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Sample records for 500mgkg-1 dw soil

  1. Two quantitative trait loci, Dw1 and Dw2, are primarily responsible for rootstock-induced dwarfing in apple

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Toshi M; Celton, Jean-Marc; Chagné, David; Tustin, D Stuart; Gardiner, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    The apple dwarfing rootstock ‘Malling9’ (‘M9’) has been used worldwide both to reduce scion vigour and as a genetic source for breeding new rootstocks. Progeny of ‘M9’ segregate for rootstock-induced dwarfing of the scion, indicating that this trait is controlled by one or more genetic factors. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of a rootstock population derived from the cross between ‘M9’ × ‘Robusta5’ (non-dwarfing) and grafted with ‘Braeburn’ scions identified a major QTL (Dw1) on linkage group (LG) 5, which exhibits a significant influence on dwarfing of the scion. A smaller-effect QTL affecting dwarfing (Dw2) was identified on LG11, and four minor-effect QTLs were found on LG6, LG9, LG10 and LG12. Phenotypic analysis indicates that the combination of Dw1 and Dw2 has the strongest influence on rootstock-induced dwarfing, and that Dw1 has a stronger effect than Dw2. Genetic markers linked to Dw1 and Dw2 were screened over 41 rootstock accessions that confer a range of effects on scion growth. The majority of the dwarfing and semi-dwarfing rootstock accessions screened carried marker alleles linked to Dw1 and Dw2. This suggests that most apple dwarfing rootstocks have been derived from the same genetic source. PMID:26504562

  2. Identification of Dw1, a Regulator of Sorghum Stem Internode Length

    PubMed Central

    Hilley, Josie; Truong, Sandra; Olson, Sara; Morishige, Daryl; Mullet, John

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum is an important C4 grain and grass crop used for food, feed, forage, sugar, and biofuels. In its native Africa, sorghum landraces often grow to approximately 3–4 meters in height. Following introduction into the U.S., shorter, early flowering varieties were identified and used for production of grain. Quinby and Karper identified allelic variation at four loci designated Dw1-Dw4 that regulated plant height by altering the length of stem internodes. The current study used a map-based cloning strategy to identify the gene corresponding to Dw1. Hegari (Dw1dw2Dw3dw4) and 80M (dw1dw2Dw3dw4) were crossed and F2 and HIF derived populations used for QTL mapping. Genetic analysis identified four QTL for internode length in this population, Dw1 on SBI-09, Dw2 on SBI-06, and QTL located on SBI-01 and SBI-07. The QTL on SBI-07 was ~3 Mbp upstream of Dw3 and interacted with Dw1. Dw1 was also found to contribute to the variation in stem weight in the population. Dw1 was fine mapped to an interval of ~33 kbp using HIFs segregating only for Dw1. A polymorphism in an exon of Sobic.009G229800 created a stop codon that truncated the encoded protein in 80M (dw1). This polymorphism was not present in Hegari (Dw1) and no other polymorphisms in the delimited Dw1 locus altered coding regions. The recessive dw1 allele found in 80M was traced to Dwarf Yellow Milo, the progenitor of grain sorghum genotypes identified as dw1. Dw1 encodes a putative membrane protein of unknown function that is highly conserved in plants. PMID:26963094

  3. An Intensive CCD Photometry Campaign to Observe DW Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David; Gaensicke, Boris

    2009-05-01

    We report on a coordinated observing campaign in April and May 2008 to study the eclipsing dwarf nova DW Ursae Majoris. This belongs to the group of SW Sex stars, nova-like variables containing accretion disks which exhibit superhumps in their light curves suggesting that their accretion disks are elliptical and precessing on time scales of a few days due to tidal interactions with the companion star. It has been suggested that the changing geometry will cause the depth of eclipses to be modulated on the accretion disk precession period. The aim of this campaign was to provide for the first time sufficient continuous photometric coverage of an eclipsing super-humper to test this hypothesis. 26 experienced amateur CCD photometrists in 7 countries participated in the project and altogether made almost 55,000 magnitude measurements over a 4 week period, keeping DW UMa under observation for more than 50% of the time. The results provide direct measurements of the orbital, super-hump and disk precession periods, confirming unambiguously that the superhump signal is a beat between the orbital and precession periods. They also reveal modulation not only of the eclipse depth but also of the eclipse time of minimum and width on the accretion disk precession period. The project is a good example of cooperation between the amateur and professional communities to address an open research issue.

  4. Sorghum DW1 positively regulates brassinosteroid signaling by inhibiting the nuclear localization of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 2.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ko; Kawamura, Mayuko; Araki-Nakamura, Satoko; Fujimoto, Haruka; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Yamaguchi, Miki; Fujii, Akihiro; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Sazuka, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Semi-dwarf traits have been widely introgressed into cereal crops to improve lodging resistance. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench), four major unlinked dwarfing genes, Dw1-Dw4, have been introduced to reduce plant height, and among them, Dw3 and Dw1 have been cloned. Dw3 encodes a gene involved in auxin transport, whereas, Dw1 was recently isolated and identified as a gene encoding a protein of unknown function. In this study, we show that DW1 is a novel component of brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Sorghum possessing the mutated allele of Dw1 (dw1), showed similar phenotypes to rice BR-deficient mutants, such as reduced lamina joint bending, attenuated skotomorphogenesis, and insensitivity against feedback regulation of BR-related genes. Furthermore, DW1 interacted with a negative regulator of BR signaling, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 2 (BIN2), and inhibited its nuclear localization, indicating that DW1 positively regulates BR signaling by inhibiting the function of BIN2. In contrast to rice and wheat breeding which used gibberellin (GA) deficiency to reduce plant height, sorghum breeding modified auxin and BR signaling. This difference may result from GA deficiency in rice and wheat does not cause deleterious side effects on plant morphology, whereas in sorghum it leads to abnormal culm bending.

  5. Quantitative assessment on soil enzyme activities of heavy metal contaminated soils with various soil properties.

    PubMed

    Xian, Yu; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Soil enzyme activities are greatly influenced by soil properties and could be significant indicators of heavy metal toxicity in soil for bioavailability assessment. Two groups of experiments were conducted to determine the joint effects of heavy metals and soil properties on soil enzyme activities. Results showed that arylsulfatase was the most sensitive soil enzyme and could be used as an indicator to study the enzymatic toxicity of heavy metals under various soil properties. Soil organic matter (SOM) was the dominant factor affecting the activity of arylsulfatase in soil. A quantitative model was derived to predict the changes of arylsulfatase activity with SOM content. When the soil organic matter content was less than the critical point A (1.05% in our study), the arylsulfatase activity dropped rapidly. When the soil organic matter content was greater than the critical point A, the arylsulfatase activity gradually rose to higher levels showing that instead of harm the soil microbial activities were enhanced. The SOM content needs to be over the critical point B (2.42% in our study) to protect its microbial community from harm due to the severe Pb pollution (500mgkg(-1) in our study). The quantitative model revealed the pattern of variation of enzymatic toxicity due to heavy metals under various SOM contents. The applicability of the model under wider soil properties need to be tested. The model however may provide a methodological basis for ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in soil.

  6. Sorghum Dw1, an agronomically important gene for lodging resistance, encodes a novel protein involved in cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Miki; Fujimoto, Haruka; Hirano, Ko; Araki-Nakamura, Satoko; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Fujii, Akihiro; Tsunashima, Masako; Song, Xian Jun; Ito, Yusuke; Nagae, Rie; Wu, Jianzhong; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Sazuka, Takashi

    2016-06-22

    Semi-dwarfing genes have contributed to enhanced lodging resistance, resulting in increased crop productivity. In the history of grain sorghum breeding, the spontaneous mutation, dw1 found in Memphis in 1905, was the first widely used semi-dwarfing gene. Here, we report the identification and characterization of Dw1. We performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and cloning, and revealed that Dw1 encodes a novel uncharacterized protein. Knockdown or T-DNA insertion lines of orthologous genes in rice and Arabidopsis also showed semi-dwarfism similar to that of a nearly isogenic line (NIL) carrying dw1 (NIL-dw1) of sorghum. A histological analysis of the NIL-dw1 revealed that the longitudinal parenchymal cell lengths of the internode were almost the same between NIL-dw1 and wildtype, while the number of cells per internode was significantly reduced in NIL-dw1. NIL-dw1dw3, carrying both dw1 and dw3 (involved in auxin transport), showed a synergistic phenotype. These observations demonstrate that the dw1 reduced the cell proliferation activity in the internodes, and the synergistic effect of dw1 and dw3 contributes to improved lodging resistance and mechanical harvesting.

  7. Sorghum Dw1, an agronomically important gene for lodging resistance, encodes a novel protein involved in cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Miki; Fujimoto, Haruka; Hirano, Ko; Araki-Nakamura, Satoko; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Fujii, Akihiro; Tsunashima, Masako; Song, Xian Jun; Ito, Yusuke; Nagae, Rie; Wu, Jianzhong; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Yonemaru, Jun-ichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Sazuka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Semi-dwarfing genes have contributed to enhanced lodging resistance, resulting in increased crop productivity. In the history of grain sorghum breeding, the spontaneous mutation, dw1 found in Memphis in 1905, was the first widely used semi-dwarfing gene. Here, we report the identification and characterization of Dw1. We performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and cloning, and revealed that Dw1 encodes a novel uncharacterized protein. Knockdown or T-DNA insertion lines of orthologous genes in rice and Arabidopsis also showed semi-dwarfism similar to that of a nearly isogenic line (NIL) carrying dw1 (NIL-dw1) of sorghum. A histological analysis of the NIL-dw1 revealed that the longitudinal parenchymal cell lengths of the internode were almost the same between NIL-dw1 and wildtype, while the number of cells per internode was significantly reduced in NIL-dw1. NIL-dw1dw3, carrying both dw1 and dw3 (involved in auxin transport), showed a synergistic phenotype. These observations demonstrate that the dw1 reduced the cell proliferation activity in the internodes, and the synergistic effect of dw1 and dw3 contributes to improved lodging resistance and mechanical harvesting. PMID:27329702

  8. Automated Calculation of Water-equivalent Diameter (DW) Based on AAPM Task Group 220.

    PubMed

    Anam, Choirul; Haryanto, Freddy; Widita, Rena; Arif, Idam; Dougherty, Geoff

    2016-07-08

    The purpose of this study is to accurately and effectively automate the calculation of the water-equivalent diameter (DW) from 3D CT images for estimating the size-specific dose. DW is the metric that characterizes the patient size and attenuation. In this study, DW was calculated for standard CTDI phantoms and patient images. Two types of phantom were used, one representing the head with a diameter of 16 cm and the other representing the body with a diameter of 32 cm. Images of 63 patients were also taken, 32 who had undergone a CT head examination and 31 who had undergone a CT thorax examination. There are three main parts to our algorithm for automated DW calculation. The first part is to read 3D images and convert the CT data into Hounsfield units (HU). The second part is to find the contour of the phantoms or patients automatically. And the third part is to automate the calculation of DW based on the automated contouring for every slice (DW,all). The results of this study show that the automated calculation of DW and the manual calculation are in good agreement for phantoms and patients. The differences between the automated calculation of DW and the manual calculation are less than 0.5%. The results of this study also show that the estimating of DW,all using DW,n=1 (central slice along longitudinal axis) produces percentage differences of -0.92% ± 3.37% and 6.75%± 1.92%, and estimating DW,all using DW,n=9 produces percentage differences of 0.23% ± 0.16% and 0.87% ± 0.36%, for thorax and head examinations, respectively. From this study, the percentage differences between normalized size-specific dose estimate for every slice (nSSDEall) and nSSDEn=1 are 0.74% ± 2.82% and -4.35% ± 1.18% for thorax and head examinations, respectively; between nSSDEall and nSSDEn=9 are 0.00% ± 0.46% and -0.60% ± 0.24% for thorax and head examinations, respectively.

  9. Automated Calculation of Water-equivalent Diameter (DW ) Based on AAPM Task Group 220.

    PubMed

    Anam, Choirul; Haryanto, Freddy; Widita, Rena; Arif, Idam; Dougherty, Geoff

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to accurately and effectively automate the calculation of the water-equivalent diameter (DW) from 3D CT images for estimating the size-specific dose. DW is the metric that characterizes the patient size and attenuation. In this study, DW was calculated for standard CTDI phantoms and patient images. Two types of phantom were used, one representing the head with a diameter of 16 cm and the other representing the body with a diameter of 32 cm. Images of 63 patients were also taken, 32 who had undergone a CT head examination and 31 who had undergone a CT thorax examination. There are three main parts to our algorithm for automated DW calculation. The first part is to read 3D images and convert the CT data into Hounsfield units (HU). The second part is to find the contour of the phantoms or patients automatically. And the third part is to automate the calculation of DW based on the automated contouring for every slice (DW,all). The results of this study show that the automated calculation of DW and the manual calculation are in good agreement for phantoms and patients. The differences between the automated calculation of DW and the manual calculation are less than 0.5%. The results of this study also show that the estimating of DW,all using DW,n=1 (central slice along longitudinal axis) produces percentage differences of -0.92%±3.37% and 6.75%±1.92%, and estimating DW,all using DW,n=9 produces percentage differences of 0.23%±0.16% and 0.87%±0.36%, for thorax and head examinations, respectively. From this study, the percentage differences between normalized size-specific dose estimate for every slice (nSSDEall) and nSSDEn=1 are 0.74%±2.82% and -4.35%±1.18% for thorax and head examinations, respectively; between nSSDEall and nSSDEn=9 are 0.00%±0.46% and -0.60%±0.24% for thorax and head examinations, respectively. PACS number(s): 87.57.Q-, 87.57.uq.

  10. Electrophoretic analysis of HLA-DR2 molecules isolated from HLA-Dw2 and HLA-Dw12 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, T; Kasahara, M; Ogasawara, K; Ikeda, H; Ishikawa, N; Hawkin, S; Wakisaka, A; Aizawa, M

    1985-02-01

    To answer the question of whether or not polymorphism exists among HLA-DR2 molecules derived from cells homozygous for HLA-DR2, but expressing different HLA-D specificities, HLA-DR2 molecules were isolated from HLA-Dw2 and HLA-Dw12 homozygous cells using a monoclonal antibody operationally monospecific for HLA-DR2, and were compared to each other by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. No electrophoretically discernible polymorphism was found in either the heavy or the light chain subunits of the HLA-DR2 molecules. These findings are in marked contrast with previous observations that each of the HLA-DR4-associated HLA-D clusters expresses an electrophoretically distinct HLA-DR4 light chain.

  11. DW-F5: A novel formulation against malignant melanoma from Wrightia tinctoria

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Jayesh; Saikia, Minakshi; V, Vinod.; Nath, Lekshmi. R.; Katiki, Mohana Rao; Murty, M.S.R.; Paul, Anju; A, Shabna; Chandran, Harsha; Joseph, Sophia Margaret; S, Nishanth Kumar.; Panakkal, Elizabeth Jayex; V, Sriramya I.; V, Sridivya I.; Ran, Sophia; S, Sankar; Rajan, Easwary; Anto, Ruby John

    2015-01-01

    Wrightia tinctoria is a constituent of several ayurvedic preparations against skin disorders including psoriasis and herpes, though not yet has been explored for anticancer potential. Herein, for the first time, we report the significant anticancer properties of a semi-purified fraction, DW-F5, from the dichloromethane extract of W. tinctoria leaves against malignant melanoma. DW-F5 exhibited anti-melanoma activities, preventing metastasis and angiogenesis in NOD-SCID mice, while being non-toxic in vivo. The major pathways in melanoma signaling mediated through BRAF, WNT/β-catenin and Akt-NF-κB converging in MITF-M, the master regulator of melanomagenesis, were inhibited by DW-F5, leading to complete abolition of MITF-M. Purification of DW-F5 led to the isolation of two cytotoxic components, one being tryptanthrin and the other being an unidentified aliphatic fraction. The overall study predicts Wrightia tinctoria as a candidate plant to be further explored for anticancer properties and DW-F5 as a forthcoming drug formulation to be evaluated as a chemotherapeutic agent against malignant melanoma. PMID:26061820

  12. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Filice, Salvatore; Granata, Vincenza; Catalano, Orlando; Amato, Daniela Maria; Di Bonito, Maurizio; D'Aiuto, Massimiliano; Capasso, Immacolata; Rinaldo, Massimo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination) in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI. PMID:26339597

  13. First photometric study of two southern eclipsing binaries IS Tel and DW Aps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özer, S.; Sürgit, D.; Erdem, A.; Öztürk, O.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents the first photometric analysis of two southern eclipsing binary stars, IS Tel and DW Aps. Their V light curves from the All Sky Automated Survey were modelled by using Wilson-Devinney method. The final models give these two Algol-like binary stars as having detached configurations. Absolute parameters of the components of the systems were also estimated.

  14. Deafness and permanently reduced potassium channel gene expression and function in hypothyroid Pit1dw mutants.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Mirna; Fang, Qing; Gong, Tzy-Wen; Dolan, David F; Raphael, Yehoash; Camper, Sally A; Duncan, R Keith

    2009-01-28

    The absence of thyroid hormone (TH) during late gestation and early infancy can cause irreparable deafness in both humans and rodents. A variety of rodent models have been used in an effort to identify the underlying molecular mechanism. Here, we characterize a mouse model of secondary hypothyroidism, pituitary transcription factor 1 (Pit1(dw)), which has profound, congenital deafness that is rescued by oral TH replacement. These mutants have tectorial membrane abnormalities, including a prominent Hensen's stripe, elevated beta-tectorin composition, and disrupted striated-sheet matrix. They lack distortion product otoacoustic emissions and cochlear microphonic responses, and exhibit reduced endocochlear potentials, suggesting defects in outer hair cell function and potassium recycling. Auditory system and hair cell physiology, histology, and anatomy studies reveal novel defects of hormone deficiency related to deafness: (1) permanently impaired expression of KCNJ10 in the stria vascularis of Pit1(dw) mice, which likely contributes to the reduced endocochlear potential, (2) significant outer hair cell loss in the mutants, which may result from cellular stress induced by the lower KCNQ4 expression and current levels in Pit1(dw) mutant outer hair cells, and (3) sensory and strial cell deterioration, which may have implications for thyroid hormone dysregulation in age-related hearing impairment. In summary, we suggest that these defects in outer hair cell and strial cell function are important contributors to the hearing impairment in Pit1(dw) mice.

  15. Association of low C2 and C4 serum levels with the HLA-DW2 allele in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    HLA typed unrelated healthy individuals (HLA-DW2 positive n = 64, and HLA-DW2 negative n = 72) were investigated for their C2 functional activity and C4 serum protein levels. For the C2 and C4 levels a bimodal distribution was found in HLA-DW2 positive and HLA-DW2 negative individuals. HLA-DW2 positive persons had a significantly higher incidence of low C2 and C4 serum levels. Our data support the concept that genes governing C2 as well as C4 serum levels are in linkage disequilibrium with the HLA-DW2 allele of the major histocompatibility complex. PMID:702053

  16. Regularized positive-definite fourth order tensor field estimation from DW-MRI.

    PubMed

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Hwang, Min Sig; Howland, Dena; Forder, John R; Vemuri, Baba C

    2009-03-01

    In Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Image (DW-MRI) processing, a 2nd order tensor has been commonly used to approximate the diffusivity function at each lattice point of the DW-MRI data. From this tensor approximation, one can compute useful scalar quantities (e.g. anisotropy, mean diffusivity) which have been clinically used for monitoring encephalopathy, sclerosis, ischemia and other brain disorders. It is now well known that this 2nd-order tensor approximation fails to capture complex local tissue structures, e.g. crossing fibers, and as a result, the scalar quantities derived from these tensors are grossly inaccurate at such locations. In this paper we employ a 4th order symmetric positive-definite (SPD) tensor approximation to represent the diffusivity function and present a novel technique to estimate these tensors from the DW-MRI data guaranteeing the SPD property. Several articles have been reported in literature on higher order tensor approximations of the diffusivity function but none of them guarantee the positivity of the estimates, which is a fundamental constraint since negative values of the diffusivity are not meaningful. In this paper we represent the 4th-order tensors as ternary quartics and then apply Hilbert's theorem on ternary quartics along with the Iwasawa parametrization to guarantee an SPD 4th-order tensor approximation from the DW-MRI data. The performance of this model is depicted on synthetic data as well as real DW-MRIs from a set of excised control and injured rat spinal cords, showing accurate estimation of scalar quantities such as generalized anisotropy and trace as well as fiber orientations.

  17. Regularized Positive-Definite Fourth Order Tensor Field Estimation from DW-MRI★

    PubMed Central

    Barmpoutis, Angelos; Vemuri, Baba C.; Howland, Dena; Forder, John R.

    2009-01-01

    In Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Image (DW-MRI) processing, a 2nd order tensor has been commonly used to approximate the diffusivity function at each lattice point of the DW-MRI data. From this tensor approximation, one can compute useful scalar quantities (e.g. anisotropy, mean diffusivity) which have been clinically used for monitoring encephalopathy, sclerosis, ischemia and other brain disorders. It is now well known that this 2nd-order tensor approximation fails to capture complex local tissue structures, e.g. crossing fibers, and as a result, the scalar quantities derived from these tensors are grossly inaccurate at such locations. In this paper we employ a 4th order symmetric positive-definite (SPD) tensor approximation to represent the diffusivity function and present a novel technique to estimate these tensors from the DW-MRI data guaranteeing the SPD property. Several articles have been reported in literature on higher order tensor approximations of the diffusivity function but none of them guarantee the positivity of the estimates, which is a fundamental constraint since negative values of the diffusivity are not meaningful. In this paper we represent the 4th-order tensors as ternary quartics and then apply Hilbert’s theorem on ternary quartics along with the Iwasawa parametrization to guarantee an SPD 4th-order tensor approximation from the DW-MRI data. The performance of this model is depicted on synthetic data as well as real DW-MRIs from a set of excised control and injured rat spinal cords, showing accurate estimation of scalar quantities such as generalized anisotropy and trace as well as fiber orientations. PMID:19063978

  18. SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF THE SW SEXTANTIS STAR DW URSAE MAJORIS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, D. W.; Wachter, S.; Lu, Ting-Ni; Knigge, Christian; Homer, Lee; Szkody, Paula; Still, M.; Long, Knox S.; Dhillon, V. S.

    2010-11-15

    We present the first pointed X-ray observation of DW Ursae Majoris, a novalike cataclysmic variable (CV) and one of the archetype members of the SW Sextantis class, obtained with the XMM-Newton satellite. These data provide the first detailed look at an SW Sex star in the X-ray regime (with previous X-ray knowledge of the SW Sex stars limited primarily to weak or non-detections in the ROSAT All Sky Survey). It is also one of only a few XMM-Newton observations (to date) of any high mass transfer rate novalike CV, and the only one in the evolutionarily important 3-4 hr orbital period range. The observed X-ray spectrum of DW UMa is very soft, with {approx}95% of the detected X-ray photons at energies <2 keV. The spectrum can be fit equally well by a one-component cooling flow model, with a temperature range of 0.2-3.5 keV, or a two-component, two-temperature thermal plasma model, containing hard ({approx}5-6 keV) and soft ({approx}0.8 keV) components. The X-ray light curve of DW UMa shows a likely partial eclipse, implying X-ray reprocessing in a vertically extended region, and an orbital modulation, implying a structural asymmetry in the X-ray reprocessing site (e.g., it cannot be a uniform corona). We also obtained a simultaneous near-ultraviolet light curve of DW UMa using the Optical Monitor on XMM-Newton. This light curve is similar in appearance to published optical-UV light curves of DW UMa and shows a prominent deep eclipse. Regardless of the exact nature of the X-ray reprocessing site in DW UMa, the lack of a prominent hard X-ray total eclipse and very low fraction of high energy X-rays point to the presence of an optically and geometrically thick accretion disk that obscures the boundary layer and modifies the X-ray spectrum emitted near the white dwarf.

  19. Characterizing dw1335-29, a recently discovered dwarf satellite of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Andreia; Bell, Eric F.; Bailin, Jeremy; Monachesi, Antonela; de Jong, Roelof S.; Harmsen, B2enjamin; Slater, Colin T.

    2017-03-01

    The number, distribution and properties of dwarf satellites are crucial probes of the physics of galaxy formation at low masses and the response of satellite galaxies to the tidal and gas dynamical effects of their more massive parent. To make progress, it is necessary to augment and solidify the census of dwarf satellites of galaxies outside the Local Group. Müller et al. presented 16 dwarf galaxy candidates near M83, but lacking reliable distances, it is unclear which candidates are M83 satellites. Using red-giant-branch stars from the HST/GHOSTS survey in conjunction with ground-based images from VLT/VIMOS, we confirm that one of the candidates, dw1335-29 - with a projected distance of 26 kpc from M83 and a distance modulus of (m-M)_0 = 28.5^{+0.3}_{-0.1} - is a satellite of M83. We estimate an absolute magnitude MV = -10.1 ± 0.4, an ellipticity of 0.40^{+0.14}_{-0.22}, a half-light radius of 656^{+121}_{-170} pc and [Fe/H] = -1.3^{+0.3}_{-0.4}. Owing to dw1335-29's somewhat irregular shape and possible young stars, we classify this galaxy as a dwarf irregular or transition dwarf. This is curious, as with a projected distance of 26 kpc from M83, dw1335-29 is expected to lack recent star formation. Further study of M83's dwarf population will reveal if star formation in its satellites is commonplace (suggesting a lack of a hot gas envelope for M83 that would quench star formation) or rare (suggesting that dw1335-29 has a larger M83-centric distance, and is fortuitously projected to small radii).

  20. A close hidden stellar companion to the SX Phe-type variable star DW Psc

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, S.-B.; Li, L.-J.; Wang, S.-M.; He, J.-J.; Zhou, X.; Jiang, L.-Q.

    2015-01-01

    DW Psc is a high-amplitude SX Phe-type variable with a period of pulsation of 0.05875 days. Using a few newly determined times of maximum light together with those collected from the literature, the changes in the observed-calculated (O-C) diagram are analyzed. It is discovered that the O-C curve of DW Psc shows a cyclic variation with a period of 6.08 years and a semi-amplitude of 0.0066 days. The periodic variation is analyzed for the light travel time effect, which is due to the presence of a stellar companion (M{sub 2}sini∼0.45(±0.03) M{sub ⊙}). The two-component stars in the binary system are orbiting each other in an eccentric orbit (e ∼ 0.4) at an orbital separation of about 2.7(±0.3) AU. The detection of a close stellar companion to an SX Phe-type star supports the idea that SX Phe-type pulsating stars are blue stragglers that were formed from the merging of close binaries. The stellar companion has played an important role in the merging of the original binary by removing angular momentum from the central binary during early dynamical interaction or/and late dynamical evolution. After the more massive component in DW Psc evolves into a red giant, the cool close companion should help to remove the giant envelope via possible critical Roche-lobe overflow, and the system may be a progenitor of a cataclysmic variable. The detection of a close stellar companion to DW Psc makes it a very interesting system to study in the future.

  1. Agriculture intensification decreases soil C content and respiration activity in a Mediterranean Vertisol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Roberta; Francaviglia, Rosa; Felici, Barbara; Renzi, Gianluca; Troccoli, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Adoption of intensive and non-conservative farming practices in Mediterranean areas, often causes a strong reduction of soil organic C, with major side effects on soil functioning and CO2 emissions to atmosphere. The purpose of our research was to evaluate the effect of durum wheat-(Triticum durum Desf.) (DW) based rotations, common in Southern Italy, on soil organic C content and soil potential respiration, after 19 years of cultivation. The rotation experiment was carried out since 1992 in Foggia (Apulia, Italy) at the experimental farm of the Cereal Research Centre in a clayey vertisol. Here we report results concerning two rotations, among seven: continuous durum wheat (CDW) and bare fallow-durum wheat-durum wheat- (BF-DW-DW) compared with an adjoining soil, covered with permanent grassland undisturbed, since 1972, considered at steady state. Results showed a negative trend of soil C in both rotations. The C reduction respect to the undisturbed soil (14.5 g C kg-1 of soil) were 0.15 and 0.13% for CDW and BF-DW-DW, respectively. Daily soil potential respiration was always higher in the undisturbed soil: it was 13.65, 10.46 and 8.64 mg C-CO2/kg soil day-1, for undisturbed soil, BF-DW-DW and DWC respectively. The cumulative respiration in 28 days for CDW and BF-DW-DW rotations compared with undisturbed soil was lower by 23 and 32%, respectively. Among the two rotations compared, BF-DW-DW showed to be slightly more conservative than the DWC rotation for soil C, even though none of the two rotations was able to keep the soil C level at values comparable to steady state, due both to soil disturbance and to lower C inputs respect to the permanent cover.

  2. Characterizing Dw1335-29, a Recently Discovered Dwarf Satellite of M83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Andreia Jessica; Bell, Eric F.; Bailin, Jeremy; Monachesi, Antonela

    2016-01-01

    Simulations of galaxy formation in a cosmological context predict that galaxies should be surrounded by hundreds of relatively massive dark matter subhalos, each of which was expected to host a dwarf satellite galaxy. Large numbers of luminous dwarf galaxies do not exist around the Milky Way or M31 - this has been termed the missing satellite problem. There are a number of possible physical drivers of this discrepancy, some of which might predict significant differences from galaxy to galaxy. Accordingly, there are a number of efforts whose goal is to solidify and augment the census of dwarf satellites of external galaxies, outside the Local Group. Recently, Mueller, Jergen & Bingelli (2015; arXiv.1509.04931) presented 16 dwarf galaxy candidates in the vicinity of M83 using the Dark Energy CAMera (DECAM). With a field from the HST/GHOSTS survey that partly covers dw1335-29 (Radburn-Smith et al. 2011; ApJS, 195, 18) in conjunction with complementary ground-based images from VIMOS that cover the whole dwarf, we confirm that one of the candidates dw1335-29 is a dwarf satellite of M83, at a projected distance from M83 of 26 kpc and a with distance modulus of m-M = 28.5-0.1+0.3, placing it in the M83 group. From our VIMOS imaging that covers the entire dwarf, we estimate an absolute magnitude of MV = -9.8-0.1+0.3, show that it is elongated with an ellipticity of 0.35+/-0.15, and has a half light radius of 500+/-50pc. Dw1335-29 has both a somewhat irregular shape and has superimposed young stars in the resolved stellar population maps, leading us to classify this galaxy as a faint dwarf irregular or transition dwarf. This is especially curious, as with a projected distance of only 26kpc from M83, our prior expectation from study of the Local Group (following e.g., Grebel et al. 2003; AJ, 125, 1926, Slater & Bell 2013; ApJ, 772, 15) would be that dw1335-29 would lack recent star formation. Further study of M83's dwarf population will reveal if star formation in its dwarfs

  3. Genome analysis of the staphylococcal temperate phage DW2 and functional studies on the endolysin and tail hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Keary, Ruth; McAuliffe, Olivia; Ross, R Paul; Hill, Colin; O’Mahony, Jim; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the genome of temperate Siphoviridae phage DW2, which is routinely propagated on Staphylococcus aureus DPC5246. The 41941 bp genome revealed an open reading frame (ORF1) which has a high level of homology with members of the resolvase subfamily of site-specific serine recombinase, involved in chromosomal integration and excision. In contrast, the majority of staphylococcal phages reported to date encode tyrosine recombinases. Two putative genes encoded by phage DW2 (ORF15 and ORF24) were highly homologous to the NWMN0273 and NWMN0280 genes encoding virulence factors carried on the genome of ϕNM4, a prophage in the genome of S. aureus Newman. Phage DW2 also encodes proteins highly homologous to two well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island derepressors encoded by the staphylococcal helper phage 80α indicating that it may similarly act as a helper phage for mobility of pathogenicity islands in S. aureus. This study also focused on the enzybiotic potential of phage DW2. The structure of the putative endolysin and tail hydrolase were investigated and used as the basis for a cloning strategy to create recombinant peptidoglycan hydrolyzing proteins. After overexpression in E. coli, four of these proteins (LysDW2, THDW2, CHAPE1-153, and CHAPE1-163) were demonstrated to have hydrolytic activity against peptidoglycan of S. aureus and thus represent novel candidates for exploitation as enzybiotics. PMID:25105056

  4. Imaging of magnetic DW injection processed in patterened Ni80Fe20 structures

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, M. T.; Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Schrefl, T.; Gibbs, M.R.J.; Allwood, D. A.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

    2009-03-23

    Magnetization reversal in patterned ferromagnetic nanowires usually occurs via domain wall (DW) nucleation and propagation from one end (or both ends) of the wire which can be significantly reduced by a large, magnetically soft pad on one of the wire ends. These 'nucleation pads' reverse at lower fields than an isolated nanowire and introduce a DW to the wire from the wire end attached to the pad. Once a critical 'injection' field is reached, the DW sweeps through the wire, reversing its magnetization. Nucleation pads are frequently used as part of nanowire devices and experimental structures. Magnetic-field-driven shift register memory can include an injection pad to write data while those attached to nanowire spiral turn sensors act as both a source and sink of domain walls. Both of these devices use two-dimensional wire circuits and therefore require the use of orthogonal in-plane magnetic fields to drive domain walls through wires of different orientations. These bi-axial fields can significantly alter the fields at which DW injection occurs and control the number of different injection modes. We have used magnetic transmission soft X-ray microscopy (M-TXM) [6] providing 25nm spatial resolution to image the evolution of magnetization configurations in patterned 24nm thick Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} rectangular nucleation pads and attached wires during DW injection. The structures consisted of 2 {micro}m x 3 {micro}m nucleation pads with wires of width 200 nm, 300 nm or 500 nm attached Comparing the magnetic configuration of the injection pads with micromagnetic models, we find that the relative orientation of closure domains in the remanent magnetization configuration of injection pads determines the reversal pathway that follows, although this is further affected by applied transverse fields. Micromagnetic simulations were performed using a hybrid finite element/boundary element code. The magnetic elements were designed with 20 nm thickness and discretized into a

  5. Dissecting repulsion linkage in the dwarfing gene Dw3 region for sorghum plant height provides insights into heterosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Li, Xianran; Fridman, Eyal; Tesso, Tesfaye T; Yu, Jianming

    2015-09-22

    Heterosis is a main contributor to yield increase in many crop species. Different mechanisms have been proposed for heterosis: dominance, overdominance, epistasis, epigenetics, and protein metabolite changes. However, only limited examples of molecular dissection and validation of these mechanisms are available. Here, we present an example of discovery and validation of heterosis generated by a combination of repulsion linkage and dominance. Using a recombinant inbred line population, a separate quantitative trait locus (QTL) for plant height (qHT7.1) was identified near the genomic region harboring the known auxin transporter Dw3 gene. With two loci having repulsion linkage between two inbreds, heterosis in the hybrid can appear as a single locus with an overdominance mode of inheritance (i.e., pseudo-overdominance). Individually, alleles conferring taller plant height exhibited complete dominance over alleles conferring shorter height. Detailed analyses of different height components demonstrated that qHT7.1 affects both the upper and lower parts of the plant, whereas Dw3 affects only the part below the flag leaf. Computer simulations show that repulsion linkage could influence QTL detection and estimation of effect in segregating populations. Guided by findings in linkage mapping, a genome-wide association study of plant height with a sorghum diversity panel pinpointed genomic regions underlying the trait variation, including Dw1, Dw2, Dw3, Dw4, and qHT7.1. Multilocus mixed model analysis confirmed the advantage of complex trait dissection using an integrated approach. Besides identifying a specific genetic example of heterosis, our research indicated that integrated molecular dissection of complex traits in different population types can enable plant breeders to fine tune the breeding process for crop production.

  6. Dissecting repulsion linkage in the dwarfing gene Dw3 region for sorghum plant height provides insights into heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Li, Xianran; Fridman, Eyal; Tesso, Tesfaye T.; Yu, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis is a main contributor to yield increase in many crop species. Different mechanisms have been proposed for heterosis: dominance, overdominance, epistasis, epigenetics, and protein metabolite changes. However, only limited examples of molecular dissection and validation of these mechanisms are available. Here, we present an example of discovery and validation of heterosis generated by a combination of repulsion linkage and dominance. Using a recombinant inbred line population, a separate quantitative trait locus (QTL) for plant height (qHT7.1) was identified near the genomic region harboring the known auxin transporter Dw3 gene. With two loci having repulsion linkage between two inbreds, heterosis in the hybrid can appear as a single locus with an overdominance mode of inheritance (i.e., pseudo-overdominance). Individually, alleles conferring taller plant height exhibited complete dominance over alleles conferring shorter height. Detailed analyses of different height components demonstrated that qHT7.1 affects both the upper and lower parts of the plant, whereas Dw3 affects only the part below the flag leaf. Computer simulations show that repulsion linkage could influence QTL detection and estimation of effect in segregating populations. Guided by findings in linkage mapping, a genome-wide association study of plant height with a sorghum diversity panel pinpointed genomic regions underlying the trait variation, including Dw1, Dw2, Dw3, Dw4, and qHT7.1. Multilocus mixed model analysis confirmed the advantage of complex trait dissection using an integrated approach. Besides identifying a specific genetic example of heterosis, our research indicated that integrated molecular dissection of complex traits in different population types can enable plant breeders to fine tune the breeding process for crop production. PMID:26351684

  7. A 16-yr photometric campaign on the eclipsing novalike variable DW Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D. R. S.; de Miguel, E.; Patterson, J.; Wood, M. A.; Barrett, D.; Boardman, J.; Brettman, O.; Cejudo, D.; Collins, D.; Cook, L. M.; Cook, M. J.; Foote, J. L.; Fried, R.; Gomez, T. L.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Jones, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Koff, R.; Koppelman, M.; Krajci, T.; Lemay, D.; Martin, B.; McClusky, J. V.; Menzies, K.; Messier, D.; Roberts, G.; Robertson, J.; Rock, J.; Sabo, R.; Skillman, D.; Ulowetz, J.; Vanmunster, T.

    2017-04-01

    We present an analysis of photometric observations of the eclipsing novalike variable DW UMa made by the CBA consortium between 1999 and 2015. Analysis of 372 new and 260 previously published eclipse timings reveals a 13.6 yr period or quasi-period in the times of minimum light. The seasonal light curves show a complex spectrum of periodic signals: both positive and negative 'superhumps', likely arising from a prograde apsidal precession and a retrograde nodal precession of the accretion disc. These signals appear most prominently and famously as sidebands of the orbital frequency; but the precession frequencies themselves, at 0.40 and 0.22 cycles per day, are also seen directly in the power spectrum. The superhumps are sometimes seen together, and sometimes separately. The depth, width and skew of eclipses are all modulated in phase with both nodal and apsidal precession of the tilted and eccentric accretion disc. The superhumps, or more correctly the precessional motions that produce them, may be essential to understanding the mysterious 'SW Sextantis' syndrome. Disc wobble and eccentricity can both produce Doppler signatures inconsistent with the true dynamical motions in the binary, and disc wobble might boost the mass-transfer rate by enabling the hot white dwarf to directly irradiate the secondary star.

  8. Mutational Analysis and Biochemical Characterization of the Burkholderia thailandensis DW503 Quorum-Sensing Network

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Ricky L.; Hines, Harry B.; Parthasarathy, N.; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative bacteria communicate and regulate gene expression through a cell density-responsive mechanism termed quorum sensing (QS), which involves the synthesis and perception of diffusible N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL). In this study we genetically and physiologically characterized the Burkholderia thailandensis DW503 QS network. In silico analysis of the B. thailandensis genome revealed the presence of at least three AHL synthases (AHS) and five transcriptional regulators belonging to the LuxIR family of proteins. Mass spectrometry demonstrated that wild-type B. thailandensis synthesizes N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL), and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL). Mutation of the btaI1 (luxI) AHS gene prevented accumulation of C8-HSL in culture supernatants, enhanced beta-hemolysis of sheep erythrocytes, increased lipase production, and altered colony morphology on swarming and twitching motility plates. Disruption of the btaI3 (luxI) AHS prevented biosynthesis of C6-HSL and increased lipase production and beta-hemolysis, whereas mutagenesis of the btaI2 (luxI) allele eliminated C10-HSL accumulation and reduced lipase production. Complementation of the btaI1 and btaI3 mutants fully restored the synthesis of C8-HSL and C6-HSL to parental levels. In contrast, mutagenesis of the btaR1, btaR3, btaR4, and btaR5 (luxR) transcriptional regulators had no effect on AHL accumulation, enhanced lipase production, and resulted in extensive beta-hemolysis on sheep blood agar plates. Furthermore, interruption of the btaI1, btaR1, and btaR3 genes altered colony morphology on twitching and swarming motility plates and induced pigmentation. Additionally, phenotypic microarray analysis indicated that QS in B. thailandensis both positively and negatively affects the metabolism of numerous substrates, including citric acid, formic acid, glucose 6-phosphate, capric acid, γ-hydroxybutyric acid, and d-arabinose. These

  9. Cardiovascular effects of a novel selective Rho kinase inhibitor, 2-(1H-indazole-5-yl)amino-4-methoxy-6-piperazino triazine (DW1865).

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Oh, Byung Koo; Park, Cheon Ho; Seo, Ho Won; Kang, Nam Sook; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jin Soo; Ho Lee, Byung

    2013-02-28

    The arising critical implications of Rho kinase signaling in cardiovascular diseases have been attracting attention in the pharmacological potential of Rho kinase inhibitors. We identified a novel inhibitor of Rho kinase (2-(1H-indazole-5-yl)amino-4-methoxy-6-piperazino triazine; DW 1865) and characterized its effects in biochemical, cellular, tissue and animal based assays. DW 1865 potently inhibited the kinase activity of both Rho kinase 1 and Rho kinase 2 in vitro, and behaved as an ATP-competitive inhibitor. Interestingly, DW1865 was 10 times more potent in inhibiting Rho kinase activities than fasudil as a selective Rho kinase inhibitor. The activity of DW1865 was shown to be highly selective for Rho kinase in the panel assay of 13 other kinases. In the isolated vascular tissue study, DW1865 exerted vasorelaxation in phenylephrine- or 5-hydroxytriptamine-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner manner. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, administration of DW1865 caused a significant and dose-related reduction in blood pressure. Furthermore, DW1865 blocked angiotensin II-induced stress fiber formation and cellular hypertrophy in rat heart-derived H9c2 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that DW1865 is a highly selective and potent Rho kinase inhibitor that will alleviate the pathophysiological actions of Rho kinase such as stress fiber formation, cellular hypertrophy, and hypertension.

  10. Copper pollution decreases the resistance of soil microbial community to subsequent dry-rewetting disturbance.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Jun-Tao; Hu, Hang-Wei; Ma, Yi-Bing; Zhang, Li-Mei; He, Ji-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Dry-rewetting (DW) disturbance frequently occurs in soils due to rainfall and irrigation, and the frequency of DW cycles might exert significant influences on soil microbial communities and their mediated functions. However, how microorganisms respond to DW alternations in soils with a history of heavy metal pollution remains largely unknown. Here, soil laboratory microcosms were constructed to explore the impacts of ten DW cycles on the soil microbial communities in two contrasting soils (fluvo-aquic soil and red soil) under three copper concentrations (zero, medium and high). Results showed that the fluctuations of substrate induced respiration (SIR) decreased with repeated cycles of DW alternation. Furthermore, the resistance values of substrate induced respiration (RS-SIR) were highest in non-copper-stressed (zero) soils. Structural equation model (SEM) analysis ascertained that the shifts of bacterial communities determined the changes of RS-SIR in both soils. The rate of bacterial community variance was significantly lower in non-copper-stressed soil compared to the other two copper-stressed (medium and high) soils, which might lead to the higher RS-SIR in the fluvo-aquic soil. As for the red soil, the substantial increase of the dominant group WPS-2 after DW disturbance might result in the low RS-SIR in the high copper-stressed soil. Moreover, in both soils, the bacterial diversity was highest in non-copper-stressed soils. Our results revealed that initial copper stress could decrease the resistance of soil microbial community structure and function to subsequent DW disturbance.

  11. Influence of lead acetate on soil microbial biomass and community structure in two different soils with the growth of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis).

    PubMed

    Liao, Min; Chen, Cheng-Li; Zeng, Lu-Sheng; Huang, Chang-Yong

    2007-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of different concentrations of lead acetate on soil microbial biomass and community structure during growth of Chinese cabbage (Brassica chinensis) in two different soils. The field soils were used for a small pot, short-term 60-day growth chamber study. The soils were amended with different Pb concentrations, ranging from 0 to 900mgkg(-1) soil. The experimental design was a 2 soilx2 vegetation/non-vegetationx6 treatments (Pb)x3 replicate factorial experiment. At 60 days the study was terminated and soils were analyzed for microbial parameters, namely, microbial biomass, basal respiration and PLFAs. The results indicated that the application of Pb at lower concentrations (100 and 300mgkg(-1)) as lead acetate resulted in a slight increase in soil microbial biomass, whereas Pb concentrations >500mgkg(-1) caused an immediate gradual significant decline in biomass. However, the degree of impact on soil microbial biomass and basal respiration by Pb was related to management (plant vegetation) or the contents of clay and organic matter in soils. The profiles of 21 phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were used to assess whether observed changes in functional microbial parameters were accompanied by changes in the composition of the microbial communities after Pb application at 0, 300 and 900mg Pbkg(-1) soil. The results of principal component analyses (PCA) indicated that there were significant increases in fungi biomarkers of 18:3omega6c, 18:1omega9c and a decrease in cy17:0, which is an indicator of gram-negative bacteria for the high levels of Pb treatments In a word, soil microbial biomass and community structure, therefore, may be sensitive indicators reflecting environmental stress in soil-Pb-plant system. However, further studies will be needed to better understand how these changes in microbial community structure might actually impact soil microbial community function.

  12. Diagnostic Value and Surgical Implications of the 3D DW-SSFP MRI On the Management of Patients with Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gang; Fu, Guo; Gu, Li-Qiang; Li, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Jia-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (3D DW-SSFP) of high-resolution magnetic resonance has emerged as a promising method to visualize the peripheral nerves. In this study, the application value of 3D DW-SSFP brachial plexus imaging in the diagnosis of brachial plexus injury (BPI) was investigated. 33 patients with BPI were prospectively examined using 3D DW-SSFP MR neurography (MRN) of brachial plexus. Results of 3D DW-SSFP MRN were compared with intraoperative findings and measurements of electromyogram (EMG) or somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for each injured nerve root. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus has enabled good visualization of the small components of the brachial plexus. The postganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 26 patients, while the preganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 22 patients. Pseudomeningoceles were commonly observed in 23 patients. Others finding of MRN of brachial plexus included spinal cord offset (in 16 patients) and spinal cord deformation (in 6 patients). As for the 3D DW-SSFP MRN diagnosis of preganglionic BPI, the sensitivity, the specificity and the accuracy were respectively 96.8%, 90.29%, and 94.18%. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus improve visualization of brachial plexus and benefit to determine the extent of injury. PMID:27782162

  13. Environmental fate of the herbicide MCPA in agricultural soils amended with fresh and aged de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste.

    PubMed

    Peña, David; López-Piñeiro, Antonio; Albarrán, Ángel; Becerra, Daniel; Sánchez-Llerena, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Olive oil agrifood industry generates large amounts of waste whose recycling as organic amendment represents an alternative to their disposal. The impact of de-oiled two-phase olive mill waste (DW) on the fate of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in Mediterranean agricultural soils was evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of the transformation of organic matter from this waste under field conditions was assessed. Four Mediterranean agricultural soils were selected and amended in laboratory with fresh DW and field-aged DW (DW and ADW treatments, respectively). Adsorption capacity increased by factors between 1.18 and 3.59, for the DW-amended soils, and by factor of 4.93, for ADW-amended soil, with respect to unamended soils, when 5% amendment was applied. The DW amendment had inhibitory effect on dehydrogenase activity and slowed herbicide dissipation, whereas the opposite effect was observed in ADW treatments. In the field-amended soil, the amount of MCPA leached was significantly reduced from 56.9% for unamended soil to 15.9% at the 5% rate. However, leaching losses of MCPA increased in the laboratory-amended soils, because of their high water-soluble organic carbon values which could enhance MCPA mobility, especially in the acidic soils. Therefore, the application of DW as organic amendment in Mediterranean agricultural soils could be an important management strategy to reduce MCPA leaching, especially if the organic matter had been previously transformed by ageing processes.

  14. The effect of tributyltin-oxide on earthworms, springtails, and plants in artificial and natural soils.

    PubMed

    Römbke, J; Jänsch, S; Junker, T; Pohl, B; Scheffczyk, A; Schallnass, H-J

    2007-05-01

    Chemical bioavailability in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) artificial soil can contrast with bioavailability in natural soils and produce ecotoxicologic benchmarks that are not representative of species' exposure conditions in the field. Initially, reproduction and growth of earthworm and Collembolan species, and early seedling growth of a dicotyledonous plant species, in nine natural soils (with a wide range of physicochemical properties) and in OECD soil were evaluated. Soils that supported reproduction and growth of the test species were then used to investigate the toxicity of tributyltin-oxide (TBT-O). Natural soils caused greater toxicity of TBT-O to earthworms (EC(50) values varied from 0.5 to 4.7 mg/kg soil dry weight [dw]) compared with toxicity in OECD soil (EC(50) = 13.4 mg/kg dw). Collembolans were less sensitive to TBT-O than earthworms in natural soils, with EC(50) values ranging from 23.4 to 177.8 mg/kg dw. In contrast, the toxicity of TBT-O to collembolans in OECD soil (EC(50) = 104.0 mg/kg dw) was within the range of EC(50) values in natural soils. Phytotoxicity tests revealed even greater difference between the effects in natural soils (EC(50) values ranged from 10.7 to 189.2 mg/kg dw) and in OECD soil (EC(50) = 535.5 mg/kg dw) compared with results of the earthworm tests. Studies also showed that EC(50) values were a more robust end point compared with EC(10) values based on comparisons of coefficients of variation. These results show that toxicity testing should include studies with natural soils in addition to OECD soil to better reflect exposure conditions in the field.

  15. A brachytic dwarfism trait (dw) in peach trees is caused by a nonsense mutation within the gibberellic acid receptor PpeGID1c.

    PubMed

    Hollender, Courtney A; Hadiarto, Toto; Srinivasan, Chinnathambi; Scorza, Ralph; Dardick, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the genetic factors controlling tree size and shape. Here, we studied the genetic basis for a recessive brachytic dwarfism trait (dw) in peach (Prunus persica) that has little or no effect on fruit development. A sequencing-based mapping strategy positioned dw on the distal end of chromosome 6. Further sequence analysis and fine mapping identified a candidate gene for dw as a non-functional allele of the gibberellic acid receptor GID1c. Expression of the two GID1-like genes found in peach, PpeGID1c and PpeGID1b, was analyzed. GID1c was predominantly expressed in actively growing vegetative tissues, whereas GID1b was more highly expressed in reproductive tissues. Silencing of GID1c in plum via transgenic expression of a hairpin construct led to a dwarf phenotype similar to that of dw/dw peaches. In general, the degree of GID1c silencing corresponded to the degree of dwarfing. The results suggest that PpeGID1c serves a primary role in vegetative growth and elongation, whereas GID1b probably functions to regulate gibberellic acid perception in reproductive organs. Modification of GID1c expression could provide a rational approach to control tree size without impairing fruit development.

  16. DW10075, a novel selective and small-molecule inhibitor of VEGFR, exhibits antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-yuan; Lv, Yong-cong; Tong, Lin-jiang; Peng, Ting; Qu, Rong; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Yi-ming; Chen, Yi; Wei, Li-xin; Geng, Mei-yu; Duan, Wen-hu; Xie, Hua; Ding, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Targeting the VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) pathway has proved to be an effective antiangiogenic approach for cancer treatment. Here, we identified 6-((2-((3-acetamidophenyl)amino)pyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-N-phenyl-1-naphthamide (designated herein as DW10075) as a novel and highly selective inhibitor of VEGFRs. Methods: In vitro tyrosine kinase activity was measured using ELISA, and intracellular signaling pathway proteins were detected by Western blot analysis. Endothelial cell proliferation was examined with CCK-8 assays, and tumor cell proliferation was determined with SRB assays. Cell migration, tube formation and rat aortic ring assays were used to detect antiangiogenic activity. Antitumor efficacy was further evaluated in U87-MG human glioblastoma xenograft tumors in nude mice receiving DW10075 (500 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for two weeks. Results: Among a panel of 21 kinases tested, DW10075 selectively inhibited VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3 (the IC50 values were 6.4, 0.69 and 5.5 nmol/L, respectively), but did not affect 18 other kinases including FGFR and PDGFR at 10 μmol/L. DW10075 significantly blocked VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR and its downstream signaling transduction in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), thus inhibited VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation. DW10075 (1–100 nmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited VEGF-induced HUVEC migration and tube formation and suppressed angiogenesis in both the rat aortic ring model and the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model. Furthermore, DW10075 exhibited anti-proliferative activity against 22 different human cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 2.2 μmol/L (for U87-MG human glioblastoma cells) to 22.2 μmol/L (for A375 melanoma cells). In U87-MG xenograft tumors in nude mice, oral administration of DW10075 significantly suppressed tumor growth, and reduced the expression of CD31 and Ki67 in the tumor tissues. Conclusion: DW10075 is a potent and highly selective inhibitor of VEGFR that

  17. Phase 1 and Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Study of Metformin, Losartan, and Linagliptin Coadministered With DW1029M in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seol Ju; Kim, Sun-Young; Lim, Cheol-Hee; Jang, Hwan Bong; Kim, Min-Gul; Jeon, Ji-Young

    2016-10-14

    We investigated botanical drug-pharmaceutical drug interactions between DW1029M (a botanical extract of Morus alba linne root bark and Puerariae radix) and metformin, losartan, and linagliptin in the steady state. Three studies were conducted as randomized, open-label, 2-period, 2-treatment, multiple-dose, 2-way crossover designs. Eligible subjects received metformin (500 mg twice daily), losartan (50 mg once daily), or linagliptin (5 mg once daily) with DW1029M (300 mg × 2T twice daily) every 12 hours on days 1 through 6 and a single dose on the morning of day 7. Coadministration of DW1029M with metformin, losartan, or linagliptin had no clinically relevant effects based on the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUCτ ) geometric least-squares mean ratio (GMR) - AUCτ GMR, 89.7; 90% confidence interval (CI), 81.0-99.4 for metformin; AUCτ GMR, 96.2; 90%CI, 86.3-107.1 for losartan; and AUCτ GMR, 89.7; 90%CI, 83.2-96.6 for linagliptin. In addition, coadministration of DW1029M did not have any clinically meaningful effect on the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax,ss ) - Cmax,ss GMR, 87.3; 90%CI, 76.2-100.0 for metformin; Cmax,ss GMR, 90.5; 90%CI, 78.3-104.6 for losartan; and Cmax,ss GMR, 81.4; 90%CI, 69.5-95.3 for linagliptin. Coadministration of DW1029M with metformin, losartan, or linagliptin was well tolerated.

  18. Can Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and Diffusion-Weighted MRI (DW-MRI) Evaluate Inflammation Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianguo; Zhang, Faming; Luan, Yun; Cao, Peng; Liu, Fei; He, Wenwen; Wang, Dehang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate diagnosis efficacy of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in Crohn's disease (CD). To find out the correlations between functional MRI parameters including Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with a serologic biomarker. The relationships between pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC were also studied. Thirty-two patients with CD (22 men, 10 women; mean age: 30.5 years) and 18 healthy volunteers without any inflammatory disease (10 men, 8 women; mean age, 34.11 years) were enrolled into this approved prospective study. Pearson analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Ktrans, Kep, Ve, Vp, and C-reactive protein (CRP), ADC, and CRP respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of the functional MRI parameters in terms of sensitivity and specificity were analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses. Optimal cut-off values of each functional MRI parameters for differentiation of inflammatory from normal bowel were determined according to the Youden criterion. Mean value of Ktrans in the CD group was significantly higher than that of normal control group. Similar results were observed for Kep and Ve. On the contrary, the ADC value was lower in the CD group than that in the control group. Ktrans and Ve were shown to be correlated with CRP (r = 0.725, P < 0.001; r = 0.533, P = 0.002), meanwhile ADC showed negative correlation with CRP (r = −0.630, P < 0.001). There were negative correlations between the pharmacokinetic parameters and ADC, such as Ktrans to ADC (r = −0.856, P < 0.001), and Ve to ADC (r = −0.451, P = 0.01). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.994 for Ktrans (P < 0.001), 0.905 for ADC (P < 0.001), 0.806 for Ve (P < 0.001), and 0.764 for Kep (P = 0.002). The cut-off point of the Ktrans was found to be 0.931 min–1. This value provided the best trade-off between

  19. Effects of the veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin on soil invertebrates in laboratory tests.

    PubMed

    Römbke, J; Krogh, K A; Moser, T; Scheffczyk, A; Liebig, M

    2010-02-01

    As part of the risk assessment of veterinary pharmaceuticals, the potential impact of these chemicals on soil ecosystems has to be determined according to European law. However, almost no data from standardized laboratory tests are available. Therefore, in the EU FP6 ERAPharm, the effects of the widely used veterinary pharmaceutical ivermectin, an anthelminthic, were studied in chronic laboratory tests performed according to OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) guidelines. In detail, three soil invertebrate species--the earthworm Eisenia fetida, the springtail Folsomia candida, and the predatory mite Hypoaspis aculeifer--were tested. The nominal concentrations of ivermectin mixed into the test substrate artificial soil was verified using residue analysis, which indicated that the test substance is persistent for at least up to 28 days. As expected when considering the mode of action of this substance, survival and reproduction of collembolans were clearly affected [LC(50) = 8.4 mg/kg soil dry weight (dw); NOEC(repro) = 0.3 mg/kg soil (dw)]. Predatory mites reacted less sensitively [LC(50) > or = 31.6 mg/kg soil (dw); NOEC(repro) = 3.2 mg/kg soil (dw)]. Earthworm survival and reproduction were affected in the same order of magnitude as the predatory mites [LC(50) > or = 10 mg/kg soil (dw); NOEC(repro) = 2.5 mg/kg soil (dw)]. These results are in good agreement with the few data known from nonstandardized tests for the same or related soil invertebrate species. The results of these tests indicate that the effects of ivermectin on soil invertebrates--in particular, collembolans--cannot be excluded at field-relevant concentrations, as determined in a risk assessment according to VICH guidelines. More sophisticated higher-tier tests (e.g., in multispecies or semifield test systems) are recommended in order to assess the potential risk more accurately.

