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Sample records for 500-mhz copper cavity

  1. Niobium thin film coating on a 500-MHz copper cavity by plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang; Genfa Wu; H. Phillips; Robert Rimmer; Anne-Marie Valente; Andy Wu

    2005-05-16

    A system using an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) plasma source for the deposition of a thin niobium film inside a copper cavity for superconducting accelerator applications has been designed and is being constructed. The system uses a 500-MHz copper cavity as both substrate and vacuum chamber. The ECR plasma will be created to produce direct niobium ion deposition. The central cylindrical grid is DC biased to control the deposition energy. This paper describes the design of several subcomponents including the vacuum chamber, RF supply, biasing grid and magnet coils. Operational parameters are compared between an operating sample deposition system and this system. Engineering work progress toward the first plasma creation will be reported here.

  2. R&D of BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, YaPing; Wang, GuangWei; Pan, WeiMin; Li, JiZhen; Liu, DeGui; Sun, Yi; Li, ZhongQuan; Dai, JianPing; Li, ShaoPeng; He, Kun; Wang, GuoPing; Zhao, GuangYuan; Ma, Qiang; Lin, HaiYing; Sha, Peng; Wang, QunYao; Qiu, Feng; Meng, FanBo; Li, Han

    2011-12-01

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCCs) in each ring for higher accelerated gradient, higher Q and lower impedance (Wang et al. The proceedings of SRF'07). There's no spare cavity due to the limited time and funding during BEPCII construction. If any serious trouble happened on either one of the two cavities and could not be recovered in a short time, the operation of BEPCII facility will be affected. Therefore, since 2009 three spare cavities have been fabricated in China to ensure reliable operation, and two of them have been successfully vertically tested in January and July 2011. This paper will briefly present the manufacture, post-process and vertical test performance of the 500 MHz spare cavities.

  3. Fabrication and Measurements of 500 MHz Double Spoke Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HyeKyoung; Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-12-01

    A 500 MHz β0=1 double spoke cavity has been designed and optimized for a high velocity application such as a compact electron accelerator at the Center for Accelerator Science at Old Dominion University [1] and the fabrication was recently completed at Jefferson Lab. The geometry specific to the double spoke cavity required a variety of tooling and fixtures. Also a number of asymmetric weld joints were expected to make it difficult to maintain minimal geometric deviation from the design. This paper will report the fabrication procedure, resulting tolerance from the design, initial test results and the lessons learned from the first β0=1 double spoke cavity fabrication.

  4. Commissioning of the 112 MHz SRF Gun and 500 MHz bunching cavities for the CeC PoP Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J. C.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntosh, P.; Moss, A.; Narayan, G.; Orfin, P.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Skaritka, J.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, E.; Wheelhouse, A.; Wu, Q.; Xiao, B.; Xin, T.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    The Coherent electron Cooling Proof-of-Principle (CeC PoP) experiment at BNL includes a short electron linac. During Phase 1, a 112 MHz superconducting RF photo-emission gun and two 500 MHz normal conducting bunching cavities were installed and are under commissioning. The paper describes the Phase1 linac layout and presents commissioning results for the cavities and associated RF, cryogenic and other sub-systems

  5. Analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities for the NSLS-II storage ring with a 500 MHz 7-cell PETRA-III cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassi, G.; Blednykh, A.; Cheng, W.; Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Teytelman, D.

    2016-02-01

    The NSLS-II storage ring is designed to operate with superconducting RF-cavities with the aim to store an average current of 500 mA distributed in 1080 bunches, with a gap in the uniform filling for ion clearing. At the early stage of the commissioning (phase 1), characterized by a bare lattice without damping wigglers and without Landau cavities, a normal conducting 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity structure has been installed with the goal to store an average current of 25 mA. In this paper we discuss our analysis of coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the Higher Order Modes (HOMs) of the 7-cell PETRA-III RF-cavity. As a cure of the instabilities, we apply a well-known scheme based on a proper detuning of the HOMs frequencies based upon cavity temperature change, and the use of the beneficial effect of the slow head-tail damping at positive chromaticity to increase the transverse coupled-bunch instability thresholds. In addition, we discuss measurements of coupled-bunch instabilities observed during the phase 1 commissioning of the NSLS-II storage ring. In our analysis we rely, in the longitudinal case, on the theory of coupled-bunch instability for uniform fillings, while in the transverse case we complement our studies with numerical simulations with OASIS, a novel parallel particle tracking code for self-consistent simulations of collective effects driven by short and long-range wakefields.

  6. A compact 500 MHz 4 kW Solid-State Power Amplifier for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, M.; Pedrozzi, M.; Ferreira, L. F. R.; Garvey, T.

    2011-05-01

    We present the development of a compact narrow-band Solid-State Power Amplifier (SSPA). We foresee a promising application of solid-state amplifiers specifically in accelerators for new generation synchrotron light sources. Such a new technology has reached a competitive price/performance ratio and expected lifetime in comparison with klystron and IOT amplifiers. The increasing number of synchrotron light sources using 500 MHz as base frequency justifies the effort in the development of the proposed amplifier. Two different techniques are also proposed to improve the control and performance of these new distributed amplification systems which we call, respectively, complete distributed system and forced compression.

  7. Architecture and design of a 500-MHz gallium-arsenide processing element for a parallel supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouts, Douglas J.; Butner, Steven E.

    1991-01-01

    The design of the processing element of GASP, a GaAs supercomputer with a 500-MHz instruction issue rate and 1-GHz subsystem clocks, is presented. The novel, functionally modular, block data flow architecture of GASP is described. The architecture and design of a GASP processing element is then presented. The processing element (PE) is implemented in a hybrid semiconductor module with 152 custom GaAs ICs of eight different types. The effects of the implementation technology on both the system-level architecture and the PE design are discussed. SPICE simulations indicate that parts of the PE are capable of being clocked at 1 GHz, while the rest of the PE uses a 500-MHz clock. The architecture utilizes data flow techniques at a program block level, which allows efficient execution of parallel programs while maintaining reasonably good performance on sequential programs. A simulation study of the architecture indicates that an instruction execution rate of over 30,000 MIPS can be attained with 65 PEs.

  8. Design and Fabrication of a Radiation-Hard 500-MHz Digitizer Using Deep Submicron Technology

    SciTech Connect

    K.K. Gan; M.O. Johnson; R.D. Kass; J. Moore

    2008-09-12

    The proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) will use tens of thousands of beam position monitors (BPMs) for precise beam alignment. The signal from each BPM is digitized and processed for feedback control. We proposed the development of an 11-bit (effective) digitizer with 500 MHz bandwidth and 2 G samples/s. The digitizer was somewhat beyond the state-of-the-art. Moreover we planned to design the digitizer chip using the deep-submicron technology with custom transistors that had proven to be very radiation hard (up to at least 60 Mrad). The design mitigated the need for costly shielding and long cables while providing ready access to the electronics for testing and maintenance. In FY06 as we prepared to submit a chip with test circuits and a partial ADC circuit we found that IBM had changed the availability of our chosen IC fabrication process (IBM 6HP SiGe BiCMOS), making it unaffordable for us, at roughly 3 times the previous price. This prompted us to change our design to the IBM 5HPE process with 0.35 µm feature size. We requested funding for FY07 to continue the design work and submit the first prototype chip. Unfortunately, the funding was not continued and we will summarize below the work accomplished so far.

  9. Field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, T.

    2015-07-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied rf field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film induces heating of the inner cavity wall, resulting in a higher RS. Introducing helium gas in the cavity, and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by less than 120 mK when RS increases with Eacc by 100 n Ω . This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally, the effects of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for the current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered RS.

  10. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system.

  11. Operation of a 500 MHz high temperature superconducting NMR: towards an NMR spectrometer operating beyond 1 GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Nakagome, H; Tennmei, K; Hamada, M; Yoshikawa, M; Otsuka, A; Hosono, M; Kiyoshi, T; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2010-04-01

    We have begun a project to develop an NMR spectrometer that operates at frequencies beyond 1 GHz (magnetic field strength in excess of 23.5 T) using a high temperature superconductor (HTS) innermost coil. As the first step, we developed a 500 MHz NMR with a Bi-2223 HTS innermost coil, which was operated in external current mode. The temporal magnetic field change of the NMR magnet after the coil charge was dominated by (i) the field fluctuation due to a DC power supply and (ii) relaxation in the screening current in the HTS tape conductor; effect (i) was stabilized by the 2H field-frequency lock system, while effect (ii) decreased with time due to relaxation of the screening current induced in the HTS coil and reached 10(-8)(0.01 ppm)/h on the 20th day after the coil charge, which was as small as the persistent current mode of the NMR magnet. The 1D (1)H NMR spectra obtained by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet were nearly equivalent to those obtained by the LTS NMR magnet. The 2D-NOESY, 3D-HNCO and 3D-HNCACB spectra were achieved for ubiquitin by the 500 MHz LTS/HTS magnet; their quality was closely equivalent to that achieved by a conventional LTS NMR. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the effects of screening current-induced magnetic field changes are predicted to be harmless for the 1.03 GHz NMR magnet system. PMID:20149698

  12. A FDR Sensor for Measuring Complex Soil Dielectric Permittivity in the 10–500 MHz Frequency Range

    PubMed Central

    Skierucha, Wojciech; Wilczek, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical details as well as electrical models of FDR (frequency domain reflectometry) sensors for the measurement of the complex dielectric permittivity of porous materials are presented. The sensors are formed from two stainless steel parallel waveguides of various lengths. Using the data from VNA (vector network analyzer) with the connected FDR sensor and selected models of the applied sensor it was possible obtain the frequency spectrum of dielectric permittivity from 10 to 500 MHz of reference liquids and soil samples of various moisture and salinity. The performance of the analyzed sensors were compared with TDR (time domain reflectometry) ones of similar mechanical construction. PMID:22319300

  13. Accurate in vivo dielectric properties of liver from 500 MHz to 40 GHz and their correlation to ex vivo measurements.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, L; Wismayer, P Schembri; Mangion, L Zammit; Sammut, C V

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we report on the characterization of the dielectric properties of in vivo rat liver at 36.4°C from 500 MHz up to 40 GHz with less than 5% uncertainty. The measured data were fitted to a Cole-Cole model and dielectric parameters are presented together with their respective 95% confidence interval. The root mean square error is 0.42. Moreover, ex vivo measurements were conducted in situ at 1, 2, 4 and 6 min after animal death and are compared to in vivo measurements. The results show that immediate changes in [Formula: see text]and [Formula: see text] are within experimental uncertainty, and therefore changes between in vivo and published ex vivo dielectric properties can be attributed to tissue hydration.

  14. Cavity Design, Fabrication and Commission Performance of a 750MHz, 4-rod Separator for CEBAF 4-Hall Beam Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haipeng; Cheng, Guangfeng; Turlington, Larry T.; Wissmann, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    A short version of the original CEBAF normal conducting 4-rod separator cavity has been developed into a 750MHz one * since the concept of simultaneous 4-hall operation for CEBAF is introduced **. This work has been advanced further based on the EM design optimization, bench measurement and by conducting RF-thermal coupled simulation using CST and ANSYS to confirm the cavity tuning and thermal performance. The cavity fabrication used matured technology like copper plating and machining. The cavity flanges, couplers, tuners and cooling channels adopted consistent/compatible hardware with the existing 500MHz cavities. The electromagnetic and thermal design simulations have greatly reduced the prototyping and bench tuning time of the first prototype. Four production cavities have reached a typical 1.94MV kick voltage or 3.0kW wall loss on each cavity after a minor multipactoring or no processing, 7.5% overhead power than the design specification.

  15. Interference Mitigation Technique Using Active Spaceborne Sensor Antenna in EESS (Active) and Space Research Service (Active) for Use in 500 MHz Bandwidth Near 9.6 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneycutt, Bryan L.

    2005-01-01

    This document presents an interference mitigation technique using the active spaceborne sensor SAR3 antenna in the Earth Exploration-Satellite Service (active) and Space Research Service (active) for use in a 500 MHz bandwidth near 9.6 GHz. The purpose of the document is present antenna designs which offer lower sidelobes and faster rolloff in the sidelobes which in turn mitigates the interference to other services from the EESS (active) and SRS (active) sensors.

  16. Diffusion behavior of copper atoms under Cu(II) reduction in Cucurbit[8]uril cavity at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bakovets, Vladimir V.; Nadolinnii, Vladimir A.; Kovalenko, Ekaterina A.; Plyusnin, Pavel E.; Dolgovesova, Irina P.; Zaikovskii, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper we describe copper clusters and nanoparticles formation by the reduction of copper (II) ions inside cavities of macrocycle molecules using supramolecular compound [Cu(Cyclen)(H{sub 2}O)@CB[8

  17. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM and SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Bellantoni, L.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-06-23

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  18. Copper Prototype Measurements of the HOM, LOM And SOM Couplers for the ILC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.K.; Dexter, A.C.; Bellantoni, L.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-11-04

    The ILC Crab Cavity is positioned close to the IP and delivered luminosity is very sensitive to the wakefields induced in it by the beam. A set of couplers were designed to couple to and damp the spurious modes of the crab cavity. As the crab cavity operates using a dipole mode, it has different damping requirements from an accelerating cavity. A separate coupler is required for the monopole modes below the operating frequency of 3.9 GHz (known as the LOMs), the opposite polarization of the operating mode (the SOM), and the modes above the operating frequency (the HOMs). Prototypes of each of these couplers have been manufactured out of copper and measured attached to an aluminum nine cell prototype of the cavity and their external Q factors were measured. The results were found to agree well with numerical simulations.

  19. Experimental attempt to stimulate receptor site environment. A 500-MHz /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance study of enkephalin amides

    SciTech Connect

    Temussi, P.A.; Tancredi, T.; Pastore, A.; Castiglione-Morelli, M.A.

    1987-12-01

    The amides of Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, Met/sup 5/-enkephalin, and three analogues, D-Ala/sup 2/, Leu /sup 5/-enkephalin, (AcO)Tyr/sup 1/, Met/sup 5/-enkephalin, and (AcO)Tyr/sup 1/,D-Ala/sup 2/, Met/sup 5/-enkephalin, have been studied by means of /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy in two different solvent systems: Me/sub 2/SO-d/sub 6/ and CDC1/sub 3/. In the latter solvent the peptides were dissolved as complexes with 18-crown-6-ether, a coronand that binds strongly to the NH/sub 3//sup +/ groups. The crown ether complexation and the apolar solvent were used to simulate the anionic subsite of the receptor and they hydrophobic environment of the receptor cavity, respectively. The very unusual amide proton chemical shifts and their temperature coefficients suggest the presence of folded conformations in CDCl/sub 3/ for all peptides, consistent with several models of opioid receptors and with the crystal structure of Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin. The differences among the proposed cyclic conformations of the five peptides may be correlated, in part, with their different biological activity. All peptides in Me/sub 2/SO-d/sub 6/ are characterized by complex mixtures of extended fully solvated conformations.

  20. Cryogenic RF Material Testing with a High-Q Copper Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; Martin, David; Yoneda, Charles

    2010-11-01

    An X-band RF cryogenic material testing system has been developed in the past few years. This system employs a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom working under a TE013 like mode. By measuring the cavity Qs with a network analyzer, the system can characterize the surface resistance of different samples at different temperatures. Using a 50 MW 2μs pulsed klystron, the system can measure the quenching H field for superconducting samples, up to 300-400 mT. In this paper, we will present the most recent developments of the system and testing results.

  1. Cryogenic RF Material Testing with a High-Q Copper Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Jiquan; Tantawi, Sami; Martin, David; Yoneda, Charles

    2010-11-04

    An X-band RF cryogenic material testing system has been developed in the past few years. This system employs a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom working under a TE{sub 013} like mode. By measuring the cavity Qs with a network analyzer, the system can characterize the surface resistance of different samples at different temperatures. Using a 50 MW 2{mu}s pulsed klystron, the system can measure the quenching H field for superconducting samples, up to 300-400 mT. In this paper, we will present the most recent developments of the system and testing results.

  2. Superconducting Materials Testing with a High-Q Copper RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Dolgashev, V.; Bowden, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nantista, C.D.; Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Capmpisi, I.E.; /Oak Ridge

    2007-11-07

    Superconducting RF is of increasing importance in particle accelerators. We have developed a resonant cavity with high quality factor and an interchangeable wall for testing of superconducting materials. A compact TE01 mode launcher attached to the coupling iris selectively excites the azimuthally symmetric cavity mode, which allows a gap at the detachable wall and is free of surface electric fields that could cause field emission, multipactor, and RF breakdown. The shape of the cavity is tailored to focus magnetic field on the test sample. We describe cryogenic experiments conducted with this cavity. An initial experiment with copper benchmarked our apparatus. This was followed by tests with Nb and MgB2. In addition to characterizing the onset of superconductivity with temperature, our cavity can be resonated with a high power klystron to determine the surface magnetic field level sustainable by the material in the superconducting state. A feedback code is used to make the low level RF drive track the resonant frequency.

  3. Copper-sulfenate complex from oxidation of a cavity mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin.

    PubMed

    Sieracki, Nathan A; Tian, Shiliang; Hadt, Ryan G; Zhang, Jun-Long; Woertink, Julia S; Nilges, Mark J; Sun, Furong; Solomon, Edward I; Lu, Yi

    2014-01-21

    Metal-sulfenate centers are known to play important roles in biology and yet only limited examples are known due to their instability and high reactivity. Herein we report a copper-sulfenate complex characterized in a protein environment, formed at the active site of a cavity mutant of an electron transfer protein, type 1 blue copper azurin. Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with Cu(I)-M121G azurin resulted in a species with strong visible absorptions at 350 and 452 nm and a relatively low electron paramagnetic resonance gz value of 2.169 in comparison with other normal type 2 copper centers. The presence of a side-on copper-sulfenate species is supported by resonance Raman spectroscopy, electrospray mass spectrometry using isotopically enriched hydrogen peroxide, and density functional theory calculations correlated to the experimental data. In contrast, the reaction with Cu(II)-M121G or Zn(II)-M121G azurin under the same conditions did not result in Cys oxidation or copper-sulfenate formation. Structural and computational studies strongly suggest that the secondary coordination sphere noncovalent interactions are critical in stabilizing this highly reactive species, which can further react with oxygen to form a sulfinate and then a sulfonate species, as demonstrated by mass spectrometry. Engineering the electron transfer protein azurin into an active copper enzyme that forms a copper-sulfenate center and demonstrating the importance of noncovalent secondary sphere interactions in stabilizing it constitute important contributions toward the understanding of metal-sulfenate species in biological systems. PMID:24390543

  4. Secondary structure in solution of two anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozymes as investigated by two-dimensional 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarma, R. H.; Sarma, M. H.; Rein, R.; Shibata, M.; Setlik, R. S.; Ornstein, R. L.; Kazim, A. L.; Cairo, A.; Tomasi, T. B.

    1995-01-01

    Two hammerhead chimeric RNA/DNA ribozymes (HRz) were synthesized in pure form. Both were 30 nucleotides long, and the sequences were such that they could be targeted to cleave the HIV-1 gag RNA. Named HRz-W and HRz-M, the former had its invariable core region conserved, the latter had a uridine in the invariable region replaced by a guanine. Their secodary structures were determined by 2D NOESY 1H 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy in 90% water and 10% D2(0), following the imino protons. The data show that both HRz-M and HRz-W form identical secondary structures with stem regions consisting of continuous stacks of AT and GT pairs. An energy minimized computer model of this stem region is provided. The results suggest that the loss of catalytic activity that is known to result when an invariant core residue is replaced is not related to the secondary structure of the ribozymes in the absence of substrate.

  5. Exploration of material removal rate of srf elliptical cavities as a function of media type and cavity shape on niobium and copper using centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp)

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Li, Yongming; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Centrifugal barrel polishing (cbp) for SRF application is becoming more wide spread as the technique for cavity surface preparation. CBP is now being used in some form at SRF laboratories around the world including in the US, Europe and Asia. Before the process can become as mature as wet chemistry like eletro-polishing (EP) and buffered chemical polishing (BCP) there are many questions which remain unanswered. One of these topics includes the uniformity of removal as a function of cavity shape and material type. In this presentation we show CBP removal rates for various media types on 1.3 GHz TESLA and 1.5 GHz CEBAF large/fine grain niobium cavities, and 1.3GHz low surface field copper cavity. The data will also include calculated RF frequency shift modeling non-uniform removal as a function of cavity position and comparing them with CBP results.

  6. Monocopper center embedded in a biomimetic cavity: from supramolecular control of copper coordination to redox regulation.

    PubMed

    Poul, Nicolas Le; Campion, Morgan; Douziech, Bénédicte; Rondelez, Yannick; Clainche, Loïc Le; Reinaud, Olivia; Mest, Yves Le

    2007-07-18

    The electrochemical behavior of diversely substituted Cu-N3-calix[6]arene, enzyme-like, "funnel" complexes is analyzed. The Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox process is regulated by the supramolecular organization of the Cu coordination. The presence of a "shoetree" alkyl nitrile guest molecule inside the host cavity is a prerequisite for a dynamic redox behavior. Combination of supramolecular CH-pi weak interactions with the calixarene cavity and electronic/steric effects from the N3 substituting groups (pyridine, imidazole, pyrrolidine) enforces the preferential geometrical pattern adopted by Cu. This dictates the pathway of the electron-transfer process and, thus, the thermodynamics and kinetics of the redox reaction in the framework of a square-scheme mechanism. The present observations recall strongly the redox control exerted by the protein matrix on copper proteins through biological concepts such as induced fit mechanism, protein foldings, and entatic and allosteric effects. PMID:17580945

  7. A Hydration Study of (1→4) and (1→6) Linked α-Glucans by Comparative 10 ns Molecular Dynamics Simulations and 500-MHz NMR

    PubMed Central

    CORZANA, FRANCISCO; MOTAWIA, MOHAMMED S.; DU PENHOAT, CATHERINE HERVÉ; PEREZ, SERGE; TSCHAMPEL, SARAH M.; WOODS, ROBERT J.; ENGELSEN, SØREN B.

    2014-01-01

    The hydration behavior of two model disaccharides, methyl-α-D-maltoside (1) and methyl-α-D-isomaltoside (2), has been investigated by a comparative 10 ns molecular dynamics study. The detailed hydration of the two disaccharides was described using three force fields especially developed for modeling of carbohydrates in explicit solvent. To validate the theoretical results the two compounds were synthesized and subjected to 500 MHz NMR spectroscopy, including pulsed field gradient diffusion measurements (1: 4.0 · 10−6 cm2 · s−1; 2: 4.2 · 10−6 cm2 · s−1). In short, the older CHARMM-based force field exhibited a more structured carbohydrate–water interaction leading to better agreement with the diffusional properties of the two compounds, whereas especially the α-(1→6) linkage and the primary hydroxyl groups were inaccurately modeled. In contrast, the new generation of the CHARMM-based force field (CSFF) and the most recent version of the AMBER-based force field (GLYCAM-2000a) exhibited less structured carbohydrate–water interactions with the result that the diffusional properties of the two disaccharides were underestimated, whereas the simulations of the α-(1→6) linkage and the primary hydroxyl groups were significantly improved and in excellent agreement with homo- and heteronuclear coupling constants. The difference between the two classes of force field (more structured and less structured carbohydrate–water interaction) was underlined by calculation of the isotropic hydration as calculated by radial pair distributions. At one extreme, the radial O…O pair distribution function yielded a peak density of 2.3 times the bulk density in the first hydration shell when using the older CHARMM force field, whereas the maximum density observed in the GLYCAM force field was calculated to be 1.0, at the other extreme. PMID:14735575

  8. Copper-sulfenate complex from oxidation of a cavity mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    SciTech Connect

    Sieracki, Nathan A.; Tian, Shiliang; Hadt, Ryan G.; Zhang, Jun-Long; Woertink, Julia S.; Nilges, Mark J.; Sun, Furong; Solomon, Edward I.; Lu, Yi

    2014-08-25

    Metal–sulfenate centers are known to play important roles in biology and yet only limited examples are known due to their instability and high reactivity. Herein we report a copper–sulfenate complex characterized in a protein environment, formed at the active site of a cavity mutant of an electron transfer protein, type 1 blue copper azurin. Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with Cu(I)–M121G azurin resulted in a species with strong visible absorptions at 350 and 452 nm and a relatively low electron paramagnetic resonance gz value of 2.169 in comparison with other normal type 2 copper centers. The presence of a side-on copper–sulfenate species is supported by resonance Raman spectroscopy, electrospray mass spectrometry using isotopically enriched hydrogen peroxide, and density functional theory calculations correlated to the experimental data. In contrast, the reaction with Cu(II)–M121G or Zn(II)–M121G azurin under the same conditions did not result in Cys oxidation or copper–sulfenate formation. Structural and computational studies strongly suggest that the secondary coordination sphere noncovalent interactions are critical in stabilizing this highly reactive species, which can further react with oxygen to form a sulfinate and then a sulfonate species, as demonstrated by mass spectrometry. Engineering the electron transfer protein azurin into an active copper enzyme that forms a copper–sulfenate center and demonstrating the importance of noncovalent secondary sphere interactions in stabilizing it constitute important contributions toward the understanding of metal–sulfenate species in biological systems.

  9. Characterization and Fabrication of Spoke Cavities for High-Velocity Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Park, HyeKyoung; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-02-01

    A 500 MHz, velocity-of-light, two-spoke cavity has been designed and optimized for possible use in a compact light source. Here we present the mechanical analysis and steps taken in fabrication of this cavity at Jefferson Lab.

  10. Cryogenic Testing of High-Velocity Spoke Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-12-01

    Spoke-loaded cavities are being investigated for the high-velocity regime. The relative compactness at low-frequency makes them attractive for applications requiring, or benefiting from, 4 K operation. Additionally, the large velocity acceptance makes them good candidates for the acceleration of high-velocity protons and ions. Here we present the results of cryogenic testing of a 325 MHz, β0= 0.82 single-spoke cavity and a 500 MHz, β0 = 1 double-spoke cavity.

  11. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  12. Comparison of the copper blackbody fixed-point cavities between NIS and LNE-Cnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. G.; Ali, K.; Bourson, F.; Sadli, M.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the results of a bilateral comparison at the copper blackbody fixed point (1084.62 °C), one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 in the high-temperature range. The ‘National Institute of Standards—Egypt (NIS)’ and the ‘Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie--France (LNE-Cnam)’ undertook such a comparison using an NIS linear pyrometer ‘LP4’ as a circulating radiation thermometer between the two laboratories. The main objective of this work was to compare the realizations of the copper blackbody fixed point for radiation thermometers and establish the level of agreement between the two laboratories in the high-temperature range. The comparison measurements revealed a slightly lower temperature of the NIS copper point than that of the LNE-Cnam copper point by about 0.08 °C. This difference is not significant with regard to the uncertainty and the stability of the pyrometer estimated as 0.15 °C. A second comparison was made a few months later by comparing simultaneously the two copper points at the LNE-Cnam premises. This comparison allowed determining a temperature difference of 0.045 ± 0.030 °C between the two cells, with the temperature of the LNE-Cnam cell being higher than that of NIS.

  13. Frequency-tunable transmon in a three-dimensional copper cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jia-Zheng; Cao, Zhi-Min; Fan, Yun-Yi; Zhou, Yu; Lan, Dong; Liu, Yu-Hao; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Li, Yong-Chao; Cao, Chun-Hai; Xu, Wei-Wei; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Yu, Hai-Feng; Yu, Yang; Sun, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Pei-Heng

    2015-11-01

    We have realized a frequency-tunable transmon in a three-dimensional cooper cavity using a direct current superconducting quantum interference device. Both the transition frequency of the transmon and the frequency of the dressed cavity can be varied with the applied external flux bias, which are well consistent with the theoretical model. The range of the variable transition frequency is from 5.188 GHz to 7.756 GHz. The energy relaxation time of the transmon is hundreds of nanoseconds. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922104 and 2011CBA00200), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11474154), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BK2012013), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120091110030), and the Dengfeng Project B of Nanjing University, China.

  14. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  15. Evaluation of cavity occurrence in the Maynardville Limestone and the Copper Ridge Dolomite at the Y-12 Plant using logistic and general linear models

    SciTech Connect

    Shevenell, L.A.; Beauchamp, J.J.

    1994-11-01

    Several waste disposal sites are located on or adjacent to the karstic Maynardville Limestone (Cmn) and the Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ccr) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These formations receive contaminants in groundwaters from nearby disposal sites, which can be transported quite rapidly due to the karst flow system. In order to evaluate transport processes through the karst aquifer, the solutional aspects of the formations must be characterized. As one component of this characterization effort, statistical analyses were conducted on the data related to cavities in order to determine if a suitable model could be identified that is capable of predicting the probability of cavity size or distribution in locations for which drilling data are not available. Existing data on the locations (East, North coordinates), depths (and elevations), and sizes of known conduits and other water zones were used in the analyses. Two different models were constructed in the attempt to predict the distribution of cavities in the vicinity of the Y-12 Plant: General Linear Models (GLM), and Logistic Regression Models (LOG). Each of the models attempted was very sensitive to the data set used. Models based on subsets of the full data set were found to do an inadequate job of predicting the behavior of the full data set. The fact that the Ccr and Cmn data sets differ significantly is not surprising considering the hydrogeology of the two formations differs. Flow in the Cmn is generally at elevations between 600 and 950 ft and is dominantly strike parallel through submerged, partially mud-filled cavities with sizes up to 40 ft, but more typically less than 5 ft. Recognized flow in the Ccr is generally above 950 ft elevation, with flow both parallel and perpendicular to geologic strike through conduits, which tend to be large than those on the Cnm, and are often not fully saturated at the shallower depths.

  16. NMR spectroscopic properties (1H at 500 MHz) of deuterated* ribonucleotide-dimers ApU*, GpC*, partially deuterated 2'-deoxyribonucleotide-dimers d(TpA*), d(ApT*), d(GpC*) and their comparison with natural counterparts (1H-NMR window).

    PubMed

    Földesi, A; Nilson, F P; Glemarec, C; Gioeli, C; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1993-02-01

    Pure 1'#,2',3',4'#,5',5''-2H6-ribonucleoside derivatives 10-14, 1'#,2',2'',3',4'#,5',5''-2H7-2'-deoxynucleoside blocks 15-18 and their natural-abundance counterparts were used to assemble partially deuterated ribonucleotide-dimers (* indicates deuteration at 1'#,2',3',4'#,5',5''(2H6)): ApU* 21, GpC* 22 and partially deuterated 2'-deoxyribonucleotide-dimers d(TpA*) 23, d(ApT*) 25, d(GpC*) 26 (* indicates deuteration at 1'#,2',2'',3',4'#,5',5''(2H7)) according to the procedure described by Földesi et al. (Tetrahedron, in press). These five partially deuterated oligonucleotides were subsequently compared with their corresponding natural-abundance counterparts by 500 MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy to evaluate the actual NMR simplifications achieved in the non-deuterated part (1H-NMR window) as a result of specific deuterium incorporation. Detailed one-dimensional 1H-NMR (500 MHz), two-dimensional correlation spectra (DQF-COSY and TOCSY) and deuterium isotope effect on the chemical shifts of oligonucleotides have been presented.

  17. Q disease on 350-MHZ superconducting spoke cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Edwards, R. L.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Liu, Jianfei; Schrage, D. L.; Shapiro, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    Q disease, i.e., an increase of RF surface resistance due to hydride precipitation, has been investigated with 350-MHz spoke cavities. This phenomenon was studied extensively in early 1990s with cavities at frequencies >1 GHz. This is possibly due to the fact that the lower-frequency cavities were believed to show insignificant effect. However, early 500-MHz KEK elliptical cavities and JAERI 130-MHz quarter wave resonators have shown significant Q degradation, suggesting that this disease can be a serious problem with lower-frequency cavities as well. Since there were no quantitative data with 350-MHz cavities, we decided to measure our two spoke cavities. Our spoke cavities were made of RRR{approx}250 niobium and were chemically polished {approx}150 microns. A few series of systematic tests have shown that our spoke cavities do not show any Q{sub 0} degradation up to {approx}24 hours of holding the cavity at 100 K. However it starts showing degradation if it is held for a longer time and the additional loss due to the Q disease increases linearly. It was also found that our spoke cavity recovers from Q disease if it is warmed up to 150 K or higher for 12 hours.

  18. Primary structure determination of five sialylated oligosaccharides derived from bronchial mucus glycoproteins of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The occurrence of the NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)] GlcNAc beta(1----.) structural element revealed by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lamblin, G; Boersma, A; Klein, A; Roussel, P; van Halbeek, H; Vliegenthart, J F

    1984-07-25

    The structure of sialylated carbohydrate units of bronchial mucins obtained from cystic fibrosis patients was investigated by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with sugar analysis. After subjecting the mucins to alkaline borohydride degradation, sialylated oligosaccharide-alditols were isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography. Five compounds could be obtained in a rather pure state; their structures were established as the following: A-1, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4) [Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----3)Gal-NAc-ol; A-2, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)GlcNAc beta(1----6)-[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAc-o1; A-3, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta-(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----3)Gal beta(1----3) GalNAc-o1; A-4, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]Glc-NAc NAc beta(1----6)[GlcNAc beta(1----3)]GalNAc-o1; A-6,NeuAc alpha-(2----3) Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----6)[Gal beta-(1----4) GlcNAc beta(1----3)]GalNAc-o1. The simultaneous presence of sialic acid in alpha(2----3)-linkage to Gal and fucose in alpha(1----3)-linkage to GlcNAc of the same N-acetyllactosamine unit could be adequately proved by high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy. This sequence constitutes a novel structural element for mucins. PMID:6746638

  19. Primary structure determination of five sialylated oligosaccharides derived from bronchial mucus glycoproteins of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The occurrence of the NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)] GlcNAc beta(1----.) structural element revealed by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lamblin, G; Boersma, A; Klein, A; Roussel, P; van Halbeek, H; Vliegenthart, J F

    1984-07-25

    The structure of sialylated carbohydrate units of bronchial mucins obtained from cystic fibrosis patients was investigated by 500-MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with sugar analysis. After subjecting the mucins to alkaline borohydride degradation, sialylated oligosaccharide-alditols were isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography. Five compounds could be obtained in a rather pure state; their structures were established as the following: A-1, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4) [Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----3)Gal-NAc-ol; A-2, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)GlcNAc beta(1----6)-[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAc-o1; A-3, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta-(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----3)Gal beta(1----3) GalNAc-o1; A-4, NeuAc alpha(2----3)Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]Glc-NAc NAc beta(1----6)[GlcNAc beta(1----3)]GalNAc-o1; A-6,NeuAc alpha-(2----3) Gal beta(1----4)[Fuc alpha(1----3)]GlcNAc beta(1----6)[Gal beta-(1----4) GlcNAc beta(1----3)]GalNAc-o1. The simultaneous presence of sialic acid in alpha(2----3)-linkage to Gal and fucose in alpha(1----3)-linkage to GlcNAc of the same N-acetyllactosamine unit could be adequately proved by high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy. This sequence constitutes a novel structural element for mucins.

