significant personal impact. For leaders who were not viewed as transformational, good change-management practices were found to be associated with higher levels of change commitment.

  17. Effects of Flight Pay and Commitment on Air Force Pilot Applicants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    sampled group that would accept a com- mitment equal to or less than that shown on the left for each given amount of flight pay and bonus shown at the...EFFECTS OF FLIGHT PAY AND COMMITMENT ON AIR FORCE PILOT APPLICANTS Joel D. Haniford, First Lieutenant, USAF Bobby M. Stone, Major, USAF LSSR 16-82 I...FLIGHT PAY AND COMMITMENT Master’s Thesis ON AIR FORCE PILOT APPLICANTS S. PERFORmINo Oqi. REPORT HUmsERt 7. AUTOR(e.) . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERaI

  18. Self-Efficacy and Behavioral Intention: A Mediational Analysis of the Effects of Commitment on Career Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillon, Vincent; Dosnon, Odile; Esteve, Marie-Dominique; Gosling, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This article examines two questions of research. Can we make educational vocational information sessions effective by applying commitment theory (Kiesler, 1971) to this particular aspect of career counseling? Does commitment as part of an initial low-cost behavior (taking part in an information session) have a direct effect or is the effect a…

  19. The Effect of Internal Marketing on Organizational Commitment: Job Involvement and Job Satisfaction as Mediators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Shueh-Chin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: After reviewing previous research, this study found that few school or educational studies have simultaneously explored both internal marketing and organizational commitment, and of those that have, only direct effects were examined. This study clarifies the relationship between school organization's internal marketing and teachers'…

  20. The Effects of Servant Leadership on Teachers' Organizational Commitment in Primary Schools in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerit, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effects of servant leadership behaviours of primary school principals on teachers' school commitment. The research data were collected from 563 teachers working in primary schools in Duzce. Servant leadership behaviours of principals were measured with a servent organizational leadership assessment scale, and the teachers'…

  1. Towards Understanding the Two Way Interaction Effects of Extraversion and Openness to Experience on Career Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arora, Ridhi; Rangnekar, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined potential two-way interaction effects of the Big Five personality traits extraversion and openness to experience on career commitment measured in terms of three components of career identity, career resilience, and career planning. Participants included 450 managers from public and private sector organizations in North…

  2. Ebstein's anomaly in adult patients over 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Yoshitake, Kiyonobu; Matsuo, Atsutoshi; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Hida, Satoru; Mito, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital heart disease of the tricuspid valve, and less than 5% of patients with EA survive beyond the age of 50. We report two unoperated cases of EA in adult patients aged over 50 years. Two patients, a 70-year-old Japanese woman and a 59-year-old Chinese woman, were referred to us for tachyarrhythmias. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated apical displacement (>8 mm/m(2) body surface area) of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve from the atrioventricular ring with tricuspid regurgitation in both patients. The former suddenly expired 20 months later after suffering from repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or heart failure, and the latter is alive with minimal signs of heart failure 12 months after the diagnosis of EA. Although the natural history of EA is extremely variable, these two patients are exceptional in that they tolerated EA well for over 50 years without any surgical intervention.

  3. An opportune life: 50 years in human cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    This article is one person's view of human cytogenetics over the past 50 years. The flowering of human cytogenetics led the way to the establishment of clinical genetics as one of the most important developments in medicine in the twentieth century. The article is written from the viewpoint of a scientist who never tired of analyzing the images of dividing cells on the light microscope and interpreting the wealth of information contained in them.

  4. John Donovan Strong; 50 years in optics: introduction.

    PubMed

    Cook, L F; Sakai, H; Barron, L

    1982-01-15

    In March 1981 the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Massachusetts held a two-day symposium on its Amherst campus to honor John Strong and to mark his retirement at the close of the 1981 academic year after 50 years of optics teaching and research. This introduction briefly reviews the symposium papers (published in this issue) that are a testimony to the respect and affection that the world of optics has for John Donovan Strong.

  5. Ensuring the 50 year life of a fissile material container

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, R.E.; Towne, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Sandia was presented with an opportunity in 1993 to design containers for the long term storage and transport of fissile material. This program was undertaken at the direction of the US Department of Energy and in cooperation with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory which were tasked with developing the internal fixturing for the contents. The hardware is being supplied by Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and the packaging will occur at Mason and Hangar Corporation`s Pantex Plant. The unique challenge was to design a container that could be sealed with the fissile material contents; and, anytime during the next 50 years, the container could be transported with only the need for the pre-shipment leak test. This required not only a rigorous design capable of meeting the long term storage and transportation requirements, but also resulted in development of a surveillance program to ensure that the container continues to perform as designed over the 50-year life. This paper addresses the design of the container, the testing that was undertaken to demonstrate compliance with US radioactive materials transport regulations, and the surveillance program that has been initiated to ensure the 50-year performance.

  6. Why Virginity Pledges Succeed or Fail: The Moderating Effect of Religious Commitment Versus Religious Participation

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Leslie Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, virginity pledges have proliferated in the US, despite mixed results regarding their effectiveness. Few studies have examined possible mechanisms that may shed light on why pledges work for some individuals but not others. Using a sample of emerging-adults aged 18–24 years old (n = 1,380),we examine the influence of religiosity on pledge signing and adherence, specifically whether the effectiveness of pledges is moderated by religiosity. Findings show that while religious participation is positively associated with signing a pledge, there is amoderating effect of religious commitment. That is, when religious commitment is high, adherence to the pledge is greater. However, for pledge signers with low religious commitment, there are unintended negative consequences with regard to increased participation in risky sexual behaviors, whether compared to other people who signed the pledge who are equally committed to their religion or to individuals who have never taken such a pledge. Implications for research and policy are discussed. PMID:25018616

  7. The Manhattan effect: when relationship commitment fails to promote support for partners' interests.

    PubMed

    Hui, Chin Ming; Finkel, Eli J; Fitzsimons, Gráinne M; Kumashiro, Madoka; Hofmann, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Research on close relationships has frequently contrasted one's own interests with the interests of the partner or the relationship and has tended to view the partner's and the relationship's interests as inherently aligned. The present article demonstrated that relationship commitment typically causes people to support their partner's personal interests but that this effect gets weaker to the extent that those interests misalign or even threaten the relationship. Studies 1a and 1b showed that (a) despite their strong correlation, partner-oriented and relationship-oriented concerns in goal-directed behaviors are separable and (b) relationship commitment strengthens only the link between relationship-oriented motivation and the goal pursuit (not the link between partner-oriented motivation and the goal pursuit). The remaining 7 studies zero in on circumstances in which the partner's and the relationship's interests are in conflict, demonstrating that (c) relationship commitment reliably increases the tendency to support the partner's personal interests when those interests do not pose a strong threat to the relationship but that (d) this effect becomes weaker-and even reverses direction-as the relationship threat posed by the partner's interests becomes stronger. The reduction or reversal of the positive link between relationship commitment and propartner behaviors in such situations is termed the Manhattan effect. These findings suggest that the partner-versus-relationship conflicts provide fertile ground for novel theorizing and empirical investigations and that relationship commitment appears to be less of a partner-promoting construct than relationship science has suggested; instead, its role appears to be focused on promoting the interests of the relationship.

  8. Unraveling the complexity of hepatitis B virus: from molecular understanding to therapeutic strategy in 50 years.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wen, Xin; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a well-known hepadnavirus with a double-stranded circular DNA genome. Although HBV was first described approximately 50 years ago, the precise mechanisms of HBV infection and effective therapeutic strategies remain unclear. Here, we focus on summarizing the complicated mechanisms of HBV replication and infection, as well as genomic factors and epigenetic regulation. Additionally, we discuss in vivo models of HBV, as well as diagnosis, prevention and therapeutic drugs for HBV. Together, the data in this 50-year review may provide new clues to elucidate molecular mechanisms of HBV pathogenesis and shed new light on the future HBV therapies.

  9. Plasma science and technology: 50 years of progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchi, J. L.; Cecchi, L. M.

    2003-09-01

    During the first 50 years of the American Vacuum Society (1953-2003), technology has advanced greatly. But the most impressive and conspicuous advance has been in computational power, due to the exponential increase in computing power at an exponentially decreasing cost per function. Many of our readers will remember the ``Macro-Mechanical System'' called a slide rule that was symbolic of engineers and scientists in the 1950s and 1960s. From the slide rule of the past to today's desktop and notebook computers, possessing speed, storage, and power capability that dwarf the mainframes of the recent past, what a transformation!

  10. A 50-Year-Old Woman Addicted to Heroin

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Charles P.

    2011-01-01

    Heroin addiction is a complicated medical and psychiatric issue, with well-established as well as newer modes of treatment. The case of Ms W, a 50-year-old woman with a long history of opiate addiction who has been treated successfully with methadone for 9 years and who now would like to consider newer alternatives, illustrates the complex issues of heroin addiction. The treatment of heroin addiction as a chronic disease is reviewed, including social, medical, and cultural issues and pharmacologic treatment with methadone and the more experimental medication options of buprenorphine and naltrexone. PMID:18594026

  11. Measles 50 Years After Use of Measles Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Goodson, James L; Seward, Jane F

    2015-12-01

    In response to severe measles, the first measles vaccine was licensed in the United States in 1963. Widespread use of measles vaccines for more than 50 years has significantly reduced global measles morbidity and mortality. However, measles virus continues to circulate, causing infection, illness, and an estimated 400 deaths worldwide each day. Measles is preventable by vaccine, and humans are the only reservoir. Clinicians should promote and provide on-time vaccination for all patients and keep measles in their differential diagnosis of febrile rash illness for rapid case detection, confirmation of measles infection, isolation, treatment, and appropriate public health response.

  12. ICTP: From a dream to a reality in 50+ years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, F.

    2017-03-01

    For more than 50 years, the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics has fostered the growth and sustainability of physics and mathematics in the developing world, benefitting hundreds of thousands of scientists. What began as a dream by its founder, Pakistani Nobel Laureate Abdus Salam, has become a first-rate international research hub connecting scientists from all corners of the globe. As the social and economic situations in many developing countries has shifted, ICTP has responded with the creation of relevant research and training programmes that continue to boost science in disadvantaged parts of the world. Today, ICTP remains a beacon of hope for scientists who aspire to greatness.

  13. Neighbourhood effects on educational attainment of adolescents, buffered by personality and educational commitment.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Jaap; Hooimeijer, Pieter; Meeus, Wim

    2015-03-01

    Research has repeatedly shown that neighbourhood disadvantage negatively influences individual educational outcomes. However, the great variation in outcomes indicates substantial unobserved heterogeneity. Looking at the rates of obtaining a basic educational qualification, the hypothesis is that individual traits of adolescents can buffer neighbourhood effects. First, adolescents with a more resilient personality may be better able to cope with neighbourhood adversity. And second, educational commitments might buffer adolescents from negative neighbourhood influences. These hypotheses are tested employing survival analysis, using six wave panel data, containing information on ten years of adolescents' lives. The results show that resilients experience no negative influence of neighbourhood disadvantage, while both undercontrollers and overcontrollers do. And, the stronger adolescents' educational commitments, the less they experience the negative effect of neighbourhood adversity. In sum, neighbourhood effects are found, but not for everybody.

  14. The effects of corporate social responsibility on employees' affective commitment: a cross-cultural investigation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Karsten; Hattrup, Kate; Spiess, Sven-Oliver; Lin-Hi, Nick

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the moderating effects of several Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) cultural value dimensions on the relationship between employees' perceptions of their organization's social responsibility and their affective organizational commitment. Based on data from a sample of 1,084 employees from 17 countries, results showed that perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) was positively related to employees' affective commitment (AC), after controlling for individual job satisfaction and gender as well as for nation-level differences in unemployment rates. In addition, several GLOBE value dimensions moderated the effects of CSR on AC. In particular, perceptions of CSR were more positively related to AC in cultures higher in humane orientation, institutional collectivism, ingroup collectivism, and future orientation and in cultures lower in power distance. Implications for future CSR research and cross-cultural human resources management are discussed.

  15. Effects of Self-Efficacy, Emotional Intelligence, and Perceptions of Future Work Environment on Preservice Teacher Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesnut, Steven R.; Cullen, Theresa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of self-efficacy, expectations of future work environment, and emotional intelligence on preservice teacher commitment to the teaching profession on a sample of 209 preservice teachers. The purpose of the study was to add to the existing knowledge surrounding preservice teacher commitment and promote…

  16. The Effect of Tertiary Teachers' Goal Orientations for Teaching on Their Commitment: The Mediating Role of Teacher Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Jiying; Yin, Hongbiao; Wang, Wenlan

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effect of tertiary teachers' goal orientations for teaching on their commitment, with a particular focus on the mediating role of teacher engagement. The results of a survey of 597 Chinese tertiary teachers indicated that teacher commitment was positively predicted by ability approach, mastery and relational goals, but was…

  17. Differential effect of IL-27 on developing versus committed Th17 cells

    PubMed Central

    El-behi, Mohamed; Ciric, Bogoljub; Yu, Shuo; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Fitzgerald, Denise C.; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2010-01-01

    IL-27 counters the effect of TGF-β+IL-6 on naïve CD4+ T cells, resulting in near complete inhibition of de novo Th17 development. In contrast, little is known about the effect of IL-27 on already differentiated Th17 cells. A better understanding of how IL-27 regulates these cells is needed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of IL-27 in Th17 cells-associated diseases. Here we show that IL-27 had surprisingly little effect on committed Th17 cells, despite their expression of a functional IL-27R. Contrary to de novo differentiation of Th17 cells, IL-27 did not suppress expression of RORγt or RORα in committed Th17 cells. Consistent with this finding, the frequency of committed Th17 cells and their cytokine secretion remained unaffected by IL-27. Both memory Th17 cells (CD4+CD25−CD62Llow) that developed in vivo and encephalitogenic Th17 cells infiltrating the CNS of mice developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) produced similar amounts of IL-17A when reactivated with IL-23, in the absence and presence of exogenous IL-27. Finally, IL-27 failed to suppress encephalitogenicity of Th17 cells in an adoptive transfer of EAE. Analysis ex vivo of transferred Th17 cells in the spleen and CNS of recipient mice showed that cells retained similar phenotype irrespective of whether cells were treated or not with IL-27. Our data demonstrate that in contrast to inhibition of de novo differentiation of Th17 cells, IL-27 has little or no effect on committed Th17 cells. These findings indicate that therapeutic applications of IL-27 might have a limited efficacy in inflammatory conditions where aggressive Th17 responses have already developed. PMID:19786534

  18. An Investigation of the Effects of Pay Inequity, Organizational Commitment, and Job Satisfaction on Career Intent.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    females were insignificant; education level had a moderate positive effect on job satisfiction ; personal Income and job satisfaction had a positive... JOB SATISFACTION ON CAREER INTENT James D. Baughman, Captain, USAF Micheal L. Darnell, Captain, USAF LSSR 55-82 DIS7RiuUn 011 STATEMENT A App,,Dved...INEQUITY , ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT , AND ___P RFOR INGORO.REP RT _NMBE JOB SATISFACTION ON CAREER INTENT 6. PERFORMINGOR.REPORT UNSER 7. AUTHOR(s

  19. Food transitions in last 50 years and related environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, P.; Reusser, D. E.; Kropp, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Food production is an important driver for global change processes such as land use change and green-house-gas emissions. We analyzed a global, long term data set on food consumption per country to identify typical patterns of diets for the last 50 years. From changes in these patterns, we derived food transitions on a global scale. Subsequently we assessed the environmental consequences from green-house-gas (GHG) emission and anthropogenic inputs. More specifically, we applied Self Organizing Maps (SOM) to identify the dietary patterns based on supply of 12 food groups from FAOSTAT dataset for a period 1961-2007. Using the data on energy output/input ratio for crop production and agricultural emission, we estimated fossil energy and GHG emission associated with the diets. We found 16 typical consumption patterns consisting of high, moderate, low and lowest calorie supply with varied food compositions. The high calorie diets are associated with a higher supply of cereals, animal-products, vegetable-oils and sugar-sweeteners featuring a total supply greater than 2800 kcal/cap/day. During the last 50 years, we observed food transitions from lower calories diets to higher calories diets. On the one hand, food transition towards affluent diet, sometime with shortcuts, occurred in developing countries. On the other hand, developed countries increased consumption of fruits and vegetables. Some of the developing countries are also stagnated in the low consumption level during the last 50 years. The high calorie diets also embed higher fossil energy (1800-3500 kcal/cap/day) and are associated with higher GHG emissions (3.7-6.1 kg CO2 eq/cap/day). However, their non-CO2 GHG emission intensities per kilo calorie of food are relatively low. Changes in dietary patterns are a part of the global change processes. Identification of past transitions is way to predict possible future transitions. This in turn supports policy processes and negotiations in the fields of climate

  20. Personal reflections on 50 years of study of benzene toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Parke, D V

    1996-01-01

    The metabolism of benzene is reviewed, and the objectives of a quantitative balance study begun in 1945 are outlined; problems of toxicology and metabolism research of some 50 years ago are considered. The quantitative metabolism of 14C-benzene in the rabbit is annotated and compared with that of unlabeled benzene quantified by nonisotopic methods. The anomalies of phenylmercapturic acid and trans-trans-muconic acid as metabolites of benzene are examined in detail by isotopic and nonisotopic methods; these compounds are true but minor metabolites of benzene. Oxygen radicals are involved in both the metabolism of benzene and its toxicity; the roles of CYP2E1, the redox cycling of quinone metabolites, glutathione oxidation, and oxidative stress in the unique radiomimetic, hematopoietic toxicity of benzene are discussed. Differences between the toxicity of benzene and the halobenzenes are related to fundamental differences in their electronic structures and to the consequent pathways of metabolic activation and detoxication. PMID:9118881

  1. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Efron, Daryl

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder and one of the main diagnoses seen by general paediatricians today. Despite the impression often portrayed in the media, it is not a new condition; in fact it has been described for over 200 years. The past 50 years has seen a progressive increase in our understanding of the underlying neurocognitive deficits in ADHD, and over the past 20 years behavioural genetics and neuroimaging studies have shed light on the complex causal factors and neurobiological processes operating. The plethora of ADHD research has advanced our knowledge of the condition, but so far has had little impact on improving clinical practice. Stimulant medication has been the mainstay of symptomatic treatment for over 30 years; however, it is still unclear how developmental trajectories can be modified to achieve best outcomes. It is hoped that novel therapies and more individualised management will evolve over the coming decades.

  2. Gala celebrates 50 years of launches from CCAFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At a 50th anniversary gala capping a year-long celebration of 50 years of rocket launches from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Chris Bailey (left), president of the AFA Cape Canaveral Chapter, receives a rocket model from Maxwell King (right), former president of Brevard Community College. The first launch at CCAFS took place at 9:28 a.m. on July 24, 1950, with the liftoff of Bumper 8 from Launch Complex 3. The gala, hosted by the Cape Canaveral Chapter Air Force Association, featured such speakers as Center Director Roy Bridges; Vice Commander, Air Force Space Command, Lt. Gen. Roger DeKok; and the Honorable David Weldon, U.S. representative of Florida's 15th Congressional District.

  3. 50 years of CP violation — What have we learned?

    SciTech Connect

    McKellar, Bruce H. J.

    2015-04-24

    Early after the discovery of CP violation, the explanation of how the Standard Model of particle physics could allow CP violation was quickly given, but it took many years for the original observation to be unequivocally explained on that basis. It was also proposed that this observation opened up the possibility that we could now explain the fact that the universe is made of matter. Remarkably, 50 years later we have no evidence in particle physics that there is any CP violation except that of the Kobayashi Maskawa mechanism of the standard model. Yet we fail completely to explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe through that mechanism. After reviewing the main points in the history I describe the present experimental attempts to find CP violation beyond the standard model, and explain the theoretical attempts to explain the matter in the Universe.

  4. Work–family climate, organizational commitment, and turnover: Multilevel contagion effects of leaders ⋆

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work–family climate (operationalized in terms of three work–family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using multilevel modeling, we found significant associations between work–family climate, and both organizational commitment and turnover intent, both within and between hotels. Findings underscored the importance of managerial support for employee work–family balance, the relevance of senior managers’ own work–family circumstances in relation to employees’ work outcomes, and the existence of possible contagion effects of leaders in relation to work–family climate. PMID:19412351

  5. The comparative effectiveness of persuasion, commitment and leader block strategies in motivating sorting.

    PubMed

    Mickaël, Dupré

    2014-04-01

    Household waste management has become essential in industrialized countries. For the recycling programs to be a success, all citizens must comply with the developed residential procedures. Governmental bodies are thus dependent on as many people as possible adhering to the sorting systems they develop. Since the 1970s oil crisis, governments have called upon social psychologists to help develop effective communication strategies. These studies have been based on persuasion and behavioral commitment (Kiesler, 1971). Less common are studies based on developing participative communication (Horsley, 1977), a form of communication that relies on individuals to pass on information. After going through the main communication perspectives as they relate to the sorting of household waste, a comparative field study will be presented on the effectiveness of persuasive, committing and participative communication. Participative communication relied on users to pass along information to their neighbors. The results show that the participants who spread information in this way, along with those who made a commitment, changed their behavior to a greater degree than the other participants.

  6. Neighbourhood Poverty, Work Commitment and Unemployment in Early Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study into the Moderating Effect of Personality.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Jaap; Yu, Rongqin; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim; Hooimeijer, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    We studied how personality moderates the effect of neighbourhood disadvantage on work commitment and unemployment in early adulthood. Using a personality typology of resilients, overcontrollers, and undercontrollers, we hypothesised that the association between neighbourhood poverty and both work commitment and unemployment would be stronger for overcontrollers and undercontrollers than for resilients. We used longitudinal data (N = 249) to test whether the length of exposure to neighbourhood poverty between age 16 and 21 predicts work commitment and unemployment at age 25. In line with our hypothesis, the findings showed that longer exposure was related to weaker work commitment among undercontrollers and overcontrollers and to higher unemployment among undercontrollers. Resilients' work commitment and unemployment were not predicted by neighbourhood poverty.

  7. Neighbourhood Poverty, Work Commitment and Unemployment in Early Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study into the Moderating Effect of Personality

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuis, Jaap; Yu, Rongqin; Branje, Susan; Meeus, Wim; Hooimeijer, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    We studied how personality moderates the effect of neighbourhood disadvantage on work commitment and unemployment in early adulthood. Using a personality typology of resilients, overcontrollers, and undercontrollers, we hypothesised that the association between neighbourhood poverty and both work commitment and unemployment would be stronger for overcontrollers and undercontrollers than for resilients. We used longitudinal data (N = 249) to test whether the length of exposure to neighbourhood poverty between age 16 and 21 predicts work commitment and unemployment at age 25. In line with our hypothesis, the findings showed that longer exposure was related to weaker work commitment among undercontrollers and overcontrollers and to higher unemployment among undercontrollers. Resilients’ work commitment and unemployment were not predicted by neighbourhood poverty. PMID:27936132

  8. A Dynamic Earth: 50 Years of Observations from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the surface of the Earth began more than a half century ago with the earliest space missions. The global geopolitical environment at the beginning of the space age fueled advances in rocketry and human exploration, but also advances in remote sensing. At the same time that space-based Earth Observations were developing, global investments in infrastructure that were initiated after World War II accelerated large projects such as the construction of highways, the expansion of cities and suburbs, the damming of rivers, and the growth of big agriculture. These developments have transformed the Earth s surface at unprecedented rates. Today, we have a remarkable library of 50 years of observations of the Earth taken by satellite-based sensors and astronauts, and these images and observations provide insight into the workings of the Earth as a system. In addition, these observations record the footprints of human activities around the world, and illustrate how our activities contribute to the changing face of the Earth. Starting with the iconic "Blue Marble" image of the whole Earth taken by Apollo astronauts, we will review a timeline of observations of our planet as viewed from space.

  9. U.S. Coast Guard Officer Performance Management System: An Analysis of Current Commitment Levels and Potential Effectiveness Indicators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    service cites several perceptions which will impact on gene:al systeis effectiveness of any perfromance appraisal efforts directed at the coast Guard...OF CUR’RENT COMMITMENT LEVELS AND POTENTIAL EFFECTIVENESS INrICATORS by Patrick J. Popieski March 1983 Thesis Advisor: R.A. Weitzman Approved for...34widec Commitment Lqvels and Potential Effectiveress 441. AUYWO11141) ILl1ar . CONTOACT on GoA~tifIz 1R. Patrick James Popieski -9. PERFOMING OftANIZAI

  10. Facilitating Effective Performance Appraisals: The Role of Employee Commitment and Organizational Climate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    presented which highlights the interactive relationships among employee commitment , organizational climate, and performance appraisal systems. The model...of these objectives?; how do employee commitment and organizational climate affect these conditions?; and what reciprocal relationships appear likely? (Author)

  11. The Moderating Effect of Network Centrality on the Relationship Between Work Experience Variables and Organizational Commitment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    concept developed by Eisenberger and his colleagues (1986) to explain the development of employee commitment to an organization. Their research...that promotes PE, LMX, and POS in an effort to achieve increased commitment. Secondly, higher degrees of centrality improve employee commitment . First

  12. 50 years of mass balance observations at Vernagtferner, Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Ludwig; Mayer, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The determination and monitoring of the seasonal and annual glacier mass balances of Vernagtferner, Austria, started in 1964 by the Commission of Glaciology, Bavarian Academy of Sciences. Detailed and continuous climate- and runoff measurements complement this mass balance series since 1974. Vernagtferner attracted the attention of scientists since the beginning of the 17th century due to its rapid advances and the resulting glacier lake outburst floods in the Ötztal valley. This is one reason for the first photogrammetric survey in 1889, which was followed by frequent topographic surveys, adding up to more than ten digital elevation models of the glacier until today. By including the known maximum glacier extent at the end of the Little Ice Age in 1845, the geodetic glacier volume balances cover a time span of almost 170 years. The 50 years of glacier mass balance and 40 years of water balance in the drainage basin are therefore embedded in a considerably longer period of glacier evolution, allowing an interpretation within an extended frame of climatology and ice dynamics. The direct mass balance observations cover not only the period of alpine-wide strong glacier mass loss since the beginning of the 1990s. The data also contain the last period of glacier advances between 1970 and 1990. The combination of the observed surface mass exchange and the determined periodic volumetric changes allows a detailed analysis of the dynamic reaction of the glacier over the period of half a century. The accompanying meteorological observations are the basis for relating these reactions to the climatic changes during this period. Vernagtferner is therefore one of the few glaciers in the world, where a very detailed glacier-climate reaction was observed for many decades and can be realistically reconstructed back to the end of the Little Ice Age.

  13. Backwards and Forwards: 50 years of the Education Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    by representatives from a number of equally prestigious universities. In one, the large physics lecture rooms were taken over by philosophy students, as smaller physics groups traipsed across to distant biology rooms. It was this kind of situation, plus the reduction in the level of technician support, that made demonstrations harder to organize. In the lively discussion that followed Professor Brown's talk there was strong support for his proposal that universities - with the help of the IoP and the Royal Society, say - should set up a national `demonstration bank' that could be tapped to provide portable, well-tried, well-resourced and well-rehearsed demonstrations. Envy was expressed for the bank of experiments and demonstrations available at school level, especially as presented by the Advancing Physics CD-ROM. Universities could also learn from the course designs exemplified by Advancing Physics and the York Salters Horners projects: a set of self-contained, coherent topics with clear end-points and built-in mathematics, with key concepts well-illustrated by relevant experiments. The final session was given by Ken Dobson, who had the onerous but luckily uncheckable task of talking about Physics education: the next 50 years! (organizer's emphasis). In less than 15 minutes he expressed his complete incompetence at carrying out such a task, but in spite of that went on to compare the current state of progress (leading to an unfortunate state of dystopia) with what he thought should happen (leading to a much happier state of utopia). The key differences were the current over-centralization, mechanistic and top-down direction of education based on a system-centred command-psychology, as compared with an organic, self-directed, learner-centred education. He called the first dystopian model the Rucsac Model : everything you needed for life had to be packed by the time you left school, and should serve you all your days. By contrast, he called the utopian future a

  14. Geochemical Diversity of the Mantle: 50 Years of Acronyms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    50 years ago, Gast, Tilton and Hedge demonstrated that the oceanic mantle is isotopically heterogeneous. 28 years ago, Zindler and Hart formalized the concept of geochemical mantle components, with an attendant, to some, odious, acronym soup. Work on a marriage of mantle geochemistry and dynamics continues unabated. We know unequivocally that the mantle is chemically heterogeneous; we do not know the scale lengths of these heterogeneities. We know unequivocally that these heterogeneities have persisted for eons (Gy); we do not know where they were formed or where they are stored. Through the kind auspices of the Plume Model, we plausibly have access to the whole mantle. The most accessible and well understood mantle reservoir is the upper depleted MORB mantle (DMM). Classically, this mantle was depleted by extraction of oceanic and continental crust from a "chondritic" bulk silicate Earth. In this post-Boyet and Carlson world, the complementary enriched reservoir may instead be hidden in the deepest mantle. In this case, DMM will become an endangered acronym. Hofmann and White (1982) argued that radiogenic Pb mantle (HIMU) is re-cycled ocean crust, and this is a comfortably viable model. It does require some ad hoc chemical manipulations during subduction. Given 2 Gy of aggregate mantle strains, the mafic component in HIMU may be of small length scale (< 50 m), possibly subsumed into the dominant peridotitic lithology. This mantle species is globally widespread. Enriched mantles (EM1 and EM2) almost certainly reflect recycling of enriched continental material. This was splendidly verified by Jackson et al (2007), with 87Sr/86Sr in Samoan EM2 lavas up to 0.721. The lithology and length scale of EM1 and EM2 is unconstrained. EM1 is globally present; EM2 is confined to the SW Pacific hotspots. FOZO is a work in progress; many would like to see it become extinct! The trace element signatures of HIMU and FOZO mantles have been constrained using melting models; in both

  15. Effects of Core Self-Evaluations on the Job Burnout of Nurses: The Mediator of Organizational Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yangen; Lu, Jiamei; Liu, Xianmin; Zhang, Pengcheng; Chen, Wuying

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of Core self-evaluations on job burnout of nurses, and especially to test and verify the mediator role of organizational commitment between the two variables. Method Random cluster sampling was used to pick up participants sample, which consisted of 445 nurses of a hospital in Shanghai. Core self-evaluations questionnaire, job burnout scale and organizational commitment scale were administrated to the study participants. Results There are significant relationships between Core self-evaluations and dimensions of job burnout and organizational commitment. There is a significant mediation effect of organizational commitment between Core self-evaluations and job burnout. Conclusions To enhance nurses’ Core self-evaluations can reduce the incidence of job burnout. PMID:24755670

  16. Lack of effect of a granulocyte proliferation inhibitor or their committed precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Lord, B I; Testa, N G; Wright, E G; Banerjee, R K

    1977-05-01

    Using the agar culture technique, we have measured the effect of granulocyte extracts GCE (and of erythrocyte-RCE and lymph node extracts-LNE) on the growth and proliferation of the committed granulocytic precursor cells, CFU-C. In addition we have determined their effects on the proliferation of the developing colony cells and on the ultimate cell production in the colonies. The results show that GCE has no effect on the growth or proliferative activity on the CFU-C. It does, however, reduce both the autoradiographic labelling indices of the developing colony cells and the net colony cellularities, acting as a cell cycle modulator. These are effects specific to the GCE since at the dose levels used, neither RCE nor LNE affected these measurements.

  17. The distributions of Chinese yak breeds in response to climate change over the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianguo

    2016-07-01

    The effects of prior climate change on yak breed distributions are uncertain. Here, we measured changes in the distributions of 12 yak breeds over the past 50 years in China and examined whether the changes could be attributed to climate change. Long-term records of yak breed distribution, grey relational analysis, fuzzy sets classification techniques and attribution methods were used. Over the past 50 years, the distributions of several yak breeds have changed in multiple directions, mainly shifting northward or westward, and most of these changes are related to the thermal index. Driven by climate change over the past years, the suitable range and the distribution centers of certain yak breeds have changed with fluctuation and have mainly shifted northward, eastward or southward. The consistency of observed versus predicted changes in distribution boundaries or distribution centers is higher for certain yak breeds. Changes in the eastern distribution boundary of two yak breeds over the past 50 years can be attributed to climate change.

  18. The effect of item content overlap on organizational commitment questionnaire--turnover cognitions relationships.

    PubMed

    Bozeman, D P; Perrewé, P L

    2001-02-01

    This study examined the effect of overlapping scale content when certain items in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ) are used to predict turnover cognition measures. Analyses of judgmental data collected from 25 subject matter experts suggested that 6 OCQ items reflected a desire or an intent to retain membership in one's organization. Confirmatory factor analyses of survey data from 172 master of business administration alumni showed that the 6 OCQ retention items shared overlapping content with turnover cognitions items. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses of survey data from 330 hotel managers showed that (a) removing the 6 OCQ retention items caused a significant decrease in the variance explained in a measure of turnover cognitions and (b) the size of this effect is larger than that suggested by previous work.

  19. Protean and Boundaryless Career Attitudes and Organizational Commitment: The Effects of Perceived Supervisor Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cakmak-Otluoglu, K. Ovgu

    2012-01-01

    Despite the traditional sentiment that protean and boundaryless career attitudes indicate a decline in organizational commitment, little empirical evidence is available. The present study examined the relation of protean and boundaryless career attitudes to organizational commitment and whether the perceived supervisor support moderated these…

  20. Organizational Commitment of Principals: The Effects of Job Autonomy, Empowerment, and Distributive Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dude, David Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Organizational commitment has been a topic of extensive interest in the organizational behavior literature since the 1950's. It has been associated with workforce stability, decreased absenteeism, organizational citizenship behaviors, and decreased turnover. This study focuses on the relationships between organizational commitment and…

  1. Effects That Previous Employment Experiences Had on Organizational Commitment of an Hourly Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartocci, Charles August

    2012-01-01

    A committed workforce is critical to the success of any organization. While there was a great deal of debate on how to best describe commitment, one model that attracted a significant following is the Three Component Model (TCM) developed by Meyer and Allen (1988). While it may be argued that the model is a mixed model combining attitudinal and…

  2. The Effects of Values, Work Centrality, and Organizational Commitment on Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: Evidence from Turkish SMEs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucanok, Basak; Karabati, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    Organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) are voluntary contributions of employees not explicitly recognized by the formal reward system and are ultimately critical for sustaining organizational effectiveness (Organ, 1988). The current study aims to investigate the effects of values, work centrality, and organizational commitment on…

  3. Relationship between transformational leadership style and organizational commitment: Mediating effect of psychological empowerment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif, Muhammad; Ayyub, Samia; Bashir, Muhammad Khawar

    2014-12-01

    This study explores the relationship between style of transformational leadership and organizational commitment of employees with mediating role of psychological empowerment in the textile sector Punjab Pakistan. Data was collected using tools from 250 employees. The transformational leadership questionnaire, MLQ-Multifactor leadership Questionnaire [1] was used to verify the perception of the employees towards transformational leadership style in two dimensions i.e. idealized influence and inspirational motivation. The organizational commitment questionnaire designed by [2] was used to verify the affective organizational commitment. Further, psychological empowerment questionnaire was developed by [3] which was used to examine the state of psychological empowerment of textile sector employees. Pearson Correlation revealed that there exists a positive significant relationship between idealized influence and affective organizational commitment, Inspirational motivation and affective organizational commitment, affective organizational commitment and psychological empowerment. The results from the study put forward that there is a significant relationship between style of transformational leadership and organizational commitment. The mediating variable which one is suitable in the model i.e. psychological empowerment and the model is good fit as the F value is significant.

  4. A multilevel cross-cultural examination of role overload and organizational commitment: investigating the interactive effects of context.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David M

    2014-07-01

    Considering the influential nature of context, the current investigation examined whether the relationship between role overload and organizational commitment was affected by various contextual factors. Drawing on the occupational stress literature, structural empowerment and cooperative climate were examined as factors that would mitigate the negative effects of role overload on organizational commitment. In addition, national culture was examined to determine whether empowerment and cooperative climate had consistent moderating effects across cultures. The relationships among these variables were examined using hierarchical linear modeling in a sample of 6,264 employees working at a multinational organization in 337 different work locations across 18 countries. Results suggested that the negative effect of role overload on organizational commitment did not vary as a function of culture in the current sample, but empowerment and cooperative climate had a moderating influence on this relationship. Furthermore, a 3-way interaction was observed between the cultural variable of power distance, empowerment, and role overload in predicting organizational commitment, suggesting that factors that serve to mitigate the negative effects of role overload in one culture may be ineffectual in another. This 3-way interaction was observed regardless of whether Hofstede's (2001) cultural value indices were used or the cultural practice scores from the Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness (GLOBE) project (R. J. House, Hanges, Javidan, Dorfman, & Gupta, 2004).

  5. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Pt. 191, App. B Appendix B to Part 191... the radionuclide decays. The time distribution of the absorbed dose rate will vary with the... radioactive material into the body. The time period, τ, is taken as 50 years as an average time of...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Pt. 191, App. B Appendix B to Part 191... the radionuclide decays. The time distribution of the absorbed dose rate will vary with the... radioactive material into the body. The time period, τ, is taken as 50 years as an average time of...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Pt. 191, App. B Appendix B to Part 191... the radionuclide decays. The time distribution of the absorbed dose rate will vary with the... radioactive material into the body. The time period, τ, is taken as 50 years as an average time of...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Pt. 191, App. B Appendix B to Part 191... the radionuclide decays. The time distribution of the absorbed dose rate will vary with the... radioactive material into the body. The time period, τ, is taken as 50 years as an average time of...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 191 - Calculation of Annual Committed Effective Dose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL AND TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Pt. 191, App. B Appendix B to Part 191... the radionuclide decays. The time distribution of the absorbed dose rate will vary with the... radioactive material into the body. The time period, τ, is taken as 50 years as an average time of...

  10. The Effects of Autonomy Gap in Personnel Policy, Principal Leadership and Teachers' Self-Efficacy on Their Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Diya; Devos, Geert; Valcke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    School autonomy in personnel policy is important to effective personnel management. With increased autonomy in personnel policy, principals could wield their leadership to improve teachers' organizational commitment. However, little is known about whether the given autonomy in personnel policy meets principals' expectation and whether and how the…

  11. Combined Effects of the Three Commitment Components on Focal and Discretionary Behaviors: A Test of Meyer and Herscovitch's Propositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Ian R.; Meyer, John P.; Luchak, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test theoretical propositions advanced by Meyer and Herscovitch (2001) concerning the interactive effects of affective, normative, and continuance commitment on focal (staying intentions) and discretionary (citizenship) behavior. Study measures were gathered from a sample of 545 hospital employees. Several a priori…

  12. Variations in the Conditions for Teachers' Professional Learning and Development: Sustaining Commitment and Effectiveness over a Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Christopher; Gu, Qing

    2007-01-01

    This paper draws upon data from a longitudinal, multi-site, mixed methods project which found that commitment and resilience are fundamental to teachers' effectiveness, and that variations in professional, personal and workplace conditions in different professional life phases affect these. It found also that teachers do not necessarily learn…

  13. Linking Work-Family Conflict to Career Commitment: The Moderating Effects of Gender and Mentoring among Nigerian Civil Servants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okurame, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Little research attention has been given to the linkage between work-family conflict and career commitment. Likewise, although, theoretical arguments about the moderator effects of mentoring on the relationship between work-family conflict and career attitudes have been made in the literature, no research has investigated this assumption. This…

  14. The Effects of Social Identification and Organizational Identification on Student Commitment, Achievement and Satisfaction in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Stephen; Butt, Muhammad Mohsin; Kratochvil, Daniel; Balakrishnan, Melodena Stephens

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effects of social and organizational identifications on student commitment, achievement and satisfaction in higher education. The sample comprised 437 students enrolled in an undergraduate or postgraduate programme in business or management. A model was developed and tested using structural…

  15. Exploring the Effects of Social Networking on Students' Perceptions of Social Connectedness, Adjustment, Academic Engagement, and Institutional Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Michele J.; Childress, Janice E.; Trujillo, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    Social networking is a tool being explored by many institutions as a means of connecting to and communicating with students. This study explores whether or not students' use of social networking services (SNSs) has significant effects on social connectedness, college adjustment, academic engagement, and institutional commitment. Students' use of…

  16. Perceived Effects of Scholarships on STEM Majors' Commitment to Teaching in High Need Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Pey-Yan; Kirchhoff, Allison; Lawrenz, Frances

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the Noyce Program, which provides scholarships for STEM majors in return for teaching in high need schools. The perceptions of 555 scholarship recipients were investigated using hierarchical cluster analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and Rasch analysis to determine how the scholarship influenced their commitments to teaching in high need schools. The analyses indicated that recipients perceived the scholarship in two ways: it influenced their commitment to complete their certification program and to teach in high need schools. Implications for teacher education programs include that recruitment strategies should identify candidates who are committed to teaching in high need schools and programs should provide experiences to encourage this commitment not just to become certified.

  17. What has happened in the last 50 years in immunology.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melanie

    2015-02-01

    Fifty years ago, in 1964, our understanding of the immune system was very rudimentary. Gell and Coombs had just described classes of hypersensitivity reactions, and Bruton had described and commenced immunoglobulin replacement in agammaglobulinaemia. The distinction between T and B cells was not identified and characterised until the 1960s and 1970s. This was followed by increasing recognition of T and B cell collaboration in immune responses and identification of significant immunodeficiencies. CD4 and CD8 T cells were only recognised in the 1970s and 1980s. We now know of five CD4 subsets; dysfunction of each is associated with different disorders. By 2014, advances in technology have enabled identification of the genetic basis of over 240 primary immunodeficiencies. Research into the gut microbiome and vitamin D holds promise for the understanding, treatment and prevention of autoimmune and allergic diseases. Immunoglobulin preparations for the treatment of antibody deficiencies improved with the development of preparations for intravenous then subcutaneous administration, giving patients choice and the ability for home-based treatment, especially if experiencing infusion associated adverse effects. Newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiency is a reality. Improvements in haemopoietic stem cell transplantation and now gene therapy, albeit still only available in the research setting, are improving long-term survival in primary immunodeficiencies. Biologic therapeutic agents are improving the control of autoimmune disease but potentially leading to secondary immunodeficiency, increasing the risk of opportunistic infection and malignancy. It is an exciting time.

  18. Effects of internal marketing on nurse job satisfaction and organizational commitment: example of medical centers in Southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng; Chang, Hsin-Hsin

    2007-12-01

    As nurses typically represent the largest percentage of employees at medical centers, their role in medical care is exceptionally important and becoming more so over time. The quality and functions of nurses impact greatly on medical care quality. The concept of internal marketing, with origins in the field of market research, argues that enterprises should value and respect their employees by treating them as internal customers. Such a marketing concept challenges traditional marketing methods, which focus on serving external customers only. The main objective of internal marketing is to help internal customers (employees) gain greater job satisfaction, which should promote job performance and facilitate the organization accomplishing its ultimate business objectives. A question in the medical service industry is whether internal marketing can similarly increase the job satisfaction of nurses and enhance their commitment to the organization. This study aimed to explore the relational model of nurse perceptions related to internal marketing, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment by choosing nurses from two medical centers in Southern Taiwan as research subjects. Of 450 questionnaire distributed, 300 valid questionnaires were returned, giving a response rate of 66.7%. After conducting statistical analysis and estimation using structural equation modeling, findings included: (1) job satisfaction has positive effects on organizational commitment; (2) nurse perceptions of internal marketing have positive effects on job satisfaction; and (3) nurse perceptions of internal marketing have positive effects on organizational commitment.

  19. Organizational commitment of military physicians.

    PubMed

    Demir, Cesim; Sahin, Bayram; Teke, Kadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Kursun, Olcay

    2009-09-01

    An individual's loyalty or bond to his or her employing organization, referred to as organizational commitment, influences various organizational outcomes such as employee motivation, job satisfaction, performance, accomplishment of organizational goals, employee turnover, and absenteeism. Therefore, as in other sectors, employee commitment is crucial also in the healthcare market. This study investigates the effects of organizational factors and personal characteristics on organizational commitment of military physicians using structural equation modeling (SEM) on a self-report, cross-sectional survey that consisted of 635 physicians working in the 2 biggest military hospitals in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that professional commitment and organizational incentives contribute positively to organizational commitment, whereas conflict with organizational goals makes a significantly negative contribution to it. These results might help develop strategies to increase employee commitment, especially in healthcare organizations, because job-related factors have been found to possess greater impact on organizational commitment than personal characteristics.

  20. The Effects of Unmet Expectations, Satisfaction, and Commitment on the Reenlistment Intentions of First-Term Enlisted Personnel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    AD-AI16 326 NAVY PERSONNEL RESEARCH AND KCVELOP1ENT CENTER SAN D-ETC F/6 5/9THE EFFECTS Of UNMT EXPECTATIONS. SATISFACTION, AND COMITMENT--ETC(U) AUG...NPRDC SR 81-25 AUGUST 1981 THE EFFECTS OF UNMET EXPECTATIONS, SATISFACTION, AND COMMITMENT ON THE REENLISTMENT INTENTIONS OF FIRST-TERM ENLISTED...1981 THE EFFECTS OF UNMET EXPECTATIONS, SATISFACTION, AND CONMIL &ff" ON THE REENLISTMENT INTENTIONS OF FIRST-TERM ENLISTED PERSONNEL Arthur 3

  1. Job Satisfaction of Nurses and Its Moderating Effects on the Relationship Between Organizational Commitment and Organizational Citizenship Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Tzu; Chang, Ching-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Because nurses deliver care to patients on behalf of hospitals, hospitals should enhance the spontaneous organizational citizenship behaviors of front-line nurses to increase patient satisfaction and, hence, to increase the competitiveness of the hospital. However, a major gap in the literature is the lack of evidence-based studies of the correlations among job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and organizational citizenship behaviors in nursing personnel. Therefore, this study performed a cross-sectional survey of nurses in 1 large hospital in Taiwan; out of 400 questionnaires distributed, 386 valid questionnaires were collected, which was a valid response rate of 96.50%. The survey results revealed that organizational commitment has a significant positive effect on organizational citizenship behaviors (γ11 = 0.57, p < .01) and that job satisfaction has a significant positive moderating effect on the relationship between organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviors (Δχ2 = 26.397, p < .01). Therefore, hospitals can improve the job satisfaction of their nursing staff by improving perceived working satisfaction, interpersonal satisfaction, and remunerative satisfaction, which would then improve organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviors.

  2. [Estimation of the committed effective dose of radioactive cesium and potassium by the market basket method].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Tomoaki; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Ikarashi, Atsuko; Hachisuka, Akiko; Matsuda, Rieko

    2013-01-01

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster after the Great East Japan Earthquake has caused radioactive contamination in food. Using the market basket method, total diet samples in Tokyo, Miyagi prefecture and Fukushima prefecture were analyzed for cesium-134 and -137 (radioactive cesium) and naturally occurring potassium-40 (radioactive potassium) in order to estimate the committed effective doses of these radioactive materials from food. Doses were calculated on the assumption that "not detected" corresponded to zero or to half the limit of detection (values in brackets). The estimated doses of radioactive cesium in Tokyo, Miyagi and Fukushima were 0.0021 (0.0024), 0.017 (0.018) and 0.019 (0.019) mSv/year, respectively. Although the doses in Miyagi and Fukushima were more than 8 times the dose in Tokyo, they were significantly lower than the maximum permissible dose (1 mSv/year) determined by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan. The estimated doses of naturally occurring radioactive potassium in these areas were in the range of 0.17-0.20 (0.18-0.20) mSv/year, and there were no significant differences between the areas.

  3. The Swedish monitoring of surface waters: 50 years of adaptive monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fölster, Jens; Johnson, Richard K; Futter, Martyn N; Wilander, Anders

    2014-01-01

    For more than 50 years, scientific insights from surface water monitoring have supported Swedish evidence-based environmental management. Efforts to understand and control eutrophication in the 1960s led to construction of wastewater treatment plants with phosphorus retention, while acid rain research in the 1970s contributed to international legislation curbing emissions. By the 1990s, long-time series were being used to infer climate effects on surface water chemistry and biology. Monitoring data play a key role in implementing the EU Water Framework Directive and other legislation and have been used to show beneficial effects of agricultural management on Baltic Sea eutrophication. The Swedish experience demonstrates that well-designed and financially supported surface water monitoring can be used to understand and manage a range of stressors and societal concerns. Using scientifically sound adaptive monitoring principles to balance continuity and change has ensured long-time series and the capability to address new questions over time.