  20. Effect of long-term zinc pollution on soil microbial community resistance to repeated contamination.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Beata

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of stress (contamination trials) on the microorganisms in zinc-polluted soil (5,018 mg Zn kg(-1) soil dry weight) and unpolluted soil (141 mg Zn kg(-1) soil dw), measured as soil respiration rate. In the laboratory, soils were subjected to copper contamination (0, 500, 1,500 and 4,500 mg kg(-1) soil dw), and then a bactericide (oxytetracycline) combined with a fungicide (captan) along with glucose (10 mg g(-1) soil dw each) were added. There was a highly significant effect of soil type, copper treatment and oxytetracycline/captan treatment. The initial respiration rate of chronically zinc-polluted soil was higher than that of unpolluted soil, but in the copper treatment it showed a greater decline. Microorganisms in copper-treated soil were more susceptible to oxytetracycline/captan contamination. After the successive soil contamination trials the decline of soil respiration was greater in zinc-polluted soil than in unpolluted soil.

  1. The EXOTIME Monitoring Program Discovers Substellar Companion Candidates around the Rapidly Pulsating Subdwarf B Stars V1636 Ori and DW Lyn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, S.; Silvotti, R.; Lutz, R.; Kim, S.-L.; Exotime Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The EXOTIME monitoring program has discovered sub-stellar companion candidates around the rapidly pulsating subdwarf B stars V1636 Ori and DW Lyn using the timing method. Here we motivate our continuing search, and refer to descriptions of the photometric data collected, the data analysis and the characteristics of the O-C diagrams obtained. We also discuss our on-going efforts to consolidate the candidate discoveries with additional simulations and confirm them with independent methods.

  2. Structural requirements for recognition of the HLA-Dw14 class II epitope: A key HLA determinant associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, Akikazu; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Kwok, W.W.; Nepom, G.T. ); Mickelson, E.M.; Masewicz, S.; Hansen, J.A. ); Radka, S.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Although HLA genes have been shown to be associated with certain diseases, the basis for this association is unknown. Recent studies, however, have documented patterns of nucleotide sequence variation among some HLA genes associated with a particular disease. For rheumatoid arthritis, HLA genes in most patients have a shared nucleotide sequence encoding a key structural element of an HLA class II polypeptide; this sequence element is critical for the interaction of the HLA molecule with antigenic peptides and with responding T cells, suggestive of a direct role for this sequence element in disease susceptibility. The authors describe the serological and cellular immunologic characteristics encoded by this rheumatoid arthritis-associated sequence element. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DRB1 gene was used to define amino acids critical for antibody and T-cell recognition of this structural element, focusing on residues that distinguish the rheumatoid arthritis-associated alleles Dw4 and Dw14 from a closely related allele, Dw10, not associated with disease. Both the gain and loss of rheumatoid arthritis-associated epitopes were highly dependent on three residues within a discrete domain of the HLA-DR molecule. Recognition was most strongly influenced by the following amino acids (in order): 70 > 71 > 67. Some alloreactive T-cell clones were also influenced by amino acid variation in portions of the DR molecule lying outside the shared sequence element.

  3. Mapping of A1 conferring resistance to the aphid Amphorophora idaei and dw (dwarfing habit) in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) using AFLP and microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Daniel J; Fernández-Fernández, Felicidad; Rys, Alicja; Knight, Victoria H; Simpson, David W; Tobutt, Kenneth R

    2007-01-01

    Background Raspberry breeding programmes worldwide aim to produce improved cultivars to satisfy market demands and within these programmes there are many targets, including increased fruit quality, yield and season, and improved pest and disease resistance and plant habit. The large raspberry aphid, Amphorophora idaei, transmits four viruses and vector resistance is an objective in raspberry breeding. The development of molecular tools that discriminate between aphid resistance genes from different sources will allow the pyramiding of such genes and the development of raspberry varieties with superior pest resistance. We have raised a red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) F1 progeny from the cross 'Malling Jewel' × 'Malling Orion' (MJ × MO), which segregates for resistance to biotype 1 of the aphid Amphorophora idaei and for a second phenotypic trait, dwarf habit. These traits are controlled by single genes, denoted (A1) and (dw) respectively. Results The progeny of 94 seedlings was scored for the segregation of 95 AFLP and 22 SSR markers and a linkage map was constructed that covers a total genetic distance of 505 cM over seven linkage groups. The average linkage group length was 72.2 cM and there was an average of 17 markers per linkage group, of which at least two were codominant SSRs, allowing comparisons with previously published maps of raspberry. The two phenotypic traits, A1 and dw, mapped to linkage groups 3 and 6 respectively. Conclusion The mapping of A1 will facilitate the discrimination of resistance genes from different sources and the pyramiding of aphid resistance genes in new raspberry cultivars; the mapping of dw will allow further investigations into the genetics of dwarfing habit in Rubus. PMID:17374159

  4. Cerebellar microfolia and other abnormalities of neuronal growth, migration, and lamination in the Pit1dw-J homozygote mutant mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekiguchi, M.; Abe, H.; Moriya, M.; Tanaka, O.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    The Snell dwarf mouse (Pit1dw-J homozygote) has a mutation in the Pit1 gene that prevents the normal formation of the anterior pituitary. In neonates and adults there is almost complete absence of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), thyroxin (T4), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Since these hormones have been suggested to play a role in normal development of the central nervous system (CNS), we have investigated the effects of the Pit1dw-J mutation on the cerebellum and hippocampal formation. In the cerebellum, there were abnormalities of both foliation and lamination. The major foliation anomalies were 1) changes in the relative size of specific folia and also the proportional sizes of the anterior vs posterior cerebellum; and 2) the presence of between one and three microfolia per half cerebellum. The microfolia were all in the medial portion of the hemisphere in the caudal part of the cerebellum. Each microfolium was just rostral to a normal fissure and interposed between the fissure and a normal gyrus. Lamination abnormalities included an increase in the number of single ectopic granule cells in the molecular layer in both cerebellar vermis (86%) and hemisphere (40%) in comparison with the wild-type mouse. In the hippocampus of the Pit1dw-J homozygote mouse, the number of pyramidal cells was decreased, although the width of the pyramidal cell layer throughout areas CA1-CA3 appeared to be normal, but less densely populated than in the wild-type mouse. Moreover, the number of granule cells that form the granule cell layer was decreased from the wild-type mouse and some ectopic granule cells (occurring both as single cells and as small clusters) were observed in the innermost portion of the molecular layer. The abnormalities observed in the Pit1dw-J homozygote mouse seem to be caused by both direct and indirect effects of the deficiency of TSH (or T4), PRL, or GH rather than by a direct effect of the deletion of Pit1.

  5. Speciation of vanadium in urban, industrial and volcanic soils by a modified Tessier method.

    PubMed

    Orecchio, Santino; Amorello, Diana; Barreca, Salvatore; Pettignano, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Vanadium (V) concentrations in industrial, urban and volcanic soils were sequentially extracted using a modified Tessier's method. The voltammetric technique was used to determine V concentrations in solutions obtained from the various extraction steps. At the reference stations, the V concentrations (sum of four individual fractions) in soils ranged from 0.72 to 0.24 g kg(-1) dry weight (d.w.) with a mean value of 0.18 g kg(-1) d.w. V concentrations in soils of the Palermo urban area ranged from 0.34 to 2.1 g kg(-1) d.w., in the Milazzo (industrial) area between 0.26 and 5.4 g kg(-1) d.w. and in the volcanic area near Mt. Etna from 0.91 to 2.9 g kg(-1) d.w. When the V concentrations around Mt. Etna were compared with those obtained at the reference stations, it was confirmed that Mt. Etna is a continuous source of V. In all the samples analyzed, the majority of V (from 94 to 100%) was detected in the fourth fraction.

  6. Distribution of persistent organic pollutants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements in soil and vegetation following a large scale landfill fire in northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Chrysikou, Loukia; Gemenetzis, Panagiotis; Kouras, Athanasios; Manoli, Evangelia; Terzi, Eleni; Samara, Constantini

    2008-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), including hexaclorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and DDTs, as well as trace elements were determined in soil and vegetation samples collected from the surrounding area of the landfill "Tagarades", the biggest in northern Greece, following a large scale fire involving approximately 50,000 tons of municipal waste. High concentrations of total PAHs, PCBs and heavy metals were found inside the landfill (1475 microg kg(-1) dw, 399 microg kg(-1) dw and 29.8 mg kg(-1) dw, respectively), whereas concentrations in the surrounding soils were by far lower ranging between 11.2-28.1 microg kg(-1) dw for PAHs, 4.02-11.2 microg kg(-1) dw for PCBs and 575-1207 mg kg(-1) dw for heavy metals. The distribution of HCHs and DDTs were quite different since certain soils exhibited equal or higher concentrations than the landfill. In vegetation, the concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, HCHs and DDTs ranged from 14.1-34.7, 3.64-25.9, 1.41-32.1 and 0.61-4.03 microg kg(-1) dw, respectively, while those of heavy metals from 81 to 159 mg kg(-1) dw. The results of the study indicated soil and vegetation pollution levels in the surroundings of the landfill comparable to those reported for other Greek locations. The impact from the landfill fire was not evident partially due to the presence of recent and past inputs from other activities (agriculture, vehicular transport, earlier landfill fires).

  7. Purification and characterization of an endo-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase from the culture medium of Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4.

    PubMed Central

    Bourgerie, S; Karamanos, Y; Grard, T; Julien, R

    1994-01-01

    A novel endo-N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (ENGase), acting on the di-N-acetylchitobiosyl part of N-linked glycans, was characterized in the culture medium of Stigmatella aurantiaca DW4. Purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and chromatofocusing, this ENGase presents, upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a molecular mass near 27 kDa. Optimal pH and pI were 4.0 and 6.8, respectively. The enzyme, named ENGase St, exhibits high activity on oligomannoside-type glycoasparagines and glycoproteins and could also hydrolyze hybrid- and complex-type glycoasparagines but does not acts as a murein hydrolase. Images PMID:7928985

  8. Capability of selected crop plants for shoot mercury accumulation from polluted soils: phytoremediation perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Luis; Rincón, Jesusa; Asencio, Isaac; Rodríguez-Castellanos, Laura

    2007-01-01

    High-biomass crops can be considered as an alternative to hyperaccumulator plants to phytoremediate soils contaminated by heavy metals. In order to assess their practical capability for the absorption and accumulation of Hg in shoots, barley, white lupine, lentil, and chickpea were tested in pot experiments using several growth substrates. In the first experimental series, plants were grown in a mixture of vermiculite and perlite spiked with 8.35 microg g(-1) d.w. of soluble Hg. The mercury concentration of the plants' aerial tissues ranged from 1.51 to 5.13 microg g(-1) d.w. with lentil and lupine showing the highest values. In a second experiment carried out using a Hg-polluted soil (32.16 microg g(-1) d.w.) collected from a historical mining area (Almadén, Spain), the crop plants tested only reached shoot Hg concentration up to 1.13 microg g(-1) d.w. In the third experimental series, the Almadén soil was spiked with 1 microg g(-1) d.w. of soluble Hg; as a result, mercury concentrations in the plant shoots increased approximately 6 times for lupine, 5 times for chickpea, and 3.5 times for barley and lentil, with respect to those obtained with the original soil without Hg added. This marked difference was attributed to the low availability of Hg in the original Almadin soil and its subsequent increase in the Hg-spiked soil. The low mercury accumulation yields obtained for all plants do not make a successful decontamination of the Almadén soils possible byphytoremediation using crop plants. However, since the crops tested can effectively decrease the plant-available Hg level in this soil, their use could, to some extent, reduce the environmental risk of Hg pollution in the area.

  9. Combination of a fast cleanup procedure and a DR-CALUX® bioassay for dioxin surveillance in Taiwanese soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ding-Yan; Lee, Yi-Pin; Li, Chiu-Ping; Chi, Kai-Hsien; Liang, Bo-Wei P; Liu, Wen-Yao; Wang, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Susana; Chen, Ting-Chien; Yeh, Kuei-Jyum C; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Chyun; Chao, How-Ran; Tsou, Tsui-Chun

    2014-05-06

    Our goal was to determine dioxin levels in 800 soil samples collected from Taiwan. An in vitro DR-CALUX® assay was carried out with the help of an automated Soxhlet system and fast cleanup column. The mean dioxin level of 800 soil samples was 36.0 pg-bioanalytical equivalents (BEQs)/g dry weight (d.w.). Soil dioxin-BEQs were higher in northern Taiwan (61.8 pg-BEQ/g d.w.) than in central, southern, and eastern Taiwan (22.2, 24.9, and 7.80 pg-BEQ/g d.w., respectively). Analysis of multiple linear regression models identified four major predictors of dioxin-BEQs including soil sampling location (β = 0.097, p < 0.001), land use (β = 0.065, p < 0.001), soil brightness (β = 0.170, p < 0.001), and soil moisture (β = 0.051, p = 0.020), with adjusted R2 = 0.947 (p < 0.001) (n = 662). An univariate logistic regression analysis with the cut-off point of 33.4 pg-BEQ/g d.w. showed significant odds ratios (ORs) for soil sampling location (OR = 2.43, p < 0.001), land use (OR = 1.47, p < 0.001), and soil brightness (OR = 2.83, p = 0.009). In conclusion, four variables, including soil sampling location, land use, soil brightness, and soil moisture, may be related to soil-dioxin contamination. Soil samples collected in northern Taiwan, and especially in Bade City, soils near industrial areas, and soils with darker color may contain higher dioxin-BEQ levels.

  10. Combination of a Fast Cleanup Procedure and a DR-CALUX® Bioassay for Dioxin Surveillance in Taiwanese Soils

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ding-Yan; Lee, Yi-Pin; Li, Chiu-Ping; Chi, Kai-Hsien; Liang, Bo-Wei P.; Liu, Wen-Yao; Wang, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Susana; Chen, Ting-Chien; Yeh, Kuei-Jyum C.; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Chyun; Chao, How-Ran; Tsou, Tsui-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to determine dioxin levels in 800 soil samples collected from Taiwan. An in vitro DR-CALUX® assay was carried out with the help of an automated Soxhlet system and fast cleanup column. The mean dioxin level of 800 soil samples was 36.0 pg-bioanalytical equivalents (BEQs)/g dry weight (d.w.). Soil dioxin-BEQs were higher in northern Taiwan (61.8 pg-BEQ/g d.w.) than in central, southern, and eastern Taiwan (22.2, 24.9, and 7.80 pg-BEQ/g d.w., respectively). Analysis of multiple linear regression models identified four major predictors of dioxin-BEQs including soil sampling location (β = 0.097, p < 0.001), land use (β = 0.065, p < 0.001), soil brightness (β = 0.170, p < 0.001), and soil moisture (β = 0.051, p = 0.020), with adjusted R2 = 0.947 (p < 0.001) (n = 662). An univariate logistic regression analysis with the cut-off point of 33.4 pg-BEQ/g d.w. showed significant odds ratios (ORs) for soil sampling location (OR = 2.43, p < 0.001), land use (OR = 1.47, p < 0.001), and soil brightness (OR = 2.83, p = 0.009). In conclusion, four variables, including soil sampling location, land use, soil brightness, and soil moisture, may be related to soil-dioxin contamination. Soil samples collected in northern Taiwan, and especially in Bade City, soils near industrial areas, and soils with darker color may contain higher dioxin-BEQ levels. PMID:24806195

  11. Nitrogen transformations and greenhouse gas emissions from a riparian wetland soil: an undisturbed soil column study.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Leoz, Borja; Antigüedad, Iñaki; Garbisu, Carlos; Ruiz-Romera, Estilita

    2011-01-15

    Riparian wetlands bordering intensively managed agricultural fields can act as biological filters that retain and transform agrochemicals such as nitrate and pesticides. Nitrate removal in wetlands has usually been attributed to denitrification processes which in turn imply the production of greenhouse gases (CO(2) and N(2)O). Denitrification processes were studied in the Salburua wetland (northern Spain) by using undisturbed soil columns which were subsequently divided into three sections corresponding to A-, Bg- and B2g-soil horizons. Soil horizons were subjected to leaching with a 200 mg NO₃⁻L⁻¹ solution (rate: 90 mL day⁻¹) for 125 days at two different temperatures (10 and 20°C), using a new experimental design for leaching assays which enabled not only to evaluate leachate composition but also to measure gas emissions during the leaching process. Column leachate samples were analyzed for NO₃⁻concentration, NH(4)(+) concentration, and dissolved organic carbon. Emissions of greenhouse gases (CO₂ and N₂O) were determined in the undisturbed soil columns. The A horizon at 20°C showed the highest rates of NO₃⁻ removal (1.56 mg N-NO₃⁻kg⁻¹ DW soil day⁻¹) and CO₂ and N₂O production (5.89 mg CO₂ kg⁻¹ DW soil day⁻¹ and 55.71 μg N-N₂O kg⁻¹ DW soil day⁻¹). For the Salburua wetland riparian soil, we estimated a potential nitrate removal capacity of 1012 kg N-NO₃⁻ha⁻¹ year⁻¹, and potential greenhouse gas emissions of 5620 kg CO₂ ha⁻¹ year⁻¹ and 240 kg N-N₂O ha⁻¹ year⁻¹.

  12. Chloroacetic acids in European soils and vegetation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ruud J B

    2003-04-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) are possible minor atmospheric degradation products of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene, respectively. These acids may be wet- or dry-deposited from the atmosphere to land surfaces and hence possibly affect plant growth. However, the existing database on TCA levels in soil is limited to a few studies carried out in the late 1980's and the early to mid-1990's and it was concluded that there is a need for further measurements of concentrations of TCA and DCA in soils. In this study soil samples from 10 locations in 5 European countries, as well as vegetation samples, and a limited number of rainwater and air samples were collected and analysed for DCA and TCA to determine the concentrations of these compounds. An isotope dilution method using GC-MS was used for the determination of these acids in the samples. The method was briefly validated and the performance characteristics are presented. The results of the analysis of the soil samples show that the DCA and TCA concentrations in soil from different sites in Europe are more or less comparable, with the exception of Germany, especially Freudenstadt, where significantly higher TCA concentrations (up to 12 microg kg(-1) dw) were found. The average DCA and TCA concentrations in soil in this study were 0.25 +/- 0.12 and 0.64 +/- 1.40 microg kg(-1) dw, respectively. Generally, the concentration in soils from forest areas are about twice those from open-land areas. The DCA and TCA concentrations in vegetation samples ranged from 2.1 to 73 microg kg(-1) dw for DCA and from 4.7 to 17 microg kg(-1) dw for TCA. Thus, the concentrations in vegetation samples are 10-20 times higher than the soil concentrations. DCA and TCA concentrations in wet deposition samples and air samples collected in The Netherlands were 0.14 and 0.15 microg l(-1) for wet deposition samples and <0.5 and 0.7 ng m(-3) for air samples respectively. For these samples taken in The Netherlands

  13. Potential of Ranunculus acris L. for biomonitoring trace element contamination of riverbank soils: photosystem II activity and phenotypic responses for two soil series.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Lilian; Lamy, Pierre; Bert, Valerie; Quintela-Sabaris, Celestino; Mench, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Foliar ionome, photosystem II activity, and leaf growth parameters of Ranunculus acris L., a potential biomonitor of trace element (TE) contamination and phytoavailability, were assessed using two riverbank soil series. R. acris was cultivated on two potted soil series obtained by mixing a TE (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn)-contaminated technosol with either an uncontaminated sandy riverbank soil (A) or a silty clay one slightly contaminated by TE (B). Trace elements concentrations in the soil-pore water and the leaves, leaf dry weight (DW) yield, total leaf area (TLA), specific leaf area (SLA), and photosystem II activity were measured for both soil series after a 50-day growth period. As soil contamination increased, changes in soluble TE concentrations depended on soil texture. Increase in total soil TE did not affect the leaf DW yield, the TLA, the SLA, and the photosystem II activity of R. acris over the 50-day exposure. The foliar ionome did not reflect the total and soluble TE concentrations in both soil series. Foliar ionome of R. acris was only effective to biomonitor total and soluble soil Na concentrations in both soil series and total and soluble soil Mo concentrations in the soil series B.

  14. Biochar from sugarcane filtercake reduces soil CO2 emissions relative to raw residue and improves water retention and nutrient availability in a highly-weathered tropical soil.

    PubMed

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions.

  15. Biochar from Sugarcane Filtercake Reduces Soil CO2 Emissions Relative to Raw Residue and Improves Water Retention and Nutrient Availability in a Highly-Weathered Tropical Soil

    PubMed Central

    Eykelbosh, Angela Joy; Johnson, Mark S.; Santos de Queiroz, Edmar; Dalmagro, Higo José; Guimarães Couto, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the degradation of nutrient-poor Ferralsols limits productivity and drives agricultural expansion into pristine areas. However, returning agricultural residues to the soil in a stabilized form may offer opportunities for maintaining or improving soil quality, even under conditions that typically promote carbon loss. We examined the use of biochar made from filtercake (a byproduct of sugarcane processing) on the physicochemical properties of a cultivated tropical soil. Filtercake was pyrolyzed at 575°C for 3 h yielding a biochar with increased surface area and porosity compared to the raw filtercake. Filtercake biochar was primarily composed of aromatic carbon, with some residual cellulose and hemicellulose. In a three-week laboratory incubation, CO2 effluxes from a highly weathered Ferralsol soil amended with 5% biochar (dry weight, d.w.) were roughly four-fold higher than the soil-only control, but 23-fold lower than CO2 effluxes from soil amended with 5% (d.w.) raw filtercake. We also applied vinasse, a carbon-rich liquid waste from bioethanol production typically utilized as a fertilizer on sugarcane soils, to filtercake- and biochar-amended soils. Total CO2 efflux from the biochar-amended soil in response to vinasse application was only 5% of the efflux when vinasse was applied to soil amended with raw filtercake. Furthermore, mixtures of 5 or 10% biochar (d.w.) in this highly weathered tropical soil significantly increased water retention within the plant-available range and also improved nutrient availability. Accordingly, application of sugarcane filtercake as biochar, with or without vinasse application, may better satisfy soil management objectives than filtercake applied to soils in its raw form, and may help to build soil carbon stocks in sugarcane-cultivating regions. PMID:24897522

  16. Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals in soil from San Luis Potosí, México.

    PubMed

    Perez-Vazquez, Francisco Javier; Flores-Ramirez, Rogelio; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Orta-Garcia, Sandra Teresa; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Carrizalez-Yañez, Leticia; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) in soil from the city of San Luis Potosí in Mexico. In order to confirm the presence of the previously mentioned compounds, outdoor surface soil samples were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometer for PBDEs, PCBs, DDT, and DDE. Meanwhile, heavy metals were quantified using the atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique. The total PBDEs levels ranged from 5.0 to 134 μg/kg dry weight (dw), with a total mean PBDEs level of 22.0 ± 32.5 μg/kg dw (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the total mean level in the studied soil was 21.6 ± 24.7 μg/kg dw (range, soil samples (100 %) had detectable levels of the metabolite DDE. Moreover, the total mean DDT level (∑ DDT and DDE) was approximately 5.50 ± 4.50 μg/kg dw. The mean levels for arsenic, mercury, cadmium, and lead in soil samples were 7.20 ± 10.7 (range, 15.0 to 265 mg/kg dw), 0.45 ± 0.48 (range, dw), 3.00 ± 3.00 (range, 1.00-13.0 mg/kg dw), and 108 ± 105 (range, 25.0 to 435 mg/kg dw), respectively. This screening study provides us with concentration data for the occurrence of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and four heavy metals in soil samples from the city of San Luis Potosí, Mexico, and considering that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the city of San Luis Potosi is necessary.

  17. MRI for Assessing Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using DCE-MR and DW-MR Data Sets: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Mario; Fusco, Roberta; Catalano, Orlando; Sansone, Mario; Avallone, Antonio; Delrio, Paolo; Pecori, Biagio; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Petrillo, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate MRI for neoadjuvant therapy response assessment in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), we have compared magnetic resonance volumetry based on DCE-MRI (V(DCE)) and on DWI (V(DWI)) scans with conventional T2-weighted volumetry (V(C)) in LARC patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Twenty-nine patients with LARC underwent MR examination before and after neoadjuvant therapy. A manual segmentation was performed on DCE-MR postcontrast images, on DWI (b-value 800 s/mm2), and on conventional T2-weighted images by two radiologists. DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weigthed volumetric changes before and after treatment were evaluated. Nonparametric sample tests, interobserver agreement, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) were performed. Diagnostic performance linked to DCE-MRI volumetric change was superior to T2-w and DW-MRI volumetric changes performance (specificity 86%, sensitivity 93%, and accuracy 93%). Area Under ROC (AUC) of V(DCE) was greater than AUCs of V(C) and V(DWI) resulting in an increase of 15.6% and 11.1%, respectively. Interobserver agreement between two radiologists was 0.977, 0.864, and 0.756 for V(C), V(DCE), and V(DWI), respectively. V(DCE) seems to be a promising tool for therapy response assessment in LARC. Further studies on large series of patients are needed to refine technique and evaluate its potential value. PMID:26413528

  18. Fluid inclusion from drill hole DW-5, Hohi geothermal area, Japan: Evidence of boiling and procedure for estimating CO2 content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasada, M.; Roedder, E.; Belkin, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid inclusion studies have been used to derive a model for fluid evolution in the Hohi geothermal area, Japan. Six types of fluid inclusions are found in quartz obtained from the drill core of DW-5 hole. They are: (I) primary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (II) primary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (III) primary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling); (IV) secondary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (V) secondary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (VI) secondary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling). Homogenization temperatures (Th) range between 196 and 347??C and the final melting point of ice (Tm) between -0.2 and -4.3??C. The CO2 content was estimated semiquantitatively to be between 0 and 0.39 wt. % based on the bubble behavior on crushing. NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of fluid inclusions was determined as being between 0 and 6.8 wt. % after minor correction for CO2 content. Fluid inclusions in quartz provide a record of geothermal activity of early boiling and later cooling. The CO2 contents and homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions with evidence of boiling generally increase with depth; these changes, and NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of the fluid can be explained by an adiabatic boiling model for a CO2-bearing low-salinity fluid. Some high-salinity inclusions without CO2 are presumed to have formed by a local boiling process due to a temperature increase or a pressure decrease. The liquid-rich primary and secondary inclusions without evidence of boiling formed during the cooling process. The salinity and CO2 content of these inclusions are lower than those in the boiling fluid at the early stage, probably as a result of admixture with groundwater. ?? 1986.

  19. Biogeochemistry of uranium in the soil-plant and water-plant systems in an old uranium mine.

    PubMed

    Favas, Paulo J C; Pratas, João; Mitra, Soumita; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2016-10-15

    The present study highlights the uranium (U) concentrations in water-soil-plant matrices and the efficiency considering a heterogeneous assemblage of terrestrial and aquatic native plant species to act as the biomonitor and phytoremediator for environmental U-contamination in the Sevilha mine (uraniferous region of Beiras, Central Portugal). A total of 53 plant species belonging to 22 families was collected from 24 study sites along with ambient soil and/or water samples. The concentration of U showed wide range of variations in the ambient medium: 7.5 to 557mgkg(-1) for soil and 0.4 to 113μgL(-1) for water. The maximum potential of U accumulation was recorded in roots of the following terrestrial plants: Juncus squarrosus (450mgkg(-1) DW), Carlina corymbosa (181mgkg(-1) DW) and Juncus bufonius (39.9mgkg(-1) DW), followed by the aquatic macrophytes, namely Callitriche stagnalis (55.6mgkg(-1) DW) Lemna minor (53.0mgkg(-1) DW) and Riccia fluitans (50.6mgkg(-1) DW). Accumulation of U in plant tissues exhibited the following decreasing trend: root>leaves>stem>flowers/fruits and this confirms the unique efficiency of roots in accumulating this radionuclide from host soil/sediment (phytostabilization). Overall, the accumulation pattern in the studied aquatic plants (L. minor, R. fluitans, C. stagnalis and Lythrum portula) dominated over most of the terrestrial counterpart. Among terrestrial plants, the higher mean bioconcentration factor (≈1 in roots/rhizomes of C. corymbosa and J. squarrosus) and translocation factor (31 in Andryala integrifolia) were encountered in the representing families Asteraceae and Juncaceae. Hence, these terrestrial plants can be treated as the promising candidates for the development of the phytostabilization or phytoextraction methodologies based on the accumulation, abundance and biomass production.

  20. Levels of flame retardants HBCD, TBBPA and TBC in surface soils from an industrialized region of East China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianfeng; Feng, Jiayong; Li, Xinhu; Li, Gang

    2014-05-01

    Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are of increasing concern because of their potential environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity. Tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl)isocyanurate (TBC) is another brominated flame retardant (BFR) which has recently been found in the environment and begun to attract attention. The objective of this study is to determine the concentration of these three BFRs in surface soil samples collected from a heavily industrialized and urbanized region in East China. Levels of ∑HBCDs ranged from below detection limits (0.020 ng g(-1)) to 102.6 ng g(-1) on a dry weight basis (dw) with a median level of 15.8 ng g(-1) dw. For TBBPA, the concentration ranged from below detection limits (0.025 ng g(-1)) to 78.6 ng g(-1) dw with a median level of 9.17 ng g(-1) dw. TBC was found at relatively lower concentrations ranging from below detection limits (0.024 ng g(-1)) to 16.4 ng g(-1) dw with a median level of 0.95 ng g(-1) dw. The concentrations of these three BFRs are significantly positively correlated, indicating a common source. Variable BFRs levels were found in different types of soils, with significantly higher concentrations observed at waste dumping sites and industrial areas. The diastereoisomer profiles of HBCDs in most of the soil samples differed from those of the commercial products. The mass inventories of HBCDs, TBBPA and TBC in this region gave preliminarily estimates of 6.68, 2.67 and 0.85 kg, respectively. Therefore, the ubiquitous contamination of soils by these BFRs may well reflect their widespread usage in the study area.

  1. Correlations between Polyacetylene Concentrations in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and Various Soil Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Granstedt, Artur; Olsson, Marie E

    2016-08-31

    This study assessed the concentrations of three falcarinol-type polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol, falcarindiol-3-acetate) in carrots and the correlations between these and different soil traits. A total of 144 carrot samples, from three different harvests taken a single season, were analysed in terms of their polyacetylene concentrations and root development. On one of the harvesting occasions, 48 soil samples were also taken and analysed. The chemical composition of the soil was found to influence the concentrations of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes in carrots. When the total soil potassium level was 200 mg/100 g soil, the concentration of falcarindiol (FaDOH) in the carrot samples was 630 μg/g DW, but when carrots were grown in soil with a total potassium level of 300 mg/100 g soil, the FaDOH concentration in the carrots fell to 445 μg/g DW. Carrots grown in soils generally low in available phosphorus exhibited higher levels of falcarindiol if the soil was also low in available magnesium and calcium. The concentrations of polyacetylenes in carrots were positively correlated with total soil phosphorus level, but negatively correlated with total soil potassium level. Of the three polyacetylenes analysed, FaDOH concentrations were influenced most by changes in soil chemical composition.

  2. Correlations between Polyacetylene Concentrations in Carrot (Daucus carota L.) and Various Soil Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kjellenberg, Lars; Johansson, Eva; Gustavsson, Karl-Erik; Granstedt, Artur; Olsson, Marie E.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the concentrations of three falcarinol-type polyacetylenes (falcarinol, falcarindiol, falcarindiol-3-acetate) in carrots and the correlations between these and different soil traits. A total of 144 carrot samples, from three different harvests taken a single season, were analysed in terms of their polyacetylene concentrations and root development. On one of the harvesting occasions, 48 soil samples were also taken and analysed. The chemical composition of the soil was found to influence the concentrations of falcarinol-type polyacetylenes in carrots. When the total soil potassium level was 200 mg/100 g soil, the concentration of falcarindiol (FaDOH) in the carrot samples was 630 μg/g DW, but when carrots were grown in soil with a total potassium level of 300 mg/100 g soil, the FaDOH concentration in the carrots fell to 445 μg/g DW. Carrots grown in soils generally low in available phosphorus exhibited higher levels of falcarindiol if the soil was also low in available magnesium and calcium. The concentrations of polyacetylenes in carrots were positively correlated with total soil phosphorus level, but negatively correlated with total soil potassium level. Of the three polyacetylenes analysed, FaDOH concentrations were influenced most by changes in soil chemical composition. PMID:28231155

  3. Effects of freshwater input on trace element pollution in salt marsh soils of a typical coastal estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Zhao, Qingqing; Lu, Qiongqiong; Wang, Junjing; Reddy, K. Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Freshwater input is an important pathway for the restoration of degraded coastal wetlands, however, little information is available on the negative effects of freshwater inputs on salt marsh soils in restored wetlands. Soil profile samples to a depth of 70 cm were collected in both degraded wetland (DW) and freshwater restored wetland (RW) in the Yellow River Delta of China to analyze the trace element pollution effects of freshwater input on coastal wetland soils. Heavy metals (i.e. Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) and arsenic (As) concentrations were determined using the inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry to investigate their distributions, sources and ecotoxicity in marsh soils from both wetlands. Our results showed that these trace elements had moderate spatial variability in both DW and RW soils. The concentrations of As, Cr, Pb and Cd in all soil layers were generally higher in RW soils than those in DW soils (p < 0.05), whereas the concentrations of Zn and Cu were higher in DW soils. Heavy metals had similar source in both wetlands, however, As and Zn in DW or As, Zn and Ni in RW might have another similar origin. The enrichment factor (EF) values for Cu, Ni and Pb in both wetlands indicated minimal enrichment levels, whereas both As and Cd were significantly enriched with EF values 3 or 6 times greater than 1.5, implying a significant natural or anthropogenic origin. As and Ni exceeded the effect range low (ERL) and threshold effect level (TEL) in both wetlands, even As exceeded the probable effect level (PEL) in RW soils. Cr, Cu and Cd were grouped into TELs-PELs, moreover, Cr concentrations in RW soils exceeded the ERL. However, both Pb and Zn concentrations were below the TELs in both wetlands. Generally, The toxic unit in more than 85% of DW or RW soil samples showed low toxicity with higher contribution of As and Ni. It is necessary to monitor and control trace elements in the freshwater supplied to restored wetlands in coastal wetland

  4. Contamination of Phthalate Esters (PAEs) in Typical Wastewater-Irrigated Agricultural Soils in Hebei, North China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Liang, Qiong; Gao, Rutai; Hou, Haobo; Tan, Wenbing; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Minda; Ma, Lina; Xi, Beidou; Wang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    The Wangyang River (WYR) basin is a typical wastewater irrigation area in Hebei Province, North China. This study investigated the concentration and distribution of six priority phthalate esters (PAEs) in the agricultural soils in this area. Thirty-nine soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected along the WYR to assess the PAE residues in soils. Results showed that PAEs are ubiquitous environmental contaminants in the topsoil obtained from the irrigation area. The concentrations of Σ6PAEs range from 0.191 μg g-1 dw to 0.457 μg g-1 dw with an average value of 0.294 μg g-1 dw. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) are the dominant PAE species in the agricultural soils. Among the DEHP concentrations, the highest DEHP concentration was found at the sites close to the villages; this result suggested that dense anthropogenic activities and random garbage disposal in the rural area are possible sources of PAEs. The PAE concentrations were weakly and positively correlated with soil organic carbon and soil enzyme activities; thus, these factors can affect the distribution of PAEs. This study further showed that only dimethyl phthalate (DMP) concentrations exceeded the recommended allowable concentrations; no remediation measures are necessary to control the PAEs in the WYR area. However, the PAEs in the topsoil may pose a potential risk to the ecosystem and human health in this area. Therefore, the exacerbating PAE pollution should be addressed.

  5. Accumulation, allocation, and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil-Brassica chinensis system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Fan, Shukai; Du, Xiaoming; Yang, Juncheng; Wang, Wenyan; Hou, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Farmland soil and leafy vegetables accumulate more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in suburban sites. In this study, 13 sampling areas were selected from vegetable fields in the outskirts of Xi'an, the largest city in northwestern China. The similarity of PAH composition in soil and vegetation was investigated through principal components analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA), rather than discrimination of PAH congeners from various sources. The toxic equivalent quantity of PAHs in soil ranged from 7 to 202 μg/kg d.w., with an average of 41 μg/kg d.w., which exceeded the agricultural/horticultural soil acceptance criteria for New Zealand. However, the cancer risk level posed by combined direct ingestion, dermal contact, inhalation of soil particles, and inhalation of surface soil vapor met the rigorous international criteria (1 × 10(-6)). The concentration of total PAHs was (1052 ± 73) μg/kg d.w. in vegetation (mean ± standard error). The cancer risks posed by ingestion of vegetation ranged from 2×10-5 to 2 × 10(-4) with an average of 1.66 × 10(-4), which was higher than international excess lifetime risk limits for carcinogens (1 × 10(-4)). The geochemical indices indicated that the PAHs in soil and vegetables were mainly from vehicle and crude oil combustion. Both the total PAHs in vegetation and bioconcentration factor for total PAHs (the ratio of total PAHs in vegetation to total PAHs in soil) increased with increasing pH as well as decreasing sand in soil. The total variation in distribution of PAHs in vegetation explained by those in soil reached 98% in RDA, which was statistically significant based on Monte Carlo permutation. Common pollution source and notable effects of soil contamination on vegetation would result in highly similar distribution of PAHs in soil and vegetation.

  6. Accumulation, Allocation, and Risk Assessment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Soil-Brassica chinensis System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Fan, Shukai; Du, Xiaoming; Yang, Juncheng; Wang, Wenyan; Hou, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Farmland soil and leafy vegetables accumulate more polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in suburban sites. In this study, 13 sampling areas were selected from vegetable fields in the outskirts of Xi’an, the largest city in northwestern China. The similarity of PAH composition in soil and vegetation was investigated through principal components analysis and redundancy analysis (RDA), rather than discrimination of PAH congeners from various sources. The toxic equivalent quantity of PAHs in soil ranged from 7 to 202 μg/kg d.w., with an average of 41 μg/kg d.w., which exceeded the agricultural/horticultural soil acceptance criteria for New Zealand. However, the cancer risk level posed by combined direct ingestion, dermal contact, inhalation of soil particles, and inhalation of surface soil vapor met the rigorous international criteria (1×10−6). The concentration of total PAHs was (1052±73) μg/kg d.w. in vegetation (mean±standard error). The cancer risks posed by ingestion of vegetation ranged from 2×10−5 to 2×10−4 with an average of 1.66×10−4, which was higher than international excess lifetime risk limits for carcinogens (1×10−4). The geochemical indices indicated that the PAHs in soil and vegetables were mainly from vehicle and crude oil combustion. Both the total PAHs in vegetation and bioconcentration factor for total PAHs (the ratio of total PAHs in vegetation to total PAHs in soil) increased with increasing pH as well as decreasing sand in soil. The total variation in distribution of PAHs in vegetation explained by those in soil reached 98% in RDA, which was statistically significant based on Monte Carlo permutation. Common pollution source and notable effects of soil contamination on vegetation would result in highly similar distribution of PAHs in soil and vegetation. PMID:25679782

  7. Contributions of available substrates and activities of trophic microbial community to methanogenesis in vegetative and reproductive rice rhizospheric soil.

    PubMed

    Chawanakul, Sansanee; Chaiprasert, Pawinee; Towprayoon, Sirintornthep; Tanticharoen, Morakot

    2009-01-01

    Potential of methane production and trophic microbial activities at rhizospheric soil during rice cv. Supanbunri 1 cultivation were determined by laboratory anaerobic diluents vials. The methane production was higher from rhizospheric than non-rhizospheric soil, with the noticeable peaks during reproductive phase (RP) than vegetative phase (VP). Glucose, ethanol and acetate were the dominant available substrates found in rhizospheric soil during methane production at both phases. The predominance activities of trophic microbial consortium in methanogenesis, namely fermentative bacteria (FB), acetogenic bacteria (AGB), acetate utilizing bacteria (AB) and acetoclastic methanogens (AM) were also determined. At RP, these microbial groups were enhanced in the higher of methane production than VP. This correlates with our finding that methane production was greater at the rhizospheric soil with the noticeable peaks during RP (1,150 +/- 60 nmol g dw(-1) d(-1)) compared with VP (510 +/- 30 nmol g dw(-1) d(-1)). The high number of AM showed the abundant (1.1x10(4) cell g dw(-1)) with its high activity at RP, compared to the less activity with AM number at VP (9.8x10(2) cell g dw(-1)). Levels of AM are low in the total microbial population, being less than 1% of AB. These evidences revealed that the microbial consortium of these two phases were different.

  8. The use of drilling solid waste as amendment of acid-sulphate soils of the Orinoco Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, P.; Urich, J.; Gonzalez, V.

    1996-12-31

    The Venezuelan oil industry has begun an exploration and drilling program in the Orinoco Delta, and an intensive research is executed about the feasibility of landspreading as an option to dispose water based drilling wastes (DW) to avoid the contamination of water bodies. The original fluvial marine seasonal floodplain nearby Boca de Uracoa town (9{degrees}N, 62{degrees}, 21{degrees} W), was modified after the closure of Manamo distributary, which led to the transformation of the original substrate with high pyrite contain, to acid-sulphate soils. Greenhouse experiments were carried out applying Drilling Waste (DW) equivalent doses of 0, 200, 500, 1000 and 1500 m3/ha to an acid-sulphate soil, using as test plant Zea mays var. PB-8. The results show that the elevated pH of DW (pH of 9.7) neutralizes the very acidic reaction of the acid-sulphate soils (pH 2.85) which is reflected on the higher production of biomass obtained with DW equivalent doses over 500 m3/ha. The Ba content in aerial biomass was below 0.2 {mu}g/g in all treatments, while Pb and Zn content were depleted by the parallel application of Phosphoric rock (PR). Concentrations of these elements in the soil equilibrium solution, shows very low leaching and low availability for vegetation.

  9. The uptake of Cs and Sr from soil to radish (Raphanus sativus L.)- potential for phytoextraction and remediation of contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wen, Fangping; Xu, Changhe; Tang, Yunlai; Luo, Xuegang

    2012-08-01

    The (133)Cs and (88)Sr uptake by plant Raphanus sativus L. was studied during cultivation in outdoor potted-soil. The distribution, accumulation of (133)Cs, (88)Sr and the antioxidant responses in plants were measured after 30 and 60 days of cultivation. The results showed that the uptake capacity of radish for (88)Sr was far higher than that for (133)Cs when the concentration of (88)Sr was as the same as that of (133)Cs in the soil (The concentration of (88)Sr or (133)Cs in the soil was from 2.5 mg kg(-1) to 40 mg kg(-1)). The highest (88)Sr accumulation was 239.18 μg g(-1) dw, otherwise, the highest (133)Cs accumulation was 151.74 μg g(-1) dw (The concentration of (88)Sr in the soil was 40 mg kg(-1)), and the lowest (88)Sr accumulation was 131.03 μg g(-1) dw, otherwise, the lowest (133)Cs accumulation was 12.85 μg g(-1) dw (The concentration of (88)Sr in the soil is 5 mg kg(-1)). The (88)Sr and (133)Cs TF values were 1.16-1.72 and 0.24-0.60, respectively. There was little influence of high concentration of (88)Sr on the total biomass of plants, so the radish is one of the ideal phytoremediation plant for Sr polluted soils. The important physiological reasons that radish had good tolerance to (88)Sr stress were that the MDA content was higher under the (88)Sr stress than that under the (133)Cs stress, and the activities of POD and CAT were lower under the (88)Sr stress than that under (133)Cs stress.

  10. Multivariate regulation of soil CO2 and N2 O pulse emissions from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liyin L; Grantz, David A; Jenerette, G Darrel

    2016-03-01

    Climate and land-use models project increasing occurrence of high temperature and water deficit in both agricultural production systems and terrestrial ecosystems. Episodic soil wetting and subsequent drying may increase the occurrence and magnitude of pulsed biogeochemical activity, affecting carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles and influencing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In this study, we provide the first data to explore the responses of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and nitrous oxide (N2 O) fluxes to (i) temperature, (ii) soil water content as percent water holding capacity (%WHC), (iii) substrate availability throughout, and (iv) multiple soil drying and rewetting (DW) events. Each of these factors and their interactions exerted effects on GHG emissions over a range of four (CO2 ) and six (N2 O) orders of magnitude. Maximal CO2 and N2 O fluxes were observed in environments combining intermediate %WHC, elevated temperature, and sufficient substrate availability. Amendments of C and N and their interactions significantly affected CO2 and N2 O fluxes and altered their temperature sensitivities (Q10 ) over successive DW cycles. C amendments significantly enhanced CO2 flux, reduced N2 O flux, and decreased the Q10 of both. N amendments had no effect on CO2 flux and increased N2 O flux, while significantly depressing the Q10 for CO2 , and having no effect on the Q10 for N2 O. The dynamics across DW cycles could be attributed to changes in soil microbial communities as the different responses to wetting events in specific group of microorganisms, to the altered substrate availabilities, or to both. The complex interactions among parameters influencing trace gas fluxes should be incorporated into next generation earth system models to improve estimation of GHG emissions.

  11. Mycotrophy of crops in rotation and soil amendment with peat influence the abundance and effectiveness of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in field soil.

    PubMed

    Vestberg, M; Saari, K; Kukkonen, S; Hurme, T

    2005-09-01

    Mycotrophy of previous crops has been shown to have an impact on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and the growth and productivity of succeeding crops. We studied the impact of 3 years of cultivation of eight crops with different degrees of mycotrophy, including mycorrhizal (strawberry, rye, timothy, onion, caraway) and non-mycorrhizal (turnip rape, buckwheat, fiddleneck) hosts, as well as the impact of peat amendment, on the effectiveness, amount and diversity of indigenous AMF. A field experiment having a split-plot design with peat amendment as the main plot, crop cultivation as a sub-plot and three replications, was carried out on silt clay mineral soil in 1999-2001. A well-humified dark peat was applied immediately before establishment of the field experiment. Each year, the relative mycorrhizal effectiveness of soil collected in September, in terms of shoot dry weight (RME(DW)), was determined in a bioassay. In the 3rd year of the experiment, AMF spores were also extracted and identified from the field soil. Expressed as the mean of 3 years of cropping in unamended soil, the mycorrhizal crops strawberry and caraway maintained RME(DW) most effectively, while the values were lower in the non-host crops buckwheat, turnip rape and fiddleneck. In addition, the numbers of AM spores detected in soil were considerably greater during 3 years of strawberry cultivation. In soil under caraway, there were high numbers of AM spores compared to the other crops. In soil amended with peat, the situation was in some cases opposite of that of unamended soil; RME(DW) was highest in rye and onion and lowest in strawberry and caraway. The reasons behind the negative impact of peat on mycorrhizal effectiveness in strawberry soil may be due to the microbiological properties of peat. The importance of including mycotrophic species in crop rotations for maintaining high soil quality and for increasing yields of subsequent crops is discussed.

  12. Mercury in soil and perennial plants in a mining-affected urban area from Northwestern Romania.

    PubMed

    Senilă, Marin; Levei, Erika A; Senilă, Lăcrimioara R; Oprea, Gabriela M; Roman, Cecilia M

    2012-01-01

    The mercury (Hg) concentrations were evaluated in soils and perennial plants sampled in four districts of Baia Mare city, a historical mining and ore processing center in Northwestern Romania. The results showed that the Hg concentration exceeded the guideline value of 1.0 mg kg(-1) dry weight (dw) established by the Romanian Legislation, in 24 % of the analyzed soil samples, while the median Hg concentration (0.70 mg kg(-1) dw) was lower than the guideline value. However, Hg content in soil was generally higher than typical values in soils from residential and agricultural areas of the cities all over the world. The median Hg concentration was 0.22 mg kg(-1) dw in the perennial plants, and exceeded the maximum level of Hg (0.10 mg kg(-1)) established by European Directive 2002/32/EC for plants used in animal feed in order to prevent its transfer and further accumulation in the higher levels of food chain. No significant correlations were found between soil Hg and other analyzed metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) resulted from the non-ferrous smelting activities, probably due to the different physicochemical properties, that led to different dispersion patterns.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water, sediment and soil of the Songhua River Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Qi, Hong; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Song, Wei-Wei; Shen, Ji-Min; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Ren, Nan-Qi; Grabuski, Josey; Li, Yi-Fan

    2013-10-01

    The Songhua River is the third largest river in China and the primary source of drinking and irrigation water for northeastern China. The distribution of 16 priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water [dissolved water (DW) and suspended particulate matter (SPM)], sediment, and soil in the river basin was investigated, and the associated risk of cancer from these PAHs was also assessed. The total concentration of PAHs ranged from 13.9 to 161 ng L(-1) in DW, 9.21 to 83.1 ng L(-1) in SPM, 20.5 to 632 ng g(-1) dw (dry weight) in sediment, and from 30.1 to 870 ng g(-1) dw in soil. The compositional pattern of PAHs indicated that three-ring PAHs were predominant in DW and SPM samples, while four-ring PAHs dominated in sediment and soil samples. The spatial distribution of PAHs revealed some site-specific sources along the river, with principal component analysis indicating that these were from pyrogenic sources (such as coal and biomass combustion, and vehicle emissions) and coke oven emission distinguished as the main source of PAHs in the Songhua River Basin. Based on the ingestion of PAH-contaminated drinking water from the Songhua River, cancer risk was quantitatively estimated by combining the Incremental Lifetime Cancer Risk assessment model and BaP-equivalent concentration for five age groups of people (adults, teenagers, children, toddlers, and infants). Overall, the results suggest that the estimated integrated lifetime cancer risk for all groups was in acceptable levels. This study is the first attempt to provide information on the cancer risk of PAHs in drinking water from the Songhua River.

  14. Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

    2000-06-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

  15. Are levels of perfluoroalkyl substances in soil related to urbanization in rapidly developing coastal areas in North China?

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing; Wang, Tieyu; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Yueqing; Li, Qifeng; Lu, Yonglong; Giesy, John P

    2015-04-01

    Concentrations of 13 perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) were quantified in 79 surface soil samples from 17 coastal cities in three provinces and one municipality along the Bohai and Yellow Seas. The ∑PFASs concentrations ranged from less than limitation of quantification (LOQ) to 13.97 ng/g dry weight (dw), with a mean of 0.98 ng/g dw. The highest concentration was observed along the Xiaoqing River from Shandong province, followed by that from the Haihe River in Tianjin (10.62 ng/g dw). Among four regions, ∑PFASs concentrations decreased in the order of Tianjin, Shandong, Liaoning and Hebei, which was consistent with levels of urbanization. Fluorine chemical industries allocated in Shandong and Liaoning played important roles in terms of point emission and contamination of PFASs, dominated by perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). Intensive anthropogenic activities involved in urbanization possibly resulted in increasing releases of PFASs from industrial and domestic sources.

  16. Application of Focused Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction to the Determination of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in Soil Samples.

    PubMed

    Flores-Ramírez, R; Medellín-Garibay, S E; Castillo, C G; Ilizaliturri-Hernández, C A; Zuki-Orozco, B A; Batres-Esquivel, L; Díaz-Barriga, F

    2015-08-01

    A simple and rapid focused ultrasound extraction (FU) based method is presented for the determination of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in soil using a gas chromatography coupled to a mass detector with electron impact ionization. The main experimental parameters affecting the FU step have been optimized by applying a PERMANOVA and PCO analysis allowing us to obtain a maximum amount of information with a minimum number of assays. The limits of detection for POPs fell within the 0.9-6.8 ng/g d.w. interval; a linear method was used with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.99. Recovery percentages at low concentrations (25 ng/g d.w.) were 75.8%-110%, and at high concentrations (75 ng/g d.w.) 82.3%-109%; the evaluated precision as RSD% of repeatability and reproducibility were within a range of 0.5%-11% and 0.3%-18%, respectively.

  17. Priming effect of 13C-labelled wheat straw in no-tillage soil under drying and wetting cycles in the Loess Plateau of China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enke; Wang, Jianbo; Zhang, Yanqing; Angers, Denis A.; Yan, Changrong; Oweis, Theib; He, Wenqing; Liu, Qin; Chen, Baoqing

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of drying and wetting (DW) cycles on soil organic carbon (SOC) mineralisation and on the priming effect (PE) induced by the addition of 13C-labelled wheat straw to long-term no-tillage (NT) and conventional-tillage (CT) soils. We observed that the SOC mineralisation rate in rewetted soils was greater than that in soils that were kept at constant water content. The proportion of CO2 derived from the straw declined dramatically during the first 10 days. The priming direction was first positive, and then became slightly negative. The PE was higher under DW cycles than under constant water content. There was no significant effect of the tillage system on the SOC mineralisation rate or PE. The data indicate that the DW cycles had a significant effect on the SOC mineralisation rate and on the PE, demonstrating a positive combined effect between wheat straw and moisture fluctuations. Further research is needed to study the role of microbial communities and C pools in affecting the SOC mineralisation response to DW cycles. PMID:26345303

  18. The influence of facility agriculture production on phthalate esters distribution in black soils of northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Pengjie; Wang, Lei; Sun, Guoqiang; Zhao, Jiaying; Zhang, Hui; Du, Na

    2015-02-15

    The current study investigates the existence of 15 phthalate esters (PAEs) in surface soils (27 samples) collected from 9 different facility agriculture sites in the black soil region of northeast China, during the process of agricultural production (comprising only three seasons spring, summer and autumn). Concentrations of the 15 PAEs detected significantly varied from spring to autumn and their values ranged from 1.37 to 4.90 mg/kg-dw, with a median value of 2.83 mg/kg-dw. The highest concentration of the 15 PAEs (4.90 mg/kg-dw) was determined in summer when mulching film was used in the greenhouses. Probably an increase in environmental temperature was a major reason for PAE transfer from the mulching film into the soil and coupled with the increased usage of chemical fertilizers in greenhouses. Results showed that of the 15 PAEs, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate(DEHP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dimethyl phthalate (DMP) were in abundance with the mean value of 1.12 ± 0.22, 0.46 ± 0.05, 0.36 ± 0.04, and 0.17 ± 0.01 mg/kg-dw, respectively; and their average contributions in spring, summer, and autumn ranged between 64.08 and 90.51% among the 15 PAEs. The results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated the concentration of these four main PAEs significantly differed among the facility agricultures investigated, during the process of agricultural production. In comparison with foreign and domestic results of previous researches, it is proved that the black soils of facility agriculture in northeast China show higher pollution situation comparing with non-facility agriculture soils.