  20. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  1. Progress on a Be Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Palmer, R.; Stratakis, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-12-24

    Previous RF experiments with normal-conducting cavities have demonstrated that there is a significant degradation in maximum gradient when the cavity is subjected to a strong axial magnetic field. We have developed a model suggesting that a cavity with beryllium walls may perform better than copper cavities. In this paper we outline the issues that led us to propose fabricating a Be-wall cavity. We also discuss a concept for fabricating such a cavity and mention some of the manufacturing issues we expect to face.

  2. The ADMX Sidecar cavity and receiver-chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutan, Christian; ADMX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) searches for dark-matter axions by looking for their resonant conversion to microwave photons in a strong magnetic field. If ADMX rules out axions in the 500 MHz - 2 GHz frequency range, new technologies and cavity geometries will need to be explored to find higher mass axions. ADMX Sidecar is a higher frequency pathfinder experiment that uses a miniature resonant cavity to search for axions in the 2 GHz - 10 GHz frequency range. The Sidecar cavity shares the magnetic field and cryogenics of the main experiment but the data pipeline and receiver-chain are new and independent of the existing infrastructure. Unlike the main experiment, which uses gear-boxes and fiberglass shafts to translate the motion of room temperature motors into the cryogenic space, piezoelectric motors are used to adjust the Sidecar tuning rod position and antenna depth. Here I discuss the design, construction and status of ADMX Sidecar. Supported by DOE Grants DE-FG02-97ER41029, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF Grant 1067242, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  3. A method for designing a variable-channel high-power cavity combiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong-Tao; Huang, Gui-Rong; Shang, Lei; Lin, Hong-Xiang; Du, Bai-Ting

    2016-08-01

    Cavity combiners have been put forward for high power combining due to their advantages of larger combining ability, variable input channels and less power loss. For a high power cavity combiner, it is better to keep the power loss ratio in a reasonable range, because large power loss would lead to strict requirements on the cooling system. A combiner with variable input channels is convenient for outputting different power levels according to practical demands. In this paper, a method for designing a variable-channel high-power cavity combiner is proposed, based on the relation between input and output coupling coefficients obtained by analyzing the equivalent circuit of the cavity combiner. This method can put the designed cavity combiner in a matching state and keep its power loss rate in a reasonable range as the number of input channels changes. As an example, a cavity combiner with 500 MHz and variable input channels from 16 to 64 is designed, and the simulation results show that our proposed method is feasible. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079034)

  4. Clamshell microwave cavities having a superconductive coating

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Arendt, Paul N.; Piel, Helmut

    1994-01-01

    A microwave cavity including a pair of opposing clamshell halves, such halves comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, or a silver-based alloy, wherein the cavity is further characterized as exhibiting a dominant TE.sub.011 mode is provided together with an embodiment wherein the interior concave surfaces of the clamshell halves are coated with a superconductive material. In the case of copper clamshell halves, the microwave cavity has a Q-value of about 1.2.times.10.sup.5 as measured at a temperature of 10K and a frequency of 10 GHz.

  5. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  6. Cavity magnomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  7. First results of testing 3.9 GHz TM(010) superconducting cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; Bellantoni, L.; Berenc, T.G.; Edwards, H.T.; Gonin, I.V.; Khabiboulline, T.N.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Fermilab is developing third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity to improve performances of A0 and TTF photoinjectors. In frame of this project we have built and tested two nine-cell copper models and one 3-cell niobium cavity. Properties of the high order modes were carefully studied in a chain of two copper cavities at room temperature. In paper we discuss results of cold tests of the 3-cell cavity before and after BCP.

  8. Fabrication process for the PEP II RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, R.M.; Rimmer, R.A.; Schwarz, H.

    1997-06-05

    This paper presents the major steps used in the fabrication of the 26 RF Cavities required for the PEP-II B-factory. Several unique applications of conventional processes have been developed and successfully implemented: electron beam welding (EBW), with minimal porosity, of .75 inch (19 mm) copper cross-sections; extensive 5-axis milling of water channels; electroplating of .37 inch (10 mm) thick OFE copper; tuning of the cavity by profiling beam noses prior to final joining with the cavity body; and machining of the cavity interior, are described here.

  9. Tetraphenylphosphonium copper(I) dicyanamide.

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Materials Science Division

    2007-01-01

    In the title compound, {l_brace}(C{sub 24}H{sub 20}P)[Cu(C{sub 2}N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}, the copper(I) dicyanamide anion forms a distorted three-dimensional single diamondoid network. Templating tetraphenylphosphonium cations reside within the cavities of the polymeric anion.

  10. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  11. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  12. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  13. High Gradient Accelerator Cavities Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, Robert Lawrence; Parsons, Gregory; Williams, Philip; Oldham, Christopher; Mundy, Zach; Dolgashev, Valery

    2014-12-09

    In the Phase I program, Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. (CCR), in collaboration with North Carolina State University (NCSU), fabricated copper accelerator cavities and used Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to apply thin metal coatings of tungsten and platinum. It was hypothesized that a tungsten coating would provide a robust surface more resistant to arcing and arc damage. The platinum coating was predicted to reduce processing time by inhibiting oxides that form on copper surfaces soon after machining. Two sets of cavity parts were fabricated. One was coated with 35 nm of tungsten, and the other with approximately 10 nm of platinum. Only the platinum cavity parts could be high power tested during the Phase I program due to schedule and funding constraints. The platinum coated cavity exhibit poor performance when compared with pure copper cavities. Not only did arcing occur at lower power levels, but the processing time was actually longer. There were several issues that contributed to the poor performance. First, machining of the base copper cavity parts failed to achieve the quality and cleanliness standards specified to SLAC National Accelerator Center. Secondly, the ALD facilities were not configured to provide the high levels of cleanliness required. Finally, the nanometer coating applied was likely far too thin to provide the performance required. The coating was ablated or peeled from the surface in regions of high fields. It was concluded that the current ALD process could not provide improved performance over cavities produced at national laboratories using dedicated facilities.

  14. High-Q ferrite-tuned cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.M.; Thiessen, H.A.; Carlini, R.D.; Potter, J.M.

    1983-08-01

    Rapid-cycling proton synchrotrons, such as the proposed LAMPF II accelerator, require approximately 10 MV per turn rf with 17% tuning range near 50 MHz. The traditional approach to ferrite-tuned cavities uses a ferrite which is longitudinally biased (rf magnetic field parallel to bias field). This method leads to unacceptably high losses in the ferrite. At Los Alamos, we are developing a cavity with transverse bias (rf magnetic field perpendicular to the bias field) that makes use of the tensor permeability of the ferrite. Initial tests of a small (10-cm-diam) quarter-wave singly re-entrant cavity tuned by several different ferrites indicate that the losses in the ferrite can be made negligible compared with the losses due to the surface resistivity of the copper cavity.

  15. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Xu W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; et al

    2012-05-20

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  16. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  17. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  18. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  19. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  20. A 201-MHz Normal Conducting RF Cavity for the International MICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.J.; Virostek, Steve; S. Zisman, Michael; Rimmer, Robert

    2008-07-01

    MICE is a demonstration experiment for the ionization cooling of muon beams. Eight RF cavities are proposed to be used in the MICE cooling channel. These cavities will be operated in a strong magnetic field; therefore, they must be normal conducting. The cavity design and construction are based on the successful experience and techniques developed for a 201-MHz prototype cavity for the US MUCOOL program. Taking advantage of a muon beamâ s penetration property, the cavity employs a pair of curved thin beryllium windows to terminate conventional beam irises and achieve higher cavity shunt impedance. The cavity resembles a round, closed pillbox cavity. Two half-shells spun from copper sheets are joined by e-beam welding to form the cavity body. There are four ports on the cavity equator for RF couplers, vacuum pumping and field probes. The ports are formed by means of an extruding technique.

  1. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  2. Dielectric supported radio-frequency cavities

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Lee, Terry G.

    2000-01-01

    A device which improves the electrical and thermomechanical performance of an RF cavity, for example, in a disk-loaded accelerating structure. A washer made of polycrystalline diamond is brazed in the middle to a copper disk washer and at the outer edge to the plane wave transformer tank wall, thus dissipating heat from the copper disk to the outer tank wall while at the same time providing strong mechanical support to the metal disk. The washer structure eliminates the longitudinal connecting rods and cooling channels used in the currently available cavities, and as a result minimizes problems such as shunt impedance degradation and field distortion in the plane wave transformer, and mechanical deflection and uneven cooling of the disk assembly.

  3. Analysis of the slot heating of the Coupled Cavity Linac cavity.

    SciTech Connect

    Konecni, S.; Bultman, N. K.

    2001-01-01

    CCL cavities are figures of revolution about the beam axis. An automated tuning program sets up the geometry for a symmetric accelerating cavity and runs SUPERFISH repetitively, varying the geometry to tune each cavity to the desired frequency for the electromagnetic fields. SUPERFISH solves Maxwell's equations in 2-D. A large portion of the RF power (60-80%) applied to accelerate protons is a waste heat deposited on the inside of the copper cavity. This waste heat is removed most efficiently with water circulating through cooling passages. The waste heat needs to be removed in order to minimize thermal deformations and with it control the resonance of the cavities. A slot between the main cavity and coupled cavity receives additional heating that is not captured in the 2-D analysis. This heating causes deformation of the region and with it frequency shift. This paper covers the estimation of the slot heating and three-dimensional thermal and structural analysis of the CCL cavity.

  4. 201 MHz Cavity R&D for MUCOOL and MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael; Norem, Jim; Bross,Alan; Moretti, Alfred; Norris, Barry; Torun, Yagmur; Phillips, Larry; Rimmer, Robert; Stirbet, Mircea; Reep, Michael; Summers, Don

    2006-06-23

    We describe the design, fabrication, analysis and preliminary testing of the prototype 201 MHz copper cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. Cavity applications include the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) as well as cooling channels for a neutrino factory or a muon collider. This cavity was developed by the US muon cooling (MUCOOL) collaboration and is being tested in the MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab. To achieve a high accelerating gradient, the cavity beam irises are terminated by a pair of curved, thin beryllium windows. Several fabrication methods developed for the cavity and windows are novel and offer significant cost savings as compared to conventional construction methods. The cavity's thermal and structural performances are simulated with an FEA model. Preliminary high power RF commissioning results will be presented.

  5. The ``Q disease'' in Superconducting Niobium RF Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, J.

    2003-07-01

    Superconducting niobium cavities can achieve quality (Q0) factors of 1010-1011, more than six orders of magnitude higher than conventional copper cavities. However, to maintain this performance at high accelerating gradient (20 MV/m) the radio-frequency (rf) surface must be damage and dust free. Cavity preparation techniques therefore routinely include a chemical etch or electropolishing. Under certain conditions, these (and other) treatments can contaminate the niobium with hydrogen. Hydrides may then form when the cavity is cooled through 150 K, even if only a few atomic percent hydrogen are present. If hydrides are formed, the cavity quality can degrade substantially (Q disease). A rapid cooldown often inhibits the hydride formation. Other "cures" include degassing cavities at 900 °C to eliminate the hydrogen. A historical review of the Q disease is provided here, with the emphasis being placed on its discovery, symptoms, mechanism, and cures.

  6. 63Cu Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Viscosity Studies of Copper (I) Perchlorate in Mixed Solvents Containing Acetonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Dip Singh; Byrne, Lindsay; Quiekenden, Terry I.

    1998-12-01

    63Cu nuclear magnetic resonance and viscosity studies of 0.064 M copper (I) Perchlorate solutions have been made at 298 K in binary mixtures of acetonitrile (AN) with dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO), hexamethylphosphotriamide (HMPA), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), nitromethane (NM), propylene carbonate (PC) and 3-hydroxypropionitrile (3 HPN) at several compositions of the mixtures using a 500 MHz NMR Spectrometer and Ubbelohde viscometer, respectively. The chemical shift (δ), linewidth (Δ) and line intensity (I) of the 63Cu NMR signal in these mixed solvents have been measured relative to the 63Cu signal in 0.064 M copper (I) Perchlorate (CuClO4) solution in pure AN. The quadrupolar re-laxation rates (1/T2)Q, reorientational correlation times (τR) and quadrupolar coupling constants (QCC) of the copper (I) solvates have also been estimated from the data. The QCC values show a big variation in all solvent systems with the change of solvent composition, indicating the formation of mixed com-plexes. The variation of all NMR parameters with solvent composition shows strong effects of DMSO, HMPA, and DMA on the solvation behaviour of Cu + in the first three mixtures, and relatively much weaker effects of PC, NM and 3HPN in the other three mixtures.

  7. Low energy booster radio frequency cavity structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.

    1993-04-01

    The structural design of the Superconducting Super Collider Low Energy Booster (LEB) Radio Frequency (RF) Cavity is very unique. The cavity is made of three different materials which all contribute to its structural strength while at the same time providing a good medium for magnetic properties. Its outer conductor is made of thin walled stainless steel which is later copper plated to reduce the electrical losses. Its tuner housing is made of a fiber reinforced composite laminate, similar to G10, glued to stainless steel plating. The stainless steel of the tuner is slotted to significantly diminish the magnetically-induced eddy currents. The composite laminate is bonded to the stainless steel to restore the structural strength that was lost in slotting. The composite laminate is also a barrier against leakage of the pressurized internal ferrite coolant fluid. The cavity`s inner conductor, made of copper and stainless steel, is subjected to high heat loads and must be liquid cooled. The requirements of the Cavity are very stringent and driven primarily by deflection, natural frequency and temperature. Therefore, very intricate finite element analysis was used to complement conventional hand analysis in the design of the cavity. Structural testing of the assembled prototype cavity is planned to demonstrate the compliance of the cavity design to all of its requirements.

  8. 1H NMR studies of reactions of copper complexes with human blood plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Bligh, S W; Boyle, H A; McEwen, A B; Sadler, P J; Woodham, R H

    1992-01-22

    Reactions of the copper complexes Cu(II)Cl2, [Cu(II)(EDTA)]2-, [Cu(II)2(DIPS)4] and [Cu(I)(DMP)2]+ (where DIPS is 3,5-diisopropylsalicylate and DMP is 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline) with human blood plasma and urine have been studied by 500 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy has been used to monitor the transfer of Cu(II) onto albumin in plasma. The rate of transfer of Cu(II) from [Cu(II)(EDTA)]2- onto albumin as measured by CD (T1/2 26 min, 0.5 mM Cu, 21 degrees), was similar to the rate of Cu(II) binding to amino acids and citrate, and to the rate of formation of [Ca(II)(EDTA)]2- in plasma. Reactions of Cu(II)Cl2 and [Cu(II)2(DIPS)4] in plasma followed a similar course, but were more rapid. The latter complex also appeared to give rise to the displacement of lactate from protein binding. Reactions of copper complexes in plasma therefore involve a range of low Mr ligands as well as albumin, and the ligands play a major role in determining the kinetics of the reactions. These factors, as well as the partitioning of both complexes and displaced ligands into lipoproteins, are likely to play important roles in the molecular pharmacology of copper-containing drugs. In urine, His and formate were involved in EDTA and DIPS displacement from their respective copper complexes, and peaks for free DIPS and [Ca(II)(EDTA)]2- were observed. The complex (Cu(I)(DMP)2]+ appeared to be relatively stable in both plasma and urine. PMID:1739401

  9. Design Methodology and Consideratios for NOVA 53 MHZ RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ader, C.; Wildman, D.W.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-19

    The NO?A Experiment will construct a detector optimized for electron neutrino detection in the existing Neutrino at Main Injector (NuMI) beamline. This beamline is capable of operating at 400 kW of primary beam power and the upgrade will allow up to 700 kW. The cavities will operate at 53 MHz and three of them will be installed in the Recycler beamline. Thermal stability of the cavities is crucial since this affects the tuning. Results of finite element thermal and structural analysis involving the copper RF cavity will be presented.

  10. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  11. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  12. High-field 1H T1 and T2 NMR relaxation time measurements of H2O in homeopathic preparations of quartz, sulfur, and copper sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Stephan; Wolf, Martin; Skrabal, Peter; Bangerter, Felix; Heusser, Peter; Thurneysen, André; Wolf, Ursula

    2009-09-01

    Quantitative meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials investigating the specific therapeutic efficacy of homeopathic remedies yielded statistically significant differences compared to placebo. Since the remedies used contained mostly only very low concentrations of pharmacologically active compounds, these effects cannot be accounted for within the framework of current pharmacology. Theories to explain clinical effects of homeopathic remedies are partially based upon changes in diluent structure. To investigate the latter, we measured for the first time high-field (600/500 MHz) 1H T1 and T2 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of H2O in homeopathic preparations with concurrent contamination control by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Homeopathic preparations of quartz (10 c-30 c, n = 21, corresponding to iterative dilutions of 100-10-100-30), sulfur (13 x-30 x, n = 18, 10-13-10-30), and copper sulfate (11 c-30 c, n = 20, 100-11-100-30) were compared to n = 10 independent controls each (analogously agitated dilution medium) in randomized and blinded experiments. In none of the samples, the concentration of any element analyzed by ICP-MS exceeded 10 ppb. In the first measurement series (600 MHz), there was a significant increase in T1 for all samples as a function of time, and there were no significant differences between homeopathic potencies and controls. In the second measurement series (500 MHz) 1 year after preparation, we observed statistically significant increased T1 relaxation times for homeopathic sulfur preparations compared to controls. Fifteen out of 18 correlations between sample triplicates were higher for controls than for homeopathic preparations. No conclusive explanation for these phenomena can be given at present. Possible hypotheses involve differential leaching from the measurement vessel walls or a change in water molecule dynamics, i.e., in rotational correlation time and/or diffusion. Homeopathic preparations

  13. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  14. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  15. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  16. Characterization of cavity wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, James A.

    Scope and Method of Study. This research focused on flow over deep cavities at subsonic speeds with emphasis on the wake downstream of the cavity. Cavity wake behaviors have not been studied in detail and are a major concern for air vehicles with cavities and in particular for optical sensor systems installed in cavities. Other key behaviors for sensor survival and performance are cavity resonance and turbulence scales in the shear layer. A wind tunnel test apparatus was developed to explore cavity and wake characteristics. It consisted of a test section insert for the OSU Indraft Wind Tunnel with an additional contraction cone for significantly increased speed. The test section included a variable depth cavity in a boundary layer splitter plate/fairing assembly, a Y-Z traverse and pitot rake with in-situ pressure transducers for high frequency response. Flows were measured over clean cavities with length to depth (L/D) ratios of 4 to 1/2 and on cavities with a porous fence for resonance suppression. Measurements were taken in streamwise and cross-stream sections to three cavity lengths downstream of the cavity trailing edge. Flow visualization using laser sheet and smoke injection was also used. Findings and Conclusions. The high speed insert demonstrated a significant new capability for the OSU wind tunnel, reaching speeds of 0.35 Mach (390 feet/second) in a 14"x14" test section. Inlet room flow was found to be quite unsteady and recommendations are made for improved flow and quantitative visualization. Key findings for cavity wake flow include its highly three dimensional nature with asymmetric peaks in cross section with boundary layer thicknesses and integral length scales several times that of a normal flat plate turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Turbulent intensities (TI) of 35% to 55% of freestream speeds were measured for the clean configuration. Fence configuration TI's were 20% to 35% of free stream and, in both configurations, TI's decayed to

  17. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2008-12-21

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  18. Optically measuring interior cavities

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary Franklin

    2009-11-03

    A method of measuring the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of an interior cavity includes the steps of collecting a first optical slice of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, collecting additional optical slices of data that represents a partial volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity, and combining the first optical slice of data and the additional optical slices of data to calculate of the three-dimensional volume or perimeter shape of the interior cavity.

  19. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  20. Liquid laser cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, S.; Filipescu, N.; Kellermeyer, G. L.; Mc Avoy, N.

    1969-01-01

    Liquid laser cavities have plenum chambers at the ends of the capillary cell which are terminated in transparent optical flats. By use of these cavities, several new europium chelates and a terbium chelate can provide laser action in solution at room temperature.

  1. CAVITY EXCITATION CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Franck, J.V.

    1959-10-20

    An electronic oscillator is described for energizing a resonant cavity and to a system for stabilizing the operatin g frequency of the oscillator at the particular frequency necessary to establish a particular preferred field configuration or mode in the cavity, in this instance a linear accelerator. A freely rnnning oscillator has an output coupled to a resonant cavity wherein a field may be built up at any one of several adjacent frequencies. A pickup loop in the cavity is suitably shielded and positioned in the cavity so that only energy at the panticular desired frequency is fed back to stabilize the oscillator. A phase and gain control is in cluded in the feedback line.

  2. Passivated niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  3. Copper urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The copper urine test is performed by collecting urine at specific times for a 24-hour period. The urine is tested for the amount of copper present. The copper urine test is used to determine the presence of Wilson ...

  4. Superconducting RF Deflecting Cavity Design and Prototype for Short X-ray Pulse Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jiaru; Chen, H.; Tang, C.-X.; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Rimmer, Robert; Slack, Gary; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Li, D.; Nassiri, Alireza; Waldschmidt, G.J.

    2008-07-01

    Deflecting RF cavities are proposed to be used in generating short x-ray pulses (on ~1-picosecond order) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)* using a novel scheme by Zholents**. To meet the required deflecting voltage, impedance budget from higher order, lower order and the same order modes (HOM, LOM and SOM) of the APS storage ring, extensive deflecting cavity design studies have been conducted with numerical simulations and cavity prototypes. In this paper, we report recent progress on a single cell S-band (2.8-GHz) superconducting deflecting cavity design with waveguide damping. A copper and a niobium prototype cavity were fabricated and tested, respectively to benchmark the cavity and damping designs. A new damping scheme has been proposed which provides stronger damping to both HOM and LOM by directly coupling to a damping waveguide on the cavity equator.

  5. Fabrication of the Prototype 201.25 MHz Cavity for a Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Rimmer; S. Manning; R. Manus; L. Phillips; M. Stirbet; K. Worland; G. Wu; D. Li; R. MacGill; J. Staples; S. Virostek; M. Zisman; K. Taminger; R. Hafley; R. Martin; D. Summers; M. Reep

    2005-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201.25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional construction methods.

  6. Fabrication of the prototype 201.25 mhz cavity for a muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Manning, S.; Manus, R.; Phillips, L.; Stirbet, M.; Worland, K.; Wu, G.; Li, D.; MacGill, R.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Taminger, K.; Hafley, R.; Martin, R.; Summers, D.; Reep, M.

    2005-05-20

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201. 25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional methods.

  7. A general approach for the calculation of intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, J.; Collado, C.; Menéndez, O.; O'Callaghan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a general procedure to calculate intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates that is applicable to the dielectric-loaded cavities currently used for measurement of surface resistance in high-temperature superconductors. The procedure would enable the use such cavities for intermodulation characterization of unpatterned superconducting films, and would remove the uncertainty of measuring intermodulation on patterned devices, in which the effect of patterning damage might influence the outcome of the measurements. We have verified the calculation method by combining superconducting and copper endplates in a rutile-loaded cavity.

  8. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with resultsmore » of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double-cell cavities of the TESLA shape have

  9. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  10. Hydroforming of elliptical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Jelezov, I.; Kneisel, Peter

    2015-02-27

    Activities of the past several years in developing the technique of forming seamless (weldless) cavity cells by hydroforming are summarized. An overview of the technique developed at DESY for the fabrication of single cells and multicells of the TESLA cavity shape is given and the major rf results are presented. The forming is performed by expanding a seamless tube with internal water pressure while simultaneously swaging it axially. Prior to the expansion the tube is necked at the iris area and at the ends. Tube radii and axial displacements are computer controlled during the forming process in accordance with results of finite element method simulations for necking and expansion using the experimentally obtained strain-stress relationship of tube material. In cooperation with industry different methods of niobium seamless tube production have been explored. The most appropriate and successful method is a combination of spinning or deep drawing with flow forming. Several single-cell niobium cavities of the 1.3 GHz TESLA shape were produced by hydroforming. They reached accelerating gradients Eacc up to 35 MV/m after buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and up to 42 MV/m after electropolishing (EP). More recent work concentrated on fabrication and testing of multicell and nine-cell cavities. Several seamless two- and three-cell units were explored. Accelerating gradients Eacc of 30–35 MV/m were measured after BCP and Eacc up to 40 MV/m were reached after EP. Nine-cell niobium cavities combining three three-cell units were completed at the company E. Zanon. These cavities reached accelerating gradients of Eacc = 30–35 MV/m. One cavity is successfully integrated in an XFEL cryomodule and is used in the operation of the FLASH linear accelerator at DESY. Additionally the fabrication of bimetallic single-cell and multicell NbCu cavities by hydroforming was successfully developed. Several NbCu clad single-cell and double

  11. ANT tuner retrofit for LEB cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, L.; Goren, Y.; Kwiatkowski, S.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes a ferrite tuner design for the LEB cavity that utilizes techniques for bonding ferrite to metallic cooling plates that is utilized in the high-power rf and microwave industry. A test tuner was designed to fit into the existing LEB-built magnet and onto the Grimm LEB Cavity. It will require a new vacuum window in order to attain maximal tuning range and high voltage capability and a new center conductor of longer length and a different vacuum window connection than the Grimm center conductor. However, the new center conductor will be essentially identical to the Grimm center conductor in its basic construction and in the way it connects to the stand for support. The tuner is mechanically very similar to high-power stacked circulators built by ANT of Germany and was designed according to ANT`s established engineering and design criteria and SSC LEB tuning and power requirements. The tuner design incorporates thin tiles of ferrite glued using a high-radiation-resistance epoxy to copper-plated stainless steel cooling plates of thickness 6.5 mm with water cooling channels inside the plates. The cooling plates constitute 16 pie-shaped segments arranged in a disk. They are electrically isolated from each other to suppress eddy currents. Five of these disks are arranged in parallel with high-pressure rf contacts between the plates at the outer radius. The end walls are slotted copper-plated stainless steel of thickness 3 mm.

  12. CIRCULAR CAVITY SLOT ANTENNA

    DOEpatents

    Kerley, P.L.

    1959-01-01

    A small-size antenna having a doughnut-shaped field pattern and which can act both as an antenna and a resonant circuit is described. The antenna is of the slotted type and comprises a resonant cavity with a center hole. A circular slot is provided in one wall of the cavity concentric with the hole and a radio frequency source is connected across the slot. The pattern and loading of the antenna are adjusted by varying the position and shape of a center element slidably disposed within the hole and projecting from the slotted side of the resonant cavity. The disclosed structure may also be used to propagate the oscillator signal down a transniission line by replacing the center element with one leg of the transmission line in a spaced relation from the walls of the cavity.

  13. RF breakdown of 805 MHz cavities in strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D.; Stratakis, D.; Kochemirovskiy, A.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Peterson, D.; Yonehara, K.; Freemire, B.; Lane, P.; Torun, Y.; Haase, A.

    2015-05-03

    Ionization cooling of intense muon beams requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF structures in the presence of strong magnetic fields. We have measured the breakdown rate in several RF cavities operating at several frequencies. Cavities operating within solenoidal magnetic fields B > 0.25 T show an increased RF breakdown rate at lower gradients compared with similar operation when B = 0 T. Ultimately, this breakdown behavior limits the maximum safe operating gradient of the cavity. Beyond ionization cooling, this issue affects the design of photoinjectors and klystrons, among other applications. We have built an 805 MHz pillbox-type RF cavity to serve as an experimental testbed for this phenomenon. This cavity is designed to study the problem of RF breakdown in strong magnetic fields using various cavity materials and surface treatments, and with precise control over sources of systematic error. We present results from tests in which the cavity was run with all copper surfaces in a variety of magnetic fields.

  14. Comparative study of normal and osteoarthritic canine synovial fluid using 500 MHz 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Damyanovich, A Z; Staples, J R; Chan, A D; Marshall, K W

    1999-03-01

    High resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate and compare the metabolic profiles of normal and osteoarthritic synovial fluids in a canine model of osteoarthritis. The spectra of osteoarthritic synovial fluid showed (a) increased concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, lipoprotein-associated fatty acids, and glycerol as well as the ketones hydroxybutyrate and hydroxyisobutyrate, (b) reduced levels of glucose, and (c) elevated levels of N-acetylglycoproteins, acetate, and acetamide compared with healthy normal canine synovial fluid. An increase was also observed in the concentrations of the amino acids alanine and isoleucine. These results suggest that (a) the intraarticular environment in canine osteoarthritis is more hypoxic and acidotic than in a normal joint, (b) lipolysis may play an increasingly important role as a source of energy in osteoarthritis, and (c) the N-acetylglycoprotein polymer component of synovial fluid (mostly hyaluronan) seems to be increasingly fragmented and degraded into acetate by way of an acetamide intermediate with progressive osteoarthritis. The observed changes in the biochemical profile of canine osteoarthritic synovial fluid may be useful in understanding alterations in joint metabolism consequent to arthritic diseases and helpful in identifying potential markers of osteoarthritis. PMID:10221839

  15. Octave-spanning spectrum generation in tapered silica photonic crystal fiber by Yb:fiber ring laser above 500 MHz.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tongxiao; Wang, Guizhong; Zhang, Wei; Li, Chen; Wang, Aimin; Zhang, Zhigang

    2013-02-15

    We report octave-spanning spectrum generated in a tapered silica photonic crystal fiber by a mode-locked Yb:fiber ring laser at a repetition rate as high as 528 MHz. The output pulses from this laser were compressed to 62 fs. By controlling the hole expansion and core diameter, a silica PCF was tapered to 20 cm with an optimal d/Λ ratio of 0.6. Pulses with the energy of 280 pJ and the peak power of 4.5 kW were injected into the tapered fiber and the pulse spectrum was expanded from 500 to 1600 nm at the level of -30 dB.

  16. Observations of 0.3 kHz to 500 MHz Periodic Oscillations in the PFRC-2 Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Emily; Swanson, Charles; Cohen, Sam; PFRC Team

    2015-11-01

    With a capacitively coupled 27-MHz RF system supplying up to 400 W of power in one end cell, hydrogen plasma was generated in the PFRC-2 device, operating in a tandem mirror mode. Langmuir probes were used to measure oscillations in the floating potential in the other PFRC-2 end cell, with a conducting floating boundary slightly downstream of the probe. A fast camera was used to examine visible plasma oscillations in PFRC-2 central cell. At speeds between 5 and 13 kfps, the fast camera showed oscillations below 700 Hz; corresponding peaks were found in the floating potential spectrum. Radial probe measurements suggest it to be a bursting m=0 mode. The probe data also showed large periodic MHz-range oscillations, at 27 MHz and its first 10 harmonics. A broad peak is near 300 MHz, close to the central-cell electron cyclotron frequency. The frequency of FFT peaks near 1 MHz, in the ICRF of the mirror-coil field, varied linearly with the magnetic field strength. These intermodulate with the RF signal, creating sidebands to the 27 MHz peak and its harmonics. We present findings from the fast camera of the rotating magnetic field mode. This work is supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

  17. [Copper and copper alloys. Technology updates].

    PubMed

    Loconsolo, V; Crespi, M

    2012-01-01

    The correlations between copper and copper alloys and human health have been the subject of some recent and extensive scientific researches. The voluntary risks evaluation, which anticipated the EU REACH Directive application, has shown that copper is a "safe" product for human health and for environment. In addition, it could be of great help thanks to its antibacterial properties. Copper tube can contribute in a relevant way to the prevention of water systems pollution by Legionella. Also the spreading of nosocomial infections is significantly contrasted by the use of copper and copper alloys for the production of articles intended for being frequently touched by people. The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States has in fact "registered" as antibacterial over 350 of copper alloys. PMID:23213799

  18. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.; Xie, Jinchun

    1999-01-01

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS).

  19. Ring resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.; Xie, J.

    1999-06-15

    Ring-shaped resonant cavities for spectroscopy allow a reduction in optical feedback to the light source, and provide information on the interaction of both s- and p-polarized light with samples. A laser light source is locked to a single cavity mode. An intracavity acousto-optic modulator may be used to couple light into the cavity. The cavity geometry is particularly useful for Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). 6 figs.

  20. Development of a Movable Plunger Tuner for the High Power RF Cavity for the PEP II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, H.D.; Fant, K.; Neubauer, Mark Stephen; Rimmer, R.A.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-08-26

    A 10 cm diameter by 5 cm travel plunger tuner was developed for the PEP-II RF copper cavity system. The single cell cavity including the tuner is designed to operate up to 150 kW of dissipated RF power. Spring finger contacts to protect the bellows from RF power are specially placed 8.5 cm away from the inside wall of the cavity to avoid fundamental and higher order mode resonances. The spring fingers are made of dispersion-strengthened copper to accommodate relatively high heating. The design, alignment, testing and performance of the tuner is described.

  1. Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic; Jason, Andrew; Miyadera, Haruo; Turchi, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

  2. Metasurface external cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luyao; Curwen, Christopher A.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Chen, Qi-Sheng; Itoh, Tatsuo; Williams, Benjamin S.

    2015-11-01

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  3. Video Toroid Cavity Imager

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2004-08-10

    A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

  4. Multicolor cavity soliton.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rui; Liang, Hanxiao; Lin, Qiang

    2016-07-25

    We show a new class of complex solitary wave that exists in a nonlinear optical cavity with appropriate dispersion characteristics. The cavity soliton consists of multiple soliton-like spectro-temporal components that exhibit distinctive colors but coincide in time and share a common phase, formed together via strong inter-soliton four-wave mixing and Cherenkov radiation. The multicolor cavity soliton shows intriguing spectral locking characteristics and remarkable capability of spectrum management to tailor soliton frequencies, which would be very useful for versatile generation and manipulation of multi-octave spanning phase-locked Kerr frequency combs, with great potential for applications in frequency metrology, optical frequency synthesis, and spectroscopy. PMID:27464131

  5. Metasurface external cavity laser

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Luyao Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S.; Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Chen, Qi-Sheng

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  6. [Copper transport and metabolism].

    PubMed

    Kurasaki, Masaaki; Saito, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    In this review, copper metabolism and transport in mammalian tissues are introduced and discussed. Firstly, the copper required amounts and LD50 levels are shown to explain the difficult balances of copper in the cells between necessity and toxicity. Furthermore, on the basis of literatures published, relationship between copper-binding metallothioneins and mechanisms for the absorption and excretion of copper or hereditary copper metabolic disorders metabolism abnormality symptom are explained. Finally it has been indicated that apoptosis induced by heavy metals, especially copper was initiated by production of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in the cells. To understand precise mechanism for copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, further investigation will be needed to clarify the copper behaviors in normal and abnormal situations. PMID:27455798

  7. Discrete cavity solitons.

    PubMed

    Peschel, U; Egorov, O; Lederer, F

    2004-08-15

    We derive evolution equations describing light propagation in an array of coupled-waveguide resonators and predict the existence of discrete cavity solitons. We identify stable, unstable, and oscillating solitons by varying the coupling strength between the anticontinuous and the continuous limit. PMID:15357356

  8. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers. PMID:22792106

  9. Broadband cavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiaogang; Wang Yanhua; Zhang Jiepeng; Zhu Yifu

    2011-10-15

    Cavity electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is created in a three-level atomic system confined in a cavity and coupled to a free-space control laser and is manifested as a narrow transmission peak of a probe laser coupled into the cavity mode and tuned to the two-photon Raman resonance with the control laser. Cavity EIT can be observed with a control laser detuned from the atomic transition frequency in a range limited by the vacuum Rabi splitting of two cavity-atom normal modes. This leads to the broadband cavity EIT obtained in the coupled-cavity-atom system with a free-space, broadband control laser. We report an experimental observation of broadband cavity EIT in cold Rb atoms with a frequency-modulated control laser and discuss its application in multichannel and multifrequency light memory.