  4. Effective variations of peer instruction: The effects of peer discussions, committing to an answer, and reaching a consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth; Whittaker, Chris

    2016-08-01

    Peer Instruction (PI) is a widely used student-centered pedagogy, but one that is used differently by different instructors. While all PI instructors survey their students with conceptual questions, some do not allow students to discuss with peers. We studied the effect of peer discussion by polling three groups of students (N = 86) twice on the same set of nine conceptual questions. The three groups differed in the tasks assigned between the first and second poll: the first group discussed, the second reflected in silence, and the third was distracted so they could neither reflect nor discuss. Comparing score changes between the first and second poll, we find minimal increases in the distraction condition (3%), sizable increases in the reflection condition (10%), and significantly larger increases in the peer discussion condition (21%). We also examined the effect of committing to an answer before peer discussion and reaching a consensus afterward. We compared a lecture-based control section to three variations of PI that differed in their requirement to commit to an answer or reach consensus (N = 108). We find that all PI groups achieve greater conceptual learning and traditional problem solving than lecture-based instruction. We find one difference between these groups: the absence of consensus building is related to a significant decrease in expert views and beliefs. Our findings can therefore be used to make two recommendations: always use peer discussions and consider asking students to reach a consensus before re-polling.

  5. Social Network Analysis of 50 Years of International Collaboration in the Research of Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shesen; Zhang, Ganzhou; Guo, Yufei

    2016-01-01

    The definition of the field of educational technology has evolved over 50 years. New inventions and economic globalization increasingly facilitate people's communication for exchange of ideas and collaboration. This work attempts to describe international research collaboration in educational technology for the past 50 years. This article intends…

  6. Imported malaria and conflict: 50 years of experience in the U.S. Military.

    PubMed

    Porter, William D

    2006-10-01

    Over the last 50 years, members of the U.S. military have faced the threat of malaria in diverse geographical locations and operational situations, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. However, because malaria may be transported out of endemic areas and into areas that are free of malaria, the threat does not end with redeployment. Since the Korean Conflict, outbreaks of imported malaria have followed every major deployment of U.S. military forces to malaria endemic areas. By examining unique aspects of these outbreaks through the years, many similarities can be drawn. Repeated observations demonstrate that preventive efforts are only effective at reducing the impact of imported malaria when commanders are informed about the risks of malaria. Commanders must also understand the preventive resources that are available while deployed, and the potential for morbidity and mortality from malaria.

  7. Effects of Leadership Behaviour on the Faculty Commitment of Humanities Departments in the University of Mysore, India: Regarding Factors of Age Group, Educational Qualifications and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabbodi, Meimanat Lonita

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of leadership behaviour on the commitment of humanities departments in the University of Mysore, India. The data were collected from among faculties, including 93 participants. The instruments used were the "Leadership behaviour questionnaire" and the "Faculty commitment questionnaire".…

  8. Work-Family Climate, Organizational Commitment, and Turnover: Multilevel Contagion Effects of Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, John W.; Harrison, Michelle M.; Cleveland, Jeannette; Almeida, David; Stawski, Robert; Crouter, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents empirical research analyzing the relationship between work-family climate (operationalized in terms of three work-family climate sub-scales), organizational leadership (i.e., senior manager) characteristics, organizational commitment and turnover intent among 526 employees from 37 different hotels across the US. Using…

  9. Long-Term Effects of Brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bach, Patricia; Hayes, Steven C.; Gallop, Robert

    2012-01-01

    A previous report explored the impact of a brief (four session) acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) intervention as compared with treatment as usual (TAU) on rehospitalization over 4 months in a sample of 80 inpatients with psychosis. The present study extended the follow-up period to 1 year and used a more sophisticated survival analysis to…

  10. Effect of Learning Organization Perception to the Organizational Commitment: A Comparison between Private and Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balay, Refik

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to examine the impact of faculty members' learning organization perceptions to the organizational commitment through quantitative method. The study group consists of 172 faculty members working in two universities, which are private (Zirve University) and public (Harran University) ones. The research results show that faculty…

  11. Effects of Management Communication, Opportunity for Learning, and Work Schedule Flexibility on Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Butts, Marcus M.; Vandenberg, Robert J.; DeJoy, David M.; Wilson, Mark G.

    2006-01-01

    In the current career climate characterized by change and turbulence, employees may demonstrate limited organizational commitment to their employers. Rousseau (1998) suggests that two key ways to elicit loyalty from employees today are to reinforce perceptions of organizational membership and demonstrate organizational care and support for…

  12. Serum uric acid is associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density in healthy Chinese males older than 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jing; Chen, Weijun; Feng, Xinhui; Liu, Wenyi; Zhang, Zhenxing; He, Li; Ye, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to investigate the association of serum uric acid (UA) levels with bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites in healthy Chinese males >50 years of age. Methods A cross-sectional study of 385 Chinese males >50 years of age who underwent health checkup in Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University in Shanghai, China, was conducted. Clinical and bone characteristics were compared in different UA tertiles (UA1: UA <4.7 mg/dL, UA2: 4.7 mg/dL ≤ UA <6 mg/dL and UA3: UA ≥6 mg/dL). Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis were used to study the correlation of UA with BMD at various skeletal sites. Results Serum UA levels were positively associated with higher BMD and T-values at the lumbar spine, but not at other skeletal sites, after adjusting for multiple confounding factors. Lumbar spine BMD; the T- and Z-values at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck; as well as intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels are higher in the highest tertile of UA than in the second tertile of UA. Conclusion Our results provide epidemiological evidence in Chinese Han males aged >50 years that serum UA levels are positively correlated with lumbar spine BMD and T-values, suggesting that UA may exert protective effect on bone density at the lumbar spine in Chinese males >50 years of age. PMID:28280317

  13. Localized committed differentiation of neural stem cells based on the topographical regulation effects of TiO2 nanostructured ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xiaoning; Wang, Shu; Guo, Weibo; Ji, Shaozheng; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Deshuai; Zhang, Xiaodi; Zhou, Jin; Tang, Wei; Wang, Changyong; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a porous-flat TiO2 micropattern was fabricated with flat and nanoporous TiO2 ceramics for investigating the effect of topography on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. This finding demonstrates that localized committed differentiation could be achieved in one system by integrating materials with different topographies.In this study, a porous-flat TiO2 micropattern was fabricated with flat and nanoporous TiO2 ceramics for investigating the effect of topography on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. This finding demonstrates that localized committed differentiation could be achieved in one system by integrating materials with different topographies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01874b

  14. How do different types of community commitment influence brand commitment? The mediation of brand attachment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Zhi-min; Su, Chen-ting; Zhou, Nan

    2013-11-01

    Although previous research indicates that participation in a brand community may foster consumer loyalty to the brand in question, research has seldom examined the mediating effect of community commitment on brand commitment. Drawing from the typologies of organizational commitment, we divide community commitment into three components: continuance community commitment (continuance CC), affective community commitment (affective CC), and normative community commitment (normative CC). We then assess the mediating role of brand attachment in the relationship between these three components and brand commitment. We test the hypotheses using a sample of online mobile phone brand communities in China. The empirical results reveal that brand attachment exerts an indirect (but not mediated) effect on the relationship between continuance CC and brand commitment and on the relationship between normative CC and brand commitment. We also find that it exerts a partial mediating effect on the relationship between affective CC and brand commitment. The findings contribute to the branding literature and have important implications for brand community management.

  15. Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Interpersonal Problemsand Psychological Flexibility in Female High School Students With Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Azadeh, Sayedeh Monireh; Kazemi-Zahrani, Hamid; Besharat, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Social anxiety is a psychological disorder which has devastative and pernicious effects on interpersonal relationships and one's psychological flexibility. The aim of this research was to determine the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on interpersonal problems and psychological flexibility in female high school students with social anxiety disorder. With a semi-experimental design, the subjects were assessed using the Social Anxiety Scale and clinical interview. The statistical population of the research was high school female students studying in 5 areas of Isfahan. 30 individuals were purposively selected as the sample. The subjects of the research were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy was given in 10 sessions of 90 minutes in the experimental group and the control group did not receive any treatment. Pre-test and post-test scores of Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, and Acceptance and Action Questionnaire were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance & the results showed that after the intervention, there was a significant difference between the scores of the subjects in the experimental and control groups. This means that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy can influence interpersonal problems and their six dimensions and psychological flexibility as well. PMID:26493425

  16. The effect of framing actuarial risk probabilities on involuntary civil commitment decisions.

    PubMed

    Scurich, Nicholas; John, Richard S

    2011-04-01

    Despite a proliferation of actuarial risk assessment instruments, empirical research on the communication of violence risk is scant and there is virtually no research on the consumption of actuarial risk assessment. Using a 2 × 3 Latin Square factorial design, this experiment tested whether decision-makers are sensitive to varying levels of risk expressed probabilistically and whether the framing of actuarial risk probabilities is consequential for commitment decisions. Consistent with research on attribute framing, in which describing an attribute in terms of its complement leads to different conclusions, this experiment found that the way actuarial risk estimates are framed leads to disparate commitment decisions. For example, risk framed as 26% probability of violence generally led decision-makers to authorize commitment, whereas the same risk framed in the complement, a 74% probability of no violence, generally led decision-makers to release. This result was most pronounced for moderate risk levels. Implications for the risk communication format debate, forensic practice and research are discussed.

  17. Commentary on 50 years of research at the NBRL, Boston, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Valeri, C R; Giorgio, G R

    2016-02-01

    Research at the NBRL, Boston, MA over the past 50 years assessed the survival and function of RBC and platelets and the function of plasma clotting proteins. Liquid preserved RBC can be stored at 4 °C for only 2 weeks to maintain a 24-hour posttransfusion survival value of 75%, moderately impaired oxygen transport function after transfusion, exert a hemostatic effect, and increase the plasma volume. Liquid preserved platelets can be stored at room temperature with agitation for only 2 days to have acceptable in vivo survival 2 hours following transfusion, normal lifespan, and a hemostatic effect to reduce the bleeding time in thrombocytopenic patients. RBCs frozen with 40% W/V glycerol at -80 °C for at least 10 years, thawed, and deglycerolized in the Haemonetics ACP215 can be stored in Nutricel at 4 °C for 2 weeks with a 24-hour posttransfusion survival of 75%, moderately impaired oxygen transport function after transfusion, exert a hemostatic effect and increase the plasma volume. Leukoreduced single donor platelets treated with 6% DMSO, the supernatant DMSO removed prior to freezing at -80 °C for 2 years, thawed, and diluted with 0.9% NaCl or AB plasma have a bimodal population of platelets: one population has reduced in vivo survival, but increased hemostatic effect and the other has normal in vivo survival. AB plasma can be stored at -80 °C for at least 14 years, thawed, and stored at 4 °C for 24 hours with acceptable in vitro function of clotting proteins. The data reported by the NBRL, Boston, Mass. over the past 50 years and the 15-year experience by the Netherlands military now recommend that FDA, ARC, HHS and DOD should support the use of universal donor frozen group O Rh positive and group O Rh negative RBC, frozen group O platelets and frozen AB plasma from male donors. The frozen blood products will eliminate the severe adverse events of mortality and morbidity associated with the current FDA approved red blood cell products, platelet

  18. Face processing improvements in prosopagnosia: successes and failures over the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    DeGutis, Joseph M.; Chiu, Christopher; Grosso, Mallory E.; Cohan, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians and researchers have widely believed that face processing cannot be improved in prosopagnosia. Though more than a dozen reported studies have attempted to enhance face processing in prosopagnosics over the last 50 years, evidence for effective treatment approaches has only begun to emerge. Here, we review the current literature on spontaneous recovery in acquired prosopagnosia (AP), as well as treatment attempts in acquired and developmental prosopagnosia (DP), differentiating between compensatory and remedial approaches. We find that for AP, rather than remedial methods, strategic compensatory training such as verbalizing distinctive facial features has shown to be the most effective approach (despite limited evidence of generalization). In children with DP, compensatory training has also shown some effectiveness. In adults with DP, two recent larger-scale studies, one using remedial training and another administering oxytocin, have demonstrated group-level improvements and evidence of generalization. These results suggest that DPs, perhaps because of their more intact face processing infrastructure, may benefit more from treatments targeting face processing than APs. PMID:25140137

  19. Fatal asbestosis 50 years after brief high intensity exposure in a vermiculite expansion plant.

    PubMed

    Wright, Robert S; Abraham, Jerrold L; Harber, Philip; Burnett, Bryan R; Morris, Peter; West, Phil

    2002-04-15

    The authors report the case of a 65-year-old accountant whose only asbestos exposure was during a summer job 50 years earlier in a California vermiculite expansion plant. Vermiculite is a silicate material that is useful in building and agriculture as a filler and insulating agent. He developed extensive fibrocalcific pleural plaques and end-stage pulmonary fibrosis, with rapidly progressive respiratory failure. Careful occupational and environmental history revealed no other source of asbestos exposure, and the initial clinical diagnosis was idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; open lung biopsy shortly before his death confirmed asbestosis. Electron microscopic lung fiber burden analysis revealed over 8,000,000 asbestos fibers per gram dry lung, 68% of which were tremolite asbestos. Additional asbestiform fibers of composition not matching any of the standard asbestos varieties were also present at over 5,000,000 fibers per gram dry lung. Comparison analysis of a sample of Libby, Montana, vermiculite showed a similar mix of asbestiform fibers including tremolite asbestos. This case analysis raises several concerns: risks of vermiculite induced disease among former workers of the more than 200 expansion plants throughout the United States; health effects of brief but very high-intensity exposures to asbestos; and possible health effects in end-users of consumer products containing vermiculite.

  20. Morphological changes of Gumara River channel over 50 years, upper Blue Nile basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, Mengiste; Nyssen, Jan; Steenhuis, Tammo S.; Moges, Michael M.; Tilahun, Seifu A.; Enku, Temesgen; Adgo, Enyew

    2015-06-01

    In response to anthropogenic disturbances, alluvial rivers adjust their geometry. The alluvial river channels in the upper Blue Nile basin have been disturbed by human-induced factors since a longtime. This paper examines channel adjustment along a 38-km stretch of the Gumara River which drains towards Lake Tana and then to the Blue Nile. Over a 50 years period, agriculture developed rapidly in the catchment and flooding of the alluvial plain has become more frequent in recent times. The objectives of this study were to document the changes in channel planform and cross-section of the Gumara River and to investigate whether the changes could have contributed to the frequent flooding or vice versa. Two sets of aerial photographs (1957 and 1980) were scanned, and then orthorectified. Recent channel planform information was extracted from SPOT images of 2006 and Google Earth. Channel planform and bed morphology (vertical changes) were determined for these nearly 50 years period. The vertical changes were determined based on aggradation along a permanent structure, historic information on river cross-sections at a hydrological gauging station, and field observations. The results indicate that the lower reach of Gumara near its mouth has undergone major planform changes. A delta with approx. 1.12 km2 of emerged land was created between 1957 and 1980 and an additional 1 km2 of land has been added between 1980 and 2006. The sinuosity of the river changed only slightly: negatively (-1.1% i.e. meandering decreased) for the period from 1957 to 1980 and positively (+3.0%) for the period 1980-2006. Comparison of cross-sections at the hydrological gauging station showed that the deepest point in the river bed aggraded by 2.91 m for the period 1963-2009. The importance of sediment deposition in the stream and on its banks is related to land degradation in the upper catchment, and to artificial rising of Lake Tana level that creates a backwater effect and sediment deposition in

  1. Initialisation and predictability of the AMOC over the last 50 years in a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingedouw, Didier; Mignot, Juliette; Labetoulle, Sonia; Guilyardi, Eric; Madec, Gurvan

    2013-05-01

    The mechanisms involved in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) decadal variability and predictability over the last 50 years are analysed in the IPSL-CM5A-LR model using historical and initialised simulations. The initialisation procedure only uses nudging towards sea surface temperature anomalies with a physically based restoring coefficient. When compared to two independent AMOC reconstructions, both the historical and nudged ensemble simulations exhibit skill at reproducing AMOC variations from 1977 onwards, and in particular two maxima occurring respectively around 1978 and 1997. We argue that one source of skill is related to the large Mount Agung volcanic eruption starting in 1963, which reset an internal 20-year variability cycle in the North Atlantic in the model. This cycle involves the East Greenland Current intensity, and advection of active tracers along the subpolar gyre, which leads to an AMOC maximum around 15 years after the Mount Agung eruption. The 1997 maximum occurs approximately 20 years after the former one. The nudged simulations better reproduce this second maximum than the historical simulations. This is due to the initialisation of a cooling of the convection sites in the 1980s under the effect of a persistent North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) positive phase, a feature not captured in the historical simulations. Hence we argue that the 20-year cycle excited by the 1963 Mount Agung eruption together with the NAO forcing both contributed to the 1990s AMOC maximum. These results support the existence of a 20-year cycle in the North Atlantic in the observations. Hindcasts following the CMIP5 protocol are launched from a nudged simulation every 5 years for the 1960-2005 period. They exhibit significant correlation skill score as compared to an independent reconstruction of the AMOC from 4-year lead-time average. This encouraging result is accompanied by increased correlation skills in reproducing the observed 2-m air temperature

  2. The recognition and treatment of growth disorders - a 50-year retrospective.

    PubMed

    Zemel, Babette

    2009-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen great progress in the understanding and treatment of classic growth disorders. Advances such as the recognition of hormone receptor defects, the development of recombinant growth hormone, and the expanding awareness of epigenetic phenomena affecting growth are among these great achievements. Yet growth failure remains a pervasive problem among children with complex health conditions, such as survivors of childhood cancers, premature infants, organ transplant recipients, and children with cystic fibrosis. The significant increases in life expectancy among these groups underscores the potential consequences of poor growth, whether due to the underlying conditions or medical treatments, as they may have long-lasting effects into adulthood. The ongoing contributions of human biologists to the study of human growth remain essential in the recognition and treatment of growth disorders, by defining normal patterns of growth and body composition, the interplay of growth and maturation, the role of environmental, behavioral and genetic factors, and the long-term consequences of growth patterns. Examples will be given based on two common genetic disorders, cystic fibrosis and sickle-cell anemia, to highlight the relationships between growth failure, survival, and malnutrition. Also, a study of bone mineral accretion in children with cystic fibrosis will illustrate the importance of understanding patterns of growth in healthy children, and their application in the diagnosis and management of children with chronic disease. These examples accentuate the need for continued participation of human biologists in the study of growth and development and the care of children.

  3. Photochemistry and Photobiology of the Spore Photoproduct: A 50-Year Journey.

    PubMed

    Setlow, Peter; Li, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Fifty years ago, a new thymine dimer was discovered as the dominant DNA photolesion in UV-irradiated bacterial spores [Donnellan, J. E. & Setlow R. B. (1965) Science, 149, 308-310], which was later named the spore photoproduct (SP). Formation of SP is due to the unique environment in the spore core that features low hydration levels favoring an A-DNA conformation, high levels of calcium dipicolinate that acts as a photosensitizer, and DNA saturation with small, acid-soluble proteins that alters DNA structure and reduces side reactions. In vitro studies reveal that any of these factors alone can promote SP formation; however, SP formation is usually accompanied by the production of other DNA photolesions. Therefore, the nearly exclusive SP formation in spores is due to the combined effects of these three factors. Spore photoproduct photoreaction is proved to occur via a unique H-atom transfer mechanism between the two involved thymine residues. Successful incorporation of SP into an oligonucleotide has been achieved via organic synthesis, which enables structural studies that reveal minor conformational changes in the SP-containing DNA. Here, we review the progress on SP photochemistry and photobiology in the past 50 years, which indicates a very rich SP photobiology that may exist beyond endospores.

  4. Well-being among 50-year-old people. The population study "50-year-old people in Kungsör".

    PubMed

    Thorell, B; Svärdsudd, K

    1990-09-01

    Self-assessed well-being has been shown to be related to earlier medical events and to be a predictor of mortality. 50-year-old men and women (n = 314) in Kungsör were invited to an examination for traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and different aspects of self-assessed well-being. The differences between men and women concerning their well-being could not explain the differences in the expected mortality between the sexes. A well-developed social network and physical exercise were the most positive determinants of well-being, while drug intake, angina pectoris, and smoking were the most negative.

  5. 50 Years of Educational Progress and Challenge in Ghana. Research Monograph No. 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akyeampong, Kwame

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 Ghana celebrated 50 years of independence from British colonial rule. The golden jubilee offered an opportunity to take stock of how the country had progressed in expanding education and the challenges for the future. This paper offers a critique of the journey, highlighting the challenges and progress. What reforms in education has taught…

  6. Keeping on Keeping on: OCR and Complaints of Racial Discrimination 50 Years after "Brown"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Mica

    2005-01-01

    This article, written by a former civil rights investigator in the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR), contends that ordinary Americans advocating for equal educational opportunity for students of color might enlist OCR more actively and knowingly to help secure racial equality of opportunity 50 years after "Brown." Now a…

  7. Male and Female Photographic Representation in 50 Years of "Music Educators Journal"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruse, Adam J.; Giebelhausen, Robin; Shouldice, Heather N.; Ramsey, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Considering the potential for stereotypes to shape professional expectations, the four researchers in this study investigated photographic representation of adult men and women in implied positions of authority in 50 years (1962-2011) of issues of "Music Educators Journal" ("MEJ"). Data included every photograph (N = 7,288) of…

  8. The "Global" Formulation of Thermodynamics and the First Law: 50 Years On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gislason, Eric A.; Craig, Norman C.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 50 years ago, Henry Bent published his groundbreaking article in this "Journal" introducing the "global" formulation of thermodynamics. In the following years, the global formulation was elaborated by Bent and by one of the present authors. The global formulation of the first law focuses on conservation of energy and the recognition that…

  9. 1958-2008: 50 Years of Youth Fitness Tests in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, James R., Jr.; Zhu, Weimo; Franks, B. Don; Meredith, Marilu D.; Spain, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The AAHPER Youth Fitness Test, the first U.S. national fitness test, was published 50 years ago. The seminal work of Krause and Hirschland influenced the fitness world and continues to do so today. Important youth fitness test initiatives in the last half century are summarized. Key elements leading to continued interest in youth fitness testing…

  10. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights: 50 Years Old but Still Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Highlights the events of the past 50 years concerning the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that is the first document in human history to codify rights that apply to every person regardless of citizenship in a particular country. Explains why the United States does not comprehend the value of the declaration. (CMK)

  11. Comprehension of a Colon Cancer Pamphlet among American Adults at Least 50 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Chiung-ju

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of comprehension of an educational pamphlet on colon cancer, by adults at least 50 years of age living in the United States. Design: Data were analysed from the "2003 National Assessment of Adult Literacy" survey. The survey was designed to assess functional English…

  12. Women in Educational Leadership in the U.S.: Reflections of a 50 Year Veteran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupton, Sandra Lee

    2009-01-01

    Little did I know when I first stepped into that ninth grade classroom as a very young, timid, first year teacher at Brooks County High School in Quitman, Georgia, that I'd still be plugging away in this profession almost 50 years later! The purpose of this paper is to provide a reflective perspective on the status of women in educational…

  13. The School Health Education Study + 50 Years: Scholars' Reflections on Its Impact and Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Robert J.; Mayer, Alyssa B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Launched 50 years ago, the School Health Education Study (SHES) examined the health education offerings in 135 public school systems, in 38 states, and over 1100 elementary schools and 350 secondary schools. In its second year, knowledge surveys were administered to students in grades 6, 9 and 12 at many of these schools. Analysis of…

  14. Socio-emotional support in French hospitals: Effects on French nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment.

    PubMed

    Ruiller, Caroline; Van Der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the differences in human resource management (HRM) practices between the non-profit health care sector and business life, the majority of health care sector research appears to be based on the HRM (for human resources management) blueprint for business life staff policy and practice. This study is aimed to better understand the impact of workplace social support in the context of French hospitals. Concrete, the first objective of this article comprises a thorough conceptualization and operationalization of workplace social support (i.e. both professional and personal social support). Data were collected in a French hospital among a sample of 62 respondents (for the qualitative part of our study), and among a sample of 171 health care professionals (nurses and nurse aids) (for the quantitative part of our study). Our outcomes indicate that, especially, personal support given by one's supervisor is strongly and positively related to nurses' and nurse aides' affective commitment. After a discussion about the outcomes, followed by some recommendations for future research, the article concludes with some practical implications for management in hospitals.

  15. The Charles F. Prentice Award Lecture 2014: A 50-Year Research Journey: Giants and Great Collaborators.

    PubMed

    Holden, Brien A

    2015-07-01

    This article, an edited version of the 2014 Charles F. Prentice Medal presentation, recounts my 50-year journey in research, from graduation in 1965 to PhD to 2015. The most important lessons I have learned are that great people, "Giants" as I call them, are generous of spirit, creative, insightful, sharing, and caring, and second, that collaboration is really the only way to do what I want to get done. I have been very fortunate to have worked with many outstanding people. As someone said to me at the Prentice Medal presentation, "I don't like you very much but the people you work with are wonderful."My journey started with a PhD investigation into seeing if orthokeratology could control myopia at the City University London in 1966. It then moved to Australia where all aspects of contact lenses were researched to try to make contact lenses safer and more effective by understanding the cornea and anterior eye systems. That journey has now turned to making contact lenses the best they can be to slow the progress of myopia. An extremely high proportion of people who are involved with global eye care initiatives and ambitious projects to develop treatments and interventions for the major vision problems impacting the world are a joy to work with. Evidence-based systems for delivering vision to the more than 600 million people globally that are blind or vision impaired because of uncorrected refractive error have involved amazing people and collaborations. This article pays tribute to the generosity and humanity of my family and the Giants in and outside the field, and many more not so well known, and the people I work with, who have punctuated and greatly enriched this journey and made many of the scientific advances documented here possible.

  16. Physical growth and development of the malnourished child: contributions from 50 years of research at INCAP.

    PubMed

    Martorell, Reynaldo

    2010-03-01

    This paper reviews the main findings and policy implications of 50 years (1949-1999) of research conducted by INCAP on growth and development. Topical areas reviewed include a) maternal size and birthweight and the causes of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), b) patterns and causes of postnatal growth retardation, c) the relative importance of genetics and the environment in explaining differences in growth among populations, d) the implications of being small, for both children and adults, e) bone growth and maturation and dental development, f) menarche, and g) methodological contributions such as anthropometric reference data, quality control of data collection, development of risk indicators and use of anthropometry in nutrition surveillance systems. Key contributions to knowledge by INCAP include a) characterization of growth failure and maturational delays as mainly occurring during the intrauterine period and the first 3 years of life b) clarification of the role of small maternal size and of inadequate dietary intakes during pregnancy as major causes of intrauterine growth failure, c) evidence that diarrheal diseases and poor dietary intakes are the principal causes of growth failure in early childhood, d) demonstration that environmental factors related to poverty, and not genetic or racial ancestry, account for most of the differences in growth between populations, e) evidence that growth failure predicts functional impairment in the child as well as in the adult andf) demonstration that nutrition interventions are effective in preventing growth failure and its consequences, if targeted to needy women and young children. INCAP's work has contributed knowledge that has informed and improved policies and programs aimed at overcoming maternal and child undernutrition and promoting optimal growth and development.

  17. Effects of Homophobic versus Nonhomophobic Victimization on School Commitment and the Moderating Effect of Teacher Attitudes in Brazilian Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Mandi M.; Santo, Jonathan B.; Da Cunha, Josafa; Weber, Lidia; Russell, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated homophobic victimization, teacher support, and school commitment in Brazilian schools. Participants were 339 students, ages 11 to 18 years old, in two public schools in Brazil. Data were obtained using the Brazil Preventing School Harassment Survey. Structural equation modeling revealed that both homophobic and…

  18. The radium legacy: Contaminated land and the committed effective dose from the ingestion of radium contaminated materials.

    PubMed

    Tyler, A N; Dale, P; Copplestone, D; Bradley, S; Ewen, H; McGuire, C; Scott, E M

    2013-09-01

    The manufacture and use of radium in the early to mid-20th century within industrial, medicinal and recreational products have resulted in a large number of contaminated sites across a number of countries with notable examples in the USA and Europe. These sites, represent a significant number of unregulated sources of potential radiological exposure that have collectively and hitherto not been well characterised. In 2007, the Radioactive Contaminated Land (RCL) Regulations came into force in the UK, providing the statutory guidance for regulators to classify and deal with RCL. Here we report on results derived from digestion experiments to estimate committed effective dose, a key aspect of the RCL Regulations, from the ingestion of radium contaminated sources that can be found in the environment. This case study includes particles, clinker and artefacts that arise from past military activities on a site that was once an airfield at Dalgety Bay on the Firth of Forth, UK. Since 2011 the number of radium contaminated finds has increased by one order of magnitude on the foreshore areas of Dalgety Bay. The increase in finds may in large part be attributed to a change in monitoring practice. A subsample of sixty sources was selected, on the basis of their activity and dimensions, and subjected to digestion in simulated stomach and lower intestine solutions. The study demonstrated that more radium-226 ((226)Ra) and lead-210 ((210)Pb; driven by Polonium solubility) are dissolved from sources in artificial 'stomach' solutions compared with 'lower intestine' solutions. The combined 'gut' solubility for (226)Ra and apparent (210)Pb varied from less than 1% to up to 35% ICRP 72 conversion factors were used to convert the activities measured in solution to committed effective dose. A little over 10% of the sources tested dissolved sufficient radioactivity to result in 100mSv committed effective dose to an infant. Using the solubility of 35% as a worst case, minimum source

  19. Committee Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    Creating the perfect governing body to power talent development and learning is a balancing act between centralized control and enough delegation to lines of business to keep content relevant. In this article, a handful of 2012 Training Top 125 winners describe how their companies effectively govern talent and learning development.

  20. Optical Sciences Center/College of Optical Sciences: 50 years of excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyant, James C.

    2014-09-01

    Aden B. Meinel established the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center, now known as the College of Optical Sciences, in 1964 to fulfill a national need for more highly trained engineers and physicists in the optical sciences. Throughout its 50-year history, OSC has grown and evolved in response to industrial demand. It now includes a worldclass faculty and an international student body, and its academic programs offer more than 100 graduate and undergraduate courses, an ABET-accredited undergraduate optical sciences and engineering degree program, and outstanding M.S. and Ph.D. graduate programs with extensive distance learning options. Its graduates are in great demand and are employed by national and international governments, businesses and universities. This paper will describe the formation of OSC and its 50 years of excellence.

  1. A method to find the 50-year extreme load during production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, René; Veldkamp, Dick

    2016-09-01

    An important yet difficult task in the design of wind turbines is to assess the extreme load behaviour, most notably finding the 50-year load. Where existing methods often focus on ways to extrapolate from small sample sizes, this paper proposes a different approach. It combines generating constrained gusts in turbulence fields, Delaunay tessellation to assign probabilities and a genetic algorithm to find the desired load in an efficient way. The individual parts of the method are verified and the results are compared to both crude Monte Carlo and importance sampling. We found that using a genetic algorithm is a promising approach to find the 50-year load, with only a small number of load cases (∼103) to be evaluated and requiring no user input but an appropriate fitness function.

  2. [Oedema and haemorrhagic diathesis in a 50-year-old woman with thyrotoxicosis].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, A; Joeres, R; Braun, U

    2014-11-01

    We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with tachyarrhythmia, mild fever, peripheral oedema, ascites, epistaxis and gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Blood analysis revealed hyperthyroxinaemia. Analysis of thyroid-stimulating antibodies highlighted Graves' disease being the cause of the prevailing thyrotoxic crisis. Remarkable in this case of thyrotoxicosis is a liver affection without elevated transaminases but disturbed serum protein synthesis leading to hypalbuminaemic oedema and haemorrhagic complications. Thyrostatic treatment led to clinical response.

  3. Psychologic scars remain 50 years after Dieppe raid, study of Canadian veterans finds.

    PubMed Central

    Spears, T

    1995-01-01

    A Toronto psychologist has conducted a 50-year follow-up study of the psychologic problems faced by Canadian troops who landed on the beaches of Dieppe, France, in 1942. Lynne Beal says many of the men have suffered in silence, never realizing that they were experiencing the widespread condition known as post-traumatic stress disorder. The veterans hope her work will help them win greater official recognition of their condition. Images p1325-a PMID:7497395

  4. The Mediator Effect of Career Development between Personality Traits and Organizational Commitment: The Example of Sport Communication Technology Talents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Hung-Jen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Tung-Hsing, Lin; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-01-01

    This paper explored the relationships among career development, personality trait, and organizational commitment and examines whether career development mediates the relationship between personality trait and organizational commitment. The sample was 275 sport communication technology talents in Taiwan. The instrument included the Personality…

  5. A Study of the Effects of Educational and Administrative-Organizational Factors on the Students' Work Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaghatdar, Mohammad Javad; Samiee, Fatemeh; Sadeghian, Alireza; Shafaie, Shokouh; Alikhani, Madineh; Hashemi, Bibi Vajiheh

    2012-01-01

    Work commitment in the organizations is a factor which leads to the development of discipline, sense of duty, morality, and improvement of human relationships at work. The existence of ethics in the organization, having commitment to the tasks and playing professional roles and behaviors in the best way and with no external control, cause inner…

  6. Nursing Assistants' Job Commitment: Effect of Nursing Home Organizational Factors and Impact on Resident Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Christine E.; Weinberg, Dana Beth; Leutz, Walter; Dossa, Almas; Pfefferle, Susan G.; Zincavage, Rebekah M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) whether certified nursing assistants (CNAs) are more committed to nursing home jobs when they perceive their jobs as enhanced (greater autonomy, use of knowledge, teamwork), and (b) whether CNA job commitment affects resident satisfaction. Design and Methods: A qualitative exploration of…

  7. Organizational Commitment of Teachers: A Meta-Analysis Study for the Effect of Gender and Marital Status in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çogaltay, Nazim

    2015-01-01

    This meta-analysis summarizes the influence of Turkish teacher's gender and marital status on their perception of organizational commitment. In total, 30 independent research studies conducted across the country are investigated to analyze the relations between gender and organizational commitment, i.e., a sample group of 11,724 participants. In…

  8. Instruction and Curriculum in Veterinary Medical Education: A 50-Year Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Oscar J; Hooper, Billy E; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Our knowledge of veterinary medicine has expanded greatly over the past 50 years. To keep pace with these changes and produce competent professionals ready to meet evolving societal needs, instruction within veterinary medical curricula has undergone a parallel evolution. The curriculum of 1966 has given way, shifting away from lecture-laboratory model with few visual aids to a program of active learning, significant increases in case- or problem-based activities, and applications of technology, including computers, that were unimaginable 50 years ago. Curricula in veterinary colleges no longer keep all students in lockstep or limit clinical experiences to the fourth year, and instead have moved towards core electives with clinical activities provided from year 1. Provided here are examples of change within veterinary medical education that, in the view of the authors, had positive impacts on the evolution of instruction and curriculum. These improvements in both how and what we teach are now being made at a more rapid pace than at any other time in history and are based on the work of many faculty and administrators over the past 50 years.

  9. Progress in Childhood Cancer: 50 Years of Research Collaboration, A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Maura; Krailo, Mark; Anderson, James R.; Reaman, Gregory H.

    2009-01-01

    The Children's Oncology Group (COG) recently celebrated the milestone of 50 years of pediatric clinical trials and collaborative research in oncology. Our group had its origins in the four legacy pediatric clinical trials groups: the Children's Cancer Group, the Pediatric Oncology Group, the National Wilms' Tumor Study Group and the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group which merged in 2000 to form the COG. Over the last 50 years, the survival rates for childhood cancer have risen from 10% to almost 80%. Outcome in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) has gone from a six month median survival to an 85% overall cure rate. We have modified therapies in most major diseases to induce remission with the least amount of long term sequelae. Here we look back on our advances but also look forward to the next 50 years which will produce even more successful treatments that will be tailored to the specific patient translating the tools of molecular genetics. Experience has clearly proven that everything we know about the diagnosis and management of childhood cancer is a result of research and the dramatic historical decrease in mortality from childhood cancer is directly related to cooperative group clinical research. PMID:18929147

  10. Medications for type 2 diabetes: how will we be treating patients in 50 years?

    PubMed Central

    Buse, John B.

    2015-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen the development of many new options for treating and preventing type 2 diabetes. Despite this success, the individual and societal burden of the disease continues unabated. Thus, the next 50 years will be critical if we are going to quell the major non-communicable disease of our time. The knowledge we will gain in the next few years from clinical studies will inform treatment guidelines with regard to which agents to use in whom and whether more aggressive approaches can slow the development of hyperglycaemia in those at high risk. Beyond that, we anticipate identification of novel targets and techniques for therapeutic intervention. These advances will lead to more personalised approaches to treatment. Most importantly, we will need to focus our political and economic efforts on enhancing and implementing public health approaches aimed at prevention of diabetes and its co-morbidities. This is one of a series of commentaries under the banner ‘50 years forward’, giving personal opinions on future perspectives in diabetes, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Diabetologia (1965–2015). PMID:25773402

  11. The mediating effect of job stress in the relationship between work-related dimensions and career commitment.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Vathsala

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine associations between career commitment, job stress, and work-related dimensions of work routinization, role clarity, social support, and promotional opportunity. Design/methodology/approach - In all, 408 employees holding supervisor or above level job positions in Sri Lanka responded to the survey. For the data analysis, structural equation modelling with maximum likelihood estimation was performed. Findings - Job stress fully mediates the relationship between role clarity and career commitment while partially mediates the relationships between work routinization, social support, and the lack of promotional opportunity and career commitment. Originality/value - An investigation into relationships between work-related dimensions and career commitment holds a number of implications in the current business environment where employee commitment may be shifting from the organization to one's career.

  12. The Effect of Dimensions of Transformational, Transactional, and Non-Leadership on the Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment of Teachers in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayadi, Yaser

    2016-01-01

    It has been found that transformational and transactional leadership is positively related to the effectiveness of the leader, the subordinate's effort, job satisfaction, and the subordinate's organizational commitment. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of transformational, transactional, and non-leadership on job satisfaction and…

  13. Transformational and Transactional Leadership Effects on Teachers' Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, and Organizational Citizenship Behavior in Primary Schools: The Tanzanian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguni, Samuel; Sleegers, Peter; Denessen, Eddie

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the effects of transformational and transactional leadership on teachers' job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and organizational citizenship behavior in the context of schools in a specific developing country context, that of Tanzania. It does so by testing a model of such effects using a set of data collected from a…

  14. Perceived weight discrimination in England: a population-based study of adults aged ⩾50 years

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S E; Steptoe, A; Beeken, R J; Croker, H; Wardle, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite a wealth of experimental studies on weight bias, little is known about weight discrimination at the population level. This study examined the prevalence and socio-demographic correlates of perceived weight discrimination in a large population-based sample of older adults. Methods: Data were from 5307 adults in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing; a population-based cohort of men and women aged ⩾50 years. Weight discrimination was reported for five domains (less respect/courtesy; treated as less clever; poorer treatment in medical settings; poorer service in restaurants/stores; threatened/harassed) at wave 5 (2010–2011). Height and weight were measured at wave 4 (2008–2009). We used logistic regression to test the odds of weight discrimination in relation to weight status, age, sex, wealth, education and marital status. Results: Perceived weight discrimination in any domain was reported by 4.6% of participants, ranging from 0.8% in the normal-weight participants through 0.9, 6.7, 24.2 and 35.1% in individuals who were overweight or met criteria for class I, II and III obesity. Overall, and in each situation, odds of perceived weight discrimination were higher in younger and less wealthy individuals. There was no interaction between weight status and any socio-demographic variable. Relative to normal-weight participants, odds ratios for any perceived weight discrimination were 1.13 (95% confidence interval 0.53–2.40) in those who were overweight, 8.86 (4.65–16.88) in those with class I obesity, 35.06 (18.30–67.16) in class II obese and 56.43 (27.72–114.87) in class III obese. Conclusions: Our results indicate that rates of perceived weight discrimination are comparatively low in individuals who are overweight or have class I obesity, but for those with class II/III obesity, >10% had experienced discrimination in each domain, and >20% had been treated with less respect or courtesy. These findings have implications for public

  15. Adverse Childhood Experiences, Commitment Offense, and Race/Ethnicity: Are the Effects Crime-, Race-, and Ethnicity-Specific?

    PubMed Central

    DeLisi, Matt; Alcala, Justin; Kusow, Abdi; Hochstetler, Andy; Heirigs, Mark H.; Caudill, Jonathan W.; Trulson, Chad R.; Baglivio, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences are associated with an array of health, psychiatric, and behavioral problems including antisocial behavior. Criminologists have recently utilized adverse childhood experiences as an organizing research framework and shown that adverse childhood experiences are associated with delinquency, violence, and more chronic/severe criminal careers. However, much less is known about adverse childhood experiences vis-à-vis specific forms of crime and whether the effects vary across race and ethnicity. Using a sample of 2520 male confined juvenile delinquents, the current study used epidemiological tables of odds (both unadjusted and adjusted for onset, total adjudications, and total out of home placements) to evaluate the significance of the number of adverse childhood experiences on commitment for homicide, sexual assault, and serious persons/property offending. The effects of adverse childhood experiences vary considerably across racial and ethnic groups and across offense types. Adverse childhood experiences are strongly and positively associated with sexual offending, but negatively associated with homicide and serious person/property offending. Differential effects of adverse childhood experiences were also seen among African Americans, Hispanics, and whites. Suggestions for future research to clarify the mechanisms by which adverse childhood experiences manifest in specific forms of criminal behavior are offered. PMID:28327508

  16. Adverse Childhood Experiences, Commitment Offense, and Race/Ethnicity: Are the Effects Crime-, Race-, and Ethnicity-Specific?

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Matt; Alcala, Justin; Kusow, Abdi; Hochstetler, Andy; Heirigs, Mark H; Caudill, Jonathan W; Trulson, Chad R; Baglivio, Michael T

    2017-03-22

    Adverse childhood experiences are associated with an array of health, psychiatric, and behavioral problems including antisocial behavior. Criminologists have recently utilized adverse childhood experiences as an organizing research framework and shown that adverse childhood experiences are associated with delinquency, violence, and more chronic/severe criminal careers. However, much less is known about adverse childhood experiences vis-à-vis specific forms of crime and whether the effects vary across race and ethnicity. Using a sample of 2520 male confined juvenile delinquents, the current study used epidemiological tables of odds (both unadjusted and adjusted for onset, total adjudications, and total out of home placements) to evaluate the significance of the number of adverse childhood experiences on commitment for homicide, sexual assault, and serious persons/property offending. The effects of adverse childhood experiences vary considerably across racial and ethnic groups and across offense types. Adverse childhood experiences are strongly and positively associated with sexual offending, but negatively associated with homicide and serious person/property offending. Differential effects of adverse childhood experiences were also seen among African Americans, Hispanics, and whites. Suggestions for future research to clarify the mechanisms by which adverse childhood experiences manifest in specific forms of criminal behavior are offered.

  17. The study of knowledge management capability and organizational effectiveness in Taiwanese public utility: the mediator role of organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chia-Nan; Chen, Huei-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies on the significance of knowledge management (KM) in the business world have been performed in recent years. Public sector KM is a research area of growing importance. Findings show that few authors specialize in the field and there are several obstacles to developing a cohesive body of literature. In order to examine their effect of the knowledge management capability [which consists of knowledge infrastructure capability (KIC) and knowledge process capability (KPC)] and organizational effectiveness (OE), this study conducted structural equation modeling to test the hypotheses with 302 questionnaires of Taipei Water Department staffs in Taiwan. In exploring the model developed in this study, the findings show that there exists a significant relationship between KPC and OE, while KIC and OE are insignificant. These results are different from earlier findings in the literature. Furthermore, this research proposed organizational commitment (OC) as the mediator role. The findings suggest that only OC has significant mediating effects between KPC and OE, whereas this is not the case for KIC and OE. It is noteworthy that the above findings inspired managers, in addition to construct the knowledge infrastructure more than focus on social media tools on the Internet, which engage knowledge workers in "peer-to-peer" knowledge sharing across organizational and company boundaries. The results are likely to help organizations (particularly public utilities) sharpen their knowledge management strategies. Academic and practical implications were drawn based on the findings.

  18. Colorectal cancer in patients under 50 years of age: A retrospective analysis of two institutions' experience

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Elizabeth A; Feingold, Daniel L; Forde, Kenneth A; Arnell, Tracey; Jang, Joon Ho; Whelan, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients under 50 years of age across two institutions. METHODS: Records of patients under age 50 years of age who had CRC surgery over a 16 year period were assessed at two institutions. The following documents where reviewed: admission notes, operative notes, and discharge summaries. The main study variables included: age, presenting symptoms, family history, tumor location, operation, stage/differentiation of disease, and post operative complications. Stage of disease was classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system: tumor depth; node status; and metastases. RESULTS: CRC was found in 180 patients under age 50 years (87 females, 93 males; mean age 41.4 ± 6.2 years). Young patients accounted for 11.2% of cases during a 6 year period for which the full data set was available. Eight percent had a 1st degree and 12% a 2nd degree family CRC history. Almost all patients (94%) were symptomatic at diagnosis; common symptoms included: bleeding (59%), obstruction (9%), and abdominal/rectal pain (35%). Evaluation was often delayed and bleeding frequently attributed to hemorrhoids. Advanced stage CRC (Stage 3 or 4) was noted in 53% of patients. Most tumors were distal to the splenic flexure (77%) and 39% involved the rectum. Most patients (95%) had segmental resections; 6 patients had subtotal/total colectomy. Poorly differentiated tumors were noted in 12% and mucinous lesions in 19% of patients of which most had Stage 3 or 4 disease. Twenty-two patients (13%) developed recurrence and/or progression of disease to date. Three patients (ages 42, 42 and 49 years) went on to develop metachronous primary colon cancers within 3 to 4 years of their initial resection. CONCLUSION: CRC was common in young patients with no family history. Young patients with symptoms merit a timely evaluation to avoid presentation with late stage CRC. PMID:24039357

  19. Renal masses presenting 25 and 50 years following blunt renal trauma.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, R S; Issa, M M; Kabalin, J N; Terris, M K

    1998-10-01

    The long-term consequences of blunt renal trauma are not well described. We report on 2 patients with a history of blunt renal trauma who presented with radiographically detected renal masses suspicious for renal tumor. Both patients suffered blows to the kidney during boxing matches followed by flank pain and hematuria. The injuries occurred 25 and 50 years prior to the detection of renal masses. Subsequent nephrectomy and histopathological evaluation revealed benign dystrophic renal tissue. These presentations represent probable long-term sequelae of blunt renal trauma.

  20. Heel pain due to psoriatic arthritis in a 50 year old recreational male athlete: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yedon, Dominique Forand; Howitt, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Heel pain is a common presentation in a sports injury practice, with a list of common differentials including achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis. However, seronegative arthritis can also cause enthesopathies that produce heel pain and should be considered in a differential diagnosis list. In this case, a 50 year old recreationally active male presented with non-traumatic insidious heel pain and without history of any skin conditions or any other symptoms of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Clinical suspicion led to laboratory testing and radiographs/bone scan which yielded the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:22131565

  1. From 50 Years Ago, the Birth of Moden Liquid-State Science.

    PubMed

    Chandler, David

    2017-03-27

    The story told in this autobiographical perspective begins 50 years ago, at the 1967 Gordon Research Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Liquids. It traces developments in liquid-state science from that time, including contributions from the author, and especially in the study of liquid water. It emphasizes the importance of fluctuations and the challenges of far-from-equilibrium phenomena. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Volume 68 is April 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in adults younger than 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yo-El S

    2013-08-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) occurring prior to age 50 is termed early-onset RBD. Early-onset RBD comprises a substantial minority of cases, and demonstrates the differences in demographics, comorbidities, and clinical considerations from previously described typical RBD with onset >50years. The world literature on RBD is reviewed with specific focus on features that distinguish early-onset RBD, including more gender parity, increased proportion of idiopathic cases, increased proportion of cases associated with narcolepsy, parasomnia overlap disorder, antidepressants, and possibly autoimmune disorders, and clinical presentation.

  3. Isolated Schwannoma of the Upper Eyelid Margin in a 50-year-old Male

    PubMed Central

    Dervişoğulları, Mehmet Serdar; Totan, Yüksel; Yıldırım, Ümran

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas (neurilemmomas) are benign neurogenic tumours of peripheral nerves. They originate from Schwann cells, which form the neural sheath. Although Schwannomas and neurofibromas are the most common primary peripheral nerve tumours, Schwannomas are rarely observed in ophthalmic areas. When they occur, ocular Schwannomas are usually located in the orbit, uveal tract and conjunctiva. Isolated eyelid Schwannomas are reported infrequently. Herein, we describe a case of eyelid Schwannoma in a 50-year-old man. The diagnosis of Schwannoma was made after the eyelid mass was removed by excisional biopsy, so this entity should be included in the differential diagnosis of eyelid margin tumours. PMID:28050327

  4. 50 years of helium liquefaction at the MIT Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joseph L.

    2002-05-01

    The evolution of the helium liquefaction facility of the MIT Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory and the history of its operation over the last 50 years are described. Professor Samuel C. Collins created the liquid-helium facility based on his earlier developments. The chronology of the laboratory helium liquefiers is given with a brief description of each one. The current facility based on the Model 2000 liquefier is described and operating experience is given. The reasons for the very high availability of the liquefaction system are developed.

  5. Formation of the 50-Year Element 94 from Deuteron Bombardment of U{sup 238}

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kennedy, J. W.; Perlman, M. L.; Segre, E.; Wahl, A. C.

    1942-06-01

    It has been shown by bombardment with deuterons of a sample of U{sup 238}, greatly depleted in U{sup 235} and U{sup 234}, that the 50-year 94 activity and 2.0 day 93 activity are formed in approximately the same yield as with the natural mixture of uranium isotopes. The activities are thus shown to arise from the U{sup 238} nucleus, and from considerations of the energy of the compound nucleus (U{sup 238} + d).