  19. Real and simulated bioavailability of lead in contaminated and uncontaminated soils

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lead (Pb) is a toxic element that occurs in elevated concentrations in soils, mostly as a result of anthropogenic activities. This study assess the Pb bioavailability in soils from two areas with different contamination level using Diffusive Gradients in Thin-Films (DGT) technique, single extractions and metal contents of vegetables grown on contaminated soils. Results In the area situated far from mining and smelting activities, the pseudo total Pb concentration (12 – 51 mg kg−1 dw) was found to be comparable to that normally found in unpolluted areas. In the area from the vicinity of the Pb smelter very high concentrations of pseudo-total Pb (850 – 9300 mg kg−1 dw) were found. The average concentrations of Pb accumulated in onion, garlic, carrot, and parsley grown on this contaminated soils were 18, 48, 38 and 91 mg kg−1 dw, respectively, and represent a risk factor for the consumers. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the utility of DGT technique for the assessment of Pb bioavailability, since, generally, better correlations are obtained between the effective Pb concentration and Pb concentration in vegetables than for bioavailable Pb determined by chemical extractions and Pb concentration in vegetables. PMID:25097761

  20. Multimodality functional imaging using DW-MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT during radiation therapy for human papillomavirus negative head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: Meixoeiro Hospital of Vigo Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aramburu Núñez, David; Lopez Medina, Antonio; Mera Iglesias, Moisés; Salvador Gomez, Francisco; Dave, Abhay; Hatzoglou, Vaios; Paudyal, Ramesh; Calzado, Alfonso; Deasy, Joseph O; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Muñoz, Victor M

    2017-01-01

    AIM To noninvasively investigate tumor cellularity measured using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and glucose metabolism measured by 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) during radiation therapy (RT) for human papillomavirus negative (HPV-) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). METHODS In this prospective study, 6 HPV- HNSCC patients underwent a total of 34 multimodality imaging examinations DW-MRI at 1.5 T Philips MRI scanner [(n = 24) pre-, during- (2-3 wk), and post-treatment (Tx), and 18F-FDG PET/CT pre- and post-Tx (n = 10)]. All patients received RT. Monoexponential modeling of the DW-MRI data yielded the imaging metric apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the mean of standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured from 18F-FDG PET uptake. All patients had a clinical follow-up as the standard of care and survival status was documented at 1 year. RESULTS There was a strong negative correlation between the mean of pretreatment ADC (ρ = -0.67, P = 0.01) and the pretreatment 18F-FDG PET SUV. The percentage (%) change in delta (∆) ADC for primary tumors and neck nodal metastases between pre- and Wk2-3 Tx were as follows: 75.4% and 61.6%, respectively, for the patient with no evidence of disease, 27.5% and 32.7%, respectively, for those patients who were alive with disease, and 26.9% and 7.31%, respectively, for those who were dead with disease. CONCLUSION These results are preliminary in nature and are indicative, and not definitive, trends rendered by the imaging metrics due to the small sample size of HPV- HNSCC patients in a Meixoeiro Hospital of Vigo Experience. PMID:28144403

  1. Studies of Chlordane Availability and Volatility in Air Force Soils and Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    slurry was also attempted. Biotreatment of the soil by composting with a spent mushroom substrate was also conducted. Laboratory and field tests were...metabolites, and photoconversion products in environmental samples using chiral high-resolution gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. ES&T 27: 1211-1220...Mycotransformation of organic and inorganic substrates . Mycologist 18: 60-70. Kennedy, D.W., S.D. Aust and J.A. Bumpus. 1990. Comparative

  2. The effects of carbon sources and micronutrients in whey and fermented whey on the kinetics of phenanthrene biodegradation in diesel contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Anders P; Östberg, Tomas L

    2011-09-15

    This paper demonstrates significant effects on phenanthrene degradation in diesel contaminated soil by the addition of organic amendments such as whey and fermented whey. Both amount of amendment added and mode of administration was shown to be decisive. There was a strong positive effect on the (14)C-mineralization of phenanthrene by multiple (bi-weekly) additions of fermented whey 210 mg dw kg(-1) soil dw (FW multi) and also by single dose addition of 2100 mg dw sweet whey kg(-1) soil dw (SW high). The most prominent effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics were a five to fifteen fold increase in the linear growth term (k(2)) and a 23-27% increase in bioavailability factor S(0) for SW high and FW multi respectively. Also, total mineralization at the end of the experiment increased from 46% in the control to 66 and 71% respectively and the lag time was reduced from 21 to 15 days by multiple addition of fermented whey. The most significant stimulating effects on phenanthrene degradation kinetics could be attributed to lactate and vitamins. This study demonstrates a more complex dependence of carbon sources and growth factors for an aromatic compound such as phenanthrene in comparison to hexadecane.

  3. Concentration and Spatial Distribution of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Surface Roadside Soils, Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhaoyu; Liu, Ying; He, Yao; Chen, Ling

    2010-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic pollutants that may lead to mutagenesis, carcinogenesis or teratogenesis. Vehicular traffic pollution is one of the important sources for PAHs in soils. Concentrations of 19 PAHs were detected in soils along nine roads in Shanghai by automatic Soxhlet extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. Concentration and spatial distribution of PAHs in surface soils beside nine target roads in Shanghai were investigated and a preliminary migration regularity of PAHs was proposed based on data analysis of Cheting Highway (NO.320 Chinese National Highway). The result showed that the total concentrations of PAHs in the target roadside soils ranged from undetectable to 34.6μg/g-dw, with a mean of 7.77μg/g-dw. In comparison with the level of PAHs in urban or suburban roadside soils, the results showed significantly that Σ PAHs concentration in roadside soils inside industrial areas was higher. The study on the migration regularity of PAHs in soils along roads demonstrated that surface runoff had a more significant effect on the PAHs transportation than air-borne transportation.

  4. Identification of dioxin and dioxin-like polychlorbiphenyls in plant tissues and contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jin-Juh; Chung, Jen-Chir; Weng, Ying-Ming; Liaw, Shu-Liang; Wang, Ming Kuang

    2007-10-01

    The environmental analysis laboratory (EAL) of the Taiwan environmental protection administration (TEPA) has been monitoring certain sites polluted in southern Taiwan by pentachlorophenol manufacture. The analytical results revealed peculiarities in the concentration distributions in plant tissues. There are no available data on dioxin and dioxin-like polychlorbiphenyls (DL-PCBs), which can be taken up from contaminated soils by plant tissues. Thus, the aims of this study were to identify, understand, and to validate these dioxin and DL-PCBs concentrations in plant tissues of the contaminated soils. This research analyzed ten species of plant tissues, including tappa (Boussonetia papyrifera) and common jasmin orange (Murraya paniculata) from sites in southern Taiwan, with different levels of contamination. Dioxin concentrations in these plant tissues ranged from 12.7 to 2919 ng WHO-TEQ(DF)/kg dry weight (d.w.), with average of 463 ng WHO-TEQ(DF)/kg d.w. (n=16). The DL-PCBs concentrations ranged from 0.236 to 1.75 ng WHO-TEQp/kg d.w., with an average of 0.605 ng WHO-TEQp/kg d.w. (n=8). Tappa is one of the most common and fastest growing plants in Taiwan. It also shows the highest tolerance to environmental contaminants and accumulates dioxin and DL-PCBs. This is one of the best species to take up dioxins and DL-PCBs effectively. It can be recommended as a candidate for dioxin and DL-PCB phyto-remediation. These data are useful to evaluate bioaccumulation of dioxin and DL-PCBs, and to study the capability of phyto-remediation in contaminated soils.

  5. Role of extrinsic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in heavy metal-contaminated wetlands with various soil moisture levels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S; Wang, C; Shen, Z; Quan, Y; Liu, X

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an efficient heavy metal (HM) control method in HM-contaminated wetlands with varied soil moisture levels through the introduction of extrinsic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) into natural wetland soil containing indigenous AMF species. A pot culture experiment was designed to determine the effect of two soil water contents (5-8% and 25-30%), five extrinsic AMF inoculants (Glomus mosseae, G. clarum, G. claroideum, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices), and HM contamination on root colonization, plant growth, and element uptake of common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel) plantlets in wetland soils. This study showed the prevalence of mycorrhizae in the roots of all P. australis plantlets, regardless of extrinsic AMF inoculations, varied soil moisture or HM levels. It seems that different extrinsic AMF inoculations effectively lowered HM concentrations in the aboveground tissues of P. australis at two soil moisture levels. However, metal species, metal concentrations, and soil moisture should also be very important factors influencing the elemental uptake performance of plants in wetland ecosystems. Besides, the soil moisture level significantly influenced plant growth (including height, and shoot and root dry weight (DW)), and extrinsic AMF inoculations differently affected shoot DW.

  6. Ractopamine up take by alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) from soil.

    PubMed

    Shelver, Weilin L; DeSutter, Thomas M

    2015-08-01

    Ractopamine is a beta adrenergic agonist used as a growth promoter in swine, cattle and turkeys. To test whether ractopamine has the potential to accumulate in plants grown in contaminated soil, a greenhouse study was conducted with alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) grown in two soils having different concentrations of organic matter (1.3% and 2.1%), amended with 0, 0.5, and 10 μg/g of ractopamine. Plant growth ranged from 2.7 to 8.8 g dry weight (dw) for alfalfa, and 8.7 to 40 g dw for wheat and was generally greater in the higher organic matter content soil. The uptake of ractopamine in plant tissues ranged from non-detectable to 897 ng/g and was strongly dependent on soil ractopamine concentration across soil and plant tissue. When adjusted to the total fortified quantities, the amount of ractopamine taken up by the plant tissue was low, <0.01% for either soil.

  7. Contamination of Phthalate Esters (PAEs) in Typical Wastewater-Irrigated Agricultural Soils in Hebei, North China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Liang, Qiong; Gao, Rutai; Hou, Haobo; Tan, Wenbing; He, Xiaosong; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Minda; Ma, Lina; Xi, Beidou; Wang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    The Wangyang River (WYR) basin is a typical wastewater irrigation area in Hebei Province, North China. This study investigated the concentration and distribution of six priority phthalate esters (PAEs) in the agricultural soils in this area. Thirty-nine soil samples (0–20 cm) were collected along the WYR to assess the PAE residues in soils. Results showed that PAEs are ubiquitous environmental contaminants in the topsoil obtained from the irrigation area. The concentrations of Σ6PAEs range from 0.191 μg g−1 dw to 0.457 μg g−1 dw with an average value of 0.294 μg g−1 dw. Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) are the dominant PAE species in the agricultural soils. Among the DEHP concentrations, the highest DEHP concentration was found at the sites close to the villages; this result suggested that dense anthropogenic activities and random garbage disposal in the rural area are possible sources of PAEs. The PAE concentrations were weakly and positively correlated with soil organic carbon and soil enzyme activities; thus, these factors can affect the distribution of PAEs. This study further showed that only dimethyl phthalate (DMP) concentrations exceeded the recommended allowable concentrations; no remediation measures are necessary to control the PAEs in the WYR area. However, the PAEs in the topsoil may pose a potential risk to the ecosystem and human health in this area. Therefore, the exacerbating PAE pollution should be addressed. PMID:26360905

  8. Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/ dibenzofurans and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soil, vegetation, workshop-floor dust, and electronic shredder residue from an electronic waste recycling facility and in soils from a chemical industrial complex in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Addink, Rudolf; Yun, Sehun; Cheng, Jinping; Wang, Wenhua; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2009-10-01

    The formation and release of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) from the incineration of electronic wastes (e-waste) that contain brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a concern. However, studies on the determination of PBDD/Fs in environmental samples collected from e-waste recycling facilities are scarce. In this study, 11 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDD/Fs and 10 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were determined in electronic shredder waste, workshop-floor dust soil, and leaves (of plants on the grounds of the facility) from a large-scale e-waste recycling facility and in surface soil from a chemical-industrial complex (comprising a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) as well as agricultural areas in eastern China. Total PBDD/F concentrations in environmental samples were in the range of 113-818 pg/g dry wt (dw) for leaves, 392-18500 pg/g dw for electronic shredder residues, 716-800000 pg/g dw for soil samples, and 89600-pg/g dw for workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility and in a range from nondetect (ND) to 427 pg/g dw in soil from the chemical-industrial complex. The highest mean concentrations of total PBDD/Fs were found in soil samples and workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility. The dioxin-like toxic equivalent (measured as TEQ) concentrations of PBDD/Fs were greater than the TEQs of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) reported in our previous study for the same set of samples. The concentrations of PBDFs were several orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations of PBDDs in samples from the e-waste facility or from soil from the chemical-industrial complex. A significant correlation was found between the concentrations of sigmaPBDD/Fs and sigmaPBDEs (r = 0.769, p < 0.01) and between sigmaPBDD/Fs and the previously reported sigmaPCDD/F concentrations (r = 0.805, p < 0.01). The estimated daily human intakes of TEQs contributed by

  9. Barium Levels in Soils and Centella asiatica

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Ghim Hock; Yap, Chee Kong; Mahmood, Maziah; Tan, Soon Guan; Hamzah, Suhaimi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Centella asiatica and surface soils were collected from 12 sampling sites in Peninsular Malaysia, and the barium (Ba) concentrations were determined. The Ba concentration [μg/g dry weight (dw)] was 63.72 to 382.01 μg/g in soils while in C. asiatica, Ba concentrations ranged from 5.05 to 21.88 μg/g for roots, 3.31 to 11.22 μg/g for leaves and 2.37 to 6.14 μg/g for stems. In C. asiatica, Ba accumulation was found to be the highest in roots followed by leaves and stems. The correlation coefficients (r) of Ba between plants and soils were found to be significantly positively correlated, with the highest correlation being between roots-soils (r=0.922, p<005), followed by leaves-soils (r=0.890, p<005) and stems-soils (r=0.848, p<005). This indicates that these three parts of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. For the transplantation study, four sites were selected as unpolluted [(Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)], semi-polluted (Seri Kembangan and Balakong) and polluted sites (Juru). Based on the transplantation study under experimental field and laboratory conditions, Ba concentrations in C. asiatica were significantly (p<0.05) higher after three weeks of exposure at Seri Kembangan, Balakong and Juru. Thus, these experimental findings confirm that the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica can reflect the Ba levels in the soils where this plant is found. Three weeks after back transplantation to clean soils, the Ba levels in C. asiatica were still higher than the initial Ba level even though Ba elimination occurred. In conclusion, the leaves, stems and roots of C. asiatica are good biomonitors of Ba pollution. PMID:24575242

  10. Bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkyl acids by earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Rich, Courtney D; Blaine, Andrea C; Hundal, Lakhwinder; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-01-20

    The presence of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in biosolids-amended and aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF)-impacted soils results in two potential pathways for movement of these environmental contaminants into terrestrial foodwebs. Uptake of PFAAs by earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to unspiked soils with varying levels of PFAAs (a control soil, an industrially impacted biosolids-amended soil, a municipal biosolids-amended soil, and two AFFF-impacted soils) was measured. Standard 28 day exposure experiments were conducted in each soil, and measurements taken at additional time points in the municipal soil were used to model the kinetics of uptake. Uptake and elimination rates and modeling suggested that steady state bioaccumulation was reached within 28 days of exposure for all PFAAs. The highest concentrations in the earthworms were for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the AFFF-impacted Soil A (2160 ng/g) and perfluorododecanoate (PFDoA) in the industrially impacted soil (737 ng/g). Wet-weight (ww) and organic carbon (OC)-based biota soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) for the earthworms were calculated after 28 days of exposure for all five soils. The highest BSAF in the industrially impacted soil was for PFDoA (0.42 goc/gww,worm). Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs, dry-weight-basis, dw) were also calculated at 28 days for each of the soils. With the exception of the control soil and perfluorodecanoate (PFDA) in the industrially impacted soil, all BAF values were above unity, with the highest being for perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) in the AFFF-impacted Soil A (139 gdw,soil/gdw,worm). BSAFs and BAFs increased with increasing chain length for the perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) and decreased with increasing chain length for the perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs). The results indicate that PFAA bioaccumulation into earthworms depends on soil concentrations, soil characteristics, analyte, and duration of exposure, and that accumulation into earthworms may be a potential

  11. Occurrence, distribution, and source of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soil and leaves from Shenzhen Special Economic Zone, China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pei-Heng; Ni, Hong-Gang; Liu, Yang-Sheng; Shi, Ye-Hong; Zeng, Hui

    2011-03-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in soil and three plant species samples taken at different land use areas in Shenzhen China. The concentrations of Σ(7)BDEs (BDE-28, BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-153, BDE-154, and BDE-183) and BDE-209 in the surface soils ranged from 0.23 to 271 and 8.9 to 5,956 ng/g dry weight (dw), respectively. These figures are comparable to that in the soils of electronic waste dismantling sites. BDE-209 was the predominant congener (contributes 85-99% of Σ(8)PBDEs (Σ(7)PBDEs plus BDE-209)) in soils. The regression slopes of total organic carbon and individual BDE congeners were rather gentle, indicating that factors other than soil organic matter regulated the soil concentrations. Proximity to sources of deposition processes might be the major factors. In the plant leaves, Σ(7)BDEs and BDE-209 concentrations ranged from 1.29 to 5.91 and 5.49 to 28.2 ng/g dw, respectively. BDE-209 is also the dominant component, but the contribution was much lower compared with that in soils. Bauhinia purpurea Linn. and Michelia alba DC. show some similarities on the uptake of PBDEs, while Ficus microcarpa var. pusillifolia is different from them. The correlations between plant leaf concentrations and predicted gaseous concentrations were moderate, indicating that gaseous concentration did not influence the leaf concentration significantly.

  12. Conserving Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Designed as enrichment materials for grades six through nine, this program is an interdisciplinary study of soils. As part of the program students: (1) examine soil organisms; (2) research history of local Native Americans to see how they and others have used the land and its soils; (3) investigate how soils are degraded and how they are conserved…

  13. Assessment of trace element accumulation by earthworms in an orchard soil remediation study using soil amendments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Centofantia, Tiziana; Chaney, Rufus L.; Beyer, W. Nelson; McConnell, Laura L.; Davis, A. P.; Jackson, Dana

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed potential bioaccumulation of various trace elements in grasses and earthworms as a consequence of soil incorporation of organic amendments for in situ remediation of an orchard field soil contaminated with organochlorine and Pb pesticide residues. In this experiment, four organic amendments of differing total organic carbon content and quality (two types of composted manure, composted biosolids, and biochar) were added to a contaminated orchard field soil, planted with two types of grasses, and tested for their ability to reduce bioaccumulation of organochlorine pesticides and metals in earthworms. The experiment was carried out in 4-L soil microcosms in a controlled environment for 90 days. After 45 days of orchardgrass or perennial ryegrass growth, Lumbricus terrestris L. were introduced to the microcosms and exposed to the experimental soils for 45 days before the experiment was ended. Total trace element concentrations in the added organic amendments were below recommended safe levels and their phytoavailablity and earthworm availability remained low during a 90-day bioremediation study. At the end of the experiment, total tissue concentrations of Cu, Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn in earthworms and grasses were below recommended safe levels. Total concentrations of Pb in test soil were similar to maximum background levels of Pb recorded in soils in the Eastern USA (100 mg kg−1 d.w.) because of previous application of orchard pesticides. Addition of aged dairy manure compost and presence of grasses was effective in reducing the accumulation of soil-derived Pb in earthworms, thus reducing the risk of soil Pb entry into wildlife food chains.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, black carbon, and molecular markers in soils of Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Bucheli, Thomas D; Blum, Franziska; Desaules, André; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2004-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were analysed in 23 soil samples (0-10 cm layer) from the Swiss soil monitoring network (NABO) together with total organic carbon (TOC) and black carbon (BC) concentration, as well as some PAH source diagnostic ratios and molecular markers. The concentrations of the sum of 16 EPA priority PAHs ranged from 50 to 619 microg/kg dw. Concentrations increased from arable, permanent and pasture grassland, forest, to urban soils and were 21-89% lower than median numbers reported in the literature for similar Swiss and European soils. NABO soils contained BC in concentrations from 0.4 to 1.8 mg/g dw, except for two sites with markedly higher levels. These numbers corresponded to 1-6% of TOC and were comparable to the limited published BC data in soil and sediments obtained with comparable analytical methods. The various PAH ratios and molecular markers pointed to a domination of pyrogenically formed PAHs in Swiss soils. In concert, the gathered data suggest the following major findings: (1) gas phase PAHs (naphthalene to fluorene) were long-range transported, cold-condensated at higher altitudes, and approaching equilibrium with soil organic matter (OM); (2) (partially) particle-bound PAHs (phenanthrene to benzo[ghi]perylene) were mostly deposited regionally in urban areas, and not equilibrated with soil OM; (3) Diesel combustion appeared to be a major emission source of PAH and BC in urban areas; and (4) wood combustion might have contributed significantly to PAH burdens in some soils of remote/alpine (forest) sites.

  15. Influences of humic acid and fulvic acid on horizontal leaching behavior of anthracene in soil barriers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sheng; Li, Bang-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hu

    2015-12-01

    The influences of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) on horizontal leaching behaviors of anthracene in barriers were investigated. Soil colloids (≤1 μm) were of concern because of their abilities of colloid-facilitated transport for hydrophobic organic compounds with soluble and insoluble organic matters. Through freely out of the barriers in the presence of soil colloids with FA added, the higher concentrations of anthracene were from 320 μg L(-1) (D1 and D3) to 390 μg L(-1) (D2 and D4) with 1 to 20 cm in length. The contents of anthracene were distributed evenly at 25 ng g(-1) dry weight (DW) (D1 and D3) and 11 ng g(-1) DW (D2 and D4) in barriers. Therefore, anthracene leaching behaviors were mainly induced by soil colloids with soluble organic matters. The insoluble organic matters would facilitate anthracene onto soil colloids and enhance the movement in and through porous media of soil matrix.

  16. Impact assessment of intermediate soil cover on landfill stabilization by characterizing landfilled municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guangxia; Yue, Dongbei; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Rui; Shi, Xiaochong; He, Liang; Guo, Jingting; Miao, Haomei; Nie, Yongfeng

    2013-10-15

    Waste samples at different depths of a covered municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill in Beijing, China, were excavated and characterized to investigate the impact of intermediate soil cover on waste stabilization. A comparatively high amount of unstable organic matter with 83.3 g kg(-1) dry weight (dw) total organic carbon was detected in the 6-year-old MSW, where toxic inorganic elements containing As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn of 10.1, 0.98, 85.49, 259.7, 530.4, 30.5, 84.0, and 981.7 mg kg(-1) dw, respectively, largely accumulated because of the barrier effect of intermediate soil cover. This accumulation resulted in decreased microbial activities. The intermediate soil cover also caused significant reduction in moisture in MSW under the soil layer, which was as low as 25.9%, and led to inefficient biodegradation of 8- and 10-year-old MSW. Therefore, intermediate soil cover with low permeability seems to act as a barrier that divides a landfill into two landfill cells with different degradation processes by restraining water flow and hazardous matter.

  17. Occurrence of veterinary antibiotics and progesterone in broiler manure and agricultural soil in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu Bin; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Latif, Puziah Abdul; Saari, Nazamid

    2014-08-01

    Repeated applications of animal manure as fertilizer are normal agricultural practices that may release veterinary antibiotics and hormones into the environment from treated animals. Broiler manure samples and their respective manure-amended agricultural soil samples were collected in selected locations in the states of Selangor, Negeri Sembilan and Melaka in Malaysia to identify and quantify veterinary antibiotic and hormone residues in the environment. The samples were analyzed using ultrasonic extraction followed by solid phase extraction (SPE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The broiler manure samples were found to be contaminated with at least six target analytes, namely, doxycycline, enrofloxacin, flumequine, norfloxacin, trimethoprim and tylosin. These analytes were detected in broiler manure samples with maximum concentrations reaching up to 78,516 μg kg(-1) dry weight (DW) (doxycycline). For manure-amended agricultural soil samples, doxycycline and enrofloxacin residues were detected in every soil sample. The maximum concentration of antibiotic detected in soil was 1331 μg kg(-1) DW (flumequine). The occurrence of antibiotics and hormones in animal manure at high concentration poses a risk of contaminating agricultural soil via fertilization with animal manure. Some physico-chemical parameters such as pH, total organic carbon (TOC) and metal content played a considerable role in the fate of the target veterinary antibiotics and progesterone in the environment. It was suggested that these parameters can affect the adsorption of pharmaceuticals to solid environmental matrices.

  18. Effect of chitosan on the available contents and vertical distribution of Cu2+ and Cd2+ in different textural soils.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi; Hu, Xiang; Ao, Yansong

    2009-08-15

    Chitosan, an environment-friendly biopolymer, has been adopted to remedy contaminated soils by heavy metals of Cu(2+) and Cd(2+). Experimental results demonstrated that, within the first 7d, available Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) contents in three textural soils (clay, loam, and sandy soil) decreased significantly after chitosan application. Moreover, the available Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) contents in soil layers of 14-16 cm and 24-26 cm were significantly reduced than that in 4-6 cm after 7d of chitosan application. Our investigation suggested that application of 0.9 g chitosan kg(-1) DW soil for 7d could be perfect for the remediation of the soil contaminated by Cu(2+) and Cd(2+).

  19. Soil experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Linton; Butler, Todd; Smith, Mike; Cline, Charles; Scruggs, Steve; Zakhia, Nadim

    1987-01-01

    An experimental procedure was devised to investigate the effects of the lunar environment on the physical properties of simulated lunar soil. The test equipment and materials used consisted of a vacuum chamber, direct shear tester, static penetrometer, and fine grained basalt as the simulant. The vacuum chamber provides a medium for applying the environmental conditions to the soil experiment with the exception of gravity. The shear strength parameters are determined by the direct shear test. Strength parameters and the resistance of soil penetration by static loading will be investigated by the use of a static cone penetrometer. In order to conduct a soil experiment without going to the moon, a suitable lunar simulant must be selected. This simulant must resemble lunar soil in both composition and particle size. The soil that most resembles actual lunar soil is basalt. The soil parameters, as determined by the testing apparatus, will be used as design criteria for lunar soil engagement equipment.

  20. Carbon flow from volcanic CO2 into soil microbial communities of a wetland mofette.

    PubMed

    Beulig, Felix; Heuer, Verena B; Akob, Denise M; Viehweger, Bernhard; Elvert, Marcus; Herrmann, Martina; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-03-01

    Effects of extremely high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on soil microbial communities and associated processes are largely unknown. We studied a wetland area affected by spots of subcrustal CO2 degassing (mofettes) with focus on anaerobic autotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis because the pore gas phase was largely hypoxic. Compared with a reference soil, the mofette was more acidic (ΔpH ∼0.8), strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 10 times), and exhibited lower prokaryotic diversity. It was dominated by methanogens and subdivision 1 Acidobacteria, which likely thrived under stable hypoxia and acidic pH. Anoxic incubations revealed enhanced formation of acetate and methane (CH4) from hydrogen (H2) and CO2 consistent with elevated CH4 and acetate levels in the mofette soil. (13)CO2 mofette soil incubations showed high label incorporations with ∼512 ng (13)C g (dry weight (dw)) soil(-1) d(-1) into the bulk soil and up to 10.7 ng (13)C g (dw) soil(-1) d(-1) into almost all analyzed bacterial lipids. Incorporation of CO2-derived carbon into archaeal lipids was much lower and restricted to the first 10 cm of the soil. DNA-SIP analysis revealed that acidophilic methanogens affiliated with Methanoregulaceae and hitherto unknown acetogens appeared to be involved in the chemolithoautotrophic utilization of (13)CO2. Subdivision 1 Acidobacteriaceae assimilated (13)CO2 likely via anaplerotic reactions because Acidobacteriaceae are not known to harbor enzymatic pathways for autotrophic CO2 assimilation. We conclude that CO2-induced geochemical changes promoted anaerobic and acidophilic organisms and altered carbon turnover in affected soils.

  1. Potential for phytoextraction of copper by Sinapis alba and Festuca rubra cv. Merlin grown hydroponically and in vineyard soils.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Mario; Rossignolo, Virginia; Salvalaggio, Nico; Schiavon, Michela

    2014-03-01

    The extensive use of copper-bearing fungicides in vineyards is responsible for the accumulation of copper (Cu) in soils. Grass species able to accumulate Cu could be cultivated in the vineyard inter-rows for copper phytoextraction. In this study, the capacity of Festuca rubra cv Merlin and Sinapis alba to tolerate and accumulate copper (Cu) was first investigated in a hydroponic system without the interference of soil chemical-physical properties. After the amendment of Cu (5 or 10 mg Cu l-(1)) to nutrient solution, shoot Cu concentration in F. rubra increased up to 108.63 mg Cu kg(-1) DW, more than three times higher than in S. alba (31.56 mg Cu kg(-1) DW). The relationship between Cu concentration in plants and external Cu was dose-dependent and species specific. Results obtained from the hydroponic experiment were confirmed by growing plants in pots containing soil collected from six Italian vineyards. The content of soil organic matter was crucial to enhance Cu tolerance and accumulation in the shoot tissues of both plant species. Although S. alba produced more biomass than F. rubra in most soils, F. rubra accumulated significantly more Cu (up to threefold to fourfold) in the shoots. Given these results, we recommended that F. rubra cv Merlin could be cultivated in the vineyard rows to reduce excess Cu in vineyard soils.

  2. Soil Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killham, Ken

    1994-04-01

    Soil Ecology is designed to meet the increasing challenge faced by today's environmental scientists, ecologists, agriculturalists, and biotechnologists for an integrated approach to soil ecology. It emphasizes the interrelations among plants, animals, and microbes, by first establishing the fundamental physical and chemical properties of the soil habitat and then functionally characterizing the major components of the soil biota and some of their most important interactions. The fundamental principles underpinning soil ecology are established and this then enables an integrated approach to explore and understand the processes of soil nutrient (carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) cycling and the ecology of extreme soil conditions such as soil-water stress. Two of the most topical aspects of applied soil ecology are then selected. First, the ecology of soil pollution is examined, focusing on acid deposition and radionuclide pollution. Second, manipulation of soil ecology through biotechnology is discussed, illustrating the use of pesticides and microbial inocula in soils and pointing toward the future by considering the impact of genetically modified inocula on soil ecology.

  3. Contribution for the Derivation of a Soil Screening Value (SSV) for Uranium, Using a Natural Reference Soil

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Ana Luisa; Marques, Catarina R.; Gavina, Ana; Carvalho, Fernando; Gonçalves, Fernando; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Pereira, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In order to regulate the management of contaminated land, many countries have been deriving soil screening values (SSV). However, the ecotoxicological data available for uranium is still insufficient and incapable to generate SSVs for European soils. In this sense, and so as to make up for this shortcoming, a battery of ecotoxicological assays focusing on soil functions and organisms, and a wide range of endpoints was carried out, using a natural soil artificially spiked with uranium. In terrestrial ecotoxicology, it is widely recognized that soils have different properties that can influence the bioavailability and the toxicity of chemicals. In this context, SSVs derived for artificial soils or for other types of natural soils, may lead to unfeasible environmental risk assessment. Hence, the use of natural regional representative soils is of great importance in the derivation of SSVs. A Portuguese natural reference soil PTRS1, from a granitic region, was thereby applied as test substrate. This study allowed the determination of NOEC, LOEC, EC20 and EC50 values for uranium. Dehydrogenase and urease enzymes displayed the lowest values (34.9 and <134.5 mg U Kg, respectively). Eisenia andrei and Enchytraeus crypticus revealed to be more sensitive to uranium than Folsomia candida. EC50 values of 631.00, 518.65 and 851.64 mg U Kg were recorded for the three species, respectively. Concerning plants, only Lactuca sativa was affected by U at concentrations up to 1000 mg U kg1. The outcomes of the study may in part be constrained by physical and chemical characteristics of soils, hence contributing to the discrepancy between the toxicity data generated in this study and that available in the literature. Following the assessment factor method, a predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) value of 15.5 mg kg−1dw was obtained for U. This PNEC value is proposed as a SSV for soils similar to the PTRS1. PMID:25353962

  4. Contribution for the derivation of a soil screening value (SSV) for uranium, using a natural reference soil.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Ana Luisa; Marques, Catarina R; Gavina, Ana; Carvalho, Fernando; Gonçalves, Fernando; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Pereira, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    In order to regulate the management of contaminated land, many countries have been deriving soil screening values (SSV). However, the ecotoxicological data available for uranium is still insufficient and incapable to generate SSVs for European soils. In this sense, and so as to make up for this shortcoming, a battery of ecotoxicological assays focusing on soil functions and organisms, and a wide range of endpoints was carried out, using a natural soil artificially spiked with uranium. In terrestrial ecotoxicology, it is widely recognized that soils have different properties that can influence the bioavailability and the toxicity of chemicals. In this context, SSVs derived for artificial soils or for other types of natural soils, may lead to unfeasible environmental risk assessment. Hence, the use of natural regional representative soils is of great importance in the derivation of SSVs. A Portuguese natural reference soil PTRS1, from a granitic region, was thereby applied as test substrate. This study allowed the determination of NOEC, LOEC, EC20 and EC50 values for uranium. Dehydrogenase and urease enzymes displayed the lowest values (34.9 and <134.5 mg U Kg, respectively). Eisenia andrei and Enchytraeus crypticus revealed to be more sensitive to uranium than Folsomia candida. EC50 values of 631.00, 518.65 and 851.64 mg U Kg were recorded for the three species, respectively. Concerning plants, only Lactuca sativa was affected by U at concentrations up to 1000 mg U kg(1). The outcomes of the study may in part be constrained by physical and chemical characteristics of soils, hence contributing to the discrepancy between the toxicity data generated in this study and that available in the literature. Following the assessment factor method, a predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) value of 15.5 mg kg-1dw was obtained for U. This PNEC value is proposed as a SSV for soils similar to the PTRS1.

  5. Spatial distribution and inter-year variation of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate (TBC) in farm soils at a peri-urban region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Thanh; Han, Shanlong; Ruan, Ting; Wang, Yawei; Feng, Jiayong; Jiang, Guibin

    2013-01-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a high production volume brominated flame retardant (BFR) which has been of increasing environmental and public health concern due to its potential environmental persistency, bioaccumulation and toxicity. Tris-(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate (TBC) is another BFR which has recently been found in environmental matrices near a manufacturing plant, but its production volume and environmental distribution is currently not well known. This study was conducted to investigate the presence and distribution of these two BFRs in farm soils at a region in southeast Beijing. Total HBCD levels ranged from 0.17 to 34.5 ng g(-1) on a dry weight basis (dw) with a median level of 2.97 ng g(-1)dw. The composition profile of HBCD diastereoisomers was, on average, 28%, 13% and 59% for α-, β- and γ-HBCD, respectively. Detection frequency of TBC was only 25% in 2010 but was detected in all soil samples in 2011, and the median level was 0.19 ng g(-1)dw with the range between below detection limit to 1.62 ng g(-1) dw. There were no significant differences of HBCD and TBC levels among different irrigation sources in the region. The soil HBCD and TBC levels in samples collected in 2011 were significantly higher than in 2010. The increasing short-term temporal levels in farm soil might be due to the rapid urbanization in this region or could also reflect the increasing usage of HBCD and TBC after the phase out of other BFRs.

  6. Impact of Metal Pollution and Thlaspi caerulescens Growth on Soil Microbial Communities▿

    PubMed Central

    Epelde, Lur; Becerril, José M.; Kowalchuk, George A.; Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong; Garbisu, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Soil microorganisms drive critical functions in plant-soil systems. As such, various microbial properties have been proposed as indicators of soil functioning, making them potentially useful in evaluating the recovery of polluted soils via phytoremediation strategies. To evaluate microbial responses to metal phytoextraction using hyperaccumulators, a microcosm experiment was carried out to study the impacts of Zn and/or Cd pollution and Thlaspi caerulescens growth on key soil microbial properties: basal respiration; substrate-induced respiration (SIR); bacterial community structure as assessed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE); community sizes of total bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and chitin-degrading bacteria as assessed by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR); and functional gene distributions as determined by functional gene arrays (GeoChip). T. caerulescens proved to be suitable for Zn and Cd phytoextraction: shoots accumulated up to 8,211 and 1,763 mg kg−1 (dry weight [DW]) of Zn and Cd, respectively. In general, Zn pollution led to decreased levels of basal respiration and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, while T. caerulescens growth increased the values of substrate-induced respiration (SIR) and total bacteria. In soils polluted with 1,000 mg Zn kg−1 and 250 mg Cd kg−1 (DW), soil bacterial community profiles and the distribution of microbial functional genes were most affected by the presence of metals. Metal-polluted and planted soils had the highest percentage of unique genes detected via the GeoChip (35%). It was possible to track microbial responses to planting with T. caerulescens and to gain insight into the effects of metal pollution on soilborne microbial communities. PMID:20935131

  7. Organ-wise accumulation of fluoride in Prosopis juliflora and its potential for phytoremediation of fluoride contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Saini, Poonam; Khan, Suphiya; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Sharma, Vinay

    2012-10-01

    Fluoride (F) contamination is a global environmental problem, as there is no cure of fluorosis available yet. Prosopis juliflora is a leguminous perennial, phreatophyte tree, widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions of world. It extensively grows in F endemic areas of Rajasthan (India) and has been known as a "green" solution to decontaminate cadmium, chromium and copper contaminated soils. This study aims to check the tolerance potential of P. juliflora to accumulate fluoride. For this work, P. juliflora seedlings were grown for 75 d on soilrite under five different concentrations of F viz., control, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg NaF kg(-1). Organ-wise accumulation of F, bioaccumulation factor (BF), translocation factor (TF), growth ratio (GR) and F tolerance index (TI) were examined. Plant accumulated high amounts of F in roots. The organ-wise distribution showed an accumulation 4.41 mg kg(-1)dw, 12.97 mg kg(-1)dw and 16.75 mg kg(-1)dw F, in stem, leaves and roots respectively. The results indicated significant translocation of F from root into aerial parts. The bioaccumulation and translocation factor values (>1.0) showed high accumulation efficiency and tolerance of P. juliflora to F. It is concluded that P. juliflora is a suitable candidate for phytoremediation purpose and can be explored further for the decontamination of F polluted soils.

  8. Soil retention of hexavalent chromium released from construction and demolition waste in a road-base-application scenario.

    PubMed

    Butera, Stefania; Trapp, Stefan; Astrup, Thomas F; Christensen, Thomas H

    2015-11-15

    We investigated the retention of Cr(VI) in three subsoils with low organic matter content in laboratory experiments at concentration levels relevant to represent leachates from construction and demolition waste (C&DW) reused as unbound material in road construction. The retention mechanism appeared to be reduction and subsequent precipitation as Cr(III) on the soil. The reduction process was slow and in several experiments it was still proceeding at the end of the six-month experimental period. The overall retention reaction fit well with a second-order reaction governed by actual Cr(VI) concentration and reduction capacity of the soil. The experimentally determined reduction capacities and second-order kinetic parameters were used to model, for a 100-year period, the one-dimensional migration of Cr(VI) in the subsoil under a layer of C&DW. The resulting Cr(VI) concentration would be negligible below 7-70 cm depth. However, in rigid climates and with high water infiltration through the road pavement, the reduction reaction could be so slow that Cr(VI) might migrate as deep as 200 cm under the road. The reaction parameters and the model can form the basis for systematically assessing under which scenarios Cr(VI) from C&DW could lead to an environmental issue for ground- and receiving surface waters.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phthalic acid esters in the soil-radish (Raphanus sativus) system with sewage sludge and compost application.

    PubMed

    Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui; Wu, Qi-Tang; Zeng, Qiao-Yun

    2008-04-01

    We studied the accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in a latosolic red soil and radish (Raphanus sativus) with application of sewage sludge at rates of 10, 20 and 40 g kg(-1) soil or compost at rate of 10 g kg(-1) soil. In radish the concentrations of individual PAHs and PAEs varied from non-detectable to 803 microg kg(-1) dry weight (d.w.) and from non-detectable to 2048 microg kg(-1) d.w., respectively. Compared to the control, higher application rates of sewage sludge resulted in pronounced increases in shoot, root and soil concentrations of PAHs and PAEs. PAE concentrations in radish grown in soil spiked with sludge compost were higher while the PAH concentrations were comparable to those receiving 10 g kg(-1) of sewage sludge. However, the root biomass of radish in soil amended with compost was significantly higher and the shoot-to-root ratio was significantly lower than in the other treatments. The bioconcentration factors (BCFs, the ratio of contaminant concentration in plant tissue to the soil concentration) of di-n-butyl phthalate and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in both shoots and roots and of total PAH concentrations in roots were less than 1.0, but some BCFs for individual PAHs were high with a maximum value of 80.

  10. Sensitivity of Eisenia andrei (Annelida, Oligochaeta) to a commercial formulation of abamectin in avoidance tests with artificial substrate and natural soil under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Maria Edna Tenório; Espíndola, Evaldo Luiz Gaeta

    2012-05-01

    Obtaining ecotoxicological data on pesticides in tropical regions is imperative for performing more realistic risk analysis, and avoidance tests have been proposed as a useful, fast and cost-effective tool. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the avoidance behavior of Eisenia andrei to a formulated product, Vertimec® 18 EC (a.i abamectin), in tests performed on a reference tropical artificial soil (TAS), to derive ecotoxicological data on tropical conditions, and a natural soil (NS), simulating crop field conditions. In TAS tests an adaptation of the substrate recommended by OECD and ISO protocols was used, with residues of coconut fiber as a source of organic matter. Concentrations of the pesticide on TAS test ranged from 0 to 7 mg abamectin/kg (dry weight-d.w.). In NS tests, earthworms were exposed to samples of soils sprayed in situ with: 0.9 L of Vertimec® 18 EC/ha (RD); twice as much this dosage (2RD); and distilled water (Control), respectively, and to 2RD: control dilutions (12.5, 25, 50, 75%). All tests were performed under 25 ± 2°C, to simulate tropical conditions, and a 12hL:12hD photoperiod. The organisms avoided contaminated TAS for an EC(50,48h) = 3.918 mg/kg soil d.w., LOEC = 1.75 mg/kg soil d.w. and NOEC = 0.85 mg/kg soil d.w. No significant avoidance response occurred for any NS test. Abamectin concentrations in NS were rather lower than EC(50, 48h) and LOEC determined in TAS tests. The results obtained contribute to overcome a lack of ecotoxicological data on pesticides under tropical conditions, but more tests with different soil invertebrates are needed to improve pesticides risk analysis.

  11. DDT, DDD, and DDE in soil of Xiangfen County, China: Residues, sources, spatial distribution, and health risks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Pan, Li-Bo; Yang, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Tao, Shi-Yang; Zhao, Long; Qin, Xiao-Peng; Sun, Zai-Jin; Hou, Hong; Zhou, Yong-Zhang

    2016-11-01

    We collected and analyzed 128 surface soil samples from Xiangfen County for dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD), and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE). Total DDT concentrations (DDTs; sum of p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDT) ranged from ND to 427.81 ng g(-1) (dry weight, dw), with a mean of 40.26 ng g(-1) (dw). Among the three compounds, p,p'-DDD was the most dominant. The DDTs in Xiangfen County soils mainly originated from historical DDT use, but there were also new inputs likely related to dicofol use. The DDTs in Xiangfen County soils were mainly degraded under anaerobic conditions, and direct degradation to DDD was the main degradation route. Regions with relatively high concentrations of DDTs were mainly located in North and South Xiangfen County. In these regions, many soil samples contained p,p'-DDT as the predominant pollutant, suggestive of extensive new inputs of DDT. A health risk assessment revealed that there are no serious long-term health impacts of exposure to DDTs in soil, for adults or children.

  12. Assessment of the bioavailability and toxicity of lead polluted soils using a combination of chemical approaches and bioassays with the collembolan Folsomia candida.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Verweij, Rudo A; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2014-09-15

    Understanding bioavailability and toxicity is essential for effective ecological assessment of contaminated soils. Total, water and 0.01 M CaCl2 extractable and porewater Pb concentrations and soil properties in different shooting field soils were investigated. Three artificial soils containing different pH and organic matter contents and two natural soils were included as controls. Survival, reproduction and avoidance responses of Folsomia candida exposed to these soils as well as internal Pb concentrations were measured. In the shooting range soils, total Pb concentrations were 47-2,398 mg/kg dw, [Formula: see text] 3.2-6.8 and organic matter content 3.8-7.0%. Pb concentrations in F. candida linearly increased with increasing Pb concentrations in the soils. Acid forest soils caused significantly higher collembolan mortality and avoidance responses and significantly lower reproduction than the neutral grassland soils, which could be attributed to differences in pH and especially CaCl2 extractable Pb concentrations. Soil properties significantly affected bioavailability and toxicity of Pb, but overall the collembolans seemed more sensitive to pH than to Pb in soils. This study shows the importance of selecting proper reference soils for assessing the effects of field soils.

  13. Chemical fingerprinting of hydrocarbon-contamination in soil.

    PubMed

    Boll, Esther S; Nejrup, Jens; Jensen, Julie K; Christensen, Jan H

    2015-03-01

    represented in soil quality assessments based on EPAPAH16 and TPH. The ∑O-PACs ranged between dw)) and 150.61 mg kg(-1) (dw). The pyrogenic contaminated soils contained considerable amount of O-PACs corresponding to between 6 and 18% of the ∑EPAPAH16.

  14. Carbon flow from volcanic CO2 into soil microbial communities of a wetland mofette

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beulig, Felix; Heuer, Verena B.; Akob, Denise M.; Viehweger, Bernhard; Elvert, Marcus; Herrmann, Martina; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Effects of extremely high carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations on soil microbial communities and associated processes are largely unknown. We studied a wetland area affected by spots of subcrustal CO2 degassing (mofettes) with focus on anaerobic autotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis because the pore gas phase was largely hypoxic. Compared with a reference soil, the mofette was more acidic (ΔpH ~0.8), strongly enriched in organic carbon (up to 10 times), and exhibited lower prokaryotic diversity. It was dominated by methanogens and subdivision 1Acidobacteria, which likely thrived under stable hypoxia and acidic pH. Anoxic incubations revealed enhanced formation of acetate and methane (CH4) from hydrogen (H2) and CO2 consistent with elevated CH4 and acetate levels in the mofette soil. 13CO2 mofette soil incubations showed high label incorporations with ~512 ng13C g (dry weight (dw)) soil−1 d−1 into the bulk soil and up to 10.7 ng 13C g (dw) soil−1 d−1 into almost all analyzed bacterial lipids. Incorporation of CO2-derived carbon into archaeal lipids was much lower and restricted to the first 10 cm of the soil. DNA-SIP analysis revealed that acidophilic methanogens affiliated withMethanoregulaceae and hitherto unknown acetogens appeared to be involved in the chemolithoautotrophic utilization of 13CO2. Subdivision 1 Acidobacteriaceae assimilated 13CO2 likely via anaplerotic reactions because Acidobacteriaceae are not known to harbor enzymatic pathways for autotrophic CO2 assimilation. We conclude that CO2-induced geochemical changes promoted anaerobic and acidophilic organisms and altered carbon turnover in affected soils.

  15. Phenols in anaerobic digestion processes and inhibition of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil.

    PubMed

    Levén, Lotta; Nyberg, Karin; Korkea-Aho, Lena; Schnürer, Anna

    2006-07-01

    This study focuses on the presence of phenols in digestate from seven Swedish large-scale anaerobic digestion processes and their impact on the activity of ammonia oxidising bacteria (AOB) in soil. In addition, the importance of feedstock composition and phenol degradation capacity for the occurrence of phenols in the digestate was investigated in the same processes. The results revealed that the content of phenols in the digestate was related to the inhibition of the activity of AOB in soil (EC(50)=26 microg phenols g(-1) d.w. soil). In addition, five pure phenols (phenol, o-, p-, m-cresol and 4-ethylphenol) inhibited the AOB to a similar extent (EC(50)=43-110 microg g(-1) d.w. soil). The phenol content in the digestate was mainly dependent on the composition of the feedstock, but also to some extent by the degradation capacity in the anaerobic digestion process. Swine manure in the feedstock resulted in digestate containing higher amounts of phenols than digestate from reactors with less or no swine manure in the feedstock. The degradation capacity of phenol and p-cresol was studied in diluted small-scale batch cultures and revealed that anaerobic digestion at mesophilic temperatures generally exhibited a higher degradation capacity compared to digestion at thermophilic temperature. Although phenol, p-cresol and 4-ethylphenol were quickly degraded in soil, the phenols added with the digestate constitute an environmental risk according to the guideline values for contaminated soils set by the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency. In conclusion, the management of anaerobic digestion processes is of decisive importance for the production of digestate with low amounts of phenols, and thereby little risks for negative effects of the phenols on the soil ecosystem.

  16. Manganese Toxicity in Sugarcane Plantlets Grown on Acidic Soils of Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu Lan; Yang, Shu; Long, Guang Xia; Zhao, Zun Kang; Li, Xiao Feng; Gu, Ming Hua

    2016-01-01

    Ratoon sugarcane plantlets in southern China have suffered a serious chlorosis problem in recent years. To reveal the causes of chlorosis, plant nutrition in chlorotic sugarcane plantlets and the role of manganese (Mn) in this condition were investigated. The study results showed that the pH of soils growing chlorotic plantlets ranged from 3.74 to 4.84. The symptoms of chlorosis were similar to those of iron (Fe) deficiency while the chlorotic and non-chlorotic plantlets contained similar amount of Fe. Chlorotic plantlets had 6.4-times more Mn in their leaf tissues compared to the control plants. There was a significantly positive correlation between Mn concentration in the leaves and the exchangeable Mn concentration in the soils. Moreover, leaf Mn concentration was related to both seasonal changes in leaf chlorophyll concentration and to the occurrence of chlorosis. Basal stalks of mature sugarcanes contained up to 564.36 mg·kg-1 DW Mn. Excess Mn in the parent stalks resulted in a depress of chlorophyll concentration in the leaves of sugarcanes as indicated by lower chlorophyll concentration in the leaves of plantlets emerged from basal stalks. Ratoon sugarcane plantlets were susceptible to chlorosis due to high Mn accumulation in their leaves (456.90–1626.95 mg·kg-1 DW), while in planted canes chlorosis did not occur because of low Mn accumulation (94.64–313.41mg·kg-1 DW). On the other hand, active Fe content in chlorotic plantlets (3.39 mg kg-1 FW) was only equivalent to 28.2% of the concentration found in the control. These results indicate that chlorosis in ratoon sugarcane plantlets results from excessive Mn accumulated in parent stalks of planted cane sugarcanes grown on excessive Mn acidic soils, while active Fe deficiency in plantlets may play a secondary role in the chlorosis. PMID:27023702

  17. Photometry of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects: 2060 Chiron (1977 UB), 10199 Chariklo (1997 CU26), 38628 Huya (2000 EB173), 28978 Ixion (2001 KX76), and 90482 Orcus (2004 DW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiazzo, M.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.; Carraro, G.; Maris, M.; Montalto, M.

    2016-07-01

    Both Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) are minor bodies found in the outer Solar System. Centaurs are a transient population that moves between the orbits of Jupiter and Neptune, and they probably diffused out of the TNOs. TNOs move mainly beyond Neptune. Some of these objects display episodic cometary behaviour; a few percent of them are known to host binary companions. Here, we study the light-curves of two Centaurs—2060 Chiron (1977 UB) and 10199 Chariklo (1997 CU26)—and three TNOs—38628 Huya (2000 EB173), 28978 Ixion (2001 KX76), and 90482 Orcus (2004 DW)—and the colours of the Centaurs and Huya. Precise, ˜1~%, R-band absolute CCD photometry of these minor bodies acquired between 2006 and 2011 is presented; the new data are used to investigate the rotation rate of these objects. The colours of the Centaurs and Huya are determined using BVRI photometry. The point spread function of the five minor bodies is analysed, searching for signs of a coma or close companions. Astrometry is also discussed. A periodogram analysis of the light-curves of these objects gives the following rotational periods: 5.5±0.4~h for Chiron, 7.0± 0.6~h for Chariklo, 4.45±0.07~h for Huya, 12.4±0.3~h for Ixion, and 11.9±0.5~h for Orcus. The colour indices of Chiron are found to be B-V=0.53±0.05, V-R=0.37±0.08, and R-I=0.36±0.15. The values computed for Chariklo are V-R=0.62±0.07 and R-I=0.61±0.07. For Huya, we find V-R=0.58±0.09 and R-I=0.64±0.20. Our rotation periods are similar to and our colour values are consistent with those already published for these objects. We find very low levels of cometary activity (if any) and no sign of close or wide binary companions for these minor bodies.

  18. (Contaminated soil)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-08

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

  19. Accumulation of Sb, Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd by various plants species on two different relocated military shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Evangelou, Michael W H; Hockmann, Kerstin; Pokharel, Rasesh; Jakob, Alfred; Schulin, Rainer

    2012-10-15

    Annually, more than 400 t Pb and 10 t Sb enter Swiss soils at some 2000 military shooting ranges. After the decommission of military shooting ranges, heavily contaminated soils (>2000 mg kg(-1) Pb) are landfilled or processed by soil washing, whereas for soils with less contamination, alternate strategies are sought. Although the use of military shooting ranges for grazing in Switzerland is common practice, no assessment has been done about the uptake of Sb in plants and its subsequent potential intake by grazing animals. We determined the uptake of Sb, Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd in the aboveground biomass of nine plant species growing on a calcareous (Chur) and a weakly acidic (Losone) military shooting range soil in order to assess if grazing would be safe to employ on decommissioned military shooting ranges. The two soils did not differ in their total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Sb and Cd, they differed however in the total concentration of Pb. Additionally, their physical and chemical properties were significantly different. The accumulation of Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb in the shoots of all nine plant species remained below the Swiss tolerance values for fodder plants (150 mg kg(-1) Zn, 15-35 mg kg(-1) Cu, 40 mg kg(-1) Pb, and 1 mg kg(-1) Cd DW), with the only exception of Pb in Chenopodium album shoots which reached a concentration of 62 mg kg(-1) DW. Antimony concentrations were 1.5-2.6-fold higher in plants growing on the calcareous soil than on the weakly acidic soil. Considering Cu, Zn, Pb, Sb and Cd, all plants, with the exception C. album, would be suitable for grazing on similar shooting range soils.

  20. Concentrations and distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in soils and plants from a deca-BDE manufacturing factory in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Niu, Shan; Hai, Reti; Li, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Residues of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), including eight PBDE congeners, were investigated in soils and plants from a deca-BDE manufacturing factory located in the Shandong province of China to evaluate and discuss their pollution level and distribution. Total concentrations in topsoil ranged from 17.0 to 146 μg g(-1) dry weight (dw) with a mean value of 58.7 μg g(-1) dw. BDE-209 was the dominant congener in soils, accounting for 55.63-99.27 % of the total PBDEs. Concentrations and congener patterns in soils varied among different soil depths. Concentration levels in topsoil are high and the heavy accumulation in deep soil also can be observed, even for some sites, the concentrations in 50-100 cm depth are higher than in topsoil. In plant samples, total PBDE concentrations and the proportion of BDE-209 were high (69.92-99.10 %). The extent of pollution by PBDEs in the deca-BDE production factory was higher than in other regions, and the environmental risk caused by the production of deca-BDE is of concern. This is the first study to report pollution of PBDEs in soils and plants from the vicinity of a deca-BDE manufacturing factory.

  1. Comparative bioremediation of heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons co-contaminated soil by natural attenuation, phytoremediation, bioaugmentation and bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Agnello, A C; Bagard, M; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G; Huguenot, D

    2016-09-01

    Biological remediation technologies are an environmentally friendly approach for the treatment of polluted soils. This study evaluated through a pot experiment four bioremediation strategies: a) natural attenuation, b) phytoremediation with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), c) bioaugmentation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and d) bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation, for the treatment of a co-contaminated soil presenting moderate levels of heavy metals (Cu, Pb and Zn at 87, 100 and 110mgkg(-1) DW, respectively) and petroleum hydrocarbons (3800mgkg(-1) DW). As demonstrated by plant biomass and selected physiological parameters alfalfa plants were able to tolerate and grow in the co-contaminated soil, especially when soil was inoculated with P. aeruginosa, which promoted plant growth (56% and 105% increase for shoots and roots, respectively) and appeared to alleviate plant stress. The content of heavy metals in alfalfa plants was limited and followed the order: Zn>Cu>Pb. Heavy metals were mainly concentrated in plant roots and were poorly translocated, favouring their stabilization in the root zone. Bioaugmentation of planted soil with P. aeruginosa generally led to a decrease of plant metal concentration and translocation. The highest degree of total petroleum hydrocarbon removal was obtained for bioaugmentation-assisted phytoremediation treatment (68%), followed by bioaugmentation (59%), phytoremediation (47%) and natural attenuation (37%). The results of this study demonstrated that the combined use of plant and bacteria was the most advantageous option for the treatment of the present co-contaminated soil, as compared to natural attenuation, bioaugmentation or phytoremediation applied alone.

  2. Soil pH effects on the interactions between dissolved zinc, non-nano- and nano-ZnO with soil bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Read, Daniel S; Matzke, Marianne; Gweon, Hyun S; Newbold, Lindsay K; Heggelund, Laura; Ortiz, Maria Diez; Lahive, Elma; Spurgeon, David; Svendsen, Claus

    2016-03-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are used in an array of products and processes, ranging from personal care products to antifouling paints, textiles, food additives, antibacterial agents and environmental remediation processes. Soils are an environment likely to be exposed to manmade nanoparticles due to the practice of applying sewage sludge as a fertiliser or as an organic soil improver. However, understanding on the interactions between soil properties, nanoparticles and the organisms that live within soil is lacking, especially with regards to soil bacterial communities. We studied the effects of nanoparticulate, non-nanoparticulate and ionic zinc (in the form of zinc chloride) on the composition of bacterial communities in soil with a modified pH range (from pH 4.5 to pH 7.2). We observed strong pH-dependent effects on the interaction between bacterial communities and all forms of zinc, with the largest changes in bacterial community composition occurring in soils with low and medium pH levels (pH 4.8 and 5.9). The high pH soil (pH 7.2) was less susceptible to the effects of zinc exposure. At the highest doses of zinc (2500 mg/kg dw soil), both nano and non-nano particulate zinc applications elicited a similar response in the soil bacterial community, and this differed significantly to the ionic zinc salt treatment. The results highlight the importance of considering soil pH in nanotoxicology studies, although further work is needed to determine the exact mechanisms controlling the toxicity and fate and interactions of nanoparticles with soil microbial communities.

  3. Soil hydraulic conductivity changes caused by irrigation with reclaimed waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, G.J.; Rosenthal, A.; Tarchitzky, J.; Shainberg, I.; Chen, Y.