  10. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  11. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  12. On copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    The action of hydrogen superoxide on copper salts in alcoholic solutions is studied. The action of hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide in alcoholic suspensions, and the action of ethereal hydrogen peroxide on copper hydroxide are discussed. It is concluded that using the procedure proposed excludes almost entirely the harmful effect of hydrolysis.

  13. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  14. [Copper pathology (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mallet, B; Romette, J; Di Costanzo, J D

    1982-01-30

    Copper is an essential dietary component, being the coenzyme of many enzymes with oxidase activity, e.g. ceruloplasmin, superoxide dismutase, monoamine oxidase, etc. The metabolism of copper is complex and imperfectly known. Active transport of copper through the intestinal epithelial cells involves metallothionein, a protein rich in sulfhydryl groups which also binds the copper in excess and probably prevents absorption in toxic amounts. In hepatocytes a metallothionein facilitates absorption by a similar mechanism and regulates copper distribution in the liver: incorporation in an apoceruloplasmin, storage and synthesis of copper-dependent enzymes. Metallothioneins and ceruloplasmin are essential to adequate copper homeostasis. Apart from genetic disorders, diseases involving copper usually result from hypercupraemia of varied origin. Wilson's disease and Menkes' disease, although clinically and pathogenetically different, are both marked by low ceruloplasmin and copper serum levels. The excessive liver retention of copper in Wilson's disease might be due to increased avidity of hepatic metallothioneins for copper and decreased biliary excretion through lysosomal dysfunction. Menkes' disease might be due to low avidity of intestinal and hepatic metallothioneins for copper. The basic biochemical defect responsible for these two hereditary conditions has not yet been fully elucidated.

  15. Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor, alternative method of measuring cavity microphonics

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski; G. Davis; Hai Dong; J. Hovater; John Musson; Thomas Powers

    2005-09-20

    As is well known, mechanical vibration or microphonics in a cryomodule causes the cavity resonance frequency to change at the vibration frequency. One way to measure the cavity microphonics is to drive the cavity with a Phase Locked Loop. Measurement of the instantaneous frequency or PLL error signal provides information about the cavity microphonic frequencies. Although the PLL error signal is available directly, precision frequency measurements require additional instrumentation, a Cavity Resonance Monitor (CRM). The analog version of such a device has been successfully used for several cavity tests [1]. In this paper we present a prototype of a Digital Cavity Resonance Monitor designed and built in the last year. The hardware of this instrument consists of an RF downconverter, digital quadrature demodulator and digital processor motherboard (Altera FPGA). The motherboard processes received data and computes frequency changes with a resolution of 0.2 Hz, with a 3 kHz output bandwidth.

  16. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  17. Access cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  18. CAVITY CONTROL ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasz Plawski, J. Hovater

    2010-09-01

    A digital low level radio frequency (RF) system typically incorporates either a heterodyne or direct sampling technique, followed by fast ADCs, then an FPGA, and finally a transmitting DAC. This universal platform opens up the possibilities for a variety of control algorithm implementations. The foremost concern for an RF control system is cavity field stability, and to meet the required quality of regulation, the chosen control system needs to have sufficient feedback gain. In this paper we will investigate the effectiveness of the regulation for three basic control system algorithms: I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature), Amplitude & Phase and digital SEL (Self Exciting Loop) along with the example of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV cavity field control system.

  19. Dielectric cavity relativistic magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    An alteration in the structure of the A6 relativistic magnetron is proposed, which introduces an extra degree of freedom to its design and enhances many of its quality factors. This modification involves the partial filling of the cavities of the device with a low-loss dielectric material. The operation of a dielectric-filled A6 is simulated; the results indicate single-mode operation at the desired π mode and a substantially cleaner rf spectrum.

  20. What Are Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... about oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? What are oral cavity and oropharyngeal cancers? Cancer starts when cells in ... the parts of the mouth and throat. The oral cavity (mouth) and oropharynx (throat) The oral cavity includes ...

  1. RF Cavity Characterization with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, C.D. Zhou, F. Marhauser

    2011-03-01

    When designing a radio frequency (RF) accelerating cavity structure various figures of merit are considered before coming to a final cavity design. These figures of merit include specific field and geometry based quantities such as the ratio of the shunt impedance to the quality factor (R/Q) or the normalized peak fields in the cavity. Other important measures of cavity performance include the peak surface fields as well as possible multipacting resonances in the cavity. High fidelity simulations of these structures can provide a good estimate of these important quantities before any cavity prototypes are built. We will present VORPAL simulations of a simple pillbox structure where these quantities can be calculated analytically and compare them to the results from the VORPAL simulations. We will then use VORPAL to calculate these figures of merit and potential multipacting resonances for two cavity designs under development at Jefferson National Lab for Project X.

  2. SIMULATIONS AND MEASUREMENTS OF A HEAVILY HOM-DAMPED MULTI-CELL SRF CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang; Robert Rimmer; Frank Marhauser

    2007-07-02

    After an initial cavity shape optimization [1] and cryomodule development [2] for an Ampere-class FEL ERL, we have simulated a complete 5-cell high-current (HC) cavity structure with six waveguide (WG) couplers for Higher Order Mode (HOM) damping and fundamental power coupling. The time-domain wakefield simulations of the MAFIA codes have been used to calculate the cavities broadband HOM impedance spectrum. Microwave Studio (MWS) has also been used to evaluate the external Q of the fundamental power coupler (FPC) and the R/Qs of the HOMs. A half scale 1497MHz single-cell model cavity and a 5-cell copper cavity including dummy HOM WG loads were fabricated to bench measure and confirm the design performance. Details of the multi-beam wakefield simulations, the HOM damping measurements and multi-peak data fitting analysis techniques are presented.

  3. Mechanical design upgrade of the APS storage ring rf cavity tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.; Bromberek, D.; Kang, Y.

    1997-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring (SR) rf system employs four banks of four spherical, single-cell resonant cavities. Each cavity is tuned by varying the cavity volume through insertion/retraction of a copper piston located at the circumference of the cavity and oriented perpendicular to the accelerator beam. During the commissioning of the APS SR, the tuners and cavity tuner ports were prone to extensive arcing and overheating. The existing tuners were modified to eliminate the problems, and two new, redesigned tuners were installed. In both cases marked improvements were obtained in the tuner mechanical performance. As measured by tuner piston and flange surface temperatures, tuner heating has been reduced by a factor of five in the new version. Redesign considerations discussed include tuner piston-to-housing alignment, tuner piston and housing materials and cooling configurations, and tuner piston sliding electrical contacts. The tuner redesign is also distinguished by a modular, more maintainable assembly.

  4. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, S.M. Jr.; Bishop, D.M.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1998-11-24

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer. 4 figs.

  5. Impurity gettering in silicon using cavities formed by helium implantation and annealing

    DOEpatents

    Myers, Jr., Samuel M.; Bishop, Dawn M.; Follstaedt, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Impurity gettering in silicon wafers is achieved by a new process consisting of helium ion implantation followed by annealing. This treatment creates cavities whose internal surfaces are highly chemically reactive due to the presence of numerous silicon dangling bonds. For two representative transition-metal impurities, copper and nickel, the binding energies at cavities were demonstrated to be larger than the binding energies in precipitates of metal silicide, which constitutes the basis of most current impurity gettering. As a result the residual concentration of such impurities after cavity gettering is smaller by several orders of magnitude than after precipitation gettering. Additionally, cavity gettering is effective regardless of the starting impurity concentration in the wafer, whereas precipitation gettering ceases when the impurity concentration reaches a characteristic solubility determined by the equilibrium phase diagram of the silicon-metal system. The strong cavity gettering was shown to induce dissolution of metal-silicide particles from the opposite side of a wafer.

  6. Ultra fast microwave-assisted leaching for the recovery of copper and tellurium from copper anode slime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhi-yuan; Yang, Hong-ying; Huang, Song-tao; Lü, Yang; Xiong, Liu

    2015-06-01

    The decomposition of copper anode slime heated by microwave energy in a sulfuric acid medium was investigated. Leaching experiments were carried out in a multi-mode cavity with microwave assistance. The leaching process parameters were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM). Under the optimized conditions, the leaching efficiencies of copper and tellurium were 99.56% ± 0.16% and 98.68% ± 0.12%, respectively. Meanwhile, a conventional leaching experiment was performed in order to evaluate the influence of microwave radiation. The mechanism of microwave-assisted leaching of copper anode slime was also investigated. In the results, the microwave technology is demonstrated to have a great potential to improve the leaching efficiency and reduce the leaching time. The enhanced recoveries of copper and tellurium are believed to result from the presence of a temperature gradient due to the shallow microwave penetration depth and the superheating at the solid-liquid interface.

  7. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  8. Cavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Forstner, S; Prams, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2012-03-23

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated. The magnetic-field-induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is resonantly transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator and read out optically with ultrahigh sensitivity. A peak magnetic field sensitivity of 400  nT  Hz(-1/2) is achieved, with theoretical modeling predicting the possibility of sensitivities below 1  pT  Hz(-1/2). This chip-based magnetometer combines high sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  9. Development of 400- to 450-MHz RFQ resonator-cavity mechanical designs

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, the resonator cavity's mechanical design may be a challenge similar in magnitude to that of the development of the accelerator structure itself. Experience with the all-copper 425-MHz RFQ proof-of-principle linac has demonstrated that the resonator cavity must be structurally stiff and easily tunable. This experience has led to development of copper-plated steel structures having vanes that may be moved within a cylinder for tuning. Design of a flexible vane-to-cylinder radio-frequency (rf) joint, the vane, and the cylinder has many constraints dictated by the small-diameter cavities in the 400-MHz-frequency region. Two types of flexible, mechanical vane-to-cylinder rf joints are being developed at Los Alamos: the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint.

  10. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  11. Multicolor cavity metrology.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kiwamu; Arai, Koji; Barr, Bryan; Betzwieser, Joseph; Brooks, Aidan; Dahl, Katrin; Doravari, Suresh; Driggers, Jennifer C; Korth, W Zach; Miao, Haixing; Rollins, Jameson; Vass, Stephen; Yeaton-Massey, David; Adhikari, Rana X

    2012-10-01

    Long-baseline laser interferometers used for gravitational-wave detection have proven to be very complicated to control. In order to have sufficient sensitivity to astrophysical gravitational waves, a set of multiple coupled optical cavities comprising the interferometer must be brought into resonance with the laser field. A set of multi-input, multi-output servos then lock these cavities into place via feedback control. This procedure, known as lock acquisition, has proven to be a vexing problem and has reduced greatly the reliability and duty factor of the past generation of laser interferometers. In this article, we describe a technique for bringing the interferometer from an uncontrolled state into resonance by using harmonically related external fields to provide a deterministic hierarchical control. This technique reduces the effect of the external seismic disturbances by 4 orders of magnitude and promises to greatly enhance the stability and reliability of the current generation of gravitational-wave detectors. The possibility for using multicolor techniques to overcome current quantum and thermal noise limits is also discussed. PMID:23201656

  12. Extremely Large Cusp Diamagnetic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T. A.

    2002-05-01

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. Some of the diamagnetic cavities were independent of the IMF directions, which is unexpected by the current MHD (or ISM) models, suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash, which provides a challenge to the existing MHD (or ISM) models. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. During high solar wind pressure period on April 21, 1999, the POLAR spacecraft observed lower ion flux in the dayside high-latitude magnetosheath than that in the neighbouring cusp cavities. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity have significant global impacts on the geospace environment research and will be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in upstream ion events.

  13. Extremely large cusp diamagnetic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fritz, T.; Siscoe, G.

    Extremely large diamagnetic cavities with a size of as large as 6 Re have been observed in the dayside high-altitude cusp regions. These diamagnetic cavities are always there day by day. Some of the diamagnetic cavities have been observed in the morningside during intervals when the IMF By component was positive (duskward), suggesting that the cusp diamagnetic cavities are different from the magnetospheric sash predicted by MHD simulations. Associated with these cavities are ions with energies from 40 keV up to 8 MeV. The charge state distribution of these cusp cavity ions was indicative of their seed populations being a mixture of the ionospheric and the solar wind particles. The intensities of the cusp cavity energetic ions were observed to increase by as large as four orders of the magnitudes. These observations indicate that the dayside high-altitude cusp diamagnetic cavity is a key region for transferring the solar wind energy, mass, and momentum into the Earth's magnetosphere. These energetic particles in the cusp diamagnetic cavity together with the cusp's connectivity to the entire magnetopause may have significant global impacts on the geospace environment. They will possibly be shedding light on the long-standing unsolved fundamental issue about the origins of the energetic particles in the ring current and in the regions upstream of the subsolar magnetopause where energetic ion events frequently are observed.

  14. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics. PMID:26684118

  15. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  16. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  17. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, T.; Cormick, C.; Landa, H.; Stojanović, Vladimir M.; Demler, E.; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  18. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  19. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  20. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  1. Accessory oral cavity

    PubMed Central

    Gnaneswaran, Manica Ramamoorthy; Varadarajan, Usha; Srinivasan, Ramesh; Kamatchi, Sangeetha

    2012-01-01

    This is a rare case report of a patient around 11 years with the complaint of extra mouth who reported to the hospital for removal of that extra mouth. On examination there was accessory oral cavity with small upper and lower lips, seven teeth and saliva was drooling out. Under general anesthesia crevicular incision from 32 to 43 was put and labial gingiva with alveolar mucosa was reflected completely and bone exposed to lower border of mandible. There were seven teeth resembling lower permanent anterior teeth in the accessory mouth, which was excised with the accessory lips. 41 extracted and osteotomy carried out extending the incision from the extracted site and osteotomy carried out. Dermoid cyst both below and above the mylohyoid muscle and rudimentary tongue found and excised and the specimen sent for histopathological examination. The wound was closed and uneventful healing noted to the satisfaction of the patient. This is a rare and interesting case which has been documented. PMID:23833508

  2. A scanning cavity microscope.

    PubMed

    Mader, Matthias; Reichel, Jakob; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a high-finesse scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1,700-fold signal enhancement compared with diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross-section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity less than 1 nm(2); we show a method to improve the spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for optical studies of nanomaterials, molecules and biological nanosystems. PMID:26105690

  3. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  4. Copper Delivery by Metallochaperone Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Copper is an essential element in all living organisms, serving as a cofactor for many important proteins and enzymes. Metallochaperone proteins deliver copper ions to specific physiological partners by direct protein-protein interactions. The Atx1-like chaperones transfer copper to intracellular copper transporters, and the CCS chaperones shuttle copper to copper,zinc superoxide dismutase. Crystallographic studies of these two copper chaperone families have provided insights into metal binding and target recognition by metallochaperones and have led to detailed molecular models for the copper transfer mechanism.

  5. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  6. Trislot-cavity microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Flush-mountable assembly composed of disk radiator sandwiched between planes of metal-clad dielectric board has greater bandwidths and beamwidths than simple disk antenna. Conducting planes connect so that disk is enclosed in cavity with Y-shaped slot in top plane. Cavity is excited by microwave energy from disk and radiates from trislot aperature.

  7. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, S.

    1984-02-09

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  8. Monochromatic radio frequency accelerating cavity

    DOEpatents

    Giordano, Salvatore

    1985-01-01

    A radio frequency resonant cavity having a fundamental resonant frequency and characterized by being free of spurious modes. A plurality of spaced electrically conductive bars are arranged in a generally cylindrical array within the cavity to define a chamber between the bars and an outer solid cylindrically shaped wall of the cavity. A first and second plurality of mode perturbing rods are mounted in two groups at determined random locations to extend radially and axially into the cavity thereby to perturb spurious modes and cause their fields to extend through passageways between the bars and into the chamber. At least one body of lossy material is disposed within the chamber to damp all spurious modes that do extend into the chamber thereby enabling the cavity to operate free of undesired spurious modes.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Matalevich, Joseph R.; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  10. Surface Study of Nb/Cu Films for Cavity Deposition by ECR Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A.T. Wu; R.C. Ike; H.L. Phillips; A-M. Valente; H. Wang; G. Wu

    2005-05-16

    Deposition of thin niobium (Nb) films on copper (Cu) cavities, using an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma appears to be an attractive alternative technique for fabricating superconducting radio frequency cavities to be used in particle accelerators. The performance of these Nb/Cu cavities is expected to depend on the surface characteristics of the Nb films. In this paper, we report on an investigation of the influence of deposition energy on surface morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of Nb films deposited on small Cu disks employing a metallographic optical microscope, a 3-D profilometer, a scanning electron microscope, and a dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometer. The results will be compared with those obtained on Nb surfaces treated by buffered chemical polishing, electropolishing, and buffered electropolishing. Possible implications from this study for Nb deposition on real Cu cavities will be discussed.

  11. DESIGN, PROTOTYPE AND MEASUREMENT OF A SINGLE-CELL DEFLECTING CAVITY FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang, Guangfeng Cheng, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Larry Turlington, Alireza Nassiri, Geoff Waldschmidt

    2009-05-01

    After the design optimization of a squashed elliptical shape, single-cell, superconducting (SC) deflecting cavity at 2.815 GHz, a copper prototype has been bench measured to determine its rf properties and the effectiveness of waveguide damping of parasitic modes [1]. RF cold tests were also performed at 2K on niobium single-cell and two-cell prototype cavities. Details of impedance calculation using wakefiled analysis of the single-cell cavity are shown to meet the strict 200 mA beam stability requirement of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Lab where a total of 16 single-cell cavities will be divided into two cryomodule. The design of higher-order mode (HOM) waveguide damping, the simulations of the Lorenz force detuning, and the prototype of on-cell damping are presented.

  12. Three-dimensional cavity quantum electrodynamics with a rare-earth spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, S.; Tkalčec, A.; Rotzinger, H.; Rieger, D.; Le Floch, J.-M.; Goryachev, M.; Tobar, M. E.; Ustinov, A. V.; Bushev, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    We present cavity QED experiments with an Er3+:Y2SiO5 crystal magnetically coupled to a three-dimensional (3D) cylindrical sapphire loaded copper resonator. Such waveguide cavities are promising for the realization of a superconducting quantum processor. Here, we demonstrate the coherent integration of a rare-earth spin ensemble with the 3D architecture. The collective coupling strength of the Er3+ spins to the 3D cavity is 21 MHz. The cylindrical sapphire loaded resonator allowed us to explore the anisotropic collective coupling between the rare-earth doped crystal and the cavity. This work shows the potential of spin doped solids in 3D quantum circuits for application as microwave quantum memories as well as for prospective microwave to optical interfaces.

  13. Stages of Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  14. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  15. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  16. Nonlocal Intracranial Cavity Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Manjón, José V.; Eskildsen, Simon F.; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E.; Collins, D. Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  17. Progressive cavity pump

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.W.

    1989-04-04

    A progressive cavity pump is described, comprising: a first housing portion defining an inlet; a second housing portion attachable to the first housing portion and defining an outlet; a substantially elastomeric stator comprising an outer portion removably attached to the first and second housing portions, having a first end and a second end spaced from the first end, an inner portion defining a pumping chamber and spaced an annular end portion interconnecting the first ends of the outer and inner portions; a rotor disposed in the inner portion of the stator and extending through the pumping chamber for pumping fluid from the inlet to the outlet in response to rotation of the rotor; and an elongated member disposed in the housing portions and generally annularly between the inner and outer portions of the stator and longitudinally between the annular end portion of the stator and a portion of the second housing portion, the member being removable from the housing portions and separable from the stator.

  18. Nonlocal intracranial cavity extraction.

    PubMed

    Manjón, José V; Eskildsen, Simon F; Coupé, Pierrick; Romero, José E; Collins, D Louis; Robles, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Automatic and accurate methods to estimate normalized regional brain volumes from MRI data are valuable tools which may help to obtain an objective diagnosis and followup of many neurological diseases. To estimate such regional brain volumes, the intracranial cavity volume (ICV) is often used for normalization. However, the high variability of brain shape and size due to normal intersubject variability, normal changes occurring over the lifespan, and abnormal changes due to disease makes the ICV estimation problem challenging. In this paper, we present a new approach to perform ICV extraction based on the use of a library of prelabeled brain images to capture the large variability of brain shapes. To this end, an improved nonlocal label fusion scheme based on BEaST technique is proposed to increase the accuracy of the ICV estimation. The proposed method is compared with recent state-of-the-art methods and the results demonstrate an improved performance both in terms of accuracy and reproducibility while maintaining a reduced computational burden. PMID:25328511

  19. Cavity-state preparation using adiabatic transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jonas; Andersson, Erika

    2005-05-01

    We show how to prepare a variety of cavity field states for multiple cavities. The state preparation technique used is related to the method of stimulated adiabatic Raman passage. The cavity modes are coupled by atoms, making it possible to transfer an arbitrary cavity field state from one cavity to another and also to prepare nontrivial cavity field states. In particular, we show how to prepare entangled states of two or more cavities, such as an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen state and a W state, as well as various entangled superpositions of coherent states in different cavities, including Schrödinger cat states. The theoretical considerations are supported by numerical simulations.

  20. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  1. Novel Crab Cavity RF Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, A.; Neubauer, M. L.; Sah, R.; Rimmer, B.; Wang, H.

    2011-03-01

    A 20-50 MV integrated transverse voltage is required for the Electron-Ion Collider. The most promising of the crab cavity designs that have been proposed in the last five years are the TEM type crab cavities because of the higher transverse impedance. The TEM design approach is extended here to a hybrid crab cavity that includes the input power coupler as an integral part of the design. A prototype was built with Phase I monies and tested at JLAB. The results reported on, and a system for achieving 20-50 MV is proposed.

  2. Copper as a biocidal tool.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Copper ions, either alone or in copper complexes, have been used to disinfect liquids, solids and human tissue for centuries. Today copper is used as a water purifier, algaecide, fungicide, nematocide, molluscicide as well as an anti-bacterial and anti-fouling agent. Copper also displays potent anti-viral activity. This article reviews (i) the biocidal properties of copper; (ii) the possible mechanisms by which copper is toxic to microorganisms; and (iii) the systems by which many microorganisms resist high concentrations of heavy metals, with an emphasis on copper. PMID:16101497

  3. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  4. [Copper and the human body].

    PubMed

    Krízek, M; Senft, V; Motán, J

    1997-11-19

    Copper is one of the essential trace elements. It is part of a number of enzymes. Deficiency of the element is manifested by impaired haematopoesis, bone metabolism, disorders of the digestive, cardiovascular and nervous system. Deficiency occurs in particular in patients suffering from malnutrition, malabsorption, great copper losses during administration of penicillamine. Sporadically copper intoxications are described (suicidal intentions or accidental ingestion of beverages with a high copper content). Acute exposure to copper containing dust is manifested by metal fume fever. Copper salts can produce local inflammations. Wilson's disease is associated with inborn impaired copper metabolism. In dialyzed patients possible contaminations of the dialyzate with copper must be foreseen as well as the possible release of copper from some dialyzation membranes. With the increasing amount of copper in the environment it is essential to monitor the contamination of the environment.

  5. Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

  6. Optical Material Characterization Using Microdisk Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Christopher P.

    Since Jack Kilby recorded his "Monolithic Idea" for integrated circuits in 1958, microelectronics companies have invested billions of dollars in developing the silicon material system to increase performance and reduce cost. For decades, the industry has made Moore's Law, concerning cost and transistor density, a self-fulfilling prophecy by integrating technical and material requirements vertically down their supply chains and horizontally across competitors in the market. At recent technology nodes, the unacceptable scaling behavior of copper interconnects has become a major design constraint by increasing latency and power consumption---more than 50% of the power consumed by high speed processors is dissipated by intrachip communications. Optical networks at the chip scale are a potential low-power high-bandwidth replacement for conventional global interconnects, but the lack of efficient on-chip optical sources has remained an outstanding problem despite significant advances in silicon optoelectronics. Many material systems are being researched, but there is no ideal candidate even though the established infrastructure strongly favors a CMOS-compatible solution. This thesis focuses on assessing the optical properties of materials using microdisk cavities with the intention to advance processing techniques and materials relevant to silicon photonics. Low-loss microdisk resonators are chosen because of their simplicity and long optical path lengths. A localized photonic probe is developed and characterized that employs a tapered optical-fiber waveguide, and it is utilized in practical demonstrations to test tightly arranged devices and to help prototype new fabrication methods. A case study in AlxGa1-xAs illustrates how the optical scattering and absorption losses can be obtained from the cavity-waveguide transmission. Finally, single-crystal Er2O3 epitaxially grown on silicon is analyzed in detail as a potential CMOS-compatable gain medium due to its high Er3

  7. [Radiotherapy for oral cavity cancers].

    PubMed

    Lapeyre, M; Biau, J; Racadot, S; Moreira, J F; Berger, L; Peiffert, D

    2016-09-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and brachytherapy are standard techniques for the irradiation of oral cavity cancers. These techniques are detailed in terms of indication, preparation, delineation and selection of the volumes, dosimetry and patient positioning control. PMID:27521039

  8. CRAB Cavity in CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.J.; Sen, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Beam collisions with a crossing angle at the interaction point are often necessary in colliders to reduce the effects of parasitic collisions which induce emittance growth and decrease beam lifetime. The crossing angle reduces the geometrical overlap of the beams and hence the luminosity. Crab cavity offer a promising way to compensate the crossing angle and to realize effective head-on collisions. Moreover, the crab crossing mitigates the synchro-betatron resonances due to the crossing angle. A crab cavity experiment in SPS is proposed as a proof of principle before deciding on a full crab-cavity implementation in the LHC. In this paper, we investigate the effects of a single crab cavity on beam dynamics in the SPS and life time.

  9. Geometry-invariant resonant cavities

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, I.; Mahmoud, A. M.; Engheta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Resonant cavities are one of the basic building blocks in various disciplines of science and technology, with numerous applications ranging from abstract theoretical modelling to everyday life devices. The eigenfrequencies of conventional cavities are a function of their geometry, and, thus, the size and shape of a resonant cavity is selected to operate at a specific frequency. Here we demonstrate theoretically the existence of geometry-invariant resonant cavities, that is, resonators whose eigenfrequencies are invariant with respect to geometrical deformations of their external boundaries. This effect is obtained by exploiting the unusual properties of zero-index metamaterials, such as epsilon-near-zero media, which enable decoupling of the temporal and spatial field variations in the lossless limit. This new class of resonators may inspire alternative design concepts, and it might lead to the first generation of deformable resonant devices. PMID:27010103

  10. Design of rf conditioner cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Rimmer, R.A.; Sessler, A.; Kirk, H.G.

    1992-06-01

    Theoretical studies are made of radio frequency structures which can be used to condition electron beams so as to greatly reduce the stringent emittance requirements for successful lasing in a free-electron laser. The basic strategy of conditioning calls for modulating an electron beam in the transverse dimension, by a periodic focusing channel, while it traverses a series of rf cavities, each operating in a TM{sub 210} mode. In this paper, we analyze the cavities both analytically and numerically (using MAFIA simulations). We find that when cylindrical symmetry is broken the coupling impedance can be greatly enhanced. We present results showing various performance characteristics as a function of cavity parameters, as well as possible designs for conditioning cavities.

  11. Targeting copper in cancer therapy: 'Copper That Cancer'.

    PubMed

    Denoyer, Delphine; Masaldan, Shashank; La Fontaine, Sharon; Cater, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of copper within the body. Many cancer types exhibit increased intratumoral copper and/or altered systemic copper distribution. The realization that copper serves as a limiting factor for multiple aspects of tumor progression, including growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, has prompted the development of copper-specific chelators as therapies to inhibit these processes. Another therapeutic approach utilizes specific ionophores that deliver copper to cells to increase intracellular copper levels. The therapeutic window between normal and cancerous cells when intracellular copper is forcibly increased, is the premise for the development of copper-ionophores endowed with anticancer properties. Also under investigation is the use of copper to replace platinum in coordination complexes currently used as mainstream chemotherapies. In comparison to platinum-based drugs, these promising copper coordination complexes may be more potent anticancer agents, with reduced toxicity toward normal cells and they may potentially circumvent the chemoresistance associated with recurrent platinum treatment. In addition, cancerous cells can adapt their copper homeostatic mechanisms to acquire resistance to conventional platinum-based drugs and certain copper coordination complexes can re-sensitize cancer cells to these drugs. This review will outline the biological importance of copper and copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, followed by a discussion of our current understanding of copper dysregulation in cancer, and the recent therapeutic advances using copper coordination complexes as anticancer agents.

  12. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D. L.; DeMello, A. J.; Lambert, A. R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R. B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  13. Blackbody Cavity for Calibrations at 200 to 273 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Dane; Ryan, Robert; Ryan, Jim; Henderson, Doug; Clayton, Larry

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory blackbody cavity has been designed and built for calibrating infrared radiometers used to measure radiant temperatures in the range from about 200 to about 273 K. In this below-room-temperature range, scattering of background infrared radiation from room-temperature surfaces could, potentially, contribute significantly to the spectral radiance of the blackbody cavity, thereby contributing a significant error to the radiant temperature used as the calibration value. The present blackbody cavity is of an established type in which multiple reflections from a combination of conical and cylindrical black-coated walls are exploited to obtain an effective emissivity greater than the emissivity value of the coating material on a flat exposed surface. The coating material in this case is a flat black paint that has an emissivity of approximately of 0.91 in the thermal spectral range and was selected over other, higher-emissivity materials because of its ability to withstand thermal cycling. We found many black coatings cracked and flaked after thermal cycling due to differences in the coefficient of expansion differences. On the basis of theoretical calculations, the effective emissivity is expected to approach 0.999. The cylindrical/conical shell enclosing the cavity is machined from copper, which is chosen for its high thermal conductivity. In use, the shell is oriented vertically, open end facing up, and inserted in a Dewar flask filled with isopropyl alcohol/dry-ice slush. A flange at the open end of the shell is supported by a thermally insulating ring on the lip of the Dewar flask. The slush cools the shell (and thus the black-body cavity) to the desired temperature. Typically, the slush starts at a temperature of about 194 K. The slush is stirred and warmed by bubbling dry air or nitrogen through it, thereby gradually increasing the temperature through the aforementioned calibration range during an interval of several hours. The temperature of the slush

  14. Copper in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the Institute of Medicine recommends the following dietary intake for copper: Infants 0 to 6 months: 200 ... Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference ... and Zinc. National Academy Press . Washington, DC, 2001. ...

  15. Volatility of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Joyce, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    The relevant aqueous thermodynamics of copper and its oxides are evaluated and summarized with emphasis on solubility, hydrolysis, and complexation. The solubilities of metallic copper, solid cuprous and cupric oxides in steam measured by Pocock and Stewart in 1963 are discussed and the latter data are fitted in the form of established empirical equations and compared to other existing results. No other sources of data were found for the solubility of copper and cupric oxide in steam and even these data are very limited. Discussion of corresponding available solubility data on both oxide phases in liquid water is given. The possible effects of complexing agents are considered. A brief discussion is provided of the role of surface adsorption in determining the fate of dissolved copper in the boiler. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Probabilistic Generation of Entanglement in Optical Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Anders S.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2003-03-01

    We propose to produce entanglement by measuring the reflection from an optical cavity. Conditioned on the detection of a reflected photon, pairs of atoms in the cavity are prepared in maximally entangled states. The success probability depends on the cavity parameters, but high quality entangled states may be produced with a high probability even for cavities of moderate quality.

  17. TEM observations of crack tip: cavity interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.A.; Ohr, S.M.; Jesser, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Crack tip-cavity interactions have been studied by performing room temperature deformation experiments in a transmission electron microscope on ion-irradiated type 316 stainless steel with small helium containing cavities. Slip dislocations emitted from a crack tip cut, sheared, and thereby elongated cavities without a volume enlargement. As the crack tip approached, a cavity volume enlargement occurred. Instead of the cavities continuing to enlarge until they touch, the walls between the cavities fractured. Fracture surface dimples do not correlate in size or density with these enlarged cavities.

  18. Normal Conducting RF Cavity for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; DeMello, A.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Summers, D.

    2010-05-23

    Normal conducting RF cavities must be used for the cooling section of the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), currently under construction at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. Eight 201-MHz cavities are needed for the MICE cooling section; fabrication of the first five cavities is complete. We report the cavity fabrication status including cavity design, fabrication techniques and preliminary low power RF measurements.

  19. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn H.; Calaga, R.; Jain, P.; Johnson, E.C.; Xu, W.

    2012-06-25

    Several past measurements of the Brookhaven ERL at superconducting temperature produced a long list of higher order modes (HOMs). The Niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to tolerable levels. However, a number of undamped resonances with Q {ge} 10{sup 6} were found at 4 K and their mode identification remained as a goal for this paper. The approach taken here consists in taking different S{sub 21} measurements on a copper cavity replica of the ERL which can be compared with the actual data and also with Microwave Studio computer simulations. Several different S{sub 21} transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, between probes in a single cell, and between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes. Mode identification is supported by bead pulling with a metallic needle or a dielectric sphere that are calibrated in the fundamental mode. This paper presents results for HOMs in the first two dipole bands with the prototypical 958 MHz trapped mode, the lowest beam tube resonances, and high-Q modes in the first quadrupole band and beyond.

  20. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  1. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  2. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  3. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Renard, Bertrand; Olivier, Gilles; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  4. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Bousson, Sebastien; Duthil, Patxi; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  5. Coupling of an overdriven cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Garbin, H.D.

    1993-11-01

    It is well known that when a nuclear test is conducted in a sufficiently large cavity, the resulting seismic signal is sharply reduced when compared to a normal tamped event. Cavity explosions are of interest in the seismic verification community because of this possibility of reducing the seismic energy generated which can lower signal amplitudes and make detection difficult. Reduced amplitudes would also lower seismic yield estimates which has implications in a Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT). In the past several years, there have been a number of nuclear tests at NTS (Nevada Test Site) inside hemispherical cavities. Two such tests were MILL YARD and MISTY ECHO which had instrumentation at the surface and in the free-field. These two tests differ in one important aspect. MILL YARD was completely decoupled i.e., the cavity wall behaved in an elastic manner. It was estimated that MILL YARD`s ground motion was reduced by a factor of at least 70. In contrast, MISTY ECHO was detonated in a hemispherical cavity with the same dimensions as MILL YARD, but with a much larger device yield. This caused an inelastic behavior on the wall and the explosion was not fully decoupled.