  6. Association Between Self-efficacy and Participation in Community-Dwelling Manual Wheelchair Users Aged 50 Years or Older

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Routhier, François; Backman, Catherine L.; Eng, Janice J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-efficacy with using a wheelchair is an emerging construct in the wheelchair-use literature that may have implications for the participation frequency in social and personal roles of wheelchair users. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the direct and mediated effects of self-efficacy on participation frequency in community-dwelling manual wheelchair users aged 50 years or older. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted. Methods Participants were community-dwelling wheelchair users (N=124), 50 years of age or older (mean=59.7 years), with at least 6 months of experience with wheelchair use. The Late-Life Disability Instrument, the Wheelchair Use Confidence Scale, the Life-Space Assessment, and the Wheelchair Skills Test–Questionnaire Version measured participation frequency, self-efficacy, life-space mobility, and wheelchair skills, respectively. Multiple regression analyses with bootstrapping were used to investigate the direct and mediated effects. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health was used to guide the analyses. Results Self-efficacy was a statistically significant determinant of participation frequency and accounted for 17.2% of the participation variance after controlling for age, number of comorbidities, and social support. The total mediating effect by life-space mobility, wheelchair skills, and perceived participation limitations was statistically significant (point estimate=0.14; bootstrapped 95% confidence interval=0.04, 0.24); however, the specific indirect effect by the wheelchair skills variable did not contribute to the total effect above and beyond the other 2 mediators. The mediated model accounted for 55.0% of the participation variance. Limitations Causality cannot be established due to the cross-sectional nature of the data, and the self-report nature of our data from a volunteer sample may be influenced by measurement bias or social desirability, or both. Conclusion Self

  7. A Randomized Control Trial Examining the Effect of Acceptance and Commitment Training on Clinician Willingness to Use Evidence-Based Pharmacotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varra, Alethea A.; Hayes, Steven C.; Roget, Nancy; Fisher, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment training (ACT) for increasing drug and alcohol counselors' willingness to use evidence-based agonist and antagonist pharmacotherapy. Fifty-nine drug and alcohol counselors were randomly assigned to either a 1-day ACT workshop or a 1-day educational control workshop. Both groups…

  8. The Mediating Effects of Basic Psychological Needs at Work on the Relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and Organizational Commitment in Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Bonni Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mediating effects of the Basic Psychological Needs at Work, comprised of competence, autonomy and relatedness, on the relationship between the Dimensions of the Learning Organization and affective and normative organizational commitment in the United States nursing population. The study incorporated…

  9. The Effects of the Working on the Work Framework, an Action Plan for Teachers, on Student Engagement, Teacher Commitment, and Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harless, Laurie Christenberry

    2010-01-01

    This study addressed the implementation of the Working on the Work (WOW) framework in an elementary school in Northwest Georgia. The researcher examined the effectiveness of the WOW framework on teacher commitment, teacher training, student engagement, and student achievement. The researcher used quantitative and qualitative research methods to…

  10. The Excellence-Commitment-and-Effective-Learning (ExCEL) Group: An Integrated Approach for First-Year College Students' Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Siu-Man Raymond; Grant, Susan; Plenert, Sheri L.

    2000-01-01

    Presents research findings that evaluate the study skills, academic performance, and retention of students who participated in an Excellence-Commitment-and-Effective-Learning (ExCEL) group. Results indicate that the ExCEL groups appear to have enhanced the participants' study skills, GPAs, and social and cultural adjustment during the first year.…

  11. [Historical sketch of modern pharmaceutical science and technology (Part 4). Post World War II 50 years].

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, K

    1995-01-01

    A short history of the pharmaceutical science and technology, postwar 50 years is divided into nine sections for the purpose of discussion. 1. Japan's postwar rehabilitation, Japanese pharmaceutical industries and newly developed pharmaceutical sciences and technologies. In 1945, the Japanese pharmaceutical industry was reconstructed. Production of penicillin was carried out with the strong support of the U.S. Occupation Forces. New sciences in pharmacy (biochemistry, biopharmacy, pharmacology, microbiology, physical chemistry, etc.) were introduced in this period. 2. Introduction age of foreign new drugs and technology (1951 to 1960s). Japan gained independence in 1951. Japanese pharmaceutical companies imported many new drugs and new pharmaceutical technologies from the U.S.A. and European countries in this period. Then, these companies were reconstruction rapidly. However, consequently Japanese pharmaceutical companies were formed as an imitation industry. 3. Rapid economic growth period for pharmaceutical companies (1956 to 1970s). In this period, many Japanese pharmaceutical companies grew rapidly at an annual rate of 15-20% over a period of 15 years, especially with regard to the production of active vitamin B1 analog drugs and some OTC (public health drugs). Some major companies made large profits, which were used to construct research facilities. 4. Problems for the harmful effects of medicines and its ethical responsibility. In the 1970s, many public toxic and harmful effects of medicines were caused, especially SMON's disease. In this time, many pharmaceutical companies changed to its security got development of ethical drugs. 5. Self development of new drugs and administration of pharmaceutical rules (1970s). During the 1970s, many pharmaceutical laws (GLP, GCP, GMP, GPMSP etc.) were enacted by the Ministry of Health and Welfare. In 1976, the Japanese Pharmaceutical Affairs Law was revised, which set forth standards regarding the efficacy and safety of

  12. Commentary: civil commitment and its reform.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Alexander I F

    2015-03-01

    Internationally, civil commitment laws have gone through substantial reforms in the past 50 years. Discernible shifts from the medically paternalistic to the excessively legalistic may be giving way to a blending of legislative intent under the rubric of therapeutic jurisprudence. In the light of those international movements, Shao and Xie describe how China's new mental health law shows the impact of these international and local influences on the development and practice of mental health law in China. The new Law was passed in 2012. It sets a broad vision for mental health services and mental health promotion in Chinese society as well as providing the legal framework for civil commitment. Practicalities of implementation may be highly significant in the success of the legislation.

  13. Transformational Leadership and Teacher Commitment to Organizational Values: The Mediating Effects of Collective Teacher Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, John A.; Gray, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Transformational leadership researchers have given little attention to teacher expectations that mediate between goals and actions. The most important of these expectations, teacher efficacy, refers to teacher beliefs that they will be able to bring about student learning. This study examined the mediating effects of teacher efficacy by comparing…

  14. The Effect of School Principals' Leadership Styles on Teachers' Organizational Commitment and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Ayhan; Sarier, Yilmaz; Uysal, Sengul

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have conducted a number of studies in order to demonstrate the effects of leadership styles on school outcomes. In these research studies, particularly, the full range of leadership styles have been used. The impact of transformational leadership, transactional leadership and laissez faire stated in this model on job satisfaction and…

  15. Herpes zoster vaccine awareness among people ≥ 50 years of age and its implications on immunization.

    PubMed

    Javed, Saba; Javed, Fatima; Mays, Rana M; Tyring, Stephen K

    2012-08-15

    Herpes zoster (HZ) vaccine was recently approved for adults ≥ 50 years of age and has been shown to reduce the incidence of zoster, postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), and associated healthcare costs. However, currently HZ immunization is sub-optimal. We examined awareness of HZ and of the HZ vaccine. Information was gathered via a one-page survey given to patients ≥ 50 years of age presenting at the dermatology clinic. From the surveyed population of 1000 individuals, the HZ vaccination rate was 11.9 percent. Vaccination coverage was highest for the ≥ 70 age group (18.3%), followed by age groups 60-69 (8.9%) and 50-59 (1.4%). Individuals with female gender, older age (≥ 70 years), higher level of education (college and beyond), retired employment status, memory of chickenpox, knowledge of shingles, and history of shingles and influenza vaccination in the past year all were more likely to have heard of and have received the HZ vaccine (except female gender, education level, and awareness of shingles). Our study suggests lack of awareness to be a significant factor in non-immunization with zoster vaccine. Targeting adults in younger age groups and minorities would be beneficial towards increasing zoster vaccine awareness and thus preventing herpes zoster and its many complications.

  16. Analysing the outcome of surgery for chronic Achilles tendinopathy over the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wasim S; Malvankar, Seema; Bhamra, Jagmeet S; Pengas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine an association between when the study was performed, the robustness of the study and the outcomes for insertional and non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy surgery. METHODS: We performed a systematic review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines to assess the methodology of studies investigating the outcome of surgery in chronic Achilles tendinopathy over the last 50 years to identify any trends that would account for the variable results. The Coleman Methodology Scores were correlated with the reported percentage success rates and with the publication year to determine any trends using Pearson’s correlation. RESULTS: We identified 62 studies published between 1964 and 2014 reporting on a total of 2923 surgically treated Achilles tendinopathies. The average follow-up time was 40 mo (range 5-204 mo), and the mean reported success rate was 83.5% (range 36%-100%). The Coleman Methodology Scores were highly reproducible (r = 0.99, P < 0.01), with a mean of 40.1 (SD 18.9, range 2-79). We found a negative correlation between reported success rate and overall methodology scores (r = -0.40, P < 0.001), and a positive correlation between year of publication and overall methodology scores (r = 0.46, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: We conclude that although the success rate of surgery for chronic Acilles tendinopathy described in the literature has fallen over the last 50 years, this is probably due to a more rigorous methodology of the studies. PMID:26191496

  17. Level of awareness about osteoporosis among women 50 years and older in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, Homero A

    2010-03-01

    Osteoporosis is an established and well-defined disease that affects millions of people around the world and is a major cause of morbidity. Not much is known about the level of awareness of the condition among the general population in Puerto Rico. The objectives of this study were: 1) to determine the level of awareness and knowledge about osteoporosis among women 50 years and older in Puerto Rico, and 2) to describe the differences in level of awareness and knowledge among women who have been diagnosed with osteoporosis and those who have not. Telephone interviews were conducted among a sample of women 50 years and older who were residents of Puerto Rico during the month on February, 2005. A four-page questionnaire was developed to address the study objectives. Of the total number of women contacted (342), 28 (8%) indicated they did not know anything about osteoporosis and could not answer the remainder of the questionnaire. In spite of widespread awareness about the condition, more than one in ten women responded they did not know what factors contribute to the development of osteoporosis and nearly one in five women did not know the complications associated with osteoporosis. Public education campaigns must address risk factors and the strategies to overcome those that are modifiable in order to prevent the development of osteoporosis and its complications.

  18. Dietary patterns and risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women and men over 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Teresa T.; Feskanich, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We examined the association between predominant dietary patterns and risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women and men over 50 years. Methods We used data from 74,540 women in the Nurses’ Health Study followed between 1980 and 2010, and 35,451 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study followed between 1986 and 2012 for this analysis. Health and lifestyle information was assessed every two years. Diet was assessed approximately every four years with a food frequency questionnaire. Two major dietary patterns were previously derived using principal component analysis. The Prudent pattern is characterized by higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and poultry, and the Western pattern is characterized by higher intakes of red and processed meats, sweets, and refined grains. We computed relative risks (RR) for hip fracture by dietary pattern scores using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusting for potential confounders. Results During follow-up, there were 1891 hip fractures in women and 596 in men. No association was observed between the Prudent or Western pattern and risk of hip fractures in either men or women. We also did not find an association among lean (BMI<25) or overweight (BMI >=25) individuals or among those with higher or lower levels of physical activity. Conclusion Neither the Prudent nor the Western dietary pattern was associated with risk of hip fractures in postmenopausal women or men over 50 years of age. PMID:25731807

  19. The US Navy Tissue Bank: 50 Years on the Cutting Edge.

    PubMed

    Strong, D M

    2000-01-01

    The US Navy Tissue Bank was established in 1949 by Dr. George Hyatt, an orthopaedic surgeon at the Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. The Navy program was the first of its kind in the world and established many of the standards that are followed today. During the 1950s, the identification of appropriate donor criteria for tissue donation, the development of procurement and processing methods, the establishment of a graph registry and documentation and the clinical evaluation of a variety of tissues were pioneered at this facility. Cryopreservation, freeze-drying, irradiation sterilization of tissue, as well as immunological principles of tissue transplantation, were developed during the 50 years of research and development by Navy scientists. Organ preservation, cadaveric bone marrow recovery and immunosuppressive protocols were also developed at the Navy Tissue Bank. The Navy was also instrumental in the establishment of the National Marrow Donor Program and the American Association of Tissue Banks in the US.Although the Navy Tissue Bank has ceased activity after 50 years of excellence, it should be recognized as the first standard setter for the world community of tissue banks.

  20. [Evolution of food science and technology in developing countries during the last 50 years].

    PubMed

    Bressani, R

    1993-01-01

    Malnutrition affects mostly the low-income groups, especially children and pregnant and nursing women despite the advances made in food processing techniques in the last 50 years. Malnutrition is more severe in rural areas of Latin America than big cities. The Institute of Food Science and Technology and the International League for Education and Nutrition of the US in 1976 initiated a study about identifying the actions that could be taken into account for developing countries and donating agencies. The problem of malnutrition in the developing has been evident in these 50 years in terms of deficiencies of protein, iodine, iron, vitamin A, and lack of information concerning proper nutrition during pregnancy and the lactation period. The problem of lack of food was supposed to be solved by the green revolution, which developed cereals with better quality protein using hybrids like triticale (rye and wheat). The population problem with the increase of younger people presents the issue of new jobs and vocations such as professions in nutrition and science. The economic problem is rooted in the dilemma of ¿selling at a low price and buying at a high price¿. The problem of human resources entails the involvement of people in all phases of food production in the developing world.

  1. Predicting fire activity in the US over the next 50 years using new IPCC climate projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Morton, D. C.; Collatz, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Fire is an integral part of the Earth system with both direct and indirect effects on terrestrial ecosystems, the atmosphere, and human societies (Bowman et al. 2009). Climate conditions regulate fire activities through a variety of ways, e.g., influencing the conditions for ignition and fire spread, changing vegetation growth and decay and thus the accumulation of fuels for combustion (Arora and Boer 2005). Our recent study disclosed the burned area (BA) in US is strongly correlated with potential evaporation (PE), a measurement of climatic dryness derived from National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) climate data (Morton et al. 2012). The correlation varies spatially and temporally. With regard to fire of peak fire seasons, Northwestern US, Great Plains and Alaska have the strongest BA/PE relationship. Using the recently released the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) Version 3 (van der Werf et al. 2010), we showed increasing BA in the last decade in most of NCA regions. Longer time series of Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) (Eidenshink et al. 2007) data showed the increasing trends occurred in all NCA regions from 1984 to 2010. This relationship between BA and PE provides us the basis to predict the future fire activities in the projected climate conditions. In this study, we build spatially explicit predictors using the historic PE/BA relationship. PE from 2011 to 2060 is calculated from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) data and the historic PE/BA relationship is then used to estimate BA. This study examines the spatial pattern and temporal dynamics of the future US fires driven by new climate predictions for the next 50 years. Reference: Arora, V.K., & Boer, G.J. (2005). Fire as an interactive component of dynamic vegetation models. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, 110 Bowman, D.M.J.S., Balch, J.K., Artaxo, P., Bond, W.J., Carlson, J.M., Cochrane, M.A., D

  2. Leadership and satisfaction in change commitment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2011-06-01

    Managerial transformational leadership skills may directly influence banking counter staff toward change commitment and improve job satisfaction and service quality, or the influence instead may be mediated by change commitment. For a sample comprised of 246 managers from four large Taiwanese banks, the following path relationships were tested: (1) the association of transformational leadership with change commitment, (2) the association of change commitment with job satisfaction, and (3) the direct or indirect (through the mediation of change commitment) effect of transformational leadership on job satisfaction. Regression was utilized to gain insight into the effects of transformational leadership and change commitment on job satisfaction. Transformational leadership may foster change by providing psychological support to the banking counter staff, enabling them to use their skills to meet the needs of individual customers in response to complex environments.

  3. Effectiveness of group acceptance and commitment therapy for fibromyalgia: a 6-month randomized controlled trial (EFFIGACT study).

    PubMed

    Luciano, Juan V; Guallar, José A; Aguado, Jaume; López-Del-Hoyo, Yolanda; Olivan, Bárbara; Magallón, Rosa; Alda, Marta; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; Gili, Margalida; Garcia-Campayo, Javier

    2014-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been burgeoning interest in the effectiveness of third-generation psychological therapies for managing fibromyalgia (FM) symptoms. The present study examined the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) on functional status as well as the role of pain acceptance as a mediator of treatment outcomes in FM patients. A total of 156 patients with FM were enrolled at primary health care centers in Zaragoza, Spain. The patients were randomly assigned to a group-based form of ACT (GACT), recommended pharmacological treatment (RPT; pregabalin + duloxetine), or wait list (WL). The primary end point was functional status (measured with the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, FIQ). Secondary end points included pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, pain, anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life. The differences between groups were calculated by linear mixed-effects (intention-to-treat approach) and mediational models through path analyses. Overall, GACT was statistically superior to both RPT and WL immediately after treatment, and improvements were maintained at 6months with medium effect sizes in most cases. Immediately after treatment, the number needed to treat for 20% improvement compared to RPT was 2 (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.0), for 50% improvement 46, and for achieving a status of no worse than mild impaired function (FIQ total score <39) also 46. Unexpectedly, 4 of the 5 tested path analyses did not show a mediation effect. Changes in pain acceptance only mediated the relationship between study condition and health-related quality of life. These findings are discussed in relation to previous psychological research on FM treatment.

  4. The effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy bibliotherapy for enhancing the psychological health of Japanese college students living abroad.

    PubMed

    Muto, Takashi; Hayes, Steven C; Jeffcoat, Tami

    2011-06-01

    International students often experience significant psychological distress but empirically tested programs are few. Broadly distributed bibliotherapy may provide a cost-effective approach. About half of the Japanese international students in a western university in the United States (N=70) were randomly assigned to a wait-list or to receive a Japanese translation of a broadly focused acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) self-help book. Although recruited without regard to health status, the sample was highly distressed with nearly 80% exceeding clinical cutoffs on one or more measures. After a 2-months period for the first treatment group to read the book and a 2-month follow up, wait-list participants also received the book. Students receiving the book showed significantly better general mental health at post and follow up. Moderately depressed or stressed, and severely anxious students showed improvement compared to those not receiving the book. These patterns were repeated when the wait-list participants finally received the book. Improvements in primary outcomes were related to how much was learned about an ACT model from the book. Follow-up outcomes were statistically mediated by changes in psychological flexibility, but not vice versa and were moderated by level of initial flexibility. Overall, the data suggest that ACT bibliotherapy improved the mental health and psychological flexibility of Japanese international students.

  5. Natural radioactivity in groundwater and estimates of committed effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Villalba, L; Montero-Cabrera, M E; Manjón-Collado, G; Colmenero-Sujo, L; Rentería-Villalobos, M; Cano-Jiménez, A; Rodríguez-Pineda, A; Dávila-Rangel, I; Quirino-Torres, L; Herrera-Peraza, E F

    2006-01-01

    The activity concentration of 222Rn, 226Ra and total uranium in groundwater samples collected from wells distributed throughout the state of Chihuahua has been measured. The values obtained of total uranium activity concentration in groundwater throughout the state run from <0.03 up to 1.34 Bq l-1. Generally, radium activity concentration was <0.16 Bq l-1, with some exceptions; in spring water of San Diego de Alcalá, in contrast, the value reached approximately 5.3 Bq l-1. Radon activity concentration obtained throughout the state was from 1.0 to 39.8 Bq l-1. A linear correlation between uranium and radon dissolved in groundwater of individual wells was observed near Chihuahua City. Committed effective dose estimates for reference individuals were performed, with results as high as 134 microSv for infants in Aldama city. In Aldama and Chihuahua cities the average and many individual wells showed activity concentration values of uranium exceeding the Mexican norm of drinking water quality.

  6. Commitment, Careers, and Retention in Organizations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    validation of a measure of employee commitment to organizations. This instrument has been used to carry out several studies relating to both the antecedents...validating a measure of employee commitment to work organizations. The instrument, developed by Porter and his colleagues, is called the Organizational...34 Employee Commitment and Organizational Effectiveness." Invited speaker, University of Washington, November 1978. Steers, R. M. "Facilitating

  7. How Do Different Types of Community Commitment Influence Brand Commitment? The Mediation of Brand Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Su, Chen-ting; Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Although previous research indicates that participation in a brand community may foster consumer loyalty to the brand in question, research has seldom examined the mediating effect of community commitment on brand commitment. Drawing from the typologies of organizational commitment, we divide community commitment into three components: continuance community commitment (continuance CC), affective community commitment (affective CC), and normative community commitment (normative CC). We then assess the mediating role of brand attachment in the relationship between these three components and brand commitment. We test the hypotheses using a sample of online mobile phone brand communities in China. The empirical results reveal that brand attachment exerts an indirect (but not mediated) effect on the relationship between continuance CC and brand commitment and on the relationship between normative CC and brand commitment. We also find that it exerts a partial mediating effect on the relationship between affective CC and brand commitment. The findings contribute to the branding literature and have important implications for brand community management. PMID:23768073

  8. Size of coarse woody debris 5 years after girdling and removal treatments in 50-year-old Loblolly PIne Plantations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M. Boyd

    2004-01-01

    PP 108 -113 in: Connor, Kristina F., ed. 2004. Proceedings of the 12th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 594 p. Abstract: In 1996, a study began at Savannah River Site to investigate large-scale replicated forest areas to control coarse woody debris for integrated biodiversity objectives. Research design was a randomized complete block with four treatments replicated in four blocks, resulting in 16 plots. The treatments applied to 50-year-old loblolly pine stands were (1) control, (2) girdling of 25 percent of trees to create catastrophic simulation, (3) annual removal of down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter, and (4) annual removal of both standing and down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter. The study tracks coarse woody debris recruitment and loading, rates of decomposition, and effects on the forest ecosystem.

  9. Commitment to health theory.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Cynthia W

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces commitment to health as a middle-range. Commitment to health (CTH) is derived from Prochaska and DiClemente's (1983) Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change. CTH theory is designed to predict the likelihood of behavior change between the action and maintenance stages of change. Commitment is defined as a freely chosen internal resolve to perform health behaviors, even when encumbered or inconvenienced by difficulties. Health is defined as the optimal level of well-being. Commitment is an independent continuous variable, but it can be categorized into three time-oriented categories: (1) low-level, (2) middle-level, and (3) high-level commitment. The higher the level of commitment, the more likely the individual will adopt long-term behavior change. This article presents the definitions, assumptions, and relational statements of CTH.

  10. The Effects of Perceptions of Organizational Structure on Job Involvement, Job Satisfaction, and Organizational Commitment Among Indian Police Officers.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Eric G; Qureshi, Hanif; Klahm, Charles; Smith, Brad; Frank, James

    2016-03-15

    Successful police organizations rely on involved, satisfied, and committed workers. The concepts of job involvement (i.e., connection with the job), job satisfaction (i.e., affective feeling toward the job), and organizational commitment (i.e., bond with the employing organization) have been shown to significantly affect intentions and behaviors of employees. The current study used multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) regression analysis on survey results from a sample of 827 Indian police officers to explore how perceptions of work environment factors affect officers' job involvement, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Organizational support, formalization (i.e., level of codified written rules and guidelines), promotional opportunities, institutional communication (i.e., salient work information is transmitted), and input into decision-making (i.e., having a voice in the process) significantly influenced the job involvement, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment of Indian police officers. Specifically, in the multivariate analysis, perceptions of formalization and instrumental communication had a positive relationship with job involvement; perceptions of organizational support, promotional opportunities, instrumental communication, and input into decision-making had positive associations with job satisfaction; and perceptions of organizational support, formalization, promotional opportunities, instrumental communication, and input into decision-making had positive relationships with organizational commitment.

  11. Employee self-enhancement motives and job performance behaviors: investigating the moderating effects of employee role ambiguity and managerial perceptions of employee commitment.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seokhwa; Takeuchi, Riki; Liu, Wei

    2007-05-01

    This study examined the effects of employee self-enhancement motives on job performance behaviors (organizational citizenship behaviors and task performance) and the value of these behaviors to them. The authors propose that employees display job performance behaviors in part to enhance their self-image, especially when their role is not clearly defined. They further argue that the effects of these behaviors on managerial reward recommendation decisions should be stronger when managers believe the employees to be more committed. The results from a sample of 84 working students indicate that role ambiguity moderated the effects of self-enhancement motives on job performance behaviors and that managerial perceptions of an employee's commitment moderated the effects of those organizational citizenship behaviors that are aimed at other individuals on managers' reward allocation decisions.

  12. The effect of over-commitment and reward on trapezius muscle activity and shoulder, head, neck, and torso postures during computer use in the field

    PubMed Central

    Bruno Garza, Jennifer L.; Eijckelhof, Belinda H.W.; Huysmans, Maaike A.; Catalano, Paul J.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Johnson, Peter W.; van Dieen, Jaap H.; van der Beek, Allard J.; Dennerlein, Jack T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Because of reported associations of psychosocial factors and computer related musculoskeletal symptoms, we investigated the effects of a workplace psychosocial factor, reward, in the presence of over-commitment, on trapezius muscle activity and shoulder, head, neck, and torso postures during computer use. Methods We measured 120 office workers across four groups (lowest/highest reward/over-commitment), performing their own computer work at their own workstations over a 2 hour period. Results Median trapezius muscle activity (p=0.04) and median neck flexion (p=0.03) were largest for participants reporting simultaneously low reward and high over-commitment. No differences were observed for other muscle activities or postures. Conclusions These data suggest that the interaction of reward and over-commitment can affect upper extremity muscle activity and postures during computer use in the real work environment. This finding aligns with the hypothesized biomechanical pathway connecting workplace psychosocial factors and musculoskeletal symptoms of the neck and shoulder. PMID:23818000

  13. Cardiomyopathy Induced by Pulmonary Sequestration in a 50-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Chatelain, Shaun; Comp, Robert A.; Grace, R. Randal

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old black man presented at the emergency department with midsternal, nonradiating chest pressure and chronic dyspnea on exertion. Four years before the current admission, he had been diagnosed with nonischemic cardiomyopathy at another facility. After our complete evaluation, we suspected that his symptoms arose from left-to-left shunting in association with pulmonary sequestration, a congenital malformation. Our preliminary diagnosis of secondary dilated cardiomyopathy was confirmed by normalization of the patient's ventricular size and function after lobectomy. To our knowledge, this patient is the oldest on record to present with cardiomyopathy consequent to pulmonary sequestration. His case is highly unusual because of his age and the rapid resolution of his symptoms after lobectomy. We believe that pulmonary sequestration should be included in the differential diagnosis of dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:25873803

  14. Eysenck, Strupp, and 50 years of psychotherapy research: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Barlow, David H; Boswell, James F; Thompson-Hollands, Johanna

    2013-03-01

    In this article, we review the status of psychotherapy research at the time of the founding of the journal Psychotherapy, and trace its history over the past 50 years, spanning the career of the first author. We trace this history in the context of the development of treatments for panic disorder and agoraphobia emanating from our research program. In so doing, we discuss the early visions of Strupp and Eysenck and the realization of many of their own goals for psychotherapy research. We conclude with a view toward the future based on cumulative knowledge of psychotherapy and psychopathology and, in the context of that knowledge, the type of ideal research programs that will be required.

  15. Driving Success over the Past 50 Years-The Faculty in Academic Veterinary Medicine.

    PubMed

    Buss, Daryl D

    2015-01-01

    The faculty at member schools and colleges of the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) are critical for continued progress in veterinary medicine. The success of those faculty members over the past 50 years has positioned veterinary medicine to engage an ever-widening array of opportunities, responsibilities, and societal needs. Yet the array of skills and accomplishments of faculty in academic veterinary medicine are not always visible to the public, or even within our profession. The quality and the wide range of their scholarship are reflected, in part, through the according of national and international awards and honors from organizations relevant to their particular areas of expertise. The goal of this study was to illustrate the breadth of expertise and the quality of the faculty at 34 schools/colleges of veterinary medicine by examining the diversity of organizations that have recognized excellence in faculty achievements through a variety of awards.

  16. A review of 50 years of aerodynamic research with NACA/NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. Leroy

    1994-01-01

    Continuous improvements in flight systems have occurred over the past 50 years due, in part, to continuous improvements in aerodynamic research techniques and capabilities. This paper traces that research from the first-hand perspective of the author who, beginning in 1944, has taken part in the NACA/NASA aerodynamic research effort through studies in low-speed wind tunnels, high-speed subsonic tunnels, transonic tunnels, supersonic tunnels, and hypersonic tunnels. New problems were found as systems advanced from low-speed propeller-driven designs to more sophisticated high-speed jet- and rocket-propelled designs. The paper reviews some of these problems and reflects on some of the solutions that have been developed in the course of various aerodynamic research programs in the past. Some of the factors, both technical and nontechnical, that have influenced the aerodynamic design, research, and development of various flight systems will be mentioned.

  17. Revista de Saúde Pública: 50 years disseminating the knowledge in nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Sichieri, Rosely; Pereira, Rosangela A

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This work describes and comments on articles in the area of Public Health Nutrition published in Revista de Saúde Pública (RSP – Public Health Journal) from 1967 to 2016. We searched in the PubMed database restricted to the periodical “Revista de Saúde Pública” and using terms related to key topics in the area of Public Health Nutrition. We retrieved 742 articles and, after exclusion of duplicates and articles unrelated to the subject, we analyzed 441 articles, grouped according to subject: dental caries, anemia, hypovitaminosis A, macro/micronutrients, malnutrition, nutritional assessment, overweight/obesity, food consumption, low birthweight, and breastfeeding. We observed significant increase in the number of articles published and diversification of subjects addressed over the 50 years, representing the consistent development of the scientific field of Nutrition in Brazil. Since its inception, RSP has played an important role in the dissemination of knowledge about the main nutritional issues in Brazil. PMID:28099649

  18. The Last 50 Years: Mismeasurement and Mismanagement Are Impeding Scientific Research

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    In the last 50 years, there have been many changes to the substance, conduct, and style of research. Many of these changes have proved disastrous to the life of scientists and to science itself. As a consequence, the near-romantic spirit of adventure and exploration that inspired young scientists of my own and earlier generations has become tarnished. Now, many of us feel beleaguered by bureaucrats and by politicians: they affect our lives profoundly, apparently without an understanding of the way discoveries are made or of the nature of science itself. The core purposes of universities, teaching and research, are being eroded by excessive administration. The number and locations of our publications are counted up like beans and the outcomes are used to rank us, one against another; a process of evaluation that has recast the purposes of publication. Applying for grants takes far too much time from a young scientist's life. PMID:26970645

  19. The Last 50 Years: Mismeasurement and Mismanagement Are Impeding Scientific Research.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    In the last 50 years, there have been many changes to the substance, conduct, and style of research. Many of these changes have proved disastrous to the life of scientists and to science itself. As a consequence, the near-romantic spirit of adventure and exploration that inspired young scientists of my own and earlier generations has become tarnished. Now, many of us feel beleaguered by bureaucrats and by politicians: they affect our lives profoundly, apparently without an understanding of the way discoveries are made or of the nature of science itself. The core purposes of universities, teaching and research, are being eroded by excessive administration. The number and locations of our publications are counted up like beans and the outcomes are used to rank us, one against another; a process of evaluation that has recast the purposes of publication. Applying for grants takes far too much time from a young scientist's life.

  20. The Bacterial Phosphotransferase System: New frontiers 50 years after its discovery

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In 1964, Kundig, Ghosh and Roseman reported the discovery of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), which they subsequently proposed might catalyze sugar transport as well as sugar phosphorylation. What we have learned in the past 50 years, since its discovery, is that in addition to these primary functions, the PTS serves as a complex protein kinase system that regulates a wide variety of transport, metabolic and mutagenic processes as well as the expression of numerous genes. Recent operon- and genome-sequencing projects have revealed novel PTS protein-encoding genes, many of which have yet to be functionally defined. The current picture of the PTS is that of a complex system with ramifications in all aspects of cellular physiology. Moreover, its mosaic evolutionary history is unusual and intriguing. The PTS can be considered to serve many prokaryotes in capacities of communication and coordination as do the nervous systems of animals. PMID:26159069

  1. Overview of inflammatory bowel disease in Australia in the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter R

    2009-10-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the intestine, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease are now very common in Australia and remain major challenges for clinicians. Australian (and New Zealand) clinicians and scientists have made considerable contributions to our current understanding of these diseases over the last 50 years, including pathogenesis (such as the 'butyrate hypothesis', 'endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress', and the identification of the peptide sequences that incite celiac disease), true population epidemiology (albeit in New Zealand), precise clinical observation, new investigative tools, innovative new potential therapies, influential clinical drug trials (such as triple antibiotics for Crohn's disease), and a dietary approach with efficacy for functional gut symptoms (the low FODMAP diet). Underpinning the success has been clinical excellence and adaptation of clinicians to the changing landscape of disease severity and therapeutic options. The future is indeed bright if such trends continue.

  2. Radioactive waste policy and legislation: 50 years on from the 1960 Act.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Steve

    2011-09-01

    Over the past 50 years a comprehensive regulatory framework for radioactive substances in the UK has been progressively introduced, important initial milestones being the white paper Cmnd 884 and the Radioactive Substances Act 1960. During the 1970s and 1980s there were a succession of enquiries and white papers which developed from the growing awareness of the problems of the nuclear waste legacy. This was followed by a comprehensive policy white paper in 1995: Cm 2919. In 1990, 1993, 1995 and 2005 some aspects of the 1960 Act were updated. The most recent, and most radical, modernisation took place in 2010, when the Act was incorporated into the Environmental Permitting Regulations, in England and Wales. Currently a major review of the exemption orders and exclusion criteria under the radioactive substances legislation is close to completion, which will complete the current phase of modernisation of the regulatory framework.

  3. How to renovate a 50-year-old wastewater treating plant: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, M.L.

    1996-02-01

    Updating an existing wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to meet current federal regulations such as Benzene NESHAP is a challenge for design, construction and scheduling. In this case history, the project team developed and implemented equipment improvements and revised operating procedures for a refinery`s 50-year-old WWTP without interrupting operations. Because it was cost-prohibitive to force downtime or a slow down in refining production, Amoco`s design team had to cover the API sump with as little disruption to operations as possible. Sealing WWPT involved installing vapor-control methods. The project team used value-based engineering and creative thinking to ``seal`` the equalization and storm-surge tanks, DAF flocculation and flotation zones, etc. Modifications and results from these modifications are described.

  4. Biogeochemical control of marine productivity in the Mediterranean Sea during the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Diego; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Piroddi, Chiara; Stips, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of biogeochemical variables derived from a coupled 3-D model of the Mediterranean Sea are evaluated for the last 50 years (1960–2010) against independent data on fisheries catch per unit effort (CPUE) for the same time period. Concordant patterns are found in the time series of all of the biological variables (from the model and from fisheries statistics), with low values at the beginning of the series, a later increase, with maximum levels reached at the end of the 1990s, and a posterior stabilization. Spectral analysis of the annual biological time series reveals coincident low-frequency signals in all of them. The first, more energetic signal peaks around the year 2000, while the second, less energetic signal peaks near 1982. Almost identical low-frequency signals are found in the nutrient loads of the rivers and in the integrated nutrient levels in the surface marine ecosystem. Nitrate concentration shows a maximum level in 1998, with a later stabilization to present-day values, coincident with the first low-frequency signal found in the biological series. Phosphate shows maximum concentrations around 1982 and a posterior sharp decline, in concordance with the second low-frequency signal observed in the biological series. That result seems to indicate that the control of marine productivity (plankton to fish) in the Mediterranean is principally mediated through bottom-up processes that could be traced back to the characteristics of riverine discharges. The high sensitivity of CPUE time series to environmental conditions might be another indicator of the overexploitation of this marine ecosystem. Key Points Biogeochemical evolution of the Mediterranean over the past 50 years River nutrient loads drive primary and secondary productions Strong link between low trophic levels and fisheries PMID:26180286

  5. Social-Economic Status and Cognitive Performance among Chinese Aged 50 Years and Older

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Guo, Yanfei; Zheng, Yang; Ma, Wenjun; Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath; Wang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Background Numerous population-based studies have suggested that socio-economic status (SES) is associated with cognitive performance, but few nationally representative epidemiological studies on cognitive performance with a large sample of older adults are available in China. And many studies explore the factors associated with cognitive performance, mainly focusing on individual level and more rarely on multiple levels that include the individual and community. Methods This study uses SAGE-China Wave 1 data which consisted of 13,157 adults aged 50 years and older to explore socioeconomic inequalities in the cognitive performance from a multilevel perspective (individual and community levels). The overall cognition score was based on the seven separate components of the cognition tests, including the four verbal recall trials, the verbal fluency test, the forward digit span test and the backward digit span test. Factor analysis was applied to evaluate and generate a single overall score. A two-level hierarchical linear model was used to evaluate the association between SES at these two levels and the overall cognition score adjusted for age, sex and marital status. Results At individual level, years of education was significantly associated with overall cognition score for both urban and rural dwellers. At the community level, a positive association was obtained between median household income and median years of education and overall cognition score among urban participants. Conclusion A significant association between SES at both individual-level and community-level (only for urban area) and cognitive performance were found in this study of a national sample of 13,157 Chinese aged 50 years and older, even after adjusting for demographic characteristics. Identifying community-based SES variables that are associated with cognitive performance in the older population provides further evidence for the need to address community characteristics associated with

  6. Stabilization Wedges and the Management of Global Carbon for the next 50 years

    ScienceCinema

    Socolow, Robert [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2016-07-12

    More than 40 years after receiving a Ph.D. in physics, I am still working on problems where conservation laws matter. In particular, for the problems I work on now, the conservation of the carbon atom matters. I will tell the saga of an annual flow of 8 billion tons of carbon associated with the global extraction of fossil fuels from underground. Until recently, it was taken for granted that virtually all of this carbon will move within weeks through engines of various kinds and then into the atmosphere. For compelling environmental reasons, I and many others are challenging this complacent view, asking whether the carbon might wisely be directed elsewhere. To frame this and similar discussions, Steve Pacala and I introduced the 'stabilization wedge' in 2004 as a useful unit for discussing climate stabilization. Updating the definition, a wedge is the reduction of CO2 emissions by one billion tons of carbon per year in 2057, achieved by any strategy generated as a result of deliberate attention to global carbon. Each strategy uses already commercialized technology, generally at much larger scale than today. Implementing seven wedges should enable the world to achieve the interim goal of emitting no more CO2 globally in 2057 than today. This would place humanity, approximately, on a path to stabilizing CO2 at less than double the pre-industrial concentration, and it would put those at the helm in the following 50 years in a position to drive CO2 emissions to a net of zero in the following 50 years. Arguably, the tasks of the two half-centuries are comparably difficult.

  7. Alzheimer Lesions in the Autopsied Brains of People 30 to 50 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Pletnikova, Olga; Rudow, Gay L.; Hyde, Thomas M.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Ali, Sabeen Z.; Bharadwaj, Rahul; Gangadeen, Salina; Crain, Barbara J.; Fowler, David R.; Rubio, Ana I.; Troncoso, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that asymptomatic Alzheimer disease lesions may appear before 50 years of age. Background Alzheimer disease has an asymptomatic stage during which people are cognitively intact despite having substantial pathologic changes in the brain. While this asymptomatic stage is common in older people, how early in life it may develop has been unknown. Methods We microscopically examined the postmortem brains of 154 people aged 30-39 years (n = 59) and 40-50 years (n = 95) for specific Alzheimer lesions: beta-amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and tau-positive neurites. We genotyped DNA samples for the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). Results We found beta-amyloid lesions in 13 brains, all of them from people aged 40 to 49 with no history of dementia. These plaques were of the diffuse type only and appeared throughout the neocortex. Among these 13 brains, 5 had very subtle tau lesions in the entorhinal cortex and/or hippocampus. All individuals with beta-amyloid deposits carried 1 or 2 APOE4 alleles. Among the individuals aged 40 to 50 with genotype APOE3/4, 10 (36%) had beta-amyloid deposits but 18 (64%) had none. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that beta-amyloid deposits in the cerebral cortex appear as early as 40 years of age in APOE4 carriers, suggesting that these lesions may constitute a very early stage of Alzheimer disease. Future preventive and therapeutic measures for this disease may have to be stratified by risk factors like APOE genotype and target people in their 40s or even earlier. PMID:26413742

  8. Investigations at regional scales of reconstruct sea level variability over the past 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Meyssignac, B.; Llovel, W.; Cazenave, A. A.; Rogel, P.

    2010-12-01

    Sea level rise is a major consequence of global warming, which threatens many low-lying, highly populated coastal regions of the world. In such regions, sea level rise amplifies other stresses due to natural phenomena (e.g., sediment load-induced ground subsidence in deltaic areas, vertical ground motions due to tectonics, volcanism and post-glacial rebound, etc.) or human activities (e.g., ground subsidence due to ground water pumping and/or oil extraction, urbanisation, etc.). Observations for the recent decades from tide gauges and satellite altimetry show that sea level rise is far from being geographically uniform. Here we present an analysis of decadal / multi-decadal sea level variations in a number of selected regions: Tropical Pacific, Indian Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region. For that purpose, we use a reconstruction of past sea level -last 50 years- based on the joint statistical analysis of tide gauge records and gridded sea level from an ocean circulation model. We highlight the sea level trends over the past 50 years in each region. Comparison between reconstructed sea-level trends with tide gauge records at sites not included in the reconstruction shows general good agreement, suggesting that regional trend patterns infer from the reconstruction are realistic (in addition, reconstructed sea-level agrees well with altimeter measurements since 1993). We find above-global average sea level rise since 1950 at several islands in the Eastern Tropical Pacific (Funafuti, Samoa, Kiribati, Cook Islands). Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analyses are performed for each region to describe accurately the spatio-temporal interannual variability. We also compute spatial trend patterns in thermal expansion to determine which part of the observed regional sea level variability can be attributed to change in ocean temperature.

  9. Clinical and radiological outcome of the cemented Contemporary acetabular component in patients < 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, M W J L; Timmer, C; Rijnen, W H C; Gardeniers, J W M; Schreurs, B W

    2013-12-01

    Despite the worldwide usage of the cemented Contemporary acetabular component (Stryker), no published data are available regarding its use in patients aged < 50 years. We undertook a mid- to long-term follow-up study, including all consecutive patients aged < 50 years who underwent a primary total hip replacement using the Contemporary acetabular component with the Exeter cemented stem between January 1999 and January 2006. There were 152 hips in 126 patients, 61 men and 65 women, mean age at surgery 37.6 years (16 to 49 yrs). One patient was lost to follow-up. Mean clinical follow-up of all implants was 7.6 years (0.9 to 12.0). All clinical questionnaire scores, including Harris hip score, Oxford hip score and several visual analogue scales, were found to have improved. The eight year survivorship of all acetabular components for the endpoints revision for any reason or revision for aseptic loosening was 94.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 89.2 to 97.2) and 96.4% (95% CI 91.6 to 98.5), respectively. Radiological follow-up was complete for 146 implants. The eight year survival for the endpoint radiological loosening was 93.1% (95% CI 86.2 to 96.6). Three surviving implants were considered radiologically loose but were asymptomatic. The presence of acetabular osteolysis (n = 17, 11.8%) and radiolucent lines (n = 20, 13.9%) in the 144 surviving cups indicates a need for continued observation in the second decade of follow-up in order to observe their influence on long-term survival. The clinical and radiological data resulting in a ten-year survival rate > 90% in young patients support the use of the Contemporary acetabular component in this specific patient group.

  10. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages in Osaka Bay, southwestern Japan: Faunal changes over the last 50 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tsujimoto, Akira; Nomura, Ritsuo; Yasuhara, Moriaki; Yoshikawa, Shusaku

    2006-01-01

    Live benthic foraminiferal assemblages from surface sediment in Osaka Bay collected in 1999 were analyzed to characterize the distribution of the modern foraminiferal assemblages. Foraminiferal assemblages were compared with those of previous studies to document environmental changes in Osaka Bay over the past 50 years. Sixty-one species of foraminifera belonging to 37 genera were recognized from the 1999 surface sediment samples. An agglutinated assemblage containing Trochammina hadai and Eggerella advena is dominant in the inner part of the bay and is related to eutrophication. The foraminiferal assemblage in areas deeper than about 20 m is composed of Eggerella advena, Ammonia beccarii forma A, and Pseudorotalia gaimardii. This assemblage may be influenced by the large clockwise Okinose Circulation Current which extends throughout the western bay. Foraminiferal assemblages in Osaka Bay have changed dramatically during the last 50 years. The Trochammina hadai-Eggerella advena assemblage became established in the inner part of the bay, reflecting eutrophication that progressed from the 1960s through the 1970s. This assemblage became dominant in 1983, and typically dominated the inner part of the bay. From 1983 to 1999, however, the abundance of taxa belonging to this assemblage decreased greatly following implementation of 1973 Osaka City bylaws that restricted wastewater discharge. Changes in benthic assemblages such as the decrease of Ammonia beccarii forma A and increase of Eggerella advena have occurred in response to decreased incidence of red tides, and floral change in the species that cause these tides. The results of this study demonstrate that the abundance and distribution of benthic foraminifers in Osaka Bay are intimately related to environmental changes related to the urbanization of coastal areas. ?? by the Palaeontological Society of Japan.

  11. Long-term variation analysis of a tropical river's annual streamflow regime over a 50-year period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyam, Mohammed; Othman, Faridah

    2015-07-01

    Studying the long-term changes of streamflow is an important tool for enhancing water resource and river system planning, design, and management. The aim of this work is to identify the long-term variations in annual streamflow regime over a 50-year period from 1961 to 2010 in the Selangor River, which is one of the main tropical rivers in Malaysia. Initially, the data underwent preliminary independence, normality, and homogeneity testing using the Pearson correlation coefficient and Shapiro-Wilk and Pettitt's tests, respectively. The work includes a study and analysis of the changes through nine variables describing the annual streamflow and variations in the yearly duration of high and low streamflows. The analyses were conducted via two time scales: yearly and sub-periodic. The sub-periods were obtained by segmenting the 50 years into seven sub-periods by two techniques, namely the change-point test and direct method. Even though analysis revealed nearly negligible changes in mean annual flow over the study period, the maximum annual flow generally increased while the minimum annual flow significantly decreased with respect to time. It was also observed that the variables describing the dispersion in streamflow continually increased with respect to time. An obvious increase was detected in the yearly duration of danger level of streamflow, a slight increase was noted in the yearly duration of warning and alert levels, and a slight decrease in the yearly duration of low streamflow was found. The perceived changes validate the existence of long-term changes in annual streamflow regime, which increase the probability of floods and droughts occurring in future. In light of the results, attention should be drawn to developing water resource management and flood protection plans in order to avert the harmful effects potentially resulting from the expected changes in annual streamflow regime.

  12. Assessment of Committed Effective Dose due to consumption of Red Sea coral reef fishes collected from the local market (Sudan).

    PubMed

    Hassona, Rifaat K; Sam, A K; Osman, O I; Sirelkhatim, D A; LaRosa, J

    2008-04-15

    An assessment of Committed Effective Dose (CED) due to consumption of Red Sea fish containing (210)Po and (137)Cs was performed for 23 different marine fish samples collected from the local market at Port Sudan. The fish were classified according to their feeding habits into three categories: carnivores, herbivores, and omnivores. Measured activity concentrations of (210)Po were found in the ranges 0.25-6.42 (carnivores), 0.7-5 (omnivores) and 1.5-3.8 (herbivores) Bq/kg fresh weight. In the same study, activity concentrations of Cs-137 were determined to be in the ranges 0.1-0.46 (carnivores), 0.09-0.35 (omnivores) and 0.09-0.32 (herbivores) Bq/kg fresh weight, which were several times lower than those of (210)Po. Appropriate conversion factors were used to derive the CED, which was found to be 0.012, 0.01 and 0.01 (microSv/yr) in carnivores, omnivores and herbivores, respectively, for (137)Cs. This contributes about 0.4% of the total dose exclusively by ingestion of fish. For (210)Po, it was found to be 3.47, 4.81 and 4.14 (microSv/yr) in carnivores, omnivores and herbivores, respectively, which represents 99.6% of the total dose (exclusively by ingestion of fish). The results of CED calculations suggest that the dose received by the Sudanese population from the consumption of marine fish is rather small and that the contribution of (137)Cs is negligible compared to (210)Po.

  13. Organizational Citizenship Behavior at Catholic Institutions of Higher Education: Effects of Organizational Commitment, Interpersonal- and System-Level Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Justin Ashby

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct an exploratory investigation of OCB, trust, and commitment among faculty and staff within Catholic IHEs. Faculty and staff from two Catholic IHEs were the focus of the study. Twenty-five schools were randomly selected from the 50 largest Catholic IHEs by undergraduate enrollment, identified from the 2012…

  14. A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Anxiety and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Evan M.; Herbert, James D.; Moitra, Ethan; Yeomans, Peter D.; Geller, Pamela A.