    1999-10-01

    Use of reclaimed waste water (RWW) in arid and semiarid regions may alleviate problems of fresh water shortage; however, it also involves some potential risks among which are degradation of soil hydraulic properties. The objectives of the current study were to study the effects of organic matter (OM) loads found in RWW obtained from a secondary treatment plant in Tel Aviv, Israel, and different size fractions of the suspended solids in the RWW on the hydraulic conductivity (HC) of three Israeli soils. The hydraulic conductivity of a clayey grumusol (Typic Chromoxerert), a typic loamy loess (Calcic Haploxeralf), and a sandy loam hamra (Typic Rhodexeralf) was determined in the laboratory using soil columns, by leaching with RWW containing zero, low, or high OM load, followed by leaching with distilled water (DW). The effects of suspended solids' size fraction on the HC was determined by filtering RWW. Leaching with high OM load RWW caused the relative HC of the grumusol, loess and hamra to drop to final values of 13.9, 24.2, and 58.8%, respectively. Filtering out suspended solids {gt}1.2 {micro} in this water improved the HC of the hamra, but did not significantly affect the final relative HC of the grumusol and loess. Leaching with low OM load RWW did not significantly decrease the HC beyond the decrease attributed to the effects of the concentration and composition of the electrolytes present in the zero OM load RWW. Subsequent leaching with DW caused an additional decrease in HC, whose magnitude for a given soil did not depend on the quality of the RWW previously used. The presence of OM in the irrigation water did not seem to have significant residual effects on soil HC. Evidently, in high OM load RWW the OM fraction determines the soils' HC, whereas in low OM load RWW, it is the electrolyte concentration and composition in the water, that seem to pose the hazard to soil hydraulic properties, especially during subsequent leaching with DW.

  4. Vertical distribution of dioxins in soil of Bien Hoa airbase, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Huyen, Dang Thuong; Igarashi, Toshifumi; Shiraiwa, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Bien Hoa airbase is a known dioxin-contaminated hotspot in Vietnam. The contamination occurred during the Vietnam War at the site where dioxins were transported, stored, sprayed, and spilled in the area. Dioxins, which are cancer inducing substances, may transfer from the soil to food crops and finally to human beings living around the area. Many surveys of dioxins in soil, water, organisms, and human have been carried out in this study area since 2002. In this paper vertical distribution of dioxins in undisturbed soil cores were examined. Twelve soil samples from three drilled cores were collected to analyze dioxin levels according to the standard Japanese analytical method. The results showed that the toxicity equivalency quantity (TEQ) in one soil sample at a depth of 2.6 m reached 3,300 pg-TEQ/g-dw. High TEQs were also observed in the clay layer. This anomaly of dioxin concentrations could be attributed to the affinity of dioxins for the clay layer. The isomer patterns in the soils were different from those in the soil of Hokkaido in that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was the most dominant in the soil sample. This indicates that the dioxins originate from a defoliant Agent Orange disposed at the site after the Vietnam War.

  5. Occurrence and fate of organochlorinated pesticides and PAH in agricultural soils from the Ebro River basin.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Alain; Lacorte, Sílvia; Barceló, Damià

    2009-08-01

    This study was aimed to assess the presence and fate of 22 organochlorinated pesticides (OCHs) and their degradation products and 16 Environmental Protection Agency-priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soils of the Ebro River basin (NE Spain) during a 3-year period. The study site is characterized by a long and active agricultural history where pesticides have largely been used. Soils were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This procedure was optimized in terms of multiresidue analysis and effective cleanup and proved to have excellent analytical performance (recoveries ranging between 71% and 133%, standard deviation <14%, and a method detection limit from 0.19 to 7.38 microg/kg). Soils form the Ebro basin showed a prevalence of 4,4'-DDT and 4,4'-DDE, found in 53% and 88% of the soil samples between 0.13 and 58.17 microg/kg-dw (dry weight), respectively, indicating a slight decreasing trend of DDT within time. PAHs were detected in all soil samples at concentrations up to 465 microg/kg-dw, and the phenanthrene/anthracene (<10) and fluoranthene/pyrene (>1) ratios indicated combustion processes as the main source attributing to the burning of weeds and vegetable wastes after harvesting. No traces of any of the OCHs and PAHs were detected in groundwater, indicating that leaching for agricultural fields is not an important process of transport for these compounds. Overall, we propose the need to perform a monitoring program to evaluate the temporal tendencies and potential impact of pesticides and PAH in soils.

  6. Soil biology for resilient healthy soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    What is a resilient healthy soil? A resilient soil is capable of recovering or adapting to stress; the health of the living/biological component of the soil is crucial for soil resiliency. Soil health is tightly coupled to the concept of soil quality (Text Box 1) and the terms are frequently used ...

  7. Concentrations of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in biosolid amended soil, influent, effluent, receiving water, and sediment of wastewater treatment plants in Canada.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Gao; Steer, Helena; Tait, Tara; Williams, Zackery; Pacepavicius, Grazina; Young, Teresa; Ng, Timothy; Smyth, Shirley Anne; Kinsman, Laura; Alaee, Mehran

    2013-10-01

    A comprehensive surveillance program was conducted to determine the occurrence of three cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) in environmental compartments impacted by wastewater effluent discharges. Eleven wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), representative of those found in Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec, Canada, were investigated to determine levels of cVMS in their influents and effluents. In addition, receiving water and sediment impacted by WWTP effluents, and biosolid-amended soil from agricultural fields were also analyzed for a preliminary evaluation of the environmental exposure of cVMS in media impacted by wastewater effluent and solids. A newly-developed large volume injection (septumless head adapter and cooled injection system) gas chromatography - mass spectrometry method was used to avoid contamination originating from instrumental analysis. Concentrations of D4, D5, and D6 in influents to the 11 WWTPs were in the range 0.282-6.69μgL(-1), 7.75-135μgL(-1), and 1.53-26.9μgL(-1), respectively. In general, wastewater treatment showed cVMS removal rates of greater than 92%, regardless of treatment type. The D4, D5, and D6 concentration ranges in effluent were <0.009-0.045μgL(-1), <0.027-1.56μgL(-1), and <0.022-0.093μgL(-1), respectively. The concentrations in receiving water influenced by effluent, were lower compared to those in effluent in most cases, with the ranges <0.009-0.023μgL(-1), <0.027-1.48μgL(-1), and <0.022-0.151μgL(-1) for D4, D5, and D6, respectively. Sediment concentrations ranged from <0.003-0.049μgg(-1)dw, 0.011-5.84μgg(-1)dw, and 0.004-0.371μgg(-1)dw for D4, D5, and D6, respectively. The concentrations in biosolid-amended soil, having values of <0.008-0.017μgg(-1)dw, <0.007-0.221μgg(-1)dw, and <0.009-0.711μgg(-1)dw for D4, D5, and D6, respectively, were lower than those in sediment impacted by wastewater

  8. Health risk assessment of abandoned agricultural soils based on heavy metal contents in Hong Kong, the world's most populated city.

    PubMed

    Man, Yu Bon; Sun, Xiao Lin; Zhao, Yin Ge; Lopez, Brenda Natalia; Chung, Shan Shan; Wu, Sheng Chun; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming H

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the consequence of changing and using agricultural soils to other purposes in Hong Kong with respect to risk to human health. This study established concentrations of the following priority elements: As, Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb and Zn in terms of total burden (using mixed acid microwave digestion) and with respect to metal bioaccessibility (using an in vitro simulated gastric solution). 55 locations were sampled representing 12 different land use types, namely, agricultural (A), abandoned agricultural (Ab), organic farm (OF), container storage (CS), construction waste (CW), e-waste storage (EW (S)), e-waste dismantling workshop (EW (DW)), e-waste open burning site (EW (OBS)), open burning site (OBS), petrol station (PS), metal recycling workshop (MRW) and car dismantling workshop (CDW). The elemental concentrations were subsequently used to establish Hazard Indices (for adults and children). 95th percentile values of total elemental concentrations were used to derive a combined (ingestion, dermal and inhalation) Hazard Index (HI) only for adults where the EW (DW) land use type indicated the potential for increased harm (HI=1.16). On the other hand, where 5th percentile values of total elemental concentrations were used to derive a combined Hazard Index (HI) for children the HI values exceeded 1 for CS, MRW, PS, EW (DW), EW (OBS) and CDW land use types (respectively, 1.21, 1.19, 1.52, 1.21, 1.81 and 2.04).

  9. Effect of soil organic matter content and pH on the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles to Folsomia candida.

    PubMed

    Waalewijn-Kool, Pauline L; Rupp, Svenja; Lofts, Stephen; Svendsen, Claus; van Gestel, Cornelis A M

    2014-10-01

    Organic matter (OM) and pH may influence nanoparticle fate and effects in soil. This study investigated the influence of soil organic matter content and pH on the toxicity of ZnO-NP and ZnCl2 to Folsomia candida in four natural soils, having between 2.37% and 14.7% OM and [Formula: see text] levels between 5.0 and 6.8. Porewater Zn concentrations were much lower in ZnO-NP than in ZnCl2 spiked soils, resulting in higher Freundlich sorption constants for ZnO-NP. For ZnCl2 the porewater Zn concentrations were significantly higher in less organic soils, while for ZnO-NP the highest soluble Zn level (23mgZn/l) was measured in the most organic soil, which had the lowest pH. Free Zn(2+) ion concentrations were higher for ZnCl2 than for ZnO-NP and were greatly dependent on pH (pHpw) and dissolved organic carbon content of the pore water. The 28-d EC50 values for the effect of ZnCl2 on the reproduction of F. candida increased with increasing OM content from 356 to 1592mgZn/kg d.w. For ZnO-NP no correlation between EC50 values and OM content was found and EC50 values ranged from 1695 in the most organic soil to 4446mgZn/kg d.w. in the higher pH soil. When based on porewater and free Zn(2+) concentrations, EC50 values were higher for ZnCl2 than for ZnO-NP, and consistently decreased with increasing pHpw. This study shows that ZnO-NP toxicity is dependent on soil properties, but is mainly driven by soil pH.

  10. Concentrations of arsenic, copper, cobalt, lead and zinc in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) growing on uncontaminated and contaminated soils of the Zambian Copperbelt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kříbek, B.; Majer, V.; Knésl, I.; Nyambe, I.; Mihaljevič, M.; Ettler, V.; Sracek, O.

    2014-11-01

    The concentrations of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) in washed leaves and washed and peeled tubers of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz, Euphorbiaceae) growing on uncontaminated and contaminated soils of the Zambian Copperbelt mining district have been analyzed. An enrichment index (EI) was used to distinguish between contaminated and uncontaminated areas. This index is based on the average ratio of the actual and median concentration of the given contaminants (As, Co, Cu, mercury (Hg), Pb and Zn) in topsoil. The concentrations of copper in cassava leaves growing on contaminated soils reach as much as 612 mg kg-1 Cu (total dry weight [dw]). Concentrations of copper in leaves of cassava growing on uncontaminated soils are much lower (up to 252 mg kg-1 Cu dw). The concentrations of Co (up to 78 mg kg-1 dw), As (up to 8 mg kg-1 dw) and Zn (up to 231 mg kg-1 dw) in leaves of cassava growing on contaminated soils are higher compared with uncontaminated areas, while the concentrations of lead do not differ significantly. The concentrations of analyzed chemical elements in the tubers of cassava are much lower than in its leaves with the exception of As. Even in strongly contaminated areas, the concentrations of copper in the leaves and tubers of cassava do not exceed the daily maximum tolerance limit of 0.5 mg kg-1/human body weight (HBW) established by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). The highest tolerable weekly ingestion of 0.025 mg kg-1/HBW for lead and the highest tolerable weekly ingestion of 0.015 mg kg-1/HBW for arsenic are exceeded predominantly in the vicinity of smelters. Therefore, the preliminary assessment of dietary exposure to metals through the consumption of uncooked cassava leaves and tubers has been identified as a moderate hazard to human health. Nevertheless, as the surfaces of leaves are strongly contaminated by metalliferous dust in the polluted areas, there is still a potential hazard

  11. Agriculture: Soils

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Productive soils, a favorable climate, and clean and abundant water resources are essential for growing crops, raising livestock, and for ecosystems to continue to provide the critical provisioning services that humans need.

  12. Simultaneous determination of veterinary antibiotics and hormone in broiler manure, soil and manure compost by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y B; Zakaria, Mohamad Pauzi; Latif, Puziah Abdul; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-11-02

    A multi-residue analytical method was developed to quantify nine antibiotics and one hormone in soil, broiler manure and manure compost. The developed method was based on ultrasonic extraction with MeOH:ACN:EDTA:McIlvaine buffer, solid phase extraction (SPE) using HLB (3 cc/60 mg) cartridge, followed by instrumental analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with 25 min total run time. It was validated and tested on soil, broiler manure and manure compost samples and showed that the method is able to simultaneously detect and quantify the target analytes with good selectivity and sensitivity. The developed method was linear in a concentration range from its instrumental quantification limit (IQL) to 500 ng/mL, with correlation coefficients higher than 0.999. The overall method performance was good for the majority of the analytes, with recoveries range from 63% to 121% in all the sample matrices. The method quantification limit (MQL) for the 10 target analytes in the soil, broiler manure and manure compost samples were 2-10, 3-16 and 5-15 μg/kg dry weight (DW), respectively. The method has also included tilmicosin, an antibiotic known to be reported in the environment for the first time. The developed method was then applied on broiler manure samples and its relative manure amended agricultural soil samples to identify and quantify veterinary antibiotic and hormone residues in the environment. These analytes were detected in broiler manure and soil samples, with maximum concentrations reaching up to 78516.1 μg/kg DW (doxycycline) and 1331.4 μg/kg DW (flumequine), respectively. The results showed that the method can potentially be adopted for the analysis of veterinary antibiotic and hormone wastes in solid environmental matrices.

  13. Is there a specific geochemical signature of urban soils dedicated to stormwater infiltration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delolme, Cécile; Poulenard, Jérôme; Dorioz, Jean-Marcel; Bedell, Jean-Philippe; Winiarski, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    . We show specifically that these soils are good phosphorus sink (1 to 3 g/kg dw) with a great proportion of available P . Dioxines and PCB are detected in all the 19 samples with contents varying from 2 to 30 ng/kg dw for the sum of 17 dioxines and 8 to 500 mg/kg dw for the sum of the 7 indicator PCB. Diuron was measured in half of the basins and para-ter-octylphénol (30 to 100 mg/kg dw) and 4-nonylphénol (300 to 1300 mg/kg dw) were quantified in all the samples. In order to see if there is a co-structure between the geochemical properties of the 19 sites and the catchment characteristics, a STATIS analysis was used to carry out a multi-table analysis with the 6 tables characterizing the sites (catchment characteristics, heavy metal content, main geochemical properties, organic pollutant content, infra-red spectra, visible spectra) and is still under way. This first results of this analysis confirm that the geochemical characteristics are independant from land use and mostly linked to an "urban geochemical specificity" in relation to air quality and urban surfaces characteristics.

  14. Ecological Risk of Heavy Metals and a Metalloid in Agricultural Soils in Tarkwa, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Bortey-Sam, Nesta; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Akoto, Osei; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Baidoo, Elvis; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2015-09-11

    Heavy metals and a metalloid in agricultural soils in 19 communities in Tarkwa were analyzed to assess the potential ecological risk. A total of 147 soil samples were collected in June, 2012 and analyzed for As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn. Mean concentrations (mg/kg dw) of heavy metals in the communities decreased in order of Zn (39) ˃ Cr (21) ˃ Pb (7.2) ˃ Cu (6.2) ˃ As (4.4) ˃ Ni (3.7) ˃ Co (1.8) ˃ Hg (0.32) ˃ Cd (0.050). Correlations among heavy metals and soil properties indicated that soil organic matter could have substantial influence on the total contents of these metals in soil. From the results, integrated pollution (C(deg)) in some communities such as, Wangarakrom (11), Badukrom (13) and T-Tamso (17) indicated high pollution with toxic metals, especially from As and Hg. Potential ecological risk (RI) indices indicated low (Mile 7) to high risks (Wangarakrom; Badukrom) of metals. Based on pollution coefficient (C(i)(f)), C(deg), monomial ecological risk (E(i)(r)) and RI, the investigated soils fall within low to high contamination and risk of heavy metals to the ecological system especially plants, soil invertebrates and/or mammalian wildlife. This represented moderate potential ecological risk in the study area, and mining activities have played a significant role.

  15. Ecological Risk of Heavy Metals and a Metalloid in Agricultural Soils in Tarkwa, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Bortey-Sam, Nesta; Nakayama, Shouta M. M.; Akoto, Osei; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Baidoo, Elvis; Mizukawa, Hazuki; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals and a metalloid in agricultural soils in 19 communities in Tarkwa were analyzed to assess the potential ecological risk. A total of 147 soil samples were collected in June, 2012 and analyzed for As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn. Mean concentrations (mg/kg dw) of heavy metals in the communities decreased in order of Zn (39) ˃ Cr (21) ˃ Pb (7.2) ˃ Cu (6.2) ˃ As (4.4) ˃ Ni (3.7) ˃ Co (1.8) ˃ Hg (0.32) ˃ Cd (0.050). Correlations among heavy metals and soil properties indicated that soil organic matter could have substantial influence on the total contents of these metals in soil. From the results, integrated pollution (Cdeg) in some communities such as, Wangarakrom (11), Badukrom (13) and T–Tamso (17) indicated high pollution with toxic metals, especially from As and Hg. Potential ecological risk (RI) indices indicated low (Mile 7) to high risks (Wangarakrom; Badukrom) of metals. Based on pollution coefficient (Cif), Cdeg, monomial ecological risk (Eir) and RI, the investigated soils fall within low to high contamination and risk of heavy metals to the ecological system especially plants, soil invertebrates and/or mammalian wildlife. This represented moderate potential ecological risk in the study area, and mining activities have played a significant role. PMID:26378563

  16. Soil dioxins levels at agriculture sites and natural preserve areas of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Jou, Jin-juh; Lin, Kae-Long; Chung, Jen-Chir; Liaw, Shu-Liang

    2007-08-17

    In this study, agriculture soil in Taiwan has been sampled and analyzed to determine the background level of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/DF) in the agricultural and nature preserve areas. Another objective is to investigate relationship between soil characteristics and air deposition in Taiwan. The results indicate that in nature preserve areas the topsoil shows an extraordinary profile of PCDD/DF compared to that in the air deposition. The PCDD/DF levels of the low-contaminated agricultural soils are compatible with those of the nature preserves soils. However, in the highly-contaminated agricultural soils, there is an abrupt jump in their concentrations, 10-100 times higher. The overall I-TEQ values of the background topsoils range from 0.101 to 15.2 ng I-TEQ/kg. Near industrial/urban areas in Taiwan the PCDD/DF are slightly higher compared to those in the low concentration group. Typically, the PCDD/DF background values found in this survey fall in the 90% confidence interval and can thus, be deemed the background levels in Taiwan. Ninety-five percent of these data are below the European and American soil standard of 10 ng I-TEQ/kg d.w. The PCDD/DF profile with one neighborhood soil sample was shown no significant difference.

  17. Immobilizer-assisted management of metal-contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Park, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Min-Suk; Owens, Gary; Youn, Gyu-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Su

    2012-07-15

    Production of food crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils is of concern because consumers are potentially exposed to hazardous metals via dietary intake of such crops or crop derived products. Therefore, the current study was conducted to develop management protocols for crop cultivation to allow safer food production. Metal uptake, as influenced by pH change-induced immobilizing agents (dolomite, steel slag, and agricultural lime) and sorption agents (zeolite and compost), was monitored in three common plants representative of leafy (Chinese cabbage), root (spring onion) and fruit (red pepper) vegetables, in a field experiment. The efficiency of the immobilizing agents was assessed by their ability to decrease the phytoavailability of metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn). The fruit vegetable (red pepper) showed the least accumulation of Cd (0.16-0.29 mgkg(-1) DW) and Pb (0.2-0.9 mgkg(-1) DW) in edible parts regardless of treatment, indicating selection of low metal accumulating crops was a reasonable strategy for safer food production. However, safer food production was more likely to be achievable by combining crop selection with immobilizing agent amendment of soils. Among the immobilizing agents, pH change-induced immobilizers were more effective than sorption agents, showing decreases in Cd and Pb concentrations in each plant well below standard limits. The efficiency of pH change-induced immobilizers was also comparable to reductions obtained by 'clean soil cover' where the total metal concentrations of the plow layer was reduced via capping the surface with uncontaminated soil, implying that pH change-induced immobilizers can be practically applied to metal contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

  18. Evaluation of the halophyte Salsola soda as an alternative crop for saline soils high in selenium and boron.

    PubMed

    Centofanti, Tiziana; Bañuelos, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Urbanization, industrial development, and intensive agriculture have caused soil contamination and land degradation in many areas of the world. Salinization is one important factor contributing to land degradation and it affects agricultural production and environmental quality. When salinization is combined with soil pollution by trace elements, as it occurs in many arid and semi-arid regions around the world, strategies to phyto-manage pollutants and sustain crop production need to be implemented. In this study, we present the case of saline soils in the West side of Central California which contain naturally-occurring selenium (Se), boron (B), and other salts, such as NaCl, CaCl2, Na2SO4, and Na2SeO4. To sustain crop production on Se- and B-laden arid saline soils, we investigated the potential of the halophyte "agretti" (Salsola soda L.) as an alternative crop. The aim of our greenhouse study was to examine adaptability, B tolerance, and Se accumulation by S. soda grown on soils collected from a typical saline-laden field site located on the West side of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Our results showed that S. soda tolerates the saline (EC ∼ 10 dS m(-1)) and B-laden soils (10 mg B L(-1)) of the SJV even with the additional irrigation of saline and B rich water (EC ∼ 3 dS m(-1) and 4 mg B L(-1)). Under these growing conditions, the plant can accumulate high concentrations of Na (80 g Na kg(-1) DW), B (100 mg B kg(-1) DW), and Se (3-4 mg Se kg(-1) DW) without showing toxicity symptoms. Hence, S. soda showed promising potential as a plant species that can be grown in B-laden saline soils and accumulate and potentially manage excessive soluble Se and B in soil.

  19. Fate and effects of ivermectin on soil invertebrates in terrestrial model ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Förster, Bernhard; Boxall, Alistair; Coors, Anja; Jensen, John; Liebig, Markus; Pope, Louise; Moser, Thomas; Römbke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    The effect of ivermectin on soil organisms was assessed in Terrestrial Model Ecosystems (TMEs). Intact soil cores were extracted from a pasture in England and kept for up to 14 weeks in the laboratory. Ivermectin was applied to the soil surface via spiked cow dung slurry at seven concentration rates ranging from 0.25 to 180 mg/TME, referring to concentrations of 0.19-227 mg ivermectin/kg soil dry weight in the uppermost (0-1 cm) soil layer. After 7, 28 and 96 days following the application soil cores were destructively sampled to determine ivermectin residues in soil and to assess possible effects on microbial biomass, nematodes, enchytraeids, earthworms, micro-arthropods, and bait-lamina feeding activity. No significant effect of ivermectin was found for microbial respiration and numbers of nematodes and mites. Due to a lack of dose-response patterns no effect concentrations could be determined for the endpoints enchytraeid and collembolan numbers as well as total earthworm biomass. In contrast, EC50 values for the endpoint feeding rate could be calculated as 0.46, 4.31 and 15.1 mg ivermectin/kg soil dry weight in three soil layers (0-1, 0-5 and 0-8 cm, respectively). The multivariate Principal Response Curve (PRC) was used to calculate the NOEC(community), based on earthworm, enchytraeid and collembolan abundance data, as 0.33 and 0.78 mg ivermectin/kg soil dw for day 7 and day 96, respectively. The results shown here are in line with laboratory data, indicating in general low to moderate effects of ivermectin on soil organisms. As shown by the results of the bait-lamina tests, semi-field methods such as TMEs are useful extensions of the battery of potential test methods since complex and ecologically relevant endpoints can be included.

  20. Utility of bioassays (lettuce, red clover, red fescue, Microtox, MetSTICK, Hyalella, bait lamina) in ecological risk screening of acid metal (Zn) contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Chapman, E Emily V; Hedrei Helmer, Stephanie; Dave, Göran; Murimboh, John D

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess selected bioassays and ecological screening tools for their suitability in a weight of evidence risk screening process of acidic metal contaminated soil. Intact soil cores were used for the tests, which minimizes changes in pH and metal bioavailability that may result from homogenization and drying of the soil. Soil cores were spiked with ZnCl(2) or CaCl(2). Leachate collected from the soil cores was used to account for the exposure pathways through pore water and groundwater. Tests assessed included MetSTICK in soil cores and Microtox in soil leachate, lettuce (Lactuca sativa), red fescue (Festuca rubra) and red clover (Trifolium pratense) in the soil cores and lettuce and red clover in soil leachate, Hyallella azteca in soil leachate, and an ecological soil function test using Bait Lamina in soil cores. Microtox, H. azteca, lettuce and red fescue showed higher sensitivity to low pH than to Zn concentrations and are therefore not recommended as tests on intact acidic soil cores and soil leachate. The Bait Lamina test appeared sensitive to pH levels below 3.7 but should be investigated further as a screening tool in less acidic soils. Among the bioassays, the MetSTICK and the T. pratense bioassays in soil cores were the most sensitive to Zn, with the lowest nominal NOEC of 200 and 400mg Zn/kg d.w., respectively. These bioassays were also tolerant of low pH, which make them suitable for assessing hazards of metal contaminated acid soils.

  1. Schoolground Soil Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Charles

    1978-01-01

    Outlined are simple activities for studying soil, which can be conducted in the schoolyard. Concepts include soil profiles, topsoil, soil sizes, making soil, erosion, slope, and water absorption. (SJL)

  2. Spatial distribution of organochlorine contaminants in soil, sediment, and fish in Bikini and Enewetak Atolls of the Marshall Islands, Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Caccamise, Sarah A L; Wu, Liejun; Woodward, Lee Ann; Li, Qing X

    2011-08-01

    Several nuclear tests were performed at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls in the Marshall Islands between 1946 and 1958. The events at Bikini Atoll involved several ships that were tested for durability during nuclear explosions, and 24 vessels now rest on the bottom of the Bikini lagoon. Nine soil samples were collected from different areas on the two islands of the atoll, and eighteen sediment, nine fish, and one lobster were collected in the vicinity of the sunken ships. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs) in these samples were analyzed using gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/ITMS). The average recoveries ranged from 78% to 104% for the different PCB congeners. The limits of detection (LOD) for PCBs, PCTs, DDE, DDT, and dieldrin ranged 10-50 pg g(-1). Some fish from Enewetak contained PCBs at a concentration range of 37-137 ng g(-1), dry weight (dw), and most of the soils from Enewetak showed evidence of PCBs (22-392 ng g(-1)dw). Most of the Bikini lagoon sediment samples contained PCBs, and the highest was the one collected from around the Saratoga, an aircraft carrier (1555 ng g(-1)dw). Some of the fish samples, most of the soil samples, and only one of the sediment samples contained 2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dichloroethylene (DDE) and PCBs. In addition to PCBs, the soils from Enewetak Atoll contained PCTs. PCTs were not detected in the sediment samples from Bikini Atoll. The results suggest local pollution sources of PCBs, PCTs, and OCPs.

  3. Basic Soils. Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Univ., Bozeman. Dept. of Agricultural and Industrial Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use in teaching a course in basic soils that is intended for college freshmen. Addressed in the individual lessons of the unit are the following topics: the way in which soil is formed, the physical properties of soil, the chemical properties of soil, the biotic properties of soil, plant-soil-water…

  4. Short- and Long-term Perspectives of Soil Change: Interactions between Capacity and Intensity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. W.; Richter, D.

    2009-12-01

    Soil chemical change is usually viewed as a change in one or more of the commonly employed methods for the chemical analysis of the solid phase of the soil (a capacity change). The pools (kg ha-1) of nutrients commonly analyzed in standard soil analyses are often very large and therefore are thought to change very slowly. On the other hand, changes in the solution phase of the soil, although very strongly affected by changes in the solid phase, can take place almost instantaneously (an intensity change). The interactions between capacity and intensity type changes are complex, but chemically consistent with one another (Reuss and Johnson, 1986). This paper reviews laboratory studies, field studies, and modeling exercises which demonstrate the interactions between capacity and intensity-type changes in soil adsorbed cation and anions, both over the short term and long term. Reuss, J.O., and D.W. Johnson. 1986. Acid Deposition and the Acidification of Soil and Water. Ecological Studies No. 59. Springer-Verlag, New York. 118 p.

  5. Spatial and vertical distribution of short chain chlorinated paraffins in soils from wastewater irrigated farmlands.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lixi; Wang, Thanh; Han, Wenya; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Qian; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2011-03-15

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are one of the most complex groups of halogenated contaminants in the environment. However, studies of short chain CPs (SCCPs) in China are very scarce. In this study, the concentrations and distribution of SCCPs in farm soils from a wastewater irrigated area in China were investigated. SCCPs were detected in all topsoil samples, with the sum of the concentrations (ΣSCCPs) in the range of 159.9-1450 ng/g (dry weight, dw). A noticeable spatial trend and specific congener distribution were observed in the wastewater irrigated farmland. Soil vertical profiles showed that ΣSCCP concentrations below the plowed layer decreased exponentially and had a significant positive relationship (R(2) > 0.83) with total organic carbon in soil cores. Furthermore, soil vertical distributions indicated that lower chlorinated (Cl(5-6)) and shorter chain (C(10-12)) congeners are more prone to migrate to deeper soil layers compared to highly chlorinated and longer chain congeners. This work demonstrated that effluents from sewage treatment plants (STPs) could be a significant source of SCCPs to the ambient environment and wastewater irrigation can lead to higher accumulation of SCCPs in farm soils.

  6. Use of different surface covering materials to enhance removal of radiocaesium in plants and upper soil from orchards in Fukushima prefecture.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mamoru; Akai, Hiroko; Saito, Yuichi; Takase, Tsugiko; Kikunaga, Hidetoshi; Sekiya, Nobuhito; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko

    2017-04-04

    The effectiveness of a decontamination methodology whereby herbaceous plants were grown through different materials covering the soil surface followed by subsequent removal of the material, associated plant tissues and attached soil on (137)Cs removal from soil was evaluated. Revegetation netting sown with Kentucky bluegrass and white clover had a high effectiveness in (137)Cs removal when rolling up the plants, roots, and rhizosphere soil approximately 6 months after sowing. The removal rate was lower when there was higher (137)Cs vertical migration down the soil profile. The maximum removal effectiveness of 93.1% was observed by rolling up fertilized Kentucky bluegrass with a well-developed root mat without netting, indicating that applying nutrients to encourage the development of roots or root mats in the 3 cm topsoil rhizosphere is an efficient technology to increase the decontamination effect of plant removal in orchards. Netting and weeding were able to remove up to 80% of (137)Cs in the soil without the use of heavy machinery. There was a significant relationship between the removal ratio and the removed soil weight per area. Using the relationship on the site below the canopy, removal of 14.3 kg m(-2) DW soil would achieve a removal ratio of 80%. The effectiveness of the technique will decrease with time as radiocaesium migrates down the soil profile but this would be expected to occur slowly in many soils.

  7. Influence of soil types and osmotic pressure on growth and (137)Cs accumulation in blackgram (Vigna mungo L.).

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Thuzar; Oo, Aung Zaw; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of soil types and osmotic levels on growth and (137)Cs accumulation in two blackgram varieties differing in salinity tolerance grown in Fukushima contaminated soils. The contamination levels of the sandy clay loam and clay soil were 1084 and 2046 Bq kg(-1) DW, respectively. The (137)Cs activity was higher in both plants grown on the sandy clay loam than on the clay soil regardless of soil (137)Cs activity concentration. No significant differences were observed in all measured growth parameters between the two varieties under optimal water conditions for both types of soil. However, the growth, leaf water contents and (137)Cs activity concentrations in both plants were lower in both soil types when there was water stress induced by addition of polyethylene glycol. Water stress-induced reduction in total leaf area and total biomass, in addition to leaf relative water content, were higher in salt sensitive 'Mut Pe Khaing To' than in salt tolerant 'U-Taung-2' plants for both soil types. Varietal difference in decreased (137)Cs uptake under water stress was statically significant in the sandy clay loam soil, however, it was not in the clay soil. The transfer of (137)Cs from soil to plants (i.e., root, stem and leaf) was higher for the sandy clay loam for both plants when compared with those of the clay soil. The decreased activity of (137)Cs in the above ground samples (leaf and stem) in both plants in response to osmotic stress suggested that plant available (137)Cs decreased when soil water is limited by osmotic stress.

  8. Lunar soil properties and soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. K.; Houston, W. N.; Hovland, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The study to identify and define recognizable fabrics in lunar soil in order to determine the history of the lunar regolith in different locations is reported. The fabric of simulated lunar soil, and lunar soil samples are discussed along with the behavior of simulated lunar soil under dynamic and static loading. The planned research is also included.

  9. Influence of soil moisture on soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fer, Miroslav; Kodesova, Radka; Nikodem, Antonin; Klement, Ales; Jelenova, Klara

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to describe an impact of soil moisture on soil respiration. Study was performed on soil samples from morphologically diverse study site in loess region of Southern Moravia, Czech Republic. The original soil type is Haplic Chernozem, which was due to erosion changed into Regosol (steep parts) and Colluvial soil (base slope and the tributary valley). Soil samples were collected from topsoils at 5 points of the selected elevation transect and also from the parent material (loess). Grab soil samples, undisturbed soil samples (small - 100 cm3, and large - 713 cm3) and undisturbed soil blocks were taken. Basic soil properties were determined on grab soil samples. Small undisturbed soil samples were used to determine the soil water retention curves and the hydraulic conductivity functions using the multiple outflow tests in Tempe cells and a numerical inversion with HYDRUS 1-D. During experiments performed in greenhouse dry large undisturbed soil samples were wetted from below using a kaolin tank and cumulative water inflow due to capillary rise was measured. Simultaneously net CO2 exchange rate and net H2O exchange rate were measured using LCi-SD portable photosynthesis system with Soil Respiration Chamber. Numerical inversion of the measured cumulative capillary rise data using the HYDRUS-1D program was applied to modify selected soil hydraulic parameters for particular conditions and to simulate actual soil water distribution within each soil column in selected times. Undisturbed soil blocks were used to prepare thin soil sections to study soil-pore structure. Results for all soil samples showed that at the beginning of soil samples wetting the CO2 emission increased because of improving condition for microbes' activity. The maximum values were reached for soil column average soil water content between 0.10 and 0.15 cm3/cm3. Next CO2 emission decreased since the pore system starts filling by water (i.e. aggravated conditions for microbes

  10. Effect of Medicago sativa L. and compost on organic and inorganic pollutant removal from a mixed contaminated soil and risk assessment using ecotoxicological tests.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Charlotte; Hogland, William; Kaczala, Fabio; Jani, Yahya; Marchand, Lilian; Augustsson, Anna; Hijri, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Several Gentle Remediation Options (GRO), e.g., plant-based options (phytoremediation), singly and combined with soil amendments, can be simultaneously efficient for degrading organic pollutants and either stabilizing or extracting trace elements (TEs). Here, a 5-month greenhouse trial was performed to test the efficiency of Medicago sativa L., singly and combined with a compost addition (30% w/w), to treat soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC), Co and Pb collected at an auto scrap yard. After 5 months, total soil Pb significantly decreased in the compost-amended soil planted with M. sativa, but not total soil Co. Compost incorporation into the soil promoted PHC degradation, M. sativa growth and survival, and shoot Pb concentrations [3.8 mg kg(-1) dry weight (DW)]. Residual risk assessment after the phytoremediation trial showed a positive effect of compost amendment on plant growth and earthworm development. The O2 uptake by soil microorganisms was lower in the compost-amended soil, suggesting a decrease in microbial activity. This study underlined the benefits of the phytoremediation option based on M. sativa cultivation and compost amendment for remediating PHC- and Pb-contaminated soils.

  11. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in wetland soils under different land uses along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in a Chinese estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Junjing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Guangliang

    2015-12-01

    Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs) along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta. In total, 16 OCPs were measured to investigate the effects of wetland reclamation and reclamation history on OCP levels. Our results showed that average ∑DDTs, HCB, MXC, and ∑OCPs were higher in surface soils of DWs compared to RiWs and ReWs. Both D30 and D20 soils contained the highest ∑OCP levels, followed by D40 and D100 soils; lower ∑OCP levels occurred in D10 soils. Higher ∑OCP levels were observed in the younger RiWs than in the older ones, and surface soils exhibited higher ∑OCP concentrations in the older ReWs compared with younger ReWs. The predominant percentages of γ-HCH in ∑HCHs (>42%) and aldrin in ∑DRINs (>46%) in most samples reflected the recent use of lindane and aldrin. The presence of dominant DDT isomers (p,p’-DDE and p,p’-DDD) indicated the historical input of DDT and significant aerobic degradation of the compound. Generally, DW soils had a higher ecotoxicological risk of OCPs than RiW and ReW soils, and the top 30 cm soils had higher ecotoxicological risks of HCHs than of DDTs.

  12. Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in wetland soils under different land uses along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in a Chinese estuary

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Junhong; Lu, Qiongqiong; Zhao, Qingqing; Wang, Junjing; Gao, Zhaoqin; Zhang, Guangliang

    2015-01-01

    Soil profiles were collected at a depth of 30 cm in ditch wetlands (DWs), riverine wetlands (RiWs) and reclaimed wetlands (ReWs) along a 100-year chronosequence of reclamation in the Pearl River Delta. In total, 16 OCPs were measured to investigate the effects of wetland reclamation and reclamation history on OCP levels. Our results showed that average ∑DDTs, HCB, MXC, and ∑OCPs were higher in surface soils of DWs compared to RiWs and ReWs. Both D30 and D20 soils contained the highest ∑OCP levels, followed by D40 and D100 soils; lower ∑OCP levels occurred in D10 soils. Higher ∑OCP levels were observed in the younger RiWs than in the older ones, and surface soils exhibited higher ∑OCP concentrations in the older ReWs compared with younger ReWs. The predominant percentages of γ-HCH in ∑HCHs (>42%) and aldrin in ∑DRINs (>46%) in most samples reflected the recent use of lindane and aldrin. The presence of dominant DDT isomers (p,p’-DDE and p,p’-DDD) indicated the historical input of DDT and significant aerobic degradation of the compound. Generally, DW soils had a higher ecotoxicological risk of OCPs than RiW and ReW soils, and the top 30 cm soils had higher ecotoxicological risks of HCHs than of DDTs. PMID:26633149

  13. Impact of soil pH and organic matter on the chemical bioavailability of vanadium species: The underlying basis for risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, Inka; Metzler, Martina; Hartikainen, Helinä

    2016-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to unravel the chemical reactions and processes dictating the potential bioavailability of vanadium (V). In environmental solutions V exists in two stable oxidation states, +IV and +V, of which + V is considered to be more toxic. In this study, the effect of speciation and soil pH on the chemical accessibility of V was investigated with two soils: 1) field soil rather rich in soil organic matter (SOM) and 2) coarse mineral soil low in SOM. Fresh soil samples treated with V(+V) (added as NaVO3) or V(+IV) (added as VOSO4) (pH adjusted to the range 4.0-6.9) were incubated for 3 months at 22 °C. The adsorption tendency of V species was explored by water extraction (Milli-Q water, 1:50 dw/V) and by sequential extraction (0.25 M KCl; 0.1 M KH2/K2HPO4; 0.1 M NaOH; 0.25 M H2SO4, 1:10 dw/V). The potential bioavailability of V was found to be dictated by soil properties. SOM reduced V(+V) to V(+IV) and acted as a sorbent for both species, which lowered the bioaccessibility of V. A high pH, in turn, favored the predominance of the V(+V) species and thus increased the chemical accessibility of V.

  14. Cs phytoremediation by Sorghum bicolor cultivated in soil and in hydroponic system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Chen, Can; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-04-03

    Cs accumulation characteristics by Sorghum bicolor were investigated in hydroponic system (Cs level at 50-1000 μmol/L) and in soil (Cs-spiked concentration was 100 and 400 mg/kg soil). Two varieties of S. bicolor Cowly and Nengsi 2# grown on pot soil during the entire growth period (100 days) did not show significant differences on the height, dry weight (DW), and Cs accumulation. S. bicolor showed the potential phytoextraction ability for Cs-contaminated soil with the bioaccumulation factor (BCF) and the translocation factor (TF) values usually higher than 1 in soil system and in hydroponic system. The aerial parts of S. bicolor contributed to 86-92% of the total removed amounts of Cs from soil. Cs level in solution at 100 μmol/L gave the highest BCF and TF values of S. bicolor. Cs at low level tended to transfer to the aerial parts, whereas Cs at high level decreased the transfer ratio from root to shoot. In soil, the plant grew well when Cs spiked level was 100 mg/kg soil, but was inhibited by Cs at 400 mg/kg soil with Cs content in sorghum reaching 1147 mg/kg (roots), 2473 mg/kg (stems), and 2939 mg/kg (leaves). In hydroponic system, average Cs level in sorghum reached 5270 mg/kg (roots) and 4513 mg/kg (aerial parts), without significant damages to its biomass at 30 days after starting Cs treatment. Cs accumulation in sorghum tissues was positively correlated with the metal concentration in medium.

  15. Carbon dioxide exchange of a perennial bioenergy crop cultivation on a mineral soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, S. E.; Shurpali, N. J.; Peltola, O.; Mammarella, I.; Hyvönen, N.; Maljanen, M.; Räty, M.; Virkajärvi, P.; Martikainen, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector is to increase the use of renewable energy sources such as bioenergy crops. Bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during biomass production, field management and transportation. The present study focuses on the cultivation of reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinaceae L.), a perennial bioenergy crop, on a mineral soil. To quantify the CO2 exchange of this RCG cultivation system, and to understand the key factors controlling its CO2 exchange, the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) was measured during three years using the eddy covariance (EC) method. The RCG cultivation thrived well producing yields of 6200 and 6700 kg DW ha-1 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Gross photosynthesis (GPP) was controlled mainly by radiation from June to September. Vapour pressure deficit (VPD), air temperature or soil moisture did not limit photosynthesis during the growing season. Total ecosystem respiration (TER) increased with soil temperature, green area index and GPP. Annual NEE was -262 and -256 g C m-2 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Throughout the studied period, cumulative NEE was -575 g C m-2. When compared to the published data for RCG on an organic soil, the cultivation of this crop on a mineral soil had higher capacity to take up CO2 from the atmosphere.

  16. Dispersion of Short- and Medium-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins (CPs) from a CP Production Plant to the Surrounding Surface Soils and Coniferous Leaves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiazhi; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Haijun; Zhan, Faqiang; Chen, Jiping

    2016-12-06

    Chlorinated paraffin (CP) production is one important emission source for short- and medium-chain CPs (SCCPs and MCCPs) in the environment. In this study, 48 CP congener groups were measured in the surface soils and coniferous leaves collected from the inner and surrounding environment of a CP production plant that has been in operation for more than 30 years to investigate the dispersion and deposition behavior of SCCPs and MCCPs. The average concentrations of the sum of SCCPs and MCCPs in the in-plant coniferous leaves and surface soils were 4548.7 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) and 3481.8 ng g(-1) dw, which were 2-fold and 10-fold higher than those in the surrounding environment, respectively. The Gaussian air pollution model explained the spatial distribution of CPs in the coniferous leaves, whereas the dispersion of CPs to the surrounding surface soils fits the Boltzmann equation well. Significant fractionation effect was observed for the atmospheric dispersion of CPs from the production plant. CP congener groups with higher octanol-air partitioning coefficients (KOA) were more predominant in the in-plant environment, whereas the ones with lower KOA values had the elevated proportion in the surrounding environment. A radius of approximately 4 km from the CP production plant was influenced by the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of CPs.

  17. Indicators: Soil Chemistry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The chemical makeup of the soil can provide information on wetland condition, wetland water quality and services being provided by the wetland ecosystem. Analyzing soil chemistry reveals if the soil is contaminated with a toxic chemical or heavy metal.

  18. Contrasting denitrifier communities relate to contrasting N2O emission patterns from acidic peat soils in arctic tundra.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Katharina; Biasi, Christina; Horn, Marcus A

    2012-05-01

    Cryoturbated peat circles (that is, bare surface soil mixed by frost action; pH 3-4) in the Russian discontinuous permafrost tundra are nitrate-rich 'hotspots' of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions in arctic ecosystems, whereas adjacent unturbated peat areas are not. N(2)O was produced and subsequently consumed at pH 4 in unsupplemented anoxic microcosms with cryoturbated but not in those with unturbated peat soil. Nitrate, nitrite and acetylene stimulated net N(2)O production of both soils in anoxic microcosms, indicating denitrification as the source of N(2)O. Up to 500 and 10 μM nitrate stimulated denitrification in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Apparent maximal reaction velocities of nitrite-dependent denitrification were 28 and 18 nmol N(2)O g(DW)(-1) h(-1), for cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils, respectively. Barcoded amplicon pyrosequencing of narG, nirK/nirS and nosZ (encoding nitrate, nitrite and N(2)O reductases, respectively) yielded ≈49 000 quality-filtered sequences with an average sequence length of 444 bp. Up to 19 species-level operational taxonomic units were detected per soil and gene, many of which were distantly related to cultured denitrifiers or environmental sequences. Denitrification-associated gene diversity in cryoturbated and in unturbated peat soils differed. Quantitative PCR (inhibition-corrected per DNA extract) revealed higher copy numbers of narG in cryoturbated than in unturbated peat soil. Copy numbers of nirS were up to 1000 × higher than those of nirK in both soils, and nirS nirK(-1) copy number ratios in cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils differed. The collective data indicate that the contrasting N(2)O emission patterns of cryoturbated and unturbated peat soils are associated with contrasting denitrifier communities.

  19. Arsenic in rice agrosystems (water, soil and rice plants) in Guayas and Los Ríos provinces, Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Otero, X L; Tierra, W; Atiaga, O; Guanoluisa, D; Nunes, L M; Ferreira, T O; Ruales, J

    2016-12-15

    Geogenic arsenic (As) can accumulate and reach high concentrations in rice grains, thus representing a potential threat to human health. Ecuador is one of the main consumers of rice in South America. However, there is no information available about the concentrations of As in rice agrosystems, although some water bodies are known to contain high levels of the element. We carried out extensive sampling of water, soil, rice plants and commercial rice (obtained from local markets). Water samples were analysed to determine physico-chemical properties and concentrations of dissolved arsenic. Soil samples were analysed to determine total organic C, texture, total Fe and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxides (FeOx), total arsenic (tAs) and the bioavailable fraction (AsMe). The different plant parts were analysed separately to determine total (tAs), inorganic (iAs) and organic arsenic (oAs). Low concentrations of arsenic were found in samples of water (generally <10μgl(-1)) and soil (4.48±3mgkg(-1)). The tAs in the rice grains was within the usual range (0.042-0.125mgkg(-1) dry weight, d.w.) and was significantly lower than in leaves (0.123-0.286mgkg(-1) d.w.) and stems (0.091-0.201mgkg(-1) d.w.). The FeOx and tAs and also AsMe in flood water were negatively correlated with tAs in the plants. However, the concentrations of As in stems and leaves were linearly correlated with tAs in the soil and flood water. The relationship between tAs and arsenic in the grain fitted a logarithmic function, as did that between tAs in the grain and the stem. The findings seem to indicate that high concentrations of arsenic in the environment (soil or water) or in the rice stem do not necessarily imply accumulation of the element in the grain. The iAs form was dominant (>80%) in all parts of the rice plants.

  20. Sulfur oxidation in rice field soil: activity, enumeration, isolation and characterization of thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stubner, S; Wind, T; Conrad, R

    1998-12-01

    In rice paddy fields the bulk soil is anoxic, but oxygenated zones occur in the surrounding of the rice roots to where oxygen is transported via the aerenchyma system of the rice plants. In the anaerobic soil compartments sulfate is consumed by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In the rhizosphere the reduced sulfur compounds can be reoxidized by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Measurements of the potential activity of thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria in soil slurries derived from planted rice soil microcosms showed turnover rates of 2-6 mumol d-1 g-dw-1. Thiosulfate was oxidized to sulfate with tetrathionate as intermediate. Most probable number (MPN) enumeration with three aerobic media and one anaerobic nitrate-amended medium showed that thiosulfate-oxidizing bacteria were abundant in paddy soil and in rhizosphere soil at numbers of 10(5) to 10(6) per gram dry weight soil. Nine isolates of S-oxidizing bacteria were obtained from enrichment cultures or from the highest dilutions of the MPN series and were affiliated to four different phylogenetic groups. These isolates were characterized by physiological properties and by comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Three isolates (TA1-AE1, TA1-A1 and TA12-21) were shown to be facultatively chemolithoautotrophic strains of Ancylobacter aquaticus. Three further isolates (Tv6-2b, Z2A-6A and Z4A-2A) were also facultatively chemolithoautotrophic and were affiliated with the Xanthobacter sp. group, probably representing new strains of X. flavus or X. tagetidis. Strain SZ-2111 was phylogenetically related to Bosea thiooxidans. However, the genus Bosea is described as obligately heterotrophic, whereas strain 5Z-2111 was able to grow autotrophically. The isolates 5Z-C1 and TBW3 were obligate chemolithoautotrophs and were closely affiliated with Thiobacillus thioparus. Our results showed that S-oxidizing bacteria were abundant and active in rice paddy soil and consisted of physiologically and phylogenetically diverse populations.

  1. Kinetics of di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate mineralization in sludge-amended soil

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, P.L.; Thyme, J.B.; Henriksen, K.; Moeldrup, P.; Roslev, P. . Environmental Engineering Lab.)

    1999-08-01

    Sewage sludge is frequently used as a soil fertilizer although it may contain elevated concentrations of priority pollutants including di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). In the present study, the kinetics of microbial [[sup 14]C]DEHP mineralization was studied in laboratory microcosms with sewage sludge and agricultural soil. A biphasic model with two independent kinetic expressions was used to fit the mineralization data. The initial mineralization activity was described well by first-order kinetics, whereas mineralization in long-term incubations was described better by fractional power kinetics. The mineralization activity was much lower in the late phase presumably due to a decline in the bioavailability of DEHP caused by diffusion-limited desorption. The initial DEHP mineralization rate in sludge-amended soil varied between 3.7 and 20.3 ng of DEHP (g dw)[sup [minus]1]d[sup [minus]1] depending on incubation conditions. Aerobic DEHP mineralization was 4--5 times faster than anaerobic mineralization, DEHP mineralization in sludge-amended soil was much more temperature sensitive than was DEHP mineralization in soil without sludge. Indigenous microorganisms in the sewage sludge appeared to dominate DEHP degradation in sludge-amended soil. It was estimated that > 41% of the DEHP in sludge-amended soil will have escaped mineralization after 1 year. In the absence of oxygen, > 68% of the DEHP will not be mineralized within 1 year. Collectively, the data suggest that a significant fraction of the DEHP in sludge-amended soils may escape mineralization under in situ conditions.

  2. Soil moisture: Some fundamentals. [agriculture - soil mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milstead, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    A brief tutorial on soil moisture, as it applies to agriculture, is presented. Information was taken from books and papers considered freshman college level material, and is an attempt to briefly present the basic concept of soil moisture and a minimal understanding of how water interacts with soil.

  3. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in soils and groundwater of a U.S. metropolitan area: migration and implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Feng; Simcik, Matt F; Halbach, Thomas R; Gulliver, John S

    2015-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are emerging anthropogenic compounds that have recently become the target of global concern due to their ubiquitous presence in the environment, persistence, and bioaccumulative properties. This study was carried out to investigate the migration of PFOS and PFOA in soils and groundwater in a U.S. metropolitan area. We observed elevated levels in surface soils (median: 12.2 ng PFOS/g dw and 8.0 ng PFOA/g dw), which were much higher than the soil-screening levels for groundwater protection developed in this study. The measured levels in subsurface soils show a general increase with depth, suggesting a downward movement toward the groundwater table and a potential risk of aquifer contamination. Furthermore, concentrations of PFOS and PFOA in monitoring wells in the source zone varied insignificantly over 5 years (2009-2013), suggesting limited or no change in either the source or the magnitude of the source. The analysis also shows that natural processes of dispersion and dilution can significantly attenuate the groundwater contamination; the adsorption on aquifer solids, on the other hand, appears to have limited effects on the transport of PFOS and PFOA in the aquifer. The probabilistic exposure assessment indicates that ingestion of contaminated groundwater constitutes a much more important exposure route than ingestion of contaminated soil. Overall, the results suggest that (i) the transport of PFOS and PFOA is retarded in the vadose zone, but not in the aquifer; (ii) the groundwater contamination of PFOS and PFOA often follows their release to surface soils by years, if not decades; and (iii) the aquifer can be a major source of exposure for communities living near point sources.

  4. Legume-grass intercropping phytoremediation of phthalic acid esters in soil near an electronic waste recycling site: a field study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting Ting; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yong Ming; Christie, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the phytoremediation of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) by legume (alfalfa, Medicago sativa L.)-grass (perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne L. and tall fescue, Festuca arundinacea) intercropping in contaminated agricultural soil at one of the largest e-waste recycling sites in China. Two compounds, DEHP and DnBP, were present in the soil and in the shoots of the test plants at much higher concentrations than the other target PAEs studied. Over 80% of 'total' (i.e., all six) PAEs were removed from the soil across all treatments by the end of the experiment. Alfalfa in monoculture removed over 90% of PAEs and alfalfa in the intercrop of the three plant species contained the highest shoot concentration of total PAEs of about 4.7 mg kg(-1) DW (dry weight). Calculation of phytoextraction efficiency indicated that the most effective plant combinations in eliminating soil PAEs were the three-species intercrop (1.78%) and the alfalfa monocrop (1.41%). Phytoremediation with alfalfa was effective in both monoculture and intercropping. High bioconcentration factors (BCFs) indicated the occurrence of significant extraction of PAEs by plants from soil, suggesting that phytoremediation may have potential for the removal of PAEs from contaminated soils.

  5. Brominated flame retardants in the surrounding soil of two manufacturing plants in China: Occurrence, composition profiles and spatial distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Long; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Song, Wei-Wei; Huo, Chun-Yan; Qiao, Li-Na; Ma, Wan-Li; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-06-01

    Surface soil samples were collected surrounding two brominated flame retardants (BFRs) manufacturing plants in China in August 2014 and analyzed for 23 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and 8 novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs). BDE209 and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were the predominant compounds in soil with the median levels of 1600 and 560 ng/g dw, respectively. The PBDEs profiles in soil samples were consistent with that of commercial product (comDecaBDE). The percentage contributions to total PBDEs decreased from higher to lower brominated homologues. Lower concentrations of NBFRs (excluding DBDPE) were detected in soil surrounding the two plants, suggesting they are byproducts or degradation products of the manufacturing activities. The concentrations of most BFRs dropped exponentially within 3-5 km of the manufacturing plants, suggesting recent deposition of these compounds to the soil. Directional distribution indicated that PBDEs and DBDPE concentrations were highest in the north direction of Plants 1. Three-day air parcel forward trajectories confirmed that the air parcel was responsible for the higher concentration of BFRs in the soil of north direction of the plant.

  6. NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. A.; Waltman, S. W.; Geng, X.; James, D.; Hernandez, L.

    2009-05-01

    NOAM-SOIL is being created by combining the CONUS-SOIL database with pedon data and soil geographic data coverages from Canada and Mexico. Completion of the in-progress NOrth AMerica Soil (NOAM-SOIL) database will provide complete North America coverage comparable to CONUS. Canadian pedons, which number more than 500, have been painstakingly transcribed to a common format, from hardcopy, and key- entered. These data, along with map unit polygons from the 1:1,000,000 Soil Landscapes of Canada, will be used to create the required spatial data coverages. The Mexico data utilizes the INEGI 1:1,000,000 scale soil map that was digitized by U. S. Geological Survey EROS Data Center in the mid 1990's plus about 20,000 pedons. The pedon data were published on the reverse side of the paper 1:250,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico and key entered by USDA and georeferenced by Penn State to develop an attribute database that can be linked to the 1:1,000,000 scale Soil Map of Mexico based on taxonomic information and geographic proximity. The essential properties that will be included in the NOAM-SOIL data base are: layer thickness (depth to bedrock or reported soil depth); available water capacity; sand, silt, clay; rock fragment volume; and bulk density. For quality assurance purposes, Canadian and Mexican soil scientists will provide peer review of the work. The NOAM-SOIL project will provide a standard reference dataset of soil properties for use at 1km resolution by NACP modelers for all of North America. All data resources, including metadata and selected raw data, will be provided through the Penn State web site: Soil Information for Environmental Modeling and Ecosystem Management (www.soilinfo.psu.edu). Progress on database completion is reported.