  6. Urinary copper excretion and hepatic copper concentrations in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Frommer, D J

    1981-01-01

    Urinary copper excretion was found to be increased in patients with cholestasis, hepatitis and cirrhosis, but the penicillamine-induced increment was normal. Wilson's disease patients had increased copper excretion before and after penicillamine, especially in untreated cases. Hepatic copper concentrations correlated with urinary copper excretion in cholestasis and treated Wilson's disease, but not in hepatitis or cirrhosis. In treated Wilson's disease, measurement of urinary copper excretion should be valuable in estimating the degree of removal of copper from the body during therapy. Urinary copper clearances were raised in various liver conditions, maximally in untreated Wilson's disease. It is suggested that only part of the serum non-caeruloplasmin copper is available for excretion into urine.

  7. Millimeter wave surface resistance measurement on high temperature superconductors using a liquid nitrogen cooled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bing-Lin; Han, Sheng-Chiang

    1991-03-01

    An accurate, relatively convenient and economical method of evaluating surface resistance Rs of high-temperature superconductors has been developed. This method is based on a technique of replacing one end wall of a copper cylindrical cavity which resonates at a frequency of 50.9 GHz in TE011 circular mode. Measurement at 50.9 GHz allows evaluation of high-quality samples whose Rs value at 10 GHz is even one order of magnitude lower than that of copper. The proper diameter of the cavity is suitable for measuring samples with an area of 1 cm2, the usual area used in thin-film growth and device fabrication. The cavity and the sample to be measured were cooled by liquid nitrogen, whose vapor pressure could be reduced to obtain temperatures down to 65 K. The temperature dependence of the Rs value of RF-magnetron-sputtered TBCCO thick film on Ag substrate and RF-magnetron-sputtered YBCO thin film on LaAlO3 substrate has been measured in the temperature range of 65-250 K. The Rs value of the thick film was 0.17 ohm at 77 K. The Rs value of the thin film dramatically decreases below 90 K and reaches 18 mohm at 77 K, which is almost two times lower than that of oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper.

  8. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  9. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  10. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  11. Experimental cavity pressure distributions at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.; Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to define pressure distributions for rectangular cavities over a range of free-stream Mach numbers and cavity dimensions. These pressure distributions together with schlieren photographs are used to define the critical values of cavity length-to-depth ratio that separate open type cavity flows from closed type cavity flows. For closed type cavity flow, the shear layer expands over the cavity leading edge and impinges on the cavity floor, whereas for open type cavity flow, the shear layer bridges the cavity. The tests were conducted by using a flat-plate model permitting the cavity length to be remotely varied from 0.5 to 12 in. Cavity depths and widths were varied from 0.5 to 2.5 in. The flat-plate boundary layer approaching the cavity was turbulent and had a thickness of approximately 0.2 in. at the cavity front face for the range of test Mach numbers from 1.5 to 2.86. Presented are a discussion of the results and a complete tabulation of the experimental data.

  12. Ceruloplasmin, copper ions, and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Raju, K S; Alessandri, G; Ziche, M; Gullino, P M

    1982-11-01

    The ability to induce new formation of capillaries in the cornea was tested for ceruloplasmin, the copper carrier of serum, for fragments of the ceruloplasmin molecule with and without copper, for heparin, and for glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine, bound or not bound to copper ions. Male or female 2- to 3-kg New Zealand White rabbits were used. These experiments were prompted by the previous observation of copper accumulation in the cornea during angiogenesis and by the inability of copper-deficient rabbits to mount an angiogenic response. The results showed that the three different molecules were all able to induce angiogenesis provided that they were bound to copper. Fragments of the ceruloplasmin molecule also induced angiogenesis but only when copper was bound to the peptides. The data are interpreted to indicate that copper ions are involved in the sequence of events leading to angiogenesis and that the carrier molecules may be of quite a different nature. PMID:6182332

  13. Accelerator drift-tube braze-joint failures in the PIGMI APF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hansborough, L.D.; Levinson, L.S.; Reiswig, R.D.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    During the assembly of the Alternating Phase Focusing cavity for the PIGMI Prototype proton accelerator, recurring failures of drift-tube braze joints occurred. In the fabrication technique, a torch braze was used to attach the stems to both the drift-tube body and the stem termination; all materials used were stainless steel. The assemblies were copper plated, using bright-acid-leveling copper plating. Some braze joints, although satisfactorily tension-tested before plating, later failed at a relatively low loading. A detailed investigation of one drift tube indicated that residual copper-plating solution in the cooling passages acted to dissolve the braze solution over a period of weeks, leading to an eventual joint failure.

  14. DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY TEST OF THE 1500 MHZ NSLS-II PASSIVE SUPERCONDUCTING RF CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Kosciuk, B.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, B.; Sharma, S.; Towne, N.; Grimm, T.L.; Boulware, C.H.; Krizmanich, C.; Kuhlman, B.; Miller, N.; Siegel, B.; Winowski, M.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. Earlier work described the design alternatives and the geometry selected for a copper prototype. We subsequently have iterated the design to lower the R/Q of the cavity and to increase the diameter of the beam pipe ferrite HOM dampers to reduce the wakefield heating. A niobium cavity and full cryomodule including LN2 shield, magnetic shield and insulating vacuum vessel have been fabricated and installed. A passive SRF 3rd harmonic cavity consisting of two tightly coupled cells has been designed and fabricated for NSLS-II. Initial cold tests of this cavity are very promising. These tests have verified that the cavity frequency and mode separation between the 0 and {pi}-modes can be set at manufacture. Further, the frequency separation can be maintained over wide tuning ranges necessary for operation. Future work includes HOM damper and motorized tuner development.

  15. 1500 MHZ Passive SRF Cavity for Bunch Lengthening in the NSLS-II Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagisawa,T.; Rose, J.; Grimm, T.; Bogle, A.

    2009-05-04

    NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. After an extensive investigation of different cavity geometries, a passive, superconducting two-cell cavity has been selected for prototyping. The cavity is HOM damped with ferrite absorbers on the beam pipes. The two-cell cavity simplifies the tuner design, compared to having two independent cells. Tradeoffs between the damping of the higher order modes, thermal isolation associated with the large beam tubes, and overall cavity length are described. A copper prototype has been constructed, and measurements of fundamental and higher order modes will be compared to calculated values.

  16. Agricultural soils spiked with copper mine wastes and copper concentrate: implications for copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Sánchez, Pablo; de la Fuente, Luz María; Camus, Isabel; Bustamante, Elena; Silva, Yasna; Urrestarazu, Paola; Torres, Juan C; Rodríguez, Patricio H

    2006-03-01

    A better understanding of exposure to and effects of copper-rich pollutants in soils is required for accurate environmental risk assessment of copper. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation in agricultural soils spiked with different types of copper-rich mine solid wastes (copper ore, tailing sand, smelter dust, and smelter slag) and copper concentrate. A copper salt (copper sulfate, CuSO4) that frequently is used to assess soil copper bioavailability and phytotoxicity also was included for comparison. Results showed that smelter dust, tailing sand, and CuSO4 are more likely to be bioavailable and, thus, toxic to plants compared with smelter slag, concentrate, and ore at equivalent total copper concentrations. Differences may be explained by intrinsic differences in copper solubilization from the source materials, but also by their capability to decrease soil pH (confounding effect). The copper toxicity and bioaccumulation in plants also varied according to soil physicochemical characteristics (e.g., pH and total organic carbon) and the available levels of plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Chemistry/mineralogy of mine materials, soil/pore-water chemistry, and plant physiological status thus should be integrated for building adequate models to predict phytotoxicity and environmental risk of copper. PMID:16566155

  17. Surface topographic characterization for polyamide composite injection molds made of aluminum and copper alloys.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A; Hernández, P; Martinez, J; Pérez, J A; Mathia, T G

    2014-01-01

    In order to ensure flexibility and rapid new product development, the mold industry made use of soft materials for cavity inserts in injection molds. However, materials of this kind are prone to wear. This article analyzes the topographic characterization of the surface and wear processes in injection molds cavities. Two materials have been used to produce the cavities: aluminum alloy EN AW‐6082 T4 and copper alloy Cu Zn39 Pb3. The surface topography was measured with the use of optical interferometry profiling technology; roughness and surface parameters were determined according to ISO 4287, ISO 25178, and EUR 15178N. In order to complete this research, an experimental part with different thicknesses and shapes was designed, and cavity inserts of aluminum and copper were made. Polyamide PA6, with 30% fiberglass reinforcement, was employed in the experimental procedure. Measurements of cavity mold surfaces were performed after 9,200 cycles on each mold and at different locations on the mold. The surface measurement was made with a white light vertical scanning interferometry, also known as coherence scanning interferometry (ISO DIS 25178‐604). The results are analyzed and differences between the two types of cavity inserts materials are discussed. PMID:23447356

  18. Copper-phosphorus alloys offer advantages in brazing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    Copper-phosphorus brazing alloys are used extensively for joining copper, especially refrigeration and air-conditioning copper tubing and electrical conductors. What is the effect of phosphorus when alloyed with copper? The following are some of the major effects: (1) It lowers the melt temperature of copper (a temperature depressant). (2) It increases the fluidity of the copper when in the liquid state. (3) It acts as a deoxidant or a fluxing agent with copper. (4) It lowers the ductility of copper (embrittles). There is a misconception that silver improves the ductility of the copper-phosphorus alloys. In reality, silver added to copper acts in a similar manner as phosphorus. The addition of silver to copper lowers the melt temperature (temperature depressant) and decreases the ductility. Fortunately, the rate and amount at which silver lowers copper ductility is significantly less than that of phosphorus. Therefore, taking advantage of the temperature depressant property of silver, a Ag-Cu-P alloy can be selected at approximately the same melt temperature as a Cu-P alloy, but at a lower phosphorus content. The lowering of the phosphorus content actually makes the alloy more ductile, not the silver addition. A major advantage of the copper-phosphorus alloys is the self-fluxing characteristic when joining copper to copper. They may also be used with the addition of a paste flux on brass, bronze, and specialized applications on silver, tungsten and molybdenum. Whether it is selection of the proper BCuP alloy or troubleshooting an existing problem, the suggested approach is a review of the desired phosphorus content in the liquid metal and how it is being altered during application. In torch brazing, a slight change in the oxygen-fuel ratio can affect the joint quality or leak tightness.

  19. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2001-05-15

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  20. Analog detection for cavity lifetime spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Harb, Charles C.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Spence, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    An analog detection system for determining a ring-down rate or decay rate 1/.tau. of an exponentially decaying ring-down beam issuing from a lifetime or ring-down cavity during a ring-down phase. Alternatively, the analog detection system determines a build-up rate of an exponentially growing beam issuing from the cavity during a ring-up phase. The analog system can be employed in continuous wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CW CRDS) and pulsed CRDS (P CRDS) arrangements utilizing any type of ring-down cavity including ring-cavities and linear cavities.

  1. High power testing of the prototype accelerating cavity (352 MHz) for the advanced photon source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J.F.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Primdahl, K.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of the higher order of modes of a prototype single-cell 352 MHz cavity for the APS 7-Gev storage ring will be presented and discussed. A cavity made from solid copper was built according to dimensions derived from URMEL program runs. The longitudinal and transverse impedances of the first several higher order modes have been measured using various-shaped metal beads. High power ( > 60 kW) testing of the cavity will be described along with design and operation of dampers for those modes with coupled-bunch instability threshold currents under 300 milliamperes, the maximum circulating positron current. Low power level rf circuitry for timing and synchronization of the various APS accelerators and storage ring will be described.

  2. High power testing of the prototype accelerating cavity (352 MHz) for the advanced photon source (APS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J.F.; Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.; Primdahl, K.

    1992-07-01

    Measurement of the higher order of modes of a prototype single-cell 352 MHz cavity for the APS 7-Gev storage ring will be presented and discussed. A cavity made from solid copper was built according to dimensions derived from URMEL program runs. The longitudinal and transverse impedances of the first several higher order modes have been measured using various-shaped metal beads. High power ( > 60 kW) testing of the cavity will be described along with design and operation of dampers for those modes with coupled-bunch instability threshold currents under 300 milliamperes, the maximum circulating positron current. Low power level rf circuitry for timing and synchronization of the various APS accelerators and storage ring will be described.

  3. Half-Wave, beta=0.43 Cavity Prototyping for a Heavy Ion Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Popielarski, John; Compton, Chris C.; Hartung, Walter; Johnson, Mat; Oliva, John; York, R. C.; Marti, Felix

    2008-04-01

    A medium velocity half wave resonator has been designed and prototyped at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University (MSU) for use in a heavy ion linac. The cavity is designed to provide 3.7 MV of accelerating voltage at an optimum beta = v/c = 0.53, with peak surface electric and magnetic fields of 32.5 MV/m and 79 mT, respectively. The cavity was designed for stiffness and tunability, as well as straightforward fabrication, assembly and cleaning. Measurements were performed to confirm Finite Element Analysis (FEA) predictions for modal analysis, bath pressure sensitivity, tuner stiffness and tuning range. A copper cavity prototype has been fabricated to confirm tolerances and formability. A tuner prototype has been built. The helium vessel and power coupler have been designed.

  4. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, H.

    1993-09-21

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

  5. Acid copper sulfate plating bath: Control of chloride and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Borhani, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Plated-through holes in high-reliability printed wiring boards require a ductile copper plate of uniform consistency. The level of control of the chemical constituents in the electroplating solutions dictates the physical properties of the copper plate. To improve the control of the chemical bath constituents, in-situ methods for electrochemically determining copper and chloride in acid copper sulfate baths were developed. A solid-state ion-selective electrode was used for the chloride ion and proved to be more reproducible than conventional silver chloride turbidimetric methods. The use of a copper solid-state ion-selective electrode in-situ was also successful in this application.

  6. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, D.G.; Allen, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail that has been possible to date. The beam is produced by using third-generation insertion devices in a 7 GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1100 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high power devices is very high and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm{sup 2}. Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop{reg_sign}, a dispersion strengthened copper, is the desired material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Facing rim cavities fluctuation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Damiano; Ribeiro, André F. P.; Fares, Ehab

    2014-06-01

    Cavity modes taking place in the rims of two opposite wheels are investigated through Lattice-Boltzmann CFD simulations. Based on previous observations carried out by the authors during the BANC-II/LAGOON landing gear aeroacoustic study, a resonance mode can take place in the volume between the wheels of a two-wheel landing gear, involving a coupling between shear-layer vortical fluctuations and acoustic modes resulting from the combination of round cavity modes and wheel-to-wheel transversal acoustic modes. As a result, side force fluctuations and tonal noise side radiation take place. A parametric study of the cavity mode properties is carried out in the present work by varying the distance between the wheels. Moreover, the effects due to the presence of the axle are investigated by removing the axle from the two-wheel assembly. The azimuthal properties of the modes are scrutinized by filtering the unsteady flow in narrow bands around the tonal frequencies and investigating the azimuthal structure of the filtered fluctuation modes. Estimation of the tone frequencies with an ad hoc proposed analytical formula confirms the observed modal properties of the filtered unsteady flow solutions. The present study constitutes a primary step in the description of facing rim cavity modes as a possible source of landing gear tonal noise.

  8. Piezoelectric tunable microwave superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, N. C.; Fan, Y.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of engineered quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices, able to operate with high-quality factors at power levels equivalent to only a few photons. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave re-entrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which controls the resonator dominant mode frequency by changing the cavity narrow gap by very small displacements. Experiments were conducted at room and dilution refrigerator temperatures showing a large dynamic range up to 4 GHz and 1 GHz, respectively, and were compared to a finite element method model simulated data. At elevated microwave power input, nonlinear thermal effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the re-entrant cavity.

  9. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  10. ADPF spoke cavity cryomodule concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J. P.; Roybal, P. L.; La Fave, R. P.; Waynert, J. A.; Schrage, D. L.; Schmierer, E. N.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Garnett, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Driven Test Facility (ADTF) is being developed as a reactor concepts test bed for transmutation of nuclear waste. A 13.3 mA continuous-wave (CW) proton beam will be accelerated to 600 MeV and impinged on a spallation target. The subsequent neutron shower is used to create a nuclear reaction within a subcritical assembly of waste material that reduces the waste half-life from the order of 10{sup 5} years to 10{sup 2} years. Additionally, significant energy is produced that can be used to generate electrical power. The ADTF proton accelerator consists of room-temperature (RT) structures that accelerate the beam to 6.7-MeV and superconducting (SC) elements that boost the beam's energy to 600-MeV. Traditional SC elliptical cavities experience structural difficulties at low energies due to their geometry. Therefore, stiff-structured SC spoke cavities have been adopted for the energy range between 6.7 and 109 MeV. Elliptical cavities are used at the higher energies. This paper describes a multi-spoke-cavity cryomodule concept for ADTF.

  11. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  12. Weld defect formation in FSWed coppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheisari, Yousof; Pashazadeh, Hamed; Teimournezhad, Jamal; Masoumi, Abolfazl

    2014-06-01

    This work was undertaken to explore the formation of weld defects in FSWed copper metals via both numerical and experimental approaches. The 4 mm-thick copper sheets were friction stir welded at a tool rotational speed of 710 rpm and tool translational speed of 40 mm/min. Microstructural evaluations were performed on the welded specimens. Also a 3D arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian numerical model was developed to obtain temperature and material velocity profiles. To this aim, DEFORM-3D was implemented for developing the numerical simulation. Numerical results for temperature values showed good agreement with the recorded experimental data. They also suggest that on the advancing side (AS) of the trailing side, the pin velocity has the minimum amount (zero), and this is the main reason for the formation of tunneling cavity. Experimental results show that a force is created between the reminder of material at the joint and the rim of AS. This force causes a prong of surface material from the AS rim to penetrate into lower parts of weld. It seems that the inadequate pressure (low values of the plunge depth), inadequate surface materials, and the trapped air are the main causes for the formation of the weld defects.

  13. Creative Copper Crests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  14. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  15. Copper leaching from chalcopyrite concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijie

    2005-07-01

    Chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) is one of the most abundant copper-bearing minerals, which accounts for approximately 70 percent of the world’s known copper reserves. For more than 30 years, a significant number of processes have been developed to leach copper from chalcopyrite concentrates. These processes recover copper via hydrometallurgical leaching of the copper component of chalcopyrite concentrates, followed by solvent extraction and electrowinning. A number of demonstration plant operations have been conducted, but as of this writing none of the processes have become completely commercially operational.

  16. A creep cavity growth model for creep-fatigue life prediction of a unidirectional W/Cu composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Verrilli, Michael J.; Halford, Gary R.

    1992-01-01

    A microstructural model was developed to predict creep-fatigue life in a (0)(sub 4), 9 volume percent tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite at the temperature of 833 K. The mechanism of failure of the composite is assumed to be governed by the growth of quasi-equilibrium cavities in the copper matrix of the composite, based on the microscopically observed failure mechanisms. The methodology uses a cavity growth model developed for prediction of creep fracture. Instantaneous values of strain rate and stress in the copper matrix during fatigue cycles were calculated and incorporated in the model to predict cyclic life. The stress in the copper matrix was determined by use of a simple two-bar model for the fiber and matrix during cyclic loading. The model successfully predicted the composite creep-fatigue life under tension-tension cyclic loading through the use of this instantaneous matrix stress level. Inclusion of additional mechanisms such as cavity nucleation, grain boundary sliding, and the effect of fibers on matrix-stress level would result in more generalized predictions of creep-fatigue life.

  17. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  20. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  1. Effect of oxide particle distribution on the helium-induced fracture of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.

    1990-12-31

    Long-term exposure to tritium (H{sup 3}) gas can degrade the mechanical properties of copper alloys while similar exposure to protium (H{sup 1}) gas does not cause such degradation. This difference in behavior is attributed to the presence of helium which is generated by the radioactive decay of tritium. The accumulation of helium, which is virtually insoluble in the copper lattice, can cause the nucleation of cavities along grain boundaries and promote intergranular fracture. Permeation studies have shown that oxide particles act as trap sites for diffusing hydrogen isotopes, and thus may affect the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced degradation by altering the initial tritium distribution in the metal lattice. Tensile and metallographic data demonstrate that oxide particles trap both tritium and helium and decrease the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced intergranular fracture. 25 refs, 3 tabs, 12 figs.

  2. Effect of oxide particle distribution on the helium-induced fracture of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term exposure to tritium (H[sup 3]) gas can degrade the mechanical properties of copper alloys while similar exposure to protium (H[sup 1]) gas does not cause such degradation. This difference in behavior is attributed to the presence of helium which is generated by the radioactive decay of tritium. The accumulation of helium, which is virtually insoluble in the copper lattice, can cause the nucleation of cavities along grain boundaries and promote intergranular fracture. Permeation studies have shown that oxide particles act as trap sites for diffusing hydrogen isotopes, and thus may affect the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced degradation by altering the initial tritium distribution in the metal lattice. Tensile and metallographic data demonstrate that oxide particles trap both tritium and helium and decrease the susceptibility of copper to helium-induced intergranular fracture. 25 refs, 3 tabs, 12 figs.

  3. Presenilin Promotes Dietary Copper Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Southon, Adam; Greenough, Mark A.; Ganio, George; Bush, Ashley I.; Burke, Richard; Camakaris, James

    2013-01-01

    Dietary copper is essential for multicellular organisms. Copper is redox active and required as a cofactor for enzymes such as the antioxidant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1). Copper dyshomeostasis has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. Mutations in the presenilin genes encoding PS1 and PS2 are major causes of early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease. PS1 and PS2 are required for efficient copper uptake in mammalian systems. Here we demonstrate a conserved role for presenilin in dietary copper uptake in the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Ubiquitous RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the single Drosophila presenilin (PSN) gene is lethal. However, PSN knockdown in the midgut produces viable flies. These flies have reduced copper levels and are more tolerant to excess dietary copper. Expression of a copper-responsive EYFP construct was also lower in the midgut of these larvae, indicative of reduced dietary copper uptake. SOD activity was reduced by midgut PSN knockdown, and these flies were sensitive to the superoxide-inducing chemical paraquat. These data support presenilin being needed for dietary copper uptake in the gut and so impacting on SOD activity and tolerance to oxidative stress. These results are consistent with previous studies of mammalian presenilins, supporting a conserved role for these proteins in mediating copper uptake. PMID:23667524

  4. Understanding cavity resonances with intracavity dispersion properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Jiteng; Wu Haibin; Mumba, M.; Gea-Banacloche, J.; Xiao Min

    2011-02-15

    We experimentally study the strongly coupled three-level atom-cavity system at both cavity and coupling frequency detuning cases. Side peak splitting and anti-crossing-like phenomena are observed under different experimental conditions. Intracavity dispersion properties are used to explain qualitatively the complicated cavity resonance structures in the composite system of inhomogeneously broadened three-level atoms inside an optical ring cavity with relatively strong driving intensities.

  5. Structural comparison of complexes of methotrexate analogues with Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase by two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR at 500 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, S.J.; Birdsall, B.; Feeney, J.; Searle, M.S.; Roberts, G.C.K.; Cheung, H.T.A.

    1987-12-29

    The authors have used two-dimensional (2D) NMR methods to examine complexes of Lactobacillus casei dihydrofolate reductase and methotrexate (MTX) analogues having structural modifications of the benzoyl ring and also the glutamic acid moiety. Assignments of the /sup 1/H signals in the spectra of the various complexes were made by comparison of their 2D spectra with those complexes containing methotrexate where we have previously assigned resonances from 32 of the 162 amino acid residues. In the complexes formed with the dihalomethotrexate analogues, the glutamic acid and pteridine ring moieties were shown to bind to the enzyme in a manner similar to that found in the methotrexate-enzyme complex. Perturbations in /sup 1/H chemical shifts of protons in Phe-49, Leu-54, and Leu-27 and the methotrexate H7 and NMe protons were observed in the different complexes and were accounted for by changes in orientation of the benzoyl ring in the various complexes. Binding of oxidized or reduced coenzyme to the binary complexes did not result in different shifts for Leu-27, Leu-54, or Leu-19 protons, and thus, the orientation of the benzoyl ring of the methotrexate analogues is not perturbed greatly by the presence of either oxidized or reduced coenzyme. In the complex with the ..gamma..-monoamide analog, the /sup 1/H signals of assigned residues in the protein had almost identical shifts with the corresponding protons in the methotrexate-enzyme complex for all residues except His-28 and, to a lesser extent, Leu-27. This indicates that while the His-28 interaction with the MTX ..gamma..-CO/sub 2//sup -/ is no longer present in this complex with the ..gamma..-amide, there has not been a major change in the overall structure of the two complexes. This behavior contrasts to that of the ..cap alpha..-amide complex where /sup 1/H signals from protons in several amino acid residues are different compared with their values in the complex formed with methotrexate.

  6. Measurement of dielectric properties of whole and ground chicken breast meat over the frequency range from 500 MHz to 50 GHz

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dielectric properties of food greatly influence its interaction with RF and MW electromagnetic fields and subsequently determine the absorption of microwave energy and consequent heating behavior of food materials in microwave heating and processing applications. Microwave heating is usually re...

  7. Dielectric behavior of the frog lens in the 100 Hz to 500 MHz range. Simulation with an allocated ellipsoidal-shells model.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M; Suzaki, T; Irimajiri, A

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to correlate the passive electrical properties of the lens tissue with its structure, we measured ac admittances for isolated frog lenses, lens nuclei, and homogenate of cortical fiber cells, over the frequency range 10(2)-5.10(8) Hz. The whole lenses molded into discoid shape show a characteristic "two-step" dielectric dispersion with a huge permittivity increment of the order of 10(5) at 1 kHz. Of the two subdispersions disclosed, dispersion 1 has a permittivity increment (delta epsilon) of 2.10(5) with a characteristic frequency (fc) of 2 kHz, and dispersion 2 has a delta epsilon of 400 with an fc of 2 MHz. In terms of loss tangent, these dispersions are more clearly located as two separate peaks. Data are analyzed using an allocated ellipsoidal-shells model which has been developed by taking into account fiber orientation inside the lens tissue. Dispersion 1 is assigned to the equatorial cortex, where fiber cells run parallel to the applied electric field, and dispersion 2 to the nucleus with a complex fiber arrangement and also to the polar cortex, in which the fiber alignment is predominantly perpendicular. In addition, the model analysis reveals that, in the frog lens, the nucleus occupies approximately 30% in volume and that relative permittivity and conductivity for the cell interior are, respectively, 45 and 3 mS/cm for the cortical cells, and 28 and 0.3 mS/cm for the nuclear cells. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:2015379

  8. Discrete wavelength-locked external cavity laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An external cavity laser (and method of generating laser light) comprising: a laser light source; means for collimating light output by the laser light source; a diffraction grating receiving collimated light; a cavity feedback mirror reflecting light received from the diffraction grating back to the diffraction grating; and means for reliably tuning the external cavity laser to discrete wavelengths.

  9. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  10. The nasal cavity microbiota of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the nares has been widely studied. However, relatively few studies have investigated the microbiota of the nasal cavity posterior to the nares. This distinct environment has the potential to contain a distinct microbiota and play an important role in health. Results We obtained 35,142 high-quality bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequence reads from the nasal cavity and oral cavity (the dorsum of the tongue and the buccal mucosa) of 12 healthy adult humans and deposited these data in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) (Bioproject: PRJNA248297). In our initial analysis, we compared the bacterial communities of the nasal cavity and the oral cavity from ten of these subjects. The nasal cavity bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria and were statistically distinct from those on the tongue and buccal mucosa. For example, the same Staphylococcaceae operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was present in all of the nasal cavity samples, comprising up to 55% of the community, but Staphylococcaceae was comparatively uncommon in the oral cavity. Conclusions There are clear differences between nasal cavity microbiota and oral cavity microbiota in healthy adults. This study expands our knowledge of the nasal cavity microbiota and the relationship between the microbiota of the nasal and oral cavities. PMID:25143824

  11. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cavity varnish. 872.3260 Section 872.3260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is...

  13. Materials Research Related to W-band Cavity Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Dennis

    2000-10-18

    Low power rf measurements, S11, of electro-discharge machined (EDM) diffusion bonded mm-wave traveling wave rf cavities were not in satisfactory agreement with electromagnetic simulations. During subsequent mechanical inspection, the cell-to-cell iris were found to be distorted. This led to a series of systematic experiments to study the mechanical properties of oxygen free high conductivity Copper (OFHC) and Glidcop AL-15. Results of these studies which include cell-to-cell iris distortion, EDM machining accuracies, surface quality, and the results of different bonding techniques are presented. The results of our mechanical studies are used to develop a set of mechanical design constraints for a second series of constant impedance W-Band structures that also used wire EDM and high temperature bonding for their manufacture.

  14. Monitoring atmospheric particulate matter through cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jonathan E; Smith, Benjamin W; Winefordner, James D

    2002-05-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was explored as a means to measure atmospheric optical extinction. Ambient air was sampled through a window on the campus of the University of Florida and transported to a ring-down cell fashioned from standard stainless steel vacuum components. When a copper vapor laser operating at 10 kHz is employed, this arrangement allowed for nearly continuous monitoring of atmospheric extinction at 510 and 578 nm. We have characterized the system performance in terms of detection limit and dynamic range and also monitored a change in atmospheric extinction during a nearby wildfire and fireworks exhibition. The sensitivity and compatibility with automation of the technique renders it useful as a laboratory-based measurement of airborne particulate matter. PMID:12033292

  15. Monitoring atmospheric particulate matter through cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jonathan E; Smith, Benjamin W; Winefordner, James D

    2002-05-01

    Cavity ring-down spectroscopy was explored as a means to measure atmospheric optical extinction. Ambient air was sampled through a window on the campus of the University of Florida and transported to a ring-down cell fashioned from standard stainless steel vacuum components. When a copper vapor laser operating at 10 kHz is employed, this arrangement allowed for nearly continuous monitoring of atmospheric extinction at 510 and 578 nm. We have characterized the system performance in terms of detection limit and dynamic range and also monitored a change in atmospheric extinction during a nearby wildfire and fireworks exhibition. The sensitivity and compatibility with automation of the technique renders it useful as a laboratory-based measurement of airborne particulate matter.

  16. Ultrafast spontaneous emission of copper-doped silicon enhanced by an optical nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Sumikura, Hisashi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    Dopants in silicon (Si) have attracted attention in the fields of photonics and quantum optics. However, the optical characteristics are limited by the small spontaneous emission rate of dopants in Si. This study demonstrates a large increase in the spontaneous emission rate of copper isoelectronic centres (Cu-IECs) doped into Si photonic crystal nanocavities. In a cavity with a quality factor (Q) of ~16,000, the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime of the Cu-IECs is 1.1 ns, which is 30 times shorter than the lifetime of a sample without a cavity. The PL decay rate is increased in proportion to Q/Vc (Vc is the cavity mode volume), which indicates the Purcell effect. This is the first demonstration of a cavity-enhanced ultrafast spontaneous emission from dopants in Si, and it may lead to the development of fast and efficient Si light emitters and Si quantum optical devices based on dopants with efficient optical access.

  17. Defect microstructures in neutron-irradiated copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1987-09-01

    The defect microstructures of copper and type 304L austenitic stainless steel have been examined following neutron irradiation under widely different conditions. Less than 0.2% of the defect clusters in steel irradiated at 120/sup 0/C with moderated fission neutrons were resolvable as stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The fraction of defect clusters identified as SFT in copper varied from approx.10% for a low-dose 14-MeV neutron irradiation at 25/sup 0/C to approx.50% for copper irradiated to 1.3 dpa in a moderated fission spectrum at 182/sup 0/C. The mean cluster size in copper was about 2.6 nm for both cases, despite the large differences in irradiation conditions. The mean defect cluster size in the irradiated steel was about 1.8 nm. The absence of SFT in stainless steel may be due to the generation of 35 appm He during the irradiation, which caused the vacancies to form helium-filled cavities instead of SFT. 20 refs.

  18. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine; Van Brackel, Emmanuel; Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  19. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  20. Superconducting Thin Films for SRF Cavity Applications: A Route to Higher Field Gradient Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Wiliam Michael

    Many linear accelerator (linac) applications rely on the use of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. In order to overcome the current field gradient limits imposed by the use of bulk niobium, a model involving the deposition of alternating superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) thin films onto the interior surface of SRF cavities has been proposed. Since SRF performance is a surface phenomenon, the critical surface of these cavities is less than 1 micron thick, thus enabling the use of thin films. Before such approach can successfully be implemented fundamental studies correlating the microstructure and superconducting properties of thin films are needed. To this end the effect of grain boundary density and interfacial strain in thin films has been explored. Thin films with a smaller grain boundary density were found to have better superconducting properties than films with a larger grain boundary density. Interfacial strain due to a lattice mismatch between the film and substrate lead to two regions in films, one strained region near the interface and one relaxed region away from the interface. The presence of two regions in the film resulted in two types of superconducting behavior. Niobium films were deposited onto copper surfaces to help understand why previous attempts of implementing niobium coated copper cavities in order to exploit the better thermal properties of copper had varying degrees of success. It was found that an increased growth temperature produced niobium films with larger grains and correspondingly better superconducting properties. Proof of principle multilayer samples were prepared to test the SIS model. For the first time, multilayers were produced that were capable of shielding an underlying niobium film from vortex penetration beyond the lower critical field of bulk niobium. This result provides evidence supporting the feasibility of the SIS model.

  1. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan; El-Jallal, Said

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  2. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing ‘Air Crescent’ sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma. PMID:27625451

  3. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity

    PubMed Central

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing ‘Air Crescent’ sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma.

  4. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  5. Botryomycosis in a lung cavity.

    PubMed

    Vinay, D; Ramasubramanian, V; Gopalakrishnan, Ram; Jessani, Laxman G

    2016-01-01

    Botryomycosis is a rare pyogranulomatous disease characterized by suppurative and often granulomatous bacterial infection of the skin, soft tissues and viscera. Only about 90 cases have been reported in world literature till date: 75% of them are cases of cutaneous botryomycosis. Of the 18 reported cases of primary pulmonary botryomycosis, only one had histologically proven botryomycosis in a lung cavity. We report here a case of primary pulmonary botryomycosis occurring in a lung cavity, which is to the best of our knowledge first such case from India. The index case was a 62 year old female who presented to us with recurrent episodes of non-massive streaky hemoptysis with CT chest revealing 'Air Crescent' sign with a probable fungal ball in a left upper lobe cavity. Left upper pulmonary lobectomy was done and histopathology of the cavitary tissue revealed Splendore-Hoeppli phenomenon and features suggestive of Botryomycosis. Tissue culture from the cavitary specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Botryomycosis can mimic Aspergilloma radiologically as was seen in our case, but therapy is often a combination of both medical and surgical measures unlike Aspergilloma. PMID:27625451

  6. Controlled directional scattering cavity for tubular absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1982-01-01

    A specular cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity is provided with a series of V groove-like indentations (or pyramidal-type indentations) which redirect energy entering between the receiver and cavity structure onto the receiver. The aperture opening of each V groove is less than half the cavity opening and in most preferred embodiments, much less than half. This enables the optical receiver to be emplaced a distance g from the cavity wherein 0.414r

  7. Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method

    DOEpatents

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.; Jackaway, Adam D.