    2007-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has a small but growing database of support. One hundred and one heterogeneous outpatients reporting moderate to severe levels of anxiety or depression were randomly assigned to traditional cognitive therapy (CT) or to ACT. To maximize external validity, the authors utilized very minimal exclusion criteria.…

  15. The Effect of School Bureaucracy on the Relationship between Principals' Leadership Practices and Teacher Commitment in Malaysia Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Teoh Hong; Kannan, Sathiamoorthy; Piaw, Chua Yan

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of this research paper was to ascertain the relationship between principal leadership practices and teacher commitment. The study was conducted using quantitative survey questionnaire to 384 secondary school teachers, ranging from band 1 to band 6 in Malaysia using multi stage stratified cluster random sampling. This study was using…

  16. The Effect of Nurse-Physician Collaboration on Job Satisfaction, Team Commitment, and Turnover Intention in Nurses.

    PubMed

    Galletta, Maura; Portoghese, Igor; Carta, Mauro Giovanni; D'Aloja, Ernesto; Campagna, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    Voluntary turnover in nursing can lead to nursing shortages that affect both individuals and the entire hospital unit. We investigated the relationship between group- and individual-level variables by examining the association of nurses' job satisfaction and team commitment at the individual level, and nurse-physician collaboration at the group level, with individuals' intention to leave the unit at the individual level. A self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,024 nurses on 72 units in 3 Italian hospitals. At the individual level, affective commitment partially mediated the relationship between job satisfaction and nursing turnover intention. Moreover, a cross-level interaction was found. Nurses with high levels of job satisfaction showed high levels of identification with their team, and this relationship was stronger when the group perception of nurse-physician collaboration was high. Results suggested that managerial strategies to promote nurse-physician collaboration may be important to increase nurses' affective commitment to the team. At the individual level, job satisfaction and team affective commitment are important factors for retaining staff, and at the group level, good work collaboration with physicians is instrumental in developing nurses' affective identification with the team. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Learning Organization Perceptions in Elementary Education in Terms of Teachers and the Effect of Learning Organization on Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdem, Mustafa; Ucar, Ibrahim Halil

    2013-01-01

    In this study, it was tried to determine to what degree the learning organization predicted organizational commitment according to primary school teachers' perceptions. Descriptive survey model was used in this study and 429 teachers were chosen among 2387 teachers who worked in primary schools in Van in 2010-2011 education years and were included…

  18. Modified Methodology for Projecting Coastal Louisiana Land Changes over the Next 50 Years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartley, Steve B.

    2009-01-01

    The coastal Louisiana landscape is continually undergoing geomorphologic changes (in particular, land loss); however, after the 2005 hurricane season, the changes were intensified because of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The amount of land loss caused by the 2005 hurricane season was 42 percent (562 km2) of the total land loss (1,329 km2) that was projected for the next 50 years in the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA), Louisiana Ecosystem Restoration Study. The purpose of this study is to provide information on potential changes to coastal Louisiana by using a revised LCA study methodology. In the revised methodology, we used classified Landsat TM satellite imagery from 1990, 2001, 2004, and 2006 to calculate the 'background' or ambient land-water change rates but divided the Louisiana coastal area differently on the basis of (1) geographic regions ('subprovinces') and (2) specific homogeneous habitat types. Defining polygons by subprovinces (1, Pontchartrain Basin; 2, Barataria Basin; 3, Vermilion/Terrebonne Basins; and 4, the Chenier Plain area) allows for a specific erosion rate to be applied to that area. Further subdividing the provinces by habitat type allows for specific erosion rates for a particular vegetation type to be applied. Our modified methodology resulted in 24 polygons rather than the 183 that were used in the LCA study; further, actively managed areas and the CWPPRA areas were not masked out and dealt with separately as in the LCA study. This revised methodology assumes that erosion rates for habitat types by subprovince are under the influence of similar environmental conditions (sediment depletion, subsidence, and saltwater intrusion). Background change rate for three time periods (1990-2001, 1990-2004, and 1990-2006) were calculated by taking the difference in water or land among each time period and dividing it by the time interval. This calculation gives an annual change rate for each polygon per time period. Change rates for each time period

  19. Spatial Analysis of Monthly and Annual Streamflow Trends In Huaihe Basin During The Past 50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Ruan, X.

    2012-12-01

    In the past 50 years, global climate change and increasingly extensive human activities have greatly altered the water cycle, inducing a series of environmental problems in Huaihe basin. The paper aims at examining the spatial and temporal variation characteristics of runoff, forecasting future trends and offering some meaningful and constructive suggestions for rational management and allocation of water resources in Huaihe basin. On the basis of the streamflow observed at 20 hydrological stations of the nine rivers belong to Huaihe basin for the period 1956-2008, the long-term monotonic trend and abrupt changes in climate change and human activities have been investigated. The Mann-Kendall statistic test is a rank-based, non-parametric approach and has been widely used to estimate the significance of long-term trends in the streamflow time series. So, the Mann-Kendall trend test and R/S method were applied to study changes in annual and seasonal streamflow. The linear regression was compared with the results obtained by using the Mann-Kendall trend test. The abrupt changes have been investigated in terms of a 5 year moving averaged annual series, using the moving t-test (MTT) method. Results suggested that the annual runoff showed a significantly decreasing trend, and more prominent at the lower reaches than that at the upper reaches over the past 50 years. The overall picture was that trends of decreased streamflow dominate annual values and the spring and autumn seasons, and trends identified in summer and winter flows were increasing. And then, the decreasing trend of runoff would be more significant in the future. The sharp points of runoff were found to be in the 1970s. The characteristics of annual runoff in the Huaihe basin were predominantly affected by the uncertainty of river volume in the headstream and increasingly extensive human activities at the headstream and mainstream as well as climate change. For the sake of sustainable social and economic

  20. Tertiary Evaluation of the Committed Effective Dose of Emergency Workers That Responded to the Fukushima Daiichi NPP Accident.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Shojiro

    2017-02-06

    In January 2014, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) learned that the committed effective dose (CED) for nine emergency workers at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident had been assessed by a method other than the standard assessment methods, established by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) in a secondary evaluation conducted in July 2013. The MHLW requested that the TEPCO and primary contractors review all CED data for 6,245 workers who engaged in emergency work in March and April 2011 except those previously reviewed in the 2013 secondary evaluation. This tertiary evaluation revealed that the recorded CED for 1,536 workers had more than 0.1 mSv discrepancy with the CED evaluated previously. The MHLW requested that TEPCO and primary contractors revise CED data for 142 workers whose CED was 2 mSv or greater that required a CED revision of 1 mSv or greater. The average CED revision was 5.86 mSv. The revised effective dose ranged from 2.17 mSv to 180.10 mSv. In addition, the number of workers whose CED exceeded 100 mSv increased by one. New issues addressed during the tertiary evaluation included the following: a) setting of calibration coefficients to convert the CED value from whole body counters equipped with NaI scintillator (WBC(NaI)) to a CED value from WBCs with Ge semiconductor detector (WBC (Ge); b) estimation methods for the cases where (131)I was not detectable by WBC (NaI) and where (137)Cs was not detectable but (134)Cs was detected; c) effects of stable iodine (KI) tablets to block the uptake of (131)I by thyroid gland; and d) complications in determining additional doses during stand-by in the seismically isolated building. To prevent the future use of non-uniform CED assessment methods in the dose assessment for workers, the MHLW issued administrative guidance documents to TEPCO and primary contractors on March 25, 2014.

  1. Diagnostic imaging over the last 50 years: research and development in medical imaging science and technology.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kunio

    2006-07-07

    Over the last 50 years, diagnostic imaging has grown from a state of infancy to a high level of maturity. Many new imaging modalities have been developed. However, modern medical imaging includes not only image production but also image processing, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), image recording and storage, and image transmission, most of which are included in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The content of this paper includes a short review of research and development in medical imaging science and technology, which covers (a) diagnostic imaging in the 1950s, (b) the importance of image quality and diagnostic performance, (c) MTF, Wiener spectrum, NEQ and DQE, (d) ROC analysis, (e) analogue imaging systems, (f) digital imaging systems, (g) image processing, (h) computer-aided diagnosis, (i) PACS, (j) 3D imaging and (k) future directions. Although some of the modalities are already very sophisticated, further improvements will be made in image quality for MRI, ultrasound and molecular imaging. The infrastructure of PACS is likely to be improved further in terms of its reliability, speed and capacity. However, CAD is currently still in its infancy, and is likely to be a subject of research for a long time.

  2. The ideal free pike: 50 years of fitness-maximizing dispersal in Windermere.

    PubMed

    Haugen, Thrond O; Winfield, Ian J; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn; Fletcher, Janice M; James, J Ben; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2006-12-07

    The ideal free distribution (IFD) theory is one of the most influential theories in evolutionary ecology. It predicts how animals ought to distribute themselves within a heterogeneous habitat in order to maximize lifetime fitness. We test the population level consequence of the IFD theory using 40-year worth data on pike (Esox lucius) living in a natural lake divided into two basins. We do so by employing empirically derived density-dependent survival, dispersal and fecundity functions in the estimation of basin-specific density-dependent fitness surfaces. The intersection of the fitness surfaces for the two basins is used for deriving expected spatial distributions of pike. Comparing the derived expected spatial distributions with 50 years data of the actual spatial distribution demonstrated that pike is ideal free distributed within the lake. In general, there was a net migration from the less productive north basin to the more productive south basin. However, a pike density-manipulation experiment imposing shifting pike density gradients between the two basins managed to switch the net migration direction and hence clearly demonstrated that the Windermere pike choose their habitat in an ideal free manner. Demonstration of ideal free habitat selection on an operational field scale like this has never been undertaken before.

  3. How the World Survived the Population Bomb: Lessons From 50 Years of Extraordinary Demographic History

    PubMed Central

    Lam, David

    2012-01-01

    The world population will reach 7 billion in late 2011, a demographic milestone that is causing renewed attention to the challenges caused by population growth. This article looks at the last 50 years of demographic change, one of the most extraordinary periods in demographic history. During this period, world population grew at rates that have never been seen before and will almost surely never be seen again. There were many concerns about the potential impact of rapid population growth in the 1960s, including mass starvation in countries such as India, depletion of nonrenewable resources, and increased poverty in low-income countries. The actual experience was very different. World food production increased faster than world population in every decade since the 1960s, resource prices fell during most of the period, and poverty declined significantly in much of the developing world. The article considers the economic and demographic explanations for the surprising successes of this important period in demographic history. It also looks at regions that have been less successful, especially Africa, and at the lessons for dealing with the important challenges that still remain. PMID:22005884

  4. 50 Years of Electronic Check Out and Launch Systems at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Stanley O.

    2007-01-01

    When NASA was created in 1958 one of the elements incorporated into this new agency was the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Huntsville, AL and its subordinate Missile Firing Laboratory (MFL) in Cape Canaveral. Under NASA, the MFL became the Launch Operations Directorate of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, but expanding operations in the build up to Apollo dictated that it be given the status of a full fledged Center in July, 1 962[ 1]. The next year it was renamed the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KS C) after the president whose vision transformed its first decade of operation. The ABMA was under the technical leadership of Dr. Werner Von Braun. The MEL was run by his deputy Dr. Kurt Debus, an electrical engineer whose experience in the field began in the early days of V-2 testing in war time Germany. In 1952 a group led by Debus arrived in Cape Canaveral to begin test launches of the new Redstone missile [2]. During the 50's, The MFL built several launch complexes and tested the Redstone, Jupiter and Jupiter C missiles. This small experienced team of engineers and technicians formed the seed from which has grown the KSC team of today. This article briefly reviews the evolution of the KSC electronic technologies for integration, check-out and launch of space vehicles and payloads during NASA's first 50 years.

  5. Occupational Exposure to Hydrazine and Subsequent Risk of Lung Cancer: 50-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Joan K.; Wald, Nicholas J.; Springett, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hydrazine is carcinogenic in animals, but there is inadequate evidence to determine if it is carcinogenic in humans. This study aimed to evaluate the association between hydrazine exposure and the risk of lung cancer. Methods The cause specific mortality rates of a cohort of 427 men who were employed at an English factory that produced hydrazine between 1945 and 1971 were compared with national mortality rates. Results By the end of December 2012 205 deaths had occurred. For men in the highest exposure category with greater than two years exposure and after more than ten years since first exposure the relative risks compared with national rates were: 0.85 (95% CI: 0.18–2.48) for lung cancer, 0.61 (95% CI: 0.07–2.21) for cancers of the digestive system, and 0.44 (95% CI: 0.05–1.57) for other cancers. Conclusions After 50 years of follow up, the results provide no evidence of an increased risk of death from lung cancer or death from any other cause. PMID:26394402

  6. Dynamo Sensitivity in Solar Analogs with 50 Years of Ca II H & K Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    The Sun has a steady 11-year cycle in magnetic activity most well-known by the rising and falling in the occurrence of dark sunspots on the solar disk in visible bandpasses. The 11-year cycle is also manifest in the variations of emission in the Ca II H & K line cores, due to non-thermal (i.e. magnetic) heating in the lower chromosphere. The large variation in Ca II H & K emission allows for study of the patterns of long-term variability in other stars thanks to synoptic monitoring with the Mount Wilson Observatory HK photometers (1966-2003) and Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph (1994-present). Overlapping measurements for a set of 27 nearby solar-analog (spectral types G0-G5) stars were used to calibrate the two instruments and construct time series of magnetic activity up to 50 years in length. Precise properties of fundamental importance to the dynamo are available from Hipparcos, the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and CHARA interferometry. Using these long time series and measurements of fundamental properties, we do a comparative study of stellar "twins" to explore the sensitivity of the stellar dynamo to small changes to structure, rotation, and composition. We also compare this sample to the Sun and find hints that the regular periodic variability of the solar cycle may be rare among its nearest neighbors in parameter space.

  7. Dynamo Sensitivity In Solar Analogs With 50 Years Of Ca II H & K Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie; Baliunas, Sallie; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-09-01

    The Sun has a steady 11-year cycle in magnetic activity most well-known by the rising and falling in the occurrence of dark sunspots on the solar disk in visible bandpasses. The 11-year cycle is also manifest in the variations of emission in the Ca II H & K line cores, due to non-thermal (i.e. magnetic) heating in the lower chromosphere. The large variation in Ca II H & K emission allows for study of the patterns of long-term variability in other stars thanks to synoptic monitoring with the Mount Wilson Observatory HK photometers (1966-2003) and Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph (1994-present). Overlapping measurements for a set of 27 nearby solar-analog (spectral types G0-G5) stars were used to calibrate the two instruments and construct time series of magnetic activity up to 50 years in length. Precise properties of fundamental importance to the dynamo are available from Hipparcos, the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and CHARA interferometry. Using these long time series and measurements of fundamental properties, we do a comparative study of stellar "twins" to explore the sensitivity of the stellar dynamo to small changes to structure, rotation, and composition. We also compare this sample to the Sun and find hints that the regular periodic variability of the solar cycle may be rare among its nearest neighbors in parameter space.

  8. Cancer in Women over 50 Years of Age: A Focus on Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Baccaro, Luiz Francisco; Conde, Délio Marques; Costa-Paiva, Lúcia; Machado, Vanessa de Souza Santos; Pinto-Neto, Aarão Mendes

    2015-01-01

    The increase in life expectancy worldwide has resulted in a greater prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases. This study aims to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with the occurrence of cancer among Brazilian women over the age of 50. A cross-sectional study with 622 women over the age of 50 was performed using a population survey. The outcome variable was the occurrence of a malignant tumor in any location. The independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, self-perception of health, health-related habits and morbidities. Statistical analysis was carried out using the chi-square test and Poisson regression. The mean age of the women was 64.1 years. The prevalence of cancer was 6.8%. The main sites of occurrence of malignant tumors were the breast (31.9%), colorectal (12.7%) and skin (12.7%). In the final statistical model, the only factor associated with cancer was smoking > 15 cigarettes/day either currently or in the past: PR 2.03 (95% CI 1.06–3.89). The results have improved understanding of the prevalence and factors associated with cancer in Brazilian women aged 50 years or more. They should be encouraged to maintain a healthy lifestyle and pay particular attention to modifiable risk factors such as smoking. PMID:25790469

  9. 50 years of medicinal plant research - every progress in methodology is a progress in science.

    PubMed

    Phillipson, J David

    2003-06-01

    Many scientific methods of analysis have been developed for the investigation of the constituents and biological activities of medicinal plants during the 50 years since the inaugural meeting of the Gesellschaft für Arzneipflanzenforschung (GA). The chromatographic (e. g., TLC, GLC, HPLC), spectroscopic (e. g., UV, IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR, MS), and biological (e. g., anticancer, anti-inflammatory, immunostimulant, antiprotozoal, CNS) techniques utilized for medicinal plant research are briefly reviewed. The contribution that advances in scientific methodology have made to our understanding of the actions of some herbal medicines (e. g., Echinacea, Ginkgo, St John's wort, Cannabis), as well as to ethnopharmacology and biotechnology, are briefly summarized. Plants have provided many medicinal drugs in the past and remain as a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. Despite all of the powerful analytical techniques available, the majority of plant species has not been investigated chemically or biologically in any great detail and even well known medicinal plants require further clinical study.

  10. Fire and Deforestation Dynamics in South America over the Past 50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Marle, M.; Field, R. D.; van der Werf, G.

    2015-12-01

    Fires play an important role in the Earth system and are one of the major sources of greenhouse gases and aerosols. Satellites have been key to understand their spatial and temporal variability in space and time, but the most frequently used satellite datasets start only in 1995. There are still large uncertainties about the frequency and intensity of fires in the pre-satellite time period, especially in regions with active deforestation, which may have changed dramatically in intensity in the past decades influencing fire dynamics. We used two datasets to extend the record of fires and deforestation in the Amazon region back in time: 1) annual forest loss rates starting in 1990 derived from Vegetation Optical Depth (VOD), which is a satellite-based vegetation product that can be used as proxy for forest loss, and 2) horizontal visibility as proxy for fire emissions, reported by weather stations and airports in the Amazon, which started around 1940, and having widespread coverage since 1973. We show that these datasets overlap with fire emission estimates from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED) enabling us to estimate fire emissions over the last 50 years. We will discuss how fires have varied over time in this region with globally significant emissions, how droughts have influenced fire activity and deforestation rates, and what the impact is of land-use change caused by fire on emissions in the Amazon region.

  11. Path of infectious diseases in Brazil in the last 50 years: an ongoing challenge

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Eliseu Alves; Sato, Ana Paula Sayuri

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this article, we comment on the main features of infectious diseases in Brazil in the last 50 years, highlighting how much of this path Revista de Saúde Pública could portray. From 1967 to 2016, 1,335 articles focusing on infectious diseases were published in Revista de Saúde Pública. Although the proportion of articles on the topic have decreased from about 50.0% to 15.0%, its notability remained and reflected the growing complexity of the research required for its control. It is noteworthy that studies design and analysis strategies progressively became more sophisticated, following the great development of epidemiology in Brazil in the recent decades. Thus, the journal has followed the success of public health interventions that permitted to control or eliminate numerous infectious diseases – which were responsible, in the past, for high rates of morbidity and mortality –, and also followed the reemergence of diseases already controlled and the emergence of until then unknown diseases, with a strong impact on the Brazilian population, establishing a little predictable and very challenging path. PMID:28099652

  12. How the world survived the population bomb: lessons from 50 years of extraordinary demographic history.

    PubMed

    Lam, David

    2011-11-01

    The world population will reach 7 billion in late 2011, a demographic milestone that is causing renewed attention to the challenges caused by population growth. This article looks at the last 50 years of demographic change, one of the most extraordinary periods in demographic history. During this period, world population grew at rates that have never been seen before and will almost surely never be seen again. There were many concerns about the potential impact of rapid population growth in the 1960s, including mass starvation in countries such as India, depletion of nonrenewable resources, and increased poverty in low-income countries. The actual experience was very different. World food production increased faster than world population in every decade since the 1960s, resource prices fell during most of the period, and poverty declined significantly in much of the developing world. The article considers the economic and demographic explanations for the surprising successes of this important period in demographic history. It also looks at regions that have been less successful, especially Africa, and at the lessons for dealing with the important challenges that still remain.

  13. Ceremony at CCAS to kick off year-long celebration of 50 years of space launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station's Complex 3/4, officials held a ceremony, kicking off a year-long series of events commemorating 50 years of launches from the Space Coast, that began with the Bumper rockets. From left are Lieutenant Governor of the State of Florida Frank T. Brogan; Congressman David Weldon, 15th Congressional District of the State of Florida; Center Director Roy D. Bridges; and Executive Director Edward F. Gormel, Joint Performance Management Office. Also present (but not seen) is Brig. Gen. Donald P. Pettit, Commander, 45th Space Wing. After six Bumper launches at White Sands Proving Grounds, N.M., and a failed Bumper 7, a successful Bumper 8 lifted off July 24, 1950, from Complex 3/4 to conduct aerodynamic investigations around Mach 7 at relatively low altitudes. The kick-off event also inaugurated a student art contest to design a commemorative etching. The winning artwork will be permanently displayed on a 24-inch black granite square in the U.S. space Walk hall of Fame in Titusville, Fla.

  14. Observed and simulated changes in Antarctic sea ice extent over the past 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagné, M.-È.; Gillett, N. P.; Fyfe, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of the polar regions by satellites has shown that sea ice extent (SIE) in the Antarctic has increased slightly since 1979. By contrast, climate model simulations including all major anthropogenic and natural climate influences simulate an average decrease in SIE since 1979. Here we take a longer view and assess the consistency of observed and simulated changes in Antarctic SIE using recently recovered satellite-based estimates of Antarctic SIE for September 1964 and May-July 1966, hence extending the current observational record from 35 to 50 years. While there is evidence of inconsistency between observed trends in Antarctic SIE and those simulated since 1979, particularly in models with realistic interannual variability, the observed trends since the mid-1960s fall within the 5-95% range of simulated trends. Thus, our results broadly support the hypothesis that the recent increase in Antarctic SIE is due to internal variability, though the reasons for the inconsistency in simulated and observed changes since 1979 remain to be determined.

  15. Interannual variability of the Upper Paraguay River dynamics over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, A.; Girard, P.

    2002-12-01

    The Pantanal, the largest inland wetland on Earth, has a unique aquatic and bird diversity. The existence and functioning of these communities strongly depend on the flood regime of the Upper Paraguay River. Understanding the interannual variability of the river dynamics is therefore essential to the preservation of this wildlife. We analyze 50-year long time series (1935-1995) of annual river height of the Paraguay River at Ladario, and annual mean precipitation over the associated drainage area (313,814 km2). A spectral analysis of the two records shows similar modes of variability (around 2-4, 7 and 15 years). These modes have been previously observed in other hydrographs of the larger Parana River basin. The short-term mode is associated with ENSO, while the two others are linked to SST anomalies over the northern tropical Atlantic. However, the river time series presents a significant increase after 1975 that has no equivalent in the precipitation record. Between 1960 and 1980 the land-use density of the states of Mato Grosso and Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil has drastically increased (by a factor of 2.1). Such land cover change tends to increase annual river discharge, as well as to affect sedimentation dynamics, eroding the river channel upstream and increasing deposition downstream. Our study will test these different hypotheses and conclude on the respective sensitivity of the river flow to climate variability and anthropogenic disturbance such as land-use extension.

  16. Attitudes to and experience of dental care among 50-year-olds in two Swedish counties.

    PubMed

    Unell, L; Söderfeldt, B; Halling, A; Birkhed, D

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate attitudes to and experiences of dental care in a population, born 1942. The following items were studied: opinions of general and oral health, attitudes to and experiences of dental care, dental care habits, experiences of latest visit to a dentist, tobacco habits and use of various dental hygiene articles. A cross-sectional mail questionnaire was sent in 1992 to all 50-year-olds in two Swedish counties, Orebro and Ostergotland, totally 8888 persons; the response rate was 71%. Of the population 89%, indicated good health. Satisfaction with dental care was high, 94%. 26% stated attendance to a dentist twice or more per year, and 64% at least once a year. As to expenses, 78% paid less than 1000 SEK the last year. Concerning the latest visit, 38% reported painless treatment, 37% no inconvenience, and 55% good care. The duration of the latest visit included on an average 27 min in travel time, 7 min in waiting time and 27 min in treatment time. Information about oral hygiene was given to 29% and about cost for treatment to 47% of the interviewed. There were 28% daily smokers. Snuff was daily used by 10% of the males. Toothbrushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste seemed to be the standard oral hygiene procedure and was reported by 80% of the respondents.

  17. [Excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle: questions remaining after 50 years of research].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Vélez, Juan Camilo; Figueroa-Gordon, Lourdes Carolina

    2009-03-01

    The excitation-contraction coupling mechanism was defined as the entire sequence of reactions linking excitation of plasma membrane to activation of contraction in skeletal muscle. By using different techniques, their regulation and interactions have been studied during the last 50 years, defining until now the importance and origin of the calcium ion as a contractile activator and the main proteins involved in the whole mechanism. Furthermore, the study of the ultrastructural basis and pharmacological regulation of the excitation-contraction coupling phenomenon has begun. The excitation-contraction coupling is thought to be altered in situations as ageing, muscle fatigue and some muscle diseases. However, many questions remain to be answered. For example, (1) How excitation-contraction coupling develops and ages? (2) What role does it play in muscle fatigue and other diseases? (3) What is the nature of the interaction between the proteins believed to be involved? The present review describes excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle and techniques used to better understand it as an introduction for discussing unanswered questions regarding excitation-contraction coupling.

  18. Global nitrogen budgets in cereals: A 50-year assessment for maize, rice, and wheat production systems

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, J. K.; Tirol-Padre, A.; Reddy, C. K.; Cassman, K. G.; Verma, Sudhir; Powlson, D. S.; van Kessel, C.; de B. Richter, Daniel; Chakraborty, Debashis; Pathak, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Industrially produced N-fertilizer is essential to the production of cereals that supports current and projected human populations. We constructed a top-down global N budget for maize, rice, and wheat for a 50-year period (1961 to 2010). Cereals harvested a total of 1551 Tg of N, of which 48% was supplied through fertilizer-N and 4% came from net soil depletion. An estimated 48% (737 Tg) of crop N, equal to 29, 38, and 25 kg ha−1 yr−1 for maize, rice, and wheat, respectively, is contributed by sources other than fertilizer- or soil-N. Non-symbiotic N2 fixation appears to be the major source of this N, which is 370 Tg or 24% of total N in the crop, corresponding to 13, 22, and 13 kg ha−1 yr−1 for maize, rice, and wheat, respectively. Manure (217 Tg or 14%) and atmospheric deposition (96 Tg or 6%) are the other sources of N. Crop residues and seed contribute marginally. Our scaling-down approach to estimate the contribution of non-symbiotic N2 fixation is robust because it focuses on global quantities of N in sources and sinks that are easier to estimate, in contrast to estimating N losses per se, because losses are highly soil-, climate-, and crop-specific. PMID:26778035

  19. Social inequality in health: revisiting moments and trends in 50 years of publication of RSP

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes the frequency and types of articles on social inequalities in health published in 50 years of the Revista de Saúde Pública, taking as reference some milestones that were used as guidelines to develop the research on this theme. Checking titles, keywords and abstracts or full texts, we identified 288 articles whose central or secondary focus was social inequalities in health. Corresponding to just 1.8% in the initial years, articles on social inequalities in health have represent 10.1% of the articles published in the last decade. The designs used were mainly cross-sectional (58.0%) and ecological (18.1%). The most analyzed themes were: food/nutrition (20.8%), mortality (13.5%), infectious diseases (10.1%), oral health (9.0%), and health services (8.7%). Articles focused on the analysis of racial inequalities in health amounted to 6.9%. Few articles monitored the trends of social inequalities in health, essential enterprise to assess and support interventions, and an even smaller number evaluated the impact of policies and programs on the reduction of social inequalities in health. PMID:28355334

  20. The Demoiselle of X-Inactivation: 50 Years Old and As Trendy and Mesmerising As Ever

    PubMed Central

    Morey, Céline; Avner, Philip

    2011-01-01

    In humans, sexual dimorphism is associated with the presence of two X chromosomes in the female, whereas males possess only one X and a small and largely degenerate Y chromosome. How do men cope with having only a single X chromosome given that virtually all other chromosomal monosomies are lethal? Ironically, or even typically many might say, women and more generally female mammals contribute most to the job by shutting down one of their two X chromosomes at random. This phenomenon, called X-inactivation, was originally described some 50 years ago by Mary Lyon and has captivated an increasing number of scientists ever since. The fascination arose in part from the realisation that the inactive X corresponded to a dense heterochromatin mass called the “Barr body” whose number varied with the number of Xs within the nucleus and from the many intellectual questions that this raised: How does the cell count the X chromosomes in the nucleus and inactivate all Xs except one? What kind of molecular mechanisms are able to trigger such a profound, chromosome-wide metamorphosis? When is X-inactivation initiated? How is it transmitted to daughter cells and how is it reset during gametogenesis? This review retraces some of the crucial findings, which have led to our current understanding of a biological process that was initially considered as an exception completely distinct from conventional regulatory systems but is now viewed as a paradigm “par excellence” for epigenetic regulation. PMID:21811421

  1. What's next after 50 years of psychiatric drug development: an FDA perspective.

    PubMed

    Laughren, Thomas P

    2010-09-01

    This article discusses changes in psychiatric drug development from a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standpoint. It first looks back at changes that have been influenced by regulatory process and then looks forward at FDA initiatives that are likely to affect psychiatric drug development in the future. FDA protects the public health by ensuring the safety and efficacy of drug products introduced into the US market. FDA works with drug sponsors during development, and, when applications are submitted, reviews the safety and efficacy data and the proposed labeling. Drug advertising and promotion and postmarketing surveillance also fall within FDA's responsibility. Among the many changes in psychiatric drug development over the past 50 years, several have been particularly influenced by FDA. Populations studied have expanded diagnostically and demographically, and approved psychiatric indications have become more focused on the clinical entities actually studied, including in some cases specific symptom domains of recognized syndromes. Trial designs have become increasingly complex and informative, and approaches to data analysis have evolved to better model the reality of clinical trials. This article addresses 2 general areas of innovation at FDA that will affect psychiatric drug development in years to come. Several programs falling under the general heading of the Critical Path Initiative, ie, biomarkers, adaptive design, end-of-phase 2A meetings, and data standards, are described. In addition, a number of important safety initiatives, including Safety First, the Sentinel Initiative, the Safe Use Initiative, and meta-analysis for safety, are discussed.

  2. Earth Observations from Space: The First 50 Years of Scientific Achievements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Observing Earth from space over the past 50 years has fundamentally transformed the way people view our home planet. The image of the "blue marble" is taken for granted now, but it was revolutionary when taken in 1972 by the crew on Apollo 17. Since then the capability to look at Earth from space has grown increasingly sophisticated and has evolved from simple photographs to quantitative measurements of Earth properties such as temperature, concentrations of atmospheric trace gases, and the exact elevation of land and ocean. Imaging Earth from space has resulted in major scientific accomplishments; these observations have led to new discoveries, transformed the Earth sciences, opened new avenues of research, and provided important societal benefits by improving the predictability of Earth system processes. This report highlights the scientific achievements made possible by the first five decades of Earth satellite observations by space-faring nations. It follows on a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC) entitled Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, also referred to as the "decadal survey." Recognizing the increasing need for space observations, the decadal survey identifies future directions and priorities for Earth observations from space. This companion report was requested by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to highlight, through selected examples, important past contributions of Earth observations from space to our current understanding of the planet.

  3. Positive Psychological Wellbeing Is Required for Online Self-Help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain to be Effective.

    PubMed

    Trompetter, Hester R; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; Lamers, Sanne M A; Schreurs, Karlein M G

    2016-01-01

    The web-based delivery of psychosocial interventions is a promising treatment modality for people suffering from chronic pain, and other forms of physical and mental illness. Despite the promising findings of first studies, patients may vary in the benefits they draw from self-managing a full-blown web-based psychosocial treatment. We lack knowledge on moderators and predictors of change during web-based interventions that explain for whom web-based interventions are especially (in)effective. In this study, we primarily explored for which chronic pain patients web-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) was (in)effective during a large three-armed randomized controlled trial. Besides standard demographic, physical and psychosocial factors we focused on positive mental health. Data from 238 heterogeneously diagnosed chronic pain sufferers from the general Dutch population following either web-based ACT (n = 82), or one of two control conditions [web-based Expressive Writing (EW; n = 79) and Waiting List (WL; n = 77)] were analysed. ACT and EW both consisted of nine modules and lasted nine to 12 weeks. Exploratory linear regression analyses were performed using the PROCESS macro in SPSS. Pain interference at 3-month follow-up was predicted from baseline moderator (characteristics that influence the outcome of specific treatments in comparison to other treatments) and predictor (characteristics that influence outcome regardless of treatment) variables. The results showed that none of the demographic or physical characteristics moderated ACT treatment changes compared to both control conditions. The only significant moderator of change compared to both EW and WL was baseline psychological wellbeing, and pain intensity was a moderator of change compared to EW. Furthermore, higher pain interference, depression and anxiety, and also lower levels of emotional well-being predicted higher pain interference in daily life 6 months later. These results suggest that web

  4. Positive Psychological Wellbeing Is Required for Online Self-Help Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Chronic Pain to be Effective

    PubMed Central

    Trompetter, Hester R.; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.; Lamers, Sanne M. A.; Schreurs, Karlein M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The web-based delivery of psychosocial interventions is a promising treatment modality for people suffering from chronic pain, and other forms of physical and mental illness. Despite the promising findings of first studies, patients may vary in the benefits they draw from self-managing a full-blown web-based psychosocial treatment. We lack knowledge on moderators and predictors of change during web-based interventions that explain for whom web-based interventions are especially (in)effective. In this study, we primarily explored for which chronic pain patients web-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) was (in)effective during a large three-armed randomized controlled trial. Besides standard demographic, physical and psychosocial factors we focused on positive mental health. Data from 238 heterogeneously diagnosed chronic pain sufferers from the general Dutch population following either web-based ACT (n = 82), or one of two control conditions [web-based Expressive Writing (EW; n = 79) and Waiting List (WL; n = 77)] were analysed. ACT and EW both consisted of nine modules and lasted nine to 12 weeks. Exploratory linear regression analyses were performed using the PROCESS macro in SPSS. Pain interference at 3-month follow-up was predicted from baseline moderator (characteristics that influence the outcome of specific treatments in comparison to other treatments) and predictor (characteristics that influence outcome regardless of treatment) variables. The results showed that none of the demographic or physical characteristics moderated ACT treatment changes compared to both control conditions. The only significant moderator of change compared to both EW and WL was baseline psychological wellbeing, and pain intensity was a moderator of change compared to EW. Furthermore, higher pain interference, depression and anxiety, and also lower levels of emotional well-being predicted higher pain interference in daily life 6 months later. These results suggest that web

  5. Perceptions of employment relations and permanence in the organization: mediating effects of affective commitment in relations of psychological contract and intention to quit.

    PubMed

    Alcover, Carlos-María; Martínez-Iñigo, David; Chambel, Maria José

    2012-06-01

    Working conditions in call/contact centers influence employees' perceptions of their relations with the organization and their attitudes to work. Such perceptions can be analyzed through the psychological contract. The association between the relational/transactional orientation of the psychological contract and intention to quit the organization was examined, as well as the mediating role of affective commitment in employment relations. Data were collected from 973 employees in a cross-sectional survey. Analysis confirmed that there was a statistically significant relation between the orientation of the psychological contract and intention to quit, which was positive for transactionally oriented and negative for relationally oriented contracts. A mediating role for affective commitment was also confirmed, and a full mediating effect was reported for both orientations.

  6. Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Interpersonal Problems and Psychological Flexibility in Female High School Students With Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, Sayedeh Monireh; Kazemi-Zahrani, Hamid; Besharat, Mohammad Ali

    2015-07-12

    Social anxiety is a psychological disorder which has devastative and pernicious effects on interpersonal relationships and one's psychological flexibility. The aim of this research was to determine the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on interpersonal problems and psychological flexibility in female high school students with social anxiety disorder. With a semi-experimental design, the subjects were assessed using the Social Anxiety Scale and clinical interview. The statistical population of the research was high school female students studying in 5 areas of Isfahan. 30 individuals were purposively selected as the sample. The subjects of the research were randomly assigned to the experimental and control groups. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy was given in 10 sessions of 90 minutes in the experimental group and the control group did not receive any treatment. Pre-test and post-test scores of Inventory of Interpersonal Problems, and Acceptance and Action Questionnaire were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance & the results showed that after the intervention, there was a significant difference between the scores of the subjects in the experimental and control groups. This means that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy can influence interpersonal problems and their six dimensions and psychological flexibility as well.

  7. Significant warming of continental West Antarctica in the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steig, E. J.; Schneider, D. P.

    2008-12-01

    We use statistical climate field reconstruction techniques to determine monthly temperature anomalies for the near-surface of the Antarctic ice sheet since 1957. Two independent data sets are used to provide estimates of the spatial covariance patterns of temperature: automatic weather stations and thermal infrared satellite observations. Quality-controlled data from occupied instrumental weather stations are used to determine the amplitude of changes in those covariance patterns through time. We use a modified principal component analyses technique (Steig et al., in review, Nature) to optimize the combination of spatial and temporal information. Verification statistics obtained from subsets of the data demonstrate the resulting reconstructions represent improvements relative to climatological mean values. We find that significant warming has occurred over most of continental West Antarctica. This is an area much larger than previously reported; most studies have concluded that warming is limited to the Antarctic Peninsula. An updated version of the recent temperature reconstruction of Monaghan et al. (2008, JGR) independently confirms our results. Warming in continental West Antarctica in the last 50 years exceeds 0.1 °C/decade, and is strongest in Spring. A possible explanation is an increase in storms in the Amundsen-Bellinghausen sea, resulting in enhanced warm air fluxes to the continent. Increased storminess in this sector is associated with the positive phase of the zonal wave-3 pattern, which independent observations suggest has increased since the 1970s (Raphael, GRL, 2004). The substantial negative sea ice anomalies in the Amundsen-Bellinghausen sea may also play a role. Our results suggest that changes in the wave-3 pattern dominates over (possibly anthropogenic) changes in the Southern Annular Mode in explaining recent Antarctic temperature variability.

  8. Long-Term Variability of 50 Years Standard Phase Height measurements over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Dieter H. W.; Entzian, Günter; Schneidereit, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Phase height measurements of low frequency radio waves are used to study the long-term variability of the mesosphere (D layer, about 80 km altitude) over Europe. The concept of standard phase heights (SPH) guaranties the continuity of the series in the case of slight frequency changes. Since February 1959, that means over 50 years, field strength measurements of the broadcasting station, Allouis (Central France), have been maintained at Kühlungsborn (54° N, 12° E, Mecklenburg, Northern Germany). A homogenized daily series was generated with a loss rate of about 2 %. The mean annual cycle of SPH-series shows a negative winter anomaly as known due to enhanced downward transport of NO and subsequent photo-ionization. The SPH-series are partially anti-correlated to the solar cycle because stronger photo-ionization is linked with higher number of electrons, which reduces the SPH. Further the statistical analysis of the SPH-series shows a significant overall trend with a decrease of 114 m per decade induced by a shrinking stratosphere due to global warming but with strong intra-decadal variability in winter. Stratospheric influences of ENSO-like and QBO-like oscillations on mesospheric SPHs have been shown for solar minimum phases. Especially in winter the SPH changes are linked with change of the residual circulation indicated by the Eliassen-Palm flux divergence. This induces changes of vertical NO transport, and the subsequent NO photo-ionization. Furthermore we show that during phases of solar maximum nonlinearity and solar feedback processes seem to be an important factor for changes of SPH-oscillation phase.

  9. Discovering the 50 Years of Solar System Exploration: Sharing Your Science with the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Dalton, H.; Shipp, S.; Shupla, C.; Halligan, E.; Boonstra, D.; Wessen, A.; Baerg, G.; Davis, P.; Burdick, A.; Zimmerman Brachman, R.

    2012-10-01

    The Year of the Solar System (YSS) offers ways for scientists to bring NASA’s science discoveries to their audiences! YSS and the continuing salute to the 50-year history of solar system exploration provide an integrated picture of our new understanding of the solar system for educators and the general public. During the last five decades, NASA has launched a variety of robotic spacecraft to study our solar system. Over that time, our understanding of planets has been revolutionized, as has the technology that has made these discoveries possible.Looking forward, the numerous ongoing and future robotic missions are returning new discoveries of our solar system at an unprecedented rate. YSS combines the discoveries of past NASA planetary missions with the most recent findings of the ongoing missions and connects them to related topics based on the big questions of planetary science, including solar system formation, volcanism, ice, and possible life elsewhere. Planetary scientists are encouraged to get involved in YSS in a variety of ways: - Give a talk at a local museum, planetarium, library, or school to share YSS and your research - Partner with a local educational institution to organize a night sky viewing or mission milestone community event - Work with a classroom teacher to explore one of the topics with students - Connect with a planetary science E/PO professional to identify ways to participate, like creating podcasts,vodcasts, or contributing to monthly topics - Share your ideas for events and activities with the planetaryE/PO community to identify partners and pathways for distribution - And more! Promotional and educational materials, updates, a calendar of activities, and a space to share experiences are available at NASA’s Solar System website: http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/yss. This is an exciting time in planetary sciences as we learn about New Worlds and make New Discoveries!

  10. Total Knee Arthroplasty After Knee Arthroscopy in Patients Older Than 50 Years.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Jason A; Gradisar, Ian M

    2016-11-01

    Several orthopedic registries have described the incidence of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in patients who have undergone knee arthroscopy. Patient risk factors may play a role in the conversion rate from knee arthroscopy to TKA. This study quantifies the incidence of conversion of knee arthroscopy to TKA from a US mixed-payer database and describes some common patient risk factors for conversion. The medical records of more than 50 million patients who were treated between 1998 and 2014 were mined with a commercially available software platform. During the study period, a total of 68,090 patients older than 50 years underwent knee arthroscopy for partial meniscectomy, chondroplasty, or debridement. Reported rates of TKA at 1, 2, and 3 years after arthroscopy were 10.1%, 13.7%, and 15.6%, respectively. Obesity, depressive disorder, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and age 70 years and older were associated with increased relative risk of conversion to TKA at 2 years. When obesity was combined individually with the top 5 other risk factors, no combination produced a higher relative risk than that of obesity alone. Patients who were 50 to 54 years of age had the lowest incidence of conversion to TKA (8.3%, P<.001). Men had a lower incidence of conversion to TKA (11.3%) than women (15.8%, P<.001). This information can help surgeons to counsel patients on the incidence of TKA after knee arthroscopy and identify preoperative risk factors that increase risk. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1041-e1044.].

  11. Age at Menarche: 50-Year Socioeconomic Trends Among US-Born Black and White Women

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Mathew V.; Kosheleva, Anna; Waterman, Pamela D.; Chen, Jarvis T.; Beckfield, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated 50-year US trends in age at menarche by socioeconomic position (SEP) and race/ethnicity because data are scant and contradictory. Methods. We analyzed data by income and education for US-born non-Hispanic Black and White women aged 25 to 74 years in the National Health Examination Survey (NHES) I (1959–1962), National Health Examination and Nutrition Surveys (NHANES) I–III (1971–1994), and NHANES 1999–2008. Results. In NHES I, average age at menarche among White women in the 20th (lowest) versus 80th (highest) income percentiles was 0.26 years higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.09, 0.61), but by NHANES 2005–2008 it had reversed and was −0.33 years lower (95% CI = −0.54, −0.11); no socioeconomic gradients occurred among Black women. The proportion with onset at younger than 11 years increased only among women with low SEP, among Blacks and Whites (P for trend < .05), and high rates of change occurred solely among Black women (all SEP strata) and low-income White women who underwent menarche before 1960. Conclusions. Trends in US age at menarche vary by SEP and race/ethnicity in ways that pose challenges to several leading clinical, public health, and social explanations for early age at menarche and that underscore why analyses must jointly include data on race/ethnicity and socioeconomic position. Future research is needed to explain these trends. PMID:25033121

  12. Sequential Imaging of Earth by Astronauts: 50 Years of Global Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia A.

    2009-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, astronauts have collected sequential imagery of the Earth. In fact, the collection of astronaut photography comprises one of the earliest sets of data (1961 to present) available to scientists to study the regional context of the Earth s surface and how it changes. While today s availability of global high resolution satellite imagery enables anyone with an internet connection to examine specific features on the Earth s surface with a regional context, historical satellite imagery adds another dimension (time) that provides researchers and students insight about the features and processes of a region. For example, one of the geographic areas with the longest length of record contained within the astronaut photography database is the lower Nile River. The database contains images that document the flooding of Lake Nasser (an analog to today s flooding behind China s Three Gorges Dam), the changing levels of Lake Nasser s water with multiyear cycles of flood and drought, the recent flooding and drying of the Toshka Lakes, as well as urban growth, changes in agriculture and coastal subsidence. The imagery database allows investigations using different time scales (hours to decades) and spatial scales (resolutions and fields of view) as variables. To continue the imagery collection, the astronauts on the International Space Station are trained to understand basic the Earth Sciences and look for and photograph major events such as tropical storms, landslides, and volcanic eruptions, and document landscapes undergoing change (e.g., coastal systems, cities, changing forest cover). We present examples of selected sequences of astronaut imagery that illustrate the interdependence of geological processes, climate cycles, human geography and development, and prompt additional questions about the underlying elements of change.

  13. The Macquarie Marshes in Arid Australia and their waterbirds: A 50-year history of decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsford, Richard T.; Thomas, Rachael F.

    1995-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between total annual flow of water in the Macquarie River and the extent of flooding in the northern part of the Macquarie Marshes and trends in waterbird populations from 1983 to 1993. The amount of water in the Macquarie River measured each year within the Macquarie Marshes explained about 86% of the variation in area flooded in the northern part of this wetland. This allowed use of long-term data on flow at Oxley, a gauge within the Macquarie Marshes, as an index to flooding. Annual flows at Oxley have decreased significantly for high and medium rainfall events in the catchment, despite no trend in rainfall between 1944 and 1993. The area flooded by large floods has contracted by at least 40-50% during the last 50 years (1944-1993). Water use has progressively increased upstream in the period, depriving the Macquarie Marshes of water: 51% of all water passing Dubbo each year, a gauge 100 km upstream, reached the Macquarie Marshes in the period 1944-1953, but by 1984-1993 this had declined to 21%. Numbers of species and density of waterbirds on the northern part of the Macquarie Marshes declined between 1983 and 1993. Three other wetlands, not affected by water abstractions, showed no declines. We believe the decline was due to wetland degradation as a result of decreased flooding. We estimated more than 88,000 waterbirds in the Macquarie Marshes in October 1984, establishing the site as an important wetland site in Australia. The extent and viability of this wetland will depend on maintaining or increasing the water supply.

  14. Increase in observed net carbon dioxide uptake by land and oceans during the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, A P; Alden, C B; Miller, J B; Tans, P P; White, J W C

    2012-08-02

    One of the greatest sources of uncertainty for future climate predictions is the response of the global carbon cycle to climate change. Although approximately one-half of total CO(2) emissions is at present taken up by combined land and ocean carbon reservoirs, models predict a decline in future carbon uptake by these reservoirs, resulting in a positive carbon-climate feedback. Several recent studies suggest that rates of carbon uptake by the land and ocean have remained constant or declined in recent decades. Other work, however, has called into question the reported decline. Here we use global-scale atmospheric CO(2) measurements, CO(2) emission inventories and their full range of uncertainties to calculate changes in global CO(2) sources and sinks during the past 50 years. Our mass balance analysis shows that net global carbon uptake has increased significantly by about 0.05 billion tonnes of carbon per year and that global carbon uptake doubled, from 2.4 ± 0.8 to 5.0 ± 0.9 billion tonnes per year, between 1960 and 2010. Therefore, it is very unlikely that both land and ocean carbon sinks have decreased on a global scale. Since 1959, approximately 350 billion tonnes of carbon have been emitted by humans to the atmosphere, of which about 55 per cent has moved into the land and oceans. Thus, identifying the mechanisms and locations responsible for increasing global carbon uptake remains a critical challenge in constraining the modern global carbon budget and predicting future carbon-climate interactions.

  15. Watershed-scale Evapotranspiration Changed Little over 50 years of Agricultural Land Abandonment in Southern Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, S. K.; Hussain, M. Z.; Lowrie, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The difference between precipitation and stream discharge over annual periods provides an indication of the total water loss to evaporation and evapotranspiration. The response of evaporative water loss to land cover change affects groundwater recharge, stream flow, and lake levels. This study examined the watershed water balance for Augusta Creek, which drains a 95-km2 glacial landscape in southwestern Michigan covered by cropland, grassland, forest, and wetlands. The climate is humid and temperate; between 1964-2014 the water-year precipitation averaged 948 mm and ranged from 695-1386 mm with no temporal trend. Over the study period the percentage of land in agriculture has decreased to about a third of its original extent, with abandoned lands gradually transitioning from old fields to woody vegetation. Comparison of precipitation on the upland watershed to baseflow discharge (USGS data; baseflow estimation by WHAT model) across the 50-year record shows that total evaporative water loss averaged 563 + 103 mm and ranged from 385-897 mm, with no apparent trend over the record. The evaporative water loss accounts for a mean + s.d. of 59 + 6% of precipitation (range, 48-70%). Evaporative water loss was positively related to total precipitation (r2 = 0.74. These results are interpreted using a Budyko plot framework to facilitate comparison with other settings. This water balance approach to infer evaporative water loss compares well with direct measurements in the same watershed since 2009 using eddy covariance (grasslands and crops) and soil moisture monitoring by time-domain reflectometry (grasslands, crops, and forest). Thus the evaporative water loss, which is predominantly by evapotranspiration, has been remarkably similar across a period of changing land cover, leaving a relatively consistent proportion for groundwater recharge and streamflow.