  7. Impact of organic nano-vesicles in soil: The case of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Gavina, A; Bouguerra, S; Lopes, I; Marques, C R; Rasteiro, M G; Antunes, F; Rocha-Santos, T; Pereira, R

    2016-03-15

    Aiming at contributing new insights into the effects of nanomaterials (NMs) in the terrestrial ecosystem, this study evaluated the impacts of organic nano-vesicles of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide (SDS/DDAB) on the emergence and growth of plant seeds, and on the avoidance and reproduction of soil invertebrates. For this purpose several ecotoxicological assays were performed with different test species (terrestrial plants: Zea mays, Avena sativa, Brassica oleracea and Lycopersicon esculentum; soil invertebrates: Eisenia andrei and Folsomia candida). A wide range of SDS/DDAB concentrations were tested, following standard protocols, and using the standard OECD soil as a test substrate (5% of organic matter). The aqueous suspensions of SDS/DDAB, used to spike the soils, were characterised by light scattering techniques for hydrodynamic size of the vesicles, aggregation index, polydispersity index, zeta potential and surface charge. The SDS/DDAB concentrations in the test soil were analysed by HPLC-UV at the end of the assays. Invertebrate species were revealed to be sensitive to nano-SDS/DDAB upon immediate exposure to freshly spiked soils. However, the degradation of SDS/DDAB nano-vesicles in the soil with time prevented the occurrence of significant reproduction effects on soil invertebrates. Plants were not particularly sensitive to SDS/DDAB, except B. oleracea (at concentrations above 375 mg kg(-1)dw). The results gathered in this study allowed a preliminary determination of a risk limit to nano-SDS/DDAB. The low toxicity of SDS/DDAB nano-vesicles could be explained by its high and fast degradation in the soil. The soil microbial community could have an important role in the fate of this NM, thus it is of remarkable importance to improve this risk limit by taking into account specific data addressing this community.

  8. Teaching Science with Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatz, Albert; Kriebs, Jean Oak

    Prepared primarily for junior high school students and utilizing an integrated science approach, this manual offers activities for examining the ecosystem and environmental problems. With organic aspects of soils as the main subject field, it includes study of soil formation, soil fertility, soil contamination, and edaphic relationships. Most of…

  9. Soil: Conservation practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary source to meet global food and fiber demands is production agriculture, but accelerated soil erosion threatens its sustainability. Soil erosion is an important contributor to the normal soil formation process, but erosion becomes problematic when it is accelerated. Soil conservation prac...

  10. Usable science: soil health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy soils are fundamental to sustainable rangelands, but soils toil in obscurity and this is reflected in the belowground “black-box” mentality often attributed to soils. Transformational changes get attention for land managers and public. For example, soil erosion associated with Dust Bowl of 1...

  11. Lunar Soil Particle Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Lunar Soil Particle Separator (LSPS) beneficiates soil prior to in situ resource utilization (ISRU). It can improve ISRU oxygen yield by boosting the concentration of ilmenite, or other iron-oxide-bearing materials found in lunar soils, which can substantially reduce hydrogen reduction reactor size, as well as drastically decreasing the power input required for soil heating

  12. Fundamentals of soil science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study guide provides comments and references for professional soil scientists who are studying for the soil science fundamentals exam needed as the first step for certification. The performance objectives were determined by the Soil Science Society of America's Council of Soil Science Examiners...

  13. Soil Classification and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This instructional unit was designed to enable students, primarily at the secondary level, to (1) classify soils according to current capability classifications of the Soil Conservation Service, (2) select treatments needed for a given soil class according to current recommendations provided by the Soil Conservation Service, and (3) interpret a…

  14. Tailoring biochars from different feedstock and produced at different temperature and time of pyrolysis for their use as soil amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raul; Moreno, Fabian; Acosta, Jose A.; Gomez Lopez, Maria Dolores; Faz, Angel

    2015-04-01

    Biochar used as a soil amendment to improve soil quality and fertility and increase soil carbon sequestration has been the focus of much research in the recent past. Unlike most conventional soil organic materials, which are readily decomposed, the recalcitrant nature of biochar increases its potential value as a soil amending material for the longer term. However, many biochars can be hydrophobic, and added to soil can aggravate water availability in areas where water scarcity is a major limiting factor for agriculture or forestry. It has been shown that biochar characteristics are influenced by production variables, especially feedstock, pyrolysis temperature and time of pyrolysis. Although there have been different studies characterizing biochars prepared from different sources, there are few studies comparing different types of biochar produced from domestic residues, manures or crop residues pyrolysis; there are, in addition, fewer studies dealing with the hydrophobic properties of the biochars. The different feedstock can have different properties which would result into different biochars even produced at the same operational factors. The main objective of this experiment was to study the influence of feedstock properties and pyrolysis temperature and time on nutrient contents, heavy metals, recalcitrance, thermal stability and hydrophobicity of biochars from cotton crop residues (CR), pig manure (PM) and domestic waste (DW). Biochars were obtained by pyrolysis under oxygen-limited conditions in a muffle furnace. The temperature was increased at 5°C min-1 to 300°C, 400°C, 500°C and 700°C and then maintained for 1h, 2h, 4 and 5 h at this temperature. All biochar properties were strongly influenced by feedstock source except for pH, the recalcitrance index and hydrophobicity. Nutrient contents were normally higher in the PM biochar, except for Cu and Ca which were higher in the DW biochar and B in the CR biochar. Heavy metal contents were significantly

  15. Decontamination of a polychlorinated biphenyls-contaminated soil by phytoremediation-assisted bioaugmentation.

    PubMed

    Secher, C; Lollier, M; Jézéquel, K; Cornu, J Y; Amalric, L; Lebeau, T

    2013-07-01

    A 70 day pot experiment was conducted for the cleaning-up of a PCBs-contaminated soil (104 mg kg(-1) soil DW) using bioaugmentation with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400) assisted or not by the use of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). The total cultivable bacteria of the soil were higher with the presence of plants. Real-time PCR showed that LB400 (targeting 16S-23S rRNA ITS) survived with abundance related to total bacteria (targeting 16S rRNA) being higher with fescue (up to a factor of three). Bioaugmentation had a positive effect on fescue biomass and more specifically on roots (by a factor of three). PCB dissipation (sum of congeners 28, 52, 101, 118, 153, 180) averaged 13 % (bioaugmented-planted) up to 32 % (non bioaugmented-planted), without any significant difference between treatments. Basically our results demonstrated that indigenous bacteria were able to dissipate PCBs (26.2 % dissipation). PCB dissipation was not related to the abundance of LB400 or to the total bacterial counts. Bioaugmentation or fescue altered the structure of the bacterial community of the soil, not the combination of both. Principal component analysis showed that bioaugmentation tended to improve the control of the process (lower variability in PCB dissipation). Opposite to that bioaugmentation increased the variability of the structure of the bacterial community.

  16. Dechlorane Plus pollution and inventory in soil of Huai'an City, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Iino, Fukuya; Huang, Jun; Lu, Yong; Yu, Gang; Morita, Masatoshi

    2010-09-01

    Dechlorane Plus (DP) has been used as a highly chlorinated flame retardant substituting those that are now internationally regulated under the Stockholm Convention. Nevertheless DP's environmental behavior has seldom been studied in China. There is only one DP manufacturer producing DP since 2005, which is located in Huai'an, Jiangsu Province. The DP levels in 21 soil samples that were taken from Huai'an in October 2009 and determined by gas chromatography/electron-capture negative ion-mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS) method ranged from 0.83 to 1.2 x 10(3) ng g(-1), following a lognormal distribution. The geometric mean was 5.1 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) and the geometric standard deviation was 4.6. Sampled soils had f(anti)[C(anti)(-DP)/(C(syn)(-DP)+C(anti)(-DP))] values of 0.67-0.85, with the average value of 0.79, which are close to the values in DP commercial products. This suggests that the main DP pollution source is the commercial DP product. The contour map of DP levels in soil indicated that the factory was the point pollution source with the highest DP level in its surrounding area, especially the southern area. A Monte Carlo based inventory estimation was conducted. The DP inventory in Huai'an is estimated to be 4-31 tons. To our knowledge, this study is the first that reports soil pollution by DP.

  17. Pleasure Boatyard Soils are Often Highly Contaminated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eklund, Britta; Eklund, David

    2014-05-01

    The contamination in pleasure boatyards has been investigated. Measured concentrations of copper, zinc, lead, mercury, cadmium, tributyltin (TBT), the 16 most common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (∑16 PAHs), and the seven most common polychlorinated biphenyls (∑7 PCBs) from investigations at 34 boatyards along the Swedish coast have been compiled. The maximum concentrations were 7,700 for Cu, 10,200, for Zn, 40,100 for Pb, 188 for Hg, 18 for Cd, 107 for TBT, 630 for carcinogenic PAHs, 1,480 for ∑16 PAHs, and 3.8 mg/kg DW for ∑7 PCB; all 10-2,000 higher than the Swedish environmental qualitative guidelines. In addition, the mean of the median values found at the 34 places shows that the lower guidance value for sensitive use of land was exceeded for the ∑7 PCBs, carcinogenic PAHs, TBT, Pb, Hg, and Cu by a factor of 380, 6.8, 3.6, 2.9, 2.2 and 1.7, respectively. The even higher guideline value for industrial use was exceeded for the ∑7 PCBs and TBT by a factor of 15 and 1.8, respectively. TBT, PAHs, Pb, Cd, and Hg are prioritized substances in the European Water Framework Directive and should be phased out as quickly as possible. Because of the risk of leakage from boatyards, precautions should be taken. The high concentrations measured are considered to be dangerous for the environment and human health and highlight the urgent need for developing and enforcing pleasure boat maintenance guidelines to minimize further soil and nearby water contamination.

  18. Effects of Pulp and Na-Bentonite Amendments on the Mobility of Trace Elements, Soil Enzymes Activity and Microbial Parameters under Ex Situ Aided Phytostabilization

    PubMed Central

    Wasilkowski, Daniel; Mrozik, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    diversity of the microorganisms in the treated soils mainly resulted from plant cultivation. Meanwhile, the highest biomass of plants at t14 was collected from the soil with Na-bentonite (6.7 g dw-1), while it was much lower in a case of pulp treatment (1.43–1.57 g dw-1). Moreover, the measurements of the heavy metal concentrations in the plant roots and shoots clearly indicated that the plants mainly accumulated metals in the roots but that the accumulation of individual metals depended on the soil additives. The efficiency of the accumulation of Pb, Cd and Zn by the roots was determined to be 124, 100 and 26% higher in the soil that was enriched with Na-bentonite in comparison with the soil that was amended with pulp, respectively. The values of the soil indices (soil fertility, soil quality and soil alteration) confirmed the better improvement of soil functioning after its enrichment with the pulp than in the presence of Na-bentonite. PMID:28068396

  19. Influence of hydraulic hysteresis on the mechanical behavior of unsaturated soils and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Charbel N.

    Unsaturated soils are commonly widespread around the world, especially at shallow depths from the surface. The mechanical behavior of this near surface soil is influenced by the seasonal variations such as rainfall or drought, which in turn may have a detrimental effect on many structures (e.g. retaining walls, shallow foundations, mechanically stabilized earth walls, soil slopes, and pavements) in contact with it. Thus, in order to better understand this behavior, it is crucial to study the complex relationship between soil moisture content and matric suction (a stress state variable defined as pore air pressure minus pore water pressure) known as the Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC). In addition, the influence of hydraulic hysteresis on the behavior of unsaturated soils, soil-structure interaction (i.e. rough and smooth steel interfaces, soil-geotextile interfaces) and pavement subgrade (depicted herein mainly by resilient modulus, Mr) was also studied. To this end, suction-controlled direct shear tests were performed on soils, rough and smooth steel interfaces and geotextile interface under drying (D) and wetting after drying (DW). The shearing behavior is examined in terms of the two stress state variables, matric suction and net normal stress. Results along the D and DW paths indicated that peak shear strength increased with suction and net normal stress; while in general, the post peak shear strength was not influenced by suction for rough interfaces and no consistent trend was observed for soils and soil-geotextiles interfaces. Contrary to saturated soils, results during shearing at higher suction values (i.e. 25 kPa and above) showed a decrease in water content eventhough the sample exhibited dilation. A behavior postulated to be related to disruption of menisci and/or non-uniformity of pore size which results in an increase in localized pore water pressures. Interestingly, wetting after drying (DW) test results showed higher peak and post peak shear

  20. Atlas of soil reflectance properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    A compendium of soil spectral reflectance curves together with soil test results and site information is presented in an abbreviated manner listing those soil properties most important in influencing soil reflectance. Results are presented for 251 soils from 39 states and Brazil. A narrative key describes relationships between soil parameters and reflectance curves. All soils are classified according to the U.S. soil taxonomy and soil series name for ease of identification.

  1. Dioxin levels in fertilizers from Belgium: determination and evaluation of the potential impact on soil contamination.

    PubMed

    Elskens, M; Pussemier, L; Dumortier, P; Van Langenhove, K; Scholl, G; Goeyens, L; Focant, J F

    2013-06-01

    Dioxins are harmful persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to which humans are exposed mostly via the consumption of animal products. They can enter the food chain at any stage, including crop fertilization. Fertilizers belong to several categories: synthetic chemicals providing the essential elements (mostly N, P and K) that are required by the crops but also organic fertilizers or amendments, liming materials, etc. Ninety-seven samples of fertilizers were taken in Belgium during the year 2011 and analyzed after a soft extraction procedure for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCBs) using GC-IDHRMS. Only small qualitative differences could be observed between the main fertilizer categories since the PCDD:PCDF:DL-PCB average ratio obtained with the results expressed in TEQ was often close to 30:30:40 (typically for sewage sludge) or 40:30:30 (typically for compost). The median dioxin levels determined were generally lower than recorded previously and were the highest for sewage sludge and compost (5.6 and 5.5 ng TEQ/kg dry weight (dw), respectively). The levels in other fertilizers were lower including manure for which the median value was only 0.2 ng TEQ/kg dw. Several fertilization scenarios relying on the use of those fertilizers were assessed taking into consideration the application conditions prevailing in Belgium. From this assessment it could be concluded that the contribution of fertilizers to the overall soil contamination will be low by comparison of other sources of contamination such as atmospheric depositions. At the field scale, intensive use of compost and sewage sludge will increase dramatically the dioxin inputs compared with other fertilization practices but this kind of emission to the soil will still be relatively low compared to the dioxin atmospheric depositions.

  2. Connecting soil microbial communities to soil functioning and soil health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One of the most important functions soils perform, is the capacity to buffer anthropogenic disturbances to sustain productivity while improving water and air quality. At the core of a healthy soil is a biological active and diverse community that provides internal nutrient cycling and is resilient t...

  3. Moebius Algorithm for Domain Wall and GapDW Fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Babich, Richard Brower, Kostas Orginos, Claudio Rebbi, David Schaich, Pavlos Vranas

    2009-06-01

    The M\\"obius domain wall action \\cite{Brower:2004xi} is a generalization of Shamir's action, which gives exactly the same overlap fermion lattice action as the separation ($L_s$) between the domain walls is taken to infinity. The performance advantages of the algorithm are presented for a small ensemble of quenched, full QCD domain wall and Gap domain wall lattices \\cite{Vranas:2006zk}. In particular, it is shown that at the larger lattice spacings relevant to current dynamical simulations M\\"obius fermions work well together with GapDWF reducing $L_s$ by more than a factor of two. It is noted that there is precise map between the domain wall and effective overlap action at finite quark mass including finite $L_s$ chiral violations so that the Ward-Takahashi identities for the axial and vector currents are exactly equivalent in both formulations.

  4. Risk assessment of Cd polluted paddy soils in the industrial and township areas in Hunan, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping; Peng, Chi

    2016-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd) contamination in rice in Youxian, Hunan, China is a major environmental health concern. In order to reveal the Cd contamination in rice and paddy soils and the health risks to the population consuming the local rice grain, field surveys were conducted in eight towns in Youxian, China. The Cd contents of paddy soils averaged 0.228-1.91 mg kg(-1), 90% exceeding the allowable limit of 0.3 mg kg(-1) stipulated by the China Soil Environmental Quality Standards. Low average pH values (for air dried oxidized soils) ranging from 4.98 to 6.02 in paddy soil were also found. More than seventy percent (39 of 53) of the grain samples exceeded the maximum safe concentration of Cd, 0.2 mg kg(-1) on a dry weight basis. Considering the high consumption of local rice (339 g capita(-1) DW d(-1)) and Cd levels measured, dietary ingestion of 78% of the sampled rice grains would have adverse health risks because the intake exposure of Cd was greater than the JECFA recommended exposures, 0.8 µg Cd BW kg(-1) day(-1) or 25 µg Cd BW kg(-1) month(-1).

  5. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  6. Shales and swelling soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Dimillio, A. F.; Strohm, W. E., Jr.; Vandre, B. C.; Anderson, L. R.

    The thirteen (13) papers in this report deal with the following areas: a shale rating system and tentative applications to shale performance; technical guidelines for the design and construction of shale embankments; stability of waste shale embankments; dynamic response of raw and stabilized Oklahoma shales; laboratory studies of the stabilization of nondurable shales; swelling shale and collapsing soil; development of a laboratory compaction degradation test for shales; soil section approach for evaluation of swelling potential soil moisture properties of subgrade soils; volume changes in compacted clays and shales on saturation; characterization of expansive soils; pavement roughness on expansive clays; and deep vertical fabric moisture barriers in swelling soils.

  7. Selective pressurized liquid extraction of replacement and legacy brominated flame retardants from soil.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Thomas J; Morrison, Paul D; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2016-08-05

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are a class of flame retardant registered as UN POPs due to their persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation potential and toxicity. Replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) have exhibited similar health hazards and environmental distribution, becoming recognized as significant contaminants. This work describes the development and validation of a sensitive and reliable method for the simultaneous quantitation of PBDEs and NBFRs in environmental soil samples using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE) and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-(EI)-MS/MS). Under optimal conditions, extraction of eight PBDEs (-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154, -183 and -209) and five NBFRs; pentabromotoluene (PBT), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromobenzene (HBB), 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB) and bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) was performed at 100°C and 1500psi using a 1:1 mixture of hexane and dichloromethane. The method utilized 33mL capacity PLE cells containing, from bottom to top, a single cellulose filter, 3g activated Florisil, 6g acid silica (10% w/w), 3g Na2SO4, another cellulose filter, 2g activated copper powder and 3g soil sample dispersed in 2g Na2SO4 and 1g of Hydromatrix. The method was evaluated by repeated extraction and analysis of all analytes from 3g soil at three spike concentrations. Good recoveries were observed for most analytes at each of the spiking levels with RSD values generally below 20%. MDLs ranged from 0.01 to 4.8ng/g dw for PBDEs and 0.01-0.55ng/g dw for NBFRs. The described one-step combined extraction and cleanup method reduces sample processing times compared with traditional procedures, while delivering comparable analytical performance. The method was successfully applied to environmental soil samples (n=5), detecting PBDEs in each sample and providing the first account of NBFR contamination in Australian soils.

  8. Application of ground bone and sheep manure on soils from two contaminated sites and influence on oat growth, uranium and radium uptake and translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, M. M.; Pacheco, A.; Santos, E.; Magalhães, M. C. F.

    2012-04-01

    fraction of uranium (80-99% for Urgeiriça soil, and 81-90% for Barracão soil) and radium (70-79% for Urgeiriça soil, and 72-87% for Barracão soil) in the four treatments, compared to the control samples, was observed after incubation. Oat yield was greater in T2 and T4 treatments for both soils. Uranium concentration in the aerial part of plants growing in both soils was small (maximum 0.297 mg/kg DW) and similar among control and treatments. However, in treatment T4 plants from Barracão soils contain lower uranium concentrations (eighteen times less) than those from Urgeiriça soils. In opposition, radium concentration in the aboveground part of oat plants growing on amended soils is quite lower than those obtained for plants from control. The soil-plant transfer coefficients calculated for both elements and plants growing in the different soils and treatments are small (U: <0.001 (Urg and Brc); Ra: <0.01 (Urg), <0.001(Brc)) and below the upper limit considered for plants in general.

  9. Residues, spatial distribution and risk assessment of DDTs and HCHs in agricultural soil and crops from the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanfei; Wang, Xiaoping; Gong, Ping; Yao, Tandong

    2016-04-01

    Due to its high elevation and cold temperature, the Tibetan Plateau (TP) is regarded as the "Third Pole". Different from other polar regions, which are truly remote, the TP has a small population and a few agricultural activities. In this study, agricultural soil and crop samples (including highland barley and rape) were collected in the main farmland of the TP to obtain the contamination levels of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) in the Tibetan agricultural system as well as the relevant human exposure risks. The average concentrations of DDTs and HCHs in the agricultural soil, highland barley and rape were 1.36, 0.661, 1.03 ng/g dw and 0.349, 0.0364, 0.0225 ng/g dw, respectively. In the agricultural soil, DDTs and HCHs metabolism (DDE, DDD and β-HCH) were abundant, which indicated a "historical" source, whereas crops contained a similar composition ((DDE + DDD)/DDT, α/β-HCH and α/γ-HCH) to that of wild plants, suggesting that the DDTs and HCHs in crops are likely from long range atmospheric transport. The human health risks via non-dietary and dietary to DDTs and HCHs in the farmland were assessed. All of the hazard index (HI) values of DDTs and HCHs for non-carcinogenic risks were <1, and most of the cancer risk values were <10(-6), suggesting that DDTs and HCHs in the farmland will not pose non-carcinogenic risks and will pose only very low cancer risks to the Tibetan residents.

  10. Utilization of steel, pulp and paper industry solid residues in forest soil amendment: relevant physicochemical properties and heavy metal availability.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, Mikko; Watkins, Gary; Pöykiö, Risto; Nurmesniemi, Hannu; Dahl, Olli

    2012-03-15

    Industrial residue application to soil was investigated by integrating granulated blast furnace or converter steel slag with residues from the pulp and paper industry in various formulations. Specimen analysis included relevant physicochemical properties, total element concentrations (HCl+HNO3 digestion, USEPA 3051) and chemical speciation of chosen heavy metals (CH3COOH, NH2OH·HCl and H2O2+H2O2+CH3COONH4, the BCR method). Produced matrices showed liming effects comparable to commercial ground limestone and included significant quantities of soluble vital nutrients. The use of converter steel slag, however, led to significant increases in the total concentrations of Cr and V. Subsequently, total Cr was attested to occur as Cr(III) by Na2CO3+NaOH digestion followed by IC UV/VIS-PCR (USEPA 3060A). Additionally, 80.6% of the total concentration of Cr (370 mg kg(-1), d.w.) occurred in the residual fraction. However, 46.0% of the total concentration of V (2470 mg kg(-1), d.w.) occurred in the easily reduced fraction indicating potential bioavailability.

  11. Trafficability and workability of soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trafficability and workability are soil capabilities supporting operations of agricultural machinery. Trafficability is a soil's capability to support agricultural traffic without degrading soils and ecosystems. Workability is a soil capability supporting tillage. Agriculture is associated with mech...

  12. What are Soil Fumigants?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These pesticides, when applied to soil, form a gas to control pests including nematodes, fungi, bacteria, insects, and weeds, that live in the soil and can disrupt plant growth and crop production. Required safety measures reduce exposure risks.

  13. The Soil Is Alive!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes activities which demonstrate the abundance of organisms living underground. Provides outlined directions, lists of materials, and a soil ecosystem transparency for delving into the properties of soil. (RT)

  14. Soils of Roztocze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uziak, Stanisław; Poznyak, Stepan P.; Wyszniewskij, Josip

    2010-01-01

    The publication outlines the characteristics of the soils found in Roztocze on the Polish and Ukrainian territory. The map enclosed (scale 1:500 000) illustrates their location. It shows that the complex from lessives and brown soils formed of loess dominates in Roztocze on the Polish side, mainly in its western part. Both in Central and Eastern Roztocze, predominant areas are covered with brown loamy soils, formed of cretaceous gaizes. The same applies to rusty and podzolic soils formed from loose sands and slightly loamy and loamy sands. Other soil units do not cover significant areas. In general, in Roztocze on the Ukrainian territory there are the same soils with a few exceptions. Large areas are covered with lessives and brown soils formed from non-uniform silt formations and rusty with podzolic soils formed from slightly loamy, loamy and loose sands.

  15. Soil and Litter Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, George

    1991-01-01

    A lesson plan for soil study utilizes the Tullgren extraction method to illustrate biological concepts. It includes background information, equipment, collection techniques, activities, and references for identification guides about soil fauna. (MCO)

  16. Enterovirus inactivation in soil.

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, J G; O'Brien, R T

    1979-01-01

    The inactivation of radioactively labeled poliovirus type 1 and coxsackievirus B 1 in soils saturated with surface water, groundwater, and septic tank liquor was directly proportional to temperature. Virus persistence was also related to soil type and the liquid amendment in which viruses were suspended. At 37 degrees C, no infectivity was recovered from saturated soil after 12 days; at 4 degrees C, viruses persisted for at least 180 days. No infectivity was recovered from dried soil regardless of temperature, soil type, or liquid amendment. Additional experiments showed that evaporation of soil water was largely responsible for the decreased recovery of infectivity from drying soil. Increased rates of virus inactivation at low soil moisture levels were also demonstrated. PMID:44178

  17. Phthalate esters contamination in soil and plants on agricultural land near an electronic waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting Ting; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yong Ming; Teng, Ying

    2013-08-01

    The accumulation of phthalic acid esters (PAEs) in soil and plants in agricultural land near an electronic waste recycling site in east China has become a great threat to the neighboring environmental quality and human health. Soil and plant samples collected from land under different utilization, including fallow plots, vegetable plots, plots with alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) as green manure, fallow plots under long-term flooding and fallow plots under alternating wet and dry periods, together with plant samples from relative plots were analyzed for six PAE compounds nominated as prior pollutants by USEPA. In the determined samples, the concentrations of six target PAE pollutants ranged from 0.31-2.39 mg/kg in soil to 1.81-5.77 mg/kg in various plants (dry weight/DW), and their bioconcentration factors (BCFs) ranged from 5.8 to 17.9. Health risk assessments were conducted on target PAEs, known as typical environmental estrogen analogs, based on their accumulation in the edible parts of vegetables. Preliminary risk assessment to human health from soil and daily vegetable intake indicated that DEHP may present a high-exposure risk on all ages of the population in the area by soil ingestion or vegetable consumption. The potential damage that the target PAE compounds may pose to human health should be taken into account in further comprehensive risk assessments in e-waste recycling sites areas. Moreover, alfalfa removed substantial amounts of PAEs from the soil, and its use can be considered a good strategy for in situ remediation of PAEs.

  18. Soil concentrations and soil-air exchange of organochlorine pesticides along the Aba profile, east of the Tibetan Plateau, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxia; Qi, Shihua; Yang, Dan; Hu, Ying; Li, Feng; Liu, Jia; Xing, Xinli

    2013-12-01

    Mianzhu—Aba profile, east of the Tibetan Plateau, was selected to study the occurrence of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) along an altitudinal gradient. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) and Aldrin, Dieldrin and Endrin (Drins) in surface soils were detected in winter (March) and summer (July). Soil concentrations (ng·g-1, dw) in winter and summer ranged as follws: DDTs, 0.37-179.16 and 0.32-42.57; HCHs, 0.14-10.76 and 0.55-32.71; Drins, N.D-3.99 and 0.02-6.93, respectively. Main soil OCPs were p, p'-DDT, p, p'-DDE, β-HCH and Drins, among which Drins were rarely reported in current literature of the Tibetan Plateau. Higher OCP concentrations in the profile were attributed close to the agricultural fields of the Sichuan Basin, current lindane and nondicofol DDTs inputs, and also long-range atmospheric transport from abroad. Soil OCP concentrations underwent obvious seasonal variation, with higher DDTs in winter and higher HCHs and Drins in summer. It may be caused by climatic conditions, summer monsoon type, and physico-chemical properties of such contaminants. Though "rest" phenomenon occurred in some sampling sites, HCHs and Drins showed an increasing trend with increasing altitude, while DDTs showed an evident decrease with increasing altitude. The altitudinal distributions of OCPs were all consistent with previous findings in other mountainous regions. A primary fugacity analysis on OCPs soil-air exchange indicated that the profile may be secondary sources for HCHs and Endrin. As with Aldrin, Dieldrin, and DDTs, the profile may be both secondary sources and sinks.

  19. Methanotrophic activity and diversity of methanotrophs in volcanic geothermal soils at Pantelleria (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-10-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic or geothermal soils are not only a source of methane, but are also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated at about 2.5 Mg a-1 (t a-1). Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values of up to 59.2 nmol g-1 soil d.w. h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile, the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer, and values greater than 6.23 nmol g-1 h-1 were still detected up to a depth of 13 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still detectable consumption at 80 °C (> 1.25 nmol g-1 h-1) was recorded. The soil total DNA extracted from the three samples was probed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers, targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected at sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not at FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site (FAV2) pointed to a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs, distantly related to Methylocaldum-Metylococcus genera, and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic Verrucomicrobia methanotrophs. Alphaproteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated from enrichment cultures under a methane

  20. Soil microscopy and micromorphology

    SciTech Connect

    FitzPatrick, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    This book is a valuable resource to help geologists integrate knowledge of soil science into the endeavor of identifying paleosols. Attention is focused on the following: soil micromorphology, including sample preparation techniques; and physical and chemical properties. Various applications are presented of micromorphological soil study. Included is coverage on the disciplines of agriculture, archeology, engineering, geomorphology, paleoclimatology, paleopedology, and microbiology.

  1. Measuring Soil Temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil temperature is a critical factor in the germination and early growth of many crops including corn, cotton, small grains, and vegetable crops. Soil temperature strongly influences the rate of critical biological reactions in the soil such as the rates of nitrification and microbial respiration. ...

  2. Soil penetrometers and penetrability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil penetrometers are useful tools that measure the penetrability, or strength, of a soil. They can be as simple as a rod or shaft with a blunt or sharp end, or complicated mechanically driven instruments with digital data collection systems. Regardless of their design, soil penetrometers measure s...

  3. Understanding Soil Moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding soil moisture is critical for landscape irrigation management. This landscaep irrigation seminar will compare volumetric and matric potential soil-moisture sensors, discuss the relationship between their readings and demonstrate how to use these data. Soil water sensors attempt to sens...

  4. Factors affecting soil cohesion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erodibility is a measure of a soil’s resistance against erosive forces and is affected by both intrinsic (or inherent) soil property and the extrinsic condition at the time erodibility measurement is made. Since soil erodibility is usually calculated from results obtained from erosion experimen...

  5. Conserving Soil. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This book of enrichment materials is an interdisciplinary study of soil designed for students in grades 6-9. The materials are presented in three units. Unit 1 contains eight activities in which students investigate soil science and study the social impact of soil by examining the history of land use by local Native Americans. Unit 2 contains 10…

  6. Methane oxidation in a landfill cover soil reactor: Changing of kinetic parameters and microorganism community structure.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhi L; Zhao, Tian T; Gao, Yan H; Yang, Xu; Liu, Shuai; Peng, Xu Y

    2017-02-23

    Changing of CH4 oxidation potential and biological characteristics with CH4 concentration was studied in a landfill cover soil reactor (LCSR). The maximum rate of CH4 oxidation reached 32.40 mol d(-1) m(-2) by providing sufficient O2 in the LCSR. The kinetic parameters of methane oxidation in landfill cover soil were obtained by fitting substrate diffusion and consumption model based on the concentration profile of CH4 and O2. The values of [Formula: see text] (0.93-2.29%) and [Formula: see text] (140-524 nmol kgsoil-DW(-1)·s(-1)) increased with CH4 concentration (9.25-20.30%), while the values of [Formula: see text] (312.9-2.6%) and [Formula: see text] (1.3 × 10(-5) to 9.0 × 10(-3) nmol mL(-1) h(-1)) were just the opposite. MiSeq pyrosequencing data revealed that Methylobacter (the relative abundance was decreased with height of LCSR) and Methylococcales_unclassified (the relative abundance was increased expect in H 80) became the key players after incubation with increasing CH4 concentration. These findings provide information for assessing CH4 oxidation potential and changing of biological characteristics in landfill cover soil.

  7. The phytoremediation potential of bioenergy crop Ricinus communis for DDTs and cadmium co-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huagang; Yu, Ning; Wang, Lijun; Gupta, D K; He, Zhenli; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Yan, Xingchu; Li, Tingqiang; Yang, Xiao-e

    2011-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) or its metabolite residues are frequently detected in agricultural soils and food, posing a threat to human health. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of 23 genotypes of Ricinus communis in mobilizing and uptake of Cd and DDTs (p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE) in the co-contaminated soil. The plant genotypes varied largely in the uptake and accumulation of DDTs and Cd, with mean concentrations of 0.37, 0.43 and 70.51 for DDTs, and 1.22, 2.27 and 37.63 mg kg(-1) dw for Cd in leaf, stem and root, respectively. The total uptake of DDTs and Cd varied from 83.1 to 267.8 and 66.0 to 155.1 μg per pot, respectively. These results indicate that R. communis has great potential for removing DDTs and Cd from contaminated soils attributed to its fast growth, high biomass, strong absorption and accumulation for both DDTs and Cd.

  8. Cadmium contamination in orchard soils and fruit trees and its potential health risk in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Li, J T; Qiu, J W; Wang, X W; Zhong, Y; Lan, C Y; Shu, W S

    2006-09-01

    This study examines cadmium (Cd) contamination in orchard soils and fruit trees in Guangzhou, China, and assesses its potential health risk. Soils and tissues samples of three species of fruit trees were collected from three orchards. The average soil Cd concentration was 1.27, 1.84 and 0.68 mg/kg in orchards I, II, and III, respectively. The carambola (Averrhoa carambola) accumulated exceptionally high concentrations of Cd (7.57, 10.84, 9.01 and 2.15 mg/kg dw in root, twig, leaf and fruit, respectively), being 6.0-24 times and 4.0-10 times the corresponding tissue Cd in the longan (Dimocarpus longan) and wampee (Clausena lansium), respectively. Furthermore, all Cd concentrations (0.04-0.25 mg Cd/kg fw) of the fruits exceeded the tolerance limit of cadmium in foods of PR China (0.03 mg/kg fw). Our results indicate that the carambola tree has high Cd accumulation capacity and might be a Cd accumulator; and its fruit, among the three species of fruits studied, also poses the highest potential health risk to local residents.

  9. Physiological responses of Kosteletzkya virginica to coastal wetland soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Honglei; Shao, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Effects of salinity on growth and physiological indices of Kosteletzkya virginica seedlings were studied. Plant height, fresh weight (FW), dry weight (DW), and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) increased at 100 mM NaCl and slightly declined at 200 mM, but higher salinity induced a significant reduction. Chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (E) were not affected under moderate salinities, while markedly decreased at severe salinities except for the increased Ci at 400 mM NaCl. Furthermore, no significant differences of Fv/Fm and ΦPSII were found at lower than 200 mM NaCl, whereas higher salinity caused the declines of Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, and qP similar to Pn, accompanied with higher NPQ. Besides, salt stress reduced the leaf RWC, but caused the accumulation of proline to alleviate osmotic pressure. The increased activities of antioxidant enzymes maintained the normal levels of MDA and relative membrane permeability. To sum up, Kosteletzkya virginica seedlings have good salt tolerance and this may be partly attributed to its osmotic regulation and antioxidant capacity which help to maintain water balance and normal ROS level to ensure the efficient photosynthesis. These results provided important implications for Kosteletzkya virginica acting as a promising multiuse species for reclaiming coastal soil.

  10. Physiological Responses of Kosteletzkya virginica to Coastal Wetland Soil

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Honglei; Shao, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Effects of salinity on growth and physiological indices of Kosteletzkya virginica seedlings were studied. Plant height, fresh weight (FW), dry weight (DW), and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) increased at 100 mM NaCl and slightly declined at 200 mM, but higher salinity induced a significant reduction. Chlorophyll content, stomatal conductance (Gs), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci), and transpiration rate (E) were not affected under moderate salinities, while markedly decreased at severe salinities except for the increased Ci at 400 mM NaCl. Furthermore, no significant differences of Fv/Fm and ΦPSII were found at lower than 200 mM NaCl, whereas higher salinity caused the declines of Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, and qP similar to Pn, accompanied with higher NPQ. Besides, salt stress reduced the leaf RWC, but caused the accumulation of proline to alleviate osmotic pressure. The increased activities of antioxidant enzymes maintained the normal levels of MDA and relative membrane permeability. To sum up, Kosteletzkya virginica seedlings have good salt tolerance and this may be partly attributed to its osmotic regulation and antioxidant capacity which help to maintain water balance and normal ROS level to ensure the efficient photosynthesis. These results provided important implications for Kosteletzkya virginica acting as a promising multiuse species for reclaiming coastal soil. PMID:25853144

  11. Climate-smart soils.

    PubMed

    Paustian, Keith; Lehmann, Johannes; Ogle, Stephen; Reay, David; Robertson, G Philip; Smith, Pete

    2016-04-07

    Soils are integral to the function of all terrestrial ecosystems and to food and fibre production. An overlooked aspect of soils is their potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Although proven practices exist, the implementation of soil-based greenhouse gas mitigation activities are at an early stage and accurately quantifying emissions and reductions remains a substantial challenge. Emerging research and information technology developments provide the potential for a broader inclusion of soils in greenhouse gas policies. Here we highlight 'state of the art' soil greenhouse gas research, summarize mitigation practices and potentials, identify gaps in data and understanding and suggest ways to close such gaps through new research, technology and collaboration.

  12. Soil bioturbation. A commentary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Wilkinson, Marshall

    2010-05-01

    Organisms such as trees, ants, earthworms, termites are important components of the earth systems that have dominantly been thought of as abiotic. Despite an early focus on soil bioturbation by heavy-weights such as Charles Darwin and Nathanial Shaler in the late 19th century, sporadic attention to this theme has subsequently followed. Recent compilations demonstrate that soil bioturbation by fauna and flora is widespread across Earths terrestrial surface, and operates at geologically rapid rates that warrant further attention. Such biotic activity contributes to soil creep, soil carbon dynamics, and is critical in engineering the medium through which ecosystems draw their abiotic requirements. Soil and its biota are fundamental components of the Earth System. However, soil scientist focussed on the dominant paradigm of landscape evolution, and bioturbation was relegated. In fact, bioturbation is still not widely appreciated within the soil and earth system research community. Nevertheless, within the last decade a review of the impact of bioturbation was launched by authors such as Geoff S. Humphreys. Bioturbation is a complex process as new soil is formed, mounds are developed, soil is buried and a downslope transport of material is done. Bioturbation modify the soil texture and porosity, increase the nutrients and encourage the soil creep flux. A review of the State-of-the-Art of Bioturbation will be presented.

  13. From soil in art towards Soil Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, C.; Landa, E. R.; Toland, A.; Wessolek, G.

    2015-02-01

    The range of art forms and genres dealing with soil is wide and diverse, spanning many centuries and artistic traditions, from prehistoric painting and ceramics to early Renaissance works in Western literature, poetry, paintings, and sculpture, to recent developments in cinema, architecture and contemporary art. Case studies focused on painting, installation, and cinema are presented with the view of encouraging further exploration of art about, in, with, or featuring soil or soil conservation issues, created by artists, and occasionally scientists, educators or collaborative efforts thereof.

  14. Evaluating phytoextraction efficiency of two high-biomass crops after soil amendment and inoculation with rhizobacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Vanessa, Álvarez-López; Ángeles, Prieto-Fernández; Sergio, Roiloa; Beatriz, Rodríguez-Garrido; Rolf, Herzig; Markus, Puschenreiter; Susan, Kidd Petra

    2017-01-24

    We evaluated the effect of compost amendment and/or bacterial inoculants on the growth and metal accumulation of Salix caprea (clone BOKU 01 AT-004) and Nicotiana tabacum (in vitro-bred clone NBCu10-8). Soil was collected from an abandoned Pb/Zn mine and rhizobacterial inoculants were previously isolated from plants growing at the same site. Plants were grown in untreated or compost-amended (5% w/w) soil and were inoculated with five rhizobacterial strains. Non-inoculated plants were also established as a control. Compost addition increased the shoot DW yield of N. tabacum but not S. caprea, while it decreased soil metal availability and lowered shoot Cd/Zn concentrations in tobacco plants. Compost amendment enhanced the shoot Cd/Zn removal due to the growth promotion of N. tabacum or to the increase in metal concentration in S. caprea leaves. Bacterial inoculants increased photosynthetic efficiency (particularly in N. tabacum) and sometimes modified soil metal availability, but this did not lead to a significant increase in Cd/Zn removal. Compost amendment was more effective in improving the Cd and Zn phytoextraction efficiency than bioaugmentation.

  15. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone

  16. Radiogeochemistry of Kamchatka soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharikhina, L. V.; Litvinenko, Yu. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background concentrations of Th and U in volcanic soils (Andosols) of Kamchatka are much lower than their clarkes in continental soils. The dose rate of gamma radiation above the soil surface (10-11.5 µR/h in the south and 8-9.5 [m]R/h in the north of Kamchatka Peninsula) is lower than the natural level of this index for the mountainous areas in the boreal zone of Russia. The natural radiogeochemical background of Kamchatka soils is controlled by the petrochemical composition of volcanic ash composing the mineral basis of Kamchatka soils. It is higher in the southern soil province, where soils develop from acidic ashes, in comparison with the northern province, with a predominance of soils developing from ashes of basic and intermediate composition. This agrees with Th and U clarkes for the corresponding types of volcanic rocks and explains the natural origin of the elevated radiogeochemical background in the southern part of Kamchatka as compared with its northern part. The soils of the northern province developing from relatively fresh volcanic ashes show a lower Th/U ratio as compared to the soils of southern Kamchatka because of higher uranium content in the newly deposited ashes.

  17. Sources, atmospheric transport and deposition mechanism of organochlorine pesticides in soils of the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Laiguo; Feng, Qianhua; He, Qiusheng; Huang, Yumei; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Guo; Zhao, Wei; Gao, Bo; Lin, Kui; Xu, Zhencheng

    2017-01-15

    Because of mountain cold-trapping, the soil in the Tibetan Plateau may be an important global sink of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). However, there are limited data on OCPs in the soils of the Tibetan Plateau. In addition, the atmospheric transport and deposition mechanisms of OCPs also need to be further studied. In this study, the sampling area covered most regions of the Tibetan Plateau. The detection frequencies of ΣChlordane (sum of trans-chlordane, cis-chlordane and oxychlordane), HCB, ΣNonachlor (sum of trans- and cis-nonachlor), DDTs, ΣEndo (sum of endosulfan-I, endosulfan-II and endosulfate), aldrin, HCHs, ΣHeptachlor (sum of heptachlor and heptachlor epoxide), mirex and dieldrin were 100%, 98.3%, 96.6%, 94.8%, 89.7%, 87.9%, 62.1%, 55.2%, 32.8% and 6.9%, respectively. DDTs (with arithmetic mean values of 1050ngkg(-1) dw) and HCHs (393ngkg(-1)) were the principal OCPs in cultivated soils, whereas ΣEndo (192ngkg(-1)) and ΣChlordane (152ngkg(-1)) were the principal OCPs in non-cultivated soils. Local use of DDTs, dicofol and HCHs may be an important source of OCP accumulation in the soil of the Tibetan Plateau. Aldrin and endosulfan are considered to be good indicators for studying atmospheric transport and deposition of OCPs from South Asia and Southeast Asia. Two zones with high OCP levels were found in the southeast and northwest of the Tibetan Plateau. The zones have dissimilar pollution sources of OCPs and are influenced by different factors that affect their precipitation scavenging efficiency. The amount of precipitation was the dominant factor in the southeast, whereas large differences in temperature and wind speed were the dominant factors in the northwest.

  18. Carbon dioxide exchange of a perennial bioenergy crop cultivation on a mineral soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Saara E.; Shurpali, Narasinha J.; Peltola, Olli; Mammarella, Ivan; Hyvönen, Niina; Maljanen, Marja; Räty, Mari; Virkajärvi, Perttu; Martikainen, Pertti J.

    2016-03-01

    One of the strategies to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the energy sector is to increase the use of renewable energy sources such as bioenergy crops. Bioenergy is not necessarily carbon neutral because of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during biomass production, field management and transportation. The present study focuses on the cultivation of reed canary grass (RCG, Phalaris arundinacea L.), a perennial bioenergy crop, on a mineral soil. To quantify the CO2 exchange of this RCG cultivation system, and to understand the key factors controlling its CO2 exchange, the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) was measured from July 2009 until the end of 2011 using the eddy covariance (EC) method. The RCG cultivation thrived well producing yields of 6200 and 6700 kg DW ha-1 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Gross photosynthesis (GPP) was controlled mainly by radiation from June to September. Vapour pressure deficit (VPD), air temperature or soil moisture did not limit photosynthesis during the growing season. Total ecosystem respiration (TER) increased with soil temperature, green area index and GPP. Annual NEE was -262 and -256 g C m-2 in 2010 and 2011, respectively. Throughout the study period from July 2009 until the end of 2011, cumulative NEE was -575 g C m-2. Carbon balance and its regulatory factors were compared to the published results of a comparison site on drained organic soil cultivated with RCG in the same climate. On this mineral soil site, the RCG had higher capacity to take up CO2 from the atmosphere than on the comparison site.

  19. A whole soil stability index (WSSI) for evaluating soil aggregation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil aggregate stability is an indicator of soil quality. However, there is no standard methodology for measuring soil aggregation or aggregate stability, particularly for determining a whole soil stability index. A whole soil stability index (WSSI) was developed here which combined data from dry ...

  20. Should soil testing services measure soil biological activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Health of agricultural soils depends largely on conservation management to promote soil organic C accumulation. Total soil organic C changes slowly, but active fractions are more dynamic. A key indicator of healthy soil is potential biological activity, which could be measured rapidly with soil te...

  1. Short-chain chlorinated paraffins in soil, paddy seeds (Oryza sativa) and snails (Ampullariidae) in an e-waste dismantling area in China: Homologue group pattern, spatial distribution and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Fu, Jianjie; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-01-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in multi-environmental matrices are studied in Taizhou, Zhejiang Province, China, which is a notorious e-waste dismantling area. The investigated matrices consist of paddy field soil, paddy seeds (Oryza sativa, separated into hulls and rice unpolished) and apple snails (Ampullariidae, inhabiting the paddy fields). The sampling area covered a 65-km radius around the contamination center. C10 and C11 are the two predominant homologue groups in the area, accounting for about 35.7% and 33.0% of total SCCPs, respectively. SCCPs in snails and hulls are generally higher than in soil samples (30.4-530 ng/g dw), and SCCPs in hulls are approximate five times higher than in corresponding rice samples (4.90-55.1 ng/g dw). Homologue pattern analysis indicates that paddy seeds (both hull and rice) tend to accumulate relatively high volatile SCCP homologues, especially the ones with shorter carbon chain length, while snails tend to accumulate relatively high lipophilic homologues, especially the ones with more substituted chlorines. SCCPs in both paddy seeds and snails are linearly related to those in the soil. The e-waste dismantling area, which covers a radius of approximate 20 km, shows higher pollution levels for SCCPs according to their spatial distribution in four matrices. The preliminary assessment indicates that SCCP levels in local soils pose no significant ecological risk for soil dwelling organisms, but higher risks from dietary exposure of SCCPs are suspected for people living in e-waste dismantling area.

  2. Soil in the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Daniel deB; Bacon, Allan R.; Brecheisen, Zachary; Mobley, Megan L.

    2015-07-01

    With scholars deliberating a new name for our geologic epoch, i.e., the Anthropocene, soil scientists whether biologists, chemists, or physicists are documenting significant changes accruing in a majority of Earth's soils. Such global soil changes interact with the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere (i.e., Earth's Critical Zone), and these developments are significantly impacting the Earth's stratigraphic record as well. In effect, soil scientists study such global soil changes in a science of anthropedology, which leads directly to the need to transform pedostratigraphyinto an anthro-pedostratigraphy, a science that explores how global soil change alters Earth's litho-, bio-, and chemostratigraphy. These developments reinforce perspectives that the planet is indeed crossing into the Anthropocene.

  3. Evaluating soil contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, W.

    1990-07-01

    The compilation was designed to help U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contaminant specialists evaluate the degree of contamination of a soil, based on chemical analyses. Included are regulatory criteria, opinions, brief descriptions of scientific articles, and miscellaneous information that might be useful in making risk assessments. The intent was to make hard-to-obtain material readily available to contaminant specialists, but not to critique the material or develop new criteria. The compilation is to be used with its index, which includes about 200 contaminants. Entries include soil contaminant criteria from other countries, contaminant guidelines for applying sewage sludge to soil, guidelines for evaluating sediments, background soil concentrations for various elements, citations to scientific articles that may help estimate the potential movement of soil contaminants into wildlife food chains, and a few odds and ends. Articles on earthworms were emphasized because they are a natural bridge between soil and many species of wildlife.

  4. Soil moisture modeling review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildreth, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    A determination of the state of the art in soil moisture transport modeling based on physical or physiological principles was made. It was found that soil moisture models based on physical principles have been under development for more than 10 years. However, these models were shown to represent infiltration and redistribution of soil moisture quite well. Evapotranspiration has not been as adequately incorporated into the models.

  5. Managing to enhance soil health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Healthy soils are critical for meeting current and future societal demands. Management strategies that protect the soil against erosion, build soil organic matter and promote nutrient cycling are ways to enhance soil health. Keeping soils covered and judicious use of agrochemicals are akin to us “hu...

  6. Soil microbiota of the prairie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prairie ecosystem is often used as a benchmark ecosystem to provide a reference soil quality or soil health assessment. Current soil health assessments include measurements of soil chemical and physical indicators and of selected microbiological activities but no characterization of soil microbi...

  7. Phthalate esters contamination in soils and vegetables of plastic film greenhouses of suburb Nanjing, China and the potential human health risk.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ting Ting; Wu, Long Hua; Chen, Like; Zhang, Hai Bo; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yong Ming

    2015-08-01

    The contamination of phthalate esters (PAEs) has become a potential threat to the environment and human health because they could be easily released as plasticizers from the daily supply products, especially in polyethylene films. Concentration levels of total six PAEs, nominated as priority pollutants by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), were investigated in soils and vegetables from four greenhouse areas in suburbs of Nanjing, East China. Total PAEs concentration ranged from 930 ± 840 to 2,450 ± 710 μg kg(-1) (dry weight (DW)) in soil and from 790 ± 630 to 3,010 ± 2,130 μg kg(-1) in vegetables. Higher concentrations of PAEs were found in soils except in Suo Shi (SS) area and in vegetables, especially in potherb mustard and purple tsai-tai samples. Risk assessment mainly based on the exposures of soil ingestion and daily vegetable intake indicated that bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in the samples from Gu Li (GL) and Hu Shu (HS) exhibited the highest hazard to children less than 6-year old. Therefore, the human health risk of the PAEs contamination in soils and vegetables should greatly be of a concern, especially for their environmental estrogen analog effects.

  8. Properties of silver nanoparticles influencing their uptake in and toxicity to the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus following exposure in soil.

    PubMed

    Makama, Sunday; Piella, Jordi; Undas, Anna; Dimmers, Wim J; Peters, Ruud; Puntes, Victor F; van den Brink, Nico W

    2016-11-01

    Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles influence their environmental fate and toxicity, and studies investigating this are vital for a holistic approach towards a comprehensive and adequate environmental risk assessment. In this study, we investigated the effects of size, surface coating (charge) of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) - a most commonly-used nanoparticle-type, on the bioaccumulation in, and toxicity (survival, growth, cocoon production) to the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. AgNPs were synthesized in three sizes: 20, 35 and 50 nm. Surface-coating with bovine serum albumin (AgNP_BSA), chitosan (AgNP_Chit), or polyvinylpyrrolidone (AgNP_PVP) produced negative, positive and neutral particles respectively. In a 28-day sub-chronic reproduction toxicity test, earthworms were exposed to these AgNPs in soil (0-250 mg Ag/kg soil DW). Earthworms were also exposed to AgNO3 at concentrations below known EC50. Total Ag tissue concentration indicated uptake by earthworms was generally highest for the AgNP_BSA especially at the lower exposure concentration ranges, and seems to reach a plateau level between 50 and 100 mg Ag/kg soil DW. Reproduction was impaired at high concentrations of all AgNPs tested, with AgNP_BSA particles being the most toxic. The EC50 for the 20 nm AgNP_BSA was 66.8 mg Ag/kg soil, with exposure to <60 mg Ag/kg soil already showing a decrease in the cocoon production. Thus, based on reproductive toxicity, the particles ranked: AgNP_BSA (negative) > AgNP_PVP (neutral) > Chitosan (positive). Size had an influence on uptake and toxicity of the AgNP_PVP, but not for AgNP_BSA nor AgNP_Chit. This study provides essential information on the role of physicochemical properties of AgNPs in influencing uptake by a terrestrial organism L. rubellus under environmentally relevant conditions. It also provides evidence of the influence of surface coating (charge) and the limited effect of size in the range of 20-50 nm, in driving uptake and toxicity

  9. Effect of growth promotants on the occurrence of endogenous and synthetic steroid hormones on feedlot soils and in runoff from beef cattle feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Snow, Daniel D; Kranz, William L; Mader, Terry L; Shapiro, Charles A; Donk, Simon J van; Shelton, David P; Tarkalson, David D; Zhang, Tian C

    2012-02-07

    Supplements and growth promotants containing steroid hormones are routinely administered to beef cattle to improve feeding efficiency, reduce behavioral problems, and enhance production. As a result, beef cattle manure will contain both synthetic steroids as well as a range of endogenous steroids including androgens, estrogens, and progestogens. A two-year controlled study was conducted in which beef cattle were administered steroid hormones via subcutaneous implants and feed additives and the occurrence of 16 endogenous and synthetic steroid hormones and metabolites was evaluated in runoff from beef cattle feedlots and in manure and soil collected from feedlot surfaces. Samples were extracted and analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometryfor metabolites of the synthetic androgen trenbolone acetate, 17α-trenbolone, 17β-trenbolone, for the nonsteroidal semisynthetic estrogen agonist, α-zearalanol, and the synthetic progesterone melengesterol acetate, as well as a wide range of endogeneous estrogens, androgens, and fusarium metabolites. Synthetic steroids including trenbolone metabolites and melengestrol acetate were detected in fresh manure and in feedlot surface soils from cattle administered synthetic steroids at concentrations up to 55 ± 22 ng/g dry weight (dw) (17α-trenbolone) and 6.5 ± 0.4 ng/g dw (melengesterol acetate). Melengesterol acetate was detected in 6% of runoff samples from feedlots holding cattle administered synthetic steroids at concentrations ranging up to 115 ng/L. The presence of melengesterol acetate in runoff from beef cattle feeding operations has not been previously reported. Synthetic steroids were not detected in manure or runoff from control cattle. A wide range of endogenous hormones were detected in runoff and feedlot surface soils and manure from cattle given synthetic steroids and from control cattle, with no statistically significant differences in concentration. These results indicate that runoff from

  10. Classiology and soil classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, V. A.

    2012-03-01

    Classiology can be defined as a science studying the principles and rules of classification of objects of any nature. The development of the theory of classification and the particular methods for classifying objects are the main challenges of classiology; to a certain extent, they are close to the challenges of pattern recognition. The methodology of classiology integrates a wide range of methods and approaches: from expert judgment to formal logic, multivariate statistics, and informatics. Soil classification assumes generalization of available data and practical experience, formalization of our notions about soils, and their representation in the form of an information system. As an information system, soil classification is designed to predict the maximum number of a soil's properties from the position of this soil in the classification space. The existing soil classification systems do not completely satisfy the principles of classiology. The violation of logical basis, poor structuring, low integrity, and inadequate level of formalization make these systems verbal schemes rather than classification systems sensu stricto. The concept of classification as listing (enumeration) of objects makes it possible to introduce the notion of the information base of classification. For soil objects, this is the database of soil indices (properties) that might be applied for generating target-oriented soil classification system. Mathematical methods enlarge the prognostic capacity of classification systems; they can be applied to assess the quality of these systems and to recognize new soil objects to be included in the existing systems. The application of particular principles and rules of classiology for soil classification purposes is discussed in this paper.

  11. Evaluation of Soil Venting Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ability of soil venting to inexpensively remove large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils is well established. However, the time required using venting to remediate soils to low contaminant levels often required by..

  12. Creative Soil Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Take plant lessons outdoors with this engaging and inquiry-based activity in which third-grade students learn how to apply soil conservation methods to growing plants. They also collect data and draw conclusions about the effectiveness of their method of soil conservation. An added benefit to this activity is that the third-grade students played…

  13. Soil and Culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Editors Ed Landa and Christian Feller have assembled an international ensemble cast of writers, artists, historians, philosophers, and scientists of broad perspective to create a book of truly fascinating reading for any soils enthusiast. When so little we see in print is truly new or original, Soil...

  14. Soil salination indicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salts are naturally present in soils, and many salt elements are essential nutrients for plants. The most common soluble salts in soil include major cations of sodium (Na+), magnesium (Mg2+), calcium (Ca2+), potassium (K+), and anions of chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO42-), bicarbonate (HCO3-) and carbo...

  15. Soil and vegetation surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    Soil sampling and analysis evaluates long-term contamination trends and monitors environmental radionuclide inventories. This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the soil and vegetation surveillance programs which were conducted during 1994. Vegetation surveillance is conducted offsite to monitor atmospheric deposition of radioactive materials in areas not under cultivation and onsite at locations adjacent to potential sources of radioactivity.