    2000-05-16

    A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

  8. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  9. Acoustic cavity technology for high performance injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of damping more than one mode of rocket engine combustion instability by means of differently tuned acoustic cavities sharing a common entrance was shown. Analytical procedures and acoustic modeling techniques for predicting the stability behavior of acoustic cavity designs in hot firings were developed. Full scale testing of various common entrance, dual cavity configurations, and subscale testing for the purpose of obtaining motion pictures of the cavity entrance region, to aid in determining the mechanism of cavity damping were the two major aspects of the program.

  10. Production of ultrahigh purity copper using waste copper nitrate solution.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Kim, D S

    2003-04-25

    The production of ultrahigh purity copper (99.9999%) by electrolysis in the presence of a cementation barrier has been attempted employing a waste nitric copper etching solution as the electrolyte. The amount of copper deposited on the cathode increased almost linearly with electrolysis time and the purity of copper was observed to increase as the electrolyte concentration was increased. At some point, however, as the electrolyte concentration increased, the purity of copper decreased slightly. As the total surface area of cementation barrier increased, the purity of product increased. The electrolyte temperature should be maintained below 35 degrees C in the range of investigated electrolysis conditions to obtain the ultrahigh purity copper. Considering that several industrial waste solutions contain valuable metallic components the result of present study may support a claim that electrowinning is a very desirable process for their treatment and recovery. PMID:12719148

  11. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Smith, J. D.A.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; Delayen, J.; Calaga, R.

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  12. Control of Cavity Resonance Using Oscillatory Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarfe, Alison Lamp; Chokani, Ndaona

    2000-01-01

    The near-zero net mass oscillatory blowing control of a subsonic cavity flow has been experimentally investigated. An actuator was designed and fabricated to provide both steady and oscillatory blowing over a range of blowing amplitudes and forcing frequencies. The blowing was applied just upstream of the cavity front Wall through interchangeable plate configurations These configurations enabled the effects of hole size, hole shape, and blowing angle to be examined. A significant finding is that in terms of the blowing amplitude, the near zero net mass oscillatory blowing is much more effective than steady blowing; momentum coefficients Lip two orders of magnitude smaller than those required for steady blowing are sufficient to accomplish the same control of cavity resonance. The detailed measurements obtained in the experiment include fluctuating pressure data within the cavity wall, and hot-wire measurements of the cavity shear layer. Spectral and wavelet analysis techniques are applied to understand the dynamics and mechanisms of the cavity flow with control. The oscillatory blowing, is effective in enhancing the mixing in the cavity shear layer and thus modifying the feedback loop associated with the cavity resonance. The nonlinear interactions in the cavity flow are no longer driven by the resonant cavity modes but by the forcing associated with the oscillatory blowing. The oscillatory blowing does not suppress the mode switching behavior of the cavity flow, but the amplitude modulation is reduced.

  13. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  14. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  15. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Lingwood, C.; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  16. Scaled experiments of explosions in cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, J.; Cranch, G. A.; Lunsford, R.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Weaver, J.; Dunlop, W.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-05-01

    Consequences of an explosion inside an air-filled cavity under the earth's surface are partly duplicated in a laboratory experiment on spatial scales 1000 smaller. The experiment measures shock pressures coupled into a block of material by an explosion inside a gas-filled cavity therein. The explosion is generated by suddenly heating a thin foil that is located near the cavity center with a short laser pulse, which turns the foil into expanding plasma, most of whose energy drives a blast wave in the cavity gas. Variables in the experiment are the cavity radius and explosion energy. Measurements and GEODYN code simulations show that shock pressures measured in the block exhibit a weak dependence on scaled cavity radius up to ˜25 m/kt1/3, above which they decrease rapidly. Possible mechanisms giving rise to this behavior are described. The applicability of this work to validating codes used to simulate full-scale cavity explosions is discussed.

  17. Copper@polypyrrole nanocables

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A simple hydrothermal redox reaction between microcrystalline CuOHCl and pyrrole leads to the isolation of striking nanostructures formed by polypyrrole-coated copper nanocables. These multicomponent cables that feature single-crystalline face-centered cubic Cu cores (ca. 300 nm wide and up to 200 μm long) are smoothly coated by conducting polypyrrole, which in addition to its functionality, offers protection against oxidation of the metal core. PMID:23009710

  18. Design and study of a high-current 5-cell superconducting rf cavity.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Nassiri, A.; Waldschmidt, G. )

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is considering the development of a superconducting linac-based fourth-generation hard X-ray source to meet future scientific needs of the hard X-ray user community. This work specifically focuses on the design of an optimized 5-cell superconducting radio-frequency structure well suited for a high-energy, high-beam-current energy recovery linac. The cavity design parameters are based on the APS storage ring nominal 7 GeV and 100 mA beam operation. A high-current 5-cell cw superconducting cavity operating at 1.4 GHz has been designed. In order to achieve a high current, the accelerating cavity shape has been optimized and large end-cell beam pipes have been adopted. The beam break-up threshold of the cavity has been estimated using the code TDBBU, which predicts a high threshold beam current for a 7 GeV energy recovery linac model. A copper prototype cavity has been fabricated that uses half-cell modules, initially assembled by clamping the cells together.

  19. Pool boiling on surfaces with mini-fins and micro-cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    The experimental studies presented here focused on pool boiling heat transfer on mini-fin arrays, mini-fins with perforated covering and surfaces with micro-cavities. The experiments were carried out for water and fluorinert FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. Mini-fins of 0.5 and 1 mm in height were uniformly spaced on the base surface. The copper foil with holes of 0.1 mm in diameter (pitch 0.2/0.4 mm), sintered with the fin tips, formed a system of connected perpendicular and horizontal tunnels. The micro-cavities were obtained through spark erosion. The maximal depth of the craters of these cavities was 15 - 30 μm and depended on the parameters of the branding-pen settings. At medium and small heat fluxes, structures with mini-fins showed the best boiling heat transfer performance both for water and FC-72. At medium and high heat fluxes (above 70 kW/m2 for water and 25 kW/m2 for FC-72), surfaces with mini-fins without porous covering and micro-cavities produced the highest heat transfer coefficients. The surfaces obtained with spark erosion require a proper selection of geometrical parameters for particular liquids - smaller diameters of cavities are suitable for liquids with lower surface tension (FC-72).

  20. RACE and Calculations of Three-dimensional Distributed Cavity Phase Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ruoxin; Gibble, Kurt

    2003-01-01

    The design for RACE, a Rb-clock flight experiment for the ISS, is described. The cold collision shift and multiple launching (juggling) have important implications for the design and the resulting clock accuracy and stability. We present and discuss the double clock design for RACE. This design reduces the noise contributions of the local oscillator and simplifies and enhances an accuracy evaluation of the clock. As we try to push beyond the current accuracies of clocks, new systematic errors become important. The best fountain clocks are using cylindrical TE(sub 011) microwave cavities. We recently pointed out that many atoms pass through a node of the standing wave microwave field in these cavities. Previous studies have shown potentially large frequency shifts for atoms passing through nodes in a TE(sub 013) cavity. The shift occurs because there is a small traveling wave component due to the absorption of the copper cavity walls. The small traveling wave component leads to position dependent phase shifts. To study these effects, we perform Finite Element calculations. Three-dimensional Finite Element calculations require significant computer resources. Here we show that the cylindrical boundary condition can be Fourier decomposed to a short series of two-dimensional problems. This dramatically reduces the time and memory required and we obtain (3D) phase distributions for a variety of cavities. With these results, we will be able to analyze this frequency shift in fountain and future space clocks.

  1. RF, Thermal and Structural Analysis of the 201.25 MHz MuonIonization Cooling Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.; Li, D.

    2005-05-10

    A finite element analysis has been carried out to characterize the RF, thermal and structural behavior of the prototype 201.25 MHz cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. A single ANSYS model has been developed to perform all of the calculations in a multi-step process. The high-gradient closed-cell cavity is currently being fabricated for the MICE (international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) and MUCOOL experiments. The 1200 mm diameter cavity is constructed of 6 mm thick copper sheet and incorporates a rounded pillbox-like profile with an open beam iris terminated by 420 mm diameter, 0.38 mm thick curved beryllium foils. Tuning is accomplished through elastic deformation of the cavity, and cooling is provided by external water passages. Details of the analysis methodology will be presented including a description of the ANSYS macro that computes the heat loads from the RF solution and applies them directly to the thermal model. The process and results of a calculation to determine the resulting frequency shift due to thermal and structural distortion of the cavity will also be presented.

  2. Cavity Optomechanics at Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenehan, Sean Michael

    The field of cavity optomechanics, which concerns the coupling of a mechanical object's motion to the electromagnetic field of a high finesse cavity, allows for exquisitely sensitive measurements of mechanical motion, from large-scale gravitational wave detection to microscale accelerometers. Moreover, it provides a potential means to control and engineer the state of a macroscopic mechanical object at the quantum level, provided one can realize sufficiently strong interaction strengths relative to the ambient thermal noise. Recent experiments utilizing the optomechanical interaction to cool mechanical resonators to their motional quantum ground state allow for a variety of quantum engineering applications, including preparation of non-classical mechanical states and coherent optical to microwave conversion. Optomechanical crystals (OMCs), in which bandgaps for both optical and mechanical waves can be introduced through patterning of a material, provide one particularly attractive means for realizing strong interactions between high-frequency mechanical resonators and near-infrared light. Beyond the usual paradigm of cavity optomechanics involving isolated single mechanical elements, OMCs can also be fashioned into planar circuits for photons and phonons, and arrays of optomechanical elements can be interconnected via optical and acoustic waveguides. Such coupled OMC arrays have been proposed as a way to realize quantum optomechanical memories, nanomechanical circuits for continuous variable quantum information processing and phononic quantum networks, and as a platform for engineering and studying quantum many-body physics of optomechanical meta-materials. However, while ground state occupancies (that is, average phonon occupancies less than one) have been achieved in OMC cavities utilizing laser cooling techniques, parasitic absorption and the concomitant degradation of the mechanical quality factor fundamentally limit this approach. On the other hand, the high

  3. Direct Production of Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victorovich, G. S.; Bell, M. C.; Diaz, C. M.; Bell, J. A. E.

    1987-09-01

    The use of commercially pure oxygen in flash smelting a typical chalcopyrite concentrate or a low grade comminuted matte directly to copper produces a large excess of heat. The heat balance is controlled by adjusting the calorific value of the solid feed. A portion of the sulfide material is roasted to produce a calcine which is blended with unroasted material, and the blend is then autogeneously smelted with oxygen and flux directly to copper. Either iron silicate or iron calcareous slags are produced, both being subject to a slag cleaning treatment. Practically all of the sulfur is contained in a continuous stream of SO2 gas, most of which is strong enough for liquefaction. A particularly attractive feature of these technologies is that no radically new metallurgical equipment needs to be developed. The oxygen smelting can be carried out not only in the Inco type flash furnace but in other suitable smelters such as cyclone furnaces. Another major advantage stems from abolishion of the ever-troublesome converter aisle, which is replaced with continuous roasting of a fraction of the copper sulfide feed.

  4. Design of RF power coupler for superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsaev, S. V.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new power coupler has been designed and is being prototyped by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for use with any of the ANL proposed superconducting (SC) half- or quarter-wave cavities for SARAF [1] and Project-X [2]. The 50 Ohm coaxial capacitive coupler is required to operate in the CW regime with up to 15 kW of forward power and under any condition for the reflected power. A key feature is a moveable copper plated stainless steel bellows which will permit up to 3 cm of axial stroke and adjustment of the external quality factor by roughly one order of magnitude in the range of 105 to 106. The mechanical and vacuum design includes two ceramic windows, one operating at room temperature and another at 70 Kelvin. The two window design allows the portion of the coupler assembled onto the SC cavity in the clean room to be compact and readily cleanable. Other design features include thermal intercepts to provide a large margin for RF heating and a mechanical guide assembly to operate cold and under vacuum with high reliability.

  5. Eigenfunction Images of a Wave Chaotic Microwave Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokirmak, Ali; Anlage, Steven

    1996-03-01

    We study the eigenfunctions of the Helmholtz equation in a two-dimensional region of space defined by the intersection of four circles forming a bow-tie. In this geometry, all typical ray-trajectory orbits are chaotic and all periodic orbits are isolated. The experiments are performed in a thin microwave resonator analog made from copper-plated brass which is excited with electric field probes entering through the top plate. (Paul So, S. M. Anlage, E. Ott, and R. N. Oerter, Phys. Rev. Lett.74), 2662 (1995). A quantity proportional to the local electric field squared is measured by dragging a small metallic perturbation about the interior of the cavity and noting the change in resonant frequency of the entire cavity. Images of the eigenmodes are constructed, and calculations of two-point correlation functions are performed on these images. We shall discuss several different imaging methods and explore how the size and the shape of the perturbation affects the resulting images. Supported by NSF NYI grant DMR-9258183.

  6. Characterization of failure processes in tungsten copper composites under fatigue loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yong-Suk; Verrilli, Michael J.; Gabb, Timothy P.

    1989-01-01

    A fractographic and metallographic investigation was performed on specimens of a tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite (9 vol percent), which had experienced fatigue failures at elevated temperatures. Major failure modes and possible failure mechanisms, with an emphasis placed on characterizing fatigue damage accumulation, were determined. Metallography of specimens fatigued under isothermal cyclic loading suggested that fatigue damage initiates in the matrix. Cracks nucleated within the copper matrix at grain boundaries, and they propagated through cavity coalescence. The growing cracks subsequently interacted with the reinforcing tungsten fibers, producing a localized ductile fiber failure. Examinations of interrupted tests before final failure confirmed the suggested fatigue damage processes.

  7. Oxidation Mechanism of Copper Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskinen, Pekka; Patana, Sonja; Kobylin, Petri; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation mechanism of copper selenide was investigated at deselenization temperatures of copper refining anode slimes. The isothermal roasting of synthetic, massive copper selenide in flowing oxygen and oxygen - 20% sulfur dioxide mixtures at 450-550 °C indicate that in both atmospheres the mass of Cu2Se increases as a function of time, due to formation of copper selenite as an intermediate product. Copper selenide oxidises to copper oxides without formation of thick copper selenite scales, and a significant fraction of selenium is vaporized as SeO2(g). The oxidation product scales on Cu2Se are porous which allows transport of atmospheric oxygen to the reaction zone and selenium dioxide vapor to the surrounding gas. Predominance area diagrams of the copper-selenium system, constructed for selenium roasting conditions, indicate that the stable phase of copper in a selenium roaster gas with SO2 is the sulfate CuSO4. The cuprous oxide formed in decomposition of Cu2Se is further sulfated to CuSO4.

  8. Copper corrosion in coastal Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S. Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is studying the atmospheric corrosion performance of copper and other metals along the Oregon coast. Only the copper results will be presented in this paper. Atmospheric corrosion measurements of copper samples were made at seven bridges, eight coastal communities, and three inland reference sites to quantify and understand the effect of high chloride environments on the corrosion performance of copper. The materials were atmospherically exposed for 1, 2, and 3 years to examine the effects of sheltering, orientation, distance from the ocean, and coastal microclimates on the rate of corrosion and the composition of the corrosion film.

  9. Experiments and computer simulations of the dynamic cavity formed by a particulated shaped-charge jet in sand

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.C.; Winer, K.A.; Reaugh, J.E.; Breithaupt, R.D.; Baum, D.W.

    1995-02-28

    Experiments have been carried out to measure the dynamic cavity growth of dry sand during penetration by particulated jets from Viper 65-mm-diameter, Cu-lined conical shaped charges at 1,000-mm standoff. The sand target was instrumented with foil switches, piezoelectric pins, and pressure transducers. Flash radiography at 450-keV was used to characterize the jets before impact and to image the target hole during jet penetration. The authors have developed a dry sand equation of state based on existing Hugoniot data as input to a porous material model incorporated in the 2-D arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode CALE. They have carried out sand penetration simulations in which the particulated jet is modeled as hot copper rods. By varying parameters in the sand and copper descriptions they identify those features that affect the dynamic cavity formation.

  10. A terahertz plasmon cavity detector

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, G. C.; Vinh, N. Q.; Allen, S. J.; Aizin, G. R.; Mikalopas, J.; Reno, J. L.; Shaner, E. A.

    2010-11-08

    Sensitivity of a plasmonic detector is enhanced by integrating a broadband log-periodic antenna with a two-dimensional plasma cavity that is defined by source, drain, and multiple gates of a GaAs/AlGaAs high electron mobility transistor. Both narrow-band terahertz detection and a rich harmonic spectrum are evident. With a bolometric sensor in the channel, we report responsivity, on resonance at 235-240 GHz and at 20 K, of up to 7 kV/W and a noise equivalent power of 5x10{sup -10} W/Hz{sup 1/2}.

  11. [Dirofilaria in the abdominal cavity].

    PubMed

    Révész, Erzsébet; Markovics, Gabriella; Darabos, Zoltán; Tóth, Ildikó; Fok, Eva

    2008-10-01

    Number of cases of filariasis have been recently reported in the Hungarian medical literature, most of them caused by Dirofilaria repens . Dirofilaria repens is a mosquito-transmitted filarioid worm in the subcutaneous tissue of dogs and cats. Human infection manifests as either subcutaneous nodules or lung parenchymal disease, which may even be asymptomatic. The authors report a human Dirofilaria repens infection of the abdominal cavity in a 61-year-old man,who underwent laparotomy for acute abdomen. Intraoperatively, local peritonitis was detected caused by a white nemathhelminth, measured 8 cm in size. Histocytology confirmed that the infection was caused by Dirofilaria repens.

  12. Mass renormalization in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Matloob, Reza

    2011-01-15

    We show that the presence of a background medium and a boundary surface or surfaces in cavity QED produces no change in the energy shift of a free charged particle due to its coupling to the fluctuating electromagnetic field of the vacuum. This clarifies that the electromagnetic and the observed mass of the charged particle are not affected by the modification of the field of the vacuum. The calculations are nonrelativistic and restricted to the dipole approximation but are otherwise based on the general requirements of causality.

  13. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  14. Three-dimensional field structure in open unstable cavities Part II: Active cavity results.

    PubMed

    Oughstun, K; Khamnei, C

    1999-05-10

    The three-dimensional field distribution of the diffractive cavity mode structure in an active, open, unstable laser resonator is presented as a function of the equivalent Fresnel number of the cavity. The active cavity mode structures are compared to that of the corresponding passive cavity so that the effects of a spatially extended, homogeneously broadened, saturable gain medium on the cavity field structure may be ascertained. The qualitative structure of this intracavity field distribution, including the central intensity core (or oscillator filament), is explained in terms of the Fresnel zone structure defined over the cavity feedback aperture. PMID:19396296

  15. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  16. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  17. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  18. Cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasulu Raju, S.; Umapathy, M.; Uma, G.

    2015-11-01

    Energy harvesting employing piezoelectric materials in mechanical structures such as cantilever beams, plates, diaphragms, etc, has been an emerging area of research in recent years. The research in this area is also focused on structural tailoring to improve the harvested power from the energy harvesters. Towards this aim, this paper presents a method for improving the harvested power from a cantilever piezoelectric energy harvester by introducing multiple rectangular cavities. A generalized model for a piezoelectric energy harvester with multiple rectangular cavities at a single section and two sections is developed. A method is suggested to optimize the thickness of the cavities and the number of cavities required to generate a higher output voltage for a given cantilever beam structure. The performance of the optimized energy harvesters is evaluated analytically and through experimentation. The simulation and experimental results show that the performance of the energy harvester can be increased with multiple cavities compared to the harvester with a single cavity.

  19. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Dhanaraj, N.; Hocker, A.; Orlov, Y.; Peterson, T.; Premo, K.

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  20. Tunable-cavity QED with phase qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Jed D.; da Silva, Fabio; Allman, Michael Shane; Lecocq, Florent; Cicak, Katarina; Sirois, Adam; Teufel, John; Aumentado, Jose; Simmonds, Raymond W.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a tunable-cavity QED architecture with an rf SQUID phase qubit inductively coupled to a single-mode, resonant cavity with a tunable frequency that allows for both tunneling and dispersive measurements. Dispersive measurement is well characterized by a three-level model, strongly dependent on qubit anharmonicity, qubit-cavity coupling and detuning. The tunable cavity frequency provides dynamic control over the coupling strength and qubit-cavity detuning helping to minimize Purcell losses and cavity-induced dephasing during qubit operation. The maximum decay time T1 = 1 . 5 μs is limited by dielectric losses from a design geometry similar to planar transmon qubits. This work supported by NIST and NSA grant EAO140639.

  1. Cavity-Dumped Communication Laser Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. T.

    2003-01-01

    Cavity-dumped lasers have significant advantages over more conventional Q-switched lasers for high-rate operation with pulse position modulation communications, including the ability to emit laser pulses at 1- to 10-megahertz rates, with pulse widths of 0.5 to 5 nanoseconds. A major advantage of cavity dumping is the potential to vary the cavity output percentage from pulse to pulse, maintaining the remainder of the energy in reserve for the next pulse. This article presents the results of a simplified cavity-dumped laser model, establishing the requirements for cavity efficiency and projecting the ultimate laser efficiency attainable in normal operation. In addition, a method of reducing or eliminating laser dead time is suggested that could significantly enhance communication capacity. The design of a laboratory demonstration laser is presented with estimates of required cavity efficiency and demonstration potential.

  2. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  3. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  4. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOEpatents

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  5. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-03-01

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  6. Silicon Integrated Cavity Optomechanical Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jie; Miao, Houxun; Michels, Thomas; Liu, Yuxiang; Srinivasan, Kartik; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2013-03-01

    Cavity optomechanics enables measurements of mechanical motion at the fundamental limits of precision imposed by quantum mechanics. However, the need to align and couple devices to off-chip optical components hinders development, miniaturization and broader application of ultrahigh sensitivity chip-scale optomechanical transducers. Here we demonstrate a fully integrated and optical fiber pigtailed optomechanical transducer with a high Q silicon micro-disk cavity near-field coupled to a nanoscale cantilever. We detect the motion of the cantilever by measuring the resonant frequency shift of the whispering gallery mode of the micro-disk. The sensitivity near the standard quantum limit can be reached with sub-uW optical power. Our on-chip approach combines compactness and stability with great design flexibility: the geometry of the micro-disk and cantilever can be tailored to optimize the mechanical/optical Q factors and tune the mechanical frequency over two orders of magnitudes. Electrical transduction in addition to optical transduction was also demonstrated and both can be used to effectively cool the cantilever. Moreover, cantilevers with sharp tips overhanging the chip edge were fabricated to potentially allow the mechanical cantilever to be coupled to a wide range of off-chip systems, such as spins, DNA, nanostructures and atoms on clean surfaces.

  7. Cavity QED Deutsch quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Salgueiro, A. N.; Nemes, M. C.

    2001-10-01

    The two-atom correlation scheme originally proposed by Davidovich, Brune, Raimond, and Haroche for measuring the decoherence of a mesoscopic superposition of coherent states of a QED cavity field is shown to be equivalent to a quantum computer solving Deutsch's problem. Using the existing analysis of decoherence in the Master equation formalism, and other important losses in this system, the final probability for obtaining the correct result for the computation is found in terms of the time period between atom traversals, the number of photons in the cavity, and the precision of the atomic velocity. The error due to decoherence in this system amounts to a phase error, and in the Master equation approach is a linear effect at small time scales. By explicitly considering the dynamics of the decoherence process when the system is coupled to a bath of oscillators with finite mode cutoff the error due to decoherence is found to decrease significantly and becomes a quadratic effect at short-time scales.

  8. SPINNING MOTIONS IN CORONAL CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Stenborg, G. E-mail: guillermo.stenborg.ctr.ar@nrl.navy.mi

    2010-08-20

    In movies made from Fe XII 19.5 nm images, coronal cavities that graze or are detached from the solar limb appear as continually spinning structures, with sky-plane projected flow speeds in the range 5-10 km s{sup -1}. These whirling motions often persist in the same sense for up to several days and provide strong evidence that the cavities and the immediately surrounding streamer material have the form of helical flux ropes viewed along their axes. A pronounced bias toward spin in the equatorward direction is observed during 2008. We attribute this bias to the poleward concentration of the photospheric magnetic flux near sunspot minimum, which leads to asymmetric heating along large-scale coronal loops and tends to drive a flow from higher to lower latitudes; this flow is converted into an equatorward spinning motion when the loops pinch off to form a flux rope. As sunspot activity increases and the polar fields weaken, we expect the preferred direction of the spin to reverse.

  9. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    ScienceCinema

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2016-07-12

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  10. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  11. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  12. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  13. Grating cavity dual wavelength dye laser.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Nava, Oscar Javier; Rodríguez-Montero, Ponciano; Iturbe-Castillo, M David; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2011-02-14

    We report simultaneous dual wavelength dye laser emission using Littman-Metcalf and Littrow cavity configurations with minimum cavity elements. Dual wavelength operation is obtained by laser operation in two optical paths inside the cavity, one of which uses reflection in the circulating dye cell. Styryl 14 laser dye operating in the 910 nm to 960 nm was used in a 15%:85% PC/EG solvent green pumped with a Q-switched doubled Nd3+:YAG laser. PMID:21369171

  14. Ray splitting in paraxial optical cavities.

    PubMed

    Puentes, G; Aiello, A; Woerdman, J P

    2004-03-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the ray dynamics in a paraxial optical cavity when a ray-splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. We show that depending on the position of the beam splitter the optical resonator can become unstable and the ray dynamics displays a positive Lyapunov exponent. PMID:15089394

  15. Passive venting technique for shallow cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr. (Inventor); Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is introduced for reducing drag and store separation difficulties caused by shallow cavities on aircraft in supersonic flight consisting of a group of hollow pipes the same length as the cavity. The pipes are attached to the cavity floor so as to allow air to flow through the pipes. This device allows air to flow through the pipes opposite to the direction of flow outside the pipes. This results in reduced drag and improved store separation characteristics.

  16. Resonant-cavity antenna for plasma heating

    DOEpatents

    Perkins, Jr., Francis W.; Chiu, Shiu-Chu; Parks, Paul; Rawls, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a resonant coil cavity wave launcher for energizing a plasma immersed in a magnetic field. Energization includes launching fast Alfven waves to excite ion cyclotron frequency resonances in the plasma. The cavity includes inductive and capacitive reactive members spaced no further than one-quarter wavelength from a first wall confinement chamber of the plasma. The cavity wave launcher is energized by connection to a waveguide or transmission line carrying forward power from a remote radio frequency energy source.

  17. Non linear effects in ferrite tuned cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.; Walling, L.; Enegren, T.; Hulsey, G. ); Yakoviev, V.; Petrov, V. )

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of dependence of the resonance shape and frequency on the RF power level in perpendicular biased ferrite-tuned cavities has been observed by G. Hulsey and C. Friedrichs in the SSC test cavity experiment. This paper presents a theoretical as well as numerical analysis of this phenomenon and compares the results with experimental data. The effect of this nonlinearity on the SSC low energy booster prototype cavity is discussed.

  18. Lead and Copper Control 101

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is an overview of the most important water treatment strategies for the control of lead and copper release from drinking water corrosion. In addition to the sections specifically on lead and copper treatment, sections are included that cover sampling to find le...

  19. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Simrock, Stefan; Brandt, Alexander; Chase, Brian; Carcagno, Ruben; Cancelo, Gustavo; Koeth, Timothy W.

    2006-12-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. FPGA-based controller, supported by Matlab system, was applied. Electrical model of a resonator was used for design of a control system. Calibration of the signal path is considered. Identification of cavity parameters has been carried out for adaptive control algorithm. Feed-forward and feedback modes were applied in operating the cavities. Required performance has been achieved; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time, while keeping reasonable level of the power consumption. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  20. Cavity-locked ring down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Harb, Charles C.; Spence, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Distinct locking and sampling light beams are used in a cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system to perform multiple ring-down measurements while the laser and ring-down cavity are continuously locked. The sampling and locking light beams have different frequencies, to ensure that the sampling and locking light are decoupled within the cavity. Preferably, the ring-down cavity is ring-shaped, the sampling light is s-polarized, and the locking light is p-polarized. Transmitted sampling light is used for ring-down measurements, while reflected locking light is used for locking in a Pound-Drever scheme.

  1. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: coherence in context.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, H; Doherty, A C

    2002-11-15

    Modern cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) illuminates the most fundamental aspects of coherence and decoherence in quantum mechanics. Experiments on atoms in cavities can be described by elementary models but reveal intriguing subtleties of the interplay of coherent dynamics with external couplings. Recent activity in this area has pioneered powerful new approaches to the study of quantum coherence and has fueled the growth of quantum information science. In years to come, the purview of cavity QED will continue to grow as researchers build on a rich infrastructure to attack some of the most pressing open questions in micro- and mesoscopic physics.

  2. Large Scale Shape Optimization for Accelerator Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Li-Ling; Ko, Kwok; /SLAC

    2011-12-06

    We present a shape optimization method for designing accelerator cavities with large scale computations. The objective is to find the best accelerator cavity shape with the desired spectral response, such as with the specified frequencies of resonant modes, field profiles, and external Q values. The forward problem is the large scale Maxwell equation in the frequency domain. The design parameters are the CAD parameters defining the cavity shape. We develop scalable algorithms with a discrete adjoint approach and use the quasi-Newton method to solve the nonlinear optimization problem. Two realistic accelerator cavity design examples are presented.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  4. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics: Coherence in Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabuchi, H.; Doherty, A. C.

    2002-11-01

    Modern cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) illuminates the most fundamental aspects of coherence and decoherence in quantum mechanics. Experiments on atoms in cavities can be described by elementary models but reveal intriguing subtleties of the interplay of coherent dynamics with external couplings. Recent activity in this area has pioneered powerful new approaches to the study of quantum coherence and has fueled the growth of quantum information science. In years to come, the purview of cavity QED will continue to grow as researchers build on a rich infrastructure to attack some of the most pressing open questions in micro- and mesoscopic physics.

  5. Quantum teleportation with atoms trapped in cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hai-Woong

    2004-09-01

    We propose a scheme to implement the quantum teleportation protocol with single atoms trapped in cavities. The scheme is based on the adiabatic passage and the polarization measurement. We show that it is possible to teleport the internal state of an atom trapped in a cavity to an atom trapped in another cavity with the success probability of 1/2 and the fidelity of 1. The scheme is resistant to a number of considerable imperfections such as the violation of the Lamb-Dicke condition, weak atom-cavity coupling, spontaneous emission, and detection inefficiency.

  6. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  7. Copper: from neurotransmission to neuroproteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Carlos M.; Greenough, Mark A.; Bush, Ashley I.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is critical for the Central Nervous System (CNS) development and function. In particular, different studies have shown the effect of copper at brain synapses, where it inhibits Long Term Potentation (LTP) and receptor pharmacology. Paradoxically, according to recent studies copper is required for a normal LTP response. Copper is released at the synaptic cleft, where it blocks glutamate receptors, which explain its blocking effects on excitatory neurotransmission. Our results indicate that copper also enhances neurotransmission through the accumulation of PSD95 protein, which increase the levels of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors located at the plasma membrane of the post-synaptic density. Thus, our findings represent a novel mechanism for the action of copper, which may have implications for the neurophysiology and neuropathology of the CNS. These data indicate that synaptic configuration is sensitive to transient changes in transition metal homeostasis. Our results suggest that copper increases GluA1 subunit levels of the AMPA receptor through the anchorage of AMPA receptors to the plasma membrane as a result of PSD-95 accumulation. Here, we will review the role of copper on neurotransmission of CNS neurons. In addition, we will discuss the potential mechanisms by which copper could modulate neuronal proteostasis (“neuroproteostasis”) in the CNS with focus in the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS), which is particularly relevant to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) where copper and protein dyshomeostasis may contribute to neurodegeneration. An understanding of these mechanisms may ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to control metal and synaptic alterations observed in AD patients. PMID:25071552

  8. Experimental study of rf pulsed heating on oxygen free electronic copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritzkau, David P.; Siemann, Robert H.

    2002-11-01

    When the thermal stresses induced by rf pulsed heating are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Therefore, pulsed heating limits the maximum surface magnetic field and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE011 mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424GHz was designed to study pulsed heating on oxygen free electronic (OFE) copper. An X-band klystron delivered up to 10MW to the cavities in 1.5 μs pulses at 60Hz repetition rate. One run was executed at a temperature rise of 120K for 56×106 pulses. Cracks at grain boundaries, slip bands, and cracks associated with these slip bands were observed. The second run consisted of 86×106 pulses with a temperature rise of 82K, and cracks at grain boundaries and slip bands were seen. Additional information can be derived from the power-coupling iris, and we conclude that a pulsed temperature rise of 250K for several million pulses leads to destruction of copper. These results can be applied to any mode of any OFE copper cavity.

  9. Modulation of copper accumulation and copper-induced toxicity by antioxidants and copper chelators in cultured primary brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulcke, Felix; Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Gonzalez-Mateos, Antonio; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    Copper is essential for several important cellular processes, but an excess of copper can also lead to oxidative damage. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a pivotal role in the copper homeostasis and antioxidative defence. To investigate whether antioxidants and copper chelators can modulate the uptake and the toxicity of copper ions in brain astrocytes, we used primary astrocytes as cell culture model. These cells accumulated substantial amounts of copper during exposure to copper chloride. Copper accumulation was accompanied by a time- and concentration-dependent loss in cell viability, as demonstrated by a lowering in cellular MTT reduction capacity and by an increase in membrane permeability for propidium iodide. During incubations in the presence of the antioxidants ascorbate, trolox or ebselen, the specific cellular copper content and the toxicity in copper chloride-treated astrocyte cultures were strongly increased. In contrast, the presence of the copper chelators bathocuproine disulfonate or tetrathiomolybdate lowered the cellular copper accumulation and the copper-induced as well as the ascorbate-accelerated copper toxicity was fully prevented. These data suggest that predominantly the cellular content of copper determines copper-induced toxicity in brain astrocytes. PMID:26302925

  10. Modulation of copper accumulation and copper-induced toxicity by antioxidants and copper chelators in cultured primary brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulcke, Felix; Santofimia-Castaño, Patricia; Gonzalez-Mateos, Antonio; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-10-01

    Copper is essential for several important cellular processes, but an excess of copper can also lead to oxidative damage. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a pivotal role in the copper homeostasis and antioxidative defence. To investigate whether antioxidants and copper chelators can modulate the uptake and the toxicity of copper ions in brain astrocytes, we used primary astrocytes as cell culture model. These cells accumulated substantial amounts of copper during exposure to copper chloride. Copper accumulation was accompanied by a time- and concentration-dependent loss in cell viability, as demonstrated by a lowering in cellular MTT reduction capacity and by an increase in membrane permeability for propidium iodide. During incubations in the presence of the antioxidants ascorbate, trolox or ebselen, the specific cellular copper content and the toxicity in copper chloride-treated astrocyte cultures were strongly increased. In contrast, the presence of the copper chelators bathocuproine disulfonate or tetrathiomolybdate lowered the cellular copper accumulation and the copper-induced as well as the ascorbate-accelerated copper toxicity was fully prevented. These data suggest that predominantly the cellular content of copper determines copper-induced toxicity in brain astrocytes.