  16. Estimating Commit Sizes Efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Riehle, Dirk

    The quantitative analysis of software projects can provide insights that let us better understand open source and other software development projects. An important variable used in the analysis of software projects is the amount of work being contributed, the commit size. Unfortunately, post-facto, the commit size can only be estimated, not measured. This paper presents several algorithms for estimating the commit size. Our performance evaluation shows that simple, straightforward heuristics are superior to the more complex text-analysis-based algorithms. Not only are the heuristics significantly faster to compute, they also deliver more accurate results when estimating commit sizes. Based on this experience, we design and present an algorithm that improves on the heuristics, can be computed equally fast, and is more accurate than any of the prior approaches.

  17. Identification of aged bloodstains through mRNA profiling: Experiments results on selected markers of 30- and 50-year-old samples.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hemiao; Wang, Chong; Yao, Lan; Lin, Qingluan; Xu, XiuLan; Hu, Lan; Li, Wanshui

    2017-03-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in recent years on the research of body fluid identification through messenger RNA(mRNA) profiling. In order to examine the viability of mRNA profiling as a method to identify aged bloodstains, this study tested two groups of bloodstain samples, dated 30 years and 50 years back respectively, on seven blood specific markers, i.e. HBB, HBA, GYPA, CD93, ALAS2, SPTB (91bp and 247bp primers), and PBGD. Test results indicate that HBA and HBB are the most stable markers in aged bloodstains, returning positive results in over 80% of the 50-year-old samples and over 90% of the 30-year-old samples. This finding proves mRNA profiling an effective way of identifying aged bloodstains.

  18. Social inequality in health: revisiting moments and trends in 50 years of publication of RSP.

    PubMed

    Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2017-03-23

    This study describes the frequency and types of articles on social inequalities in health published in 50 years of the Revista de Saúde Pública, taking as reference some milestones that were used as guidelines to develop the research on this theme. Checking titles, keywords and abstracts or full texts, we identified 288 articles whose central or secondary focus was social inequalities in health. Corresponding to just 1.8% in the initial years, articles on social inequalities in health have represent 10.1% of the articles published in the last decade. The designs used were mainly cross-sectional (58.0%) and ecological (18.1%). The most analyzed themes were: food/nutrition (20.8%), mortality (13.5%), infectious diseases (10.1%), oral health (9.0%), and health services (8.7%). Articles focused on the analysis of racial inequalities in health amounted to 6.9%. Few articles monitored the trends of social inequalities in health, essential enterprise to assess and support interventions, and an even smaller number evaluated the impact of policies and programs on the reduction of social inequalities in health. RESUMO Este estudo descreve a frequência e os tipos de artigos sobre desigualdades sociais em saúde publicados nos 50 anos da Revista de Saúde Pública, tomando por referência alguns marcos que balizaram o desenvolvimento das investigações nessa temática. Checando títulos, palavras-chave e resumos ou textos completos, foram identificados 288 artigos cujo foco central ou secundário era desigualdades sociais em saúde. Correspondendo a apenas 1,8% nos anos iniciais, artigos sobre desigualdades sociais em saúde chegaram a representar 10,1% dos publicados na última década. Os desenhos utilizados foram principalmente transversais (58,0%) e ecológicos espaciais (18,1%). Os temas mais analisados foram: alimentação/nutrição (20,8%), mortalidade (13,5%), doenças infecciosas (10,1%), saúde bucal (9,0%) e serviços de saúde (8,7%). Artigos voltados à an

  19. EDITORIAL: International Conference on Finite Fermionic Systems: Nilsson Model 50 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    In 1955 Sven Gösta Nilsson published the paper `Binding States of Individual Nucleons in Strongly Deformed Nuclei'. This eminent work has been crucial for the understanding of the structure of deformed atomic nuclei. Moreover, the so-called Nilsson model has been widely used for the description of other types of finite systems of fermions such as quantum dots and cold fermionic atoms. During one week in June 2005 we celebrated in Lund the 50th anniversary of the Nilsson model with the International Conference on Finite Fermionic Systems - Nilsson Model 50 Years. With the historical view in mind, the conference focused on present and future problems in nuclear structure physics as well as on the physics of other types of finite Fermi systems. As a background to the recent developments Nobel Laureate Ben Mottelson presented a recollection of early applications and achievements of the Nilsson model in the first talk of the conference, including a personal view of Sven Gösta Nilsson. We are particularly pleased that this contribution could be included in these proceedings. The scientific programme was structured according to the following subjects: Shell structure and deformations The heaviest elements and beyond Nuclei far from stability Pairing correlations Nuclear spectroscopy: large deformations Nuclear spectroscopy: rotational states Order and chaos Cold fermionic atoms Quantum dots Many new and interesting results were presented in the 15 invited talks, 30 oral contributions, and in the 33 papers of the poster sessions. The present volume of Physica Scripta contains most of the talks, as well as the short contributions of the posters. We thank the speakers and all participants who actively contributed to give this memorable conference a very high scientific level in the presented contributions, as well as in numerous discussions inside and outside the sessions. We also thank the international advisory committee for their invaluable work in helping us setting up

  20. Evidence for water cycle changes during past 50 years in Tibetan Plateau: Review and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau, the largest geomorphologic unit on the Eurasian continent, and highest plateau in the world, exhibits “Asian water tower” A large amount of water is stored in the world’s highest and largest plateau, the Tibetan Plateau, in the forms of glaciers, snowpacks, lakes, and rivers. It is vital to understand whether the supply to these water resources has been experiencing any changes during recent global warming. Climate warming on the plateau in past decades has been suggested by meteorological observation and ice core records. The average annual and winter temperatures on the plateau rose about 0.16o and 0.32 o C per decade, respectively, from 1955 to 1996. The climatic warming trend seems more evident on the plateau than globally during the past 50 years. In response to the warming, one of the more important questions in hydrology is: if the climate warms in the future, will there be an intensification of the water cycle and, if so, what are evidence have been cached by current framework? There is considerable interest in this question because an intensification of the water cycle may lead to changes in water-resource availability, an increase in the frequency and intensity of droughts, and an amplification of warming through the water vapor feedback. Empirical evidence for ongoing intensification of the water cycle would provide additional support for the theoretical framework that links intensification with warming. There are 75 metrological observatories and 16 hydrological stations located on the Tibetan Plateau, comprising the Tibetan Autonomous Region, Qinghai Province, and parts of Sichuan and Gansu provinces, widely ranging from southern to northern part of the plateau. These data can be approximately regarded as natural flow data because the human water use is very small in quantity and can thus be ignored in these gauged catchments, These data were widely used in estimation of variation of runoff and evaporation. Various satellite

  1. Revista de Saúde Pública: 50 years disseminating the knowledge in nutrition.

    PubMed

    Sichieri, Rosely; Pereira, Rosangela A

    2016-12-22

    This work describes and comments on articles in the area of Public Health Nutrition published in Revista de Saúde Pública (RSP - Public Health Journal) from 1967 to 2016. We searched in the PubMed database restricted to the periodical "Revista de Saúde Pública" and using terms related to key topics in the area of Public Health Nutrition. We retrieved 742 articles and, after exclusion of duplicates and articles unrelated to the subject, we analyzed 441 articles, grouped according to subject: dental caries, anemia, hypovitaminosis A, macro/micronutrients, malnutrition, nutritional assessment, overweight/obesity, food consumption, low birthweight, and breastfeeding. We observed significant increase in the number of articles published and diversification of subjects addressed over the 50 years, representing the consistent development of the scientific field of Nutrition in Brazil. Since its inception, RSP has played an important role in the dissemination of knowledge about the main nutritional issues in Brazil. RESUMO Este trabalho descreve e comenta os artigos na área de Nutrição em Saúde Pública, publicados na Revista de Saúde Pública (RSP) de 1967 a 2016. Foi realizada busca na base de dados PubMed restrita ao periódico "Revista de Saúde Pública" e utilizando termos relacionados com temáticas chaves da área de Nutrição em Saúde Pública. Foram recuperados 742 artigos e, após as exclusões dos artigos repetidos e daqueles não relacionados com a temática, foram analisados 441 artigos, agrupados segundo o tema: cárie dental, anemia, hipovitaminose A, macro/micronutrientes, desnutrição, avaliação do estado nutricional, sobrepeso/obesidade, consumo de alimentos, baixo peso ao nascer, e aleitamento materno. Observou-se incremento significativo no número de artigos publicados e a diversificação dos temas tratados ao longo destes 50 anos, retratando o consistente desenvolvimento do campo científico da Nutrição no Brasil. Desde seu início, a

  2. The Astrophysical r-Process 50 Years after B{sup 2}FH

    SciTech Connect

    Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Farouqi, K.; Mashonkina, L. I.

    2008-01-24

    Since the historical papers by Burbidge et al. and Cameron 50 years ago, it is generally accepted that half of the chemical elements above Fe are formed in explosive stellar scenarios by a rapid neutron-capture process (the classical ''r-process''). Already from their essential ideas, it became clear that a correct modelling of this nucleosynthesis process requires both, the knowledge of various nuclear properties very far from stability and a detailed description of the astrophysical environments. However, it took about three decades, until in 1986 the first experimental nuclear-physics data on the neutron-magic r-isotopes {sup 80}Zn and {sup 130}Cd could be obtained, which act as key ''waiting points'' in the respective A{approx_equal}80 and 130 peaks of the Solar-System (SS) r-abundances (N{sub r,{center_dot}}). Since then, using steadily improved nuclear data, we have optimized our r-process calculations to reproduce the present observables of the isotopic N{sub r,{center_dot}} ''residuals'', as well as the more recent elemental abundances in ultra-metal-poor, r-process-enriched halo stars. Concerning the latter observations, we support the basic idea about two different types of r-processes. Based on our many years' experience with the site-independent ''waiting-point approach'', we recently have extended our studies to fully dynamical network calculations for the most likely astrophysical r-process scenario, i.e. the high-entropy wind (HEW) of core-collapse type II supernovae (SN II). Again, an excellent reproduction of all observables for the ''main'' r-process has been achieved. However, a major difference is the nucleosynthesis origin of the lighter heavy elements in the 29{<=}Z{<=}45 mass region. Here, the HEW model predicts-instead of a ''weak'' neutron-capture r-process component-a primary rapid charged-particle process. This may explain the recent observations of a non-correlation of these elements with the heavier ''main'' r-process elements.

  3. Path of infectious diseases in Brazil in the last 50 years: an ongoing challenge.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Eliseu Alves; Sato, Ana Paula Sayuri

    2016-12-22

    In this article, we comment on the main features of infectious diseases in Brazil in the last 50 years, highlighting how much of this path Revista de Saúde Pública could portray. From 1967 to 2016, 1,335 articles focusing on infectious diseases were published in Revista de Saúde Pública. Although the proportion of articles on the topic have decreased from about 50.0% to 15.0%, its notability remained and reflected the growing complexity of the research required for its control. It is noteworthy that studies design and analysis strategies progressively became more sophisticated, following the great development of epidemiology in Brazil in the recent decades. Thus, the journal has followed the success of public health interventions that permitted to control or eliminate numerous infectious diseases - which were responsible, in the past, for high rates of morbidity and mortality -, and also followed the reemergence of diseases already controlled and the emergence of until then unknown diseases, with a strong impact on the Brazilian population, establishing a little predictable and very challenging path. RESUMO Neste artigo, comentamos as principais características das doenças infecciosas no Brasil, nos últimos 50 anos, destacando o quanto a Revista de Saúde Pública conseguiu capturar essa trajetória. De 1967 a 2016, foram publicados 1.335 artigos na Revista de Saúde Pública com foco em doenças infecciosas. Ainda que a proporção de artigos sobre esse tema tenha declinado de cerca de 50,0% para 15,0%, seu destaque se manteve e refletiu a crescente complexidade das pesquisas necessárias para o seu controle. Nota-se que os desenhos dos estudos e as estratégias de análise ganharam progressivamente maior sofisticação, acompanhando o grande desenvolvimento da epidemiologia no Brasil, nas últimas décadas. Assim, foi registrado não apenas o sucesso de intervenções de saúde pública que permitiram o controle ou a eliminação de inúmeras doen

  4. Building on 50 Years of Systems Engineering Experience for a New Era of Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Lyles, Garry M.; McConnaughey, Paul K.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has delivered space transportation solutions for America's complex missions, ranging from scientific payloads that expand knowledge, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, to astronauts and lunar rovers destined for voyages to the Moon. Currently, the venerable Space Shuttle, which has been in service since 1981, provides the United States (US) capability for both crew and heavy cargo to low-Earth orbit to construct the International Space Station, before the Shuttle is retired in 2010. In the next decade, NASA will replace this system with a duo of launch vehicles: the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle. The goals for this new system include increased safety and reliability coupled with lower operations costs that promote sustainable space exploration for decades to come. The Ares I will loft the Orion crew exploration vehicle, while the heavy-lift Ares V will carry the Altair lunar lander, as well as the equipment and supplies needed to construct a lunar outpost for a new generation of human and robotic space pioneers. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center manages the Shuttle's propulsion elements and is managing the design and development of the Ares rockets, along with a host of other engineering assignments in the field of scientific space exploration. Specifically, the Marshall Center's Engineering Directorate houses the skilled workforce and unique facilities needed to build capable systems upon the foundation laid by the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Shuttle programs. This paper will provide details of the in-house systems engineering and vehicle integration work now being performed for the Ares I and planned for the Ares V. It will give an overview of the Ares I system-level testing activities, such as the ground vibration testing that will be conducted in the Marshall Center's Dynamic Test Stand to verify the integrated vehicle stack's structural

  5. Techniques for Interface Stress Measurements within Prosthetic Sockets of Transtibial Amputees: A Review of the Past 50 Years of Research

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fakih, Ebrahim A.; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Mahmad Adikan, Faisal Rafiq

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of interface stresses between the residual limb and prosthetic socket of a transtibial amputee has been considered as a direct indicator of the socket quality fit and comfort. Therefore, researchers have been very interested in quantifying these interface stresses in order to evaluate the extent of any potential damage caused by the socket to the residual limb tissues. During the past 50 years a variety of measurement techniques have been employed in an effort to identify sites of excessive stresses which may lead to skin breakdown, compare stress distributions in various socket designs, and evaluate interface cushioning and suspension systems, among others. The outcomes of such measurement techniques have contributed to improving the design and fitting of transtibial sockets. This article aims to review the operating principles, advantages, and disadvantages of conventional and emerging techniques used for interface stress measurements inside transtibial sockets. It also reviews and discusses the evolution of different socket concepts and interface stress investigations conducted in the past five decades, providing valuable insights into the latest trends in socket designs and the crucial considerations for effective stress measurement tools that lead to a functional prosthetic socket. PMID:27447646

  6. Estimating least-developed countries’ vulnerability to climate-related extreme events over the next 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Anthony G.; Tadross, Mark; Nussbaumer, Patrick; Asante, Kwabena; Metzger, Marc; Rafael, Jose; Goujon, Anne; Brundrit, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    When will least developed countries be most vulnerable to climate change, given the influence of projected socio-economic development? The question is important, not least because current levels of international assistance to support adaptation lag more than an order of magnitude below what analysts estimate to be needed, and scaling up support could take many years. In this paper, we examine this question using an empirically derived model of human losses to climate-related extreme events, as an indicator of vulnerability and the need for adaptation assistance. We develop a set of 50-year scenarios for these losses in one country, Mozambique, using high-resolution climate projections, and then extend the results to a sample of 23 least-developed countries. Our approach takes into account both potential changes in countries’ exposure to climatic extreme events, and socio-economic development trends that influence countries’ own adaptive capacities. Our results suggest that the effects of socio-economic development trends may begin to offset rising climate exposure in the second quarter of the century, and that it is in the period between now and then that vulnerability will rise most quickly. This implies an urgency to the need for international assistance to finance adaptation. PMID:20080585

  7. Techniques for Interface Stress Measurements within Prosthetic Sockets of Transtibial Amputees: A Review of the Past 50 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Al-Fakih, Ebrahim A; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Mahmad Adikan, Faisal Rafiq

    2016-07-20

    The distribution of interface stresses between the residual limb and prosthetic socket of a transtibial amputee has been considered as a direct indicator of the socket quality fit and comfort. Therefore, researchers have been very interested in quantifying these interface stresses in order to evaluate the extent of any potential damage caused by the socket to the residual limb tissues. During the past 50 years a variety of measurement techniques have been employed in an effort to identify sites of excessive stresses which may lead to skin breakdown, compare stress distributions in various socket designs, and evaluate interface cushioning and suspension systems, among others. The outcomes of such measurement techniques have contributed to improving the design and fitting of transtibial sockets. This article aims to review the operating principles, advantages, and disadvantages of conventional and emerging techniques used for interface stress measurements inside transtibial sockets. It also reviews and discusses the evolution of different socket concepts and interface stress investigations conducted in the past five decades, providing valuable insights into the latest trends in socket designs and the crucial considerations for effective stress measurement tools that lead to a functional prosthetic socket.

  8. Comparison of weight loss outcomes 1 year after sleeve gastrectomy and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in patients aged above 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Praveenraj, Palanivelu; Gomes, Rachel M; Kumar, Saravana; Perumal, Sivalingam; Senthilnathan, Palanisamy; Parthasarathi, Ramakrishnan; Rajapandian, Subbiah; Palanivelu, Chinnusamy

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Safe, effective weight loss with resolution of comorbidities has been convincingly demonstrated with bariatric surgery in the aged obese. They, however, lose less weight than younger individuals. It is not known if degree of weight loss is influenced by the choice of bariatric procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the degree of weight loss between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in patients above the age of 50 years at 1 year after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients more than 50 years of age who underwent LSG or LRYGB between February 2012 and July 2013 with at least 1 year of follow-up. Data evaluated at 1 year included age, sex, weight, body mass index (BMI), mean operative time, percentage of weight loss and excess weight loss, resolution/remission of diabetes, morbidity and mortality. RESULTS: Of a total of 86 patients, 54 underwent LSG and 32 underwent LRYGB. The mean percentage of excess weight loss at the end of 1 year was 60.19 ± 17.45 % after LSG and 82.76 ± 34.26 % after LRYGB (P = 0.021). One patient developed a sleeve leak after LSG, and 2 developed iron deficiency anaemia after LRYGB. The remission/improvement in diabetes mellitus and biochemistry was similar. CONCLUSION: LRYGB may offer better results than LSG in terms of weight loss in patients over 50 years of age. PMID:27279392

  9. PREFACE: 50 years in science: Alejandro Szanto de Toledo (2045-2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-07-01

    During the XXXVII RTFNB 2014, we had the pleasure to organize a tribute to Professor Alejandro Szanto de Toledo to commemorate his 50 years of dedication to nuclear physics. Named ''Alexfest'', it gathered friends and very prominent physicists from around the world that came to Brazil specially to render a tribute to Alex, as many friends and colleagues called him. During the whole afternoon, the invited speakers presented some of the physics topics and important contributions that Alex gave to the field of nuclear physics during his five decades of intense work. Alex is the responsible for several landmarks in the Brazilian nuclear science, especially in the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo (IFUSP), where he spent almost his entire career. He started his professional life in the IFUSP Van de Graaf Laboratory, under Oscar Sala's supervision as an undergraduate student. His talent allowed him to give significant contributions to the machine operation since the beginning of his internship in the laboratory. He soon became the responsible for the development, construction and implementation of an ion source for the new Pelletron accelerator, project coordinated by Oscar Sala as well. This was a huge responsibility for a young master degree student. His PhD thesis was about nuclear fusion, a topic that he mastered during his career. His international reputation allowed him to become a visiting researcher at several laboratories in the US, France, Japan, Russia and Germany. Not satisfied with the challenges that his career was imposing to him, Alex pioneered the creation of a high-energy nuclear physics group in Brazil, becoming member of the STAR (Solenoidal Tracker At Rhic) collaboration in 1995, one of the two major experiments of the RHIC accelerator (Relativistic heavy Ion Collider), located in the Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA. Later on, in 2006, he also led his group to become part of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment ALICE (A

  10. The political economy of maize production and poverty reduction in Zambia: analysis of the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Hanjra, Munir A; Culas, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Poverty and food security are endemic issues in much of sub-Saharan Africa. To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger in the region remains a key Millennium Development Goal. Many African governments have pursued economic reforms and agricultural policy interventions in order to accelerate economic growth that reduces poverty faster. Agricultural policy regimes in Zambia in the last 50 years (1964–2008) are examined here to better understand their likely impact on food security and poverty, with an emphasis on the political economy of maize subsidy policies. The empirical work draws on secondary sources and an evaluation of farm household data from three villages in the Kasama District of Zambia from 1986/87 and 1992/93 to estimate a two-period econometric model to examine the impact on household welfare in a pre- and post-reform period. The analysis shows that past interventions had mixed effects on enhancing the production of food crops such as maize. While such reforms were politically popular, it did not necessarily translate into household-level productivity or welfare gains in the short term. The political economy of reforms needs to respond to the inherent diversity among the poor rural and urban households. The potential of agriculture to generate a more pro-poor growth process depends on the creation of new market opportunities that most benefit the rural poor. The state should encourage private sector investments for addressing infrastructure constraints to improve market access and accelerate more pro-poor growth through renewed investments in agriculture, rural infrastructure, gender inclusion, smarter subsidies and regional food trade. However, the financing of such investments poses significant challenges. There is a need to address impediments to the effective participation of public private investors to generate more effective poverty reduction and hunger eradication programmes. This article also explores the opportunities for new public

  11. Landscape Architects and Environmental Concern: An Examination of Attitudes, Verbal Commitment and Actual Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Anita Anne

    Landscape architects have a combination of abilities that have been gained through education and experience that could make their demonstration of environmental concern as citizens very effective. This study assessed the attitudes, verbal commitment, and actual commitment regarding environmental concern held by landscape architects registered and…

  12. Commitment to Health Scale.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Cynthia W

    2005-01-01

    The Commitment to Health Scale (CHS) was developed to predict likelihood of clients being able to permanently adopt new health-promoting behaviors. Commitment is based on the association between starting new health behaviors and long-term performance of those behaviors. The CHS evolved from an examination of Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Algorithm, Decisional Balance Scale, and Strong and Weak Principle (Velicer, Rossi, Prochaska, & DiClemente, 1996). Scale items were assessed by classical and Rasch measurement methods. The research was performed in three separate studies at various locations in the United States and included approximately 1100 subjects. A new unidimensional variable was identified called Commitment to Health. Internal consistency reliability of the scale was .94 (Cronbach's alpha). External validity and reliability were assessed based on expected and observed ordering and between known groups. Scale scores predicted self-reported health behaviors and body mass index.

  13. [50 years anniversary of Research Institute for Occupational Medicine and Human Ecology with Siberian Division of RAMSc].

    PubMed

    Rukavishnikov, V S; Shaiakhmetov, S F; Gus'kova, T M

    2010-01-01

    The article covers main steps of establishment and development of Research Institute for Occupational medicine and Human ecology with Siberian Division of RAMSc over 50 years of activities, major results of research, contribution of the Institute personnel into development of hygienic science and practical medicine in Siberia.

  14. Internet-based vestibular rehabilitation for adults aged 50 years and over: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Adam W A; Kirby, Sarah; Essery, Rosie; Little, Paul; Bronstein, Adolfo; Turner, David; Stuart, Beth; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Yardley, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dizziness is highly prevalent in older adults and can lead to falls, fear of falling, loss of confidence, anxiety and depression. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) exercises are effective in reducing dizziness due to vestibular dysfunction, but access to trained therapists is limited. Providing dizzy patients with booklets teaching them how to carry out VR exercises has been shown to be a cost-effective way of managing dizziness in primary care. Internet-based intervention delivery has many advantages over paper-based methods, including the provision of video instructions, automated tailoring and symptom-related feedback. This trial will examine whether an internet-based VR intervention is (1) effective in reducing dizziness and (2) a cost-effective primary care treatment option. Methods/analysis This will be a single blind, randomised controlled trial carried out in UK primary care. A stand-alone internet-based VR intervention will be compared with routine care in 262 dizzy patients aged 50 years and over. Measures will be taken at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Our primary outcome measure will be the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing dizziness symptoms compared with routine care at 6 months. Cost-effectiveness will be examined along with the effect of the intervention on dizziness-related disability and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Psychological process variables including expectancy, self-efficacy and acceptance will be explored in relation to adherence and symptom reduction. Ethics/dissemination This trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by an NHS Research Ethics Committee, Southampton A REC Reference: 13/SC/0119. The findings of this trial will be disseminated to the scientific community through presentations at national and international conferences, and by publishing in peer review journals. Findings will be disseminated to the public through targeted press releases. This trial will provide valuable information on

  15. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  16. Commitment to Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori, Renilde

    1995-01-01

    This reprint from a 1985 issue of "The NAMTA Journal" discusses the ideas of Maria Montessori and Erich Fromm in relation to world peace and the role of education in promoting peace. Also examines the nature of conflict, war, and peace, and the need to commit oneself to peace. (MDM)

  17. The Vocational Commitment Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Susan F.; Hubbard, Constance F.

    1973-01-01

    The Index is the result of an effort made to examine all components of vocational commitment and to translate this information into an instrument which could be used to assess the relationship of an individual to a vocation.. The predictive ability of the 74-item device requires further research. (Author/AG)

  18. Home food availability is associated with multiple socio-economic indicators in 50 year olds from Canterbury, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Renée; Gearry, Richard B; Grant, Emily; Pearson, John; Skidmore, Paula Ml

    2014-01-01

    Financial restraints and poverty lead to poor diets and poor health outcomes. Limited research shows that socioeconomic status is related to home availability of certain foods. However, studies in this area have used different socio-economic indicators, which may not equally influence eating-related behaviors. Using multiple indicators of socio-economic status may provide a more accurate picture of these relationships. The aim of this study was to investigate whether several socio-economic indicators are independently associated with home availability of selected foods known to influence chronic disease risk in 50 year olds from Canterbury, New Zealand, participating in the CHALICE study. Participants were selected randomly from health research extracts from Canterbury. Data from 216 participants (110 females, 106 males) were included. The presence (but not quantity) of foods/beverages in the home was measured by a validated home food inventory. Linear regression analyses were performed for the following home food inventory scores: fruit, vegetables, lower fat dairy, obesogenic foods and sweetened beverages with household income, standard of living and education using multivariate models. Higher household income and standard of living were individually associated with a 2% to 3% higher fruit and vegetables (3 to 5 types/forms) and total food scores (6 to 9 types/forms) (p<0.03). Higher education level was associated with a 2.5% increase in fruit and vegetables score (4 types/forms) and an 8% decrease in sweetened beverages score (0.4 beverages) (p<0.02). These results suggest that using only one measure of socio-economic status cannot accurately capture the effects of social inequalities in food availability. Those experiencing the most social disadvantage had a lesser availability of fruit and vegetables which may be detrimental to good health.

  19. Necessity of Periodic Ophthalmological Examinations in Binocular B Class Driving Licence Holders Over 50 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Ali; Öktem, Çağlar; Karabıçak Acer, Ayşe; Kocamış, Özkan; Taşdemir, Sedat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether binocular B class driving licence (BBCDL) holders over 50 years old are in compliance with the BBCDL criteria for visual acuity, to determine the age-based prevalence of ophthalmological disorders reducing visual acuity in this group, and to investigate whether periodic ophthalmological examinations are needed in licence holders over 50 years of age. Materials and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 451 adults over 50 years old having a BBCDL. The study subjects were categorized into 3 age groups as group 1 (51-60 years), group 2 (61-70 years), and group 3 (over 71 years). Results: The mean age of the subjects was 60.02±7.27 years; 338 (74.9%) were male and 113 (25.1%) were female. The BBCDL criteria were met by 353 (78.3%) subjects whereas 98 (21.7%) subjects did not meet them. Eighty-four (85.7%) of 98 patients not meeting BBCDL criteria still drove. The mean age of the subjects meeting BBCDL criteria (58.82±6.77 years) was significantly lower than the subjects not meeting them (64.34±7.40 years) (p<0.001). The most common pathologies in the individuals still driving despite not meeting BBCDL criteria were senile cataract (38.5%) and diabetic retinopathy (23.1%) in group 1, senile cataract (55.3%) and diabetic retinopathy (14.9%) in group 2, and senile cataract (63.6%) and senile macular degeneration+senile cataract (18.2%) in group 3. Conclusion: More than a fifth of individuals over 50 years old did not meet the BBCDL criteria, due predominantly to senile cataract, and the majority of these individuals continue to drive. Therefore, we believe that individuals over 50 years old who have a BBCDL should undergo periodic ophthalmological examinations. PMID:27800264

  20. From controlled to committed.

    PubMed

    Hess, J C

    1996-02-01

    Most of us agree that people are our most important resource. Yet we spend a minimal amount of time learning more about human behavior, communication, and how our attitudes and behavior impact employee performance. Instead we rely on traditional methods of negative reinforcement in an attempt to control our areas of responsibility. While these methods can render some short-term success, managers and organizations that succeed during these times of change and fierce competition will be those that take the time to understand and capture the power of a committed workforce. The committed workforce is energized, not simply compliant, as a result of having basic human needs for achievement satisfied, belonging to a group, and receiving recognition for its contributions. Committed workers typically describe the manager as one who has the ability to give them a great degree of control over their area of influence. We all know that we don't change our leadership style like we change clothes. Old habits die hard. it takes a personal commitment and lots of practice to rid outselves of habits and behavior that no longer serve our departments and facilities. This commitment, however, is crucial to survival. As managers, we must cope with increasing ambiguity and uncertainty in the workplace. To survive these challenges, we must improve our interpersonal skills and ability to successfully bring out the best in others. I believe that success will continue for managers who not only increase their knowledge and technical ability, but who also inspire their workers to move forward with a collective sense of enthusiasm and purpose.

  1. Effects of the men's program on U.S. Army soldiers' intentions to commit and willingness to intervene to prevent rape: a pretest posttest study.

    PubMed

    Foubert, John D; Masin, Ryan C

    2012-01-01

    Noncommissioned male officers in the U.S. Army stationed in Germany were trained to present a 1-hour rape prevention workshop--The Men's Program--to 237 enlisted male soldiers. A comparison group of 244 male soldiers received a briefing focused on reducing the individual's risk for experiencing sexual assault, discussion of myths and facts about sexual assault, and how to avoid being accused of sexual assault. Participants in The Men's Program experienced significant change in the predicted direction for bystander willingness to help, bystander efficacy, rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault with low to medium effect sizes. Comparison group participants experienced no effect on these variables except for a significant decline in rape myth acceptance with a very low effect size. Between-group differences pointed to the efficacy of The Men's Program. Implications of these results for rape prevention programming in the military are discussed.

  2. Mathematical modeling reveals differential effects of erythropoietin on proliferation and lineage commitment of human hematopoietic progenitors in early erythroid culture

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Daniel; Carter, Deborah; Homer, Martin; Marucci, Lucia; Gampel, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Erythropoietin is essential for the production of mature erythroid cells, promoting both proliferation and survival. Whether erythropoietin and other cytokines can influence lineage commitment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is of significant interest. To study lineage restriction of the common myeloid progenitor to the megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitor of peripheral blood CD34+ cells, we have shown that the cell surface protein CD36 identifies the earliest lineage restricted megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitor. Using this marker and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester to track cell divisions in vitro, we have developed a mathematical model that accurately predicts population dynamics of erythroid culture. Parameters derived from the modeling of cultures without added erythropoietin indicate that the rate of lineage restriction is not affected by erythropoietin. By contrast, megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitor proliferation is sensitive to erythropoietin from the time that CD36 first appears at the cell surface. These results shed new light on the role of erythropoietin in erythropoiesis and provide a powerful tool for further study of hematopoietic progenitor lineage restriction and erythropoiesis. PMID:26589912

  3. [Interferon in the treatment of viral hepatitis. The interferon was discovered 50 years ago].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Lengyel, Gabriella

    2007-08-19

    The interferons are heterogenic glycoproteins which are produced on the effect of virus infection, as immune answer, by the living cells. They were discovered half a century ago. They have antineoplastic, antiviral and immunomodulator effect. The names of interferons used in the therapy are nominated with Greek letters. This nomination shows their origins: the interferon-alpha originates from leucocytes, the interferon-beta does from fibroblasts and the interferon-gamma is produced as immune interferon by lymphocytes. In human medicine both natural and recombinant interferons are applied. The connection of polyethyleneglycol to interferons ensures their sustained effect. Nowadays they are applied in the therapy of chronic hepatitis B or C as well as in oncology to inhibit the neoplasm progression.

  4. Assessment of committed effective dose due to the ingestion of (210)Po and (210)Pb in consumed Lebanese fish affected by a phosphate fertilizer plant.

    PubMed

    Aoun, M; El Samad, O; Bou Khozam, R; Lobinski, R

    2015-02-01

    Ingestion of radionuclides through seafood intake is a one of the sources contributing to the internal effective dose in the human organism. In order to evaluate the internal exposure and potential risks due to (210)Po and (210)Pb associated with fish consumption, these radionuclides were measured in commonly consumed fish species from a clean area and an area subjected to the impact of a Lebanese phosphate fertilizer plant. The highest concentration of (210)Pb was 98.7 Bq/kg fresh weight while (210)Po activity concentrations varied from 3.6 Bq/kg to 140 Bq/kg. A supplementary radiation exposure was detected; the highest committed effective dose due to (210)Po and (210)Pb was found to be 1110 μSv/y and 450 μSv/y, respectively. Moreover, the average mortality and morbidity risks due to the fish consuming were estimated.

  5. Can changes in the distribution of lizard species over the past 50 years be attributed to climate change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianguo

    2016-08-01

    We analyzed changes in the distributions of nine lizard species in China over the past 50 years and identified whether these changes could be attributed to climate change. Long-term records of lizard distributions, grey relational analysis, fuzzy set classification techniques, and attribution methods were used. The distribution of nearly half of the lizard species primarily shifted northward, westward, or eastward since the 1970s, and most changes were related to the thermal index. In response to climate change over the past 50 years, the distribution boundary and center of some species have mainly shifted northward, westward, or eastward, with some irregular shifting during the process. The observed and predicted changes in distribution were highly consistent for some lizard species. The changes in the northern and eastern distribution limits of nearly half of the lizard species and the western limits and distribution centers of several species can be attributed to climate change.

  6. Robust relativistic bit commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Chailloux, André; Leverrier, Anthony

    2016-12-01

    Relativistic cryptography exploits the fact that no information can travel faster than the speed of light in order to obtain security guarantees that cannot be achieved from the laws of quantum mechanics alone. Recently, Lunghi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 030502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.030502] presented a bit-commitment scheme where each party uses two agents that exchange classical information in a synchronized fashion, and that is both hiding and binding. A caveat is that the commitment time is intrinsically limited by the spatial configuration of the players, and increasing this time requires the agents to exchange messages during the whole duration of the protocol. While such a solution remains computationally attractive, its practicality is severely limited in realistic settings since all communication must remain perfectly synchronized at all times. In this work, we introduce a robust protocol for relativistic bit commitment that tolerates failures of the classical communication network. This is done by adding a third agent to both parties. Our scheme provides a quadratic improvement in terms of expected sustain time compared with the original protocol, while retaining the same level of security.

  7. Struggle and Moral Purpose in American Education 50 Years after "Brown"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishon, Phillip; Geringer, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Fifty years ago, on 17 May 1954, the United States Supreme Court ruled in "Brown v. Board of Education" that the "separate but equal" doctrine that had effectively legalized "educational apartheid" some 58 years earlier deprived racially segregated children of the equal protection of laws guaranteed by the fourteenth…

  8. The Spectrum of Optic Disc Ischemia in Patients Younger than 50 Years (An Amercian Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Anthony C.; Costa, Roberta M. S.; Dumitrascu, Oana M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the spectrum of clinical and fluorescein angiographic features of optic disc ischemia in patients younger than 50 years. Methods: This retrospective comparative case series from a university consultative neuro-ophthalmology practice consisted of two phases. The first compared 108 cases of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in patients younger than 50 years (NAIONy) to a cohort of 108 cases in patients 50 years or older (NAIONo). Predisposing risk factors, fluorescein angiographic features, and clinical course were compared. In the second phase, 12 cases of diabetic papillopathy under age 50 were assessed by fluorescein angiographic criteria for evidence of optic disc ischemia and compared to patients with NAIONy. Results: NAIONy comprised 108 (12.7%) of 848 NAION cases reviewed. Chronic renal failure with dialysis and migraine were more common in NAIONy. Fellow eye involvement rate was significantly higher for NAIONy patients (46/108, 42.6%) than for NAIONo patients (32/108, 29.6%). Fluorescein angiographic features of ischemia were documented in 44 (81.5%) of 54 eyes studied. In one case, these features were documented in pre-NAION edema. Diabetic papillopathy demonstrated delayed filling consistent with ischemia in 7 of 10 (70.0%), without significant visual field loss. Conclusions: Ischemic optic neuropathy in patients younger than 50 years is not rare. Fellow eye involvement is more frequent in younger patients. Fluorescein angiography confirmation of impaired perfusion in multiple syndromes of optic neuropathy corroborates a spectrum of optic disc ischemia ranging from perfusion delay without visual loss to severely impaired perfusion and visual loss and incorporates optic neuropathies previously considered nonischemic. PMID:24167327

  9. Measuring government commitment to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Amanda; Zoloa, Juan Ignacio; Duran, Denizhan

    2013-04-18

    Vaccination is among the most cost-effective health interventions and has attracted ever greater levels of funding from public and private donors. However, some countries, mainly populous lower-middle income countries, are lagging behind on vaccination financing and performance. In this paper, we discuss the rationale for investing in vaccination and construct a metric to measure government commitment to vaccination that could promote accountability and better tracking of performance. While noting the limitations of available data, we find that populous middle-income countries, which stand to gain tremendously from increased vaccination uptake, perform poorly in terms of their vaccination outcomes.

  10. 24 CFR 200.46 - Commitment issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and Endorsement... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Commitment Applications § 200.46 Commitment issuance....

  11. 24 CFR 200.46 - Commitment issuance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and Endorsement... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Commitment Applications § 200.46 Commitment issuance....

  12. Are changes of the geomagnetic field intensity related to changes of the tropical Pacific sea-level pressure during the last 50 years?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo Antunes; da Silva, Ligia Alves; Guarnieri, Fernando LuíS.

    2008-08-01

    The influence of solar variability into the lower atmospheric regions has been suggested on different atmospheric parameters in different time scales. However, a plausible mechanism to explain these observations remains unclear. Although it is widely accepted that the climate change over the past 50 years is attributed to human influence, we present the case that local climate change in the tropical Pacific may be due to changes in the Earth's magnetic field strength. The changes in the tropical Pacific circulation have been observed during the last 50 years, and they are attributed to the increase of the global surface temperature. However, a geomagnetic modulation of the net radiative flux in the southern tropical Pacific was recently suggested. Moreover, comparisons of long-term reconstructions of the Northern Hemisphere surface temperature and solar activity proxies indicated that the existence of a geomagnetic signal in climate data would support a direct link between solar variability and their effects on climate. Here we show that in the tropical Pacific the sea-level pressure, which is a component of the Walker circulation, could be related to the magnetospheric, ionospheric, and upper-atmosphere processes which may propagate downward to the lower atmosphere. Furthermore, we show that the changes in sea-level pressure and the Walker circulation are correlated to the westward drift of the magnetic anomaly. We compare the region averaged monthly values of the sea-level pressure in the tropical Pacific with those of the magnetic field intensity near the surface for the last 50 years. We find that the sea-level pressure in the tropical Pacific is increasing as the magnetic field intensity is decreasing. The correlation coefficient of the sea-level pressure 36-month running means versus the magnetic field intensity is 0.96. We anticipate our investigation to be a starting point for a more sophisticated investigation of the coupling between the space weather

  13. AIDS in adults 50 years of age and over: characteristics, trends and spatial distribution of the risk1

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Jordana de Almeida; Silva, Antônia Oliveira; de Sá, Laísa Ribeiro; de Almeida, Sandra Aparecida; Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2014-01-01

    Objective to analyze the sociodemographic characteristics, epidemic trend and spatial distribution of the risk of AIDS in adults 50 years of age and over. Method population-based, ecological study, that used secondary data from the Notifiable Disease Information System (Sinan/AIDS) of Paraíba state from the period January 2000 to December 2010. Results during the study period, 307 cases of AIDS were reported among people 50 years of age or over. There was a predominance of males (205/66, 8%), mixed race, and low education levels. The municipalities with populations above 100 thousand inhabitants reported 58.5% of the cases. There was a progressive increase in cases among women; an increasing trend in the incidence (positive linear correlation); and an advance in the geographical spread of the disease, with expansion to the coastal region and to the interior of the state, reaching municipalities with populations below 30 thousand inhabitants. In some locations the risk of disease was 100 times greater than the relative risk for the state. Conclusion aging, with the feminization and interiorization of the epidemic in adults 50 years of age and over, confirms the need for the induction of affirmative policies targeted toward this age group. PMID:25029044

  14. An observational study of comorbidity and healthcare utilisation among HIV-positive patients aged 50 years and over.

    PubMed

    Patel, Roshani; Moore, Thomas; Cooper, Vanessa; McArdle, Conor; Perry, Nicky; Cheek, Elizabeth; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fisher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The number of HIV-positive people aged ≥50 years is rising each year. We measured the prevalence of non-infectious illnesses and their risk factors and described healthcare use in this UK population. A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted at an outpatient HIV specialist clinic in south east England. Patients age ≥50 years were invited to complete questionnaires measuring demographics, non-infectious illnesses, medication use, lifestyle and healthcare utilisation. The response rate was 67%. Of 299 participants, 84% reported ≥1 comorbid condition and 61% reported ≥2 (multimorbidity). Most commonly reported were high cholesterol, sexual dysfunction, hypertension and depression. In multivariate analyses, age, number of years HIV-positive and duration of antiretroviral therapy remained significant predictors of comorbidity when controlling for lifestyle factors (exercise, smoking and use of recreational drugs and alcohol). Use of non-HIV healthcare services was associated with increasing comorbidity, a longer duration of HIV and recreational drug use. The majority of HIV-patients aged ≥50 years reported multiple comorbidities and this was associated with polypharmacy and increased use of non-HIV services. Further research examining the quality, safety and patient experience of healthcare is needed to inform development of services to optimally meet the needs of older HIV-positive patients.

  15. Global temperature change potential of nitrogen use in agriculture: A 50-year assessment.

    PubMed

    Fagodiya, R K; Pathak, H; Kumar, A; Bhatia, A; Jain, N

    2017-03-21

    Nitrogen (N) use in agriculture substantially alters global N cycle with the short- and long-term effects on global warming and climate change. It increases emission of nitrous oxide, which contributes 6.2%, while carbon dioxide and methane contribute 76% and 16%, respectively of the global warming. However, N causes cooling due to emission of NOx, which alters concentrations of tropospheric ozone and methane. NOx and NH3 also form aerosols with considerable cooling effects. We studied global temperature change potential (GTP) of N use in agriculture. The GTP due to N2O was 396.67 and 1168.32 Tg CO2e on a 20-year (GTP20) and 439.94 and 1295.78 Tg CO2e on 100-year scale (GTP100) during years 1961 and 2010, respectively. Cooling effects due to N use were 92.14 and 271.39 Tg CO2e (GTP20) and 15.21 and 44.80 Tg CO2e (GTP100) during 1961 and 2010, respectively. Net GTP20 was 369.44 and 1088.15 Tg CO2e and net GTP100 was 429.17 and 1264.06 Tg CO2e during 1961 and 2010, respectively. Thus net GTP20 is lower by 6.9% and GTP100 by 2.4% compared to the GTP considering N2O emission alone. The study shows that both warming and cooling effects should be considered to estimate the GTP of N use.

  16. Global temperature change potential of nitrogen use in agriculture: A 50-year assessment

    PubMed Central

    Fagodiya, R. K.; Pathak, H.; Kumar, A.; Bhatia, A.; Jain, N.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) use in agriculture substantially alters global N cycle with the short- and long-term effects on global warming and climate change. It increases emission of nitrous oxide, which contributes 6.2%, while carbon dioxide and methane contribute 76% and 16%, respectively of the global warming. However, N causes cooling due to emission of NOx, which alters concentrations of tropospheric ozone and methane. NOx and NH3 also form aerosols with considerable cooling effects. We studied global temperature change potential (GTP) of N use in agriculture. The GTP due to N2O was 396.67 and 1168.32 Tg CO2e on a 20-year (GTP20) and 439.94 and 1295.78 Tg CO2e on 100-year scale (GTP100) during years 1961 and 2010, respectively. Cooling effects due to N use were 92.14 and 271.39 Tg CO2e (GTP20) and 15.21 and 44.80 Tg CO2e (GTP100) during 1961 and 2010, respectively. Net GTP20 was 369.44 and 1088.15 Tg CO2e and net GTP100 was 429.17 and 1264.06 Tg CO2e during 1961 and 2010, respectively. Thus net GTP20 is lower by 6.9% and GTP100 by 2.4% compared to the GTP considering N2O emission alone. The study shows that both warming and cooling effects should be considered to estimate the GTP of N use. PMID:28322322

  17. Global temperature change potential of nitrogen use in agriculture: A 50-year assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagodiya, R. K.; Pathak, H.; Kumar, A.; Bhatia, A.; Jain, N.

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen (N) use in agriculture substantially alters global N cycle with the short- and long-term effects on global warming and climate change. It increases emission of nitrous oxide, which contributes 6.2%, while carbon dioxide and methane contribute 76% and 16%, respectively of the global warming. However, N causes cooling due to emission of NOx, which alters concentrations of tropospheric ozone and methane. NOx and NH3 also form aerosols with considerable cooling effects. We studied global temperature change potential (GTP) of N use in agriculture. The GTP due to N2O was 396.67 and 1168.32 Tg CO2e on a 20-year (GTP20) and 439.94 and 1295.78 Tg CO2e on 100-year scale (GTP100) during years 1961 and 2010, respectively. Cooling effects due to N use were 92.14 and 271.39 Tg CO2e (GTP20) and 15.21 and 44.80 Tg CO2e (GTP100) during 1961 and 2010, respectively. Net GTP20 was 369.44 and 1088.15 Tg CO2e and net GTP100 was 429.17 and 1264.06 Tg CO2e during 1961 and 2010, respectively. Thus net GTP20 is lower by 6.9% and GTP100 by 2.4% compared to the GTP considering N2O emission alone. The study shows that both warming and cooling effects should be considered to estimate the GTP of N use.

  18. [In memory of Roland Kuhn (1912-2005) and 50 years of imipramine].

    PubMed

    Bossong, F

    2008-09-01

    Based on his clinical experience and knowledge in the humanities, phenomenology, and natural sciences, the Swiss psychiatrist and Rorschach expert Roland Kuhn discovered the specific antidepressant effect of imipramine in the treatment of vital depressive disorder. This discovery of the first tricyclic antidepressant drug shows how an education covering the various fields of psychiatry facilitates therapeutic and scientific achievements. Kuhn's methods as a psychiatrist and his papers can show present and future generations of psychiatrist ways to make new discoveries in the field of psychiatry, psychotherapy, and psychopharmacology.

  19. High angular resolution X-ray astronomy in the next 50 years. Back to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    The 0.5 arc second angular resolution of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory is likely to be the best that can be obtained with grazing incidence optics, especially when larger effective area is required. We describe a telescope concept based upon transmitting diffractive-refractive optics that appears to be capable of providing better than mili arc second angular resolution. However, focal lengths are of the order of 1000 km, which requires long distance formation-flying between two spacecraft. In order to counteract gravity gradient forces to maintain alignment of optics with the detector and change targets,one of the spacecraft must contain engines for propulsion.

  20. Common climatic signal from glaciers in the European Alps over the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, C.; Fischer, A.; Mayer, C.; Bauder, A.; Galos, S. P.; Funk, M.; Thibert, E.; Six, D.; Braun, L.; Huss, M.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional glacier-wide mass balances are commonly used to study the effect of climate forcing on glacier melt. Unfortunately, the glacier-wide mass balances are also influenced by the glacier's dynamic response. Investigations on the effects of climate forcing on glaciers can be largely improved by analyzing point mass balances. Using a statistical model, we have found that 52% of the year-to-year deviations in the point mass balances of six glaciers distributed across the entire European Alps can be attributed to a common variability. Point mass balance changes reveal remarkable regional consistencies reaching 80% for glaciers less than 10 km apart. Compared to the steady state conditions of the 1962-1982 period, the surface mass balance changes are -0.85 m water equivalent (w.e.) a-1 for 1983-2002 and -1.63 m w.e. a-1 for 2003-2013. This indicates a clear and regionally consistent acceleration of mass loss over recent decades over the entire European Alps.