  16. The Global Soil Partnership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, Luca

    2015-07-01

    The Global Soil Partnership (GSP) has been established, following an intensive preparatory work of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), as a voluntary partnership coordinated by the FAO in September 2011 [1]. The GSP is open to all interested stakeholders: Governments (FAO Member States), Universities, Research Organizations, Civil Society Organizations, Industry and private companies. It is a voluntary partnership aiming towards providing a platform for active engagement in sustainable soil management and soil protection at all scales: local, national, regional and global. As a “coalition of the willing” towards soil protection, it attempts to make progress in reversing soil degradation with those partners that have a genuine will of protecting soils for our future generations. It openly aims towards creating an enabling environment, despite the resistance of a minority of national governments, for effective soil protection in the large majority of the countries that are genuinely concerned about the rapid depletion of their limited soil resources.

  17. Soil Health Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoorman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil health and cover crops are topics of interest to farmers, gardeners, and students. Three soil health and cover crop demonstrations provide educational resources. Demonstrations one outlines two educational cover crop seed displays, including the advantages and disadvantages. Demonstration two shows how to construct and grow a cover crop root…

  18. Small Soil Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Elmer R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive technique for providing student opportunities to observe and identify the variety of small animals living in the first few inches below the surface of the soil. A classification key to some small soil animals is also presented. (HM)

  19. Uptake and translocation of metals in Spinacia oleracea L. grown on tannery sludge-amended and contaminated soils: effect on lipid peroxidation, morpho-anatomical changes and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sarita; Mallick, Shekhar; Misra, Rohit Kumar; Singh, Sarita; Basant, Ankita; Gupta, Amit Kumar

    2007-02-01

    The plants of Spinacia oleracea L. grown on contaminated soil (CS) and different amendments of tannery sludge (TS) have shown high accumulation of metals in its edible part. The accumulation of toxic metal (Cr) in the leaves of the plants grown on CS was recorded as 40.67 microgg(-1)dw. However, the leaves of the plants grown on 100% TS have accumulated about two times (70.80 microgg(-1)dw) higher Cr than the 10% TS (31.21 microgg(-1)dw). Among growth parameters, the root length was more affected at 90 d than the shoot length, number of leaves and leaf area. The study of scanning electron micrographs showed 29.31% increase in stomatal length in the leaves of the plants grown on CS as compared to garden soil (GS), which served as control, however it decreased in the plants grown on higher amendments of TS. The decrease in MDA content at initial period of exposure and lower amendment was recorded in the leaves, whereas, significant increase (>10% TS onward) was observed with increase in tannery sludge ratio at 90 d as compared to GS. A coordinated increase in all the studied antioxidants (cysteine, non-protein thiol, ascorbic acid, carotenoid contents) was found up to 75 d of growth. At 90 d, most of the antioxidant decreased as compared to 75 d causing oxidative stress as evidenced by increased level of lipid peroxidation and decreased chlorophyll and protein contents. Maximum increase of 181.43% in MDA content and maximum decrease of 53.69% in total chlorophyll content was recorded in the leaves of the plants grown on 100% TS after 90 d of growth. The plants grown on CS have shown an increase in shoot length, number of leaves, leaf area, photosynthetic pigments and protein contents and in all the studied antioxidants. Thus, these plants are able to combat stress involving defense mechanism, resulting in healthy growth of the plants. The results are well coordinated as there is no change in the MDA content as compared to the plants grown on GS. In view of high Cr

  20. Soil invertebrates as bioindicators of urban soil quality.

    PubMed

    Santorufo, Lucia; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Rocco, Annamaria; Maisto, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed at relating the abundance and diversity of invertebrate communities of urban soils to chemical and physical soil characteristics and to identify the taxa most sensitive or tolerant to soil stressors. The invertebrate community of five urban soils in Naples, Italy, was sampled. To assess soil quality invertebrate community indices (Shannon, Simpson, Menhinick and Pielou indices), Acarina/Collembola ratios, and the soil biological quality index (QBS) were calculated. The chemical and physical characteristics of the soils strongly differed. Abundance rather than taxa richness of invertebrates were more affected by soil characteristics. The community was more abundant and diverse in the soils with high organic matter and water content and low metal (Cu, Pb, Zn) concentrations. The taxa more resistant to the urban environment included Acarina, Enchytraeids, Collembola and Nematoda. Collembolans appeared particularly sensitive to changing soil properties. Among the investigated indices, QBS seems most appropriate for soil quality assessment.

  1. The Soil Series in Soil Classifications of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indorante, Samuel; Beaudette, Dylan; Brevik, Eric C.

    2014-05-01

    Organized national soil survey began in the United States in 1899, with soil types as the units being mapped. The soil series concept was introduced into the U.S. soil survey in 1903 as a way to relate soils being mapped in one area to the soils of other areas. The original concept of a soil series was all soil types formed in the same parent materials that were of the same geologic age. However, within about 15 years soil series became the primary units being mapped in U.S. soil survey. Soil types became subdivisions of soil series, with the subdivisions based on changes in texture. As the soil series became the primary mapping unit the concept of what a soil series was also changed. Instead of being based on parent materials and geologic age, the soil series of the 1920s was based on the morphology and composition of the soil profile. Another major change in the concept of soil series occurred when U.S. Soil Taxonomy was released in 1975. Under Soil Taxonomy, the soil series subdivisions were based on the uses the soils might be put to, particularly their agricultural uses (Simonson, 1997). While the concept of the soil series has changed over the years, the term soil series has been the longest-lived term in U.S. soil classification. It has appeared in every official classification system used by the U.S. soil survey (Brevik and Hartemink, 2013). The first classification system was put together by Milton Whitney in 1909 and had soil series at its second lowest level, with soil type at the lowest level. The second classification system used by the U.S. soil survey was developed by C.F. Marbut, H.H. Bennett, J.E. Lapham, and M.H. Lapham in 1913. It had soil series at the second highest level, with soil classes and soil types at more detailed levels. This was followed by another system in 1938 developed by M. Baldwin, C.E. Kellogg, and J. Thorp. In this system soil series were again at the second lowest level with soil types at the lowest level. The soil type

  2. Phytoextraction of uranium from contaminated soil by Macleaya cordata before and after application of EDDS and CA.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-wu; Hu, Nan; Ding, De-xin; Hu, Jin-song; Li, Guang-yue; Wang, Yong-dong

    2015-04-01

    This is the first report on using Macleaya cordata for phytoextraction of uranium from the uranium contaminated soil in the greenhouse. Macleaya M. cordata was found to increase uranium concentration in the soil solution by increasing the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The amendment experiments with citric acid (CA) and [S,S]-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) at the rates of 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mmol kg(-1) dry weight (DW) soil showed that EDDS was more efficient to increase uranium concentration in the shoot than CA when they were applied at the same rate. The applications of 5.0 mmol kg(-1) EDDS and 10.0 mmol kg(-1) CA were most appropriate for increasing uranium concentrations in the shoot of M. cordata. CA was more efficient to increase the solubility of uranium at the same application rates except for 2.5 mmol kg(-1) application rate. There was a linear correlation between the uranium concentration in the shoot and the average uranium concentration of one planted pot during 14 days in soil solution after the application of different rates of EDDS and CA, respectively (r(2) = 0.972, P < 0.01; r (2) = 0.948, P < 0.01), indicating that uranium uptake was dependent on the soluble uranium concentration. The Fe-U-DOC and Mn-U-DOC complexes were probably formed after the application of CA. Soil solution pH and Fe, Mn, Ca, and DOC concentrations in soil solution were found to be changed by the chelates.

  3. Distribution of α-, β-, γ-, and δ-hexachlorocyclohexane in soil-plant-air system in a tea garden.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhigang; Zheng, Lili; Guo, Pingping; Bi, Junqi

    2013-05-01

    The residue of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers (mainly α-, β-, γ-, and δ-HCH) in the soils, plant tissues and atmosphere were measured in a typical tea garden in Fujian, a major tea-producing province in China, and this study focused on the distribution and accumulation of HCHs. HCHs could accumulate in most of the plant tissues, with the highest HCH concentration of 3.0±2.9ng/g dw in old leaves. Uptake of HCHs by the roots from soil was the possible pathway for HCHs accumulation in plants, and the accumulation was an isomer-selective process, with the highest concentration factor of 10.3 for α-HCH. The higher percentages of α- and γ-HCH in roots (28.1 percent and 43.7 percent) than those in soil (14.0% and 34.1 percent) also implied the isomer-selective accumulation of HCHs. ΣHCHs in the gaseous phase (157±97pg/m(3)) were significantly higher than those in particle phase (19±20pg/m(3)). Volatilization of HCHs from soils and uptake by the plant's aerial tissues might be the pathway for HCHs accumulation in leaves and stems, and β-HCH showed the highest accumulation capacity in young leaves. The percentage distribution pattern of the dust on plant leaves were similar to that in soils, suggesting that the dust on the leaves were mainly from the soils. High γ-HCH concentrations and low α-/γ-HCH ratios in plant's aerial tissues suggested the input of lindane in tea garden.

  4. The Changing Model of Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, D. D.; Yaalon, D.

    2012-12-01

    The contemporary genetic model of soil is changing rapidly in response to advances in soil science and to human and environmental forcings in the 21st century (Richter and Yaalon, 2012). Three ongoing changes in the model of soil include that: (1) lower soil boundaries are much deeper than the solum, historically the O to B horizons, (2) most soils are polygenetic paleosols, products of soil-forming processes that have ranged widely over soils' lifetimes, and (3) soils are globally human-natural bodies, no longer natural bodies. Together, these changes in the model of soil mean that human forcings are a global wave of soil polygenesis altering fluxes of matter and energy and transforming soil thermodynamics as potentially very deep systems. Because soils are non-linear systems resulting from high-order interactions of physics, chemistry, and biology, trajectories of how human forcings alter soils over decades are not readily predictable and require long-term soil observations. There is much to learn about how soils are changing internally as central components of management systems and externally in relation to wider environments. To be critical, research has been remarkably superficial in studies of soil, reductionist in approach, and lacking in time-series observations of responses to soil management. While this criticism may sound negative, it creates significant opportunities for contemporary soil scientists.

  5. Soil Moisture Project Evaluation Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, R. H. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Approaches planned or being developed for measuring and modeling soil moisture parameters are discussed. Topics cover analysis of spatial variability of soil moisture as a function of terrain; the value of soil moisture information in developing stream flow data; energy/scene interactions; applications of satellite data; verifying soil water budget models; soil water profile/soil temperature profile models; soil moisture sensitivity analysis; combinations of the thermal model and microwave; determing planetary roughness and field roughness; how crust or a soil layer effects microwave return; truck radar; and truck/aircraft radar comparison.

  6. Climate-smart soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paustian, Keith; Lehmann, Johannes; Ogle, Stephen; Reay, David; Robertson, G. Philip; Smith, Pete

    2016-04-01

    Soils are integral to the function of all terrestrial ecosystems and to food and fibre production. An overlooked aspect of soils is their potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Although proven practices exist, the implementation of soil-based greenhouse gas mitigation activities are at an early stage and accurately quantifying emissions and reductions remains a substantial challenge. Emerging research and information technology developments provide the potential for a broader inclusion of soils in greenhouse gas policies. Here we highlight ‘state of the art’ soil greenhouse gas research, summarize mitigation practices and potentials, identify gaps in data and understanding and suggest ways to close such gaps through new research, technology and collaboration.

  7. Soil Transport Implement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, William; Fan, William; Lloyd, Joey; Pham, Nam-Anh; Stevens, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The design of the Soil Transport Implement (STI) for SKITTER is presented. The purpose of STI is to provide a protective layer of lunar soil for the lunar modules. The objective is to cover the lunar module with a layer of soil approximately two meters thick within a two week period. The amount of soil required to cover the module is roughly 77 dump truck loads or three million earth pounds. A spinning disk is employed to accomplish its task. STI is an autonomous, teleoperated system. The design incorporates the latest advances in composite materials and high strength, light weight alloys to achieve a high strength to weight ratio. The preliminary design should only be used to assess the feasibility of employing a spinning wheel as a soil transport implement. A mathematical model of the spinning wheel was used to evaluate the performance of this design.

  8. Relaxometry in soil science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, G. E.; Jaeger, F.; Bayer, J. V.

    2009-04-01

    NMR relaxometry is a sensitive, informative and promising method to study pore size distribution in soils as well as many kinds of soil physicochemical processes, among which are wetting, swelling or changes in the macromolecular status. Further, it is a very helpful method to study interactions between molecules in soil organic matter and it can serve to study the state of binding of water or organic chemicals to soil organic matter. The method of Relaxometry excite the nuclei of interest and their relaxation kinetics are observed. The relaxation time is the time constant of this first order relaxation process. Most applications of relaxometry concentrate on protons, addressing water molecules or H-containing organic molecules. In this context, 1H-NMR relaxometry may be used as an analysis method to determine water uptake characteristics of soils, thus gaining information about water distribution and mobility as well as pore size distribution in wet and moist samples. Additionally, it can also serve as a tool to study mobility of molecular segments in biopolymers. Principally, relaxometry is not restricted to protons. In soil science, relaxometry is also applied using deuterium, xenon and other nuclei to study pore size distribution and interactions. The relaxation time depends on numerous parameters like surface relaxivity, diffusion and interactions between nuclei as well as between nuclei and the environment. One- and two-dimensional methods address the relation between relaxation time and diffusion coefficients and can give information about the interconnectivity of pores. More specific information can be gained using field cycling techniques. Although proton NMR relaxometry is a very promising method in soil science, it has been applied scarcely up to now. It was used to assess changes in molecular rigidity of humic substances. A very recent study shows the potential of NMR relaxometry to assess the pore size distribution of soils in a fast and non

  9. Test of tree core sampling for screening of toxic elements in soils from a Norwegian site.

    PubMed

    Algreen, Mette; Rein, Arno; Legind, Charlotte N; Amundsen, Carl Einar; Karlson, Ulrich Gosewinkel; Trapp, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    Tree core samples have been used to delineate organic subsurface plumes. In 2009 and 2010, samples were taken at trees growing on a former dump site in Norway and analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn). Concentrations in wood were in averages (dw) 30 mg/kg for Zn, 2 mg/kg for Cu, and < 1 mg/kg for Cd, Cr, As and Ni. The concentrations in wood samples from the polluted test site were compared to those derived from a reference site. For all except one case, mean concentrations from the test site were higher than those from the reference site, but the difference was small and not always significant. Differences between tree species were usually higher than differences between reference and test site. Furthermore, all these elements occur naturally, and Cu, Ni, and Zn are essential minerals. Thus, all trees will have a natural background of these elements, and the occurrence alone does not indicate soil pollution. For the interpretation of the results, a comparison to wood samples from an unpolluted reference site with same species and similar soil conditions is required. This makes the tree core screening method less reliable for heavy metals than, e.g., for chlorinated solvents.

  10. Effects of flooding cycles in the Pantanal on the turnover of soil nitrogen pools and emission of N2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liengaard, L.; Nielsen, L. P.; Revsbech, N. P.; Elberling, B.; Priemé, A.; Prast, A. E.; Kühl, M.

    2011-06-01

    The global nitrous oxide (N2O) budget remains unbalanced. Currently, ~25 % of the global N2O emission is ascribed to uncultivated tropical soils, but the exact locations and controlling mechanisms are not clear. In this study, we present the first detailed study of the dynamics of soil nitrogen pools and flux of N2O from the world's largest wetland Pantanal, South America. At three long-term measurement sites we measured porewater pH, NO3-, NH4+ , N2O and O2 as well as N2O dynamics in soil slurry, and in situ fluxes of N2O and CO2. The pool of inorganic nitrogen changed (7.1-92 μg NH4+-N g dw-1, and 0.1-201 μg NO3--N g dw-1) with the seasonal flooding and drying cycles, indicating dynamic shifts between ammonification, nitrification and denitrification. In the field, O2 penetrated to a depth of 60 cm in dry soil, but O2 was rapidly depleted in response to precipitation. Soil pH fluctuated from pH 7-7.5 in flooded soil to pH 3.5-4.5 in the same drained soil. Microsensor measurements showed rapid N2O accumulation reaching >500-1000 Pa in soil slurries due to incomplete denitrification. In situ fluxes of N2O were comparable to heavily fertilized forest or agricultural soils. The dominating parameter affecting N2O emission rate was precipitation inducing peak emissions of >3 mmol N2O m-2 d-1, while the mean daily flux was 0.43 mmol N2O m-2 d-1. Single measurement based screening of in situ activity at 10 Pantanal sites during dry conditions averaged 0.39 mmol N2O m-2 d-1. The in situ N2O fluxes were only weakly correlated (r2 = 0.177) with NO3- and pH value, showing a tendency (p = 0.063) for NO3- concentration to be positively correlated with the in situ N2O flux and a weaker tendency (p = 0.138) for the pH value to be negatively correlated with the in situ N2O flux. Over 170 days of the drained period we estimated non-wetted drained soil to contribute 70.0 mmol N2O m-2, while rain induced peak events contributed 9.2 mmol N2O m-2, resulting in a total N2O emission

  11. Assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contamination in surface soil of coal stockpile sites in South Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mizwar, Andy; Priatmadi, Bambang Joko; Abdi, Chairul; Trihadiningrum, Yulinah

    2016-03-01

    Concentrations, spatial distribution, and sources of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), listed as priority pollutants by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), were investigated in surface soils of three different coal stockpile, agricultural, and residential sites in South Kalimantan Province, Indonesia. Total PAHs concentration ranged from 4.69 to 22.67 mg kg(-1)-dw. PAHs concentrations in soil of coal stockpile sites were higher than those in agricultural and residential soil. A complex of petrogenic origin and pyrolytic sources was found within the study area, as suggested by the isomeric ratios of PAHs. The results of principal component analysis and multiple linear regressions (PCA/MLR) showed that three sources contributed to the PAHs in the study area, including biomass and coal combustion (48.46%), raw coal (35.49%), and vehicular emission (16.05%). The high value of total benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration (B[a]Peq) suggests that local residents are exposed to a high carcinogenic potential.

  12. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation on heavy metal accumulation of maize grown in a naturally contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa Yuan; Lin, Xian Gui; Yin, Rui

    2007-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was carried out to study heavy metal (HM) phytoaccumulation from soil contaminated with Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd by maize (Zea mays L.) inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (AMF). Two AM fungal inocula--MI containing only one AM fungal strain (Glomus caledonium 90036) and MII consisting of Gigaspora margarita ZJ37, Gigaspora decipens ZJ38, Scutellospora gilmori ZJ39, Acaulospora spp., and Glomus spp.--were applied to the soil under unsterilized conditions. The control received no mycorrhizal inoculation. The maize plants were harvested after 10 wk of growth. MI-treated plants had higher mycorrhizal colonization than MII-treated plants. Both MI and MII increased P concentrations in roots, but not in shoots. Neither MI nor MII had significant effects on shoot or root dry weight (DW). Compared with the control, shoot Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd concentrations were decreased by MI but increased by MII. Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd uptake into shoots and roots all increased in MII-treated plants, while in MI-treated plants Cu, Zn, and Pb uptake into shoots and Cd uptake into roots decreased but Cu, Zn, and Pb uptake into roots and Cd into shoots increased. MII was more effective than MI in promoting HM extraction efficiencies. The results indicate that MII can benefit HMphytoextraction and, therefore, show potential in the phytoremediation of HM-contaminated soils.

  13. Degradation and resilience of soils

    PubMed Central

    Lal, R.

    1997-01-01

    Debate on global soil degradation, its extent and agronomic impact, can only be resolved through understanding of the processes and factors leading to establishment of the cause-effect relationships for major soils, ecoregions, and land uses. Systematic evaluation through long-term experimentation is needed for establishing quantitative criteria of (i) soil quality in relation to specific functions; (ii) soil degradation in relation to critical limits of key soil properties and processes; and (iii) soil resilience in relation to the ease of restoration through judicious management and discriminate use of essential input. Quantitative assessment of soil degradation can be obtained by evaluating its impact on productivity for different land uses and management systems. Interdisciplinary research is needed to quantify soil degradation effects on decrease in productivity, reduction in biomass, and decline in environment quality throught pollution and eutrophication of natural waters and emission of radiatively-active gases from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Data from long-term field experiments in principal ecoregions are specifically needed to (i) establish relationships between soil quality versus soil degradation and soil quality versus soil resilience; (ii) identify indicators of soil quality and soil resilience; and (iii) establish critical limits of important properties for soil degradation and soil resilience. There is a need to develop and standardize techniques for measuring soil resilience.

  14. Soil disturbance increases soil microbial enzymatic activity in arid ecoregion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional diversity of the soil microbial community is commonly used in the assessment of soil health as it relates to the activity of soil microflora involved in carbon cycling. Soil microbes in different microenvironments will have varying responses to different substrates, thus catabolic fingerp...

  15. Soil fauna, soil properties and geo-ecosystem functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammeraat, L. H.

    2012-04-01

    The impact of soil fauna on soil processes is of utmost importance, as the activity of soil fauna directly affects soil quality. This is expressed by the direct effects of soil fauna on soil physical and soil chemical properties that not only have great importance to food production and ecosystems services, but also on weathering and hydrological and geomorphological processes. Soil animals can be perceived as ecosystem engineers that directly affect the flow of water, sediments and nutrients through terrestrial ecosystems. The biodiversity of animals living in the soil is huge and shows a huge range in size, functions and effects. Most work has been focused on only a few species such as earthworms and termites, but in general the knowledge on the effect of soil biota on soil ecosystem functioning is limited as it is for their impact on processes in the soil and on the soil surface. In this presentation we would like to review some of the impacts of soil fauna on soil properties that have implications for geo-ecosystem functioning and soil formation processes.

  16. Anaerobic soil disinfestation and soil borne pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD; also referred to as Biological Soil Disinfestation (BSD)) is a pre-plant soil treatment method developed to control plant disease and manage yield decline in many crop production systems. The practice involves induction of anaerobic soil conditions by increasing m...

  17. Introductory Soil Science Exercises Using USDA Web Soil Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Christopher J.; Mikhailova, Elena; McWhorter, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    The USDA, Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Web Soil Survey is a valuable teaching tool for soil science education. By incorporating the Web Soil Survey into an undergraduate-level course, students are able to use the most detailed digital soil survey information without the steep learning curve associated with geographic information…

  18. Describing Soils: Calibration Tool for Teaching Soil Rupture Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seybold, C. A.; Harms, D. S.; Grossman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rupture resistance is a measure of the strength of a soil to withstand an applied stress or resist deformation. In soil survey, during routine soil descriptions, rupture resistance is described for each horizon or layer in the soil profile. The lower portion of the rupture resistance classes are assigned based on rupture between thumb and…

  19. [Trophic chains in soil].

    PubMed

    Goncharov, A A; Tiunov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Trophic links of soil animals are extensively diverse but also flexible. Moreover, feeding activity of large soil saprotrophs often cascades into a range of ecosystem-level consequences via the ecological engineering. Better knowledge on the main sources of energy utilized by soil animals is needed for understanding functional structure of soil animal communities and their participation in the global carbon cycling. Using published and original data, we consider the relative importance of dead organic matter and saprotrophic microorganisms as a basal energy source in the detritus-based food chains, the feeding of endogeic macrofauna on the stabilized soil organic matter, and the role of recent photosynthate in the energy budget of soil communities. Soil food webs are spatially and functionally compartmentalized, though the separation of food chains into bacteria- and fungi-based channels seems to be an over-simplification. The regulation of the litter decomposition rates via top-down trophic interactions across more than one trophic level is only partly supported by experimental data, but mobile litter-dwelling predators play a crucial role in integrating local food webs within and across neighboring ecosystems.

  20. Infiltration in Swelling Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldez, Juan V.; Sposito, Garrison

    1985-01-01

    Infiltration phenomena in swelling soils were investigated theoretically. The approach taken consisted of applying both the approximate analytical techniques developed by J.-Y. Parlange and co-workers and conventional finite difference numerical methods to study the generalized Richards equation for one-dimensional infiltration in a swelling soil. Equations were derived for the ponding time and the post-ponding infiltration rate that are generalizations of the Parlange-Smith model expressions for rigid soils. Ponding times for swelling soils were shown to be shorter than those for nonswelling analogs, and post-ponding infiltration rates in swelling soils were shown to approach zero instead of becoming equal to the hydraulic conductivity, as in rigid soils. These results were confirmed, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with the numerical model, which also provided instantaneous moisture profiles and surface swelling predictions in agreement with field observations. A three-parameter infiltration equation proposed recently by J.-Y. Parlange et al. (1982) was generalized to describe swelling soils and shown to be in good agreement with published laboratory and field data. It appears that the generalized analytical model equations developed can be employed conveniently in hydrologic applications which do not require high accuracy in predictions.

  1. Soil washing treatability study

    SciTech Connect

    Krstich, M.

    1995-12-01

    Soil washing was identified as a viable treatment process option for remediating soil at the FEMP Environmental Management Project (FEMP). Little information relative to the specific application and potential effectiveness of the soil washing process exists that applies to the types of soil at the FEMP. To properly evaluate this process option in conjunction with the ongoing FEMP Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS), a treatability testing program was necessary to provide a foundation for a detailed technical evaluation of the viability of the process. In August 1991, efforts were initiated to develop a work plan and experimental design for investigating the effectiveness of soil washing on FEMP soil. In August 1992, the final Treatability Study Work Plan for Operable Unit 5: Soil Washing (DOE 1992) was issued. This document shall be referenced throughout the remainder of this report as the Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP). The purpose of this treatability study was to generate data to support initial screening and the detailed analysis of alternatives for the Operable Unit 5 FS.

  2. SOIL Geo-Wiki: A tool for improving soil information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalský, Rastislav; Balkovic, Juraj; Fritz, Steffen; See, Linda; van der Velde, Marijn; Obersteiner, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Crowdsourcing is increasingly being used as a way of collecting data for scientific research, e.g. species identification, classification of galaxies and unravelling of protein structures. The WorldSoilProfiles.org database at ISRIC is a global collection of soil profiles, which have been 'crowdsourced' from experts. This system, however, requires contributors to have a priori knowledge about soils. Yet many soil parameters can be observed in the field without specific knowledge or equipment such as stone content, soil depth or color. By crowdsourcing this information over thousands of locations, the uncertainty in current soil datasets could be radically reduced, particularly in areas currently without information or where multiple interpretations are possible from different existing soil maps. Improved information on soils could benefit many research fields and applications. Better soil data could enhance assessments of soil ecosystem services (e.g. soil carbon storage) and facilitate improved process-based ecosystem modeling from local to global scales. Geo-Wiki is a crowdsourcing tool that was developed at IIASA for land cover validation using satellite imagery. Several branches are now available focused on specific aspects of land cover validation, e.g. validating cropland extent or urbanized areas. Geo-Wiki Pictures is a smart phone application for collecting land cover related information on the ground. The extension of Geo-Wiki to a mobile environment provides a tool for experts in land cover validation but is also a way of reaching the general public in the validation of land cover. Here we propose a Soil Geo-Wiki tool that builds on the existing functionality of the Geo-Wiki application, which will be largely designed for the collection and sharing of soil information. Two distinct applications are envisaged: an expert-oriented application mainly for scientific purposes, which will use soil science related language (e.g. WRB or any other global reference

  3. Soil chromatographic movement of technetium-99 through selected Minnesota soils

    SciTech Connect

    Balogh, J.C.; Grigal, D.F.

    1980-11-01

    We monitored the movement of technetium-99 through 41 samples of Minnesota soils, using soil column layer chromatography (CLC), a modification of soil thin layer chromatography. Under the aerobic conditions of soil CLC, /sup 99/Tc occurs as the pertechnetate anion. Pertechnetate movement in the soils was characterized by the traditional R/sub f/ chromatographic parameter. Reduced R/sub f/ values were statistically related to elevated levels of soil organic matter. Complexation of /sup 99/Tc, related to soil organic matter, was weak. Elution patterns of /sup 99/Tc in the soil CLC columns were asymmetric, with pertechnetate retardation associated with both hydrodynamic dispersion and weak retention. Pertechnetate was less mobile than was Cl/sup -/ in selected soils by soil CLC.

  4. Development of soil taxation and soil classification as furthered by the Austrian Soil Science Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarten, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Soil taxation and soil classification are important drivers of soil science in Austria. However, the tasks are quite different: whereas soil taxation aims at the evaluation of the productivity potential of the soil, soil classification focusses on the natural development and - especially nowadays - on functionality of the soil. Since the foundation of the Austrian Soil Science Society (ASSS), representatives both directions of the description of the soil have been involved in the common actions of the society. In the first years it was a main target to improve and standardize field descriptions of the soil. Although both systems differ in the general layout, the experts should comply with identical approaches. According to this work, a lot of effort has been put into the standardization of the soil classification system, thus ensuring a common basis. The development, state of the art and further development of both classification and taxation systems initiated and carried out by the ASSS will be shown.

  5. Soil Moisture Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L. (Editor); Moore, D. G. (Editor); Schmugge, T. J. (Editor); Friedman, D. B. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Workshop was held at the United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, Maryland on January 17-19, 1978. The objectives of the Workshop were to evaluate the state of the art of remote sensing of soil moisture; examine the needs of potential users; and make recommendations concerning the future of soil moisture research and development. To accomplish these objectives, small working groups were organized in advance of the Workshop to prepare position papers. These papers served as the basis for this report.

  6. Managing compost stability and amendment to soil to enhance soil heating during soil solarization.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Christopher W; Guo, Hongyun; Claypool, Joshua T; Marshall, Megan N; Perano, Kristen M; Stapleton, James J; Vandergheynst, Jean S

    2013-05-01

    Soil solarization is a method of soil heating used to eradicate plant pathogens and weeds that involves passive solar heating of moist soil mulched (covered) with clear plastic tarp. Various types of organic matter may be incorporated into soil prior to solarization to increase biocidal activity of the treatment process. Microbial activity associated with the decomposition of soil organic matter may increase temperatures during solarization, potentially enhancing solarization efficacy. However, the level of organic matter decomposition (stability) necessary for increasing soil temperature is not well characterized, nor is it known if various amendments render the soil phytotoxic to crops following solarization. Laboratory studies and a field trial were performed to determine heat generation in soil amended with compost during solarization. Respiration was measured in amended soil samples prior to and following solarization as a function of soil depth. Additionally, phytotoxicity was estimated through measurement of germination and early growth of lettuce seedlings in greenhouse assays. Amendment of soil with 10%(g/g) compost containing 16.9 mg CO2/gdry weight organic carbon resulted in soil temperatures that were 2-4 °C higher than soil alone. Approximately 85% of total organic carbon within the amended soil was exhausted during 22 days of solarization. There was no significant difference in residual respiration with soil depth down to 17.4 cm. Although freshly amended soil proved highly inhibitory to lettuce seed germination and seedling growth, phytotoxicity was not detected in solarized amended soil after 22 days of field solarization.

  7. Effect of different soil washing solutions on bioavailability of residual arsenic in soils and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Im, Jinwoo; Yang, Kyung; Jho, Eun Hea; Nam, Kyoungphile

    2015-11-01

    The effect of soil washing used for arsenic (As)-contaminated soil remediation on soil properties and bioavailability of residual As in soil is receiving increasing attention due to increasing interest in conserving soil qualities after remediation. This study investigates the effect of different washing solutions on bioavailability of residual As in soils and soil properties after soil washing. Regardless of washing solutions, the sequential extraction revealed that the residual As concentrations and the amount of readily labile As in soils were reduced after soil washing. However, the bioassay tests showed that the washed soils exhibited ecotoxicological effects - lower seed germination, shoot growth, and enzyme activities - and this could largely be attributed to the acidic pH and/or excessive nutrient contents of the washed soils depending on washing solutions. Overall, this study showed that treated soils having lower levels of contaminants could still exhibit toxic effects due to changes in soil properties, which highly depended on washing solutions. This study also emphasizes that data on the As concentrations, the soil properties, and the ecotoxicological effects are necessary to properly manage the washed soils for reuses. The results of this study can, thus, be utilized to select proper post-treatment techniques for the washed soils.

  8. Main Parameters of Soil Quality and it's Management Under Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László Phd, M., ,, Dr.

    2009-04-01

    Reviewing Paper Introduction: Malcolm summarised the topic of soil quality and it's management in a well synthetized form in 2000. So, the soils are fundamental to the well-being and productivity of agricultural and natural ecosystems. Soil quality is a concept being developed to characterize the usefulness and health of soils. Soil quality includes soil fertility, potential productivity, contaminant levels and their effects, resource sustainability and environmental quality. A general definition of soil quality is the degree of fitness of a soil for a specific use. The existence of multiple definitions suggests that the soil quality concept continues to evolve (Kádár, 1992; Várallyay, 1992, 1994, 2005; Németh, 1996; Malcolm, 2000; Márton, 2005; Márton et al. 2007). Recent attention has focused on the sustainability of human uses of soil, based on concerns that soil quality may be declining (Boehn and Anderson, 1997). We use sustainable to mean that a use or management of soil will sustain human well-being over time. Lal (1995) described the land resources of the world (of which soil is one component) as "finite, fragile, and nonrenewable," and reported that only about 22% (3.26 billion ha) of the total land area on the globe is suitable for cultivation and at present, only about 3% (450 million ha) has a high agricultural production capacity. Because soil is in large but finite supply, and some soil components cannot be renewed within a human time frame, the condition of soils in agriculture and the environment is an issue of global concern (Howard, 1993; FAO, 1997). Concerns include soil losses from erosion, maintaining agricultural productivity and system sustainability, protecting natural areas, and adverse effects of soil contamination on human health (Haberern, 1992; Howard, 1993; Sims et al., 1997). Parr et al. (1992) state, "...soil degradation is the single most destructive force diminishing the world's soil resource base." Soil quality guidelines

  9. Two Centuries of Soil Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    Narrates U.S. soil conservation history since the late eighteenth century. Discusses early practices such as contour plowing. Profiles individuals who promoted soil conservation and were largely responsible for the creation of the Soil Conservation Service. Explains the causes of erosion and how soil conservation districts help farmers prevent…

  10. Developing Intepretive Soil Education Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansmeyer, T. L.; Cooper, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes several soil educational displays developed for park and nature center trails. Displays include full-scale soil monoliths displayed along the trails with explanations on why and how the soils are different, and micro-monoliths exhibiting the different soil types. (MDH)

  11. Soil and soil environmental quality monitoring in China: a review.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yanguo; Wu, Jin; Lu, Sijin; Wang, Yeyao; Jiao, Xudong; Song, Liuting

    2014-08-01

    Over the past few decades, numerous concerns have been raised in China over the issue of environmental sustainability. Various soil survey and monitoring programs have been carried out in China to study soil quality, and to provide a scientific basis for environment policy making. This paper provides an overview of past and current soil quality surveys and monitoring activities in China. This paper includes a summary of concerns over background concentrations of elements in soil, and soil environmental standards and guidelines in China. Levels of pollution in urban soil, agricultural soil, and soil in mining and smelting areas were compared using the concentrations and pollution indexes. In addition to soil surveys, soil monitoring is essential to study the data and to examine the effects of contaminants in soils. However, the current soil quality monitoring system was insufficient to accurately determine the soil quality status of soils across China. For accurate soil monitoring in China, it will be necessary to set up routine monitoring systems at various scales (national, provincial, and local scales), taking into consideration monitoring indicators and quality assurance. This is currently an important priority for the environmental protection administration of China.

  12. THE DIRT ON SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This keynote presentation will provide basic information regarding the physical, chemical, and biological importance of soils to 50 second grade teachers within the Cincinnati Public School System as part of a Hamilton County Department of Environmenatl Services Sois Workshop.

  13. SAMPLING VIRUSES FROM SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes in detail methods for detecting viruses of bacteria and humans in soil. Methods also are presented for the assay of these viruses. Reference sources are provided for information on viruses of plants.

  14. Soil Fumigant Chemicals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The main soil fumigant pesticide chemicals are chloropicrin, dazomet, 1,3-dichloropropene (telone), dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), metam sodium, metam potassium, and methyl bromide. Find label requirements, reregistration eligibility decisions (REDs), and more

  15. Soil Gas Sampling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Field Branches Quality System and Technical Procedures: This document describes general and specific procedures, methods and considerations to be used and observed when collecting soil gas samples for field screening or laboratory analysis.

  16. Soil Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, G.

    1979-01-01

    A brief review is presented of some of the organic compounds and reactions that occur in soil. Included are nitrogenous compounds, compounds of phosphorus and sulfur, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, and aliphatic acids. (BB)

  17. Soil colloidal behavior

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent understanding that organic and inorganic contaminants are often transported via colloidal particles has increased interest in colloid science. The primary importance of colloids in soil science stems from their surface reactivity and charge characteristics. Characterizations of size, shape,...

  18. Thermal Properties of Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    24 23. Effect of texture and density on thermal conductivity and on thermal diffusivity...take place uniformly rough idea of their domains of influence as related to throughout the porous medium (e.g. see De Vries 1958). soil texture and... texture " is formed by a reconsti- soitt coitact effects by deriving parameters atyd coef- tuion of the entire soil systedtb with a ecange in its ficients

  19. Active synthetic soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Henninger, Donald L. (Inventor); Allen, Earl R. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic soil/fertilizer for horticultural application having all the agronutrients essential for plant growth is disclosed. The soil comprises a synthetic apatite fertilizer having sulfur, magnesium and micronutrients dispersed in a calcium phosphate matrix, a zeolite cation exchange medium saturated with a charge of potassium and nitrogen cations, and an optional pH buffer. Moisture dissolves the apatite and mobilizes the nutrient elements from the apatite matrix and the zeolite charge sites.

  20. Active synthetic soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Henninger, Donald L. (Inventor); Allen, Earl R. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic soil/fertilizer for horticultural application having all the agronutrients essential for plant growth is disclosed. The soil comprises a synthetic apatite fertilizer having sulfur, magnesium, and micronutrients dispersed in a calcium phosphate matrix, a zeolite cation exchange medium saturated with a charge of potassium and nitrogen cations, and an optional pH buffer. Moisture dissolves the apatite and mobilizes the nutrient elements from the apatite matrix and the zeolite charge sites.

  1. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  2. Rock and soil mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Derski, W.; Izbicki, R.; Kisiel, I.; Mroz, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Although theoretical in character, this book provides a useful source of information for those dealing with practical problems relating to rock and soil mechanics - a discipline which, in the view of the authors, attempts to apply the theory of continuum to the mechanical investigation of rock and soil media. The book is in two separate parts. The first part, embodying the first three chapters, is devoted to a description of the media of interest. Chapter 1 introduces the main argument and discusses the essence of the discipline and its links with other branches of science which are concerned, on the one hand, with technical mechanics and, on the other, with the properties, origins, and formation of rock and soil strata under natural field conditions. Chapter 2 describes mechanical models of bodies useful for the purpose of the discourse and defines the concept of the limit shear resistance of soils and rocks. Chapter 3 gives the actual properties of soils and rocks determined from experiments in laboratories and in situ. Several tests used in geotechnical engineering are described and interconnections between the physical state of rocks and soils and their rheological parameters are considered.

  3. Evaluating soil contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This compilation was designed to help U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contaminant specialists evaluate the degree of contamination of a soil, based on chemical analyses. Included are regulatory criteria, opinions, brief descriptions of scientific articles, and miscellaneous information that might be useful in making risk assessments. The intent was to make hard-to-obtain material readily available to contaminant specialists, but not to critique the material or develop new criteria. The compilation is to be used with its index, which includes about 200 contaminants. There are several entries for a few of the most thoroughly studied contaminants, but for most of them the information available is meager. Entries include soil contaminant criteria from other countries, contaminant guidelines for applying sewage sludge to soil, guidelines for evaluating sediments, background soil concentrations for various elements, citations to scientific articles that may help estimate the potential movement of soil contaminants into wildlife food chains, and a few odds and ends. Articles on earthworms were emphasized because they are a natural bridge between soil and many species of wildlife.

  4. Soil bioventing demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, J.S.; Kampbell, D.H.; Wilson, J.T.; DiGiulio, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    A pilot scale demonstration project of a soil bioventing system, which utilizes the biodegradation in soil and physical removal of VOC by induced air flow, is in operation at the U.S. Coast Guard Aviation Field in Traverse City, Michigan. The system is being tested to determine its suitability for remediation of the vadose zone in conjunction with aquifer remediation at a site contaminated by an aviation gas spill. Several microcosm studies with soil obtained from the vertical profile of the contaminated site showed rapid microbial decompositions of hydrocarbon fumes with NPK nutrient and moisture addition. Basic removal kinetics data were obtained from these experiments. Field pneumatic pump tests for soil-air characterization have been conducted. The soil-air permeability and pressure distributions under the air injection/withdrawal systems were obtained. On the basis of information from the laboratory and field tests, a conceptual design at a field scale was made. The system will be implemented on the selected study site and the operation will start in fall, 1990. Additional soil core samplings and continuous monitoring of operation are planned.

  5. Soil degradation effect on biological activity in Mediterranean calcareous soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Alcover-Sáez, S.; Mormeneo, S.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Soil degradation processes include erosion, organic matter decline, compaction, salinization, landslides, contamination, sealing and biodiversity decline. In the Mediterranean region the climatological and lithological conditions, together with relief on the landscape and anthropological activity are responsible for increasing desertification process. It is therefore considered to be extreme importance to be able to measure soil degradation quantitatively. We studied soil characteristics, microbiological and biochemical parameters in different calcareous soil sequences from Valencia Community (Easter Spain), in an attempt to assess the suitability of the parameters measured to reflect the state of soil degradation and the possibility of using the parameters to assess microbiological decline and soil quality. For this purpose, forest, scrubland and agricultural soil in three soil sequences were sampled in different areas. Several sensors of the soil biochemistry and microbiology related with total organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, microorganism number and enzyme activities were determined. The results show that, except microorganism number, these parameters are good indicators of a soil biological activity and soil quality. The best enzymatic activities to use like indicators were phosphatases, esterases, amino-peptidases. Thus, the enzymes test can be used as indicators of soil degradation when this degradation is related with organic matter losses. There was a statistically significant difference in cumulative O2 uptake and extracellular enzymes among the soils with different degree of degradation. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for funding and support (MICINN, project CGL2006-09776).

  6. A modified soil water based Richards equation for layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinka, F.; Ahrens, B.

    2010-09-01

    Most Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) models like TERRA-ML (implemented e.g. in the CCLM model (www.clm-community.eu)) use the soil moisture based Richards equation to simulate vertical water fluxes in soils, assuming a homogeneous soil type. Recently, high-resolution soil type datasets (e.g. BüK 1000, only for Germany (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, BGR, www.bgr.bund.de) or Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD, version 1.1, FAO/IIASA/ISRIC/ISSCAS/JRC, March 2009)) have been developed. Deficiencies in the numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation may occur if inhomogeneous soil type data is implemented, because there are possibly discontinuities in soil moisture due to various soil type characteristics. One way to fix this problem is to use the potential based Richards equation, but this may lead to problems in conservation of mass. This presentation will suggest a possible numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation for inhomogeneous soils. The basic idea is to subtract the equilibrium state of it from soil moisture fluxes. This should reduce discontinuities because each soil layer aspires the equilibrium state and therefore differences might be of the same order. First sensitivity studies have been done for the Main river basin, Germany.

  7. Soil functional types: surveying the biophysical dimensions of soil security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Barré, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Soil is a natural capital that can deliver key ecosystem services (ES) to humans through the realization of a series of soil processes controlling ecosystem functioning. Soil is also a diverse and endangered natural resource. A huge pedodiversity has been described at all scales, which is strongly altered by global change. The multidimensional concept soil security, encompassing biophysical, economic, social, policy and legal frameworks of soils has recently been proposed, recognizing the role of soils in global environmental sustainability challenges. The biophysical dimensions of soil security focus on the functionality of a given soil that can be viewed as the combination of its capability and its condition [1]. Indeed, all soils are not equal in term of functionality. They show different processes, provide different ES to humans and respond specifically to global change. Knowledge of soil functionality in space and time is thus a crucial step towards the achievement soil security. All soil classification systems incorporate some functional information, but soil taxonomy alone cannot fully describe the functioning, limitations, resistance and resilience of soils. Droogers and Bouma [2] introduced functional variants (phenoforms) for each soil type (genoform) so as to fit more closely to soil functionality. However, different genoforms can have the same functionality. As stated by McBratney and colleagues [1], there is a great need of an agreed methodology for defining the reference state of soil functionality. Here, we propose soil functional types (SFT) as a relevant classification system for the biophysical dimensions of soil security. Following the definition of plant functional types widely used in ecology, we define a soil functional type as "a set of soil taxons or phenoforms sharing similar processes (e.g. soil respiration), similar effects on ecosystem functioning (e.g. primary productivity) and similar responses to global change (land-use, management or

  8. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  9. Characterization of H2S removal and microbial community in landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Hong-Tao; Wei, Xiao-Meng; Su, Yao; He, Ruo

    2015-12-01

    H2S is a source of odors at landfills and poses a threat to the surrounding environment and public health. In this work, compared with a usual landfill cover soil (LCS), H2S removal and biotransformation were characterized in waste biocover soil (WBS), an alternative landfill cover material. With the input of landfill gas (LFG), the gas concentrations of CH4, CO2, O2, and H2S, microbial community and activity in landfill covers changed with time. Compared with LCS, lower CH4 and H2S concentrations were detected in the WBS. The potential sulfur-oxidizing rate and sulfate-reducing rate as well as the contents of acid-volatile sulfide, SO4(2-), and total sulfur in the WBS and LCS were all increased with the input of LFG. After exposure to LFG for 35 days, the sulfur-oxidizing rate of the bottom layer of the WBS reached 82.5 μmol g dry weight (d.w.)(-1) day(-1), which was 4.3-5.4 times of that of LCS. H2S-S was mainly deposited in the soil covers, while it escaped from landfills to the atmosphere. The adsorption, absorption, and biotransformation of H2S could lead to the decrease in the pH values of landfill covers; especially, in the LCS with low pH buffer capacity, the pH value of the bottom layer dropped to below 4. Pyrosequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene showed that the known sulfur-metabolizing bacteria Ochrobactrum, Paracoccus, Comamonas, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter dominated in the WBS and LCS. Among them, Comamonas and Acinetobacter might play an important role in the metabolism of H2S in the WBS. These findings are helpful to understand sulfur bioconversion process in landfill covers and to develop techniques for controlling odor pollution at landfills.

  10. Soils and the soil cover of the Valley of Geysers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostyuk, D. N.; Gennadiev, A. N.

    2014-06-01

    The results of field studies of the soil cover within the tourist part of the Valley of Geysers in Kamchatka performed in 2010 and 2011 are discussed. The morphology of soils, their genesis, and their dependence on the degree of hydrothermal impact are characterized; the soil cover patterns developing in the valley are analyzed. On the basis of the materials provided by the Kronotskii Biospheric Reserve and original field data, the soil map of the valley has been developed. The maps of vegetation conditions, soil temperature at the depth of 15 cm, and slopes of the surface have been used for this purpose together with satellite imagery and field descriptions of reference soil profiles. The legend to the soil map includes nine soil units and seven units of parent materials and their textures. Soil names are given according to the classification developed by I.L. Goldfarb (2005) for the soils of hydrothermal fields. The designation of soil horizons follows the new Classification and Diagnostic System of Russian Soils (2004). It is suggested that a new horizon—a thermometamorphic horizon TRM—can be introduced into this system by analogy with other metamorphic (transformed in situ) horizons distinguished in this system. This horizon is typical of the soils partly or completely transformed by hydrothermal impacts.

  11. Effect of soil texture on the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The intensity brightness temperature of the microwave emission from the soil is determined primarily by its dielectric properties. The large difference between the dielectric constant of water and that of dry soil produces a strong dependence of the soil's dielectric constant on its moisture content. This dependence is effected by the texture of the soil because the water molecules close to the particle surface are tightly bound and do not contribute significantly to the dielectric properties. Since this surface area is a function of the particle size distribution (soil texture), being larger for clay soils with small particles, and smaller for sandy soils with larger particles; the dielectric properties will depend on soil texture. Laboratory measurements of the dielectric constant for soils are summarized. The dependence of the microwave emission on texture is demonstrated by measurements of brightness temperature from an aircraft platform for a wide range of soil textures. It is concluded that the effect of soil texture differences on the observed values can be normalized by expressing the soil moisture values as a percent field capacity for the soil.

  12. Soil property effects on wind erosion of organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobeck, Ted M.; Baddock, Matthew; Scott Van Pelt, R.; Tatarko, John; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica

    2013-09-01

    Histosols (also known as organic soils, mucks, or peats) are soils that are dominated by organic matter (OM > 20%) in half or more of the upper 80 cm. Forty two states have a total of 21 million ha of Histosols in the United States. These soils, when intensively cropped, are subject to wind erosion resulting in loss of crop productivity and degradation of soil, air, and water quality. Estimating wind erosion on Histosols has been determined by USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) as a critical need for the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) model. WEPS has been developed to simulate wind erosion on agricultural land in the US, including soils with organic soil material surfaces. However, additional field measurements are needed to understand how soil properties vary among organic soils and to calibrate and validate estimates of wind erosion of organic soils using WEPS. Soil properties and sediment flux were measured in six soils with high organic contents located in Michigan and Florida, USA. Soil properties observed included organic matter content, particle density, dry mechanical stability, dry clod stability, wind erodible material, and geometric mean diameter of the surface aggregate distribution. A field portable wind tunnel was used to generate suspended sediment and dust from agricultural surfaces for soils ranging from 17% to 67% organic matter. The soils were tilled and rolled to provide a consolidated, friable surface. Dust emissions and saltation were measured using an isokinetic vertical slot sampler aspirated by a regulated suction source. Suspended dust was sampled using a Grimm optical particle size analyzer. Particle density of the saltation-sized material (>106 μm) was inversely related to OM content and varied from 2.41 g cm-3 for the soil with the lowest OM content to 1.61 g cm-3 for the soil with highest OM content. Wind erodible material and the geometric mean diameter of the surface soil were inversely related to dry clod

  13. Ferrihydrite in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Ferrihydrite—an ephemeral mineral—is the most active Fe-hydroxide in soils. According to modern data, the ferrihydrite structure contains tetrahedral lattice in addition to the main octahedral lattice, with 10-20% of Fe being concentrated in the former. The presence of Fe tetrahedrons influences the surface properties of this mineral. The chemical composition of ferrihydrite samples depends largely on the size of lattice domains ranging from 2 to 6 nm. Chemically pure ferrihydrite rarely occurs in the soil; it usually contains oxyanion (SiO14 4-, PO4 3-) and cation (Al3+) admixtures. Aluminum replace Fe3+ in the structure with a decrease in the mineral particle size. Oxyanions slow down polymerization of Fe3+ aquahydroxomonomers due to the films at the surface of mineral nanoparticles. Si- and Al-ferrihydrites are more resistant to the reductive dissolution than the chemically pure ferrihydrite. In addition, natural ferrihydrite contains organic substance that decreases the grain size of the mineral. External organic ligands favor ferrihydrite dissolution. In the European part of Russia, ferrihydrite is more widespread in the forest soils than in the steppe soils. Poorly crystallized nanoparticles of ferrihydrite adsorb different cations (Zn, Cu) and anions (phosphate, uranyl, arsenate) to immobilize them in soils; therefore, ferrihydrite nanoparticles play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle of iron and other elements.

  14. Soil microstructure and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, P.; Fryer, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the process of comparing Martian soils with terrestial soils, high resolution electron microscopy and associated techniques should be used to examine the finer soil particles, and various techniques of electron and optical microscopy should be used to examine the undisturbed structure of Martian soils. To examine the structure of fine grained portions of the soil, transmission electron microscopy may be required. A striking feature of many Martian soils is their red color. Although the present-day Martian climate appears to be cold, this color is reminiscent of terrestial tropical red clays. Their chemical contents are broadly similar.

  15. Occurrence of emerging contaminants in agricultural soils, sewage sludge and waters in Valencia (E Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boluda, Rafael; Marimon, Lupe; Atzeni, Stefania; Mormeneo, Salvador; Iranzo, María; Zueco, Jesús; Gamón, Miguel; Sancenón, José; Romera, David; Gil, Carlos; Amparo Soriano, Maria; Granell, Clara; Roca, Núria; Bech, Jaume

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, studies into the presence and distribution of emerging contaminants (ECs), like pharmaceutical products, some pesticides and mycotoxins in the natural environment, are receiving considerable attention. Thus, the presence of these compounds in waters, soils and wastes in different locations including agricultural systems has been stressed; very few studies into this matter are available in Spain. The main source of ECs in the environment is wastewater spillage from wastewater treatment plants (WTP), where these compounds arrive from the sewer system network. The objective of this study was to determine the levels of 35 ECs constituted by nine pharmaceutical products, 23 fungicides and three mycotoxins in soils, sewages sludge and waters adjacent to WTP from an agriculture area of Valencia (E Spain) influenced by intense urban and industrial activity. Seven samples from sludge, 13 soil samples and eight samples of waters from the area of influence of WTP were collected. The ECs extraction were performed using 5 g of fresh sample and a mixture of acetonitrile with 1% formic acid and water at the 3:1 ratio by shaking for 45 min and then centrifuging at 4,000 rpm for 5 min. The extract was filtered and determination was done by HPLC system connected to a 3200-Qtrap de triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with an electrospray ion source. The results showed that soil-ECs concentrations were 10 times lower that in sewage sludge. The smaller number of detections and detected compounds should also be stressed. As in previous cases, fungicides azole (tebuconazole and tricyclazole), along with boscalid, were the most detected compounds with concentrations of between 100 and 400 µg kg-1 dw. In second place, propiconazole and azoxystrobin stood out, followed by carbendazim, dimetomorph, pyraclostrobin and propamocarb. The following drugs and mycotoxins were detected to have a higher to lower concentration (1-40 µg kg-1): telmisartan, irbesartan, venlafaxine

  16. Soil biogeochemistry, plant physiology and phytoremediation of cadmium contaminated soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cadmium (Cd) loading in soil and the environment has been accelerated worldwide due to enhanced industrialization and intensified agricultural production, particularly in the developing countries. Soil Cd pollution, resulting from both anthropogenic and geogenic sources, has posed an increasing chal...

  17. SOIL WASHING TREATABILITY TESTS FOR PESTICIDE- CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1987 Sand Creek Operable Unit 5 record of decision (ROD) identified soil washing as the selected technology to remediate soils contaminated with high levels of organochlorine pesticides, herbicides, and metals. Initial treatability tests conducted to assess the applicability...

  18. Keys to soil taxonomy by soil survey staff (sixth edition)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This publication, Keys to Soil Taxonomy, serves two purposes. It provides the taxonomic keys necessary for the classification of soils according to Soil Taxonomy in a form that can be used easily in the field, and it also acquaints users of Soil Taxonomy with recent changes in the classification system. This volume includes all revisions of the keys that have so far been approved, replacing the original keys in Soil Taxonomy: A Basic System of Soil Classification for Making and Interpreting Soil Surveys (1975), the work on which this abridged version, first published in 1983, is based. This publication incorporates all amendments approved to date and published in National Soil Taxonomy Handbook (NSTH) Issues 1-17.

  19. Dryland soil microbial communities display spatial biogeographic patterns associated with soil depth and soil parent material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steven, Blaire; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) are common to drylands worldwide. We employed replicated, spatially nested sampling and 16S rRNA gene sequencing to describe the soil microbial communities in three soils derived from different parent material (sandstone, shale, and gypsum). For each soil type, two depths (biocrusts, 0–1 cm; below-crust soils, 2–5 cm) and two horizontal spatial scales (15 cm and 5 m) were sampled. In all three soils, Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria demonstrated significantly higher relative abundance in the biocrusts, while Chloroflexi and Archaea were significantly enriched in the below-crust soils. Biomass and diversity of the communities in biocrusts or below-crust soils did not differ with soil type. However, biocrusts on gypsum soil harbored significantly larger populations of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria and lower populations of Cyanobacteria. Numerically dominant operational taxonomic units (OTU; 97% sequence identity) in the biocrusts were conserved across the soil types, whereas two dominant OTUs in the below-crust sand and shale soils were not identified in the gypsum soil. The uniformity with which small-scale vertical community differences are maintained across larger horizontal spatial scales and soil types is a feature of dryland ecosystems that should be considered when designing management plans and determining the response of biocrusts to environmental disturbances.

  20. Soil cultivation in vineyards alters interactions between soil biota and soil physical and hydrological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Buchholz, Jacob; Querner, Pascal; Winter, Silvia; Kratschmer, Sophie; Pachinger, Bärbel; Strauss, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Stiper, Katrin; Potthoff, Martin; Guernion, Muriel; Scimia, Jennifer; Cluzeau, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Several ecosystem services provided by viticultural landscapes result from interactions between soil organisms and soil parameters. However, to what extent different soil cultivation intensities in vineyards compromise soil organisms and their interactions between soil physical and hydrological properties is not well understood. In this study we examined (i) to what extent different soil management intensities affect the activity and diversity of soil biota (earthworms, Collembola, litter decomposition), and (ii) how soil physical and hydrological properties influence these interactions, or vice versa. Investigating 16 vineyards in Austria, earthworms were assessed by hand sorting, Collembola via pitfall trapping and soil coring, litter decomposition by using the tea bag method. Additionally, soil physical (water infiltration, aggregate stability, porosity, bulk density, soil texture) and chemical (pH, soil carbon content, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorus) parameters were assessed. Results showed complex ecological interactions between soil biota and various soil characteristics altered by management intensity. These investigations are part of the transdisciplinary BiodivERsA project VineDivers and will ultimately lead into management recommendations for various stakeholders.