  11. Investigation for surface resistance of yttrium-barium-copper-oxide thin films on various substrates for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Hongjun

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) materials such as YBCO (Yttrium-Barium-Copper-Oxide) are very attractive in microwave applications because of their extremely low surface resistance. In the proposed all-HTS tunable filter, a layer of HTS thin film on a very thin substrate (100 mum) is needed to act as the toractor that can be rotated to tune the frequency. In order to provide more substrate candidates that meet both electrical and mechanical requirements for this special application, surface resistance of YBCO thin films on various substrates was measured using microstrip ring resonator method. For alumina polycrystalline substrate, a layer of YSZ (Yttrium stabilized Zirconia) was deposited using IBAD (ion beam assisted deposition) method prior to YBCO deposition. The surface resistance of the YBCO thin film on alumina was found to be 22 mO due to high-angle grain boundary problem caused by the mixed in-plane orientations and large FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the thin film. For YBCO thin films on a YSZ single crystal substrate, the surface resistance showed even higher value of 30 mO because of the mixed in-plane orientation problem. However, by annealing the substrate in 200 Torr oxygen at 730°C prior to deposition, the in-plane orientation of YBCO thin films can be greatly improved. Therefore, the surface resistance decreased to 1.4 mO, which is still more than an order higher than the reported best value. The YBCO thin films grown on LaAlO3 single crystal substrate showed perfect in-plane orientation with FWHM less 1°. The surface resistance was as low as 0.032 mO. A tunable spiral resonator made of YBCO thin film on LaAlO3 single crystal substrate demonstrated that the resonant frequency can be tuned in a rang as large as 500 MHz by changing the gap between toractor and substrate. The Q-factor was more than 12,000, which ensured the extraordinarily high sensitivity for the proposed all-HTS tunable filter.

  12. Epithelial Dysplasia in Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Samaneh; Kargahi, Neda; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Homayoni, Solmaz

    2014-01-01

    Among oral lesions, we encounter a series of malignant epithelial lesions that go through clinical and histopathologic processes in order to be diagnosed. Identifying these processes along with the etiology knowledge of these lesions is very important in prevention and early treatments. Dysplasia is the step preceding the formation of squamous cell carcinoma in lesions which have the potential to undergo dysplasia. Identification of etiological factors, clinical and histopathologic methods has been the topic of many articles. This article, reviews various articles presenting oral cavity dysplasia, new clinical methods of identifying lesions, and the immunohistochemical research which proposes various markers for providing more precise identification of such lesions. This article also briefly analyzes new treatment methods such as tissue engineering. PMID:25242838

  13. Performance analysis of superconducting rf cavities for the CERN rare isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calatroni, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Rosaz, G.; Sublet, A.; Venturini Delsolaro, W.; Vaglio, R.; Palmieri, V.

    2016-09-01

    The first cryomodule of the new HIE-ISOLDE rare isotope accelerator has recently been commissioned with beam at CERN, with the second cryomodule ready for installation. Each cryomodule contains five superconducting low-beta quarter wave cavities, produced with the technology of sputtering a thin niobium film onto the copper substrate (Nb /Cu ). This technology has several benefits compared to the bulk niobium solution, but also drawbacks among which the most relevant is the increase of surface resistance with accelerating field. Recent work has established the possible connection of this phenomenon to local defects in the Nb /Cu interface, which may lead to increased thermal impedance and thus local thermal runaway. We have analyzed the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE cavities series production, as well as of a few prototypes', in terms of this model, and found a strong correlation between the rf properties and one of the model characteristic quantities, namely the total surface having increased interface thermal impedance.

  14. An unobtrusive liquid sensor utilizing a micromilled RF spark gap transmitter and resonant cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, H.; Wilson, C.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports on a new dielectric liquid sensor that utilizes an RF sparkgap transmitter coupled with an aluminum microwave resonant cavity. The transmitter is a micromilled polymer transmitter housing with patterned copper electrodes that generate micro-arcs. This transmitter which operates outside the measured liquid generates a directed ultrawideband signal which is received by the aluminum waveguide. Absorption resonances in the microwave cavity, measured with a spectrum analyzer are a function of the liquids' dielectric constant at lower frequencies, as well as from molecular vibrations/rotations at higher frequencies. In many chemical manufacturing processes, liquids being manufactured are removed, tested in a lab, and then disposed of, or else they will contaminate the full batch. In beer brewing, for instance, samples are removed, density tested for alcohol content, then disposed of. Using this sensor, the chemical process could be continuously monitored by a computerized system without risk of contamination.

  15. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  16. Axicon based conical resonators with high power copper vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijendra; Subramaniam, V V; Daultabad, S R; Chakraborty, Ashim

    2010-07-01

    We report for the first time the performance of axicon based conical resonators (ABCRs) in a copper vapor laser, with novel results. The unstable conical resonator comprising of conical mirror (reflecting axicon) with axicon angle approximately pi/18, cone angle approximately 160 degrees, and a convex mirror of 60 cm radius of curvature was effective in reducing the average beam divergence to approximately 0.15 mrad (approximately 25 fold reduction compared to standard multimode plane-plane cavity) with output power of approximately 31 W. Extraction efficiency of approximately 50%-60% and beam divergence of <1 mrad was achieved in other stable ABCR configurations using flat and concave mirrors with the axicon. This is a significant improvement compared to 4-5 mrad normally observed in conventional stable resonators in copper vapor lasers. The conical resonators with copper vapor laser provide high misalignment tolerance beta approximately 4-5 mrad where beta is the tilt angle of the conical mirror from optimum position responsible for approximately 20% decline in laser power. The depth of focus d was approximately three times larger in case of conical resonator as compared to that of standard spherical unstable resonator under similar beam divergence and focusing conditions. PMID:20687708

  17. Time-resolved beam-quality characterization of copper-vapor lasers with unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Chang, J J

    1994-04-20

    Beam quality (BQ) of a 4-cm copper-vapor laser (CVL) with unstable resonators of different magnifications was characterized based on time-resolved far-field measurement. It was found that the BQ improvement after each round trip of the cavity cannot be predicted correctly from resonator theory. With a cavity Fresnel number of ~ 300, the achievable CVL BQ at the later part of the pulse was limited to approximately 4 times diffraction limited (×DL), even with a cavity magnification of 130. A pronounced temporal BQ oscillation, which is synchronized with the temporal pulse modulation, was also observed throughout the entire pulse. Examination of the temporal evolution of the far-field spot with use of a gated camera revealed that the strong presence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in the cavity during the entire laser pulse severely limited the achievable BQ because of consecutive cavity feedback that included this highly divergent ASE. BQ deterioration caused by intense ASE throughout the pulse was reduced when a cavity with a smaller Fresnel number was used. PMID:20885572

  18. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Kneisel, Peter; Cameiro, Tadeu

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  19. Continuous optical discharge in a laser cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivel', Yu. A.

    2016-08-01

    Optical discharge in a laser cavity is experimentally studied. A significant increase in the absorption of laser radiation (up to total absorption) is revealed. Optical schemes for initiation and maintaining of optical discharge in the cavity are proposed for technological applications of the optical discharge.

  20. Fast tuning of superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, M.; Wilson, C. M.; Persson, F.; Johansson, G.; Shumeiko, V.; Bauch, T.; Duty, T.; Delsing, P.

    2008-11-07

    Photons are fundamental excitations of electromagnetic fields and can be captured in cavities. For a given cavity with a certain size, the fundamental mode has a fixed frequency f which gives the photons a specific 'color'. The cavity also has a typical lifetime {tau}, which results in a finite linewidth {delta}f. If the size of the cavity is changed fast compared to {tau}, and so that the frequency change {delta}f>>{delta}f, then it is possible to change the 'color' of the captured photons. Here we demonstrate superconducting microwave cavities, with tunable effective lengths. The tuning is obtained by varying a Josephson inductance at one end of the cavity. We show data on four different samples and demonstrate tuning by several hundred linewidths in a time {delta}t<<{tau}. Working in the few photon limit, we show that photons stored in the cavity at one frequency will leak out from the cavity with the new frequency after the detuning. The characteristics of the measured devices make them suitable for different applications such as dynamic coupling of qubits and parametric amplification.

  1. Folded cavity design for a ruby resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arunkumar, K. A.; Trolinger, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A folded cavity laser resonator operating in the TEM(00) mode has been built and tested. The new oscillator configuration leads to an increase in efficiency and to better line narrowing due to the increased number of passes through the laser rod and tuning elements, respectively. The modification is shown to lead to cavity ruggedization.

  2. Developing of superconducting niobium cavities for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobol, I. L.; Yurevich, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of a study of structure and mechanical properties of welding joints, superconducting characteristics of the material after joining of welded components of superconducting radio frequency cavities are presented. The paper also describes the results of testing of the RF 1.3 GHz single-cell niobium cavity manufactured in the PTI NAS Belarus.

  3. Design of multilamp nonimaging laser pump cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    A technique has been developed to design single laser rod, multiple flash lamp pump cavities that allow all of the energy generated by the lamp to pass through the laser rod before entering another lamp cavity. The effective lamp and rod perimeters are matched, guaranteeing maximal concentration and uniformity of pumping.

  4. Mode suppression means for gyrotron cavities

    DOEpatents

    Chodorow, Marvin; Symons, Robert S.

    1983-08-09

    In a gyrotron electron tube of the gyro-klystron or gyro-monotron type, having a cavity supporting an electromagnetic mode with circular electric field, spurious resonances can occur in modes having noncircular electric field. These spurious resonances are damped and their frequencies shifted by a circular groove in the cavity parallel to the electric field.

  5. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  6. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  7. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate (CH2OH(CHOH)4COO)2Cu, CAS Reg... ingredient is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Copper gluconate...

  9. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate... practice. Copper gluconate may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of the...

  11. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate... practice. Copper gluconate may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of the...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate... practice. Copper gluconate may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of the...

  14. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  15. Metabolism and functions of copper in brain.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Mercer, Julian F B; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an important trace element that is required for essential enzymes. However, due to its redox activity, copper can also lead to the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cellular uptake, storage as well as export of copper have to be tightly regulated in order to guarantee sufficient copper supply for the synthesis of copper-containing enzymes but also to prevent copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, copper is of importance for normal development. In addition, both copper deficiency as well as excess of copper can seriously affect brain functions. Therefore, this organ possesses ample mechanisms to regulate its copper metabolism. In brain, astrocytes are considered as important regulators of copper homeostasis. Impairments of homeostatic mechanisms in brain copper metabolism have been associated with neurodegeneration in human disorders such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. This review article will summarize the biological functions of copper in the brain and will describe the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in copper transport, storage and export of brain cells. The role of copper in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis will also be discussed.

  16. TESLA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Simrock, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The digital control of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) resonator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity in DESY-Hamburg has been driven by the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system. This experiment focused attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the resonator is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The identification of the resonator parameters is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  17. Experimental study of turbulent axisymmetric cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Sung, H. J.

    1994-08-01

    An experimental study is made of turbulent axisymmetric cavity flow. The flow configuration consists of a sudden expansion and contraction pipe joint. In using the LDV system, in an effort to minimize refraction of laser beams at the curved interface, a refraction correction formula for the Reynolds shear stress is devised. Three values of the cavity length ( L = 300, 600 and 900 mm) are chosen, and the cavity height ( H) is fixed at 55 mm. Both open and closed cavities are considered. Special attention is given to the critical case L = 600 mm, where the cavity length L is nearly equal to the reattachment length of the flow. The Reynolds number, based on the inlet diameter ( D = 110 mm) is 73,000. Measurement data are presented for the static wall pressure, mean velocity profiles, vorticity thickness distributions, and turbulence quantities.

  18. Voltage control of cavity magnon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, S.; Yao, B. M.; Rao, J. W.; Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M.

    2016-07-01

    We have experimentally investigated the microwave transmission of the cavity-magnon-polariton (CMP) generated by integrating a low damping magnetic insulator onto a 2D microwave cavity. The high tunability of our planar cavity allows the cavity resonance frequency to be precisely controlled using a DC voltage. By appropriately tuning the voltage and magnetic bias, we can observe the cavity photon magnon coupling and the magnetic coupling between a magnetostatic mode and the generated CMP. The dispersion of the generated CMP was measured by either tuning the magnetic field or the applied voltage. This electrical control of CMP may open up avenues for designing advanced on-chip microwave devices that utilize light-matter interaction.

  19. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  20. Cavity cooling a single charged levitated nanosphere.

    PubMed

    Millen, J; Fonseca, P Z G; Mavrogordatos, T; Monteiro, T S; Barker, P F

    2015-03-27

    Optomechanical cavity cooling of levitated objects offers the possibility for laboratory investigation of the macroscopic quantum behavior of systems that are largely decoupled from their environment. However, experimental progress has been hindered by particle loss mechanisms, which have prevented levitation and cavity cooling in a vacuum. We overcome this problem with a new type of hybrid electro-optical trap formed from a Paul trap within a single-mode optical cavity. We demonstrate a factor of 100 cavity cooling of 400 nm diameter silica spheres trapped in vacuum. This paves the way for ground-state cooling in a smaller, higher finesse cavity, as we show that a novel feature of the hybrid trap is that the optomechanical cooling becomes actively driven by the Paul trap, even for singly charged nanospheres. PMID:25860743

  1. Large Grain Superconducting RF Cavities at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Brinkmann, A.; Ermakov, A.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Matheisen, A.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Singer, X.; Spiwek, M.; Wen, H.; Brokmeier, H. G.

    2007-08-09

    The DESY R and D program on cavities fabricated from large grain niobium explores the potential of this material for the production of approx. 1000 nine-cell cavities for the European XFEL. The program investigates basic material properties, comparing large grain material to standard sheet niobium, as well as fabrication and preparation aspects. Several single-cell cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated from large grain niobium. A gradient up to 41 MV/m at Q0 = 1.4{center_dot}1010 (TB = 2K) was measured after electropolishing. The first three large grain nine-cell cavities worldwide have been produced under contract of DESY with ACCEL Instruments Co. The first tests have shown that all three cavities reach an accelerating gradient up to 30 MV/m after BCP (Buffered Chemical Polishing) treatment, what exceeds the XFEL requirements for RF test in the vertical cryostat.

  2. Microphonics Measurements in SRF Cavities for RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, M.P.; Fuerst, Joel; Kedzie, M.; Sharamentov, S.I.; Shepard, Kenneth; Delayen, Jean

    2003-05-01

    Phase stabilization of the RIA drift tube cavities in the presence of microphonics will be a key issue for RIA. Due to the relatively low beam currents (lte 0.5 pmA) required for the RIA driver, microphonics will impact the rf power required to control the cavity fields. Microphonics measurements on the ANL Beta=0.4 single spoke cavity and on the ANL Beta=0.4 two-cell spoke cavity have been performed many at high fields and using a new "cavity resonance monitor" device developed in collaboration with JLAB. Tests on a cold two-cell spoke are the first ever on a multi-cell spoke geometry. The design is essentially a production model with an integral stainless steel housing to hold the liquid helium bath.

  3. Performance of 3-cell Seamless Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, Peter K.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Jelezov, I.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.

    2009-11-01

    In the last several months we have surface treated and cryogenically tested three TESLA-type 3-cell cavities, which had been manufactured at DESY as seamless assemblies by hydroforming. The cavities were completed at JLab with beam tube/flange assemblies. All three cavities performed very well after they had been post-purified with titanium at 1250C for 3 hrs. The cavities, two of which consisted of an end cell and 2 center cells and one was a center cell assembly, achieved gradients of Eacc = 32 MV/m, 34 MV/m and 35 MV/m without quenches. The performance was limited by the appearance of the “Q-drop” in the absence of field emission. This contribution reports about the various measurements undertaken with these cavities.

  4. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  5. Casimir forces of metallic microstructures into cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenanakis, George; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2015-08-01

    A theoretical estimate of the Casimir force of a metallic structure embedded into a cubic cavity is proposed. We demonstrate that by calculating the eigenmodes of the system we can determine the Casimir force, which can be either attractive or repulsive, by simply changing the geometry of the structures relative to the walls of the cavity. In this analysis, several cases of structures are taken into account, from rectangular slabs to chiral "omega" particles, and the predicted data are consistent with recent literature. We demonstrate that the sidewalls of the studied cavity contribute decisively to the repulsive Casimir force between the system and the nearby top surface of the cavity. Finally, we provide evidence that the medium embedded into the studied cavity (and especially its permittivity) can change the intensity of the Casimir force, while its repulsive nature, once established (owing to favorable geometrical features), remains quite robust.

  6. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  7. Aspergillosis complicating a microwave ablation cavity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Bandula, Steven; Brown, Jeremy; Whelan, Jeremy; Illing, Rowland

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient who following chemotherapy developed semi-invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and an aspergilloma in a lung cavity previously formed by microwave ablation (MWA). A 55-year-old woman presented with cough and shortness of breath after finishing three cycles of chemotherapy for a metastatic nerve sheath tumour. She had been treated by MWA for pulmonary metastases 2 years previously which resulted in a residual right apical lung cavity. Postchemotherapy imaging showed that this cavity had enlarged, developed a thicker wall and contained lobulated soft tissue with a crescent sign on coronal reformats. In addition, the patient's Aspergillus-specific IgG was markedly raised. Treatment with itraconazole improved the symptoms and reduced the cavity size and wall thickness. This case shows that persisting lung cavities after MWA are a potential site for semi-invasive aspergillosis and has implications for the timing of chemotherapy in patient with metastatic lung disease. PMID:27624446

  8. Design of 95 GHz gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid with water cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Borodin, Dmitri; Ben-Moshe, Roey; Einat, Moshe

    2014-07-15

    The design work for 2nd harmonic 95 GHz, 50 kW gyrotron based on continuous operation copper solenoid is presented. Thermionic magnetron injection gun specifications were calculated according to the linear trade off equation, and simulated with CST program. Numerical code is used for cavity design using the non-uniform string equation as well as particle motion in the “cold” cavity field. The mode TE02 with low Ohmic losses in the cavity walls was chosen as the operating mode. The Solenoid is designed to induce magnetic field of 1.8 T over a length of 40 mm in the interaction region with homogeneity of ±0.34%. The solenoid has six concentric cylindrical segments (and two correction segments) of copper foil windings separated by water channels for cooling. The predicted temperature in continuous operation is below 93 °C. The parameters of the design together with simulation results of the electromagnetic cavity field, magnetic field, electron trajectories, and thermal analyses are presented.

  9. Design of half-reentrant SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, M.; Grimm, T. L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-07-01

    The shape of a TeSLA inner cell can be improved to lower the peak surface magnetic field at the expense of a higher peak surface electric field by making the cell reentrant. Such a single-cell cavity was designed and tested at Cornell, setting a world record accelerating gradient [V. Shemelin et al., An optimized shape cavity for TESLA: concept and fabrication, 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, Travemünde, Germany, September 8-12, 2003; R. Geng, H. Padamsee, Reentrant cavity and first test result, Pushing the Limits of RF Superconductivity Workshop, Argonne National Laboratory, September 22-24, 2004]. However, the disadvantage to a cavity is that liquids become trapped in the reentrant portion when it is vertically hung during high pressure rinsing. While this was overcome for Cornell’s single-cell cavity by flipping it several times between high pressure rinse cycles, this may not be feasible for a multi-cell cavity. One solution to this problem is to make the cavity reentrant on only one side, leaving the opposite wall angle at six degrees for fluid drainage. This idea was first presented in 2004 [T.L. Grimm et al., IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 15(6) (2005) 2393]. Preliminary designs of two new half-reentrant (HR) inner cells have since been completed, one at a high cell-to-cell coupling of 2.1% (high- kcc HR) and the other at 1.5% (low- kcc HR). The parameters of a HR cavity are comparable to a fully reentrant cavity, with the added benefit that a HR cavity can be easily cleaned with current technology.

  10. Superconducting cavity tuner performance at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.; Preble, J.; Schneider, W.

    1993-06-01

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a 4 GeV, multipass CW electron beam is to be accelerated by 338 SRF, 5-cell niobium cavities operating at a resonant frequency of 1497 MHz. Eight cavities arranged as four pairs comprise a cyromodule, a croygenically isolated linac subdivision. The frequency is controlled by a mechanical tune attached to the first and fifth cell of the cavity which elastically deforms the cavity and thereby alters its resonant frequency. The tuner is driven by a stepper motor mounted external to the cryomodule that transfers torque through two rotary feedthroughs. A linear variable differential transducer (LVDT) mounted on the tuner monitors the displacement, and two limit switches interlock the movement beyond a 400 kHz bandwidth. Since the cavity has a loaded Q of 6.6 {center_dot} 10{sup 6}, the control system must maintain the frequency of the cavity to within {plus_minus} 50 Hz of the drive frequency for efficient coupling. This requirement is somewhat difficult to achieve since the difference in thermal contractions of the cavity and the tuner creates a frequency hystersis of approximately 10 kHz. The cavity is also subject to frequency shifts due to pressure fluctuations of the helium bath as well as radiation pressure. This requires that each cavity be characterized in terms of frequency change as a function of applied motor steps to allow proper tuning operations. This paper describes the electrical and mechanical performance of the cavity tuner during the commissioning and operation of the cryomodulus manufactured to date.

  11. Gaseous Refining of Anode Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Pradeep; Themelis, N. J.; Zanchuk, Walter A.

    1982-12-01

    The refining of blister copper prior to casting into anodes consists of oxidizing the copper melt to remove sulfur and then reducing its oxygen content. The age-old "wood poling" technique for deoxidation is gradually being replaced by the injection of reducing gases through one or two tuyeres. Thermodynamic and mass transfer analysis as well as laboratory tests have shown that the operating efficiency of gas injection can be improved considerably by enhancing mixing and gas-liquid mass transfer conditions within the copper bath. The injection of inert gas through porous plugs offers a viable industrial means for effecting such an improvement.

  12. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  13. Intercalation processes of copper complexes in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Cheatham, Thomas E.; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The family of anticancer complexes that include the transition metal copper known as Casiopeínas® shows promising results. Two of these complexes are currently in clinical trials. The interaction of these compounds with DNA has been observed experimentally and several hypotheses regarding the mechanism of action have been developed, and these include the generation of reactive oxygen species, phosphate hydrolysis and/or base-pair intercalation. To advance in the understanding on how these ligands interact with DNA, we present a molecular dynamics study of 21 Casiopeínas with a DNA dodecamer using 10 μs of simulation time for each compound. All the complexes were manually inserted into the minor groove as the starting point of the simulations. The binding energy of each complex and the observed representative type of interaction between the ligand and the DNA is reported. With this extended sampling time, we found that four of the compounds spontaneously flipped open a base pair and moved inside the resulting cavity and four compounds formed stacking interactions with the terminal base pairs. The complexes that formed the intercalation pocket led to more stable interactions. PMID:25958394

  14. Treatment Options for Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  15. Treatment Options by Stage (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer Screening Research Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Lip and Oral Cavity Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  17. Electromagnetic Casting of Copper Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, D. E.; Lewis, B. G.; Renschen, P. D.

    1985-09-01

    Electromagnetic (EMC) casting technology has been successfully developed for copper base alloys. This casting technique eliminates the mold related defects normally encountered in direct chill (DC) mold casting, and provides castings with greatly improved hot workability.

  18. Majorana Electroformed Copper Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overman, Nicole R.; Overman, Cory T.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2012-04-30

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize ultra high purity electroformed copper for a variety of detector components and shielding. A preliminary mechanical evaluation was performed on the Majorana prototype electroformed copper material. Several samples were removed from a variety of positions on the mandrel. Tensile testing, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and hardness testing were conducted to evaluate mechanical response. Analyses carried out on the Majorana prototype copper to this point show consistent mechanical response from a variety of test locations. Evaluation shows the copper meets or exceeds the design specifications.

  19. Lab Tracker and Copper Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bound (Free) Copper 5 - 15 µg/dl Membership Fees Please Choose A Membership Plan Below Basic $40 ... the household to be WDA members No registration fees for Annual Conference Banquet, up to four registrants ...

  20. Michelson-Morley with a Birefringent Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Francisco J.; Hohensee, Michael; Müller, Holger

    2012-06-01

    We report on the progress of a birefringent cavity test of the isotropy of the speed of light. Previous experimental tests have constrained anisotropies in the speed of light at the level of parts in 10^17 [1-2]. These experiments search for frame-dependent variations in the resonant frequencies of two orthogonally mounted optical cavities. Uncorrelated fluctuations in the cavity lengths are a significant challenge for such experiments. Our experiment uses a single dielectric-filled cavity, and measures the difference in the resonant frequency of two orthogonally polarized modes. Anisotropies in the speed of light will manifest as a frame-dependent strain on the dielectric [3-4], giving rise to a frame-dependent variation in the cavity birefringence. By making the length of each cavity mode identical, we expect that our experiment will be less sensitive to thermal cavity fluctuations. [4pt] [1] S. Herrmann, A. Senger, K. M"ohle, M. Nagel, E.V. Kovalchuk and A. Peters, PRD 80, 105011 (2009).[2] Ch. Eisel, A. Yu. Nevsky, and S. Schiller, PRL 103, 090401 (2009).[3] H. M"uller, PRD 71, 045004 (2005).[4] V.A. Kosteleck'y and M. Mewes, PRD 80, 015020 (2009).

  1. Optimized Multi-Ion Cavity Coupling.

    PubMed

    Begley, Stephen; Vogt, Markus; Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) are paving the way to utilize multiple quantum emitters confined in a single optical cavity. In such systems, it is crucially important to control the quantum mechanical coupling of individual emitters to the cavity mode. In this regard, combining ion trap technologies with CQED provides a particularly promising approach due to the well-established motional control over trapped ions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate coupling of up to five trapped ions in a string to a high-finesse optical cavity. By changing the axial position and spacing of the ions in a fully deterministic manner, we systematically characterize their coupling to the cavity mode through visibility measurements of the cavity emission. In good agreement with the theoretical model, the results demonstrate that the geometrical configuration of multiple trapped ions can be manipulated to obtain optimal cavity coupling. Our system presents a new ground for exploring CQED with multiple quantum emitters, enabled by the highly controllable collective light-matter interaction. PMID:27314716

  2. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; H. Kaiser; X. Singer; I. Gonin; I. Zhelezov; T. Khabibullin; P. Kneisel; K. Saito

    2000-07-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10{sup 10} at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n{Omega} after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 {micro}m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E{sub acc} {approx} 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 {micro}m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E{sub acc} {ge} 42 MV/m.

  3. Optimized Multi-Ion Cavity Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, Stephen; Vogt, Markus; Gulati, Gurpreet Kaur; Takahashi, Hiroki; Keller, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological advances in cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) are paving the way to utilize multiple quantum emitters confined in a single optical cavity. In such systems, it is crucially important to control the quantum mechanical coupling of individual emitters to the cavity mode. In this regard, combining ion trap technologies with CQED provides a particularly promising approach due to the well-established motional control over trapped ions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate coupling of up to five trapped ions in a string to a high-finesse optical cavity. By changing the axial position and spacing of the ions in a fully deterministic manner, we systematically characterize their coupling to the cavity mode through visibility measurements of the cavity emission. In good agreement with the theoretical model, the results demonstrate that the geometrical configuration of multiple trapped ions can be manipulated to obtain optimal cavity coupling. Our system presents a new ground for exploring CQED with multiple quantum emitters, enabled by the highly controllable collective light-matter interaction.

  4. Forward Modeling of a Coronal Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, T. A.; Gibson, S. E.; Schmit, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    We apply a forward model of emission from a coronal cavity in an effort to determine the temperature and density distribution in the cavity. Coronal cavities are long, low-density structures located over filament neutral lines and are often seen as dark elliptical features at the solar limb in white light, EUV and X-rays. When these structures erupt they form the cavity portions of CMEs The model consists of a coronal streamer model with a tunnel-like cavity with elliptical cross-section and a Gaussian variation of height along the tunnel length. Temperature and density can be varied as a function of altitude both in the cavity and streamer. We apply this model to a cavity observed in Aug. 2007 by a wide array of instruments including Hinode/EIS, STEREO/EUVI and SOHO/EIT. Studies such as these will ultimately help us understand the the original structures which erupt to become CMEs and ICMES, one of the prime Solar Orbiter objectives.

  5. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods, such as transient absorption spectroscopy and 2D-spectroscopy, are widely used across many disciplines. However, these techniques are typically restricted to optically thick samples, such as solids and liquid solutions. Using a frequency comb laser and optical cavities, we present a new technique for performing ultrafast optical spectroscopy with high sensitivity, enabling work in dilute gas-phase molecular beams. Resonantly enhancing the probe pulses, we demonstrate transient absorption measurements with a detection limit of ΔOD = 2 ×10-10 (1 ×10-9 /√{Hz}). Resonantly enhancing the pump pulses allows us to produce a high excitation fraction at high repetition-rate, so that signals can be recorded from samples with optical densities as low as OD 10-8 , or column densities < 1010 molecules/ cm2. To our knowledge, this represents a 5,000-fold improvement of the state-of-the-art. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1404296.

  6. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Brecht, T. Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  7. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, T.; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  8. Recent advances in copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guiyang; Singh, Ajay N; Oz, Orhan K; Sun, Xiankai

    2011-04-01

    Copper has five radioisotopes ((60)Cu, (61)Cu, (62)Cu, (64)Cu, and (67)Cu) that can be used in copper radiopharmaceuticals. These radioisotopes decay by mixed emissions of β+, β-, and γ with a wide range of half-lives from 9.74 min ((62)Cu) to 2.58 d ((67)Cu), which enable the design and synthesis of a variety of radiopharmaceuticals for different biomedical applications in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. However, due to the availability and production cost, the research efforts in copper radiopharmaceuticals are mainly focused on the use of (64)Cu (t(1/2) = 12.7 h; 17.4% β+, 43% EC, 39% β-), a radioisotope with low positron energy (E β+max = 0.656 MeV) that is ideal for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging quantification and β- emissions along with Auger electron for radiotherapy. Driven by the ever-increasing availability of preclinical and clinical PET scanners, a considerable interest has been seen in the development of novel copper radiopharmaceuticals in the past decade for a variety of diseases as represented by PET imaging of cancer. To avoid unnecessary literature redundancy, this review focuses on the unrepresented research aspects of copper chemistry (e.g. electrochemistry) and their uses in the evaluation of novel nuclear imaging probe design and recent advances in the field towards the practical use of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

  9. Dynamic behavior of microstructural copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatoly, Bragov; Andrey, Lomunov

    2005-07-01

    Microcrystalline (grain size ˜100nm) copper of technical purity (99.98%), obtained at intensive plastic deformation by the method of equichannel angular pressing and oxygen-free copper (purity 99.99%) are investigated. The structure of metal after such processing has a high level of internal stresses. As a result of large plastic deformations in a sample the set of defects located near to borders of grains was formed. These borders on structure differ from borders of grains in usual copper: structure of such borders friable and wide, instead of thin, as at macrocrystalline copper. The dynamic loading of samples at compression by the Kolsky method was made in two directions: lengthways and across a plane of sliding. Some samples were subjected to thermal processing (annealing), at various temperatures. The nonlinear dependences of dynamic yield strength on annealing temperature are received. The qualitative model for explaining a change of yield strength in copper of technical purity and oxygen-free copper depending on time and preliminary annealing temperature is constructed.

  10. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S.; Nekuda, Jennifer A.

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  11. Cavity-Controlled Chemistry in Molecular Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Felipe; Spano, Frank C.

    2016-06-01

    The demonstration of strong and ultrastrong coupling regimes of cavity QED with polyatomic molecules has opened new routes to control chemical dynamics at the nanoscale. We show that strong resonant coupling of a cavity field with an electronic transition can effectively decouple collective electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom in a disordered molecular ensemble, even for molecules with high-frequency quantum vibrational modes having strong electron-vibration interactions. This type of polaron decoupling can be used to control chemical reactions. We show that the rate of electron transfer reactions in a cavity can be orders of magnitude larger than in free space for a wide class of organic molecular species.

  12. Cavity-Assisted Spin Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chuanzhou; Dong, Lin; Pu, Han

    We consider a single ultracold atom trapped inside a single-mode optical cavity, where a two-photon Raman process induces an effective coupling between atom's pseudo-spin and external center-of-mass (COM) motion. Without the COM motion, this system is described by the Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model. We show how the atomic COM motion dramatically modifies the predictions based on the JC model. We also investigated the situation when cavity pumping and decay are taken into account. We take a quantum Master equation approach to study this open system and again show how the cavity-induced spin-orbit coupling affects the properties of the system.

  13. Atom-mirror entanglement via cavity dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lingchao; Hu, Xiangming; Rao, Shi; Xu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    We present a cavity dissipation scheme to prepare a hybrid system of an atomic ensemble and a moving mirror in squeezed and entangled states. This scheme is based on four-wave mixing in the atoms and radiation pressure on the mirror, both of which combine to lead to Bogoliubov interactions of the atoms and the mirror with the cavity fields. Under adiabatic conditions, the cavity fields cause the hybrid Bogoliubov modes to evolve into the vacuum states, which correspond to the two-mode squeezed and entangled states. The dependence of the hybrid entanglement on the system parameters is also presented in and beyond the Bogoliubov interactions.

  14. Multicolor quadripartite entanglement from an optomechanical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Huatang; Li Gaoxiang

    2011-08-15

    We investigate the generation of multicolor quadripartite entangled beams of light with continuous variables via optomechanical coupling in an optical cavity. It is found that the genuine quadripartite entanglement can be achieved among the Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands of two driven cavity fields. This entanglement still exists for the environment temperature up to about 50 K. We also show that the obtained genuine quadripartite entanglement actually results from concurrent four-wave-mixing processes in the system, which can, in principle, be generalized to obtain a genuine 2N-partite entangled state of light from a generic N-mode cavity optomechanical system.

  15. Dielectric detection by an electromagnetic cavity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherall, James C.; Beckley, Howard F.; Gatto, Joseph A.

    2004-09-01

    A method to screen for flammable and explosive materials in bottles by electromagnetic measurement is described. The technique makes use of an aluminum cavity having strong electromagnetic resonances in the radio wave band. An object inserted into the cavity changes the internal field configuration, and causes small, but measurable shifts in the resonant frequencies. The response depends on the electrical permittivity, or dielectric constant, of the material. By measuring the frequency change of many different cavity modes, the dielectric constant of the perturbing object can be inferred independently of the object's size and shape. We demonstrate the detection of materials in bottles using an experimental device.