  1. Evidence Base Update: 50 Years of Research on Treatment for Child and Adolescent Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Francis, Sarah E; Rith-Najarian, Leslie; Chorpita, Bruce F

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health disorder among children and adolescents. We examined 111 treatment outcome studies testing 204 treatment conditions for child and adolescent anxiety published between 1967 and mid-2013. Studies were selected for inclusion in this review using the PracticeWise Evidence-Based Services database. Using guidelines identified by this journal (Southam-Gerow & Prinstein, 2014), studies were included if they were conducted with children and/or adolescents (ages 1-19) with anxiety and/or avoidance problems. In addition to reviewing the strength of the evidence, the review also examined indicators of effectiveness, common practices across treatment families, and mediators and moderators of treatment outcome. Six treatments reached well-established status for child and adolescent anxiety, 8 were identified as probably efficacious, 2 were identified as possibly efficacious, 6 treatments were deemed experimental, and 8 treatments of questionable efficacy emerged. Findings from this review suggest substantial support for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) as an effective and appropriate first-line treatment for youth with anxiety disorders. Several other treatment approaches emerged as probably efficacious that are not primarily CBT based, suggesting that there are alternative evidence-based treatments that practitioners can turn to for children and adolescents who do not respond well to CBT. The review concludes with a discussion of treatments that improve functioning in addition to reducing symptoms, common practices derived from evidence-based treatments, mediators and moderators of treatment outcomes, recommendations for best practice, and suggestions for future research.

  2. Glaciers and climate change: Interpretation of 50 years of direct mass balance of Hintereisferner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Direct mass balance data of Hintereisferner glacier annually measured for fifty years were reanalyzed and bias-corrected. The glacier area and the patterns of the spatial distribution of specific mass balance were homogenized using the measured data and the current methods of modern mass balance analysis on Hintereisferner. The homogenized mass balance shows a good agreement with the geodetic and the hydrological mass balance. The comparison with modelled mass balance and measured temperature data showed that the homogenized mass balance correlated best with TS sum ( R2 = 0.76) followed by the simple degree-day sum ( R2 = 0.60) and the mean summer temperature ( R2 = 0.55). From that and from the calculation of the effects of albedo changes follows that the frequency and duration of summer snowfalls play an important role in the summer ablation of the glacier. The analysis of sub areas shows that at high elevations mass balance is dominated by the influence of winter precipitation. At low elevations, the increasingly negative mass balance was a result of the increase of the mean summer temperatures and the decrease of surface elevation. Between 1953 and 2003, the surface of the glacier tongue lowered by 160 m. This corresponds to a temperature increase of about 1 °C at the surface 2003 compared to the surface 1953. In the same period, the potential incoming solar radiation during the summer is reduced by the surface lowering. Comparing the effect of these two factors, the impact of the topographic temperature change on mass balance is much higher than the impact of increased shading. At higher elevations, the effect of topographic changes is small compared to changes in the mean surface albedo. The separation of glacier tributaries has been decreasing the inflow of ice to the main tongue. The mass balance of the glacier parts connected to the main tongue decreases faster than the mass balance of the total area. Therefore, the retreat of Hintereisferner is governed

  3. The good, the bad, and the ugly: a 50-year perspective on the outcome problem.

    PubMed

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2013-03-01

    In the middle of the 20th century, Hans Eysenck reviewed studies of psychotherapy, which consisted primarily of psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and eclectic treatments, and concluded that psychotherapy (as opposed to behavior therapy) was not effective and was possibly harmful. In the inaugural article in Psychotherapy, Hans Strupp challenged Eysenck's conclusions and discussed how psychotherapy research should progress. Eysenck criticized Strupp's conjectures and Strupp responded. In this article, I discuss progress in psychotherapy research by examining "the good, the bad, and the ugly" aspects of the Eysenck and Strupp interchange. Essentially, Eysenck and Strupp motivated researchers to pursue, with increased sophistication, process and outcome research, but each was defending a theoretical position (behavior therapy and psychodynamic therapy, respectively). Despite the progress, the conjecture at issue continues to be debated today.

  4. 50 years of thiazides: should thiazide diuretics be considered third-line hypertension treatment?

    PubMed

    Brown, Angela; Captain, Becky

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to review available and emerging antihypertensive treatment options in light of current guidelines and evidence from large clinical trials. The published literature was reviewed for evidence regarding first-line options for antihypertensive agents, including thiazide-type diuretics, as monotherapy or as part of combination therapy. Current guidelines recommend using thiazide-type diuretics as first-line therapy alone or in combination with another agent. Other commonly used antihypertensive agents include calcium channel blockers, β-adrenergic receptor blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren. These agents are associated with varying degrees of evidence that they may provide protection from cardiovascular or renal disease beyond that associated with blood pressure reduction. Thiazide diuretics are inexpensive and effective but may not be preferable to other classes of antihypertensives that reduce blood pressure to a similar extent with a better safety profile and superior reductions in cardiovascular event rates. However, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and direct renin inhibitors also show promise as initial monotherapy or as part of a combination therapy regimen. In patients requiring additional blood pressure reduction, add-on therapy with a diuretic could provide additional blood pressure-lowering efficacy.

  5. Global-scale river flood vulnerability in the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Tanoue, Masahiro; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of flooding are expected to rise due to population increases, economic growth and climate change. Hence, understanding the physical and spatiotemporal characteristics of risk drivers (hazard, exposure and vulnerability) is required to develop effective flood mitigation measures. Here, the long-term trend in flood vulnerability was analysed globally, calculated from the ratio of the reported flood loss or damage to the modelled flood exposure using a global river and inundation model. A previous study showed decreasing global flood vulnerability over a shorter period using different disaster data. The long-term analysis demonstrated for the first time that flood vulnerability to economic losses in upper-middle, lower-middle and low-income countries shows an inverted U-shape, as a result of the balance between economic growth and various historical socioeconomic efforts to reduce damage, leading to non-significant upward or downward trends. We also show that the flood-exposed population is affected by historical changes in population distribution, with changes in flood vulnerability of up to 48.9%. Both increasing and decreasing trends in flood vulnerability were observed in different countries, implying that population growth scenarios considering spatial distribution changes could affect flood risk projections. PMID:27782160

  6. Global-scale river flood vulnerability in the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Masahiro; Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    The impacts of flooding are expected to rise due to population increases, economic growth and climate change. Hence, understanding the physical and spatiotemporal characteristics of risk drivers (hazard, exposure and vulnerability) is required to develop effective flood mitigation measures. Here, the long-term trend in flood vulnerability was analysed globally, calculated from the ratio of the reported flood loss or damage to the modelled flood exposure using a global river and inundation model. A previous study showed decreasing global flood vulnerability over a shorter period using different disaster data. The long-term analysis demonstrated for the first time that flood vulnerability to economic losses in upper-middle, lower-middle and low-income countries shows an inverted U-shape, as a result of the balance between economic growth and various historical socioeconomic efforts to reduce damage, leading to non-significant upward or downward trends. We also show that the flood-exposed population is affected by historical changes in population distribution, with changes in flood vulnerability of up to 48.9%. Both increasing and decreasing trends in flood vulnerability were observed in different countries, implying that population growth scenarios considering spatial distribution changes could affect flood risk projections.

  7. Govindjee at 80: more than 50 years of free energy for photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Eaton-Rye, Julian J

    2013-10-01

    We provide here a glimpse of Govindjee and his pioneering contributions on the two light reactions and the two pigment systems, particularly on the water-plastoquinone oxido-reductase, Photosystem II. His focus has been on excitation energy transfer; primary photochemistry, and the role of bicarbonate in electron and proton transfer. His major tools have been kinetics and spectroscopy (absorption and fluorescence), and he has provided an understanding of both thermoluminescence and delayed light emission in plants and algae. He pioneered the use of lifetime of fluorescence measurements to study the phenomenon of photoprotection in plants and algae. He, however, is both a generalist and a specialist all at the same time. He communicates very effectively his passion for photosynthesis to the novice as well as professionals. He has been a prolific author, outstanding lecturer and an editor par excellence. He is the founder not only of the Historical Corner of Photosynthesis Research, but of the highly valued Series Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration Including Bioenergy and Related Processes. He reaches out to young people by distributing Z-scheme posters, presenting Awards of books, and through tri-annual articles on "Photosynthesis Web Resources". At home, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, he has established student Awards for Excellence in Biological Sciences. On behalf of all his former graduate students and associates, I wish him a Happy 80th birthday. I have included here several tributes to Govindjee by his well-wishers. These write-ups express the high regard the photosynthesis community holds for "Gov" and illuminate the different facets of his life and associations.

  8. Natural menopause among women below 50 years in India: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Ogollah, Reuben; Singh, Abhishek; Dean, Tara; Dewey, Ann; Stones, William

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The age at which menopause naturally occurs may reflect nutritional and environmental circumstances as well as genetic factors. In this study we examined natural menopause as a marker of women's health at the population level in India and in some major States. Methods: Data from the Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS) carried out during 2007-2008 covering 643,944 ever-married women aged 15-49 yr were used; women of older ages were not included in this survey. Since not all women in this age group had achieved natural menopause at the time of survey, Cox proportional hazard regression models were employed to obtain the median age of women reporting a natural menopause, excluding those who underwent hysterectomy. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated for key socio-economic and reproductive variables that could potentially affect the age at natural menopause <40 yr. Results: Overall, menopause prior to age 40 was reported by approximately 1.5 per cent of women. In the national data set, significant associations with age at natural menopause were identified with marriage breakdown or widowhood, poverty, Muslim religious affiliation, ‘scheduled caste’ status, not having received schooling, rural residence, having never used contraceptive pills, not been sterilized or had an abortion, low parity and residence in the western region. Within data from five selected States examined separately, the strength of these associations varied. Interpretation & conclusions: Associations of natural menopause with sociocultural, family planning and demographic variables were noted. Most importantly, there was an association with poverty that would require further investigation as to causality. The proportion of women experiencing early menopause may represent a useful overall indicator of women's health. The data are reassuring with regard to possible late effects of sterilization on ovarian function. PMID:28139535

  9. Overview of patient dosimetry in diagnostic radiology in the USA for the past 50 years

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Nickoloff, Edward L.; Boone, John M.

    2008-12-15

    This review covers the role of medical physics in addressing issues directly related to patient dosimetry in radiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, and CT. The sections on radiography and fluoroscopy radiation doses review the changes that have occurred during the last 50 to 60 years. A number of technological improvements have contributed to both a significant reduction in patient and staff radiation doses and improvements to the image quality during this period of time. There has been a transition from film-screen radiography with hand dip film processing to electronic digital imaging utilizing CR and DR. Similarly, fluoroscopy has progressed by directly viewing image intensifiers in darkened rooms to modern flat panel image receptor systems utilizing pulsed radiation, automated variable filtration, and digitally processed images. Mammography is one of the most highly optimized imaging procedures performed, because it is a repetitive screening procedure that results in annual radiation exposure. Mammography is also the only imaging procedure in the United States in which the radiation dose is regulated by the federal government. Consequently, many medical physicists have studied the dosimetry associated with screen-film and digital mammography. In this review, a brief history of mammography dose assessment by medical physicists is discussed. CT was introduced into clinical practice in the early 1970s, and has grown into one of the most important modalities available for diagnostic imaging. CT dose quantities and measurement techniques are described, and values of radiation dose for different types of scanner are presented. Organ and effective doses to adult patients are surveyed from the earliest single slice scanners, to the latest versions that include up to two x-ray tubes and can incorporate as many as 256 detector channels. An overview is provided of doses received by pediatric patients undergoing CT examinations, as well as methods, and results, of studies

  10. Humid tropical rain forest has expanded into eucalypt forest and savanna over the last 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Tng, David Y P; Murphy, Brett P; Weber, Ellen; Sanders, Gregor; Williamson, Grant J; Kemp, Jeanette; Bowman, David M J S

    2012-01-01

    Tropical rain forest expansion and savanna woody vegetation thickening appear to be a global trend, but there remains uncertainty about whether there is a common set of global drivers. Using geographic information techniques, we analyzed aerial photography of five areas in the humid tropics of northeastern Queensland, Australia, taken in the 1950s and 2008, to determine if changes in rain forest extent match those reported for the Australian monsoon tropics using similar techniques. Mapping of the 1950s aerial photography showed that of the combined study area (64,430 ha), 63% was classified as eucalypt forests/woodland and 37% as rain forest. Our mapping revealed that although most boundaries remained stable, there was a net increase of 732 ha of the original rain forest area over the study period, and negligible conversion of rain forest to eucalypt forest/woodland. Statistical modeling, controlling for spatial autocorrelation, indicated distance from preexisting rain forest as the strongest determinant of rain forest expansion. Margin extension had a mean rate across the five sites of 0.6 m per decade. Expansion was greater in tall open forest types but also occurred in shorter, more flammable woodland vegetation types. No correlations were detected with other local variables (aspect, elevation, geology, topography, drainage). Using a geographically weighted mean rate of rain forest margin extension across the whole region, we predict that over 25% of tall open forest (a forest type of high conservation significance) would still remain after 2000 years of rain forest expansion. This slow replacement is due to the convoluted nature of the rain forest boundary and the irregular shape of the tall open forest patches. Our analyses point to the increased concentration of atmospheric CO2 as the most likely global driver of indiscriminate rain forest expansion occurring in northeastern Australia, by increasing tree growth and thereby overriding the effects of fire

  11. The Living Filter: Monitoring Nitrate Accumulation after 50 Years of Wastewater Irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, J.

    2015-12-01

    As global freshwater sources decline due to environmental contamination and a growing population, more sustainable wastewater renovation techniques will need to be applied to ensure freshwater for future generations. One such example of a sustainable solution is called the Living Filter, located on the campus of Pennsylvania State University. For fifty years, Pennsylvania State University has sprayed treated wastewater onto agricultural fields and forest ecosystems, leaving natural processes to further filter the wastewater. This cyclical process is deemed sustainable because the freshwater is recycled, providing drinking water to an increasing university population and nutrients to agricultural crops, without causing major environmental catastrophes such as fish kills, eutrophication or groundwater contamination. At first glance this project seems sustainable and effective, but for how long can this setup continue without nutrient overloading and environmental contamination? To be truly declared sustainable, the hopeful answer to this question is indefinitely. Using a combination of soil core and monitoring tools, ecosystem indicators such as soil nutrient capacities, moisture levels, and soil characteristics were measured. Comparing data from the initial system installation to present data collected from soil cores showed how ecosystems changed over time. Results revealed that nitrate concentrations were elevated through the profile in all land use types, but the concentrations were below EPA threshold. Soil characteristic analysis including particle size distribution, soil elemental composition, and texture yielded inconclusive results regarding which factors control the nitrate accumulation most significantly. The nitrate depth profile findings suggest that spray irrigation at the Living Filter under the current rates of application has not caused the ultimate stage of nitrogen saturation in the spray irrigation site. Variations in land use present interesting

  12. A Study of the Effects of Locus of Control and Commitment on Retention and Performance at the United States Air Force Academy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    analysis of a preliminary model concerning the antecedents and outcomes of employee commitment to organizations using a cross-validated framework...Attrition. The theory prevelant in the research suggests that one of the most predictable outcomes of employee commitment is reduced turnover. By

  13. Bone mineral density is not associated with musculoskeletal pain in postmenopausal Korean women aged ≥50 years.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Kim, Tae Gyun; Lee, In Hyeok; Jung, Ki Jin; Park, Jin Woo; Moon, Sang Young; Park, Moon Seok

    2015-02-01

    Although many studies reported improvement of back pain after osteoporosis treatment, there is insufficient evidence to determine whether osteoporosis is painful. We investigated whether bone mineral density correlated with musculoskeletal pain in postmenopausal Korean women aged ≥50 years. Data for postmenopausal women aged ≥50 years were obtained from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database. Demographics, Kellgren-Lawrence grade, and numeric rating scale for pain in the hip and knee joints, presence of back pain, and activity level were analyzed. Only subjects with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans and hip and knee radiographs were included. Those with malignancy, pain medication use, or a history of fragility fractures were excluded. After univariate analysis, multiple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the significant factors correlated with the degree of hip and knee pain. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors significantly associated with the presence of back pain. In total, 387 women were included in the data analysis. Age (p = 0.005) was the only significant factor correlated with the intensity of hip pain, while Kellgren-Lawrence grade (p < 0.001) was the only significant factor correlated with knee pain intensity in multiple regression analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that age (p = 0.002) was the only significant factor associated with the presence of back pain. Musculoskeletal pain was not affected by or associated with the bone mineral density (BMD) of the affected body part in postmenopausal Korean women aged ≥50 years after adjusting for the degree of osteoarthritis.

  14. Celebrating 50 Years!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansdottir, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The author congratulates members of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) on celebrating the 50th anniversary of their annual conference. These conferences have kept the spirit alive from the early years, especially the engagement in investigative, collaborative, and reasoning activities. In the 50th year as an association, the author…

  15. Diaphragmatic hernia during pregnancy: a case report with a review of the literature from the past 50 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Hou, Qiannan; Zhang, Zhu; Zhang, Jian; Xi, Mingrong

    2011-07-01

    Diaphragmatic hernia is a rare complication during pregnancy. Only 30 reports have been published on this subject in English between 1959 and 2009. Due to misdiagnoses and management delays, diaphragmatic hernia usually presents itself as a life-threatening emergency. Here, we present a case report of a patient with a traumatic diaphragmatic hernia who became acutely symptomatic during pregnancy. The diaphragmatic hernia was managed successfully, and we describe the presentation, management and outcome of this case. We also present a review of all of the reported cases of diaphragmatic hernias complicating pregnancy that have been published in English during the past 50 years.

  16. A 50-year-old woman with haemoptysis, cough and tachypnea: cholesterol pneumonia accompanying with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengxi; Zhang, Nuofu; Zhou, Ying; Li, Jinhui; Gu, Yingying; Wang, Jian; Liu, Chunli

    2017-03-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon disease caused by the presence of lipid in the alveoli. Here we described a case of a 50-year-old woman with haemoptysis, cough and tachypnea, who was diagnosed with cholesterol pneumonia accompanying with pulmonary artery hypertension. The extremely high pulmonary artery pressure achieved, in this case, is alarming and should alert the physicians that the cholesterol pneumonia may be one of the underlying causes of pulmonary artery hypertension. After a treatment of methylprednisolone, her clinical symptoms were significantly improved, which suggested that steroid might be a promising therapeutic for patients with cholesterol pneumonia.

  17. Commitment and exploration as mechanisms of identity formation.

    PubMed

    Meeus, W; Iedema, J; Maassen, G H

    2002-06-01

    We report a two-wave longitudinal study of 1,571 Dutch adolescents concerning the role of commitment and exploration in identity development. We used the Utrecht-Groningen Identity Development Scale to measure commitment and exploration in the domains of relational and societal identity. Our results can be summarized in three points. (1) Commitment and exploration are related processes in the development of identity. Adolescents with strong commitments also frequently explore them, and adolescents with low exploration in general have weak commitments. (2) The longitudinal stability of commitment and exploration has a medium effect size. For relational identity the stability of commitment is greater than that of exploration, but this is not the case for societal identity. The explanation we give for the lack of this difference in stability between commitment and exploration in societal identity is that the formative period for societal identity comes primarily at the end of adolescence. In that connection, we conclude that for present-day Dutch adolescents the formation of relational identity probably precedes that of societal identity. (3) In neither identity domain is commitment predictive of exploration three years later, nor is the reverse the case. We conclude that no long-term developmental sequentiality of commitment and exploration was found, but the results do not rule out the possibility of short-term developmental sequentiality.

  18. Kinetic commitment in the catalysis of glutamine synthesis by GS1 from Arabidopsis using (14)N/(15)N and solvent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Mauve, Caroline; Giraud, Nicolas; Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard R A; Antheaume, Ingrid; Tea, Illa; Tcherkez, Guillaume

    2016-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2) catalyzes the production of glutamine from glutamate, ammonium and ATP. Although being essential in plants for N assimilation and recycling, kinetic commitments and transition states of the reaction have not been clearly established yet. Here, we examined (12)C/(13)C, (14)N/(15)N and H2O/D2O isotope effects in Arabidopsis GS1 catalysis and compared to the prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) enzyme. A(14)N/(15)N isotope effect ((15)V/K ≈ 1.015, with respect to substrate NH4(+)) was observed in the prokaryotic enzyme, indicating that ammonium utilization (deprotonation and/or amidation) was partially rate-limiting. In the plant enzyme, the isotope effect was inverse ((15)V/K = 0.965), suggesting that the reaction intermediate is involved in an amidation-deamidation equilibrium favoring (15)N. There was no (12)C/(13)C kinetic isotope effect ((13)V/K = 1.000), suggesting that the amidation step of the catalytic cycle involves a transition state with minimal alteration of overall force constants at the C-5 carbon. Surprisingly, the solvent isotope effect was found to be inverse, that is, with a higher turn-over rate in heavy water ((D)V ≈ 0.5), showing that restructuration of the active site due to displacement of H2O by D2O facilitates the processing of intermediates.

  19. Experimental unconditionally secure bit commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Yuan; Curty, Marcos; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Li, Yu-Huai; Lin, Ze-Hong; Sun, Qi-Chao; Li, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Teng-Yun; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Cabello, Adan; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-03-01

    Quantum physics allows unconditionally secure communication between parties that trust each other. However, when they do not trust each other such as in the bit commitment, quantum physics is not enough to guarantee security. Only when relativistic causality constraints combined, the unconditional secure bit commitment becomes feasible. Here we experimentally implement a quantum bit commitment with relativistic constraints that offers unconditional security. The commitment is made through quantum measurements in two quantum key distribution systems in which the results are transmitted via free-space optical communication to two agents separated with more than 20 km. Bits are successfully committed with less than 5 . 68 ×10-2 cheating probability. This provides an experimental proof of unconditional secure bit commitment and demonstrates the feasibility of relativistic quantum communication.

  20. Teacher Team Commitment, Teamwork and Trust: Exploring Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sungmin; Henkin, Alan B.; Egley, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate relationships between teamwork, trust and teacher team commitment. Design/methodology/approach: Research has confirmed the value-added effects of organizational commitment in terms of job performance, organizational effectiveness, and employee retention. This study focused on teacher teams as the unit of analysis, and…

  1. Towards an evidence-based management of right iliac fossa pain in the over 50-year-old patient

    PubMed Central

    Gammeri, E; Catton, A; van Duren, BH; Appleton, SG

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Right iliac fossa pain is a common presenting complaint to general surgery. The differential diagnosis is wide, particularly in the elderly. Computed tomography (CT) is often used in the ‘older’ population, as they have a higher prevalence of acute colonic diverticulitis and colonic neoplasia, both of which should be identified prior to surgery. There is, however, no published evidence to support this practice. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients aged over 50 years who presented with right iliac fossa (RIF) pain to a district general hospital. We determined whether tenderness was predominantly right- or left-sided and whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) was present on admission. The use of imaging modalities, their results and, if performed, operative findings were recorded. Results Of 3160 patients identified, 89 met the inclusion criteria. Diagnoses included appendicitis (27%), neoplasia (15%), non-specific abdominal pain (15%) and acute colonic diverticulitis (10%). CT was performed in 82% of patients, with a sensitivity of 97% based on operative findings. Six patients underwent surgery without a scan, two of whom required a change in the planned procedure due to unexpected findings. Conclusions Unless contraindicated, CT scanning should be mandatory in patients aged over 50 years presenting with signs of peritonism in the RIF or lower abdomen. PMID:27269436

  2. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients. PMID:27047819

  3. No increases in the rate of undescended testis in Hungary during the last 50 years: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Stelios; Ács, Nándor; Czeizel, Andrew E

    2015-08-01

    Undescended testis (cryptorchidism) is a common structural birth defect, i.e. congenital abnormality of the male genital organs and increasing trend in its birth prevalence was reported in some countries. The aim of this study was to analyze the recorded annual birth prevalence of isolated undescended testis (IUT) in the population-based large dataset of the Hungarian Congenital Abnormality Registry for the period between 1962 and 2011, i.e. during the last 50 years. Cases with IUT reported after births were evaluated, and their annual rate per 1000 live-births was calculated. The rates of cases with IUT were compared with the so-called true rate of IUT measured in a previous clinical-epidemiological study based on the personal examination of 10,203 newborn infants. The birth prevalence of cases with recorded IUT in Hungary was lower than expected based on the true rate of IUT. Thus the two waves in the rate of IUT were connected with the different completeness of reporting. In conclusion the birth prevalence of cases with IUT in Hungary did not indicate a real increasing trend during the last 50 years.

  4. Conflicting pressures on romantic relationship commitment for anxiously attached individuals.

    PubMed

    Joel, Samantha; MacDonald, Geoff; Shimotomai, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    Anxious attachment predicts strong desires for intimacy and stability in romantic relationships, yet the relation between anxious attachment and romantic commitment is unclear. We propose that extant literature has failed to find a consistent relation because anxiously attached individuals experience conflicting pressures on commitment. Data from Australia (N=137) show that relationship satisfaction and felt security each act as suppressors of a positive relation between anxious attachment and commitment. Data from Japan (N=159) replicate the suppression effect of felt security and also demonstrate that the residual positive relation between anxious attachment and commitment can be partly explained by dependence on the partner. These findings suggest that anxiously attached individuals may be ambivalent about commitment. Dissatisfaction and worries about negative evaluation appear to exert downward pressure on commitment, counteracting the upward pressure that is exerted by factors such as relational dependency.

  5. A Clinical Pilot Study of Individual and Group Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Their Parents: Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Kanstrup, Marie; Wicksell, Rikard K.; Kemani, Mike; Wiwe Lipsker, Camilla; Lekander, Mats; Holmström, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric chronic pain is common and can result in substantial long-term disability. Previous studies on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have shown promising results in improving functioning in affected children, but more research is still urgently needed. In the current clinical pilot study, we evaluated an ACT-based interdisciplinary outpatient intervention (14 sessions), including a parent support program (four sessions). Adolescents were referred to the clinic if they experienced disabling chronic pain. They were then randomized, along with their parents, to receive group (n = 12) or individual (n = 18) treatment. Adolescent pain interference, pain reactivity, depression, functional disability, pain intensity and psychological flexibility, along with parent anxiety, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. There were no significant differences in outcomes between individual and group treatment. Analyses illustrated significant (p < 0.01) improvements (medium to large effects) in pain interference, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. Additionally, analyses showed significant (p < 0.01) improvements (large effects) in parent pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. On all significant outcomes, clinically-significant changes were observed for 21%–63% of the adolescents across the different outcome measures and in 54%–76% of the parents. These results support previous findings and thus warrant the need for larger, randomized clinical trials evaluating the relative utility of individual and group treatment and the effects of parental interventions. PMID:27854323

  6. A Clinical Pilot Study of Individual and Group Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Their Parents: Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Functioning.

    PubMed

    Kanstrup, Marie; Wicksell, Rikard K; Kemani, Mike; Wiwe Lipsker, Camilla; Lekander, Mats; Holmström, Linda

    2016-11-16

    Pediatric chronic pain is common and can result in substantial long-term disability. Previous studies on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have shown promising results in improving functioning in affected children, but more research is still urgently needed. In the current clinical pilot study, we evaluated an ACT-based interdisciplinary outpatient intervention (14 sessions), including a parent support program (four sessions). Adolescents were referred to the clinic if they experienced disabling chronic pain. They were then randomized, along with their parents, to receive group (n = 12) or individual (n = 18) treatment. Adolescent pain interference, pain reactivity, depression, functional disability, pain intensity and psychological flexibility, along with parent anxiety, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. There were no significant differences in outcomes between individual and group treatment. Analyses illustrated significant (p < 0.01) improvements (medium to large effects) in pain interference, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. Additionally, analyses showed significant (p < 0.01) improvements (large effects) in parent pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. On all significant outcomes, clinically-significant changes were observed for 21%-63% of the adolescents across the different outcome measures and in 54%-76% of the parents. These results support previous findings and thus warrant the need for larger, randomized clinical trials evaluating the relative utility of individual and group treatment and the effects of parental interventions.

  7. Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Depression, Psychological Well-Being and Feeling of Guilt in 7 - 15 Years Old Diabetic Children

    PubMed Central

    Ataie Moghanloo, Vahid; Ataie Moghanloo, Roghayyeh; Moazezi, Mousa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes imposes restrictions on physical, emotional, and social functioning of children and adolescents. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for depression, psychological well-being and feeling of guilt in 7 - 15 years old diabetic children. Patients and Methods: This was a clinical trial with pre-test and post-test design with control group. The study population consisted of 34 participants selected using convenient sampling out of all 7 - 15 years old patients that referred to the Diabetes Association of Tabriz. They were randomly allocated into two equal groups (experimental and control). The experimental group participated in therapy sessions and the control group did not receive any intervention. The research instruments were reynolds child depression scale (RCDS), eysenck feelings of guilt scale and satisfaction with life scale (SWLS). Results: Multivariate covariance analysis (MANCOVA) showed that the treatment was effective on variables of depression, psychological well-being and feeling guilty in 7 - 15 years old diabetic children (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The aforementioned treatment is effective and suggested to be used in other psychosomatic diseases of children. PMID:26396702

  8. Quantum bit commitment under Gaussian constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandilara, Aikaterini; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum bit commitment has long been known to be impossible. Nevertheless, just as in the classical case, imposing certain constraints on the power of the parties may enable the construction of asymptotically secure protocols. Here, we introduce a quantum bit commitment protocol and prove that it is asymptotically secure if cheating is restricted to Gaussian operations. This protocol exploits continuous-variable quantum optical carriers, for which such a Gaussian constraint is experimentally relevant as the high optical nonlinearity needed to effect deterministic non-Gaussian cheating is inaccessible.

  9. Effectiveness of Web-Delivered Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Relation to Mental Health and Well-Being: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Glendenning, Alexander; Hoon, Alice E; John, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background The need for effective interventions to improve mental health and emotional well-being at a population level are gaining prominence both in the United Kingdom and globally. Advances in technology and widespread adoption of Internet capable devices have facilitated rapid development of Web-delivered psychological therapies. Interventions designed to manage a range of affective disorders by applying diverse therapeutic approaches are widely available. Objective The main aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence base of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in a Web-based delivery format. Method A systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis was conducted. Two electronic databases were searched for Web-delivered interventions utilizing ACT for the management of affective disorders or well-being. Only Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) were included. Results The search strategy identified 59 articles. Of these, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria specified. The range of conditions and outcome measures that were identified limited the ability to draw firm conclusions about the efficacy of Web-delivered ACT-based intervention for anxiety or well-being. Conclusions ACT in a Web-based delivery format was found to be effective in the management of depression. Rates of adherence to study protocols and completion were high overall suggesting that this therapeutic approach is highly acceptable for patients and the general public. PMID:27558740

  10. Factors Predicting Faculty Commitment to the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjortoft, Nancy

    This paper examines the effect of faculty rank, satisfaction with salary, working conditions, institutional reputation, perceived influence on institutional policies, participation in meetings, and perceived governance on organizational commitment (at both the departmental and institutional level) using a representative sample of 4,925 faculty.…

  11. Organizational Justice and Commitment in Interscholastic Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisenant, Warren

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of three organizational justice dimensions on the commitment of high school student athletes (N = 480) to continue playing a referent sport. The athletes were asked to complete an instrument designed to assess their perceived levels of justice displayed by their coaches in three justice…

  12. Influencing Organizational Commitment through Office Redesign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Paula C.; McElroy, James C.; Scheibe, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research on the effects of office redesign on work-related outcomes has been largely a theoretical and yielded mixed and conflicting findings. Expanding on individual reactions to office design changes as specified by social interference theory, we propose that office redesign affects organizational commitment and this relationship is…

  13. The Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Bibliotherapy for Enhancing the Psychological Health of Japanese College Students Living Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muto, Takashi; Hayes, Steven C.; Jeffcoat, Tami

    2011-01-01

    International students often experience significant psychological distress but empirically tested programs are few. Broadly distributed bibliotherapy may provide a cost-effective approach. About half of the Japanese international students in a western university in the United States (N=70) were randomly assigned to a wait-list or to receive a…

  14. Commitment and Compatibility: Teachers' Perspectives on the Implementation of an Effective School-Based, Peer-Led Smoking Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audrey, Suzanne; Holliday, Jo; Campbell, Rona

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Although current UK policy argues that schools have a key role in raising health standards, emphasis on the core curriculum restricts teachers' opportunities to undertake health promotion activities. The challenge is to design effective health promotion interventions that minimize pressures on teaching staff and curriculum space. Here…

  15. Ion beams 12, Legnaro 6-8 June 2012, the 50 years (1961-2011) of the Legnaro Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Renato Angelo

    2013-07-18

    A short review of the history of the Legnaro Laboratory is presented since its foundation 50 years ago by Prof. A. Rostagni of the University of Padova. The evolution of the Laboratory as a national reference center for fundamental and applied nuclear physics researches is outlined, pointing out its transformation into the INFN National Laboratories in 1968. After the first CN VdG Accelerator of 5.5 MV operating in 1961 and the AN2000 devoted to interdisciplinary researches (1971), i.e. 40 years ago, ten years later the advent of the first heavy ion facility in Italy, the XTU Tandem accelerator, and later on of the ALPI superconducting linear accelerator, was crucial for any future developments, not only in the field of nuclear physics but also for the evolution of interdisciplinary programmes with ion beams.

  16. Determination of Both Fetus' and Mother's Blood Type from an Autopsy Case Immersed in Formalin for Over 50 Years.

    PubMed

    Uno, Akari Takaya; Morita, Satomu; Furukawa, Satoshi; Nishi, Katsuji; Hitosugi, Masahito

    2016-07-01

    A female fetus which had been immersed in formalin for more than 50 years was found in Japan. Because no liquid blood could be obtained, we tried to use immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods to tissue samples obtained at autopsy to identify both the fetal and mother's blood type. We detected B antigens on endothelial cells in paraffin sections of the fetal organs. Furthermore, we observed both anti-A- and anti-B-positive red blood cells in the intervillous space, which is indicative of the mother's blood type. To our knowledge, this is the first case report on determining the blood type of both the fetus and the mother from tissue immersed in formalin for such a long time. The results suggest that IHC is valuable for the determination of ABO blood type in circumstances of long postmortem duration and unfavorable storage conditions.

  17. Changes in management and outcomes for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes over the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Over the 50 years from 1964 to 2014, outcomes for children with type 1 diabetes have improved significantly, because of both technological advancements and changes in management philosophy. For the child with type 1 diabetes in 2014, intensive management with multiple daily injections or insulin pump therapy and the support of a specialist multidisciplinary team is now standard care. The main treatment goal is no longer the avoidance of hypoglycaemia, but the minimisation of hyperglycaemia and glucose variability, thereby reducing the risk of microvascular complications. However, the inherent burden of care and diligence required by patients and families, if they are to maintain optimal diabetes control, have not changed and may even have increased. While the long sought-after cure for diabetes remains elusive, artificial pancreas or closed-loop systems hold the most promise for improving the burden of care in the near term for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  18. [50 years of the Revista de Biologia Tropical: its contribution to the development of the Geo-Paleontology].

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Teresita

    2002-06-01

    The geosciences contribution along the 50 years of the Revista de Biología Tropical had been scarcity and episodic. Until now there are 2374 papers but only 21 (0.88%) have some relation with geological sciences. It's possible to recognize two periods with geological contributions, one between 1963 and 1978. It's appropriate to underline the importance of the biologist L. D. Gómez with his contributions about Costa Rican Paleobotanic in this period. The other period includes from 1988 to the present, and it's typified by an increase of biologist and geologist participation in different topics regarding with geosciences. Foreign and national researches are in the same ratio and belong from several countries like Costa Rica, México and Dominican Republic. The subjects are concerning mainly about fossil taxonomy (Paleontology: 81%), only 19% are related with geological topics. Such distribution could be explained because the affinity between the fossil studies and the biological sciences.

  19. Ventricular Tachycardia in Fabry Disease Detected in a 50-Year-Old Woman during 14-Day Continuous Cardiac Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gburek, Jaime; Rochford, Laura; Hopkin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder. Female carriers were long thought to be asymptomatic; however, research has revealed the opposite. Cardiac conditions are the chief causes of death in women with Fabry disease. Although ventricular tachycardia has been reported in male patients with Fabry disease, it is not thought to be a frequent finding in females. We describe the case of a 50-year-old woman in whom we used 14-day continuous electrocardiographic monitoring to identify nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, after electrocardiograms and 24-hour Holter monitoring failed to detect the arrhythmia. A permanent implantable cardioverter-defibrillator relieved the patient's symptoms. We discuss why this case supports the need for more extensive electrophysiologic evaluation in women who have Fabry disease. PMID:28100976

  20. Cementless acetabular fixation in patients 50 years and younger at 10 to 18 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Teusink, Matthew J; Callaghan, John J; Warth, Lucian C; Goetz, Devon D; Pedersen, Douglas R; Johnston, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the 10- to 18-year follow-up of cementless acetabular fixation in patients 50 years and younger. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive group of 118 patients (144 hips) in whom primary total hip arthroplasty had been performed by 2 surgeons using a cementless acetabular component. Two (1.4%) cementless acetabular components were revised because of aseptic loosening. Twenty-four hips (16.7%) were revised for any mechanical failure of the acetabular component mostly related to acetabular liner wear and osteolysis. The average linear wear rate was 0.19 mm per year, which was higher than our previous reports with cemented acetabular fixation. The fiber mesh ingrowth surface of the cementless acetabular component in this study was superior to cemented acetabular components in terms of fixation. However, the high rates of wear and osteolysis have led to poor overall acetabular component construct survivorship.

  1. REVIEW ARTICLE: The next 50 years of the SI: a review of the opportunities for the e-Science age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Marcus P.

    2010-12-01

    The International System of Units (SI) was declared as a practical and evolving system in 1960 and is now 50 years old. A large amount of theoretical and experimental work has been conducted to change the standards for the base units from artefacts to physical constants, to improve their stability and reproducibility. Less attention, however, has been paid to improving the SI definitions, utility and usability, which suffer from contradictions, ambiguities and inconsistencies. While humans can often resolve these issues contextually, computers cannot. As an ever-increasing volume and proportion of data about physical quantities is collected, exchanged, processed and rendered by computers, this paper argues that the SI definitions, symbols and syntax should be made more rigorous, so they can be represented wholly and unambiguously in ontologies, programs, data and text, and so the SI notation can be rendered faithfully in print and on screen.

  2. The Measurement of Organizational Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowday, Richard T.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This paper summarizes a stream of research aimed at developing and validating a measure of employee commitment to work organizations. The instrument, developed by Porter and his colleagues, is called the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Satisfactory test-retest reliabilities and internal consistency reliabilities were found. (Author)

  3. Organizational Climate and Teacher Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Stephen Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of school climate and teacher commitment in elementary schools in Alabama. A total of 67 elementary schools were surveyed and 1353 teachers voluntarily participated in the study. The instruments used in this study were the Organizational Climate Index (OCI) and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire (OCQ).…

  4. [High prevalence of arterial hypertension in women over 50 years of age in the city of Leon, Guanajuato].

    PubMed

    Kornhauser, C; Malacara, J M; Donato, F; Botello, D

    1994-01-01

    We studied the prevalence of arterial hypertension and its associated risk factors in the urban population of León, State of Guanajuato. Using a cross sectional design we selected by home interview 1000 volunteers 16 to 70 years old from three socioeconomic levels. Forty seven of 468 males (10.0%) and 67 of 532 females (12.6%) were found with hypertension. Increased rates for women were significant (p < 0.01). The rates of hypertension increased slowly with age for men, but for women a sudden increase was found at 48 years of age, the mean age of menopause. At 50 years of age or older, the rate for hypertension was 22.3% for men and 41.7% for women (chi 2 = 7.27, p = 0.007). The multivariate study of factors associated with hypertension showed significance for age, body mass index and smoking habit for the total group and for men, but only age and body weight for women. No association was seen for alcoholism, life style and socioeconomy. A univariate analysis of menopause was strongly associated with hypertension (chi 2 = 46.8, p < 0.0001) and the relative risk for hypertension in menopausal women was 8.04 (7.56-9.73). We conclude that the frequency of hypertension in this urban population is similar to that found in other studies except for women over 50 years of age. Such excess risk of hypertension in this group may be explained by an increased frequency of obesity and an increment in sedentary habits which occur in our female population, and the possible participation of hormone deprivation.

  5. [Changing characteristics of organic matter and pH of cultivated soils in Zhejiang province over the last 50 years].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Kui; Chang, Yue-Chang

    2013-11-01

    By comparing the current quality investigation data of cultivated soils in Zhejiang province with the past data, changing characteristics of organic matter and pH value of the soils in this province over last 50 years were analyzed. The results showed that content of organic matter and pH value of the cultivated soils changed greatly during past 50 years, and the changes varied with historical periods and soil types. From 1958 to 1980s, accumulation of soil organic matter was obvious, soil organic matter increased averagely by 40.34%, and the mean pH increased slightly by 0.05 of pH unit. From 1980s to 2008, the mean content of organic matter in paddy soils decreased by 5.58%. The changes of soil organic matter varied with distribution zones of the paddy soils. The mean content of organic matter of paddy soils in valley plain increased with time, and those in plain with water network, hilly area and coastal plain decreased with time. The mean contents of organic matter in fluvio-aquic soil and coastal saline soil in the year 2008 were 29.48% and 14.60% respectively higher than those in 1980s. As compared with those obtained at 1980s, the cultivated soil in this province have been significantly acidified in the past thirty years, the mean pH value declined by 0.25 of pH unit, and the decline of pH value of paddy soils was greater than those of fluvio-aquic soil and saline soil. Changes in fertilization structure and conversion of paddy fields to upland were thought as main causes of the changes in both soil organic matter and pH value.

  6. A rare variant of inguinal hernia: Cryptorchid testis at the age of 50 years. Etiopathogenicity, prognosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kassir, Radwan; Dubois, Joelle; Berremila, Sid-Ali; Baccot, Sylviane; Boueil-Bourlier, Alexia; Tiffet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cryptorchidism is characterized by the extra-scrotal position of the testis. The surgical community has little to no knowledge of cryptorchid testis in adults apart from of pediatric surgeons. Therefore, we sought to describe this unusual cause of inguinal hernia. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 50-year-old man was referred with a inguinal hernia. Diagnosis of cryptorchidism was made during surgery, as the patient underwent an operation for repair of his left inguinal hernia. The testicle was non-viable and a left testicle was resected. Histopathology report confirmed a atrophic testis without testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). DISCUSSION This is an extremely rare case of cryptorchidism revealed in an adult. The patient remained asymptomatic for 50 years. Most studies have concluded that there is a direct correlation between how long the testis was subjected to a cryptorchid position and TGCT incidence. The recommended age of surgical correction is before the age of 2 years. In our case, we did not find correlation between the time of surgery and risk of TGCT. Histopathology report confirmed the presence of leydig cells, seminiferous tubule and Sertoli cells without TGCT. Very little is known about link between cryptorchidism and TGCT. The correct diagnosis of inguinal hernia is usually made during an inguinal hernia repair. CONCLUSION The surgeon must always be alert to the possibility of cryptorchid testis during a surgical exploration of an inguinal hernia. In suspected cases, laparoscopy ultrasonographic, CT scan and laparoscopy evaluation may be helpful in diagnosing of this atypical inguinal hernia before surgery. PMID:24892247

  7. Knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to dietary sodium among 35- to 50-year-old Ontario residents

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Sophia; Pipe, Andrew L; Moroz, Isabella A; Reid, Robert D; Blanchard, Christopher M; Cote, Danielle F; Mark, Amy E

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excessive consumption of dietary sodium is an important public health issue. Little is known about the knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to sodium consumption among Canadians. OBJECTIVE: To examine knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to sodium consumption among a sample of Canadians 35 to 50 years of age. METHODS: A random-digit-dial telephone survey was conducted among adults aged 35 to 50 years of age in two regions in Ontario. Logistic regression was used to examine the likelihood of having taken action in the past 30 days to reduce sodium consumption, and the likelihood that respondents were intending to reduce sodium in the next six months. RESULTS: A total of 3130 interviews were completed. The majority of respondents were aware of excessive sodium consumption as a health issue and reported that they were taking action to reduce their dietary sodium intake. A large proportion of respondents did not correctly identify many foods as being high in sodium and, consequently, may have incorrectly believed they were consuming healthy amounts of sodium. Respondents who believed sodium reduction was important were more likely to have taken action to reduce sodium within the previous 30 days. Respondents who self-identified as consuming too much sodium were less likely to have taken action. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the present study suggest that in addition to policy changes designed to reduce the sodium content of foods, there is a need to address the low levels of knowledge surrounding sources of excessive sodium in popular Canadian foods, the importance of a reduced intake of sodium and the availability of lower-sodium alternatives. PMID:20485696

  8. [50 years of connective tissue research: from the French Connective Tissue Club to the French Society of Extracellular Matrix Biology].

    PubMed

    Maquart, François-Xavier; Borel, Jacques-Paul

    2012-01-01

    The history of connective tissue research began in the late 18th century. However, it is only 50 years later that the concept of connective tissue was shaped. It took another fifty years before biochemical knowledge of extracellular matrix macromolecules began to emerge in the first half of the 20th century. In 1962, thanks to Ladislas and Barbara Robert, back from the US, the first society called "French Connective Tissue Club" was created in Paris. The first board was constituted of Albert Delaunay, Suzanne Bazin and Ladislas Robert. Very quickly, under the influence of these pioneers, national and international meetings were organized and, in 1967, a "Federation of the European Connective Tissue Clubs" was created at the initiative of Ladislas Robert (Paris) and John Scott (Manchester). It spread rapidly to the major European nations. In 1982 the transformation of "Clubs" in "Societies" occurred, a name more in line with the requirements of the time. In 2008, the "French Connective Tissue Society" became the "French Society of Extracellular Matrix Biology" ("Société Française de Biologie de la Matrice Extracellulaire", SFBMEc), to better highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in the biology of living organisms. The SFBMEc's mission today is to promote and develop scientific exchanges between academic, industrial, and hospital laboratories involved in research on the extracellular matrix. SFBMEc organizes or subsidizes scientific meetings and awards scholarships to Ph.D. students or post-docs to participate in international conferences. It includes 200 to 250 members from different disciplines, developing strong interactions between scientists, clinicians and pathologists. It is present all around the French territory in many research laboratories. During these last 50 years, the extraordinary advances made possible by the development of new investigation techniques, in particular molecular biology, cell and tissue imaging, molecular modeling

  9. Experimental Unconditionally Secure Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Yuan; Curty, Marcos; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Li, Yu-Huai; Lin, Ze-Hong; Sun, Qi-Chao; Li, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Teng-Yun; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Cabello, Adán; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Quantum physics allows for unconditionally secure communication between parties that trust each other. However, when the parties do not trust each other such as in the bit commitment scenario, quantum physics is not enough to guarantee security unless extra assumptions are made. Unconditionally secure bit commitment only becomes feasible when quantum physics is combined with relativistic causality constraints. Here we experimentally implement a quantum bit commitment protocol with relativistic constraints that offers unconditional security. The commitment is made through quantum measurements in two quantum key distribution systems in which the results are transmitted via free-space optical communication to two agents separated with more than 20 km. The security of the protocol relies on the properties of quantum information and relativity theory. In each run of the experiment, a bit is successfully committed with less than 5.68×10-2 cheating probability. This demonstrates the experimental feasibility of quantum communication with relativistic constraints.

  10. Alcohol breeds empty goal commitments.

    PubMed

    Sevincer, A Timur; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2009-08-01

    According to alcohol-myopia theory (C. M. Steele & R. A. Josephs, 1990), alcohol leads individuals to disproportionally focus on the most salient aspects of a situation and to ignore peripheral information. The authors hypothesized that alcohol leads individuals to strongly commit to their goals without considering information about the probability of goal attainment. In Study 1, participants named their most important interpersonal goal, indicated their expectations of successfully attaining it, and then consumed either alcohol or a placebo. In contrast to participants who consumed a placebo, intoxicated participants felt strongly committed to their goals despite low expectations of attaining them. In Study 2, goal-directed actions were measured over time. Once sober again, intoxicated participants with low expectations did not follow up on their strong commitments. Apparently, when prospects are bleak, alcohol produces empty goal commitments, as commitments are not based on individuals' expectations of attaining their goals and do not foster goal striving over time.

  11. 46 CFR 308.5 - Voluntary contract of commitment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE General § 308.5 Voluntary contract of commitment. Applications for insurance on vessels described in § 308... obtained from the American War Risk Agency or MARAD. The effective date of the contract of commitment...