  1. Soil macrofauna webmasters of ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The role of plant roots and microflora in shaping many ecosystem processes is generally appreciated in the contrary rho role of soil mcrofauna in this context is assumed to be negligible and rather anecdotic. But more than half of the litter fall is consumed by soil fauna and soil fauna can also consume and or translocation substantial amount of soil. Here we demonstrate on example of post mining chronosequences how site colonization by soil fauna affect composition of whole soil biota community, plant succession and soil formation. Filed and laboratory experiments show that decomposition of fauna feces may be sped up compare to litter at the very beginning but in long term fauna feces decompose slower than litter. This is also supported by micro morphological observation which shows that fauna feces form substantial part of soil. Fauna feces also induce lover or even negative priming effect when introduced in soil in comparison with litter that triggers positive priming effect. Laboratory experiment show that fauna effect is context sensitive and is more pronounced in systems already affected by soil fauna. Soil mixing by soil fauna consequently affect environmental conditions in soils such as water holding capacity or nutrient availability, it also affect composition of decomposer food web including microbial community (fungal bacterial ratio) which feed back in alternation of plant community composition during succession This fauna activity is not constant everywhere the higher effect of fauna activity on litter layer was observed in temperate soils of deciduous forests and with litter having CN between 20-30. In conclusion soil fauna use directly only small proportion of energy in the litter but can substantially affect soil carbon turnover, soil formation, decomposer food web and plant community.

  2. Soils, time, and primate paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Soils are the skin of the earth. From both poles to the equator, wherever rocks or sediment are exposed at the surface, soils are forming through the physical and chemical action of climate and living organisms. The physical attributes (color, texture, thickness) and chemical makeup of soils vary considerably, depending on the composition of the parent material and other variables: temperature, rainfall and soil moisture, vegetation, soil fauna, and the length of time that soil-forming processes have been at work. United States soil scientists1 have classified modern soils into ten major groups and numerous subgroups, each reflecting the composition and architecture of the soils and, to some extent, the processes that led to their formation. The physical and chemical processes of soil formation have been active throughout geologic time; the organic processes have been active at least since the Ordovician.2 Consequently, nearly all sedimentary rocks that were deposited in nonmarine settings and exposed to the elements contain a record of ancient, buried soils or paleosols. A sequence of these rocks, such as most ancient fluvial (stream) deposits, provides a record of soil paleoenvironments through time. Paleosols are also repositories of the fossils of organisms (body fossils) and the traces of those organisms burrowing, food-seeking, and dwelling activities (ichnofossils). Indeed, most fossil primates are found in paleosols. Careful study of ancient soils gives new, valuable insights into the correct temporal reconstruction of the primate fossil record and the nature of primate paleoenvironments. ?? 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Working with Soil - Soil science in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannam, Jacqueline; Lacelles, Bruce; Owen, Jason; Thompson, Dick; Jones, Bob; Towers, Willie

    2015-04-01

    Working with Soil is the Professional Competency Scheme developed by the British Society of Soil Science's Professional Practice Committee, formerly the Institute of Professional Soil Scientists. Ten competency documents cover the required qualifications, skills and knowledge for different aspects of applied soil science. The Society is currently engaged in a five year plan to translate the competency documents into a comprehensive set of training courses. Foundation skills in field-based science are covered by three separate training courses - Exposing and describing a soil profile (Course 1), Soil classification (Course 2), and Soil survey techniques (Course 3). Course 1 has run successfully twice a year since 2013. The other two courses are under development and are scheduled to start in 2015. The primary objective of Foundation Skills Course 1 is to develop confidence and familiarity with field soil investigation and description, understanding the soil underfoot and putting soils into a wider landscape context. Delegates excavate a soil profile pit, and describe and sample the exposed soil to standard protocols. Delegates work in teams of 4 or 5 so that an element of shared learning is part of the process. This has been a very positive aspect of the courses we have run to date. The course has attracted professionals from agricultural and environmental consultancies but is also very popular with research students and has formed a part of an Advanced Training Programme in Soil Science for postgraduates. As there is only one soil science degree course remaining in the UK, many students on their admission do not have a background in field-based pedology and lack an understanding of soil in the context of landscape scale soil functions. Feedback to date has been very positive.

  4. Soil texture classification algorithm using RGB characteristics of soil images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil texture has an important influence on agriculture, affecting crop selection, movement of nutrients and water, soil electrical conductivity, and crop growth. Soil texture has traditionally been determined in the laboratory using pipette and hydrometer methods that require a considerable amount o...

  5. SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION COLUMN EXPERIMENTS ON GASOLINE CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a technique that is used to remove volatile organic compounds from unsaturated soils. Air is pumped through and from the contaminated zone to remove vapor phase constituents. In the work, laboratory soil column experiments were conducted using a gas...

  6. A Laboratory Exercise Relating Soil Energy Budgets to Soil Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Richard T.; Cerny-Koenig, Teresa; Kotuby-Amacher, Janice; Grossl, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Enrollment by students in degree programs other than traditional horticulture, agronomy, and soil science has increased in basic plant and soil science courses. In order to broaden the appeal of these courses to students from majors other than agriculture, we developed a hands-on laboratory exercise relating the basic concepts of a soil energy…

  7. Soil solution assessment of the soil availability of xenobiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Wolt, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    Soil solution displacement provides a means whereby xenobiotic availability in the soil environment can be evaluated rapidly and effectively. The displacement and analysis of soil solution provides (a) refined measurements of the bioavailability of soil active xenobiotics, (b) static measurements of phase partitioning of xenobiotics under conditions which closely mimic soil moisture regimes in field environments, and (c) dynamic measurements of xenobiotic availability as a function of residence time in the soil. The biological availability (efficacy/toxicity) and the geochemical availability (environmental fate) of biologically active molecules are both a function of the xenobiotic effective concentration (that is, chemical activity) and solid-liquid distribution in soils is possible based on knowledge of xenobiotic pK{sub a} and mole weight, and measurement of soil solution xenobiotic intensity, pH, and ionic strength. Dynamic measures based on soil solution displacement with time offer a means to assess time domain influences on xenobiotic availability. Soil solution displacement and analysis has been employed successfully for refined assessments of leachability, phytotoxicity, and sorptivity of xenobiotics and offers a useful adjunct to more traditional whole soil extractions for determination of xenobiotic fate and behavior in soil.

  8. Soil quality demonstrations for building economically and environmentally sustainable soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil quality, soil health, and soil sustainability are widely used terms but are difficult to define and illustrate, especially to a non-technical audience. A packet of a dozen demonstrations for the field and classroom was compiled and titled ‘Building a Sustainable Soil’. In this packet, new meth...

  9. Soils in Schools: Embedding Soil Science in STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    Soil science, though relevant to a variety of subjects including science, geography, mathematics, social sciences and history, is typically perceived as a subgenre of agriculture. With a global need for soil scientists, and declining numbers in university soil courses, there's a growing gap between science needs and providers. One way to promote…

  10. Sorption of Pahs To Soil Minerals and Subsurface Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S.; Totsche, K. U.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    In subsurface soil horizons, the sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants may primarily be controlled by the composition and the properties of the soil minerals. Therefore this study aimed to elucidate the sorption and the sorption kinetics of hydrophobic organic contaminants to different inorganic soil constituents and subsurface soil horizons. Batch sorption experiments are conducted with three poly- cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS; phenanthrene, pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene), with the model minerals quartz sand, quartz sand coated with goethite and a quartz sand - mont- morillonite mixture, and with b and c horizons of different soil types developped in the temperate climate. Batch experiments show a considerable sorption of PAHS to all soil minerals and soil horizons except for the sorption of phenanthrene to quartz sand. The sorption process of PAHS to single minerals is rapid and completed after 4 hours of contact time. The sorption to subsurface soil horizons, however, is not in equilibrium after 120h of contact time and shows a considerable sorption kinetic. Sorption capacity is higher for clay minerals and iron oxides than for quartz sand which corresponds with a higher sorption capacity of soil horizons with a high clay content. Sorption isotherms of the soil minerals are best described by a nonlinear isotherm whereas the sorption isotherms of the subsurface soil horizons are more or less linear indicating different sorption mechanisms for mineral sorbents and soil horizons.

  11. Soil Genesis and Development, Lesson 5 - Soil Geography and Classification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The system of soil classification developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is called Soil Taxonomy. Soil Taxonomy consists of a hierarchy of six levels which, from highest to lowest, are: Order, Suborder, Great Group, Subgroup, family, and series. This lesson will focus on bro...

  12. Soil Genesis and Development, Lesson 4 - Soil Profile Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The history of a soil is reflected in the arrangement of its constituent parts. Largely the arrangement is related to the movement, or lack of movement, of water through the soil in all directions. Understanding the processes that result in a specific soil type allows for more precise and effectiv...

  13. Shrublands and Soil Erosion. An State-of-the-Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Estríngana, Pablo; Dunkerley, David; Cerdà, Artemi

    2014-05-01

    . L.F. (Eds.) Terrestrial Ecosystems in a Changing World, Global Change - The IGBP Series, pp. 247-259. Romero Díaz, A. 2003 Influencia de la litología en las consecuencias del abandono de tierras de cultivo en medio Mediterráneos semiáridos. Papeles de Geografía 38, 151-165. Romero Díaz, A., Belmonte Serrato, F., Ruiz-Sinoga, J.D. 2010. The geomorphic impact of afforestations on soil erosion in Southeast Spain. Land Degradation and Development 21, 188-195.Rowell, 2005 Ruiz Sinoga, J.D., Romero Díaz, A., Ferre Bueno, E., Martínez Murillo, J.F. 2010. The role of soil surface conditions in regulating runoff and erosion processes on a metamorphic hillslope (Southern Spain). Soil surface conditions, runoff and erosion in Southern Spain. Catena 80, 131-139. Tomaselli, R. 1981. Main physiognomic types and geographic distribution of shrub systems related to Mediterranean climates. In: di Castri, F., Goodall, D.W., Specht, R. (Eds.), Ecosystems of the world: Mediterranean-type shrublands. Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, pp. 95-106. UNEP. 1991. Status of Desertification and Implementation of the United Nations Plan of Action to Combat Desertification. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Nairobi. Zhao, G., Mu, X., Wen, Z., Wang, F., and Gao, P. 2013. Soil erosion, conservation, and Eco-environment changes in the Loess Plateau of China. Land Degradation & Development, 24: 499- 510. DOI 10.1002/ldr.2246 Ziadat, F. M., and Taimeh, A. Y. 2013. Effect of rainfall intensity, slope and land use and antecedent soil moisture on soil erosion in an arid environment. Land Degradation & Development, 24: 582- 590. DOI 10.1002/ldr.2239

  14. Soil Vapor Extraction Implementation Experiences

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This issue paper identifies issues and summarizes experiences with soil vapor extraction (SVE) as a remedy for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soils. The issues presented here reflect discussions with over 30 Remedial Project Managers (RPMs)...

  15. World's soils are under threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, Luca; Pennock, Daniel Jon; McKenzie, Neil; Badraoui, Mohamed; Chude, Victor; Baptista, Isaurinda; Mamo, Tekalign; Yemefack, Martin; Singh Aulakh, Mikha; Yagi, Kazuyuki; Hong, Suk Young; Vijarnsorn, Pisoot; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Arrouays, Dominique; Black, Helaina; Krasilnikov, Pavel; Sobocká, Jaroslava; Alegre, Julio; Henriquez, Carlos Roberto; de Lourdes Mendonça-Santos, Maria; Taboada, Miguel; Espinosa-Victoria, David; AlShankiti, Abdullah; Kazem AlaviPanah, Sayed; El Mustafa Elsheikh, Elsiddig Ahmed; Hempel, Jon; Camps Arbestain, Marta; Nachtergaele, Freddy; Vargas, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    The Intergovernmental Technical Panel on Soils has completed the first State of the World's Soil Resources Report. Globally soil erosion was identified as the gravest threat, leading to deteriorating water quality in developed regions and to lowering of crop yields in many developing regions. We need to increase nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer use in infertile tropical and semi-tropical soils - the regions where the most food insecurity among us are found - while reducing global use of these products overall. Stores of soil organic carbon are critical in the global carbon balance, and national governments must set specific targets to stabilize or ideally increase soil organic carbon stores. Finally the quality of soil information available for policy formulation must be improved - the regional assessments in the State of the World's Soil Resources Report frequently base their evaluations on studies from the 1990s based on observations made in the 1980s or earlier.

  16. CORRELATING METAL SPECIATION IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding bioavailability of metals from exposure to contaminated soils is a challenging aspect of environmental research. This presentation will examine three areas of research with respect to metal speciation in soils as it relates to bioavailability: 1) Pb immobilization a...

  17. Tools for proximal soil sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proximal soil sensing (i.e. near-surface geophysical methods) are used to study soil phenomena across spatial scales. Geophysical methods exploit contrasts in physical properties (dielectric permittivity, apparent electrical conductivity or resistivity, magnetic susceptibility) to indirectly measur...

  18. Saline irrigation and Zn amendment effect on Cd phytoavailability to Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L.) grown on a long-term amended agricultural soil: a human risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Valdez-González, J C; López-Chuken, U J; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Flores-Banda, F; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2014-05-01

    Crops, particularly in the Northeast region of Mexico, have to cope with increasing soil salinization due to irrigation. Chloride (Cl(-)) concentration has been strongly related to enhance cadmium (Cd) uptake by plants due to increased solubility in the soil solution. The effect of irrigation with slightly saline water from a local well was evaluated in this work on the accumulation and translocation of Cd in Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris L.) grown in soil historically amended with stabilized sewage sludge under a regime of phosphorus and zinc fertilization. A factorial pot experiment was conducted with two phosphate fertilizer levels (PF, 0 and 80 kg ha(-1) dry soil, respectively), two Zn levels (0 and 7 kg ha(-1) dry soil), and two sources of water for irrigation deionized water (DW) and slightly saline well water (WW) from an agricultural site. Additionally, a human risk assessment for Cd ingestion from plants was assessed. Results showed that Cl(-) salinity in the WW effectively mobilized soil Cd and increased its phytoavailability. A higher level of Cd was found in roots (46.41 mg kg(-1)) compared to shoots (10.75 mg kg(-1)). Although the total content of Cd in the edible parts of the Swiss chard irrigated with WW exceeded permissible recommended consumption limit, bioavailable cadmium in the aboveground parts of the plant in relation to the total cadmium content was in the range from 8 to 32 %. Therefore, human health risks might be overestimated when the total concentration is taken into account.

  19. Traceability of polychlorinated dibenzo-dioxins/furans pollutants in soil and their ecotoxicological effects on genetics, functions and composition of bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Ammouneh, Hassan; Almousally, Ibrahem; Alorr, Abdulfattah; Shaban, Mouhnad; Alnaser, Amer Abu; Ghanem, Iyad

    2014-08-01

    Dioxins (PCDD/Fs) are persistent organic pollutants. Their accumulation in soil is a crucial step in their transmission through the ecosystem. Traceability of dioxin in soil was evaluated in four sites A, B, C and D considered as potential industrial PCDD/Fs sources in Syria. Our results showed that the highest pollution with dioxin (⩾50 ppt) was found in site C (vicinity of Homs refinery). In parallel, analysis of physicochemical proprieties and bacterial density of soil samples were carried out. Bacterial density differed significantly among samples between 68×10(4) and 64×10(6) CFU g(-1)DW. Analysis of 16S rRNA encoding sequences showed that the genus Bacillus was the most abundant (74.7%) in all samples, followed by the genera Arthrobacter and Klebsiella with 5.2% and 4.7%, respectively. The genera Microbacterium, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter and Exiguobacterium formed between 2.1% and 2.6%. Cellulomonas, Kocuria, Lysinibacillus, Staphylococcus and Streptomyces were in a minority (0.5-1%). The bacterial richness and biodiversity, estimated by DMg and H' index, were highest in the heavily polluted site. Molecular screening for angular dioxygenase (AD α-subunit) and the cytochrome P450 (CYPBM3) genes, led to identification of 41 strains as AD-positive and 31 strains as CYPBM3-positive. RT-real-time PCR analysis showed a significant abundance of AD α-subunit transcript in the heavily dioxin-polluted soils, while the expression of CYPBM3 was highest in the moderately polluted soils. Our results illustrate the microbial diversity and functionality in soil exposed to dioxin pollution. Identification of dioxin-degrading bacteria from polluted sites should allow bioremediation to be carried out.

  20. Relationships between soil physicochemical, microbiological properties, and nutrient release in buffer soils compared to field soils.

    PubMed

    Stutter, Marc I; Richards, Samia

    2012-01-01

    The retention of nutrients in narrow, vegetated riparian buffer strips (VBS) is uncertain and underlying processes are poorly understood. Evidence suggests that buffer soils are poor at retaining dissolved nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), necessitating management actions if P retention is not to be compromised. We sampled 19 buffer strips and adjacent arable field soils. Differences in nutrient retention between buffer and field soils were determined using a combined assay for release of dissolved P, N, and C forms and particulate P. We then explored these differences in relation to changes in soil bulk density (BD), moisture, organic matter by loss on ignition (OM), and altered microbial diversity using molecular fingerprinting (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism [TRFLP]). Buffer soils had significantly greater soil OM (89% of sites), moisture content (95%), and water-soluble nutrient concentrations for dissolved organic C (80%), dissolved organic N (80%), dissolved organic P (55%), and soluble reactive P (70%). Buffer soils had consistently smaller bulk densities than field soils. Soil fine particle release was generally greater for field than buffer soils. Significantly smaller soil bulk density in buffer soils than in adjacent fields indicated increased porosity and infiltration in buffers. Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities showed altered diversity between the buffer and field soils, with significant relationships with soil BD, moisture, OM, and increased solubility of buffer nutrients. Current soil conditions in VBS appear to be leading to potentially enhanced nutrient leaching via increasing solubility of C, N, and P. Manipulating soil microbial conditions (by management of soil moisture, vegetation type, and cover) may provide options for increasing the buffer storage for key nutrients such as P without increasing leaching to adjacent streams.

  1. Soil! Get the Scoop - The Soil Science Society of America's International Year of Soils Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbo, David L.; Hopmans, Jan; Olson, Carolyn; Fisk, Susan; Chapman, Susan; van Es, Harold

    2015-04-01

    Soils are a finite natural resource and are nonrenewable on a human time scale. Soils are the foundation for food, animal feed, fuel and natural fiber production, the supply of clean water, nutrient cycling and a range of ecosystem functions. The area of fertile soils covering the world's surface is limited and increasingly subject to degradation, poor management and loss to urbanization. Increased awareness of the life-supporting functions of soil is called for if this trend is to be reversed and so enable the levels of food production necessary to meet the demands of population levels predicted for 2050. The Soil Science Society of America is coordinating with the Global Soil Partnership and other organizations around the world to celebrate the 2015 International Year of Soils and raise awareness and promote the sustainability of our limited soil resources. We all have a valuable role in communicating vital information on soils, a life sustaining natural resource. Therefore, we will provide resources to learn about soils and help us tell the story of soils. We will promote IYS on social media by sharing our posts from Facebook and Twitter. Additionally SSSA developed 12 monthly themes that reflect the diverse value of soils to our natural environment and society. Each month has information on the theme, a lesson plan, and other outreach activities. All information is available on a dedicated website www.soil.org/IYS. The site will be updated constantly throughout the year.

  2. A Rapid Soils Analysis Kit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    for lateritic soils, whose plasticity character changes dramatically with oven drying. At present, there is no protocol to address this type of soil...Gather and incorporate moisture-density data on marginal soils such as corals and laterites and plastic silts (MH) to improve the usefulness of

  3. Soil Respiration - A Geochemist's Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cappellen, P.

    2015-12-01

    Soil biogeochemistry is largely driven by the decomposition of plant-derived organic matter by soil microorganisms. In addition to its effects on water quality and soil fertility, the decomposition of organic matter couples soil processes to climate, via the production and emission of greenhouse gases. In this presentation, I will review a number of key factors controlling the rate of decomposition of soil organic matter. In particular, I will discuss the importance of the spatial and temporal variations in redox conditions as drivers of soil respiration. The discussion will highlight the limitations of current soil respiration models based on partitioning soil organic matter in a finite number of pools of different degradability. In order to predict the sensitivity of soil respiration to anthropogenic pressures - including climate warming - it is crucial to relate the apparent degradability of soil organic matter to the geochemical and hydrological dynamics of the soil environment. Overall, there remains much scope for geochemists to help develop more robust, process-based, representations of soil respiration in global carbon models and climate predictions.

  4. Biochar effects on soil hydrology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar has the potential to alter soil hydrology, and these alterations may lead to significant changes in water cycling and ecosystem processes mediated by water. Biochar soil amendment may change infiltration and drainage in both sandy and clay soils, may increase or decrease plant-available wate...

  5. Sensor based soil health assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification and assessment of soil health involves determining how well a soil is performing its biological, chemical, and physical functions relative to its inherent potential. Due to high cost, labor requirements, and soil disturbance, traditional laboratory analyses cannot provide high resolut...

  6. Soils and Foundations: A Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Melvin J.

    The teaching guide and course outline for a 12-week course in soils and foundations is designed to help student technicians in a two-year associate degree civil engineering technology program to obtain entry level employment as highway engineering aides, soil testing technicians, soil mappers, or construction inspectors. The seven teaching units…

  7. Evaluation of soil moisture sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the measurement accuracy and repeatability of the EC-5 and 5TM soil volumetric water content (SVWC) sensors, MPS-2 and 200SS soil water potential (SWP) sensors, and 200TS soil temperature sensor. Six 183cm x 183cm x 71cm wooden compartments were built inside a greenhouse, and e...

  8. Crop Residue and Soil Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop yield is greatly influenced by the amount of water that moves from the soil, through the plant, and out into the atmosphere. Winter wheat yield responds linearly to available soil water content at planting (bu/a = 5.56 + 5.34*inches). Therefore, storing precipitation in the soil during non-crop...

  9. EVALUATION OF SOIL VENTING APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of soil venting to inexpensively remove large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils is well established. However, the time required using venting to remediate soils to low contaminant levels often required by state and federal regulators...

  10. Container Soil-Water Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spomer, L. Art; Hershey, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity that illustrates the relationship between the soil found in containers and soil in the ground including the amount of air and water found in each. Sponges are used to represent soil. Materials, procedures, and probable results are described. (KR)

  11. Minnesota's Soils and Their Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, Clifton

    There is an increasing need for land planning and understanding soil is one step toward assuring proper land use. This publication, written by soil scientists and teachers, is designed as a reference for high school teachers. It is designed to be a comprehensive collection about Minnesota soils (although the information can be applied to other…

  12. Influence of tree canopy on N₂ fixation by pasture legumes and soil rhizobial abundance in Mediterranean oak woodlands.

    PubMed

    Carranca, C; Castro, I V; Figueiredo, N; Redondo, R; Rodrigues, A R F; Saraiva, I; Maricato, R; Madeira, M A V

    2015-02-15

    Symbiotic N2 fixation is of primordial significance in sustainable agro-forestry management as it allows reducing the use of mineral N in the production of mixed stands and by protecting the soils from degradation. Thereby, on a 2-year basis, N2 fixation was evaluated in four oak woodlands under Mediterranean conditions using a split-plot design and three replicates. (15)N technique was used for determination of N2 fixation rate. Variations in environmental conditions (temperature, rainfall, radiation) by the cork tree canopy as well as the age of stands and pasture management can cause great differences in vegetation growth, legume N2 fixation, and soil rhizobial abundance. In the present study, non-legumes dominated the swards, in particular beneath the tree canopy, and legumes represented only 42% of total herbage. A 2-fold biomass reduction was observed in the oldest sown pasture in relation to the medium-age sward (6 t DW ha(-1)yr(-1)). Overall, competition of pasture growth for light was negligible, but soil rhizobial abundance and symbiotic N2 fixation capacity were highly favored by this environmental factor in the spring and outside the influence of tree canopy. Nitrogen derived from the atmosphere was moderate to high (54-72%) in unsown and sown swards. Inputs of fixed N2 increased from winter to spring due to more favorable climatic conditions (temperature and light intensity) for both rhizobia and vegetation growths. Assuming a constant fixation rate at each seasonal period, N2 fixation capacity increased from about 0.10 kg N ha(-1) per day in the autumn-winter period to 0.15 kg N ha(-1) per day in spring. Belowground plant material contributed to 11% of accumulated N in pasture legumes and was not affected by canopy. Size of soil fixing bacteria contributed little to explain pasture legumes N.

  13. Soil-ecological risks for soil degradation estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid; Kust, German; Andreeva, Olga

    2016-04-01

    Soil degradation includes the processes of soil properties and quality worsening, primarily from the point of view of their productivity and decrease of ecosystem services quality. Complete soil cover destruction and/or functioning termination of soil forms of organic life are considered as extreme stages of soil degradation, and for the fragile ecosystems they are normally considered in the network of their desertification, land degradation and droughts /DLDD/ concept. Block-model of ecotoxic effects, generating soil and ecosystem degradation, has been developed as a result of the long-term field and laboratory research of sod-podzol soils, contaminated with waste, containing heavy metals. The model highlights soil degradation mechanisms, caused by direct and indirect impact of ecotoxicants on "phytocenosis- soil" system and their combination, frequently causing synergistic effect. The sequence of occurring changes here can be formalized as a theory of change (succession of interrelated events). Several stages are distinguished here - from heavy metals leaching (releasing) in waste and their migration downward the soil profile to phytoproductivity decrease and certain phytocenosis composition changes. Phytoproductivity decrease leads to the reduction of cellulose content introduced into the soil. The described feedback mechanism acts as a factor of sod-podzolic soil self-purification and stability. It has been shown, that using phytomass productivity index, integrally reflecting the worsening of soil properties complex, it is possible to solve the problems dealing with the dose-reflecting reactions creation and determination of critical levels of load for phytocenosis and corresponding soil-ecological risks. Soil-ecological risk in "phytocenosis- soil" system means probable negative changes and the loss of some ecosystem functions during the transformation process of dead organic substance energy for the new biomass composition. Soil-ecological risks estimation is

  14. SoilInfo App: global soil information on your palm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengl, Tomislav; Mendes de Jesus, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    ISRIC ' World Soil Information has released in 2014 and app for mobile de- vices called 'SoilInfo' (http://soilinfo-app.org) and which aims at providing free access to the global soil data. SoilInfo App (available for Android v.4.0 Ice Cream Sandwhich or higher, and Apple v.6.x and v.7.x iOS) currently serves the Soil- Grids1km data ' a stack of soil property and class maps at six standard depths at a resolution of 1 km (30 arc second) predicted using automated geostatistical mapping and global soil data models. The list of served soil data includes: soil organic carbon (), soil pH, sand, silt and clay fractions (%), bulk density (kg/m3), cation exchange capacity of the fine earth fraction (cmol+/kg), coarse fragments (%), World Reference Base soil groups, and USDA Soil Taxonomy suborders (DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0105992). New soil properties and classes will be continuously added to the system. SoilGrids1km are available for download under a Creative Commons non-commercial license via http://soilgrids.org. They are also accessible via a Representational State Transfer API (http://rest.soilgrids.org) service. SoilInfo App mimics common weather apps, but is also largely inspired by the crowdsourcing systems such as the OpenStreetMap, Geo-wiki and similar. Two development aspects of the SoilInfo App and SoilGrids are constantly being worked on: Data quality in terms of accuracy of spatial predictions and derived information, and Data usability in terms of ease of access and ease of use (i.e. flexibility of the cyberinfrastructure / functionalities such as the REST SoilGrids API, SoilInfo App etc). The development focus in 2015 is on improving the thematic and spatial accuracy of SoilGrids predictions, primarily by using finer resolution covariates (250 m) and machine learning algorithms (such as random forests) to improve spatial predictions.

  15. Biochar addition impacts soil microbial community in tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Fu, Shenglei; Méndez, Ana; Gascó, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    Studies on the effect of biochar on soil microbial activity and community structure in tropical areas are scarce. In this study we report the effect of several types of biochar (sewage sludge biochar, paper mill waste biochar, miscanthus biochar and pinewood biochar) in the soil microbial community of two tropical soils, an Acrisol and an Oxisol. In addition we study the effect of the presence or absence of earthworms in soil microbial community. Soil microbial community was more strongly affected by biochar than by the presence or absence of macrofauna.

  16. Soil and Water: Some Teaching Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines six soil and water investigations that students can pursue outdoors, in nature centers, or in classrooms: soil characteristics; relationship between soil ph and plant life; what aggregates tell us; differences in soil structure; differences in rate of water absorption by soil; and soil exploration with a Berlesi funnel. (NEC)

  17. 30 CFR 823.14 - Soil replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... soil-horizon depths, soil densities, soil pH, and other specifications such that reconstructed soils... reconstructed shall be 48 inches, or a lesser depth equal to the depth to a subsurface horizon in the natural... the original soil productive capacity. Soil horizons shall be considered as inhibiting or...

  18. 30 CFR 823.14 - Soil replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... soil-horizon depths, soil densities, soil pH, and other specifications such that reconstructed soils... reconstructed shall be 48 inches, or a lesser depth equal to the depth to a subsurface horizon in the natural... the original soil productive capacity. Soil horizons shall be considered as inhibiting or...

  19. 30 CFR 823.14 - Soil replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... soil-horizon depths, soil densities, soil pH, and other specifications such that reconstructed soils... reconstructed shall be 48 inches, or a lesser depth equal to the depth to a subsurface horizon in the natural... the original soil productive capacity. Soil horizons shall be considered as inhibiting or...

  20. 30 CFR 823.14 - Soil replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... soil-horizon depths, soil densities, soil pH, and other specifications such that reconstructed soils... reconstructed shall be 48 inches, or a lesser depth equal to the depth to a subsurface horizon in the natural... the original soil productive capacity. Soil horizons shall be considered as inhibiting or...

  1. 30 CFR 823.14 - Soil replacement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... soil-horizon depths, soil densities, soil pH, and other specifications such that reconstructed soils... reconstructed shall be 48 inches, or a lesser depth equal to the depth to a subsurface horizon in the natural... the original soil productive capacity. Soil horizons shall be considered as inhibiting or...

  2. Opportunity Trenches Martian Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity dragged one of its wheels back and forth across the sandy soil at Meridiani Planum to create a hole (bottom left corner) approximately 50 centimeters (19.7 inches) long by 20 centimeters (7.9 inches) wide by 9 centimeters (3.5 inches) deep. The rover's instrument deployment device, or arm, will begin studying the fresh soil at the bottom of this trench later today for clues to its mineral composition and history. Scientists chose this particular site for digging because previous data taken by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer indicated that it contains crystalline hematite, a mineral that sometimes forms in the presence of water. The brightness of the newly-exposed soil is thought to be either intrinsic to the soil itself, or a reflection of the Sun. Opportunity's lander is in the center of the image, and to the left is the rock outcrop lining the inner edge of the small crater that encircles the rover and lander. This mosaic image is made up of data from the rover's navigation and hazard-avoidance cameras.

  3. Soil on Phoenix's MECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows soil delivery to NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The image was taken by the lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008).

    At the bottom of the image is the chute for delivering samples to MECA's microscopes. It is relatively clean due to the Phoenix team using methods such as sprinkling to minimize cross-contamination of samples. However, the cumulative effect of several sample deliveries can be seen in the soil piles on either side of the chute.

    On the right side are the four chemistry cells with soil residue piled up on exposed surfaces. The farthest cell has a large pile of material from an area of the Phoenix workspace called 'Stone Soup.' This area is deep in the trough at a polygon boundary, and its soil was so sticky it wouldn't even go through the funnel.

    One of Phoenix's solar panels is shown in the background of this image.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Exploring Soil Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Deborah R.

    1991-01-01

    Describes a soil lab that can be performed with a minimum of equipment and time, utilizing a lawn, field, or woodlot. Students dig a 1-meter-deep pit and observe the litter and humus layers where most microbial and fungal decomposition occurs. Describes comparing different locations by pH level and concentration of potassium, phosphorous, and…

  5. Irwin Scoops up Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Astronaut James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot, uses a scoop in making a trench in the lunar soil during Apollo 15 extravehicular activity (EVA). Mount Hadley rises approximately 14,765 feet (about 4,500 meters) above the plain in the background.

  6. Spending our soil resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A third of the world's population suffers from food insecurity. With an expected 2 billion population increase in the next few decades, that number is expected to rise significantly, leading to more people that are insecure and starving unless our soils can produce more food. Added to the problem ar...

  7. Airbag Impressions in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows where the rover's airbags left impressions in the martian soil. The drag marks were made after the rover successfully landed at Meridiani Planum and its airbags were retracted. The rover can be seen in the foreground.

  8. Improved Biosensors for Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberg, J. J.; Masiello, C. A.; Cheng, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Microbes drive processes in the Earth system far exceeding their physical scale, affecting crop yields, water quality, the mobilization of toxic materials, and fundamental aspects of soil biogeochemistry. The tools of synthetic biology have the potential to significantly improve our understanding of microbial Earth system processes: for example, synthetic microbes can be be programmed to report on environmental conditions that stimulate greenhouse gas production, metal oxidation, biofilm formation, pollutant degradation, and microbe-plant symbioses. However, these tools are only rarely deployed in the lab. This research gap arises because synthetically programmed microbes typically report on their environment by producing molecules that are detected optically (e.g., fluorescent proteins). Fluorescent reporters are ideal for petri-dish applications and have fundamentally changed how we study human health, but their usefulness is quite limited in soils where detecting fluorescence is challenging. Here we describe the construction of gas-reporting biosensors, which release nonpolar gases that can be detected in the headspace of incubation experiments. These constructs can be used to probe microbial processes within soils in real-time noninvasive lab experiments. These biosensors can be combined with traditional omics-based approaches to reveal processes controlling soil microbial behavior and lead to improved environmental management decisions.

  9. Soil, An Environmental Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This environmental unit is one of a series designed for integration within an existing curriculum. The unit is self-contained and requires minimal teacher preparation. The philosophy of the series is based on an experience-oriented process that encourages self-paced independent student work. This particular unit investigates soil in relation to…

  10. Soils. Transparency Masters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This document is a collection of 43 overhead transparency masters to be used as teaching aids in a course of study involving soils such as geology, agronomy, hydrology, earth science, or land use study. Some transparencies are in color. Selected titles of transparencies may give the reader a better understanding of the graphic content. Titles are:…

  11. How soil shapes the landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasny, Budiman; Finke, Peter; Vanwalleghem, Tom Tom; Stockmann, Uta; McBratney, Alex

    2014-05-01

    There has been an increase in interest in quantitative modelling of soil genesis, which can provide prediction of environmental changes through numerical models. Modelling soil formation is a difficult task because soil itself is highly complex with interactions between water, inorganic materials and organic matter. This paper will provide a review on the research efforts of modelling soil genesis, their connection with landscape models and the inexorable genesis of the IUSS soil landscape modelling working group. Quantitative modelling soil formation using mechanistic models have begun in the 1980s such as the 'soil deficit' model by Kirkby (1985), Hoosbeek & Bryant's pedodynamic model (1992), and recently the SoilGen model by Finke (2008). These profile models considered the chemical reactions and physical processes in the soil at the horizon and pedon scale. The SoilGen model is an integration of sub-models, such as water and solute movement, heat transport, soil organic matter decomposition, mineral dissolution, ion exchange, adsorption, speciation, complexation and precipitation. The model can calculate with detail the chemical changes and materials fluxes in a profile and has been successfully applied. While they can simulate soil profile development in detail, there is still a gap how the processes act in the landscape. Meanwhile research in landscape formation in geomorphology is progressing steadily over time, slope development models model have been developed since 1970s (Ahnert, 1977). Soil was also introduced in a landscape, however soil processes are mainly modelled through weathering and transport processes (Minasny & McBratney 1999, 2001). Recently, Vanwalleghem et al. (2013) are able to combine selected physical, chemical and biological processes to simulate a full 3-D soil genesis in the landscape. Now there are research gaps between the 2 approaches: the landscape modellers increasingly recognise the importance of soil and need more detailed soil

  12. Biomarker in archaeological soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; Schneeweiß, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The use of biomarkers in an archaeological context allow deeper insights into the understanding of anthropogenic (dark) earth formation and from an archaeological point of view, a completely new perspective on cultivation practices in the historic past. During an archaeological excavation of a Slavic settlement (10th/11th C. A.D.) in Brünkendorf (Wendland region in Northern Germany), a thick black soil (Nordic Dark Earth) was discovered that resembled the famous terra preta phenomenon. For the humid tropics, terra preta could act as model for sustainable agricultural practices and as example for long-term CO2-sequestration into terrestrial ecosystems. The question was whether this Nordic Dark Earth had similar properties and genesis as the famous Amazonian Dark Earth in order to find a model for sustainable agricultural practices and long term CO2-sequestration in temperate zones. For this purpose, a multi-analytical approach was used to characterize the sandy-textured Nordic Dark Earth in comparison to less anthropogenically influenced soils in the adjacent area in respect of ecological conditions (e.g. amino sugar), input materials (faeces) and the presence of stable soil organic matter (black carbon). Amino sugar analyses showed that Nordic Dark Earth contained higher amounts of microbial residues being dominated by soil fungi. Faecal biomarkers such as stanols and bile acids indicated animal manure from omnivores and herbivores but also human excrements. Black carbon content of about 30 Mg ha-1 in the Nordic Dark Earth was about four times higher compared to the adjacent soil and in the same order of magnitude compared to terra preta. Our data strongly suggest parallels to anthropogenic soil formation in Amazonia and in Europe by input of organic wastes, faecal material and charred organic matter. An obvious difference was that in terra preta input of human-derived faecal material dominated while in NDE human-derived faecal material played only a minor role

  13. Growth inhibition and efficiency of the antioxidant system in spring barley and common radish grown on soil polluted ionic liquids with iodide anions.

    PubMed

    Biczak, Robert; Śnioszek, Martyna; Telesiński, Arkadiusz; Pawłowska, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) constitute a huge group of substances that are increasingly common in the commercial use. This situation may lead to the contamination of the soil environment which being the basic of plants vegetation. This paper presents the effect of four ILs with I(-) anion on the growth and development of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) and common radish (Raphanus sativus L. subvar. radicula Pers) and changes in metabolism of the plants. Seedlings of spring barley and common radish cultivated on soil with increasing ILs concentration exhibited typical phytotoxicity symptoms. A considerable reduction of shoot and root lengths, decrease of fresh weight (FW) and increase of dry weight (DW) occurred in both test plants. Ionic liquids concentration increase in soil was correlated with the decrease of concentrations of all photosynthetic pigments in the plants. The observed increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and changes in the H2O2 level indicated presence of oxidative stress in spring barley and common radish, which usually led to the increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) activity. The most reliable biomarker of oxidative stress was chlorophyll level and changes in POD activity.

  14. Impact of Soil Texture on Soil Ciliate Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, J. F.; Brown, S.; Habtom, E.; Brinson, F.; Epps, M.; Scott, R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water content and connectivity strongly influence microbial activities in soil, controlling access to nutrients and electron acceptors, and mediating interactions between microbes within and between trophic levels. These interactions occur at or below the pore scale, and are influenced by soil texture and structure, which determine the microscale architecture of soil pores. Soil protozoa are relatively understudied, especially given the strong control they exert on bacterial communities through predation. Here, ciliate communities in soils of contrasting textures were investigated. Two ciliate-specific primer sets targeting the 18S rRNA gene were used to amplify DNA extracted from eight soil samples collected from Sumter National Forest in western South Carolina. Primer sets 121F-384F-1147R (semi-nested) and 315F-959R were used to amplify soil ciliate DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the resulting PCR products were analyzed by gel electrophoresis to obtain quantity and band size. Approximately two hundred ciliate 18S rRNA sequences were obtained were obtained from each of two contrasting soils. Sequences were aligned against the NCBI GenBank database for identification, and the taxonomic classification of best-matched sequences was determined. The ultimate goal of the work is to quantify changes in the ciliate community under short-timescale changes in hydrologic conditions for varying soil textures, elucidating dynamic responses to desiccation stress in major soil ciliate taxa.

  15. Soil warming alters microbial substrate use in alpine soils.

    PubMed

    Streit, Kathrin; Hagedorn, Frank; Hiltbrunner, David; Portmann, Magdalena; Saurer, Matthias; Buchmann, Nina; Wild, Birgit; Richter, Andreas; Wipf, Sonja; Siegwolf, Rolf T W

    2014-04-01

    Will warming lead to an increased use of older soil organic carbon (SOC) by microbial communities, thereby inducing C losses from C-rich alpine soils? We studied soil microbial community composition, activity, and substrate use after 3 and 4 years of soil warming (+4 °C, 2007-2010) at the alpine treeline in Switzerland. The warming experiment was nested in a free air CO2 enrichment experiment using depleted (13)CO2 (δ(13)C = -30‰, 2001-2009). We traced this depleted (13)C label in phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) of the organic layer (0-5 cm soil depth) and in C mineralized from root-free soils to distinguish substrate ages used by soil microorganisms: fixed before 2001 ('old'), from 2001 to 2009 ('new') or in 2010 ('recent'). Warming induced a sustained stimulation of soil respiration (+38%) without decline in mineralizable SOC. PLFA concentrations did not reveal changes in microbial community composition due to soil warming, but soil microbial metabolic activity was stimulated (+66%). Warming decreased the amount of new and recent C in the fungal biomarker 18:2ω6,9 and the amount of new C mineralized from root-free soils, implying a shift in microbial substrate use toward a greater use of old SOC. This shift in substrate use could indicate an imbalance between C inputs and outputs, which could eventually decrease SOC storage in this alpine ecosystem.

  16. Soil washing results for mixed waste pond soils at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing technology was assessed as a means for remediating soil contaminated with mixed wastes primarily composed of heavy metals and radionuclides. The soils at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site are considered suitable for soil washing because of their relatively low quantities of silt and clay. However, in a limited number of soil washing experiments using soils from different locations in the north pond of the 300 Area, the degree of decontamination achieved for the coarse fraction of the soil varied considerably. Part of this variation appears to be due to the presence of a discrete layer of contaminated sediment found in some of the samples. 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Soil moisture estimation with limited soil characterization for decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanzy, A.; Richard, G.; Boizard, H.; Défossez, P.

    2009-04-01

    Many decisions in agriculture are conditional to soil moisture. For instance in wet conditions, farming operations as soil tillage, organic waste spreading or harvesting may lead to degraded results and/or induce soil compaction. The development of a tool that allows the estimation of soil moisture is useful to help farmers to organize their field work in a context where farm size tends to increase as well as the need to optimize the use of expensive equipments. Soil water transfer models simulate soil moisture vertical profile evolution. These models are highly sensitive to site dependant parameters. A method to implement the mechanistic soil water and heat flow model (the TEC model) in a context of limited information (soil texture, climatic data, soil organic carbon) is proposed [Chanzy et al., 2008]. In this method the most sensitive model inputs were considered i.e. soil hydraulic properties, soil moisture profile initialization and the lower boundary conditions. The accuracy was estimated by implementing the method on several experimental cases covering a range of soils. Simulated soil moisture results were compared to soil moisture measurements. The obtained accuracy in surface soil moisture (0-30 cm) was 0.04 m3/m3. When a few soil moisture measurements are available (collected for instance by the farmer using a portable moisture sensor), significant improvement in soil moisture accuracy is obtained by assimilating the results into the model. Two assimilation strategies were compared and led to comparable results: a sequential approach, where the measurement were used to correct the simulated moisture profile when measurements are available and a variational approach which take moisture measurements to invert the TEC model and so retrieve soil hydraulic properties of the surface layer. The assimilation scheme remains however heavy in terms of computing time and so, for operational purposed fast code should be taken to simulate the soil moisture as with the

  18. Soil physics: a Moroccan perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahlou, Sabah; Mrabet, Rachid; Ouadia, Mohamed

    2004-06-01

    Research on environmental pollution and degradation of soil and water resources is now of highest priority worldwide. To address these problems, soil physics should be conceived as a central core to this research. This paper objectives are to: (1) address the role and importance of soil physics, (2) demonstrate progress in this discipline, and (3) present various uses of soil physics in research, environment and industry. The study of dynamic processes at and within the soil vadose zone (flow, dispersion, transport, sedimentation, etc.), and ephemeral phenomena (deformation, compaction, etc.), form an area of particular interest in soil physics. Soil physics has changed considerably over time. These changes are due to needed precision in data collection for accurate interpretation of space and time variation of soil properties. Soil physics interacts with other disciplines and sciences such as hydro(geo)logy, agronomy, environment, micro-meteorology, pedology, mathematics, physics, water sciences, etc. These interactions prompted the emergence of advanced theories and comprehensive mechanisms of most natural processes, development of new mathematical tools (modeling and computer simulation, fractals, geostatistics, transformations), creation of high precision instrumentation (computer assisted, less time constraint, increased number of measured parameters) and the scale sharpening of physical measurements which ranges from micro to watershed. The environment industry has contributed to an enlargement of many facets of soil physics. In other words, research demand in soil physics has increased considerably to satisfy specific and environmental problems (contamination of water resources, global warming, etc.). Soil physics research is still at an embryonic stage in Morocco. Consequently, soil physicists can take advantage of developments occurring overseas, and need to build up a database of soil static and dynamic properties and to revise developed models to meet

  19. Soil burial contribution to deep soil organic carbon storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaopricha, N. T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2013-12-01

    Previous reviews of deep soil C have focused on root inputs and the vertical transport of particulate and dissolved organic matter through mixing, gravity, and preferential flowpaths as the main modes of delivery of C to the deep subsoil. Depositional processes have received considerable attention in the context of long-range soil erosion and sedimentation on land, but the role of soil burial in the sequestration of C photosynthesized in situ at depositional sites has been largely absent from discussions of deep soil organic C (SOC) dynamics. Burial can disconnect a soil from atmospheric conditions and slow or inhibit microbial decomposition. Buried soil horizons, which are former surface soils that have been buried through various depositional processes, can store more SOC than would exist at such depths from in situ root inputs and leaching from upper horizons. Here, we discuss factors contributing to SOC storage in soils below 1 m with a focus on soil burial. We review the contributions of geomorphic and anthropogenic depositional processes to deep SOC storage and describe how environmental conditions or state factors during and since burial influence SOC persistence in buried soils. We draw from examples in the paleosol and geomorphology literature to identify the effects of soil burial by volcanic, aeolian, alluvial, colluvial, glacial, and anthropogenic processes on soil C storage. Buried soils have been traditionally studied for information about past environments and can also serve as useful case studies for understanding both the sensitivity of landscape processes to future environmental change and the mechanisms contributing to soil organic matter stabilization. Soil burial can store SOC at any depth. Here, we focus particularly on buried soil horizons at ≥ 1 m depth to highlight how much SOC exists at depths below those typically considered in SOC inventories, studies of soil organic matter dynamics, and most biogeochemical models. Understanding the

  20. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization, soil moisture and soil temperature on soil respiration during summer fallow season].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Guo, Sheng-Li; Zou, Jun-Liang; Li, Ze; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2011-11-01

    On the loess plateau, summer fallow season is a hot rainy time with intensive soil microbe activities. To evaluate the response of soil respiration to soil moisture, temperature, and N fertilization during this period is helpful for a deep understanding about the temporal and spatial variability of soil respiration and its impact factors, then a field experiment was conducted in the Changwu State Key Agro-Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, China. The experiment included five N application rates: unfertilized 0 (N0), 45 (N45), 90 (N90), 135(N135), and 180 (N180) kg x hm(-2). The results showed that at the fallow stage, soil respiration rate significantly enhanced from 1.24 to 1.91 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and the average of soil respiration during this period [6.20 g x (m2 x d)(-1)] was close to the growing season [6.95 g x (m2 x d)(-1)]. The bivariate model of soil respiration with soil water and soil temperature was better than the single-variable model, but not so well as the three-factor model when explaining the actual changes of soil respiration. Nitrogen fertilization alone accounted for 8% of the variation soil respiration. Unlike the single-variable model, the results could provide crucial information for further research of multiple factors on soil respiration and its simulation.

  1. Soil survey and resource inventory guide for dynamic soil properties and soil change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data and information about how soils change are needed by producers, land managers, and decision makers in order to plan for long-term productivity, interpret indicators used in monitoring and assessments, and manage human impacts on soil. In order to meet these needs, the National Cooperative Soil ...

  2. Evaluation-of soil enzyme activities as soil quality indicators in sludge-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Dindar, Efsun; Şağban, Fatma Olcay Topaç; Başkaya, Hüseyin Savaş

    2015-07-01

    Soil enzymatic activities are commonly used as biomarkers of soil quality. Several organic and inorganic compounds found in municipal wastewater sludges can possibly be used as fertilizers. Monitoring and evaluating the quality of sludge amended soils with enzyme activities accepted as a beneficial practice with respect to sustainable soil management. In the present study, variation of some enzyme activities (Alkaline phosphatase, dehydrogenase, urease and beta-glucosidase activities) in soils amended with municipal wastewater sludge at different application rates (50, 100 and 200 t ha(-1) dry sludge) was evaluated. Air dried sludge samples were applied to soil pots and sludge-soil mixtures were incubated during a period of three months at 28 degrees C. The results of the study showed that municipal wastewater sludge amendment apparently increased urease, dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and P-glucosidase activities in soil by 48-70%, 14-47%, 33-66% and 9-14%, respectively. The maximum activity was generally observed in sludge amended soil with dose of 200 t ha(-1). Urease activity appeared to be a better indicator of soil enhancement with wastewater sludge, as its activity was more strongly increased by sludge amendment. Accordingly, urease activity is suggested to be soil quality indicator best suited for measuring existing conditions and potential changes in sludge-amended soil.

  3. Soil biological indicators of soil health for a national soil health assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil is one of our nation's most valuable resources that provides life-sustaining functions. Billions of organisms live belowground and perform critical soil processes to support plant, animal, and human health aboveground. By shifting our view of soils from an inert growing material to a biological...

  4. Soil biodiversity and human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Diana H.; Nielsen, Uffe N.; Six, Johan

    2015-12-01

    Soil biodiversity is increasingly recognized as providing benefits to human health because it can suppress disease-causing soil organisms and provide clean air, water and food. Poor land-management practices and environmental change are, however, affecting belowground communities globally, and the resulting declines in soil biodiversity reduce and impair these benefits. Importantly, current research indicates that soil biodiversity can be maintained and partially restored if managed sustainably. Promoting the ecological complexity and robustness of soil biodiversity through improved management practices represents an underutilized resource with the ability to improve human health.

  5. Soil biodiversity and human health.

    PubMed

    Wall, Diana H; Nielsen, Uffe N; Six, Johan

    2015-12-03

    Soil biodiversity is increasingly recognized as providing benefits to human health because it can suppress disease-causing soil organisms and provide clean air, water and food. Poor land-management practices and environmental change are, however, affecting belowground communities globally, and the resulting declines in soil biodiversity reduce and impair these benefits. Importantly, current research indicates that soil biodiversity can be maintained and partially restored if managed sustainably. Promoting the ecological complexity and robustness of soil biodiversity through improved management practices represents an underutilized resource with the ability to improve human health.

  6. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  7. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; ...

    2015-02-05

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore » this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  8. Soil adherence to human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Konz, J.J.; Whitmyre, G.K. )

    1989-12-01

    Dermal exposure to soils contaminated with toxic chemicals represents a potential public health hazard. These soils, contaminated with chemicals such as PCBs and dioxins, may be found at various locations throughout the US. Furthermore, dermal contact with pesticide-containing particles and contaminated soil particles is of importance for exposures to agricultural workers who reenter fields after pesticide application. With respect to dermal exposure to pesticide-contaminated particulate matter, several occurrences of human toxicity to ethyl parathion in citrus groves have been reported. These exposures resulted from dermal contact with high concentrations of the toxic transformation product paraoxon in soil dust contaminated as a result of application of pesticide to the overhead foliage of trees. To assess dermal exposure to chemically-contaminated soil at sites of concern, dermal adherence of soil must be determined prior to the assessment of dermal absorption. The purpose of the experiment reported herein was to determine the amount of soil (mg/cm{sup 2}) that adheres to adult hands under various soil conditions. These conditions include the type of soil, the organic content of the soil, and the particle size of the soil.

  9. Soil Temperature Reemergence in Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Schaefer, K.

    2007-12-01

    Soil temperature reemergence is the disappearance and subsequent reappearance of near surface soil temperature anomalies, driven by soil freeze-thaw processes. Reemergence of past soil temperature anomalies is a new class of time-delayed, land-atmosphere feedbacks influencing surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat. Anomalous energy is stored, isolated from diffusion processes, as variations in latent heat of fusion. Schaefer et al. [2007] found that past soil temperature anomalies in seasonally frozen soils are stored as variations in the amount of ground ice and can reemerge at the surface after soil thaw in spring. Schaefer et al. [2007] also hypothesized that temperature anomalies in permafrost would be stored as variations in the active layer depth, reappearing after the soil column completely freezes in winter. Essentially, a warm summer produces a deeper active layer, which requires more energy to freeze in autumn, resulting in warmer soils in winter. Here, we explore this hypothesis using statistical analysis of long-term, in situ soil temperature measurements at 37 permafrost hydro-meteorological stations across Siberia. The observations span 30-40 years at depths of 2-320 cm. We also use a simple soil thermodynamic model with phase changes to explore the detailed thermodynamic processes driving temperature reemergence in permafrost.

  10. World's soils are under threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, L.; Pennock, D. J.; McKenzie, N. J.; Badraoui, M.; Chude, V.; Baptista, I.; Mamo, T.; Yemefack, M.; Singh Aulakh, M.; Yagi, K.; Hong, S. Young; Vijarnsorn, P.; Zhang, G.-L.; Arrouays, D.; Black, H.; Krasilnikov, P.; Sobocká, J.; Alegre, J.; Henriquez, C. R.; Mendonça-Santos, M. L.; Taboada, M.; Espinosa-Victoria, D.; AlShankiti, A.; AlaviPanah, S. K.; Elsheikh, E. A. E.; Hempel, J.; Camps Arbestain, M.; Nachtergaele, F.; Vargas, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Technical Panel on Soils has completed the first State of the World's Soil Resources report. Globally soil erosion was identified as the gravest threat, leading to deteriorating water quality in developed regions and to lowering of crop yields in many developing regions. We need to increase nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer use in infertile tropical and semi-tropical soils - the regions where the most food insecure among us are found - while reducing global use of these products overall. Stores of soil organic carbon are critical in the global carbon balance, and national governments must set specific targets to stabilize or ideally increase soil organic carbon stores. Finally the quality of soil information available for policy formulation must be improved - the regional assessments in the SWSR report frequently base their evaluations on studies from the 1990s based on observations made in the 1980s or earlier.

  11. Mobility and microbially mediated mobilization of gold and arsenic in soils from two gold mines in semi-arid and tropical Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, F.; McPhail, D. C.

    2007-03-01

    The mobility and microbially mediated solubilization of Au and As in regolith materials from two Au mines in Australia, i.e., the Peak Hill Gold Mine in semi-arid New South Wales and the Hit or Miss Gold Mine in tropical northern Queensland, was studied using a combination of geochemical and microbiological techniques. Gold is highly mobile in both environments, the mobility of Au increases with increasing degree of weathering of host materials, and the resident microbiota are capable of mediating its solubilization. The results of the microcosm experiments demonstrate that the activity of microorganisms needs to be taken into account when studying the mobility and solubilization of Au in the Australian regolith. In primary, unweathered mineralization material from the Hit or Miss mine 99 wt% of Au was extracted only in the strongest final step of the sequential extractions, in concentrated aqua regia. In alteration zone material from the Peak Hill Gold Mine 80 wt% of Au was associated with the operationally defined Mn and Fe oxides. In contrast, in auriferous soils overlying mineralization at both sites 90-95 wt% of Au was associated with the operationally defined exchangeable, clay-bound and organic fractions. Microcosm experiments were incubated biologically active and inactive (sterilized) in 1:4 (w/v) aqueous slurries at 25 °C in the dark for up to 95 days. In biologically active microcosms with soils from the Peak Hill- and the Hit or Miss Gold Mines approximately 55 wt% (907 ng g -1 d.w. soil) and 20 wt% (233 ng g -1 d.w. soil) of the total Au, respectively, was solubilized during the incubation. In contrast, no or significantly lower Au concentrations were observed in biologically inactive microcosms. The mobility and microbially mediated release of As was limited at both sites and appears to be mostly controlled by abiotic adsorption and desorption on Mn- and Fe-oxides. Arsenic has a low solubility in the more mobile fractions and is mostly associated

  12. A human health risk assessment of rare earth elements in soil and vegetables from a mining area in Fujian Province, Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Chen, Zhibiao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Yonghe

    2013-10-01

    Contaminated food through dietary intake has become the main potential risk impacts on human health. This study investigated concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, vegetables, human hair and blood, and assessed human health risk through vegetables consumption in the vicinity of a large-scale mining area located in Hetian Town of Changting County, Fujian Province, Southeast China. The results of the study included the following mean concentrations for total and bio-available REEs of 242.92 ± 68.98 (135.85-327.56)μg g(-1) and 118.59 ± 38.49 (57.89-158.96)μg g(-1) dry weight (dw) in agricultural soil, respectively, and total REEs of 3.58 ± 5.28 (0.07-64.42)μg g(-1) dw in vegetable samples. Concentrations of total REEs in blood and hair collected from the local residents ranged from 424.76 to 1274.80 μg L(-1) with an average of 689.74 ± 254.25 μg L(-1) and from 0.06 to 1.59 μg g(-1) with an average of 0.48 ± 0.59 μg g(-1) of the study, respectively. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between REEs in blood and corresponding soil samples (R(2)=0.6556, p<0.05), however there was no correlation between REEs in hair and corresponding soils (p>0.05). Mean concentrations of REEs of 2.85 (0.59-10.24)μg L(-1) in well water from the local households was 53-fold than that in the drinking water of Fuzhou city (0.054 μg L(-1)). The health risk assessment indicated that vegetable consumption would not result in exceeding the safe values of estimate daily intake (EDI) REEs (100-110 μg kg(-1)d(-1)) for adults and children, but attention should be paid to monitoring human beings health in such rare earth mining areas due to long-term exposure to high dose REEs from food consumptions.