  16. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis.

  17. Atomic hydrogen maser active oscillator cavity and bulb design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, H. E.; Washburn, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance characteristics and reliability of the active oscillator atomic hydrogen maser depend upon oscillation parameters which characterize the interaction region of the maser, the resonant cavity and atom storage bulb assembly. With particular attention to use of the cavity frequency switching servo (1) to reduce cavity pulling, it is important to maintain high oscillation level, high atomic beam flux utilization efficiency, small spin exchange parameter and high cavity quality factor. It is also desirable to have a small and rigid cavity and bulb structure and to minimize the cavity temperature sensitivity. Curves for a novel hydrogen maser cavity configuration which is partially loaded with a quartz dielectric cylinder and show the relationships between cavity length, cavity diameter, bulb size, dielectric thickness, cavity quality factor, filling factor and cavity frequency temperature coefficient are presented. The results are discussed in terms of improvement in maser performance resulting from particular design choices.

  18. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  19. BTA copper complexes.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Manfred; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Klapötke, Thomas M; Mayer, Peter; Weber, Birgit; Weigand, Jan J

    2005-10-31

    Cupric oxide is one of the most important additives used (a) to catalyze decomposition reactions in gas generators to obtain cooler reaction gases, (b) as burning enhancer for ammonium perchlorate-based composite propellants, and (c) as coloring agent in pyrotechnics. In this context, the reaction of Cu(2+) ions in aqueous ammonia solution with bis(tetrazolyl)amine (H(2)bta) was investigated. Depending on the reaction conditions three complexes were obtained: Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2) (1), Cu(bta)(NH(3))(2).H(2)O (2), and (NH(4))(2)Cu(bta)(2).2.5H(2)O (3). The crystal structures of 1 and 2 are discussed with respect to the coordination mode of the dianion of N,N-bis(1(2)H-tetrazol-5-yl)-amine (bta), which mediates in the case of 1 and 2 weak superexchange interactions between the adjacent magnetic transition-metal Cu(II) cations. These antiferromagnetic interactions result from 1D copper chains over an hidden azide end-to-end bridge. Interestingly, the structural arrangement of 1 completely changes in the presence of crystal-bound water. Moreover, some physicochemical properties (e.g., heat of formation, friction, and impact sensitivity, DSC) of these complexes with respect to high-energetic materials are discussed.

  20. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System.

    PubMed

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-13

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems. PMID:26613442

  1. Striped-double cavity fabry-perot interferometers using both glass and air cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, S; Steinmetz, L

    1998-07-08

    We have used piezo-driven Fabry-Perot interferometers in the past far many continuous velocity-time measurements of fast moving surfaces. In order to avoid the annoying drift of some of these devices, we have developed and used inexpensive, solid glass, striped etalons with lengths up to 64 mm. Usable apertures are 35 mm by 80 mm with a finess of 25. A roundabout technique was devised for double cavity operation. We built a passive thermal housing for temperature stability, with tilt and height adjustments. We have also developed and used our first fixed etalon air-spaced cavity with a rotatable glass double- cavity insert. The rotation allows the referee cavity fractional order to be adjusted separately from that of the main cavity. It needs very little thermal protection, and eliminates the need for a roundabout scheme for double cavity operation, but is more costly than the solid glass version I

  2. Through tubing progressing cavity pump

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, A.E.

    1986-06-03

    A method is described of installing a progressing cavity pump assembly within a well, the pump assembly being of the type having a stator, a helical rotor located in the stator and rotated by a string of sucker rods extending through tubing to the surface. The method consists of: securing a tubular seating member to a lower end of the tubing and lowering the tubing into the well; mounting a seating member on a lower end of the pump assembly; mounting a rotor nipple to the upper end of the stator and a drive rod to the upper end of the rotor, and providing the rotor nipple and drive rod with engaging means that allows a selected amount of vertical movement of the rotor with respect to the stator; connecting the upper end of the drive rod to the sucker rods; lowering the pump assembly into the tubing on the sucker rods until the seating member on the pump assembly contacts the tubular seating member; continuing to lower the sucker rods without rotation, moving the rotor downward with respect to the stator and forcing the seating members together with the weight of the sucker rods applied to the stator through the engaging means; then moving the sucker rods and the rotor a selected distance upward while the stator remains stationary to position the top of the rotor above the stator a selected distance; then connecting the sucker rods at the surface to a rotary power source and rotating the sucker rods to cause the pump to operate.

  3. Plasma Treatment of Niobium SRF Cavity Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    J. Upadhyay, M. Raskovic, L. Vuskovic, S. Popovic, A.-M. Valente-Feliciano, L. Phillips

    2010-05-01

    Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate non- superconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region of the SRF cavity surface and to remove mechanically damaged surface layer improving surface roughness. We have demonstrated on flat samples that plasma etching in Ar / Cl2 of bulk Nb is a viable alternative surface preparation technique to BCP and EP methods, with comparable etching rates. The geometry of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb defines the use of asymmetric RF discharge configuration for plasma etching. In a specially designed single cell cavity with sample holders, discharge parameters are combined with etched surface diagnostics to obtain optimum combination of etching rates, roughness and homogeneity in a variety of discharge types, conditions, and sequences. The optimized experimental conditions will ultimately be applied to single cell SRF cavities.

  4. Selected computations of transonic cavity flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An efficient diagonal scheme implemented in an overset mesh framework has permitted the analysis of geometrically complex cavity flows via the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Use of rapid hyperbolic and algebraic grid methods has allowed simple specification of critical turbulent regions with an algebraic turbulence model. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results are made in two dimensions for the following problems: a backward-facing step; a resonating cavity; and two quieted cavity configurations. In three-dimensions the flow about three early concepts of the stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) are compared to wind-tunnel data. Shedding frequencies of resolved shear layer structures are compared against experiment for the quieted cavities. The results demonstrate the progress of computational assessment of configuration safety and performance.

  5. Cavity induced perfect absorption in metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luu Dang, Hong; Nguyen, Hoang Tung; Dung Nguyen, Van; Bui, Son Tung; Tuyen Le, Dac; Ngo, Quang Minh; Vu, Dinh Lam

    2016-03-01

    We present novel resonant modes at the THz regime in a structure combining conventional metamaterial absorber (MA) with a cavity (MAC). The well-known structure consisting of three individual layers of periodic metallic dishes on the top, a dielectric layer in the middle, and a metallic film in the bottom is used, and the cavity is formed on the top layer by changing the geometry of the metallic dishes. MACs with various cavity parameters are designed and their absorption characteristics, such as magnetic field distribution, surface current, and power loss density at resonant frequencies of the designed structure, are numerically investigated. Resonant effects in this work may find applications in THz tunable and broadband MA, and our investigation on the dependence of the absorption frequency and absorption intensity on the geometric cavity of the designed structure will provide a general guideline for MAC design.

  6. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  7. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, Richard N.; Martin, Juergen; Paldus, Barbara A.

    1998-01-01

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available.

  8. Deflecting light into resonant cavities for spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Zare, R.N.; Martin, J.; Paldus, B.A.

    1998-09-29

    Light is coupled into a cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) resonant cavity using an acousto-optic modulator. The AOM allows in-coupling efficiencies in excess of 40%, which is two to three orders of magnitude higher than in conventional systems using a cavity mirror for in-coupling. The AOM shutoff time is shorter than the roundtrip time of the cavity. The higher light intensities lead to a reduction in shot noise, and allow the use of relatively insensitive but fast-responding detectors such as photovoltaic detectors. Other deflection devices such as electro-optic modulators or elements used in conventional Q-switching may be used instead of the AOM. The method is particularly useful in the mid-infrared, far-infrared, and ultraviolet wavelength ranges, for which moderately reflecting input mirrors are not widely available. 5 figs.

  9. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A cavity structure having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  10. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  11. Analysis and control of cavity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourta, A.; Vitale, E.

    2008-07-01

    A flow above a cavity leads to an unsteady separated flow. This configuration exhibits an intense aeroacoustic coupling, where very intense aerodynamic noise can be emitted. Moreover, a majority of tangential flow above a cavity has an oscillatory character, resulting from a strong coupling between the acoustic and the flow dynamics. In the present work, we are interested in characterizing the dynamics and the frequency distribution of a cavity flow. First, the dynamics of the cavity are analyzed and the frequency distribution is established, which is followed by a study of nonlinear interaction. An open loop control using a synthetic jet is then applied in order to reduce noise generation. Finally, by choosing suitable jet parameters a significant noise reduction is obtained.

  12. Stability of proteins inside a hydrophobic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that enclosing a protein in an athermal cavity stabilizes the protein against reversible unfolding by virtue of eliminating many open chain conformations. Examples of such confined spaces include pores in chromatographic columns, Anfinsen's cage in Chaperonins, interiors of Ribosomes or regions of steric occlusion inside cells. However, the situation is more complex inside a hydrophobic cavity. The protein has a tendency to adsorb on the surface of the hydrophobic cavity, but at the same time it loses conformational entropy because of confinement. We study this system using a simple Hydrophobic Polar (HP) lattice protein model. Canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations at different temperatures and surface hydrophobicity show that proteins are stabilized at low and moderate hydrophobicity upon adsorption. The range of surface hydrophobicity over which a protein is stable increases with a decrease in radius of the cavity.

  13. Thermodynamic cycle in a cavity optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ian, Hou

    2014-07-01

    A cavity optomechanical system is initiated by the radiation pressure of a cavity field onto a mirror element acting as a quantum resonator. This radiation pressure can control the thermodynamic character of the mirror to some extent, such as by cooling its effective temperature. Here, we show that by properly engineering the spectral density of a thermal heat bath that interacts with a quantum system, the evolution of the quantum system can be effectively turned on and off. Inside a cavity optomechanical system, when the heat bath is realized by a multi-mode oscillator modelling of the mirror, this on-off effect translates to infusion or extraction of heat energy in and out of the cavity field, facilitating a four-stroke thermodynamic cycle.

  14. Progressive cavity pump for downhole inflatable packer

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J.A.

    1992-03-24

    This patent describes a downhole inflatable packer pump. It comprises: case means for attaching to a lower testing string portion and having an inlet and an outlet, the outlet being communicable with an inflatable packer at a location below the pump; mandrel means, rotatably disposed within the case means, for connecting to an upper testing string portion for mutual rotation therewith and rotating within the case means; an elastomeric pump stator disposed in the case means, the stator having a convoluted inner surface; a rotor extending form the mandrel means and into the stator, the rotor having a convoluted outer surface, the stator and rotor defining a plurality of cavities therebetween, whereby rotation of the rotor within the stator moves fluid progressively from cavity to cavity and thereby from the inlet to the outlet; passageway means for providing fluid communication between the lower testing string portion and the upper testing string portion, the passageway means being sealing separated from the cavities.

  15. Constant field gradient planar cavity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    A cavity structure is described having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  16. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  17. Interference and Chaos in Metamaterials Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchinitser, Natalia; Jose, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    Optical metamaterials are engineered artificial nanostructures that possess optical properties not available in nature. As metamaterials research continues to mature, their practical applications as well as fundamental questions on wave propagation in these materials attract significant interest. In this talk we focus on wave propagation and interference in chaotic wave cavities with negative or near-zero index of refraction and in double-slit configurations. In this context, we explicitly consider an incomplete two-dimensional D-cavity previously studied, which shows chaotic ray propagation together with scars. We have addressed the question as to how that type of wave propagation is modified by adding metamaterials in these chaotic cavities. We find that the wave interference patterns show significant qualitatively and quantitative changes depending on the effective parameters of the cavity, illumination conditions (planes waves versus beams), and geometry of the system. We will discuss possible experimental setups where these results may be validated.

  18. Mechanically and thermally stable maser cavity resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.; Hoffman, T. E.; Levine, M. W.

    1972-01-01

    New type cavity resonator is designed for hydrogen maser. Resonator consists of three pieces of glass-ceramic material having extremely low thermal coefficient of expansion and provides very stable mechanical tuning.

  19. Photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Quiring, W.; Al-Hmoud, M.; Reuter, D.; Zrenner, A.; Rai, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-07-27

    We report about the fabrication and analysis of high Q photonic crystal cavities with metallic Schottky-contacts. The structures are based on GaAs n-i membranes with an InGaAs quantum well in the i-region and nanostructured low ohmic metal top-gates. They are designed for photocurrent readout within the cavity and fast electric manipulations. The cavity structures are characterized by photoluminescence and photocurrent spectroscopy under resonant excitation. We find strong cavity resonances in the photocurrent spectra and surprisingly high Q-factors up to 6500. Temperature dependent photocurrent measurements in the region between 4.5 K and 310 K show an exponential enhancement of the photocurrent signal and an external quantum efficiency up to 0.26.

  20. Indicators for microbiologically induced corrosion of copper pipes in a cold-water plumbing system.

    PubMed

    Arens, P; Tuschewitzki, G J; Wollmann, M; Follner, H; Jacobi, H

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion damage in the copper cold-water plumbing system of a large building was investigated. An unusual combination of corrosion patterns was found on the inner copper pipe surfaces that were in contact with water. Damage was in the form of shallow cavities, a surface cover or pinprick-like pits. The corrosion system was influenced by thermal treatment and also by cefoxitin dosing. The latter fact in particular is a clear indication of microbiological involvement in this corrosive action. Different parameters, to be measured in standing water (24-h stagnation), are considered typical for this type of corrosion: the detection of Sphingomonas spec. and other species in whose cell wall regions copper can accumulate, a copper content of more than 2 mg/l, oxygen consumption of more than 4 mg/l and an increase in pH. With the help of these indicators, it is possible to recognize microbiologically induced corrosion in copper plumbing systems before pipe perforation occur. PMID:7727024

  1. Effect of Cavity QED on Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rfifi, Saad; Siyouri, Fatimazahra

    2016-06-01

    We use a quantum electrodynamics model, to study the evolution of maximally entangled bipartite states (Bell states), as well as a maximally entangled tripartite states as a multipartite system. Furthermore, we study the entanglement behaviour of these output states in cavity QED as function of interaction time and the coupling strength. The present study discusses the separability and the entanglement limit of such states after interaction with a cavity QED.

  2. Exploration of very high gradient cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory

    2011-07-01

    Several of the 9-cell ILC cavities processed at Jlab within ongoing ILC R&D program have shown interesting behavior at high fields, such as mode mixing and sudden field emission turn-on during quench. Equipped with thermometry and oscillating superleak transducer (OST) system for quench detection, we couple our RF measurements with local dissipation measurements. In this contribution we report on our findings with high gradient SRF cavities.

  3. Beam Dynamics in the Cebaf Superconducting Cavities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zenghai

    1995-01-01

    This work is a study of beam dynamics in the CEBAF superconducting cavities under the influence of the fields generated by externally applied RF and beam particles. A full 3-D modeling of the CEBAF 5-cell superconducting cavity is carried out. Details of the modeling with MAFIA are discussed. Multipole fields due to the asymmetric couplers are studied by means of 3-D Fourier transforms. The cavity steering and focusing of the multipole fields are studied. Experimental measurements of these effects are performed to validate the modeling. Evaluation of the cavity misalignment is discussed. The emittance degradation effects in the CEBAF superconducting linacs and an FEL driver linac due to the head-tail effects of the cavity steering and the x - y coupling effects of the multipole fields are studied. The beam-cavity interactions for cases of v _{s}, v_{t} not= c are studied. The Lindman boundary condition is implemented to accommodate simulation of infinite long beam pipes of the beam line. A fourth-order finite-difference algorithm is derived in cylindrical coordinates to reduce the frequency dependent truncation errors, which were discovered in the process of calculating wake fields of very short bunches, of the second-order Yee algorithm. The effects of the slippage between the source particle and the test particle are considered in the wake function calculations. Radial scaling relations are obtained for calculating the wake functions on the axis from the integrated value at the beam pipe radius. The scaling found not only depends on the beam energy but also depends on the bunch length of the beam and the opening of the cavity. The conditions for the validity of the ultrarelativistic treatment of the wakefield are discussed. The emittance growth and the energy spread due to the combined effects of the cavity multipole fields and the wakefields in a 40 MeV IR FEL driver linac are studied.

  4. Space shuttle cavity assessment test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheps, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    In order to obtain basic radiation properties of the radiator/payload bay door cavity, three tests were conducted on a full-size structural simulator of the cavity. There were three tests conducted: (1) CATA used for determination of exchange factors, absorbed solar flux, and door covering influences, (2) quartz lamp array calibrated to provide IR flux distribution on CATA, and (3) retest with radiometer array for background flux measurement.

  5. Extra-cavity feedback into unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Corkum, P B; Baldis, H A

    1979-05-01

    Unstable resonators constructed of totally reflecting optics are particularly sensitive to extra-cavity feedback. This is demonstrated experimentally by reflecting the attenuated output of an injection mode-locked TEA CO(2) laser, fitted with a confocal unstable resonator, back into the laser resonator. Even after attenuation by ~10(6), significant perturbation ( greater, similar10%) could be observed in the temporal characteristics of the output train. A theory of extra-cavity feedback in the geometric limit is presented. PMID:20212847

  6. Development of spoke cavities for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.; Kelly, M. P.; Fuerst, J.; Kedzie, M.; Conway, Z. A.; Physics

    2006-07-15

    This paper reports the development status of 345 MHz, 4 cm beam aperture, three-spoke-loaded, TEM-class superconducting cavities for particle velocities 0.4 < v/c < 0.8. Two prototype cavities have been operated cw at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 10 MV/m. Results of cold tests, including mechanical properties and microphonic behavior, are presented.

  7. Effect of Cavity QED on Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rfifi, Saad; Siyouri, Fatimazahra

    2016-11-01

    We use a quantum electrodynamics model, to study the evolution of maximally entangled bipartite states (Bell states), as well as a maximally entangled tripartite states as a multipartite system. Furthermore, we study the entanglement behaviour of these output states in cavity QED as function of interaction time and the coupling strength. The present study discusses the separability and the entanglement limit of such states after interaction with a cavity QED.

  8. The comet Halley diamagnetic cavity boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Lindgren, C. J.; Puhl, P.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetometer onboard the Giotto spacecraft observed a diamagnetic cavity surrounding the nucleus of comet Halley. A narrow transition layer with enhanced plasma density is formed at this shock-like boundary as a flux of cometary ions flowing into it from within the cavity is removed by electron-ion recombination. We examine the structure of this layer using both a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical model and a one- dimensional hybrid code.

  9. Teleporting entanglements of cavity-field states

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, Geisa; Baseia, B.; Almeida, N.G. de; Avelar, A. T.

    2004-08-01

    We present a scheme to teleport an entanglement of zero- and one-photon states from one cavity to another. The scheme, which has 100% success probability, relies on two perfect and identical bimodal cavities, a collection of two kinds of two-level atoms, a three-level atom in a ladder configuration driven by a classical field, Ramsey zones, and selective atomic-state detectors.

  10. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  11. New Developments on PBG RF Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Yu, D.

    2004-12-01

    Performance and design features of metal PBG and rod-loaded cavities for single-beam and multi-beam acceleration and rf power generation devices are considered. Fundamental differences of the performance between single-defect and multi-defect structures are identified. Rod-loaded cavity designs are considered for a 6-beam klystron. Preliminary design of the X-band MBK demonstrates feasibility of generating high power with high efficiency in a very compact construction.

  12. [Myoepithelioma of nasal cavity: a case report].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Tu, Xiang; Jiang, Hongqun

    2015-03-01

    Myoepithelioma is an uncommon benign tumor that most likely occurs in the salivary gland. Extra-salivary myoepithelioma are sporadic and rare, especially the quantities occur in the sinonasal cavity are fewer in related literature reported. In this paper, we present a rare case of benign myoepithelioma that occurred in the nasal cavity, and the related process of pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are discussed.

  13. Cavity quantum electrodynamics on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Sadgrove, Mark; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. By using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  14. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.; Davis, John W.

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  15. Regulated copper uptake in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in response to copper availability.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K L; Hassett, R; Kosman, D; Merchant, S

    1996-01-01

    A saturable and temperature-dependent copper uptake pathway has been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The uptake system has a high affinity for copper ions (Km approximately 0.2 microM) and is more active in cells that are adapted to copper deficiency than to cells grown in a medium containing physiological (submicromolar to micromolar) copper ion concentrations. The maximum velocity of copper uptake by copper-deficient cells (169 pmol h-1 10(6) cells-1 or 62 ng min-1 mg-1 chlorophyll) is up to 20-fold greater than that of fully copper-supplemented cells, and the Km (approximately 2 x 10(2) nM) is unaffected. Thus, the same uptake system appears to operate in both copper-replete and copper-deficient cells, but its expression or activity must be induced under copper-deficient conditions. A cupric reductase activity is also increased in copper-deficient compared with copper-sufficient cells. The physiological characteristics of the regulation of this cupric reductase are compatible with its involvement in the uptake pathway. Despite the operation of the uptake pathway under both copper-replete and copper-deficient conditions, C. reinhardtii cells maintained in fully copper-supplemented cells do not accumulate copper in excess of their metabolic need. These results provide evidence for a homeostatic mechanism for copper metabolism in C. reinhardtii. PMID:8883382

  16. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  17. Transient Microphonic Effects In Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Powers; G. Davis; Lawrence King

    2005-07-10

    A number of experiments were performed on an installed and operational 5-cell CEBAF cavity to determine the minimum time required to reestablish stable gradient after a cavity window arc trip. Once it was determined that gradient could be reestablished within 10 ms by applying constant power RF signal in and a voltage controlled Oscillator-phase locked loop based system (VCO-PLL), a second experiment was performed to determine if stable gradient could be reestablished using a fixed frequency RF system with a simple gradient based closed loop control system. During this test, instabilities were observed in the cavity forward power signal, which were determined to be microphonic in nature. These microphonic effects were quantified using a cavity resonance monitor and a VCO{_}PLL RF system. Two types of microphonic effects were observed depending on the type of arc event. If the arc occurred in the vacuum space between the warm and cold windows, the transient frequency shift was about 75 Hz peak-to-peak. If the arc occurred on the cavity side of the cold window the transient frequency shift was about 400 Hz peak-to-peak. The background microphonics level for the tested cavity was approximately 30 Hz peak-to-peak. Experimental results, analysis of the resultant klystron power transients, the decay time of the transients, and the implications with respect to fast reset algorithms will be presented.

  18. Frequency doubled, cavity dumped feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Jr., Donald L. (Inventor); Robinson, Deborah L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Higher efficiency in cavity dumping and frequency doubling in a laser used to produce modulated output beam pulses is achieved by deflecting light out of the resonant cavity to a third mirror through a frequency doubler using an electro-optic modulator and a polarizing beamsplitter in the resonant cavity, or using just an acousto-optic modulator to deflect light out of the laser cavity in response to a control signal (electric or acoustic). The frequency doubler in front of the third mirror rotates the frequency doubled light so that it will pass out of the laser cavity through the polarizing beamsplitter, while undoubled frequency light is reflected by the polarizing beamsplitter back into the gain medium of the laser. In the case of using a type-II frequency doubler, a dichroic beamsplitter deflects out the frequency doubled light and passes the undoubled frequency light to the polarizing beamsplitter for return to the laser gain medium. If an acousto-optic modulator is used, it deflects light out of the primary laser cavity, so a polarizing beamsplitter is not needed, and only a dichroic beamsplitter is needed to separate frequency doubled light out of the path from the third mirror.

  19. Scaled experiments of explosions in cavities

    DOE PAGES

    Grun, J.; Cranch, G. A.; Lunsford, R.; Compton, S.; Walton, O. R.; Weaver, J.; Dunlop, W.; Fournier, K. B.

    2016-05-11

    Consequences of an explosion inside an air-filled cavity under the earth's surface are partly duplicated in a laboratory experiment on spatial scales 1000 smaller. The experiment measures shock pressures coupled into a block of material by an explosion inside a gas-filled cavity therein. The explosion is generated by suddenly heating a thin foil that is located near the cavity center with a short laser pulse, which turns the foil into expanding plasma, most of whose energy drives a blast wave in the cavity gas. Variables in the experiment are the cavity radius and explosion energy. Measurements and GEODYN code simulationsmore » show that shock pressuresmeasured in the block exhibit a weak dependence on scaled cavity radius up to ~25 m/kt1/3, above which they decrease rapidly. Possible mechanisms giving rise to this behavior are described. As a result, the applicability of this work to validating codes used to simulate full-scale cavityexplosions is discussed.« less

  20. Laser plasma interactions in fused silica cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Mao, Samuel S.; Yoo, Jong H.; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2003-06-24

    The effect of laser energy on formation of a plasma inside a cavity was investigated. The temperature and electron number density of laser-induced plasmas in a fused silica cavity were determined using spectroscopic methods, and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. Plasma temperature and electron number density during laser ablation in a cavity with aspect ratio of 4 increased faster with irradiance after the laser irradiance reached a threshold of 5 GW/cm{sup 2}. The threshold irradiance of particulate ejection was lower for laser ablation in a cavity compared with on a flat surface; the greater the cavity aspect ratio, the lower the threshold irradiance. The ionization of silicon becomes saturated and the crater depths were increased approximately by an order of magnitude after the irradiance reached the threshold. Phase explosion was discussed to explain the large change of both plasma characteristics and mass removal when irradiance increased beyond a threshold value. Self-focusing of the laser beam was discussed to be responsible for the decrease of the threshold in cavities.

  1. Vector cavity solitons in broad area Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Averlant, Etienne; Tlidi, Mustapha; Thienpont, Hugo; Ackemann, Thorsten; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of two-dimensional vector cavity solitons in a Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) under linearly polarized optical injection when varying optical injection linear polarization direction. The polarization of the cavity soliton is not the one of the optical injection as it acquires a distinct ellipticity. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by the spin-flip VCSEL model. Our findings open the road to polarization multiplexing when using cavity solitons in broad-area lasers as pixels in information technology. PMID:26847004

  2. Effect of copper co-crystallized with sugar on caries development in desalivated rats.

    PubMed

    Rosalen, P L; Bowen, W H; Pearson, S K

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the effects of varying levels of copper incorporated in sucrose by co-crystallization on caries development in the desalivated rat model and to examine the retention of copper in the oral cavity and its influence on protein and carbohydrate composition of plaque. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were infected by Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 and desalivated when aged 26 days. Four groups were placed in a König-Höfer programmed feeder and received 17 meals daily at hourly intervals, and essential nutrition (NCP No. 2) by gavage twice daily. The control group (1) received meals of plain sucrose, and groups 2, 3, and 4 received sucrose co-crystallized with 300 ppm Cu2+(2), 150 Cu2+(3), and 75 Cu2+(4). After 3 weeks, the animals were killed, and blood was collected for determination of copper. The lower jaw was removed and sonicated in 0.9% saline solution. Microbial assessment and copper, protein and carbohydrate assays were performed for each animal. Smooth-surface and [sulcal] caries scores were: (1) 92.0[41.4]; (2) 6.1[34.2]; (3) 16.7[32.0]; (4) 24.0[36.0]. Copper in sucrose drastically affected the population of S. sobrinus when compared with the control. Also, Cu2+ sucrose groups had significantly more copper per unit of protein and carbohydrate in jaw suspension than the control group. Concentration of copper in the blood was apparently unaffected by any dietary regimen. It is concluded that Cu2+ in a range of concentrations (75-300 ppm Cu2+) when delivered co-crystallized with sucrose is an effective cariostatic agent. The co-crystallization of a cariostatic agent with sucrose may be an effective method to decrease the cariogenic potential of sucrose.

  3. Dosimetric response of variable-size cavities in photon-irradiated media and the behaviour of the Spencer-Attix cavity integral with increasing Δ.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-04-01

    Cavity theory is fundamental to understanding and predicting dosimeter response. Conventional cavity theories have been shown to be consistent with one another by deriving the electron (+positron) and photon fluence spectra with the FLURZnrc user-code (EGSnrc Monte-Carlo system) in large volumes under quasi-CPE for photon beams of 1 MeV and 10 MeV in three materials (water, aluminium and copper) and then using these fluence spectra to evaluate and then inter-compare the Bragg-Gray, Spencer-Attix and 'large photon' 'cavity integrals'. The behaviour of the 'Spencer-Attix dose' (aka restricted cema), D S-A(▵), in a 1-MeV photon field in water has been investigated for a wide range of values of the cavity-size parameter ▵: D S-A(▵) decreases far below the Monte-Carlo dose (D MC) for ▵ greater than  ≈  30 keV due to secondary electrons with starting energies below ▵ not being 'counted'. We show that for a quasi-scatter-free geometry (D S-A(▵)/D MC) is closely equal to the proportion of energy transferred to Compton electrons with initial (kinetic) energies above ▵, derived from the Klein-Nishina (K-N) differential cross section. (D S-A(▵)/D MC) can be used to estimate the maximum size of a detector behaving as a Bragg-Gray cavity in a photon-irradiated medium as a function of photon-beam quality (under quasi CPE) e.g. a typical air-filled ion chamber is 'Bragg-Gray' at (monoenergetic) beam energies  ⩾260 keV. Finally, by varying the density of a silicon cavity (of 2.26 mm diameter and 2.0 mm thickness) in water, the response of different cavity 'sizes' was simulated; the Monte-Carlo-derived ratio D w/D Si for 6 MV and 15 MV photons varied from very close to the Spencer-Attix value at 'gas' densities, agreed well with Burlin cavity theory as ρ increased, and approached large photon behaviour for ρ  ≈  10 g cm(-3). The estimate of ▵ for the Si cavity was improved by incorporating a Monte-Carlo-derived correction for

  4. Dosimetric response of variable-size cavities in photon-irradiated media and the behaviour of the Spencer-Attix cavity integral with increasing Δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2016-04-01

    Cavity theory is fundamental to understanding and predicting dosimeter response. Conventional cavity theories have been shown to be consistent with one another by deriving the electron (+positron) and photon fluence spectra with the FLURZnrc user-code (EGSnrc Monte-Carlo system) in large volumes under quasi-CPE for photon beams of 1 MeV and 10 MeV in three materials (water, aluminium and copper) and then using these fluence spectra to evaluate and then inter-compare the Bragg-Gray, Spencer-Attix and ‘large photon’ ‘cavity integrals’. The behaviour of the ‘Spencer-Attix dose’ (aka restricted cema), D S-A(▵), in a 1-MeV photon field in water has been investigated for a wide range of values of the cavity-size parameter ▵: D S-A(▵) decreases far below the Monte-Carlo dose (D MC) for ▵ greater than  ≈  30 keV due to secondary electrons with starting energies below ▵ not being ‘counted’. We show that for a quasi-scatter-free geometry (D S-A(▵)/D MC) is closely equal to the proportion of energy transferred to Compton electrons with initial (kinetic) energies above ▵, derived from the Klein-Nishina (K-N) differential cross section. (D S-A(▵)/D MC) can be used to estimate the maximum size of a detector behaving as a Bragg-Gray cavity in a photon-irradiated medium as a function of photon-beam quality (under quasi CPE) e.g. a typical air-filled ion chamber is ‘Bragg-Gray’ at (monoenergetic) beam energies  ⩾260 keV. Finally, by varying the density of a silicon cavity (of 2.26 mm diameter and 2.0 mm thickness) in water, the response of different cavity ‘sizes’ was simulated; the Monte-Carlo-derived ratio D w/D Si for 6 MV and 15 MV photons varied from very close to the Spencer-Attix value at ‘gas’ densities, agreed well with Burlin cavity theory as ρ increased, and approached large photon behaviour for ρ  ≈  10 g cm-3. The estimate of ▵ for the Si cavity was improved by incorporating a Monte

  5. Compound parabolic concentrator with cavity for tubular absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1983-01-01

    A compond parabolic concentrator with a V-shaped cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity redirects all energy entering between the receiver and the cavity structure onto the receiver, if the optical receiver is emplaced a distance from the cavity not greater than 0.27 r (where r is the radius of the receiver).

  6. Teleportation of a Weak Coherent Cavity Field State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Wesley B.; Qiang, Wen-Chao; Avelar, Ardiley T.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we propose a scheme to teleport a weak coherent cavity field state. The scheme relies on the resonant atom-field interaction inside a high-Q cavity. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is assumed much smaller than one, hence the field decay inside the cavity can be effectively suppressed.

  7. Cavity polaritons in an organic single-crystalline rubrene microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchimoto, Yuta; Nagai, Hikaru; Amano, Masamitsu; Bando, Kazuki; Kondo, Hisao

    2014-06-01

    We fabricated a single-crystalline rubrene microcavity using a simple solution technique and observed cavity polaritons in the microcavity at room temperature (RT). Large Rabi splitting energies were obtained from dispersion of the cavity polaritons. Furthermore, photoluminescence from the cavity polaritons was observed at RT. The findings will be of importance for the application of cavity polaritons.

  8. Mode coupling and cavity-quantum-dot interactions in a fiber-coupled microdisk cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Kartik; Painter, Oskar

    2007-02-15

    A quantum master equation model for the interaction between a two-level system and whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) of a microdisk cavity is presented, with specific attention paid to current experiments involving a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) embedded in a fiber-coupled Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As microdisk cavity. In standard single mode cavity QED, three important rates characterize the system: the QD-cavity coupling rate g, the cavity decay rate {kappa}, and the QD dephasing rate {gamma}{sub (perpendicular)}. A more accurate model of the microdisk cavity includes two additional features. The first is a second cavity mode that can couple to the QD, which for an ideal microdisk corresponds to a traveling wave WGM propagating counter to the first WGM. The second feature is a coupling between these two traveling wave WGMs, at a rate {beta}, due to backscattering caused by surface roughness that is present in fabricated devices. We consider the transmitted and reflected signals from the cavity for different parameter regimes of {l_brace}g,{beta},{kappa},{gamma}{sub (perpendicular)}{r_brace}. A result of this analysis is that even in the presence of negligible roughness-induced backscattering, a strongly coupled QD mediates coupling between the traveling wave WGMs, resulting in an enhanced effective coherent coupling rate g={radical}(2)g{sub 0} corresponding to that of a standing wave WGM with an electric field maximum at the position of the QD. In addition, analysis of the second-order correlation function of the reflected signal from the cavity indicates that regions of strong photon antibunching or bunching may be present depending upon the strength of coupling of the QD to each of the cavity modes. Such intensity correlation information will likely be valuable in interpreting experimental measurements of a strongly coupled QD to a bimodal WGM cavity.