  12. Overstretched and unreciprocated commitment: reviewing research on the occupational health and safety effects of downsizing and job insecurity.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Michael; Bohle, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, a leading business practice has been often-repeated rounds of downsizing and restructuring (also referred to as reorganization, re-engineering, and a host of other euphemistic terms) by large private and public sector employers. Frequently associated with other practices such as outsourcing, privatization, and the increased use of temporary workers, downsizing/restructuring has increased the level of job insecurity among workers as well as leading to changes in work processes (including work intensification and multi-tasking) and management behavior. How has downsizing/restructuring and increased job insecurity affected the occupational health, safety, and well-being of workers, and what measures have employers, unions, and governments taken to address any adverse effects? The authors reviewed international studies of the occupational health and safety (OHS) effects of downsizing/restructuring and increased job insecurity undertaken over the past 20 years. After imposing quality filters, they obtained 86 studies. Analysis revealed that 73 (85%) of the studies found poorer OHS outcomes (using a range of measures). Studies were examined to see whether they provided clues as to the reasons for negative outcomes.

  13. A randomized control trial examining the effect of acceptance and commitment training on clinician willingness to use evidence-based pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Varra, Alethea A; Hayes, Steven C; Roget, Nancy; Fisher, Gary

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment training (ACT) for increasing drug and alcohol counselors' willingness to use evidence-based agonist and antagonist pharmacotherapy. Fifty-nine drug and alcohol counselors were randomly assigned to either a 1-day ACT workshop or a 1-day educational control workshop. Both groups then attended a 2-day workshop on empirically supported treatments for substance abuse. Measures were taken at pre- and posttraining and 3-month follow-up on reported use of pharmacotherapy, willingness to use pharmacotherapy, perceived barriers to implementing new treatments, and general acceptance. As compared with those in the education alone condition, participants in the ACT condition showed significantly higher rates of referrals to pharmacotherapy at follow-up, rated barriers to learning new treatments as less believable at posttraining and follow-up, and showed greater psychological flexibility at posttraining and follow-up. Mediational analyses indicated that reduced believability of barriers and greater psychological flexibility mediated the impact of the intervention. Results support the idea that acceptance-based interventions may be helpful in addressing the psychological factors related to poor adoption of evidence-based treatments.

  14. Concentration of 3H in ground water and estimation of committed effective dose due to ground water ingestion in some places in the Maharashtra state, India.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P J; Bhade, S P D; Kolekar, R V; Singh, Rajvir; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of tritium in environmental samples requires highest possible sensitivity. In the present study, the authors have optimised the counting window for the analysis of (3)H in environmental samples using the recently installed Ultra Low Level Quantulus 1220 Liquid Scintillation Counting at BARC to improve the detection limit of the system. The optimised counting window corresponding to the highest figure of merit of 883.8 was found to be 20-162 channels. Different brands of packaged drinking waters were analysed to select a blank that would define the system background. The minimum detectable activity (MDA) achieved was 1.5 Bq l(-1) for a total counting time of 500 min. The concentration of tritium in well and bore well water samples collected from the villages of Pune, villages located at 1.8 km from Tarapur Atomic Power Station, Kolhapur and Ratnagiri, was analysed. The activity concentration ranged from 0.55 to 3.66 Bq l(-1). The associated age-dependant dose from water ingestion in the study area was estimated. The effective committed dose recorded for different age classes is negligible compared with World Health Organization and US Environmental Protection Agency dose guidelines.

  15. Contexts as Shared Commitments

    PubMed Central

    García-Carpintero, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary semantics assumes two influential notions of context: one coming from Kaplan (1989), on which contexts are sets of predetermined parameters, and another originating in Stalnaker (1978), on which contexts are sets of propositions that are “common ground.” The latter is deservedly more popular, given its flexibility in accounting for context-dependent aspects of language beyond manifest indexicals, such as epistemic modals, predicates of taste, and so on and so forth; in fact, properly dealing with demonstratives (perhaps ultimately all indexicals) requires that further flexibility. Even if we acknowledge Lewis (1980)'s point that, in a sense, Kaplanian contexts already include common ground contexts, it is better to be clear and explicit about what contexts constitutively are. Now, Stalnaker (1978, 2002, 2014) defines context-as-common-ground as a set of propositions, but recent work shows that this is not an accurate conception. The paper explains why, and provides an alternative. The main reason is that several phenomena (presuppositional treatments of pejoratives and predicates of taste, forces other than assertion) require that the common ground includes non-doxastic attitudes such as appraisals, emotions, etc. Hence the common ground should not be taken to include merely contents (propositions), but those together with attitudes concerning them: shared commitments, as I will defend. PMID:26733087

  16. Contexts as Shared Commitments.

    PubMed

    García-Carpintero, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary semantics assumes two influential notions of context: one coming from Kaplan (1989), on which contexts are sets of predetermined parameters, and another originating in Stalnaker (1978), on which contexts are sets of propositions that are "common ground." The latter is deservedly more popular, given its flexibility in accounting for context-dependent aspects of language beyond manifest indexicals, such as epistemic modals, predicates of taste, and so on and so forth; in fact, properly dealing with demonstratives (perhaps ultimately all indexicals) requires that further flexibility. Even if we acknowledge Lewis (1980)'s point that, in a sense, Kaplanian contexts already include common ground contexts, it is better to be clear and explicit about what contexts constitutively are. Now, Stalnaker (1978, 2002, 2014) defines context-as-common-ground as a set of propositions, but recent work shows that this is not an accurate conception. The paper explains why, and provides an alternative. The main reason is that several phenomena (presuppositional treatments of pejoratives and predicates of taste, forces other than assertion) require that the common ground includes non-doxastic attitudes such as appraisals, emotions, etc. Hence the common ground should not be taken to include merely contents (propositions), but those together with attitudes concerning them: shared commitments, as I will defend.

  17. The synergistic effect of nanotopography and sustained dual release of hydrophobic and hydrophilic neurotrophic factors on human mesenchymal stem cell neuronal lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Teo, Benjamin Kim Kiat; Tan, Guo-Dong Sean; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2014-08-01

    A combination of nanotopography and controlled release is a potential platform for neuronal tissue engineering applications. Previous studies showed that combining both physical and chemical guidance was more effective than individual cues in the directional promotion of neurite outgrowth. Nanotopography can direct human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into neuronal lineage, while controlled release of neurotrophic factors can deliver temporally controlled biochemical signals. Hypothesizing that the synergistic effect will enhance neuronal lineage commitment of hMSCs, a fabrication method for multiple neurotrophic factors delivery from a single nanopatterned (350 nm gratings), poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) film was developed and evaluated. Our results showed a synergistic effect on hMSC differentiation cultured on substrates with both nanotopographical and biochemical cues. The protein/drug encapsulation into PCL nanopatterned films was first optimized using a hydrophilic model protein, bovine serum albumin. The hydrophobic retinoic acid (RA) molecule was directly incorporated into PCL films. To achieve sustained release, hydrophilic nerve growth factor (NGF) was first encapsulated within polyelectrolyte complexation fibers before they were embedded within the nanopatterned PCL film. Our results showed that nanotopography on the fabricated polymer films remained intact, while release of bioactive RA and NGF was sustained over a period of 3 weeks. Under the combinatorial effect of physical and biochemical cues, we observed an enhanced upregulation of neuronal genes such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and neurofilament light (NFL) as compared with sustained delivery of individual cues and bolus delivery. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that MAP2 and NFL gene upregulation in hMSCs was most pronounced on the nanogratings with sustained release of both RA and NGF. The fabricated platforms supported the sustained delivery of multiple

  18. Dairy Intake Enhances Body Weight and Composition Changes during Energy Restriction in 18–50-Year-Old Adults—A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Stonehouse, Welma; Wycherley, Thomas; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie; Taylor, Pennie; Brinkworth, Grant; Riley, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to investigate the effects of dairy food or supplements during energy restriction on body weight and composition in 18–50-year-old. Methods: RCTs ≥ 4 weeks comparing the effect of dairy consumption (whole food or supplements) with control diets lower in dairy during energy restriction on body weight, fat and lean mass were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Pubmed, Cochrane Central and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) until March 2016. Reports were identified and critically appraised in duplicate. Data were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. Chi2- and I2-statistics indicated heterogeneity. Dose effect was assessed using meta-regression analysis. GRADE guidelines were used to rate the quality (QR) of the evidence considering risk of bias, inconsistency, indirectness, imprecision, publication bias and effect estimates. Results: 27 RCTs were reviewed. Participants consumed between 2 and 4 standard servings/day of dairy food or 20–84 g/day of whey protein compared to low dairy control diets, over a median of 16 weeks. A greater reduction in body weight (−1.16 kg [−1.66, −0.66 kg], p < 0.001, I2 = 11%, QR = high, n = 644) and body fat mass (−1.49 kg [−2.06, −0.92 kg], p < 0.001, I2 = 21%, n = 521, QR = high) were found in studies largely including women (90% women). These effects were absent in studies that imposed resistance training (QR = low-moderate). Dairy intake resulted in smaller loss of lean mass (all trials pooled: 0.36 kg [0.01, 0.71 kg], p = 0.04, I2 = 64%, n = 651, QR = moderate). No between study dose-response effects were seen. Conclusions: Increased dairy intake as part of energy restricted diets resulted in greater loss in bodyweight and fat mass while attenuating lean mass loss in 18–50-year-old adults. Further research in males is needed to investigate sex effects. PMID:27376321

  19. Consequences of organizational commitment in abolished company sports team - a case study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yuki; Hochi, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Motoki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to show that how the abolishment of company sports team influenced the organizational commitment in employees. In this study, Three-Component Model of Organizational Commitment (Meyer and Allen, 1997) was tested with 16 employees (10 males, 6 females) of T Company in NAGANO prefecture. The average age of the participants was 44, 50 years (SD=±0.85). And from 16 employees, 3 male employees were measured on organizational commitment with interview test. According to the analysis, the relation between organizational commitment in employees and the abolishment of company sports team was not positive significant correlation. Furthermore, results of interview test did not show the relation between organizational commitment in employees and the abolishment of company sports team. However, results of interview test showed the relation with organizational commitment of players in T Company sports team. Consequently, the goal to possess a sports team in T Company was not to boost organizational commitment in employees. In addition, it is necessary to reconsider the correlation among employees engaged in T Company in the future.

  20. Arbitrarily Long Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Kaushik; Chailloux, André; Leverrier, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    We consider the recent relativistic bit commitment protocol introduced by Lunghi et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 030502 (2015)] and present a new security analysis against classical attacks. In particular, while the initial complexity of the protocol scales double exponentially with the commitment time, our analysis shows that the correct dependence is only linear. This has dramatic implications in terms of implementation: in particular, the commitment time can easily be made arbitrarily long, by only requiring both parties to communicate classically and perform efficient classical computation.

  1. A 50-year natural experiment: The impact of non-native riparian vegetation on an unregulated canyon-bound river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Non-native riparian vegetation has become a dominant feature along the rivers of the Colorado River basin. The relative role of changes in flow regime and changes in the distribution, composition and abundance of riparian vegetation in causing narrowing is unclear. The flow regime of the Yampa River in northwestern Colorado is only minimally affected by dams and diversions. Encroachment of the non-native riparian shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) into the system has resulted in alteration of cross-sectional form. We take advantage of the natural experiment, set up when tamarisk invaded a large river with an unperturbed flow regime, to describe the timing, style, and magnitude of channel and vegetative changes on the Yampa River during the past 50 years. This geomorphic history provides a way of defining the role of tamarisk, independent of flow regime changes, in causing narrowing and planform simplification. We match spatially-limited, yet temporally rich, stratigraphic and dendrogeomorphic analyses from floodplain trenches and pits with spatially-rich, yet temporally limited, historical aerial photographs to identify long-term trends in channel form. Tamarisk cohort maps inform us on the large-scale distribution and timing of non-native vegetation encroachment and detailed germination and geomorphic histories of individual tamarisk are interpreted to provide information on the interactions and feedbacks among floods, tamarisk, and geomorphic processes. The geomorphic and vegetative reconstruction presented here identifies tamarisk as a key player in altering geomorphic form on the Yampa River by accelerating conversion of active channel surfaces to floodplain and suppressing floodplain stripping. On average, mutli-thread reaches, where the alluvial valley of the Yampa River is widest, narrowed 6% during the past 50 years. In the early 1960's, tamarisk was sparsely distributed in the river corridor. The channel was maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium, such

  2. Reporters and Their Professional and Organizational Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Lee B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Secondary analyses of data gathered in a national study of United States journalists yielded information about variables that predict professional and organizational commitment. The factors selected for analysis were found to explain organizational commitment better than professional commitment. (GT)

  3. Estimating the Prevalence of Ovarian Cancer Symptoms in Women Aged 50 Years or Older: Problems and Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhuoyu; Gilbert, Lucy; Ciampi, Antonio; Kaufman, Jay S; Basso, Olga

    2016-11-01

    Diagnostic testing is recommended in women with "ovarian cancer symptoms." However, these symptoms are nonspecific. The ongoing Diagnosing Ovarian Cancer Early (DOVE) Study in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, provides diagnostic testing to women aged 50 years or older with symptoms lasting for more than 2 weeks and less than 1 year. The prevalence of ovarian cancer in DOVE is 10 times that of large screening trials, prompting us to estimate the prevalence of these symptoms in this population. We sent a questionnaire to 3,000 randomly sampled women in 2014-2015. Overall, 833 women responded; 81.5% reported at least 1 symptom, and 59.7% reported at least 1 symptom within the duration window specified in DOVE. We explored whether such high prevalence resulted from low survey response by applying inverse probability weighting to correct the estimates. Older women and those from deprived areas were less likely to respond, but only age was associated with symptom reporting. Prevalence was similar in early and late responders. Inverse probability weighting had a minimal impact on estimates, suggesting little evidence of nonresponse bias. This is the first study investigating symptoms that have proven to identify a subset of women with a high prevalence of ovarian cancer. However, the high frequency of symptoms warrants further refinements before symptom-triggered diagnostic testing can be implemented.

  4. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M M

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining.

  5. Thermal comfort and tourism climate changes in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau in the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Chi, Xiaoli

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the thermal comfort and its changes in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau over the last 50 years have been evaluated by using the physiological equivalent temperature (PET), and a more complete tourism climate picture is presented by the Climate-Tourism-Information Scheme (CTIS). The results show that PET classes in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau cover six out of the nine-point thermal sensation scale — very cold, cold, cool, slightly cool, neutral and slightly warm — and cold stress is prevailing throughout the year. A small number of slightly cool/warm and neutral days occur in summer months. There occur no warm, hot and very hot days. The frequency of PET classes varies among regions, depending on their altitude/latitude conditions. Xining, Lhasa and Yushu are the top three cities in terms of thermal favorability. With global warming, annual cumulative number of thermally favorable days has been increasing, and that of cold stress has been reducing. The change is more obvious in lower elevation than that in higher elevation regions. The improving thermal comfort in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau might be a glad tiding for local communities and tourists. Besides PET, CTIS can provide a number of additional bioclimatic information related to tourism and recreational activities. CTIS for Lhasa and Xining shows that sunshine is plentiful all the year round, and windy days occur frequently from late January to early May. This is a useful bioclimatic information for tourism authorities, travel agencies, resorts and tourists.

  6. 50 years of physical growth and impressive technological advances unmatched by health human resources reform and cultural change.

    PubMed

    Scott, Graham W S

    2012-01-01

    The year 1962 was pre-medicare. The public was concerned about access and individual affordability of care. Funding involved public or private responsibility and the role of government. Physicians, the most influential providers, were concerned that government funding would result in the loss of their independence and their becoming state employees. The retrospective analysis "Looking Back 50 Years in Hospital Administration" by Graham and Sibbald is arresting as it underlines just how much progress we have made in what could be termed "hardware" in support of healthcare policy and hospital administration. From this perspective, the progress has been eye opening, given the advent of universal healthcare, the advancement in our physical facilities, the development of high-quality diagnostic equipment, the explosion of new research centres and new and complex clinical procedures. The development of this hardware has given our providers better weapons and contributed to a remarkable improvement in life expectancy. But progress in health administration and policy management involves more than hardware. If the hardware constitutes the tools, then the "software" of the healthcare system involves the human resources and the culture change that must be positioned to make maximum use of the hardware. In 2062, looking back at the 2012 experience, the legacy test may be whether we dealt with health human resources and culture change at a rate that matched our progress in hardware.

  7. Mid-to long-term results of revision total hip replacement in patients aged 50 years or younger.

    PubMed

    Lee, P T H; Lakstein, D L; Lozano, B; Safir, O; Backstein, J; Gross, A E

    2014-08-01

    Revision total hip replacement (THR) for young patients is challenging because of technical complexity and the potential need for subsequent further revisions. We have assessed the survivorship, functional outcome and complications of this procedure in patients aged < 50 years through a large longitudinal series with consistent treatment algorithms. Of 132 consecutive patients (181 hips) who underwent revision THR, 102 patients (151 hips) with a mean age of 43 years (22 to 50) were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 11 years (2 to 26) post-operatively. We attempted to restore bone stock with allograft where indicated. Using further revision for any reason as an end point, the survival of the acetabular component was 71% (sd 4) and 54% (sd 7) at ten- and 20 years. The survival of the femoral component was 80% (sd 4) and 62% (sd 6) at ten- and 20 years. Complications included 11 dislocations (6.1%), ten periprosthetic fractures (5.5%), two deep infections (1.1%), four sciatic nerve palsies (2.2%; three resolved without intervention, one improved after exploration and freeing from adhesions) and one vascular injury (0.6%). The mean modified Harris Hip Score was 41 (10 to 82) pre-operatively, 77 (39 to 93) one year post-operatively and 77 (38 to 93) at the latest review. This overall perspective on the mid- to long-term results is valuable when advising young patients on the prospects of revision surgery at the time of primary replacement.

  8. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining. PMID:26549926

  9. Evaluating changes in stream fish species richness over a 50-year time-period within a landscape context

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Midway, Stephen R.; Wagner, Tyler; Tracy, Bryn H.; Hogue, Gabriela M.; Starnes, Wayne C.

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, streams and rivers are facing a suite of pressures that alter water quality and degrade physical habitat, both of which can lead to changes in the composition and richness of fish populations. These potential changes are of particular importance in the Southeast USA, home to one of the richest stream fish assemblages in North America. Using data from 83 stream sites in North Carolina sampled in the 1960’s and the past decade, we used hierarchical Bayesian models to evaluate relationships between species richness and catchment land use and land cover (e.g., agriculture and forest cover). In addition, we examined how the rate of change in species richness over 50 years was related to catchment land use and land cover. We found a negative and positive correlation between forest land cover and agricultural land use and average species richness, respectively. After controlling for introduced species, most (66 %) stream sites showed an increase in native fish species richness, and the magnitude of the rate of increase was positively correlated to the amount of forested land cover in the catchment. Site-specific trends in species richness were not positive, on average, until the percentage forest cover in the network catchment exceeded about 55 %. These results suggest that streams with catchments that have moderate to high (>55 %) levels of forested land in upstream network catchments may be better able to increase the number of native species at a faster rate compared to less-forested catchments.

  10. Retrospective analysis of the genetic diversity of Klebsiella oxytoca isolated in Poland over a 50-year period.

    PubMed

    Stojowska, K; Krawczyk, B; Kałuzewski, S; Kur, J

    2009-10-01

    Population genetics analyses and determination of the phylogenetic relationships between strains have proven to be extremely useful approaches, enabling deeper insights into the epidemiological pattern of bacterial species. There is no longitudinal data describing the molecular epidemiology of Klebsiella oxytoca strains that are opportunistic pathogens responsible for an increasing number of multi-resistant infections in hospitals. The aim of the present study was to assess the genetic diversity of K. oxytoca strains over a 50-year period using internal transcribed spacer polymerase chain reaction (ITS-PCR) and PCR MP (ang. PCR melting profiles) genotyping methods on a large collection of strains isolated from the patients of several hospitals in Poland. The phylogenetic analysis based on ITS-PCR exhibited six distinct branches. Two main groups, KoX and KoY, with four and two sub-groups within KoX and KoY, respectively, have been identified. Typing by the PCR MP method showed a higher level of genetic diversity. However, all K. oxytoca strains were also divided into six genotype groups (KoA, KoB, KoC, KoD, KoE and KoF). In conclusion, we found that the ITS-PCR and PCR MP methods are useful for the phylogenetic delineation of genetic groups in K. oxytoca.

  11. Prognostic features of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes aged < 50 years: update of a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Finsinger, Paola; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Santopietro, Michelina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Volpicelli, Paola; Petrucci, Luigi; Nanni, Mauro; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-12-01

    Fewer than 10% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are younger than 50 years. A series of 91 younger patients (median age 44 years with female prevalence) are reported and compared with elderly patients. Frequent karyotypic changes were trisomy 8 (9.8%) and monosomy 7 (5%). Twenty-three patients had occupational exposure to potential mutagens (benzene and solvents), with a male predominance, higher frequency of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) (52%) and higher frequency of monosomy 7 (21.7%). At a median follow-up of 72 months, 22 patients (24%) evolved to acute leukemia, with higher frequency being observed among the exposed cohort (39% vs. 19% non-exposed). Unfavorable factors for overall survival were: age > 40 years, > 5% of blasts, trilinear bone marrow involvement and intermediate-high World Health Organization Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) risk. The present results suggest that younger MDS could be identified as a distinct subset. For patients belonging to the low/intermediate-I risk group, due to a low transformation rate, aggressive approaches should rarely be recommended.

  12. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining.

  13. Communication, Leadership, and Organizational Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eblen, Anna L.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes the relationship of leadership style and communication behavior to employee commitment. Finds that leaders' stylistic qualities and socially skilled communication play a part in predicting how subordinates feel about their organization. (MS)

  14. Considerations in civil commitment of individuals with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Cavaiola, Alan A; Dolan, David

    2016-01-01

    Several states currently have enacted laws that allow for civil commitment for individuals diagnosed with severe substance use disorders. Civil commitment or involuntary commitment refers to the legal process by which individuals with mental illness are court-ordered into inpatient and/or outpatient treatment programs. Although initially civil commitment laws were intended for individuals with severe mental illness, these statutes have been extended to cover individuals with severe substance use disorders. Much of the recent legislation allowing for civil commitment of individuals with substance use disorders has come about in response to the heroin epidemic and is designed to provide an alternative to the unrelenting progression of opioid use disorders. Civil commitment also provides an opportunity for individuals with opioid use disorders to make informed decisions regarding ongoing or continued treatment. However, civil commitment also raises concerns regarding the potential violation of 14th Amendment rights, specifically pertaining to abuses of deprivation of liberty or freedom, which are guaranteed under the 14th Amendment to the United States Constitution. This commentary examines these issues while supporting the need for effective brief civil commitment legislation in all states.

  15. The Effect of Perceived Organizational Support and Perceived Organizational Politics on Teacher Commitment: An Analysis of Public and Non-Public Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sides, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current research was to comparatively explore and document similarities and differences in POS, POP, and teacher commitment within the two school settings (public and non-public) by analyzing the perceptions of teachers within secondary school settings within a mid-south state. Surveys were sent to teachers for completion. After…

  16. The Effect of Personal Values, Organizational Values, and Person-Organization Fit on Ethical Behaviors and Organizational Commitment Outcomes among Substance Abuse Counselors: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Tammara Petrill

    2013-01-01

    Numerous research studies have concluded that values drive perceptions, responses to situations, judgments, interactions among people, and behaviors. In addition, studies have found that congruence or agreement between individual values and organizational values can increase job satisfaction and commitment. Minimal research has explored the…

  17. Effects of Two Versions of an Empathy-Based Rape Prevention Program on Fraternity Men's Survivor Empathy, Attitudes, and Behavioral Intent to Commit Rape or Sexual Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foubert, John D.; Newberry, Johnathan T.

    2006-01-01

    Fraternity men (N = 261) at a small to midsized public university saw one of two versions of a rape prevention program or were in a control group. Program participants reported significant increases in empathy toward rape survivors and significant declines in rape myth acceptance, likelihood of raping, and likelihood of committing sexual assault.…

  18. Long-term variability of 50 years of standard phase-height measurement at Kühlungsborn, Mecklenburg, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Dieter H. W.; Entzian, Günter

    2015-04-01

    The phase-height measurements of low-frequency radio waves are used to study the long-term variability of the mesosphere over Europe. Due to international regulations (the Geneva Frequency Plan of 1975), most existing European radio stations were required to change their broadcasting frequencies but slightly. It is shown that the daily standard phase heights (SPHs) determined for a constant zenith angle are equal for close frequencies (up to about 10 kHz). Further, this concept guarantees the continuity of the same series of SPH in the case of slight frequency change. At Kühlungsborn (54°N, 12°E, Mecklenburg, Northern Germany), the field strength measurements of the broadcasting station Allouis (Central France) have been maintained since February 1959. Based on the SPH method, a homogenized daily series was generated for a 50-year period with a loss rate of about 2%. The statistical analysis of the SPH series shows a significant overall trend with a decrease of 114 m per decade. The mean annual cycle is dominant, and it shows a well-known winter minimum. As expected, the long-term variability is partly anticorrelated with the solar cycle. For the solar minimum, the stratospheric influences of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-like and quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO)-like oscillations on SPH have been found. During winter, the SPH changes are linked to changes of the residual circulation and its induced changes of vertical NO transports, and its subsequent NO photoionization. It is shown that during intervals of solar maximum nonlinearity and solar feedback processes play an important role in phase changes of SPH oscillation.

  19. Genetic variation, phenotypic stability, and repeatability of drought response in European larch throughout 50 years in a common garden experiment.

    PubMed

    George, Jan-Peter; Grabner, Michael; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Weißenbacher, Lambert; Schueler, Silvio

    2016-09-26

    Assessing intra-specific variation in drought stress response is required to mitigate the consequences of climate change on forest ecosystems. Previous studies suggest that European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), an important European conifer in mountainous and alpine forests, is highly vulnerable to drought. In light of this, we estimated the genetic variation in drought sensitivity and its degree of genetic determination in a 50-year-old common garden experiment in the drought-prone northeastern Austria. Tree ring data from larch provenances originating from across the species' natural range were used to estimate the drought reaction in four consecutive drought events (1977, 1981, 1990-1994, and 2003) with extremely low standardized precipitation- and evapotranspiration-index values that affected growth in all provenances. We found significant differences among provenances across the four drought periods for the trees' capacity to withstand drought (resistance) and for their capacity to reach pre-drought growth levels after drought (resilience). Provenances from the species' northern distribution limit in the Polish lowlands were found to be more drought resistant and showed higher stability across all drought periods than provenances from mountainous habitats at the southern fringe. The degree of genetic determination, as estimated by the repeatability, ranged up to 0.39, but significantly differed among provenances, indicating varying degrees of natural selection at the provenance origin. Generally, the relationship between the provenances' source climate and drought behavior was weak, suggesting that the contrasting patterns of drought response are a result of both genetic divergence out of different refugial lineages and local adaptation to summer or winter drought conditions. Our analysis suggests that European larch posseses high genetic variation among and within provenances that can be used for assisted migration and breeding programs.

  20. Performance and agreement of risk stratification instruments for postoperative delirium in persons aged 50 years or older.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Carolien J; Absalom, Anthony R; de Bock, Geertruida H; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Izaks, Gerbrand J

    2014-01-01

    Several risk stratification instruments for postoperative delirium in older people have been developed because early interventions may prevent delirium. We investigated the performance and agreement of nine commonly used risk stratification instruments in an independent validation cohort of consecutive elective and emergency surgical patients aged ≥50 years with ≥1 risk factor for postoperative delirium. Data was collected prospectively. Delirium was diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. The observed incidence of postoperative delirium was calculated per risk score per risk stratification instrument. In addition, the risk stratification instruments were compared in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), and positive and negative predictive value. Finally, the positive agreement between the risk stratification instruments was calculated. When data required for an exact implementation of the original risk stratification instruments was not available, we used alternative data that was comparable. The study population included 292 patients: 60% men; mean age (SD), 66 (8) years; 90% elective surgery. The incidence of postoperative delirium was 9%. The maximum observed incidence per risk score was 50% (95%CI, 15-85%); for eight risk stratification instruments, the maximum observed incidence per risk score was ≤25%. The AUC (95%CI) for the risk stratification instruments varied between 0.50 (0.36-0.64) and 0.66 (0.48-0.83). No AUC was statistically significant from 0.50 (p≥0.11). Positive predictive values of the risk stratification instruments varied between 0-25%, negative predictive values between 89-95%. Positive agreement varied between 0-66%. No risk stratification instrument showed clearly superior performance. In conclusion, in this independent validation cohort, the performance and agreement of commonly used risk stratification instruments for postoperative delirium was poor. Although some caution is needed

  1. Mortality after Distal Radius Fracture in Men and Women Aged 50 Years and Older in Southern Norway

    PubMed Central

    Øyen, Jannike; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Haugeberg, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Increased mortality rates in patients sustaining hip and vertebral fractures are well documented; however in distal radius fracture patients the results are conflicting. The aim of this study was to examine short- and long-term mortality in distal radius fracture patient in comparison with the background population. Patients aged ≥50 years with distal radius fracture living in Southern Norway who suffered a fracture in the two year period 2004 and 2005 were included in the study. The mortality risk of the standard Norwegian population was used to calculate the standardized mortality ratio (SMR). The number of distal radius fractures was 883 (166 men and 717 women). Mean age was 69 years (men 65 years and women 70 years). After one year the overall mortality rate was 3.4% (men 5.4% and women 2.9%) and after five years 4.6% (men 4.0% and women 4.8%). The SMR for men and women compared to the Norwegian population for the first year was 1.6 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.6, 2.7) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.4, 1.2), respectively, and after five years 1.7 (95% CI: 0.3, 3.0) and 2.0 (95% CI: 1.2, 2.7). Stratified on age groups (50–70 and >70 years) an increased SMR was only seen in female patients aged >70 years five years after the fracture (SMR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.6). In conclusion, increased SMR was found in female patients aged >70 years five years after the distal radius fracture, but not in men or in women younger than 70 years. PMID:25380128

  2. Relational Commitment and Threats to Relationship Maintenance Goals: Influences on Condom Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umphrey, Laura; Sherblom, John

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effects of relational commitment (high commitment versus low commitment) and relationship maintenance goals (high threat versus low threat) on decisions to request the use of a condom. Methods: The authors conducted a 2-part study using a survey of responses to hypothetical scenarios and decisions in actual…

  3. The "CEO" of women's work lives: how Big Five Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Openness predict 50 years of work experiences in a changing sociocultural context.

    PubMed

    George, Linda G; Helson, Ravenna; John, Oliver P

    2011-10-01

    Few long-term longitudinal studies have examined how dimensions of personality are related to work lives, especially in women. We propose a life-course framework for studying work over time, from preparatory activities (in the 20s) to descending work involvement (after age 60), using 50 years of life data from the women in the Mills Longitudinal Study. We hypothesized differential work effects for Extraversion (work as pursuit of rewards), Openness (work as self-actualization), and Conscientiousness (work as duty) and measured these 3 traits as predictor variables when the women were still in college. In a prospective longitudinal design, we then studied how these traits predicted the women's subsequent work lives from young adulthood to age 70 and how these effects depended on the changing sociocultural context. Specifically, the young adulthood of the Mills women in the mid-1960s was rigidly gender typed and family oriented; neither work nor education variables at that time were predicted from earlier personality traits. However, as women's roles changed, later work variables became related to all 3 traits, as expected from current Big Five theory and research. For example, early personality traits predicted the timing of involvement in work, the kinds of jobs chosen, and the status and satisfaction achieved, as well as continued work participation and financial security in late adulthood. Early traits were also linked to specific cultural influences, such as the traditional feminine role, the women's movement, and graduate education for careers.

  4. Osler vindicated: glioma of the leg center with Jacksonian epilepsy; removal and cure, with a 50-year follow-up. Historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Feindel, William

    2009-08-01

    On December 14, 1883, William Osler, then pathologist at the Montreal General Hospital, presented the specimen of a brain with an almond-sized glioma beneath the right motor cortex to the Montreal Medico-Chirurgical Society. The brain specimen was from a young woman who had suffered from intermittent Jacksonian seizures for 14 years and had eventually died in status epilepticus. Aware of the pioneering removal of a tumor from the cortex reported on in 1885 by Bennett and Godlee, Osler wrote of his case, "this was an instance in which operation would have been justifiable and possibly have been the means of saving life." In 1953, a young man with Jacksonian attacks that began in his foot underwent removal of a Grade I glioma from the central fissure. The operation was performed in an awake craniotomy during which cortical mapping was used to define the motor and sensory cortices. Treatment with focal radiation followed, and afterward the patient became seizure-free, stopped taking anticonvulsant medication, and has led an active life over the past 50 years. Reference is made to the experiences of Sherrington, Cushing, and Penfield with cortical stimulation in the awake patient under regional anesthesia as an effective aid to surgery for epileptogenic lesions, tumors, and vascular malformations. Their technique allows for maximal resection with minimal neurological deficits. Over the past 20 years, this approach has been adopted effectively in many neurosurgical centers.

  5. Organisational Commitment and Committee Turnover of Volunteers in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuskelly, Graham

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 328 volunteers serving on sports committees in Australia found that organizational commitment was higher in organizations with open decision making, conflict resolution, and attention to group process. Positive, effective committee functioning led to lower turnover. (SK)

  6. Conceptual and methodological challenges to measuring political commitment to respond to HIV

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Researchers have long recognized the importance of a central government’s political “commitment” in order to mount an effective response to HIV. The concept of political commitment remains ill-defined, however, and little guidance has been given on how to measure this construct and its relationship with HIV-related outcomes. Several countries have experienced declines in HIV infection rates, but conceptual difficulties arise in linking these declines to political commitment as opposed to underlying social and behavioural factors. Methods This paper first presents a critical review of the literature on existing efforts to conceptualize and measure political commitment to respond to HIV and the linkages between political commitment and HIV-related outcomes. Based on the elements identified in this review, the paper then develops and presents a framework to assist researchers in making choices about how to assess a government's level of political commitment to respond to HIV and how to link political commitment to HIV-related outcomes. Results The review of existing studies identifies three components of commitment (expressed, institutional and budgetary commitment) as different dimensions along which commitment can be measured. The review also identifies normative and ideological aspects of commitment and a set of variables that mediate and moderate political commitment that need to be accounted for in order to draw valid inferences about the relationship between political commitment and HIV-related outcomes. The framework summarizes a set of steps that researchers can follow in order to assess a government's level of commitment to respond to HIV and suggests ways to apply the framework to country cases. Conclusions Whereas existing studies have adopted a limited and often ambiguous conception of political commitment, we argue that conceiving of political commitment along a greater number of dimensions will allow researchers to draw a more complete

  7. The thermochemistry of cubane 50 years after its synthesis: a high-level theoretical study of cubane and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Agapito, Filipe; Santos, Rui C; Borges dos Santos, Rui M; Martinho Simões, José A

    2015-03-26

    The gas-phase enthalpy of formation of cubane (603.4 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)) was calculated using an explicitly correlated composite method (W1-F12). The result obtained for cubane, together with the experimental value for the enthalpy of sublimation, 54.8 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1), led to 548.6 ± 4.5 kJ mol(-1) for the solid-phase enthalpy of formation. This value is only 6.8 kJ mol(-1) higher than the 50-year-old original calorimetric result. The carbon-hydrogen bond dissociation enthalpy (C-H BDE) of cubane (438.4 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)), together with properties relevant for its experimental determination using gas-phase ion thermochemistry, namely the cubane gas-phase acidity (1704.6 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)), cubyl radical electron affinity (45.8 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)), cubane ionization energy (1435.1 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)), cubyl radical cation proton affinity (918.8 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)), cubane cation appearance energy (1099.6 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)), and cubyl ionization energy (661.2 ± 4 kJ mol(-1)), were also determined. These values were compared with those calculated for unstrained hydrocarbons (viz., methane, ethane, and isobutane). The strain energy of cubane (667.2 kJ mol(-1)) and cubyl radical (689.4 kJ mol(-1)) were independently estimated via quasihomodesmotic reactions. These values were related via a simple model to the C-H BDE in cubane. Taking into account the accuracy of the computational method, the comparison with high-precision experimental results, and the data consistency afforded by the relevant thermodynamic cycles, we claim an uncertainty better than ±4 kJ mol(-1) for the new enthalpy of formation values presented.

  8. Patient Perspectives on Online Health Information and Communication With Doctors: A Qualitative Study of Patients 50 Years Old and Over

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background As health care systems around the world shift toward models that emphasize self-care management, there is increasing pressure for patients to obtain health information online. It is critical that patients are able to identify potential problems with using the Internet to diagnose and treat a health issue and that they feel comfortable communicating with their doctor about the health information they acquire from the Internet. Objective Our aim was to examine patient-identified (1) problems with using the Internet to identify and treat a health issue, (2) barriers to communication with a doctor about online health information seeking, and (3) facilitators of communication with a doctor about patient searches for health information on the Internet. Methods For this qualitative exploratory study, semistructured interviews were conducted with a sample of 56 adults age 50 years old and over. General concerns regarding use of the Internet to diagnose and treat a health issue were examined separately for participants based on whether they had ever discussed health information obtained through the Internet with a doctor. Discussions about barriers to and facilitators of communication about patient searches for health information on the Internet with a doctor were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Six higher-level general concerns emerged: (1) limitations in own ability, (2) credibility/limitations of online information, (3) anxiety, (4) time consumption, (5) conflict, and (6) non-physical harm. The most prevalent concern raised by participants who communicated with a doctor about their online health information seeking related to the credibility or limitations in online information. Participants who had never communicated with a doctor about their online health information seeking most commonly reported concerns about non-physical harm. Four barriers to communication emerged: (1) concerns about embarrassment, (2) concerns that the doctor doesn’t want

  9. Evidence of bottom-up control of marine productivity in the Mediterranean Sea during the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Diego; Garcia-Gorriz, Elisa; Piroddi, Chiara; Stips, Adolf

    2014-05-01

    The temporal dynamics of biogeochemical variables derived from a coupled 3D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model of the entire Mediterranean Sea is evaluated during the last 50 years (1960 - 2010). Realistic atmospheric forcing and river discharge are used to force the dynamics of the coupled model system. The time evolutions of primary and secondary productions in the entire basin are assessed against available independent data on fisheries yields and catches per unit effort for the same time period. Concordant patterns are found in the time-series of all biological variables (from the model and from fisheries statistics), with low values at the beginning of the series, a later increase with maximum values reached at the end of the 1990's and a posterior stabilization or a small decline. Spectral analysis of the annual biological time-series reveals coincident low-frequency signals in all of them; the first, more energetic signal, peaks at 2000 while the second one (less energetic) presents maximum values at around 1982. Almost identical low-frequency signals are found in the nutrient loads of the main rivers of the basin and in the integrated (0-100 meters) mean nutrient concentrations in the marine ecosystem. Nitrate concentration shows an increasing trend up to 1998 with a later stabilization or a slight decline to present day values. This nitrate evolution seems to be driving the first low-frequency signal found in the biological time series. Phosphate, on the other hand, shows maximum concentrations around 1982 and a posterior sharp decline. This nutrient seems to be responsible for the second low-frequency signal observed in the biological time-series. Our analysis shows that the control of marine productivity (from plankton to fish) in the Mediterranean basin seem to be principally mediated through bottom-up processes that could be traced back to the characteristics of riverine discharges. Other types of control could not be excluded from our analysis (e

  10. Engineering America's Current and Future Space Transportation Systems: 50 Years of Systems Engineering Innovation for Sustainable Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dmbacher, Daniel L.; Lyles, Garry M.; McConnaughey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has delivered space transportation solutions for America's complex missions, ranging from scientific payloads that expand knowledge, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, to astronauts and lunar rovers destined for voyages to the Moon. Currently, the venerable Space Shuttle, which has been in service since 1981, provides the United States' (U.S.) capability for both crew and heavy cargo to low-Earth orbit to' construct the International Space Station, before the Shuttle is retired in 2010. In the next decade, NASA will replace this system with a duo of launch vehicles: the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle (Figure 1). The goals for this new system include increased safety and reliability coupled with lower operations costs that promote sustainable space exploration for decades to come. The Ares I will loft the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, while the heavy-lift Ares V will carry the Altair Lunar Lander and the equipment and supplies needed to construct a lunar outpost for a new generation of human and robotic space pioneers. This paper will provide details of the in-house systems engineering and vehicle integration work now being performed for the Ares I and planned for the Ares V. It will give an overview of the Ares I system-level test activities, such as the ground vibration testing that will be conducted in the Marshall Center's Dynamic Test Stand to verify the integrated vehicle stack's structural integrity and to validate computer modeling and simulation (Figure 2), as well as the main propulsion test article analysis to be conducted in the Static Test Stand. These activities also will help prove and refine mission concepts of operation, while supporting the spectrum of design and development work being performed by Marshall's Engineering Directorate, ranging from launch vehicles and lunar rovers to scientific spacecraft and associated experiments

  11. Health and well being of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people aged 50 years and over.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Mark

    2017-03-07

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to examine the health and well being of older lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people, the health issues that concern them, the services they use and challenges accessing services.Methods This study comprised a survey of the health and well being of 312 LGBTI people aged 50 years and over in New South Wales. The survey included the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) measure of health-related quality of life, the Kessler 10 (K10) measure of psychological distress, and the three-item Loneliness Scale.Results Higher levels of psychological distress, lower mental health and greater loneliness were found among this sample than is typically found in the general population. Mental health was lower among carers and those not in a relationship, while psychological distress was greater among those living alone and those experiencing higher rates of loneliness. The most commonly accessed health service was a general practitioner (GP), with most respondents reporting that they were open about their sexuality to their GP and that they had a regular GP. Some reported difficulties accessing health services because of their gender or sexual diversity.Conclusions Although many older LGBTI people are well, both physically and mentally, they do appear to face increased risk of certain health issues compared with the general population.What is known about the topic? Overseas research indicates that older LGBTI people may be at greater risk of certain physical and mental health conditions than the general population.What does this paper add? This paper provides Australian data, using well-validated instruments, on the health and well being of older LGBTI people. It provides evidence of the health issues that older LGBTI people are most concerned about and the barriers they face in accessing services.What are the implications for practitioners? It is important for health practitioners to be aware that older LGBTI people appear to be

  12. Safe Commits for Transactional Featherweight Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuong Tran, Thi Mai; Steffen, Martin

    Transactions are a high-level alternative for low-level concurrency-control mechanisms such as locks, semaphores, monitors. A recent proposal for integrating transactional features into programming languages is Transactional Featherweight Java (TFJ), extending Featherweight Java by adding transactions. With support for nested and multi-threaded transactions, its transactional model is rather expressive. In particular, the constructs governing transactions - to start and to commit a transaction - can be used freely with a non-lexical scope. On the downside, this flexibility also allows for an incorrect use of these constructs, e.g., trying to perform a commit outside any transaction. To catch those kinds of errors, we introduce a static type and effect system for the safe use of transactions for TFJ. We prove the soundness of our type system by subject reduction.

  13. Long space missions, gene therapy, and the vital role of magnesium: a three-pronged plan for the next 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, William J

    2010-01-01

    Since pharmaceuticals cannot be used in space until liver and kidney dysfunctions are corrected, and with invariable malabsorption, it appears there is no alternative other than to use subcutaneous magnesium (Mg) replacements in the presence of deficiencies and use of gene therapy. I suggest beginning with the correction of as many as four gene deficiencies: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and erythropoietin (EPO), all as well as Mg related to perfusion and angiogenesis. There is no evidence of significant lunar radiation levels in the absence of a solar storm. It could then be determined whether this has resulted in correction of liver and kidney dysfunction. If this persists, serial additions of gene therapy will be required determining the effect of each individual gene trial on organ function. Microgravity and endothelial gaps with leaks trigger reduced plasma volume. Partial correction by use of a plasma volume substitute and development of a delivery device may reduce complexity of gene therapy. Research would be conducted both on Earth and in microgravity, with the development of subcutaneous pharmaceuticals and Mg, and a space walk-reliable subcutaneous silicon device, given that no replenishable subcutaneous device is presently available. A three-pronged approach provides a plan for the next 50 years: A. complete correction of a Mg deficit; B. partial replacement with plasma volume substitutes, and C. multiple gene factor strategy. PMID:21694938

  14. The Association between the Consumption of Fish/Shellfish and the Risk of Osteoporosis in Men and Postmenopausal Women Aged 50 Years or Older.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjin; Park, Youngsoon

    2016-02-25

    Fish rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been suggested to have a favorable effect on bone health, but previous epidemiologic studies have shown inconsistent results. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis that the consumption of fish and shellfish is positively associated with bone mass and negatively associated with the risk of osteoporosis in Koreans and Americans. Men and postmenopausal women ≥ 50 years old from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2011 (n = 7154) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010 (n = 2658) were included. There was a positive correlation between the consumption of fish and shellfish and bone mineral density (BMD) of the total femur, femoral neck, and lumbar spine in Koreans. Consistently, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a significant association between intake of fish and shellfish and the risk of osteoporosis in Koreans but not in Americans. Consumption of fish and shellfish was 4-5 times higher in Koreans than Americans in the present study. In conclusion, intake of fish and shellfish was associated with BMD and the risk of osteoporosis in Koreans but not in Americans, suggesting that a minimum intake level of fish and shellfish might be recommended to protect against bone loss and osteoporosis.

  15. Launch Commit Criteria Monitoring Agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmel, Glenn S.; Davis, Steven R.; Leucht, Kurt W.; Rowe, Dan A.; Kelly, Andrew O.; Boeloeni, Ladislau

    2005-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing Systems Branch at NASA Kennedy Space Center has developed and deployed a software agent to monitor the Space Shuttle's ground processing telemetry stream. The application, the Launch Commit Criteria Monitoring Agent, increases situational awareness for system and hardware engineers during Shuttle launch countdown. The agent provides autonomous monitoring of the telemetry stream, automatically alerts system engineers when predefined criteria have been met, identifies limit warnings and violations of launch commit criteria, aids Shuttle engineers through troubleshooting procedures, and provides additional insight to verify appropriate troubleshooting of problems by contractors. The agent has successfully detected launch commit criteria warnings and violations on a simulated playback data stream. Efficiency and safety are improved through increased automation.

  16. Conscientious commitment to women's health.

    PubMed

    Dickens, Bernard M; Cook, Rebecca J

    2011-05-01

    Conscientious commitment, the reverse of conscientious objection, inspires healthcare providers to overcome barriers to delivery of reproductive services to protect and advance women's health. History shows social reformers experiencing religious condemnation and imprisonment for promoting means of birth control, until access became popularly accepted. Voluntary sterilization generally followed this pattern to acceptance, but overcoming resistance to voluntary abortion calls for courage and remains challenging. The challenge is aggravated by religious doctrines that view treatment of ectopic pregnancy, spontaneous abortion, and emergency contraception not by reference to women's healthcare needs, but through the lens of abortion. However, modern legal systems increasingly reject this myopic approach. Providers' conscientious commitment is to deliver treatments directed to women's healthcare needs, giving priority to patient care over adherence to conservative religious doctrines or religious self-interest. The development of in vitro fertilization to address childlessness further illustrates the inspiration of conscientious commitment over conservative objections.

  17. Assessment of coastal erosion and quantification of land loss on Western Pacific atolls during the last 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborosi, Danko; Zega, Mojca; Jenson, John W.

    2010-05-01

    others, and that land is not always eroding but in some cases accreting. We are currently engaged in a systematic survey of islands across the region in order to differentiate local problems from wide-ranging phenomena and gain insight into the temporal and geospatial "big picture." The direct aim is to comprehensively and more precisely assess coastal erosion and quantify changes in land area of different islands over the past 50 years. The project consists of fieldwork and GIS analyses, and it is the first to employ such methods to evaluate shoreline transformation in the western Pacific. We visit each island, interview local people regarding recent land changes and events, and carry out site investigations and mapping. Each inhabited island is circumambulated on foot, and beach slopes and scarps are measured, sediments examined, human activities and vegetation damage noted, etc. More importantly, the entire coast of each island is mapped using MobileMapper PRO portable units capable of generating GIS shapefiles in the field. Created coverages include the actual shoreline, sandy banks, vegetated areas, coastal engineering, control points, etc. Data collected on the ground is imported into ArcGIS and rectified using remote sensing imagery. It is then compared to all available historical maps, notably US Army Corps of Engineers 1960s topographic charts, which were previously assembled, digitized, and georeferenced for the purposes of this project. Any discrepancies in island outline and land area would have occurred over the past half a century. Due to the vastness of western Pacific region and logistical obstacles to working on remote islands, data are accumulated gradually. Ultimately, this island-by-island approach will allow documentation of historical and regional erosion patterns, contribute to understanding of local and global components of recent coastal changes, and deliver recommendations for environmental management and emergency avoidance on atolls and other

  18. Variation of the Earth tide-seismicity compliance parameter the last 50 years for the seismic area of Evoikos, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, Michael E.; Arabelos, Demetrious N.; Vergos, George; Spatalas, Spyrous

    2015-04-01

    The results of the analysis of the last 50 years earthquakes series in seismic active areas of Greece, i.e. the areas (a) of the Mygdonian Basin(Contadakis et al. 2007), (b) of the Ionian Islands (Contadakis et al. 2012 ) and (c) of the Hellenic Arc (Vergos et al. 2012 ), indicate that the monthly variation of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence is in accordance with the period of the tidal lunar monthly and semi-monthly (Mm and Mf) variations. The same happens with the corresponding daily variations of the frequencies of earthquake occurrence with the diurnal luni-solar (K1, O1) and semidiurnal lunar (M2) and solar (S2) tidal variations. In addition the confidence level for the identification of such period accordance between earthquakes occurrence frequency and tidal periods varies with seismic activity, i.e. the higher confidence level corresponds to periods with stronger seismic activity. These results are in favor of a tidal triggering process on earthquakes when the stress in the focal area is near the critical level. Based on these results, we consider the confidence level of earthquake frequency of occurrence - tidal period accordance, p, as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence. A test on posterior of this idea, (i.e. the value of the confidence level index, p, indicate the fault matureness) in the case of the recent seismic activity at Fthiotida, was positive (Contadakis et al 2014). In this paper we present the results of a second test by the occasion of the recent seismic activity of Central Evoikos. The results also are positive. We suggest that this compliance parameter may be used as an additional element for the seismic risk assessment. References Cadicheanu, N., van Ruymbeke, M and Zhu P.,2007:Tidal triggering evidence of intermediate depth earthquakes in Vrancea zone(Romania), NHESS 7,733-740. Contadakis, M. E., Arabelos, D. N., Spatalas, S., 2009, Evidence for tidal triggering on the shallow earthquakes of the

  19. [A 50-year history of new drugs in Japan-the development and trends of hemostatics and antithrombotic drugs].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hikaru; Abiko, Yasushi; Akimoto, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments and trends of hemostatic and antithrombotic drugs in Japan were investigated chronologically for the last 50 years after the 2nd World War. 1. Hemostatic drugs are classified into three groups ; capillary stabilizers, blood coagulants and antifibrinolytics. l) As to capillary stabilizers, flavonoid (rutin, 1949), adrenochrome derivative (carbazochrome, 1954) and conjugated estrogen (Premarin, 1964) were introduced therapeutically. Especially, the soluble types of adrenochrome compounds (Adona 1956, S-Adchnon, 1962) were devised and used widely in Japan. 2) Drugs concerning blood coagulation, thrombin, introduced in 1953, and hemocoagulase, a snake venom introduced in 1966, were used clinically. V.K. groups producing various coagulation factors were introduced as V.K1 (Phytonadione, 1962) and V.K2 (rnenatetrenone,1972), and they were admitted in "The Japanese Pharmacopoeia"editions 8 and 14, respectively). 3) Regarding antifibrinolytic drugs, Japanese researchers have made remarkable contributions. e-Aminocapronic acid (Ipsilon, 1962) and tranexamic acid (Transamin, 1965) were developed and used for various abnormal bleedings or hemorrhage associated with plasmin over-activation. tranexamic acid also proved to suppress inflammations of the throat such as tonsillitis, pharyngitis or laryngitis. 2. Antithrombotic drugs are also divided into three groups; anticoagulants, antiplatelet drugs and fibrinolytics.1) The anticoagulants used therapeutically by injection are heparins (Na-salt, 1951; Ca-salt, 1962) and low-molecular-weight heparins such as dalteparin (1992), parnaparin (1994) and reviparin (1999). The low molecule compounds are superior to the original heparins in reducing the risk of bleeding. As oral anticoagulants, coumarin derivatives, dicumarol (1950), ethylbiscoumacetate (1954), phenylindandione (1956) and warfarin (1962) are known. Warfarin potassium is the main drug for oral therapy of thromboembolism lately. Gabexate mesilate (1989) and

  20. Impact of committed individuals on vaccination behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Tao; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Zhang, Lianzhong

    2012-11-01

    We study how the presence of committed vaccinators, a small fraction of individuals who consistently hold the vaccinating strategy and are immune to influence, impact the vaccination dynamics in well-mixed and spatially structured populations. For this purpose, we develop an epidemiological game-theoretic model of a flu-like vaccination by integrating an epidemiological process into a simple agent-based model of adaptive learning, where individuals (except for those committed ones) use anecdotal evidence to estimate costs and benefits of vaccination. We show that the committed vaccinators, acting as “steadfast role models” in the populations, can efficiently avoid the clustering of susceptible individuals and stimulate other imitators to take vaccination, hence contributing to the promotion of vaccine uptake. We substantiate our findings by making comparative studies of our model on a full lattice and on a randomly diluted one. Our work is expected to provide valuable information for decision-making and design more effective disease-control strategy.

  1. Sport commitment and participation in masters swimmers: the influence of coach and teammates.

    PubMed

    Santi, Giampaolo; Bruton, Adam; Pietrantoni, Luca; Mellalieu, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how coach and teammates influence masters athletes' sport commitment, and the effect of functional and obligatory commitments on participation in masters swimming. The sample consisted of 523 masters swimmers (330 males and 193 females) aged between 22 and 83 years (M = 39.00, SD = 10.42). A bi-dimensional commitment scale was used to measure commitment dimensions and perceived influence from social agents. Structural equation modelling analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of social agents on functional and obligatory commitments, and the predictive capabilities of the two types of commitment towards sport participation. Support provided by coach and teammates increased functional commitment, constraints from these social agents determined higher obligatory commitment, and coach constraints negatively impacted functional commitment. In addition, both commitment types predicted training participation, with functional commitment increasing participation in team training sessions, and obligatory commitment increasing the hours of individual training. The findings suggest that in order to increase participation in masters swimming teams and reduce non-supervised training, coach and teammates should exhibit a supportive attitude and avoid over expectation.

  2. The impact of variable commitment in the Naming Game on consensus formation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiang; Doyle, Casey; Korniss, Gyorgy; Szymanski, Boleslaw K

    2017-02-02

    The Naming Game has proven to be an important model of opinion dynamics in complex networks. It is significantly enriched by the introduction of nodes committed to a single opinion. The resulting model is still simple but captures core concepts of opinion dynamics in networks. This model limitation is rigid commitment which never changes. Here we study the effect that making commitment variable has on the dynamics of the system. Committed nodes are assigned a commitment strength, w, defining their willingness to lose (in waning), gain (for increasing) or both (in variable) commitment to an opinion. Such model has committed nodes that can stick to a single opinion for some time without losing their flexibility to change it in the long run. The traditional Naming Game corresponds to setting w at infinity. A change in commitment strength impacts the critical fraction of population necessary for a minority consensus. Increasing w lowers critical fraction for waning commitment but increases this fraction for increasing commitment. Further, we show that if different nodes have different values of w, higher standard deviation of w increases the critical fraction for waning commitment and decrease this fraction for increasing commitment.

  3. The impact of variable commitment in the Naming Game on consensus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiang; Doyle, Casey; Korniss, Gyorgy; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.

    2017-02-01

    The Naming Game has proven to be an important model of opinion dynamics in complex networks. It is significantly enriched by the introduction of nodes committed to a single opinion. The resulting model is still simple but captures core concepts of opinion dynamics in networks. This model limitation is rigid commitment which never changes. Here we study the effect that making commitment variable has on the dynamics of the system. Committed nodes are assigned a commitment strength, w, defining their willingness to lose (in waning), gain (for increasing) or both (in variable) commitment to an opinion. Such model has committed nodes that can stick to a single opinion for some time without losing their flexibility to change it in the long run. The traditional Naming Game corresponds to setting w at infinity. A change in commitment strength impacts the critical fraction of population necessary for a minority consensus. Increasing w lowers critical fraction for waning commitment but increases this fraction for increasing commitment. Further, we show that if different nodes have different values of w, higher standard deviation of w increases the critical fraction for waning commitment and decrease this fraction for increasing commitment.

  4. The impact of variable commitment in the Naming Game on consensus formation

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiang; Doyle, Casey; Korniss, Gyorgy; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.

    2017-01-01

    The Naming Game has proven to be an important model of opinion dynamics in complex networks. It is significantly enriched by the introduction of nodes committed to a single opinion. The resulting model is still simple but captures core concepts of opinion dynamics in networks. This model limitation is rigid commitment which never changes. Here we study the effect that making commitment variable has on the dynamics of the system. Committed nodes are assigned a commitment strength, w, defining their willingness to lose (in waning), gain (for increasing) or both (in variable) commitment to an opinion. Such model has committed nodes that can stick to a single opinion for some time without losing their flexibility to change it in the long run. The traditional Naming Game corresponds to setting w at infinity. A change in commitment strength impacts the critical fraction of population necessary for a minority consensus. Increasing w lowers critical fraction for waning commitment but increases this fraction for increasing commitment. Further, we show that if different nodes have different values of w, higher standard deviation of w increases the critical fraction for waning commitment and decrease this fraction for increasing commitment. PMID:28150714

  5. Cheat sensitive quantum bit commitment.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Lucien; Kent, Adrian

    2004-04-16

    We define cheat sensitive cryptographic protocols between mistrustful parties as protocols which guarantee that, if either cheats, the other has some nonzero probability of detecting the cheating. We describe an unconditionally secure cheat sensitive nonrelativistic bit commitment protocol which uses quantum information to implement a task which is classically impossible; we also describe a simple relativistic protocol.

  6. The Measurement of Vocational Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Susan F.; Hubbard, Constance F.

    Recent efforts toward career education and the rise in occupationally oriented programs on the secondary and postsecondary level encourage a close examination of the nature of the relationship between people and their vocations. A 74 item device, the Vocational Commitment Index was developed to assess this relationship. Based upon a theoretically…

  7. Regulatory Foci and Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markovits, Yannis; Ullrich, Johannes; van Dick, Rolf; Davis, Ann J.

    2008-01-01

    We use regulatory focus theory to derive specific predictions regarding the differential relationships between regulatory focus and commitment. We estimated a structural equation model using a sample of 520 private and public sector employees and found in line with our hypotheses that (a) promotion focus related more strongly to affective…

  8. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    This is the introductory article to a special series in Cognitive and Behavioral Practice on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Instead of each article herein reviewing the basics of ACT, this article contains that review. This article provides a description of where ACT fits within the larger category of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT):…

  9. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  10. Predictors of Child Caregiver Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Nancy Carnahan; Lowther, Malcolm

    This study examined the relationship between child caregiver commitment and the caregiver's personal characteristics and work experience, the characteristics of the job, and the quality of the child care center. Questionnaires that included several measurement instruments were sent to 381 full-time child caregivers in 94 centers. Caregiver…

  11. Hampshire Country School Staff Commitments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampshire Country School, Rindge, NH.

    Intended for professional personnel of the Hampshire Country School, which treats gifted children with immobilizing emotional dysfunctions, the handbook specifies staff commitments. The Code of Ethics, adapted from the National Education Association Code as supplemented by The Council for Exceptional Children, sets forth four principles:…

  12. Physical Education Teachers' Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Hayri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine physical education teachers' organizational commitment levels. The sample consisted of 204 physical education teachers working in the city center of Konya in the 2011 to 2012 academic year. The respondents were randomly selected in this research. Data collected for this research by using the Scale for…

  13. Commitment Profiles and Employee Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Laura; Vandenberghe, Christian; Vandenberg, Robert; Bentein, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    We examined how affective (AC), normative (NC), perceived sacrifice (PS), and few alternatives (FA) commitments combine to form profiles and determine turnover intention and turnover. We theorized that three mechanisms account for how profiles operate, i.e., the degree to which membership is internally regulated, the perceived desirability and…

  14. Higher Education and Social Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasution, S.; Virasai, Banphot, Eds.

    The proceedings of the Regional Institute of Higher Education and Development's seminar and the meaning and implications of social commitment in higher education are reported. The welcoming address (S. Nasution) and the opening address (Y. B. Dato' Murad bin Mohd. Noor) welcome the participants and set the tone for the discussions to follow. The…

  15. Idiosyncratic Deals and Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Thomas W. H.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between idiosyncratic deals and organizational commitment. In particular, it examines how two individual differences which reflect self-worth (core self-evaluations and age) moderate that relationship. We predicted that employees with feelings of high self-worth will expect and will feel entitled to these…

  16. Faculty Organizational Commitment and Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Janet; Ott, Molly; Bell, Alli

    2012-01-01

    Building on a theoretical framework that links characteristics of individuals and their work settings to organizational commitment (OC) and citizenship behavior, this study considers why faculty may be disengaging from institutional service. Analyses of survey data collected from a state system of higher education suggest that job characteristics,…

  17. The Relationships between Collegiate DECA Commitment, Mentoring and College Students' Perceived Career Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between student's Collegiate DECA commitment, psychological capital, mentoring, and perceived career commitment. Proposed relationships were supported with several psychological theories and frameworks including Organizational Commitment, Psychological Capital, and Social Identity Theory. Data was…

  18. Professional commitment: Does it buffer or intensify job demands?

    PubMed

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether professional commitment can be seen as a moderator in the relationship between job demands and emotional exhaustion among Norwegian nurses. Inspired by the job demands-resources model, this study explores whether having a strong commitment to the nursing profession can be seen as a resource that buffers the effect of job demands on emotional exhaustion or, conversely, intensifies the impact of job demands. A survey that comprised Norwegian nurses who had graduated three years previously (N = 388) was conducted. Multiple regression was performed to test the hypothesis. The results provide support to a buffering effect; thus, individuals with a higher degree of professional commitment conveyed a weaker association between job demands and emotional exhaustion compared with nurses with a lower degree of commitment. Developing a better understanding of the potential buffering effect of professional commitment is of great interest. The present study is the first to utilize professional commitment as a resource within the job demands-resources framework.

  19. A higher serum gamma-glutamyl transferase level could be associated with an increased risk of incident osteoporotic fractures in Korean men aged 50 years or older.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Jun; Baek, Seunghee; Ahn, Seong Hee; Kim, Seon Ha; Jo, Min-Woo; Bae, Sung Jin; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Ghi Su; Choe, Jaewon; Koh, Jung-Min

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has detrimental effects on bone metabolism, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) is known to play an important role in the generation of free radical species through the extra-cellular hydrolysis of glutathione, the main cellular antioxidant. We performed a large longitudinal study with an average follow-up period of 3 years to investigate the association between baseline serum GGT levels and the development of future osteoporotic fractures (OFs) in men. A total of 16,036 Korean men aged 50 years or older who had undergone comprehensive routine health examinations were enrolled. Incident fractures at osteoporosis-related sites (e.g., hip, spine, distal radius, and proximal humerus) that occurred after baseline examinations were identified from the nationwide claims database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service of Korea using selected ICD-10 codes. Among the study subjects, 156 cases (1.0%) developed incident OFs during the study period. The event rate was 32.7 (95% CI = 28.0-38.3) per 10,000 person-years. Multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazard analyses adjusted for age, body mass index, lifestyle factors, and medical and drug histories revealed that the hazard ratio per standard deviation increase of the baseline GGT levels for the development of incident fractures was 1.115 (95% CI = 1.011-1.230). These data provide the first epidemiological evidence, in support of previous in vitro and animal studies, of the harmful effects of GGT on bone metabolism, and indicate that the serum GGT level may be a useful biomarker of poor bone health outcomes in men.

  20. Company, country, connections: counterfactual origins increase organizational commitment, patriotism, and social investment.

    PubMed

    Ersner-Hershfield, Hal; Galinsky, Adam D; Kray, Laura J; King, Brayden G

    2010-10-01

    Four studies examined the relationship between counterfactual origins--thoughts about how the beginning of organizations, countries, and social connections might have turned out differently--and increased feelings of commitment to those institutions and connections. Study 1 found that counterfactually reflecting on the origins of one's country increases patriotism. Study 2 extended this finding to organizational commitment and examined the mediating role of poignancy. Study 3 found that counterfactual reflection boosts organizational commitment even beyond the effects of other commitment-enhancing appeals and that perceptions of fate mediate the positive effect of counterfactual origins on commitment. Finally, Study 4 temporally separated the counterfactual manipulation from a behavioral measure of commitment and found that counterfactual reflection predicted whether participants e-mailed social contacts 2 weeks later. The robust relationship between counterfactual origins and commitment was found across a wide range of companies and countries, with undergraduates and M.B.A. students, and for attitudes and behaviors.

  1. Alcohol affects goal commitment by explicitly and implicitly induced myopia.

    PubMed

    Sevincer, A Timur; Oettingen, Gabriele; Lerner, Tobias

    2012-05-01

    Alcohol commits people to personally important goals even if expectations of reaching the goals are low. To illuminate this effect, we used alcohol myopia theory, stating that alcohol intoxicated people disproportionally attend to the most salient aspects of a situation and ignore peripheral aspects. When low expectations of reaching an important goal were activated students who consumed alcohol were less committed than students who consumed a placebo. We observed less commitment regardless of whether low expectations were explicitly activated in a questionnaire (Study 1) or implicitly activated through subliminal priming (Study 2). The results imply that, intoxicated people commit to goals according to what aspects of a goal are activated either explicitly or implicitly.

  2. Relationships among perceived career support, affective commitment, and work engagement.

    PubMed

    Poon, June M L

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to test the predictive effects of perceived career support and affective commitment on work engagement. It was hypothesized that perceived career support would relate positively to work engagement and this relationship would be transmitted through affective commitment. Survey data were collected from 115 full-time employees enrolled as part-time graduate students in a large public university in Malaysia. Multiple regression analysis yielded results indicating that the relationship between perceived career support and work engagement was mediated by affective commitment. This finding suggests that employers can promote employee work engagement by ensuring employees perceive their organization to be supportive of their career and increasing employees' level of affective commitment.

  3. Mentoring Literacy Professionals: Continuing the Spirit of CRA/ALER after 50 Years. The Thirty-First Yearbook: A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the College Reading Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Sampson, Mary Beth, Ed.; Foote, Martha M., Ed.; Falk-Ross, Francine, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This volume is a milestone year for the Yearbook, the conference, and the College Reading Association (CRA). At this conference, CRA celebrated its 50th year. The title of this thirty-first yearbook mirrors the theme of the 2008 conference--"Mentoring Literacy Professionals for 50 Years." The title "Mentoring Literacy Professionals:…

  4. Trichuris sp. from 1,040 +/- 50-year-old Cervidae coprolites from the archaeological site Furna do Estrago, Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sianto, Luciana; Duarte, Antônio Nascimento; Chame, Marcia; Magalhães, Juliana; Souza, Mônica Vieira de; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando; Araújo, Adauto

    2012-03-01

    We present results of the paleoparasitological analysis of Cervidae coprolites that were recovered from the archaeological site Furna do Estrago, Pernambuco, Brazil. Trichuris sp. eggs were recovered from the coprolite samples dated 1,040 ± 50 years before present. This is the first record of Trichuris sp. in semiarid Cervidae, unexpectedly recorded in archaeological material.

  5. Patient perspective on herpes zoster and its complications: an observational prospective study in patients aged over 50 years in general practice.

    PubMed

    Bouhassira, Didier; Chassany, Olivier; Gaillat, Jacques; Hanslik, Thomas; Launay, Odile; Mann, Claude; Rabaud, Christian; Rogeaux, Olivier; Strady, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the effect of herpes zoster and zoster-related pain should inform care to improve health-related quality of life in elderly patients. A 12-month, longitudinal, prospective, multicenter observational study conducted in primary care in France enrolled patients aged ≥ 50 years with acute eruptive herpes zoster. Patient-reported zoster-related pain was assessed by validated questionnaires (Douleur Neuropathique en 4 Questions [DN4], Zoster Brief Pain Inventory [ZBPI], and Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory [NPSI]) on days 0 and 15, and at months 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12. Health-related quality of life was assessed by the 12-item short-form health survey (SF-12) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale on day 0 and at months 3, 6, and 12. Of 1358 patients included, 1032 completed follow-up. Mean ± standard deviation age was 67.7 ± 10.7 (range, 50-95) years; 62.2% were women. Most patients (94.1%) were prescribed antiviral drugs. The prevalence of zoster-related pain on day 0 and at months 3, 6, 9, and 12 was 79.6%, 11.6%, 8.5%, 7.4%, and 6.0%, respectively. Patients with persistent pain had lower scores on the physical and mental component summaries of the SF-12 and the ZBPI interference score than those without pain. By logistic regression analysis, main predictive factors on day 0 for postherpetic neuralgia at month 3 were age, male sex, ZBPI interference score, Physical Component Summary score of the SF-12, and neuropathic quality of pain (DN4 score ≥ 4). Despite early diagnosis and treatment with antiviral agents, many patients with herpes zoster experience persistent pain and marked long-term reduction in health-related quality of life.

  6. 7 CFR 3550.70 - Conditional commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... into the required agreements; (4) Be financially responsible and have the ability to finance or obtain... approval of an affirmative marketing plan. (b) Limitations. Conditional commitments for new or... as bad weather, materials shortages, or marketing difficulties. Conditional commitments may...

  7. Spermatogenesis: The Commitment to Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Griswold, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis requires a stem cell pool, a period of amplification of cell numbers, the completion of reduction division to haploid cells (meiosis), and the morphological transformation of the haploid cells into spermatozoa (spermiogenesis). The net result of these processes is the production of massive numbers of spermatozoa over the reproductive lifetime of the animal. One study that utilized homogenization-resistant spermatids as the standard determined that human daily sperm production (dsp) was at 45 million per day per testis (60). For each human that means ∼1,000 sperm are produced per second. A key to this level of gamete production is the organization and architecture of the mammalian testes that results in continuous sperm production. The seemingly complex repetitious relationship of cells termed the “cycle of the seminiferous epithelium” is driven by the continuous commitment of undifferentiated spermatogonia to meiosis and the period of time required to form spermatozoa. This commitment termed the A to A1 transition requires the action of retinoic acid (RA) on the undifferentiated spermatogonia or prospermatogonia. In stages VII to IX of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium, Sertoli cells and germ cells are influenced by pulses of RA. These pulses of RA move along the seminiferous tubules coincident with the spermatogenic wave, presumably undergoing constant synthesis and degradation. The RA pulse then serves as a trigger to commit undifferentiated progenitor cells to the rigidly timed pathway into meiosis and spermatid differentiation. PMID:26537427

  8. Spermatogenesis: The Commitment to Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis requires a stem cell pool, a period of amplification of cell numbers, the completion of reduction division to haploid cells (meiosis), and the morphological transformation of the haploid cells into spermatozoa (spermiogenesis). The net result of these processes is the production of massive numbers of spermatozoa over the reproductive lifetime of the animal. One study that utilized homogenization-resistant spermatids as the standard determined that human daily sperm production (dsp) was at 45 million per day per testis (60). For each human that means ∼1,000 sperm are produced per second. A key to this level of gamete production is the organization and architecture of the mammalian testes that results in continuous sperm production. The seemingly complex repetitious relationship of cells termed the "cycle of the seminiferous epithelium" is driven by the continuous commitment of undifferentiated spermatogonia to meiosis and the period of time required to form spermatozoa. This commitment termed the A to A1 transition requires the action of retinoic acid (RA) on the undifferentiated spermatogonia or prospermatogonia. In stages VII to IX of the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium, Sertoli cells and germ cells are influenced by pulses of RA. These pulses of RA move along the seminiferous tubules coincident with the spermatogenic wave, presumably undergoing constant synthesis and degradation. The RA pulse then serves as a trigger to commit undifferentiated progenitor cells to the rigidly timed pathway into meiosis and spermatid differentiation.

  9. International Military Commitment: A Conceptual Definition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    commitments chiefly in military terms--most recently, in terms of the threat to our interest posed by the Soviet Union and by Communist China" (1973...nd accurate the poli t i c i t, n policy o 198 0’s wi1 i (Sprout i.arch 25/ ns, Europea t i-polar condi t ions h y d i fferont f...behavior had been effected -- if only crudely and at a very basic level. A nuclear weapons duopoly by the Lmited States and the Soviet Union and a less

  10. 40 CFR 63.75 - Enforceable commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... made, and any other emission reduction measures to be used; and (6) A statement of commitment, signed... approval of commitments that have not been approved by December 1, 1993. (g) The control measure... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Enforceable commitments. 63.75...

  11. Anchors of Religious Commitment in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, Emily; Dollahite, David C.; Hardy, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores adolescent religious commitment using qualitative data from a religiously diverse (Jewish, Christian, Muslim) sample of 80 adolescents. A new construct, "anchors of religious commitment," grounded in interview data, is proposed to describe what adolescents commit to as a part of their religious identity. Seven anchors of…

  12. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M.; Morrow, Paula C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines affective commitment to employing and client organizations among long-term contracted employees, a new and growing employment classification. Drawing on organizational commitment and social exchange literatures, we propose two categories of antecedents of employee commitment to client organizations. We tested our hypotheses…

  13. Professionalism as a Form of Work Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Paula C.; Goetz, Joe F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluated concept of professionalism as a form of work commitment using a modified version of Hall's (1968) multidimensional measure of professionalism on 325 accountants in public practice. Examined three forms of work commitment--job involvement, organizational commitment, and work ethic endorsement--and four professional behaviors. Suggests the…

  14. Young Children's Understanding of Joint Commitments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafenhain, Maria; Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    When adults make a joint commitment to act together, they feel an obligation to their partner. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether young children also understand joint commitments to act together. In the first study, when an adult orchestrated with the child a joint commitment to play a game together and then broke off from their joint…

  15. Commitment among Arab Adolescents in Israel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Ari, Adital Tirosh; Azaiza, Faisal

    1998-01-01

    Examines 662 Arab adolescents' commitments to their own self-development, family, Arab people, and village along with the order in which these commitments are structured. Reveals that the two prevalent patterns of adolescent commitment, individualistic and collectivistic, demonstrate the adolescents' struggle with these value systems and the…

  16. 24 CFR 200.47 - Firm commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and Endorsement... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Commitment Applications § 200.47 Firm commitments. A valid firm... completion of construction or substantial rehabilitation of the project; or (2) Upon completion of...

  17. 24 CFR 200.47 - Firm commitments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT GENERAL INTRODUCTION TO FHA PROGRAMS Requirements for Application, Commitment, and Endorsement... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Commitment Applications § 200.47 Firm commitments. A valid firm... completion of construction or substantial rehabilitation of the project; or (2) Upon completion of...

  18. The effects of maternal parenting style and religious commitment on self-regulation, academic achievement, and risk behavior among African-American parochial college students.

    PubMed

    Abar, Beau; Carter, Kermit L; Winsler, Adam

    2009-04-01

    This study explored relations between religiosity, both parent and student, and maternal parenting style and student academic self-regulation, academic achievement, and risk behavior among African-American youth attending a parochial college. Eighty-five students completed self-report survey measures of religiosity, self-regulation, academic achievement, and risk behavior. Participants also completed youth report measures of parental religiosity and perceived maternal parenting style. Correlational analyses show authoritative parenting to be associated with high levels of academic performance and study skills. Additional correlations revealed that highly religious students tend to perform well academically, study better, and engage in fewer risk behaviors than youth less committed to religion. Although no direct relations were observed between parenting style and student religiosity, maternal parenting style was found to moderate relations between parental and student religiosity. Findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to the population studied.

  19. Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment: Affective Commitment Predictors in a Group of Professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Maria Santa

    Job satisfaction and organizational commitment have long been identified as relevant factors for the well-being of individuals within an organization and the success of the organization itself. As the well-being can be, in principle, considered as emergent from the influence of a number of factors, the main goal of a theory of organizations is to identify these factors and the role they can play. In this regard job satisfaction and organizational commitment have been often identified with structural factors allowing an organization to be considered as a system, or a wholistic entity, rather than a simple aggregate of individuals. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that job satisfaction has a significant, direct effect on determining individuals' attachment to an organization and a significant but indirect effect on their intention to leave a company. However, a complete assessment of the role of these factors in establishing and keeping the emergence of an organization is still lacking, due to shortage of measuring instruments and to practical difficulties in interviewing organization members. The present study aims to give a further contribution to what is currently known about the relationship between job satisfaction and affective commitment by using a group of professionals, all at management level. A questionnaire to measure these constructs, following a pilot study, was designed and administered to 1042 participants who were all professionals and had the title of industrial manager or director. The factors relating to job satisfaction and the predictive value of these factors (to predict an employee's emotional involvement with their organization) were simultaneously tested by a confirmative factorial model. The results were generalized with a multi-sample procedure by using models of structural equations. This procedure was used to check whether these factors could be considered or not as causes producing the measured affective commitment. The results

  20. Cognitive and Functional Decline among Individuals 50 Years of Age or Older in Cambé, Paraná, Brazil: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Marcos Aparecido Sarria; Bortoletto, Maira Aira Sayuri Sakay; de Souza, Regina Kazue Tanno; Prina, Douglas Manuel Carrapeiro; Vieira, Maria Cristina Umpierrez; Silva, Ana Maria Rigo

    2016-01-01

    Aims To identify the frequency of cognitive and functional decline (CFD) among adults 50 years of age and older by a population-based study. Methods Cognitive function was analyzed by the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the functional conditions were based on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Cases of CFD included individuals with cognitive decline and 2 or more compromised IADL. Results A total of 693 individuals were studied. The frequency of CFD was 16.3%. A low socioeconomic profile was associated with greater CFD independent of gender, age, education, and presence of depression (OR = 2.46; 95% CI: 1.53-3.97). Conclusions These data show a high frequency of CFD among adults 50 years and older. Individuals with less education and a lower socioeconomic level exhibited poorer cognitive and functional conditions. PMID:27350779

  1. The Sense of Commitment: A Minimal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Michael, John; Sebanz, Natalie; Knoblich, Günther

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a starting point for psychological research on the sense of commitment within the context of joint action. We begin by formulating three desiderata: to illuminate the motivational factors that lead agents to feel and act committed, to pick out the cognitive processes and situational factors that lead agents to sense that implicit commitments are in place, and to illuminate the development of an understanding of commitment in ontogeny. In order to satisfy these three desiderata, we propose a minimal framework, the core of which is an analysis of the minimal structure of situations which can elicit a sense of commitment. We then propose a way of conceptualizing and operationalizing the sense of commitment, and discuss cognitive and motivational processes which may underpin the sense of commitment. PMID:26779080

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma arising from long-term (50-year) Lupus vulgaris: is there a need for a close medical follow-up in such chronic diseases?

    PubMed

    Leocata, P; Crisman, G; Vitale, A R; Siniscalchi, G; Biondi, P; Colella, G

    2009-12-01

    Skin manifestations of tuberculous infection (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) are represented by miliary tuberculosis of the skin, tuberculous chancre, scrofuloderma, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, periorificial tuberculosis, and lupus vulgaris (LV). Among this group, LV is the most common skin condition, diagnosed in 10% of tuberculotic patients. The authors report herein a case of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) arising from long-standing (50-year) LV and underline the need of an extensive follow-up of tuberculotic lesions.

  3. Commitment accounting for CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. J.; Socolow, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived energy infrastructure that burns fossil fuels represents a multi-decade 'commitment' to emit CO2. Today's global power sector, alone, represents hundreds of billions of tons of still unrealized 'committed emissions' of CO2. And every year, substantial new commitments to future emissions are made, as new power plants are built. The socioeconomic inertia of these commitments is a major barrier to climate change mitigation. Here, we quantify these annual commitments by a bottom-up analysis of all power plants commissioned between 1950 and 2011; assigning emission commitments to the year when each generator came on line. We find, assuming 40-year commitments, that the global commitment to future emissions from the world's generators in 2011 (the most recent year in our analysis) was 318 Gt CO2, of which 216 Gt CO2 were commitments from the world's coal-fired generators and 134 Gt CO2 were commitments from China's generators. Annual new global commitments exceeded 15 Gt CO2 per year in every year since 2000. Moreover, between 2005-2010 (the latest year of available emissions data), new global commitments were more than twice as large as actual emissions from all power plants. Country-specific ratios of new committed emissions to actual emissions, averaged over 1990-2010 were 4.1 for China, 2.6 for India, 0.9 for the EU, and 0.6 for the US. We urge that the reporting of annual CO2 emissions, already widely institutionalized, be augmented by 'commitment accounting' which makes these future emissions salient. Annual committed emissions and annual emissions of primary power infrastructure. New committed emissions (light green) have grown from approximately 4 Gt CO2 per year in 1960 to roughly 10 Gt CO2 per year between 1970-1995, and then to more than 15 Gt CO2 per year since 2000. Throughout this period, new committed emissions have exceeded annual emissions (blue curve, source: IEA). Although the commitments made 30-40 years ago have largely been realized (dark

  4. Impact of a 12-week aerobic exercise training program on anthropometric and metabolic parameters of a group of type 2 diabetes Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years

    PubMed Central

    Dahjio, Yves; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N.; Azabji-Kenfack, Marcel; Essouma, Mickael; Loni, Gabriel Ekali; Onana, Arnold Ewane; Dehayem, Mesmin; Mvom, Angeline; Tadjore, Maurice Njock

    2016-01-01

    Background We examined whether aerobic exercise could have an impact on anthropometric and metabolic parameters of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years. Methods We enrolled 23 T2DM Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years regularly followed at the National Obesity Center of Yaounde, Cameroon, in a 12-week aerobic exercise program monitored by a pedometer. Exercise intensity was progressively set between 55% and 75% of maximum heart rate. We measured weight, body mass index (BMI), fat, lean mass, visceral fat, maximum oxygen uptake, glycaemia and insulin tolerance index at baseline, after six and twelve weeks. A mixed ANOVA model was used to evaluate changes of outcome measures over time. Results Total body weight was significantly reduced after 12 weeks (P<0.05), waist circumference after 6 and 12 weeks (P<0.05). There was an increase of the lean mass from 6 weeks (P<0.001) and a reduction of the mean visceral fat at 12 weeks (P<0.001). At the end of the program, the mean glycaemia was significantly decreased (P<0.05), and the maximum oxygen uptake was enhanced (P<0.05). Conclusions The 12-week aerobic exercise program improved the anthropometric and metabolic parameters as well as the aerobic capacity of T2DM Cameroonian women aged ≥50 years. PMID:27826567

  5. Our Commitment to Bioenergy Sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is committed to developing the resources, technologies, and systems needed to support a thriving bioenergy industry that protects natural resources and ad- vances environmental, economic, and social benefits. BETO’s Sustainability Technology Area proactively identifies and addresses issues that affect the scale-up potential, public acceptance, and long-term viability of advanced bioenergy systems; as a result, the area is critical to achieving BETO’s overall goals.

  6. Commitment to Nonwork Roles and Job Performance: Enrichment and Conflict Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weer, Christy H.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Linnehan, Frank

    2010-01-01

    An extensive commitment to nonwork roles was negatively associated with the job performance of 182 women legal secretaries. In addition to its direct negative effect on job performance, nonwork role commitment had both a negative indirect effect (through emotional energy expended on nonwork roles) and a positive indirect effect (through resources…

  7. Committed climate change due to historical land use and management: the concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freibauer, Annette; Dolman, Han; Don, Axel; Poeplau, Christopher

    2013-04-01

    A significant fraction of the European land surface has changed its land use over the last 50 years. Management practices have changed in the same period in most land use systems. These changes have affected the carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of the European land surface. Land use intensity, defined here loosely as the degree to which humans interfere with the land, strongly affects GHG emissions. Land use and land management changes suggest that the variability of the carbon balance and of GHG emissions of cultivated land areas in Europe is much more driven by land use history and management than driven by climate. Importantly changes in land use and its management have implications for future GHG emissions, and therefore present a committed climate change, defined as inevitable future additional climate change induced by past human activity. It is one of the key goals of the large-scale integrating research project "GHG-Europe - Greenhouse gas management in European land use systems" to quantify the committed climate change due to legacy effects by land use and management. The project is funded by the European Commission in the 7th framework programme (Grant agreement no.: 244122). This poster will present the conceptual approach taken to reach this goal. (1) First of all we need to proof that at site, or regional level the management effects are larger than climate effects on carbon balance and GHG emissions. Observations from managed sites and regions will serve as empirical basis. Attribution experiments with models based on process understanding are run on managed sites and regions will serve to demonstrate that the observed patterns of the carbon balance and GHG emissions can only be reproduced when land use and management are included as drivers. (2) The legacy of land use changes will be quantified by combining spatially explicit time series of land use changes with response functions of carbon pools. This will allow to separate short-term and

  8. Variation of the Earth Tide-Seismicity Compliance Parameter the Last 50 Years for the South Himalaya Fault, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contadakis, M. E.; Arabelos, D. N.; Vergos, G.; Scordilis, E. M.; Spatalas, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    Based on the results of our studies for the tidal triggering effect on the seismicity of the Hellenic area, we consider the confidence level of earthquake occurrence - tidal period accordance p as an index of tectonic stress criticality for earthquake occurrence. In this paper, by the occasion of the recent catastrophic earthquake of Nepal, we investigate the variation of the index p for the South Himalaya Fault area. The preliminary results indicate positive correlation of the index p with seismicity, for all the tidal periods. We suggest that this compliance parameter p may be used as an additional element for the seismic risk assessment.

  9. [50 years' of the Institute of Sports Medicine at the Charles University Medical School on the 650th anniversary of its founding].

    PubMed

    Novotný, V

    1999-01-01

    . In 650 years history of pedagogic and scientific success of Charles University, 50-year activity of Institute of Sports Medicine means only tiny part. In view of healthy risks, which brings modern life style and in view of worsening of environment, an important task stand before the discipline with new prevention conception.

  10. Juvenile selective vitamin B12 malabsorption: 50 years after its description – 10 years of genetic testing

    PubMed Central

    Gräsbeck, Ralph; Tanner, Stephan M.

    2011-01-01

    Fifty years have passed since the description of juvenile selective malabsorption of cobalamin (Cbl). Quality of life improvements have dramatically reduced the incidence of parasite-induced or nutritional Cbl deficiency. Consequently, inherited defects have become a leading cause of Cbl deficiency in children which is not always expressed as anemia. Unfortunately, the gold-standard for clinical diagnosis, the Schilling test, has increasingly become unavailable and replacement tests are only in their infancy. Genetic testing is complicated by genetic heterogeneity and differential diagnosis. This review documents the history, research, and advances in genetics that have elucidated the causes of juvenile cobalamin malabsorption. Genetic research has unearthed many cases in the past decade, mostly in Europe and North America, often among immigrants from the Middle East or North Africa. Lack of suitable clinical testing potentially leaves many patients inadequately diagnosed. The consequences of suboptimal Cbl levels for neurological development are well-documented. By raising awareness, we wish to push for fast-track development of better clinical tools and suitable genetic testing. Clinical awareness must include attention to ethnicity, a sensitive topic but effective for fast diagnosis. The treatment with monthly parenteral Cbl for life offers a simple and cost-effective solution once proper diagnosis is made. PMID:21623254

  11. Simulating effects of land use changes on carbon fluxes: past contributions to atmospheric CO2 increases and future commitments due to losses of terrestrial sink capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmann, K. M.; Joos, F.; Fischer, G.

    2008-09-01

    The impact of land use on the global carbon cycle and climate is assessed. The Bern carbon cycle-climate model was used with land use maps from HYDE3.0 for 1700 to 2000 A.D. and from post-SRES scenarios for this century. Cropland and pasture expansion each cause about half of the simulated net carbon emissions of 188 GtC over the industrial period and 1.1 GtC yr-1 in the 1990s, implying a residual terrestrial sink of 113 GtC and of 1.8 GtC yr-1, respectively. Direct CO2 emissions due to land conversion as simulated in book-keeping models dominate carbon fluxes due to land use in the past. They are, however, mitigated by 25% through the feedback of increased atmospheric CO2 stimulating uptake. CO2 stimulated sinks are largely lost when natural lands are converted. Past land use change has eliminated potential future carbon sinks equivalent to emissions of 80-150 GtC over this century. They represent a commitment of past land use change, which accounts for 70% of the future land use flux in the scenarios considered. Pre-industrial land use emissions are estimated to 45 GtC at most, implying a maximum change in Holocene atmospheric CO2 of 3 ppm. This is not compatible with the hypothesis that early anthropogenic CO2 emissions prevented a new glacial period.

  12. Commitment and the responsive bystander: a field evaluation with a less problematic request.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    Prior research on the effect of commitment on bystander intervention has focused on situations involving crime (e.g., robbery). However, the effect of commitment on less problematic situations has never been examined. In this field study, a female confederate asked (commitment condition) or did not ask (no-commitment condition) a customer to keep an eye on her grocery cart on the pretext that she had forgotten something in the store. Several seconds later, a male confederate arrived behind the first confederate's cart and began to move it in order to take her place. It was found that participants (N = 40) intervened to stop the second confederate more frequently in the commitment condition. The results support the assumption that bystander commitment influences behavior even in a non-crime situation.

  13. The birthplace of planetary radio astronomy: The Seneca, Maryland observatory 50 years after Burke and Franklin's Jupiter radio emission discovery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, L. N.; Thieman, J. R.; Higgins, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    Burke and Franklin's discovery of radio emissions from Jupiter in 1955 effectively marked the birth of the field of planetary radio astronomy. The discovery was made near Seneca, Maryland using the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism/Carnegie Institution of Washington's Mills Cross Array. Fifty years later there is very little evidence of this 96-acre X-shaped array of dipoles still in existence, nor evidence of any of the other antennas used at this site. The site, now known as the McKee Besher Wildlife Management Area, is owned by the State of Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Radio Jove, a NASA/GSFC education and public outreach project, will recognize the 50th anniversary of this discovery through an historic reenactment using their receiver and dual-dipole array system. Our search through the DTM/CIW archives, our visit to the site to look for evidence of this array, and other efforts at commemorating this anniversary will be described.

  14. Outpatient civil commitment: a dangerous charade or a component of a comprehensive institution of civil commitment?

    PubMed

    Schopp, Robert F

    2003-01-01

    This article examines three criticisms frequently directed toward preventive commitment as one form of outpatient commitment. These criticisms contend that preventive commitment (a) abandons the dangerousness criteria for civil commitmnet, (b) promotes unwarranted inpatient commitment of those who do not meet civil commitment criteria, and (c) undermines important individual liberties by diluting the right to refuse treatment. Understanding and evaluating these criticisms requires analysis of the intersection among empirical, conceptual, and justificatory claims. According to the analysis presented here, advocates of preventive commitment can defend a legitimate role for preventive commitment. This analysis applies to preventive commitment as a dispositional alternative within a comprehensive institution of civil commitment involving distinct parens patriae and police power components.

  15. Leadership and change commitment in the life insurance service context in Taiwan: the mediating-moderating role of job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2011-06-01

    The effects of transformational leadership and satisfaction were studied along with their interconnected effects (mediation and moderation) on commitment to change in the life insurance industry in two samples, sales managers and salespersons. A multiple mediated-moderated regression approach showed mediation and moderation to have statistically significant main effects on change commitment. Transformational leadership and satisfaction made a more important contribution to change commitment while job satisfaction had a mediating and moderating role that could enhance the relationships between leadership and change commitment. This information is of importance in building successful change commitment associations with customers.

  16. Modeling the response of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica, to external forcings for the next 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Larour, E. Y.; Rignot, E. J.; Mouginot, J.; Khazendar, A.

    2012-12-01

    Pine Island Glacier experienced spectacular changes over the past decades. This glacier has been thinning and accelerating since the 1970's at least and its grounding line has been retreating inland at a rate of about 1 km/yr. Initiation of these changes is usually attributed to warmer ocean waters in the Amundsen Sea affecting the floating part of Pine Island. By buttressing grounded ice flow and controlling the discharge of inland ice to the ocean, the ice shelf of Pine Island plays a major role in the stability of the glacier. Interactions between the ice shelf and ice stream remain poorly understood, which limits the ability to predict the future evolution of major outlet glaciers and ice streams and their contribution to sea level rise. We use the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) and a three-dimensional higher-order model to simulate the evolution of the glacier for the next fifty years and assess the effect of changes in several climate forcings and model parameters, namely basal melting under the floating part, ice front position, atmospheric conditions and grounding line retreat. Simulation results show the dominant effect of basal melting and of grounding line retreat. Results also show that changes are not limited to the ice shelf and the grounding line area but propagate far inland, almost to the ice divide. We find that enhanced basal melting or grounding line retreat are each associated with a distinct pattern of ice thinning and acceleration. We compare the simulation results with remote sensing observations of velocity changes and grounding line evolution to elucidate which forcing is more likely to have caused the recent acceleration of Pine Island Glacier. In general, our simulations indicate that Pine Island Glacier has much potential to continue changing over the coming years. This work was performed at the University of California Irvine and the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National

  17. Why the evidence for outpatient commitment is good enough.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Jeffrey W; Swartz, Marvin S

    2014-06-01

    After nearly three decades of studies evaluating the legal practice of involuntary outpatient commitment, there is yet little consensus about its effectiveness and only limited implementation. Debate continues over how best to assist adults with serious mental illnesses who are unable or unwilling to participate in prescribed community treatment and as a result experience repeated involuntary hospitalizations or involvement with the criminal justice system. The authors comment on the Oxford Community Treatment Order Evaluation Trial (OCTET), a recently conducted randomized trial of outpatient commitment, and discuss the limitations of the study's design for resolving the persistent question of whether compulsory treatment is more effective than purely voluntary treatment for this difficult-to-reach target population. The authors conclude that the search for a definitive and generalizable randomized trial of outpatient commitment may be a quixotic quest; the field should, rather, welcome the results of well-conducted, large-scale, quasi-experimental and naturalistic studies with rigorous multivariable statistical controls.

  18. Characterizing Cold Giant Planets in Reflected Light: Lessons from 50 Years of Outer Solar System Exploration and Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marley, Mark Scott; Hammel, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    A space based coronagraph, whether as part of the WFIRST/AFTA mission or on a dedicated space telescope such as Exo-C or -S, will be able to obtain photometry and spectra of multiple gas giant planets around nearby stars, including many known from radial velocity detections. Such observations will constrain the masses, atmospheric compositions, clouds, and photochemistry of these worlds. Giant planet albedo models, such as those of Cahoy et al. (2010) and Lewis et al. (this meeting), will be crucial for mission planning and interpreting the data. However it is equally important that insights gleaned from decades of solar system imaging and spectroscopy of giant planets be leveraged to optimize both instrument design and data interpretation. To illustrate these points we will draw on examples from solar system observations, by both HST and ground based telescopes, as well as by Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini, to demonstrate the importance clouds, photochemical hazes, and various molecular absorbers play in sculpting the light scattered by solar system giant planets. We will demonstrate how measurements of the relative depths of multiple methane absorption bands of varying strengths have been key to disentangling the competing effects of gas column abundances, variations in cloud height and opacity, and scattering by high altitude photochemical hazes. We will highlight both the successes, such as the accurate remote determination of the atmospheric methane abundance of Jupiter, and a few failures from these types of observations. These lessons provide insights into technical issues facing spacecraft designers, from the selection of the most valuable camera filters to carry to the required capabilities of the flight spectrometer, as well as mission design questions such as choosing the most favorable phase angles for atmospheric characterization.

  19. Do genetic factors protect for early onset lung cancer? A case control study before the age of 50 years

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Albert; Illig, Thomas; Korb, Katrin; Klopp, Norman; Zietemann, Vera; Wölke, Gabi; Meese, Eckart; Sybrecht, Gerhard; Kronenberg, Florian; Cebulla, Matthias; Degen, Maria; Drings, Peter; Gröschel, Andreas; Konietzko, Nikolaus; Kreymborg, Karsten grosse; Häußinger, Karl; Höffken, Gerd; Jilge, Bettina; Ko, You-Dschun; Morr, Harald; Schmidt, Christine; Schmidt, E-Wilhelm; Täuscher, Dagmar; Bickeböller, Heike; Wichmann, H-Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background Early onset lung cancer shows some familial aggregation, pointing to a genetic predisposition. This study was set up to investigate the role of candidate genes in the susceptibility to lung cancer patients younger than 51 years at diagnosis. Methods 246 patients with a primary, histologically or cytologically confirmed neoplasm, recruited from 2000 to 2003 in major lung clinics across Germany, were matched to 223 unrelated healthy controls. 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms of genes with reported associations to lung cancer have been genotyped. Results Genetic associations or gene-smoking interactions was found for GPX1(Pro200Leu) and EPHX1(His113Tyr). Carriers of the Leu-allele of GPX1(Pro200Leu) showed a significant risk reduction of OR = 0.6 (95% CI: 0.4–0.8, p = 0.002) in general and of OR = 0.3 (95% CI:0.1–0.8, p = 0.012) within heavy smokers. We could also find a risk decreasing genetic effect for His-carriers of EPHX1(His113Tyr) for moderate smokers (OR = 0.2, 95% CI:0.1–0.7, p = 0.012). Considered both variants together, a monotone decrease of the OR was found for smokers (OR of 0.20; 95% CI: 0.07–0.60) for each protective allele. Conclusion Smoking is the most important risk factor for young lung cancer patients. However, this study provides some support for the T-Allel of GPX1(Pro200Leu) and the C-Allele of EPHX1(His113Tyr) to play a protective role in early onset lung cancer susceptibility. PMID:18298806

  20. 76 FR 58999 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Persons Who Commit, Threaten To Commit, Or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... Emergency With Respect to Persons Who Commit, Threaten To Commit, or Support Terrorism #0; #0; #0... the National Emergency With Respect to Persons Who Commit, Threaten To Commit, Or Support Terrorism On... persons who commit, threaten to commit, or support terrorism, pursuant to the International...