  9. Efficient Characterization of Protein Cavities within Molecular Simulation Trajectories: trj_cavity.

    PubMed

    Paramo, Teresa; East, Alexandra; Garzón, Diana; Ulmschneider, Martin B; Bond, Peter J

    2014-05-13

    Protein cavities and tunnels are critical in determining phenomena such as ligand binding, molecular transport, and enzyme catalysis. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable the exploration of the flexibility and conformational plasticity of protein cavities, extending the information available from static experimental structures relevant to, for example, drug design. Here, we present a new tool (trj_cavity) implemented within the GROMACS ( www.gromacs.org ) framework for the rapid identification and characterization of cavities detected within MD trajectories. trj_cavity is optimized for usability and computational efficiency and is applicable to the time-dependent analysis of any cavity topology, and optional specialized descriptors can be used to characterize, for example, protein channels. Its novel grid-based algorithm performs an efficient neighbor search whose calculation time is linear with system size, and a comparison of performance with other widely used cavity analysis programs reveals an orders-of-magnitude improvement in the computational cost. To demonstrate its potential for revealing novel mechanistic insights, trj_cavity has been used to analyze long-time scale simulation trajectories for three diverse protein cavity systems. This has helped to reveal, respectively, the lipid binding mechanism in the deep hydrophobic cavity of a soluble mite-allergen protein, Der p 2; a means for shuttling carbohydrates between the surface-exposed substrate-binding and catalytic pockets of a multidomain, membrane-proximal pullulanase, PulA; and the structural basis for selectivity in the transmembrane pore of a voltage-gated sodium channel (NavMs), embedded within a lipid bilayer environment. trj_cavity is available for download under an open-source license ( http://sourceforge.net/projects/trjcavity ). A simplified, GROMACS-independent version may also be compiled. PMID:26580540

  10. Superconducting drift-tube cavity development for the RIA driver.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.; Kelly, M. P.; Fuerst, J. D.

    2002-09-23

    This paper reports the design and development of two intermediate-velocity superconducting cavities and design of an associated cryomodule for the RIA driver linac. The two cavity types are a 115 MHz, {beta}{sub GEOM} = 0.15 quarter-wave resonant (QWR) cavity, and a 173 MHz, {beta}{sub GEOM} = 0.26 half-wave loaded cavity. Both cavities are well-corrected for dipole and quadrupole asymmetries in the accelerating field. The cryomodule is being designed to incorporate a separate vacuum system for cavity vacuum to provide a particulate-free environment for the superconducting cavities.

  11. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  12. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  13. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, J B; Myers, B M; Kost, L J; Kuntz, S M; LaRusso, N F

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload. Images PMID:2910913

  14. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload.

  15. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  19. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance...

  20. The link between copper and Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Purchase, Rupert

    2013-01-01

    Wilson's disease (hepatolenticular degeneration) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism leading to copper accumulation in the liver and extrahepatic organs such as the brain and cornea. Patients may present with combinations of hepatic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms. Copper is the therapeutic target for the treatment of Wilson's disease. But how did copper come to be linked with Wilson's disease? The answer encompasses a study of enzootic neonatal ataxia in lambs in the 1930s, the copper-chelating properties of British Anti-Lewisite, and the chemical analysis for copper of the organs of deceased Wilson's disease patients in the mid-to-late 1940s. Wilson's disease is one of a number of copper-related disorders where loss of copper homeostasis as a result of genetic, nutritional or environmental factors affects human health.

  1. Plasma dynamic synthesis of ultradispersed copper oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanenkova, Yu; Sivkov, A.; Saygash, A.; Shanenkov, I.

    2015-10-01

    Copper oxide is necessary material for production of superconductors. The issue of obtaining high purity and nanosides CuO is actual. This article shows the results on the obtaining of nanodispersed copper oxide by plasma dynamic method in system based on coaxial magneto plasma accelerator with copper electrodes. Such analyses of ultradispersed synthesized products as X-Ray diffractometry, IR-spectroscopy and thermal analysis were carried out. According to XRD such phases as copper Cu, copper oxide (I) Cu2O, copper oxide (II) CuO, and copper hydroxide hydrate Cu(OH)2·H2O were identified in the product. It was found that with the gradual heating of the initial product up to 800 °C the phase content changed dramatically in terms of enhancing copper oxide phase (up to 97%).

  2. Thermotransport in liquid aluminum-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A thermotransport study was made on a series of liquid aluminum-copper alloys which contained from trace amounts to 33 weight percent copper. The samples in the form of narrow capillaries were held in known temperature gradient of thermotransport apparatus until the stationary state was reached. The samples were analyzed for the concentration of copper along the length. Copper was observed to migrate to the colder regions in all the samples. The heat of transport, Q*, was determined for each composition from a plot of concentration of copper versus reciprocal absolute temperature. The value of Q* is the highest at trace amounts of copper (4850 cal/gm-atom), but decreases with increasing concentration of copper and levels off to 2550 cal/gm-atom at about 25 weight percent copper. The results are explained on the basis of electron-solute interaction and a gas model of diffusion.

  3. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host.

  4. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  5. Leaching of Copper Ore by Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John; Biaha, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative laboratory exercise based upon the procedures copper manufacturers employ to increase copper production is described. The role of chemoautotrophic microorganisms in biogeologic process is emphasized. Safety considerations when working with bacteria are included. (KR)

  6. Boron-deoxidized copper withstands brazing temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, E. H.

    1966-01-01

    Boron-deoxidized high-conductivity copper is used for fabrication of heat transfer components that are brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere. This copper has high strength and ductility at elevated temperatures and does not exhibit massive intergranular failure.

  7. Placental copper transport in the brindled mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Garnica, A.; Bates, J.

    1986-03-01

    Pregnant brindled (brin) mice were injected at 16 or 19 days gestation with 2 doses of CuCl/sub 2/ 6 mcg/g/dose, separated by 12 h, and sacrificed 6 h after the second. The copper conc. in placenta (P) and kidneys (K) of uninjected (UI) brin mice were higher than in UI controls, while conc. in liver (L) and fetal carcass (F) were lower. After injection (I), placental copper conc. increased while the carcass conc. remained unchanged. Brin mouse is a model for the human inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes syndrome, which is characterized by signs of copper deficiency. These data indicate that metabolism of copper in brin fetus is abnormal, but depressed fetal copper levels cannot be corrected by acute copper dosing because of the sequestration of copper in placenta.

  8. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder obtained from chlorophyll...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder obtained from chlorophyll...

  10. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder obtained from chlorophyll...

  11. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder obtained from chlorophyll...

  12. Copper and Anesthesia: Clinical Relevance and Management of Copper Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Adrian; Dameron, Charles T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has implicated abnormal copper homeostasis in the underlying pathophysiology of several clinically important disorders, some of which may be encountered by the anesthetist in daily clinical practice. The purpose of this narrative review is to summarize the physiology and pharmacology of copper, the clinical implications of abnormal copper metabolism, and the subsequent influence of altered copper homeostasis on anesthetic management. PMID:23762044

  13. 21 CFR 73.2125 - Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin... § 73.2125 Potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin shall conform in identity...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The color additive potassium sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder obtained from chlorophyll...

  15. Tensile behavior of nanocrystalline copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Eastman, J.A. |

    1995-11-01

    High density nanocrystalline copper produced by inert gas condensation was tested in tension. Displacements were measured using foil strain gauges, which greatly improved the accuracy of the strain data. The Young`s modulus of nanocrystalline copper was found to be consistent with that of coarse-grained copper. Total elongations of {approx} 1% were observed in samples with grain sizes less than 50 nm, while a sample with a grain size of 110 nm exhibited more than 10% elongation, perhaps signifying a change to a dislocation-based deformation mechanism in the larger-grained material. In addition, tensile tests were performed as a function of strain rate, with a possible trend of decreased strength and increased elongation as the strain rate was decreased.

  16. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, Michael; Ermak, Oleg; Saar, Amir; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits.

  17. Monitoring copper in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Walshe, J M

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring copper metabolism in patients with Wilson's disease is not an exact science. At present, there are no simple methods of estimating the total body load of this metal. Indirect methods must therefore be used. A survey of the current literature shows that most approaches rely on the determination of blood and urine copper concentration. Both these should decrease with treatment. In parallel with decreased copper concentration, there should be subsequent improvement in more routine laboratory tests including liver and renal function, blood count parameters, and clotting factors. Lack of compliance is revealed by a reversal of this trend. This chapter critically reviews current testing methods and describes other approaches that may be helpful.

  18. Superconducting cavity material for the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Brinkmann, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Navitski, A.; Tamashevich, Y.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of the strategy for superconducting cavity material procurement and quality management is done on the basis of the experience with the cavity production for the European x-ray free electron laser (EXFEL) facility. An adjustment of the material specification to EXFEL requirements, procurement of material, quality control (QC), documentation, and shipment to cavity producers have been worked out and carried out by DESY. A multistep process of qualification of the material suppliers included detailed material testing, single- and nine-cell cavity fabrication, and cryogenic radiofrequency tests. Production of about 25 000 semi-finished parts of high purity niobium and niobium-titanium alloy in a period of three years has been divided finally between companies Heraeus, Tokyo Denkai, Ningxia OTIC, and PLANSEE. Consideration of large-grain (LG) material as a possible option for the EXFEL has resulted in the production of one cryogenic module consisting of seven (out of eight) LG cavities. LG materials fulfilled the EXFEL requirements and showed even 25% to 30% higher unloaded quality factor. A possible shortage of the required quantity of LG material on the market led, however, to the choice of conventional fine-grain (FG) material. Eddy-current scanning (ECS) has been applied as an additional QC tool for the niobium sheets and contributed significantly to the material qualification and sorting. Two percent of the sheets have been rejected, which potentially could affect up to one-third of the cavities. The main imperfections and defects in the rejected sheets have been analyzed. Samples containing foreign material inclusions have been extracted from the sheets and electrochemically polished. Some inclusions remained even after 150 μm surface layer removal. Indications of foreign material inclusions have been found in the industrially fabricated and treated cavities and a deeper analysis of the defects has been performed.

  19. DIAGNOSING THE PROMINENCE-CAVITY CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, Donald J.; Gibson, Sarah

    2013-06-10

    Prominences and cavities are ubiquitously observed together, but the physical link between these disparate structures has not been established. We address this issue by using dynamic emission in the extreme ultraviolet to probe the connections of these structures. The SDO/AIA observations show that the cavity exhibits excessive emission variability compared to the surrounding quiet-Sun streamer, particularly in the 171 A bandpass. We find that this dynamic emission takes the form of coherent loop-like brightening structures which emanate from the prominence into the central cavity. The geometry of these structures, dubbed prominence horns, generally mimics the curvature of the cavity boundary. We use a space-time statistical analysis of two cavities in multiple AIA bandpasses to constrain the energetic properties of 45 horns. In general, we find there is a positive correlation between the light curves of the horns in the 171 A and 193 A bandpasses; however, the 193 A emission is a factor of five weaker. There is also a strong correlation between structural changes to the prominence as viewed in the He II 304 A bandpass and the enhanced 171 A emission. In that bandpass, the prominence appears to extend several megameters along the 171 A horn where we observe co-spatial, co-temporal 304 A and 171 A emission dynamics. We present these observations as evidence of the magnetic and energetic connection between the prominence and the cavity. Further modeling work is necessary to explain the physical source and consequences of these events, particularly in the context of the traditional paradigm: the cavity is underdense because it supplies mass to the overdense prominence.

  20. Copper bioavailability and fractionation in copper-contaminated sandy soils in the wet subtropics (southern Brazil).

    PubMed

    Mirlean, Nicolai; Baisch, Paulo; Medeanic, Svetlana

    2009-03-01

    We studied the distribution, bioavailability and speciation of copper in subtropical sandy soils exposed to long-term applications of copper-based fungicide. In the surface horizon of the contaminated soils, bioavailable copper surpasses the toxic threshold for plants up to several times. Mobile fractions of copper predominate in top layers, contributing to contamination spreading downward to groundwater. Copper accumulates on the underlying iron hydroxide barrier in quantities comparable to total copper concentrations in the surface horizon. Despite the impediment of the geochemical barrier, most applied copper reaches the aquifer, contaminating the groundwater.

  1. Novel methods of copper vapor laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    McColl, W.B.; Ching, H.; Bosch, R.; Brake, M.; Gilgenbach, R.

    1990-12-31

    Microwave and intense electron beam excitation of copper vapor are being investigated to be used in copper vapor lasers for isotope separation. Both methods use copper chloride vapor by heating copper chloride. Helium was used as the buffer gas at 2 to 100 torr. In the microwave system, intense copperlines at 510 nm and 578 nm were observed. Initial electron beam results indicate that light emission follows the beam current.

  2. Measurements of Conversion Efficiency for a Flat Plate Thermophotovoltaic System Using a Photonic Cavity Test System

    SciTech Connect

    E.J. Brown; C.T. Ballinger; S.R. Burger; G.W. Charache; L.R. Danielson; D.M. DePoy; T.J. Donovan; M. LoCascio

    2000-05-30

    The performance of a 1 cm{sup 2} thermophotovoltaic (TPV) module was recently measured in a photonic cavity test system. A conversion efficiency of 11.7% was measured at a radiator temperature of 1076 C and a module temperature of 29.9 C. This experiment achieved the highest direct measurement of efficiency for an integrated TPV system. Efficiency was calculated from the ratio of the peak (load matched) electrical power output and the heat absorption rate. Measurements of these two parameters were made simultaneously to assure the validity of the measured efficiency value. This test was conducted in a photonic cavity which mimicked a typical flat-plate TPV system. The radiator was a large, flat graphite surface. The module was affixed to the top of a copper pedestal for heat absorption measurements. The heat absorption rate was proportional to the axial temperature gradient in the pedestal under steady-state conditions. The test was run in a vacuum to eliminate conductive and convective heat transfer mechanisms. The photonic cavity provides the optimal test environment for TPV efficiency measurements because it incorporates all important physical phenomena found in an integrated TPV system: high radiator emissivity and blackbody spectral shape, photon recycling, Lambertian distribution of incident radiation and complex geometric effects. Furthermore, the large aspect ratio between radiating surface area and radiator/module spacing produces a view factor approaching unity with minimal photon leakage.

  3. Cavity control system: optimization methods for single cavity driving and envelope detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.; Simrock, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The paper is an introduction to the optimization methods of the linear accelerator cavity control system. Three distinct time periods of cavity operation are considered; filling with the EM field energy, field stabilization, and field decay. These periods represent completely different states and behavior of the cavity. The cavity could be operated by several different methods in each work phase: During the filling -- feedback and feed-forward alone, feedback and feed-forward together, self-tuning; During the flattop -- feed-forward and feedback alone or together, During the decay -- detuning and quality factor may be measured. The optimization is understood as a choice of the most efficient way of the cavity control during each period. The control may be done in terms of minimum power consumption from the klystron during whole work cycle and efficient field stabilization in the cavity, during flattop period. The introductory analysis of the cavity operational modes in three mentioned periods is presented in this paper. Additionally the alternative more precise algorithm of the cavity voltage envelope detection is proposed.

  4. Spin-cavity interactions between a quantum dot molecule and a photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Vora, Patrick M; Bracker, Allan S; Carter, Samuel G; Sweeney, Timothy M; Kim, Mijin; Kim, Chul Soo; Yang, Lily; Brereton, Peter G; Economou, Sophia E; Gammon, Daniel

    2015-07-17

    The integration of InAs/GaAs quantum dots into nanophotonic cavities has led to impressive demonstrations of cavity quantum electrodynamics. However, these demonstrations are primarily based on two-level excitonic systems. Efforts to couple long-lived quantum dot electron spin states with a cavity are only now succeeding. Here we report a two-spin-cavity system, achieved by embedding an InAs quantum dot molecule within a photonic crystal cavity. With this system we obtain a spin singlet-triplet Λ-system where the ground-state spin splitting exceeds the cavity linewidth by an order of magnitude. This allows us to observe cavity-stimulated Raman emission that is highly spin-selective. Moreover, we demonstrate the first cases of cavity-enhanced optical nonlinearities in a solid-state Λ-system. This provides an all-optical, local method to control the spin exchange splitting. Incorporation of a highly engineerable quantum dot molecule into the photonic crystal architecture advances prospects for a quantum network.

  5. Spin-cavity interactions between a quantum dot molecule and a photonic crystal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Patrick M.; Bracker, Allan S.; Carter, Samuel G.; Sweeney, Timothy M.; Kim, Mijin; Kim, Chul Soo; Yang, Lily; Brereton, Peter G.; Economou, Sophia E.; Gammon, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The integration of InAs/GaAs quantum dots into nanophotonic cavities has led to impressive demonstrations of cavity quantum electrodynamics. However, these demonstrations are primarily based on two-level excitonic systems. Efforts to couple long-lived quantum dot electron spin states with a cavity are only now succeeding. Here we report a two-spin-cavity system, achieved by embedding an InAs quantum dot molecule within a photonic crystal cavity. With this system we obtain a spin singlet-triplet Λ-system where the ground-state spin splitting exceeds the cavity linewidth by an order of magnitude. This allows us to observe cavity-stimulated Raman emission that is highly spin-selective. Moreover, we demonstrate the first cases of cavity-enhanced optical nonlinearities in a solid-state Λ-system. This provides an all-optical, local method to control the spin exchange splitting. Incorporation of a highly engineerable quantum dot molecule into the photonic crystal architecture advances prospects for a quantum network.

  6. Spin-cavity interactions between a quantum dot molecule and a photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Vora, Patrick M; Bracker, Allan S; Carter, Samuel G; Sweeney, Timothy M; Kim, Mijin; Kim, Chul Soo; Yang, Lily; Brereton, Peter G; Economou, Sophia E; Gammon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The integration of InAs/GaAs quantum dots into nanophotonic cavities has led to impressive demonstrations of cavity quantum electrodynamics. However, these demonstrations are primarily based on two-level excitonic systems. Efforts to couple long-lived quantum dot electron spin states with a cavity are only now succeeding. Here we report a two-spin-cavity system, achieved by embedding an InAs quantum dot molecule within a photonic crystal cavity. With this system we obtain a spin singlet-triplet Λ-system where the ground-state spin splitting exceeds the cavity linewidth by an order of magnitude. This allows us to observe cavity-stimulated Raman emission that is highly spin-selective. Moreover, we demonstrate the first cases of cavity-enhanced optical nonlinearities in a solid-state Λ-system. This provides an all-optical, local method to control the spin exchange splitting. Incorporation of a highly engineerable quantum dot molecule into the photonic crystal architecture advances prospects for a quantum network. PMID:26184654

  7. Spin–cavity interactions between a quantum dot molecule and a photonic crystal cavity

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Patrick M.; Bracker, Allan S.; Carter, Samuel G.; Sweeney, Timothy M.; Kim, Mijin; Kim, Chul Soo; Yang, Lily; Brereton, Peter G.; Economou, Sophia E.; Gammon, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The integration of InAs/GaAs quantum dots into nanophotonic cavities has led to impressive demonstrations of cavity quantum electrodynamics. However, these demonstrations are primarily based on two-level excitonic systems. Efforts to couple long-lived quantum dot electron spin states with a cavity are only now succeeding. Here we report a two-spin–cavity system, achieved by embedding an InAs quantum dot molecule within a photonic crystal cavity. With this system we obtain a spin singlet–triplet Λ-system where the ground-state spin splitting exceeds the cavity linewidth by an order of magnitude. This allows us to observe cavity-stimulated Raman emission that is highly spin-selective. Moreover, we demonstrate the first cases of cavity-enhanced optical nonlinearities in a solid-state Λ-system. This provides an all-optical, local method to control the spin exchange splitting. Incorporation of a highly engineerable quantum dot molecule into the photonic crystal architecture advances prospects for a quantum network. PMID:26184654

  8. THE EVOLUTION OF SYNTHETICALLY PRECIPITATED COPPER SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to explore the effect of water quality, particularly chloride and sulfate, on copper mineral formation. Copper-sulfate and chloride compounds are often found on the surface of copper pipes in drinking water distribution systems. When attempting to ...

  9. Copper accumulation in the crayfish (Orconectes rusticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the crayfish, O. rusticus could fulfill Nehring's (1976) criteria for a good biological monitor of heavy metal pollution. Since there is some evidence that the cupric ion is the most toxic form of aqueous copper, crayfish-accumulated copper was compared to both total and cupric copper in the culture water.

  10. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  11. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  12. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  13. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  14. Copper toxicity in aquaculture: A practical approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copper sulfate is used as a therapeutant for various applications in aquaculture. There is a great deal of information on the toxicity of copper, especially in low-alkalinity waters; however, much of this information is fragmented, and a comprehensive guide of copper toxicity and safe concentration...

  15. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  16. Suspect copper toxicity in an alpaca.

    PubMed Central

    Carmalt, J L; Baptiste, K E; Blakley, B

    2001-01-01

    An alpaca presented in lateral recumbency and subsequently died. On necropsy examination the liver showed severe, widespread, periacinar hepatocellular necrosis, staining positive to a rhodamine stain for copper. Hepatic copper concentration was elevated. Copper toxicity in the camelid is difficult to diagnose, since the classical hemolytic crisis is not observed. PMID:11467185

  17. Joining of alumina via copper/niobium/copper interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Robert A.; Chapman, Daniel R.; Danielson, David T.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-03-15

    Alumina has been joined at 1150 degrees C and 1400 degrees C using multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayers. Four-point bend strengths are sensitive to processing temperature, bonding pressure, and furnace environment (ambient oxygen partial pressure). Under optimum conditions, joints with reproducibly high room temperature strengths (approximately equal 240 plus/minus 20 MPa) can be produced; most failures occur within the ceramic. Joints made with sapphire show that during bonding an initially continuous copper film undergoes a morphological instability, resulting in the formation of isolated copper-rich droplets/particles at the sapphire/interlayer interface, and extensive regions of direct bonding between sapphire and niobium. For optimized alumina bonds, bend tests at 800 degrees C-1100 degrees C indicate significant strength is retained; even at the highest test temperature, ceramic failure is observed. Post-bonding anneals at 1000 degrees C in vacuum or in gettered argon were used to assess joint stability and to probe the effect of ambient oxygen partial pressure on joint characteristics. Annealing in vacuum for up to 200 h causes no significant decrease in room temperature bend strength or change in fracture path. With increasing anneal time in a lower oxygen partial pressure environment, the fracture strength decreases only slightly, but the fracture path shifts from the ceramic to the interface.

  18. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2016-07-12

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  19. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2009-06-09

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  20. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  1. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  2. Relationship between soil copper content and copper content of selected crop plants in central Chile.

    PubMed

    Badilla-Ohlbaum, R; Ginocchio, R; Rodríguez, P H; Céspedes, A; González, S; Allen, H E; Lagos, G E

    2001-12-01

    A survey of copper levels in agricultural soils of central Chile revealed two soil clusters-one with a mean copper level of 162 mg/kg and one with a mean copper level of 751 mg/kg of soil. Samples of soils from both soil clusters were characterized on the basis of physicochemical characteristics, and copper extractability was compared by saturation and CaCl2 extraction as well as an acid-leaching procedure (TCLP). We also measured the copper content of various tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and onion (Allium cepa) crops growing on these soils. Other than copper levels, soils from the two clusters were quite similar, with slightly greater levels of molybdenum and cadmium in the high-copper soils. Within each cluster, extracted copper levels and total soil copper levels were not correlated. However, the three extraction procedures solubilized significantly more copper from the high-Cu soils. Mineralogical characterization of the soil particles and depth profiles of soil metal levels in a subsample of sites suggested that highly insoluble copper ore and mining wastes might account for the high copper levels. Neither total nor extractable copper levels allowed statistical prediction of the levels of copper in plant tissue. The edible tissues of both crops had the same mean copper content, regardless of the copper soil level. However, copper contents of stems and leaves were significantly higher for plants growing on the high-Cu soils. These results show that in these soils, high copper levels are associated with very insoluble copper species and thus low bioavailability of copper to crop plants. PMID:11764158

  3. ADMX Microwave Cavity R&D Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Ian; ADMX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), a direct-detection axion search, has begun taking data with a redesigned system. Earlier phases conducted axion searches in the mass range of 1.9-3.5 μeV (460-850 MHz) setting upper limits below the theoretical KSVZ coupling strength of the axion to two photons. The current upgrades will allow ADMX to detect axions with even the most pessimistic (DFSZ) couplings in this frequency range. In order to expand the mass reach of the detector, ADMX is conducting extensive research and development of microwave cavities. Prototype development programs include photonic band-gaps, multi-vane cavities, partitioned cavities, in-phase coupled cavities, and superconducting hybrid cavities. Additional studies include techniques for mode detection and mode-crossing suppression, and strategic planning. The various projects are in different phases of analysis, fabrication, and/or testing. The current status and near term objectives will be presented. Supported by DOE Grants DE-SC0010280, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF Grant 1067242, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  4. A spherical cavity model for quadrupolar dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Iglika M.; Slavchov, Radomir I.; Ivanov, Tzanko; Mosbach, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The dielectric properties of a fluid composed of molecules possessing both dipole and quadrupole moments are studied based on a model of the Onsager type (molecule in the centre of a spherical cavity). The dielectric permittivity ɛ and the macroscopic quadrupole polarizability αQ of the fluid are related to the basic molecular characteristics (molecular dipole, polarizability, quadrupole, quadrupolarizability). The effect of αQ is to increase the reaction field, to bring forth reaction field gradient, to decrease the cavity field, and to bring forth cavity field gradient. The effects from the quadrupole terms are significant in the case of small cavity size in a non-polar liquid. The quadrupoles in the medium are shown to have a small but measurable effect on the dielectric permittivity of several liquids (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, CO2, CS2, C6H6, H2O, CH3OH). The theory is used to calculate the macroscopic quadrupolarizabilities of these fluids as functions of pressure and temperature. The cavity radii are also determined for these liquids, and it is shown that they are functions of density only. This extension of Onsager's theory will be important for non-polar solutions (fuel, crude oil, liquid CO2), especially at increased pressures.

  5. Unifying Brillouin scattering and cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Laer, Raphaël; Baets, Roel; Van Thourhout, Dries

    2016-05-01

    So far, Brillouin scattering and cavity optomechanics have been mostly disconnected branches of research, although both deal with photon-phonon coupling. This begs for the development of a broader theory that contains both fields. Here, we derive the dynamics of optomechanical cavities from that of Brillouin-active waveguides. This explicit transition elucidates the link between phenomena such as Brillouin amplification and electromagnetically induced transparency. It proves that effects familiar from cavity optomechanics all have traveling-wave partners, but not vice versa. We reveal a close connection between two parameters of central importance in these fields: the Brillouin gain coefficient and the zero-point optomechanical coupling rate. This enables comparisons between systems as diverse as ultracold atom clouds, plasmonic Raman cavities, and nanoscale silicon waveguides. In addition, back-of-the-envelope calculations show that unobserved effects, such as photon-assisted amplification of traveling phonons, are now accessible in existing systems. Finally, we formulate both circuit- and cavity-oriented optomechanics in terms of vacuum coupling rates, cooperativities, and gain coefficients, thus reflecting the similarities in the underlying physics.

  6. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  7. The copYAZ Operon Functions in Copper Efflux, Biofilm Formation, Genetic Transformation, and Stress Tolerance in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Lévesque, Céline M.

    2015-01-01

    CopYAZ system in copper export and have further expanded knowledge on the importance of copper homeostasis and the CopYAZ system in modulating streptococcal physiology, including stress tolerance, membrane potential, genetic competence, and biofilm formation. IMPORTANCE S. mutans is best known for its role in the initiation and progression of human dental caries, one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. S. mutans is also implicated in bacterial endocarditis, a life-threatening inflammation of the heart valve. The core virulence factors of S. mutans include its ability to produce and sustain acidic conditions and to form a polysaccharide-encased biofilm that provides protection against environmental insults. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of copper and/or deletion of copYAZ (the copper homeostasis system) have serious implications in modulating biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and genetic transformation in S. mutans. Manipulating the pathways affected by copper and the copYAZ system may help to develop potential therapeutics to prevent S. mutans infection in and beyond the oral cavity. PMID:26013484

  8. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  9. Nitrogen doping study in ingot niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Makita, Junki

    2015-09-01

    Thermal diffusion of nitrogen in niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities at temperature ~800 °C has resulted in the increase in quality factor with a low-field Q-rise extending to Bp > 90 mT. However, the maximum accelerating gradient of these doped cavities often deteriorates below the values achieved by standard treatments prior to doping. Here, we present the results of the measurements on ingot niobium cavities doped with nitrogen at 800 °C. The rf measurements were carried out after the successive electropolishing to remove small amount of material from the inner surface layer. The result showed higher breakdown field with lower quality factor as material removal increases.

  10. When can the magnetosphere support cavity modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, Michael; Welling, Daniel; Moldwin, Mark; Ridley, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere supports several types of Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves; these include trapped fast mode waves often referred to as cavity modes, waveguide modes, and tunneling modes/virtual resonance. All trapped fast mode waves require a stable outer boundary to sustain wave activity. The magnetopause, often treated as the outer boundary for cavity/waveguide modes in the dayside magnetosphere, is often not stable, particularly during geomagnetic storms. We examine how magnetopause motion affects the magnetosphere's ability to sustain trapped fast mode waves on the dayside using idealized simulations obtained from the BATSRUS global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. We present the first observations of cavity modes in BATSRUS, replicating results from other global MHD codes. We further show how varying solar wind conditions - in particular, increasing density and dynamic pressure fluctuations - affect magnetopause motion and, in turn, trapped fast mode waves.

  11. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Proslier, Th.; Ha, Y.; Zasadzinski, J.; Ciovati, G.; Kneissel, P.; Reece, C.; Rimmer, R.; Gurevich, A.; Cooley, L.; Wu, G.; Pellin, M.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: (1) results from ALD coated cavities and coupons, (2) new evidence from point contact tunneling (PCT) showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, (3) a study of high pressure rinsing damage on niobium samples.

  12. Atoms and cavities: Explorations of quantum entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimond, J. M.; Hagley, E.; Maitre, X.; Nogues, G.; Wunderlich, C.; Brune, M.; Haroche, S.

    1999-06-11

    The interaction of circular Rydberg atoms with a high-quality microwave cavity makes it possible to realize complex quantum state manipulations. The state of an atom can be 'copied' onto the cavity. Reversing this operation at a later time with a second atom, we realize an elementary 'quantum memory' holding an atomic quantum coherence for a while in a cavity mode. We have also generated two-atom entangled states of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen type. At variance with previous experiments, this one implies massive particles in a completely controlled process. These entanglement manipulations can be generalized to more complex or to mesoscopic systems and open the way to new tests of fundamental aspects of the quantum world.

  13. Hybrid Microwave-Cavity Heat Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergenfeldt, Christian; Samuelsson, Peter; Sothmann, Björn; Flindt, Christian; Büttiker, Markus

    2014-02-01

    We propose and analyze the use of hybrid microwave cavities as quantum heat engines. A possible realization consists of two macroscopically separated quantum-dot conductors coupled capacitively to the fundamental mode of a microwave cavity. We demonstrate that an electrical current can be induced in one conductor through cavity-mediated processes by heating up the other conductor. The heat engine can reach Carnot efficiency with optimal conversion of heat to work. When the system delivers the maximum power, the efficiency can be a large fraction of the Carnot efficiency. The heat engine functions even with moderate electronic relaxation and dephasing in the quantum dots. We provide detailed estimates for the electrical current and output power using realistic parameters.

  14. Cavity gas pressure measurements on DIAMOND FORTUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.; Breeze, S.P.

    1993-10-01

    Five measurements were made of the gas pressure in the cavity as a function of time on the DIAMOND FORTUNE event. The measurements were obtained with a fast and slow blowdown technique; an additional transducer on the cavity side of the explosive valve provided valuable data. Data from three of the five transducers are nearly coincident data from the other two show temperature-related shifts. The timeframe of the credible measurements extends from 0.1 second to four hours. The pressure at two seconds was 2,100 kPa (300 Psi). On the logarithmic time scale this level decays monotonically to 210 kPa (30 Psi) at 1,000 seconds. During the next decade of time the cavity pressure approached atmospheric pressure. Over the initial few seconds the measured amplitude is close to the S-Cubed prediction; with increased time the measured pressure decays at a faster rate.

  15. Cavity-Enhanced Transport of Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schachenmayer, Johannes; Genes, Claudiu; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2015-05-01

    We show that exciton-type transport in certain materials can be dramatically modified by their inclusion in an optical cavity: the modification of the electromagnetic vacuum mode structure introduced by the cavity leads to transport via delocalized polariton modes rather than through tunneling processes in the material itself. This can help overcome exponential suppression of transmission properties as a function of the system size in the case of disorder and other imperfections. We exemplify massive improvement of transmission for excitonic wave packets through a cavity, as well as enhancement of steady-state exciton currents under incoherent pumping. These results may have implications for experiments of exciton transport in disordered organic materials. We propose that the basic phenomena can be observed in quantum simulators made of Rydberg atoms, cold molecules in optical lattices, as well as in experiments with trapped ions.

  16. Electro-osmotic flows in rectangular cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshko, Viatcheslav; Trofimchuk, Alexandre; Gourjii, Alexandre; Bezym'yana, Elina

    2010-11-01

    The talk presents the results of investigation of the microfluidics mixing processes in a rectangular cavity flows induced by elctro-osmotic excitation. Enhanced mixing plays an important role in biological and chemical pharmaceutics analysis in microfluidics systems. Analytical solution is presented for the velocity field in the cavity under various electric potential distributions. The location of the periodic points in the flow are accurately established and the structure of stable and unstable manifolds is discussed. The optimal form of excitation is suggested in order to obtain most effective mixing regime in the cavity. The regular and chaotic regions are identified under various condition of excitation. Finally, we compare numerical and analytical solutions with the results of laboratory experiments for real microfluidic flows.

  17. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  18. Observing spin optodynamical analog of cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Justin; Kohler, Jonathan; Spethmann, Nicolas; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan

    2016-05-01

    Cavity Optomechanics has been realized in many diverse systems and led to many interesting results such as ponderomotive squeezing of light, beyond-SQL measurement sensitivity, and squeezing of mechanical oscillators. Optical cavities also allow sensitive measurements of the spin of an atomic ensemble. It has been proposed to utilize this sensitivity to realize an analog of optomechanics by measuring the precession of small excitations of a spin-oscillator around a transverse magnetic field. I will present our recent work in which we realize optomechanical analogs in our system such as cavity-assisted cooling and amplification and optical spring shifts. In addition, the presence of a high-energy `ground state' of the spin oscillator allows the realization of an effective negative mass oscillator which is demonstrated by an inverted sideband asymmetry. In our ongoing work we attempt to realize coherent quantum noise cancelation by coupling spin oscillation with mechanical oscillation.

  19. Optical Resonant Cavity in a Nanotaper

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Goto, Takenari; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Chang, Jiho; Yao, Takafumi

    2010-01-01

    The present study describes an optical resonant cavity in a nanotaper with scale reduction from micro to several nanometers. Both experimental results and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based simulation suggested that the nanometer-scale taper with a diameter similar to the wavelength of light acted as a mirror, which facilitated the formation of a laser cavity and caused lasing in ZnO nanotapers. As the light inside the nanotaper propagated toward the apex, the lateral mode was reduced and reflection occurred. This report suggests that use of the resonant optical cavities in nanotapers might result in novel active and passive optical components, which will broaden the horizons of photonic technology.

  20. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.