  13. Communicating soil property variability in heterogeneous soil mapping units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farewell, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Soil properties and classes can change over very short distances. For the purpose of scale, clarity and field sampling density, soil maps in England and Wales commonly use mapping units which are groupings of taxonomic soil series, commonly found in association with each other in the landscape. These mixed units (Soil Associations), typically contain between 3 and 7 soil series with physical or chemical properties, which can vary across the mapping unit, or may be relatively homogeneous. The degree of variation is not constant between soil properties, for instance, pH may be relatively constant, but volumetric shrinkage potential may be highly variable. Over the past ten years, the number of users of GIS soil property maps has dramatically increased, yet the vast majority of these users do not have a soil or geoscience background. They are instead practitioners in specific industries. As a result, new techniques have been developed to communicate the variation in maps of soil properties to a non-expert audience. GIS data structures allow more flexibility in the reporting of uncertainty or variation in soil mapping units than paper-based maps. Some properties are categorical, others continuous. In England and Wales, the national and regional memberships of soil associations are available, with areal percentages of the comprising soil series being estimated for each association by a combination of expert judgment and field observations. Membership at a local scale can vary considerably from the national average. When summarizing across a whole map unit, for continuous variables, rarely is it appropriate to provide a mean value, or even a weighted average based on membership percentage of the association. Such approaches can make a nonsense of wide-ranging data. For instance a soil association comprising soil series with highly different percentages of sand, silt and clay may result in a 'loamy' mean soil texture which is not reflective of any of the comprising soils

  14. Soil organic matter and soil biodiversity spots in urban and semi urban soils of southeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Esperanza

    2015-04-01

    We have observed how the constant use of compost or vermicompost has created spots of soil restoration in urban and semiurban soils of Chiapas (Huitepec and Teopisca), increasing soil organic matter amount, soil moisture and soil porosity, and enhancing then the presence of soil biodiversity; for example, in a Milpa with vermicompost (polyculture of Zea mays with Curcubita pepo, and Fasolius vulgaris) we have found a high density of an epigeic earthworm (640 ind.m2), Dichogaster bolahui, not present in the same type of soil just some meters of distance, in an Oak forest, where soil macroinvertebrates abundance decreased drastically. In another ecosystem within a Persea Americana culture, we found how above and below ground soil biodiversity is affected by the use of vermicompost, having clearly different microcosmos with and without vermicompost (30-50% more micro and macro invertebrates with vermicompost). So now in Campeche, within those soils that are classified by the mayas as tzequel, soils not use for agriculture, we have implemented home gardens and school gardens by the use of compost of vermicomposts in urban and semiurban soils. In school gardens (mainly primary schools) students have cultivated several plants with alimentary purposes; teachers have observed how the increase of soil biodiversity by the use of compost or vermicompost has enhanced the curiosity of children, even has promoted a more friendly behavior among students, they have learned how to do compost and how to apply it. Urban and semiurban soils can be modified by the use of compost and vermicompost, and soil biodiversity has extremely increased.

  15. Sensitivity of soil organic matter in anthropogenically disturbed organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Säurich, Annelie; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Don, Axel; Freibauer, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Drained peatlands are hotspots of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from agriculture. However, the variability of CO2 emissions increases with disturbance, and little is known on the soil properties causing differences between seemingly similar sites. Furthermore the driving factors for carbon cycling are well studied for both genuine peat and mineral soil, but there is a lack of information concerning soils at the boundary between organic and mineral soils. Examples for such soils are both soils naturally relatively high in soil organic matter (SOM) such as Humic Gleysols and former peat soils with a relative low SOM content due to intensive mineralization or mixing with underlying or applied mineral soil. The study aims to identify drivers for the sensitivity of soil organic matter and therefore for respiration rates of anthropogenically disturbed organic soils, especially those near the boundary to mineral soils. Furthermore, we would like to answer the question whether there are any critical thresholds of soil organic carbon (SOC) concentrations beyond which the carbon-specific respiration rates change. The German agricultural soil inventory samples all agricultural soils in Germany in an 8x8 km² grid following standardized protocols. From this data and sample base, we selected 120 different soil samples from more than 80 sites. As reference sites, three anthropogenically undisturbed peatlands were sampled as well. We chose samples from the soil inventory a) 72 g kg-1 SOC and b) representing the whole range of basic soil properties: SOC (72 to 568 g kg-1), total nitrogen (2 to 29 g kg-1), C-N-ratio (10 to 80) bulk density (0.06 to 1.41 g/cm³), pH (2.5 to 7.4), sand (0 to 95 %) and clay (2 to 70 %) content (only determined for samples with less than 190 g kg-1 SOC) as well as the botanical origin of the peat (if determinable). Additionally, iron oxides were determined for all samples. All samples were sieved (2 mm) and incubated at standardized water content and

  16. Ephemeral gully: soil control factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ollobarren, Paul; Giménez, Rafael; Ángel Campo, Miguel; Casalí, Javier

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion on hillslopes has been divided traditionally into sheet, rill, and (ephemeral) gully erosion. In sheet erosion, a relatively shallow overland flow acts on a hillslope and removes sediment particles uniformly from the land surface. Usually, rill erosion occur in uncertain points within sloping surfaces, whereas gullies occur in more specific places in the landscapes, i.e., within topographic swales or hollows. So that, current models for prediction of (ephemeral) gully initiation and development rely mainly on topographic factors while soil conditions are almost neglected. However, the assessment of the erodibility of soil materials is essential for analyzing and properly modeling gully erosion. But, despite the wealth of studies to characterize soil vulnerability to (gully) erosion, a universal approach is still lacking. This is due to the complexity of soil conditions and erosion phenomenon and their interactions. A useful and feasible soil characterization for gully erosion prediction at large scale should be based on simple, quick, repeatable and relatively inexpensive tests to perform. This work proposes a methodology for conducting simple tests in the field and laboratory to detect soil conditions prone to gully initiation. This approach for assessing soil erodibility includes the use of vane shear apparatus, penetrometers and a mini-rain simulator as well as some current (modified) laboratory tests for assessing soil crustability and erodibility. A pool of simple soil variables to assess soils prone to gully development is proposed. Among the main variables we have the granulometric composition of the top soil (textural fractions and gravel), organic matter content, soil cohesiveness and relative sensitivity of topsoils for crusting. Our finding may be particularly useful for erosion modelling when gully initiation and development do not largely rely on topographic features but in soil conditions.

  17. Discovering the essence of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frink, D.

    2012-04-01

    Science, and what it can learn, is constrained by its paradigms and premises. Similarly, teaching and what topics can be addressed are constrained by the paradigms and premises of the subject matter. Modern soil science is founded on the five-factor model of Dokuchaev and Jenny. Combined with Retallack's universal definition of soil as geologic detritus affected by weathering and/or biology, modern soil science emphasizes a descriptive rather than an interpretive approach. Modern soil science however, emerged from the study of plants and the need to improve crop yields in the face of chronic and wide spread famine in Europe. In order to teach that dirt is fascinating we must first see soils in their own right, understand their behavior and expand soil science towards an interpretive approach rather than limited as a descriptive one. Following the advice of James Hutton given over two centuries ago, I look at soils from a physiological perspective. Digestive processes are mechanical and chemical weathering, the resulting constituents reformed into new soil constituents (e.g. clay and humus), translocated to different regions of the soil body to serve other physiological processes (e.g. lamellae, argillic and stone-line horizons), or eliminated as wastes (e.g. leachates and evolved gasses). Respiration is described by the ongoing and diurnal exchange of gasses between the soil and its environment. Circulatory processes are evident in soil pore space, drainage capacity and capillary capability. Reproduction of soil is evident at two different scales: the growth of clay crystals (with their capacity for mutation) and repair of disturbed areas such as result from the various pedo-perturbations. The interactions between biotic and abiotic soil components provide examples of both neurological and endocrine systems in soil physiology. Through this change in perspective, both biotic and abiotic soil processes become evident, providing insight into the possible behavior of

  18. Organic wastes as soil amendments - Effects assessment towards soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Mathieu; Chelinho, Sónia; Alvarenga, Paula; Mourinha, Clarisse; Palma, Patrícia; Sousa, José Paulo; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago

    2017-05-15

    Using organic wastes, as soil amendments, is an important alternative to landfilling with benefits to soil structure, water retention, soil nutrient and organic matter concentrations. However, this practice should be monitored for its environmental risk due to the frequent presence, of noxious substances to soil organisms. To evaluate the potential of eight organic wastes with different origins, as soil amendments, reproduction tests with four soil invertebrate species (Folsomia candida, Enchytraeus crypticus, Hypoaspis aculeifer, Eisenia fetida) were performed using gradients of soil-waste mixtures. Results obtained demonstrated that contaminant concentrations required by current legislation might not be a protective measure for the soil ecosystem, as they do not properly translate the potential toxicity of wastes to soil invertebrates. Some wastes with contaminant loadings below thresholds showed higher toxicity than wastes with contaminants concentrations above legal limits. Also, test organism reproduction was differently sensitive to the selected wastes, which highlights the need to account for different organism sensitivities and routes of exposure when evaluating the toxicity of such complex mixtures. Finally this study shows that when combining chemical and ecotoxicological data, it is possible to postulate on potential sources of toxicity, contributing to better waste management practices and safer soil organic amendment products.

  19. Chelant soil-washing technology for metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate here, in a pilot-scale experiment, the feasibility of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)based washing technology for soils contaminated with potentially toxic metals. Acid precipitation coupled to initial alkaline toxic metal removal and an electrochemical advanced oxidation process were used for average recovery of 76 +/- 2% of EDTA per batch and total recycle of water in a closed process loop. No waste water was generated; solid wastes were efficiently bitumen-stabilized before disposal. The technology embodiment, using conventional process equipment, such as a mixer for soil extraction, screen for soil/gravel separation, filter chamber presses for soil/liquid and recycled EDTA separation and soil rinsing, continuous centrifuge separator for removal of precipitated metals and electrolytic cells for process water cleansing, removed up to 72%, 25% and 66% of Pb, Zn and Cd from garden soil contaminated with up to 6960, 3797 and 32.6 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively, in nine 60kg soil batches. Concentrations of Pb and Zn remaining in the remediated soil and bioaccessible from the simulated human intestinal phase soil were reduced by 97% and 96% and were brought under the level of determination for Cd. In the most cost-effective operation mode, the material and energy costs of remediation amounted to 50.5 Euros ton(-1) soil and the total cost to 299 Euros ton(-1).

  20. Soil biodiversity and soil community composition determine ecosystem multifunctionality.

    PubMed

    Wagg, Cameron; Bender, S Franz; Widmer, Franco; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2014-04-08

    Biodiversity loss has become a global concern as evidence accumulates that it will negatively affect ecosystem services on which society depends. So far, most studies have focused on the ecological consequences of above-ground biodiversity loss; yet a large part of Earth's biodiversity is literally hidden below ground. Whether reductions of biodiversity in soil communities below ground have consequences for the overall performance of an ecosystem remains unresolved. It is important to investigate this in view of recent observations that soil biodiversity is declining and that soil communities are changing upon land use intensification. We established soil communities differing in composition and diversity and tested their impact on eight ecosystem functions in model grassland communities. We show that soil biodiversity loss and simplification of soil community composition impair multiple ecosystem functions, including plant diversity, decomposition, nutrient retention, and nutrient cycling. The average response of all measured ecosystem functions (ecosystem multifunctionality) exhibited a strong positive linear relationship to indicators of soil biodiversity, suggesting that soil community composition is a key factor in regulating ecosystem functioning. Our results indicate that changes in soil communities and the loss of soil biodiversity threaten ecosystem multifunctionality and sustainability.

  1. Spatial variability of soil hydraulics and remotely sensed soil parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lascano, R. J.; Van Bavel, C. H. M.

    1982-01-01

    The development of methods to correctly interpret remotely sensed information about soil moisture and soil temperature requires an understanding of water and energy flow in soil, because the signals originate from the surface, or from a shallow surface layer, but reflect processes in the entire profile. One formidable difficulty in this application of soil physics is the spatial heterogeneity of natural soils. Earlier work has suggested that the heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties may be described by the frequency distribution of a single scale factor. The sensitivity of hydraulic and energetic processes to the variation of this scale factor is explored with a suitable numerical model. It is believed that such an analysis can help in deciding how accurately and extensively basic physical properties of field soils need to be known in order to interpret thermal or radar waveband signals. It appears that the saturated hydraulic conductivity needs to be known only to its order of magnitude, and that the required accuracy of the soil water retention function is about 0.02 volume fraction. Furthermore, the results may be helpful in deciding how the total scene or view field, as perceived through a sensor, is composed from the actual mosaic of transient soil properties, such as surface temperature or surface soil moisture. However, the latter proposition presupposes a random distribution of permanent properties, a condition that may not be met in many instances, and no solution of the problem is apparent.

  2. The soils of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.

    1988-01-01

    A mineralogical model for the Mars fine soil that includes as major components smectite clays absorbed and coated with amorphous iron oxyhydroxides and perhaps mixed with small amounts of better-crystalized iron oxides as separate phases is proposed. Also present as accessory minerals are sulfate minerals such as kieserite (MgSO4.H2O) and/or anhydrite (CaSO4), rutile (TiO2), and maghemite (Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4), the last two as magnetic components. Carbonates may be present at low concentrations only (less than 1 to 2 pct). However, a prime question to be addressed by a Mars Sample Return Mission shall be related to the mineralogical composition of the soil, and its spatial variability.

  3. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Neuhaus, John E.

    1992-01-01

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  4. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOEpatents

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  5. Soil carbon in the hyperarid soils from the Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Silva, Julio E.; Fletcher, Lauren; Perez, Saul; Condori, Rene; Conley, Catharine; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; McKay, Chris

    Soil carbon content and its relation to site characteristics are important in evaluating current regional, continental, and global soil C stores and projecting future changes. Data from 485 soil samples were compiled for 6 different types of hyperarid soils of the Atacama desert located in South America, along the western slopes of the Andes and the Pacific Ocean from 16° S to 30° S. The soil organic carbon (SOC) of sandy soil ranged from 0.004 to 0.012% C/gr of soil, which is normally distributed in the study (mean = 0.136 g C m-2) for the 0-0.1 m profile and 0.001 to 0.029% C/gr of soil (mean = 2.998 g C m-2) for the 0-0.9 m profile. Variability in SOC contents and bulk density contributed substantially to SOC variation. Regression analysis of climatic and pedological characteristics associated with hyperarid soils with respect to their SOC indicated that combinations of site characteristics explained up to 90% of the SOC variability. The SOC increased with precipitation, and decreasing evaporation and temperature. Climatic zones, and carbonate carbon were noted for different desert soil types. The largest accumulations of carbonates (SIC) were found in calcic soils and in warm, arid areas. SIC contents ranged from 0.017 to 0.14% C/gr of soil (mean = 1.93 g C m-2) for the 0-0.1 m profile and 0.02 to 0.48% Carbon/g of soil (mean = 6.66 g C m-2) for the 0-0.9 m profile. The top 1.0-m soil layer of hyperarid lands contains some 1.13 Tg of organic carbon and 3.1 Tg of carbonate carbon. The total stored carbon was 3.7-fold the organic carbon alone. Thus, the carbon stored in soil carbonates in desertification prone lands in Atacama Desert is an important factor affecting changes in concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Key words: Soil organic carbon, carbonates, hyperarid soils, Atacama Desert.

  6. Soil Rock Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A redesigned version of a soil/rock analyzer developed by Martin Marietta under a Langley Research Center contract is being marketed by Aurora Tech, Inc. Known as the Aurora ATX-100, it has self-contained power, an oscilloscope, a liquid crystal readout, and a multichannel spectrum analyzer. It measures energy emissions to determine what elements in what percentages a sample contains. It is lightweight and may be used for mineral exploration, pollution monitoring, etc.

  7. The Mystery Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click for larger view

    This high-resolution image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the region containing the patch of soil scientists examined at Gusev Crater just after Spirit rolled off the Columbia Memorial Station. Scientists examined this patch on the 13th and 15th martian days, or sols, of Spirit's journey. Using nearly all the science instruments located on the rover's instrument deployment device or 'arm,' scientists yielded some puzzling results including the detection of a mineral called olivine and the appearance that the soil is stronger and more cohesive than they expected. Like detectives searching for clues, the science team will continue to peruse the landscape for explanations of their findings.

    Data taken from the camera's red, green and blue filters were combined to create this approximate true color picture, acquired on the 12th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's journey.

    The yellow box (see inset above) in this high-resolution image from the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit outlines the patch of soil scientists examined at Gusev Crater just after Spirit rolled off the Columbia Memorial Station.

  8. Contaminated soil stabilization demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Sampson, A.E.; Phillips, S.J.

    1991-10-01

    Long-term herbicide control along with a shotcrete cover was constructed at the Hanford Site in May 1991. The cover system allows for maintenance-free containment of contaminants by preventing wind and water transport of contaminants from the soil surface, preventing plant uptake of contaminants, and minimizing water infiltration through the soil column. The cover is composed of two parts: a commercial nonwoven geotextile material impregnated with trifluralin, and a >5-centimeter top cover of shotcrete containing polyethylene fibers. The herbicide-impregnated geotextile functions to prevent plant root growth into contaminated soil if any holes or cracks develop in the shotcrete layer. The herbicide component, trifluralin, is mixed into polymer nodules that degrade slowly over many years, thus releasing trifluralin slowly over time. The shotcrete topcover was sprayed using a sludge pump and air compressor to form a hard, impenetrable surface that prevents wind erosion and reduces water infiltration through the contaminated materials underneath. The benefits of the cover system are expected to last 20 to 30 years. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Inference of Soil Hydrologic Parameters from Soil Moisture Monitoring Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, D. G.; Seyfried, M. S.; McNamara, J. P.; Hwang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important control on hydrologic function, as it governs flux through the soil and responds to and determines vertical fluxes from and to the atmosphere, groundwater recharge and lateral fluxes through the soil. Most physically based hydrologic models require parameters to represent soil physical properties governing flow and retention of vadose water. The presented analysis compares four methods of objective analysis to determine field capacity, plant extraction limit (or permanent wilting point) and field saturated soil moisture content from decadal records of volumetric water content. These values are found as either data attractors or limits in the VWC records and may vary with interannual moisture availability. Results are compared to values from pedotransfer functions and discussed in terms of historic methods of measurement in soil physics.

  10. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-07

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon.

  11. Characterization of polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame retardants in surface soils from Surabaya, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Sudaryanto, Agus; Setiawan, Iwan Eka; Riyadi, Adi Slamet; Isobe, Tomohiko; Ogawa, Shohei; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2011-04-01

    In this study, soil contamination by PCBs, PBDEs, HBCDs and two novel BFRs such as 1,2-bis-(2,4,6-tribromopenoxy) ethane (BTBPE) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in various locations such as industrial, urban, rural, dumping site and agricultural areas of Surabaya, Indonesia has been characterized in order to evaluate their contamination status, profiles, potential sources, fate and behavior. Range and median concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs, HBCDs, BTBPE and DBDPE were ND - 9.6 (1.2), 0.069 - 24 (7.4), ND - 1.8 (0.48), ND - 1.7 (0.14) and ND - 7.6 (2.2) ng g(-1)dw, respectively. Industrial, urban and dumping areas were inventoried as the main sources of these pollutants. Decreasing gradient levels were observed for these contaminants from industrial district, urban, dumping site, rural and agricultural areas, in that order. Furthermore, organic carbon contents and proximity to the point sources were found as the major controlling factors. Contaminant profiles were characterized by the predominance of hexa-, hepta- and penta-homologues for PCBs; deca-, nona- and octa- for PBDEs and α-isomer for HBCDs. Product mixtures such as Ar1260/KC600 and Ar1254/KC500 for PCBs, deca- and octa-BDEs for PBDEs were the possible common formulations used in study area. To our knowledge, this is a first comprehensive study on characterization of soil contamination by PCBs, PBDEs and HBCDs together with two novel BFRs in a highly industrialized city located in tropical region. This study provides baseline information for establishing national monitoring programs in Indonesia.

  12. Permeability of soils in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Hara, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    The permeability of soils in Mississippi was determined and mapped using a geographic information system (GIS). Soil permeabilities in Mississippi were determined to range in value from nearly 0.0 to values exceeding 5.0 inches per hour. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service's State Soil Geographic Data Base (STATSGO) was used as the primary source of data for the determination of area-weighted soil permeability. STATSGO provides soil layer properties that are spatially referenced to mapped areas. These mapped areas are referred to as polygons in the GIS. The polygons arc boundaries of soils mapped as a group and are given unique Map Unit Identifiers (MUIDs). The data describing the physical characteristics of the soils within each polygon are stored in a tabular data base format and are referred to as attributes. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service developed STATSGO to be primarily used as a guide for regional resource planning, management, and monitoring. STATSGO was designed so that soil information could be extracted from properties tables at the layer level, combined by component, and statistically expanded to cover the entire map unit. The results of this study provide a mapped value for permeability which is representative of the vertical permeability of soils in that area. The resultant permeability map provides a representative vertical soil permeability for a given area sufficient for county, multi- county, and area planning, and will be used as the soil permeability data component in the evaluation of the susceptibility of major aquifers to contami- nation in Mississippi.

  13. Hormones, sterols, and fecal indicator bacteria in groundwater, soil, and subsurface drainage following a high single application of municipal biosolids to a field.

    PubMed

    Gottschall, N; Topp, E; Edwards, M; Payne, M; Kleywegt, S; Russell, P; Lapen, D R

    2013-04-01

    A land application of dewatered municipal biosolids (DMB) was conducted on an agricultural field in fall 2008 at a rate of 22Mg dry weight (dw) ha(-1). Pre- and post- application, hormone, sterol and fecal indicator bacteria concentrations were measured in tile drainage water, groundwater (2, 4, 6m depth), surface soil cores, and DMB aggregates incorporated in the soil (∼0.2m depth) for a period of roughly 1year post-application. Hormones and sterols were detected up to 1year post-application in soil and in DMB aggregates. Hormone (androsterone, desogestrel, estrone) contamination was detected briefly in tile water samples (22d and ∼2months post-app), at lowngL(-1) concentrations (2-34ngL(-1)). Hormones were not detected in groundwater. Sterols were detected in tile water throughout the study period post-application, and multiple fecal sterol ratios suggested biosolids as the source. Coprostanol concentrations in tile water peaked at >1000ngL(-1) (22d post-app) and were still >100ngL(-1) at 6months post-application. Fecal indicator bacteria were detected throughout the study period in tile water, groundwater (⩽2m depth), soil and DMB aggregate samples. These bacteria were strongly linearly related to coprostanol in tile water (R(2)>0.92, p<0.05). The limited transport of hormones and sterols to tile drainage networks may be attributed to a combination of the hydrophobicity of these compounds and limited macroporosity of the field soil. This transitory contamination from hormones and sterols is unlikely to result in any significant pulse exposure risk in subsurface drainage and groundwater.

  14. Presence and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on lettuce leaves and in soil treated with contaminated compost and irrigation water.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M; Viñas, I; Usall, J; Anguera, M; Abadias, M

    2012-05-15

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks associated with produce consumption have brought attention to contaminated compost manure, and polluted irrigation water as potential sources of pathogens for the contamination of these crops. The aim of this study was to determine the potential transfer of E. coli O157:H7 from soil fertilized with contaminated compost or irrigated with contaminated water to edible parts of lettuce together with its persistence in soil under field conditions in two different seasons (fall and spring). Moreover, its survival on lettuce sprinkled with contaminated irrigation water was evaluated, as well as the prevalence of aerobic mesophilic, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae in control lettuce samples. Four treatments, contaminated compost, surface and sprinkle irrigation with contaminated water and uninoculated pots, were used in this work. Contaminated compost was applied to soil in the pots before lettuce was transplanted and contaminated irrigation water was applied twice and three times on the plants after the seedlings were transplanted, for sprinkle and surface irrigation, respectively. E. coli O157:H7 survived in soil samples for 9 weeks at levels, 4.50 log cfu gdw(-1) (dw, dry weight) in fall and 1.50 log cfu gdw(-1) in spring. The pathogen survives better in fall, indicating an important influence of environmental factors. E. coli O157:H7 population in lettuce leaves after sprinkle irrigation was very high (between 10(3) and 10(6) cfu g(-1)), but decreased to undetectable levels at field conditions. There was also transfer of E. coli O157:H7 from soil contaminated with compost or irrigated with contaminated water to lettuce leaves, mainly to the outer ones. The mean counts for aerobic mesophilic, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae populations were also influenced by environmental conditions; higher levels were observed under fall conditions than in spring conditions. Contamination of lettuce plants in the field can occur

  15. An alternative to soil taxonomy for describing key soil characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Miller, Mark E.; Brown, Joel R.; Toevs, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    is not a simple task. Furthermore, because the US system of soil taxonomy is not applied universally, its utility as a means for effectively describing soil characteristics to readers in other countries is limited. Finally, and most importantly, even at the finest level of soil classification there are often large within-taxa variations in critical properties that can determine ecosystem responses to drivers such as climate and land-use change.

  16. A Handbook on Artificial Soils for Indoor Photovoltaic Soiling Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison

    2014-10-01

    This manuscript is intended to serve as a practical guide to conducting repeatable indoor soiling experiments for PV applications. An outline of techniques, materials and equipment used in prior studies [1-3] is presented. Additional recommendations and practical guidance has been presented. Major sections include techniques to formulate soil simulants, ('standard grime') and feedstocks from traceable components, spray application, and quantitative measurement methodologies at heavy and minimal soil loadings.

  17. Incineration of PCB-contaminated soils: Effect on soil properties

    SciTech Connect

    Chaouki, J.; Guy, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Mourot, P.; Masciotra, P.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental program was conducted to determine the effect of fluidized bed combustion on the properties and characteristics of a soil lightly contaminated with PCBs. The following properties of a soil sample and its leachate were characterized before and after incineration: pH, particle size distribution, and contaminant content. Three runs were carried out on a pilot scale fluidized bed at identical conditions, with three different soil samples: set point temperature of 870 {+-} 40 C and minimal residence time of 30 min. The main conclusions can be summarized as follows: under the operating conditions of the test, PCBs present in soil are eliminated to below the detection level; the runs showed good reproducibility; soil pH increases from 8.6 {+-} 0.1 to 10.7 {+-} 0.2 because of the natural limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), which calcines and then hydrolyzes to basic calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}); the incineration seems to lead to soil agglomeration; soil heavy metal content is decreased significantly after incineration; soil leachate heavy metal content is not significantly affected by incineration, except for chromium (from 0.02 to 0.06 mg/L) and zinc (from 0.1 to 0.25 mg/L); treated soil leachate content for organics and organochlorines is below the detection level.

  18. Derivation of Soil Ecological Criteria for Copper in Chinese Soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wei, Dongpu; Ma, Yibing; McLaughlin, Mike J

    2015-01-01

    Considerable information on copper (Cu) ecotoxicity as affected by biological species and abiotic properties of soils has been collected from the last decade in the present study. The information on bioavailability/ecotoxicity, species sensitivity and differences in laboratory and field ecotoxicity of Cu in different soils was collated and integrated to derive soil ecological criteria for Cu in Chinese soils, which were expressed as predicted no effect concentrations (PNEC). First, all ecotoxicity data of Cu from bioassays based on Chinese soils were collected and screened with given criteria to compile a database. Second, the compiled data were corrected with leaching and aging factors to minimize the differences between laboratory and field conditions. Before Cu ecotoxicity data were entered into a species sensitivity distribution (SSD), they were normalized with Cu ecotoxicity predictive models to modify the effects of soil properties on Cu ecotoxicity. The PNEC value was set equal to the hazardous concentration for x% of the species (HCx), which could be calculated from the SSD curves, without an additional assessment factor. Finally, predictive models for HCx based on soil properties were developed. The soil properties had a significant effect on the magnitude of HCx, with HC5 varying from 13.1 mg/kg in acidic soils to 51.9 mg/kg in alkaline non-calcareous soils. The two-factor predictive models based on soil pH and cation exchange capacity could predict HCx with determination coefficients (R2) of 0.82-0.91. The three-factor predictive models--that took into account the effect of soil organic carbon--were more accurate than two-factor models, with R2 of 0.85-0.99. The predictive models obtained here could be used to calculate soil-specific criteria. All results obtained here could provide a scientific basis for revision of current Chinese soil environmental quality standards, and the approach adopted in this study could be used as a pragmatic framework for

  19. Soil organic carbon distribution in roadside soils of Singapore.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subhadip; Scharenbroch, Bryant C; Ow, Lai Fern

    2016-12-01

    Soil is the largest pool of organic carbon in terrestrial systems and plays a key role in carbon cycle. Global population living in urban areas are increasing substantially; however, the effects of urbanization on soil carbon storage and distribution are largely unknown. Here, we characterized the soil organic carbon (SOC) in roadside soils across the city-state of Singapore. We tested three hypotheses that SOC contents (concentration and density) in Singapore would be positively related to aboveground tree biomass, soil microbial biomass and land-use patterns. Overall mean SOC concentrations and densities (0-100 cm) of Singapore's roadside soils were 29 g kg(-1) (4-106 g kg(-1)) and 11 kg m(-2) (1.1-42.5 kg m(-2)) with median values of 26 g kg(-1) and 10 kg m(-2), respectively. There was significantly higher concentration of organic carbon (10.3 g kg(-1)) in the top 0-30 cm soil depth compared to the deeper (30-50 cm, and 50-100 cm) soil depths. Singapore's roadside soils represent 4% of Singapore's land, but store 2.9 million Mg C (estimated range of 0.3-11 million Mg C). This amount of SOC is equivalent to 25% of annual anthropogenic C emissions in Singapore. Soil organic C contents in Singapore's soils were not related to aboveground vegetation or soil microbial biomass, whereas land-use patterns to best explain variance in SOC in Singapore's roadside soils. We found SOC in Singapore's roadside soils to be inversely related to urbanization. We conclude that high SOC in Singapore roadside soils are probably due to management, such as specifications of high quality top-soil, high use of irrigation and fertilization and also due to an optimal climate promoting rapid growth and biological activity.

  20. A soil quality index for reclaimed mine soils.

    PubMed

    Asensio, Verónica; Guala, S D; Vega, Flora A; Covelo, Emma F

    2013-10-01

    The quality of soils found in mines is low if they do not receive any reclamation treatment; yet, to the authors’ knowledge, there are still no equations to evaluate the quality of metal-contaminated mine soils after the application of the most widely used reclamation treatments (planting vegetation and amending with wastes). Therefore, the purposes of the present study were 1) to propose a method for developing soil quality indexes (SQIs); 2) to develop the SQIs for 2 types of mine soils (settling pond and mine tailing) reclaimed by planting trees, amending with wastes, or both; and 3) to assess the quality of these soils under field conditions. The results obtained after the use of an SQI developed for reclaimed mine soils through the selection of an SQI with a factor analysis and the totaling of the scores of the selected variables revealed that this method is a valid tool for developing SQIs. Applying this index with reclaimed mine soils showed that the untreated sites had a very low quality and that the treatment that most improved the soils was amending with wastes (sewage sludges and paper mill residues). The authors recommend the periodic addition of sewage sludges and paper mill residues to degraded sites as they increase the quality of soils, but the effects decrease over time.

  1. Quantifying Shrink Swell Capacity of Soil Using Soil Moisture Isotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, L. D.; Cobos, D. R.; Campbell, C. S.; Morgan, C.

    2013-12-01

    Vertisols, soils instinctively known for their expansive clays that cause them to have a high shrink swell potential, cover 2.4% of the earths ice-free land. In the United States these expansive soils can cause upwards of 6 billion in damages to pavements, foundations, and utility lines annually (Brady & Weil, 2010). Because of this, it is especially important that a soils ability to shrink and swell is well characterized when making engineering decisions. One traditional method for measuring a soil's expansive potential, the Coefficient of Linear Extensibility (COLE), can take weeks to months to complete (Grossman et al., 1968; Schafer and Singer, 1976b). Use of soil moisture isotherms, or the Soil Moisture Characteristic Curve (SMCC), in recent research has shown that the slope of the SMCC is related to a soils swelling potential (McKeen, 1992). The goal of this research is to evaluate the robustness of the relationship between the SMCC and COLE for a set of well-characterized test soils with COLE ranging from 0 to 0.176. If expansive potential can be reliably predicted from the SMCC, then data from recently developed automatic soil moisture isotherm generators could be used to characterize expansive potential with a fraction of the time and effort necessary for traditional techniques.

  2. Effect of soil reclamation process on soil C fractions.

    PubMed

    Asensio, V; Vega, F A; Covelo, E F

    2014-01-01

    Mine soils are notable for their low organic matter content. Soils in the depleted copper mine in Touro (Galicia, Spain) were vegetated with trees (eucalyptuses and pines) and amended with wastes (sewage sludge and paper mill residues) to increase their carbon concentration. Two different zones at the mine (settling pond and mine tailing) and their respective treated areas (vegetated and/or amended) were sampled and analysed with the aim of evaluating in depth the effect of the reclamation treatments on both the concentration and quality of soil organic matter under field conditions. The results showed that the two treatments (tree vegetation and waste amendment) significantly increased the organic C in the mine soils from 1.4-6.6 to 10-112 g kg(-1). However, only the soil amended with wastes in the settling pond reached the usual values of undisturbed soils (92-126 g TOC kg(-1) soil). Amending with wastes was also the only treatment that increased the soil humified organic C concentration to proper values and therefore also the microbial biomass C. We recommend the use of organic wastes for amending soils poor in organic matter as well as the regular application of this treatment, as the nitrogen supply can be more limiting for plant growth than the organic C.

  3. Derivation of Soil Ecological Criteria for Copper in Chinese Soils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wei, Dongpu; Ma, Yibing; McLaughlin, Mike J.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable information on copper (Cu) ecotoxicity as affected by biological species and abiotic properties of soils has been collected from the last decade in the present study. The information on bioavailability/ecotoxicity, species sensitivity and differences in laboratory and field ecotoxicity of Cu in different soils was collated and integrated to derive soil ecological criteria for Cu in Chinese soils, which were expressed as predicted no effect concentrations (PNEC). First, all ecotoxicity data of Cu from bioassays based on Chinese soils were collected and screened with given criteria to compile a database. Second, the compiled data were corrected with leaching and aging factors to minimize the differences between laboratory and field conditions. Before Cu ecotoxicity data were entered into a species sensitivity distribution (SSD), they were normalized with Cu ecotoxicity predictive models to modify the effects of soil properties on Cu ecotoxicity. The PNEC value was set equal to the hazardous concentration for x% of the species (HCx), which could be calculated from the SSD curves, without an additional assessment factor. Finally, predictive models for HCx based on soil properties were developed. The soil properties had a significant effect on the magnitude of HCx, with HC5 varying from 13.1 mg/kg in acidic soils to 51.9 mg/kg in alkaline non-calcareous soils. The two-factor predictive models based on soil pH and cation exchange capacity could predict HCx with determination coefficients (R2) of 0.82–0.91. The three-factor predictive models – that took into account the effect of soil organic carbon – were more accurate than two-factor models, with R2 of 0.85–0.99. The predictive models obtained here could be used to calculate soil-specific criteria. All results obtained here could provide a scientific basis for revision of current Chinese soil environmental quality standards, and the approach adopted in this study could be used as a pragmatic

  4. Minute tubular forms in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.; Liu, K.-C.

    1979-01-01

    Large numbers of long, straight, flattened structures were observed during an electron-microscope study of bacteriophage in aqueous extracts. These structures were called tubules and ranged in width from 10 to 50 nm. Materials and methods were discussed relative to extraction of tubules from soil, electron microscopy, quantitation of tubules in filtrate suspension, tests performed on tubules, plaque formation, and nutrient amendments. It is found that all of the tubules recovered from soil are broken at one or both ends. They are present in surface soils but not in a subsurface sample. Their numbers decrease during bacterial multiplication in soil or broth-containing soil. The tubules appear to be composed of protein that could be disintegrated to liberate nonprotein fibers. A possible clue to the nature of the tubules is their apparent relation to soil bacteria.

  5. Dependence of soil respiration on soil temperature and soil moisture in successional forests in Southern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tang, X.-L.; Zhou, G.-Y.; Liu, S.-G.; Zhang, D.-Q.; Liu, S.-Z.; Li, J.; Zhou, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in soil respiration and its relationship with biophysical factors in forests near the Tropic of Cancer remain highly uncertain. To contribute towards an improvement of actual estimates, soil respiration rates, soil temperature, and soil moisture were measured in three successional subtropical forests at the Dinghushan Nature Reserve (DNR) in southern China from March 2003 to February 2005. The overall objective of the present study was to analyze the temporal variations of soil respiration and its biophysical dependence in these forests. The relationships between biophysical factors and soil respiration rates were compared in successional forests to test the hypothesis that these forests responded similarly to biophysical factors. The seasonality of soil respiration coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with high respiration rates in the hot humid season (April-September) and with low rates in the cool dry season (October-March). Soil respiration measured at these forests showed a clear increasing trend with the progressive succession. Annual mean (±SD) soil respiration rate in the DNR forests was (9.0 ± 4.6) Mg CO2-C/hm2per year, ranging from (6.1 ± 3.2) Mg CO2-C/hm2per year in early successional forests to (10.7 ± 4.9) Mg CO2-C/hm2 per year in advanced successional forests. Soil respiration was correlated with both soil temperature and moisture. The T/M model, where the two biophysical variables are driving factors, accounted for 74%-82% of soil respiration variation in DNR forests. Temperature sensitivity decreased along progressive succession stages, suggesting that advanced-successional forests have a good ability to adjust to temperature. In contrast, moisture increased with progressive succession processes. This increase is caused, in part, by abundant respirators in advanced-successional forest, where more soil moisture is needed to maintain their activities.

  6. Agronomic and environmental soil test phosphorus method comparisons and diet modification impacts on poultry litter phosphorus composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugene, Branly

    Phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields to freshwater ecosystems is of increasing concern due to elevated soil P levels brought on by long term and excessive application rates of manure and commercial fertilizers. Both Bray P1 and Mehlich-3 P (PM3) soil tests are used in Indiana to make fertilizer recommendations and to limit manure application rates. The Mehlich-3 P Saturation Ratio (PSRM3) has been proposed as an alternative to PM3 and the ammonium oxalate degree of P saturation (DPSOX) for assessing the risk of soluble P loss from soils. We assessed the correlations among agronomic soil test methods (PM3 and Bray P1), environmental soil test methods (soluble P: deionized water, DW; artificial rainwater, ARW; dilute salt extractable P, DSEP), ammonium oxalate P (POX), total P (TP), and P saturation methods from 565 Indiana surface soil samples. Significant correlations were found among the various STP methods evaluated, and Bray P1 and PM3 displayed the strongest coefficient of correlation (r = 0.93, p < 0.0001). Mehlich-3 P had stronger correlations with TP and POX compared to correlations between Bray P1 and TP and POX, and their correlations were all highly significant ( p < 0.0001). Additionally, all soluble P forms were significantly correlated with Bray P1, PM3, and POX, and the correlations between Bray P1 and all three soluble P measures were consistently greater than those between other soil test methods and the soluble measures. Significant correlations were found between PM3 and PSRM3 (r = 0.93, p < 0.0001) and between PSRM3 and DPSOX (r = 0.92, p < 0.0001), suggesting that PSRM3 can be as effective as DPSOX to identify soils with a greater potential to contribute bioavailable (not just soluble) P to surface and ground water. We conclude that both PM3 and PSRM3 can be integrated into more comprehensive P loss risk algorithms to mitigate elevated P concentration in surface and ground water. The PSRM3 can be used as an alternative to PM3 as it does

  7. Aflatoxin decomposition in various soils

    SciTech Connect

    Angle, J.S.

    1986-08-01

    The persistence of aflatoxin in the soil environment could potentially result in a number of adverse environmental consequences. To determine the persistence of aflatoxin in soil, /sup 14/C-labeled aflatoxin B1, was added to silt loam, sandy loam, and silty clay loam soils and the subsequent release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was determined. After 120 days of incubation, 8.1% of the original aflatoxin added to the silt loam soil was released as CO/sub 2/. Aflatoxin decomposition in the sandy loam soil proceeded more quickly than the other two soils for the first 20 days of incubation. After this time, the decomposition rate declined and by the end of the study, 4.9% of the aflatoxin was released as CO/sub 2/. Aflatoxin decomposition proceeded most slowly in the silty clay loam soil. Only 1.4% of aflatoxin added to the soil was released as CO/sub 2/ after 120 days incubation. To determine whether aflatoxin was bound to the silty clay loam soil, aflatoxin B1 was added to this soil and incubated for 20 days. The soil was periodically extracted and the aflatoxin species present were determined using thin layer chromatographic (TLC) procedures. After one day of incubation, the degradation products, aflatoxins B2 and G2, were observed. It was also found that much of the aflatoxin extracted from the soil was not mobile with the TLC solvent system used. This indicated that a conjugate may have formed and thus may be responsible for the lack of aflatoxin decomposition.

  8. Soil Science and Global Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Rattan

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable management of soil is integral to any rational approach to addressing global issues of the 21st century. A high quality soil is essential to: i) advancing food and nutritional security, ii) mitigating and adapting to climate change, iii) improving quality and renewability of water, iv) enriching biodiversity, v) producing biofuel feedstocks for reducing dependence on fossil fuel, and vi) providing cultural, aesthetical and recreational opportunities. Being the essence of all terrestrial life, soil functions and ecosystem services are essential to wellbeing of all species of plants and animals. Yet, soil resources are finite, unequally distributed geographically, and vulnerable to degradation by natural and anthropogenic perturbations. Nonetheless, soil has inherent resilience, and its ecosystem functions and services can be restored over time. However, soil resilience depends on several key soil properties including soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration and pool, plant-available water capacity (PWAC), nutrient reserves, effective rooting depth, texture and clay mineralogy, pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC) etc. There is a close inter-dependence among these properties. For example, SOC concentration strongly affects, PWAC, nutrient reserve, activity and species diversity of soil flora and fauna, CEC etc. Thus, judicious management of SOC concentration to maintain it above the threshold level (~1.5-2%) in the root zone is critical to sustaining essential functions and ecosystem services. Yet, soils of some agroecosystems (e.g., those managed by resources-poor farmers and small landholders in the tropics and sub-tropics) are severely depleted of their SOC reserves. Consequently. Agronomic productivity and wellbeing of people dependent on degraded soils is jeopardized. The ecosystem C pool of the terrestrial biosphere has been mined by extractive practices, the nature demands recarbonization of its biosphere for maintenance of its functions and

  9. Soil vulnerability for cesium transfer.

    PubMed

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Sweeck, Lieve

    2011-07-01

    The recent events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan have raised questions about the accumulation of radionuclides in soils and the possible impacts on agriculture surrounding nuclear power plants. This article summarizes the knowledge gained after the nuclear power plant accident in Chernobyl, Ukraine, on how soil parameters influence soil vulnerability for radiocesium bioavailability, discusses some potential agrochemical countermeasures, and presents some predictions of radiocesium crop concentrations for areas affected by the Fukushima accident.

  10. Acoustic behaviors of unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Soils are unconsolidated granular materials, consisting of solid particles, water and air. Their mechanical and dynamic behaviors are determined by the discrete nature of the media as well as external and inter-particle forces. For unsaturated soils, two factors significantly affect soils acoustic/seismic responses: external pressure and internal water potential/matric suction. In triaxial cell tests, unsaturated soils were subjected to predefined stress paths to undergo stages of normal consolidation, unload-reload cycles, and failure. The stress deformation curve and stress-P-wave velocity were measured and compared. The study revealed that soil's dynamic response to external pressure are similar to those of the load-deformation behaviors and demonstrated that acoustic velocity can be used to monitor the state of stress of soils. In a long term field soil survey, the P-wave velocities were found to be correlated with water potential as expressed as a power-law relationship. The above phenomena can be understood by using the Terzaghi' s the principle of effective stress. The measured results were in good agreement with Brutsaert theory. The effective stress concept can also be applied to explain the observations in a soil pipe flow study in which soil internal erosion processes were monitored and interpreted by the temporal evolution of the P-wave velocity. In addition to above linear acoustic behaviors, soils, like other earth materials, exhibit astonishing non-classical nonlinear behaviors such as end-point memory, hysteresis, strain -dependent shear modulus, resonant frequency shift, and phase shift, harmonics generation, etc. A nonlinear acoustic study of a soil as a function of water content showed that the nonlinear acoustic parameter are much sensitive to the variations of soil water content than that of the acoustic velocity.

  11. Dairy manure applications and soil health implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy manure applications can potentially improve soil health by adding organic matter (OM) to the soil. However, intensive dairy manure applications can cause salt accumulations on arid, irrigated soils, impairing soil health, which can reduce crop growth and yield. Soil organic matter, a major c...

  12. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: BIOGENESIS SOIL WASHING TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil washing technologies are designed to transfer contaminants from soil to a liquid phase. The BloGenesis™ soil washing technology uses a proprietary surfactant solution to transfer organic contaminants from soil to wastewater. The surfactant used in the soil washing process wa...

  13. In-situ vitrification of soil

    DOEpatents

    Brouns, Richard A.; Buelt, James L.; Bonner, William F.

    1983-01-01

    A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

  14. Rhizosphere Organic Anions Play a Minor Role in Improving Crop Species' Ability to Take Up Residual Phosphorus (P) in Agricultural Soils Low in P Availability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanliang; Krogstad, Tore; Clarke, Jihong L; Hallama, Moritz; Øgaard, Anne F; Eich-Greatorex, Susanne; Kandeler, Ellen; Clarke, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Many arable lands have accumulated large reserves of residual phosphorus (P) and a relatively large proportion of soil P is less available for uptake by plants. Root released organic anions are widely documented as a key physiological strategy to enhance P availability, while limited information has been generated on the contribution of rhizosphere organic anions to P utilization by crops grown in agricultural soils that are low in available P and high in extractable Ca, Al, and Fe. We studied the role of rhizosphere organic anions in P uptake from residual P in four common crops Triticum aestivum, Avena sativa, Solanum tuberosum, and Brassica napus in low- and high-P availability agricultural soils from long-term fertilization field trials in a mini-rhizotron experiment with four replications. Malate was generally the dominant organic anion. More rhizosphere citrate was detected in low P soils than in high P soil. B. napus showed 74-103% increase of malate in low P loam, compared with clay loam. A. sativa had the greatest rhizosphere citrate concentration in all soils (5.3-15.2 μmol g(-1) root DW). A. sativa also showed the highest level of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; 36 and 40%), the greatest root mass ratio (0.51 and 0.66) in the low-P clay loam and loam respectively, and the greatest total P uptake (5.92 mg P/mini-rhizotron) in the low-P loam. B. napus had 15-44% more rhizosphere acid phosphatase (APase) activity, ~0.1-0.4 units lower rhizosphere pH than other species, the greatest increase in rhizosphere water-soluble P in the low-P soils, and the greatest total P uptake in the low-P clay loam. Shoot P content was mainly explained by rhizosphere APase activity, water-soluble P and pH within low P soils across species. Within species, P uptake was mainly linked to rhizosphere water soluble P, APase, and pH in low P soils. The effects of rhizosphere organic anions varied among species and they appeared to play minor roles in

  15. Rhizosphere Organic Anions Play a Minor Role in Improving Crop Species' Ability to Take Up Residual Phosphorus (P) in Agricultural Soils Low in P Availability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanliang; Krogstad, Tore; Clarke, Jihong L.; Hallama, Moritz; Øgaard, Anne F.; Eich-Greatorex, Susanne; Kandeler, Ellen; Clarke, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Many arable lands have accumulated large reserves of residual phosphorus (P) and a relatively large proportion of soil P is less available for uptake by plants. Root released organic anions are widely documented as a key physiological strategy to enhance P availability, while limited information has been generated on the contribution of rhizosphere organic anions to P utilization by crops grown in agricultural soils that are low in available P and high in extractable Ca, Al, and Fe. We studied the role of rhizosphere organic anions in P uptake from residual P in four common crops Triticum aestivum, Avena sativa, Solanum tuberosum, and Brassica napus in low- and high-P availability agricultural soils from long-term fertilization field trials in a mini-rhizotron experiment with four replications. Malate was generally the dominant organic anion. More rhizosphere citrate was detected in low P soils than in high P soil. B. napus showed 74–103% increase of malate in low P loam, compared with clay loam. A. sativa had the greatest rhizosphere citrate concentration in all soils (5.3–15.2 μmol g−1 root DW). A. sativa also showed the highest level of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF; 36 and 40%), the greatest root mass ratio (0.51 and 0.66) in the low-P clay loam and loam respectively, and the greatest total P uptake (5.92 mg P/mini-rhizotron) in the low-P loam. B. napus had 15–44% more rhizosphere acid phosphatase (APase) activity, ~0.1–0.4 units lower rhizosphere pH than other species, the greatest increase in rhizosphere water-soluble P in the low-P soils, and the greatest total P uptake in the low-P clay loam. Shoot P content was mainly explained by rhizosphere APase activity, water-soluble P and pH within low P soils across species. Within species, P uptake was mainly linked to rhizosphere water soluble P, APase, and pH in low P soils. The effects of rhizosphere organic anions varied among species and they appeared to play minor roles in

  16. Approximating Phosphorus Leaching from Agricultural Organic Soils by Soil Testing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Z M; Zhang, T Q; Kessel, C; Tan, C S; O'Halloran, I P; Wang, Y T; Speranzini, D; Van Eerd, L L

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorus applied to soils in excess of crop requirement could create situations favorable to P enrichment in subsurface flow that contributes to eutrophication of surface water. This pathway of P loss can be more severe in muck (i.e., organic) soils where agricultural production is intensive. This study evaluated the suitability of various environmental and agronomic soil P tests initially designed for mineral soils to predict dissolved reactive P (DRP) in subsurface flow from organic soils. Intact soil columns were collected from 44 muck soils in Ontario to provide a wide range of soil test P levels. A lysimeter leaching study was conducted by evenly adding water in an amount equivalent to 5 mm of rainfall. The leachate DRP concentration was linearly related to soil water-extractable P and CaCl-extractable P with values of 0.90 and 0.93, respectively, and to Bray-1 P and FeO-impregnated filter paper extractable P in a split-line model with a change point. Mehlich-3 P and Olsen P, a method recommended for agronomic P calibration in Ontario, were not related to leachate DRP concentration. All P sorption index (PSI) based degree of P saturation (DPS) values were closely related to leachate DRP in split-line models, with the DPS indices expressed as Bray-1 P/PSI and FeO-P/PSI having the highest correlation with leachate DRP concentration. Because it is desirable from practical and economic standpoints that the environmental risk assessment shares the same soil test with agronomic P calibration, the two PSI-based DPS indices as presented can be considered as environmental risk indicators of DRP subsurface loss from organic soils.

  17. Apollo 11 soil mechanics investigation.

    PubMed

    Costes, N C; Carrier, W D; Mitchell, J K; Scott, R F

    1970-01-30

    The fine-grained surface material at the Apollo 11 landing site is a brownish, medium-gray, slightly cohesive granular soil, with bulky grains in the silt-to-fine-sand range, having a specific gravity of 3.1 and exhibiting adhesive characteristics. Within the upper few centimeters, the lunar soil has an average density of about 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter and is similar in appearance and behavior to the soils studied at the Surveyor equatorial landing sites. Althouglh considerably different in composition and in range of particle shapes, it is similar in its mechanical behavior to terrestrial soils of the same grain size distribution.

  18. Is soil carbon storage underestimated?

    PubMed

    Díaz-Hernández, José Luis

    2010-06-01

    An accurate evaluation of the carbon stored in soils is essential to fully understand the role of soils as source or sink of atmospheric CO(2), as well as the feedback processes involved in soil-atmosphere CO(2) exchange. Depth and strategies of sampling have been, and still are, sources of uncertainties, because most current estimates of carbon storage in soils are based on conventional soil surveys and data sets compiled primarily for agricultural purposes. In a study of the Guadix-Baza basin, a semiarid area of southern Spain, sizeable amounts of carbon have been found stored in the subsoil. Total carbon estimated within 2-m was 141.3 kg Cm(-2) compared to 36.1 kg Cm(-2) if estimates were based solely on conventional soil depths (e.g. 40-cm in Regosols and 100-cm in Fluvisols). Thus, the insufficient sampling depth could lead to considerable underestimation of global soil carbon. In order to correctly evaluate the carbon content in world soils, more specific studies must be planned and carried out, especially in those soils where caliche and other carbonated cemented horizons are present.

  19. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmugge, T. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The AgRISTARS Soil Moisture Project has made significant progress in the quantification of microwave sensor capabilities for soil moisture remote sensing. The 21-cm wavelength has been verified to be the best single channel for radiometric observations of soil moisture. It has also been found that other remote sensing approaches used in conjunction with L-band passive data are more successful than multiple wavelength microwave radiometry in this application. AgRISTARS studies have also improved current understanding of noise factors affecting the interpretability of microwave emission data. The absorption of soil emission by vegetation has been quantified, although this effect is less important than absorption effects for microwave radiometry.

  20. The Biotoxicity of Mars Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerney, Krystal

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence from the Opportunity and Spirit rovers suggests that the soils on Mars might be very high in biotoxic materials induding sulfate salts, chlorides, and acidifying agents. Yet, very little is known about how the chemistries of Mars soils might affect the survival and growth of terrestrial microorganisms. The primary objectives of the proposed research will be to: (1) prepare and characterize Mars analog soils amended with potential biotoxic levels of sulfates, chlorides, and acidifying minerals; (2) use the stimulants to conduct a series of toxicology assays to determine if terrestrial microorganisms from spacecraft or extreme environments can survive direct exposure to the biotoxic soils, and (3) mix soils from extreme environments on Earth into Mars analog soils to determine if terrestrial microorganisms can grow and replicate under Martian conditions. The Mars analog soils will be thoroughly characterized by a wide diversity of soil chemistry assays to determine the exact nature of the soluble biotoxic components following hydration. The microbial experiments will be designed to test the effects of Mars stimulants on microbial survival, growth and replication during direct challenge experiments. Toxicology experiments will be designed to mimic terrestrial microbes coming into contact with biotoxic soils with and without liquid water. Results are expected to help" ... characterize the limits of life in ... planetary environments ... " and may help constrain the search for life on Mars.

  1. The Systems Mapping of Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforova, Alexandra; Fleis, Maria; Borisov, Mickail

    2013-04-01

    Soil, together with rocks, waters, air, and living organisms, is one of the natural elements, which make up landscapes. At the same time soil is a unique (derivative) natural element because only it originates from the interaction of all the other (basic) natural elements. Reasoning from this fact, soil maps must be unique too - fundamentally different from geological, geomorphological, natural vegetation, and other thematic maps of the basic natural elements. It is suggested creating conceptually new soil maps, namely the systems soil maps, which are derived from the systems landscape maps. Legends of such maps are based on hierarchical classification of natural landscapes-systems. The last-mentioned are regarded as elementary structural units of the Earth's landscape envelope comprised of interacting landscape elements. The landscapes-systems step by step are divided into divisions and subdivisions of different hierarchical levels unless reaching separate and isolated landscapes-systems, which can not be divided further because of their homogeneity. Criteria used to differentiate between landscapes-systems include the most prominent properties of natural landscape elements, for instance: sequence of the elements, range of altitudes and slopes, zonal vegetation types associated with effective heat sum and precipitation ratio, the main genetic soil horizons, genetic types and forms of relief, lithology of parent materials, depth of humus horizons, chemical composition of ground waters, and so forth. Levels at which criteria of classification are soil properties are named the "soil" one; they are the lowest one in each scale range. The systems soil maps are produced for "soil" levels and show certain soil properties in connection with those properties of the basic natural elements, which cause these soil properties. In GIS environment the systems soil maps are produced automatically from an integrated polygon layer created manually on the basis of expert analysis of

  2. Use of spent mushroom substrates from Agaricus subrufescens (syn. A. blazei, A. brasiliensis) and Lentinula edodes productions in the enrichment of a soil-based potting media for lettuce (Lactuca sativa) cultivation: Growth promotion and soil bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Ribas, L C C; de Mendonça, M M; Camelini, C M; Soares, C H L

    2009-10-01

    This study aimed to assess physicochemical and microbiological properties of fresh spent mushroom substrates (SMSs)--without post-crop heat treatment--from Agaricus subrufescens and Lentinula edodes production to optimize the use of these residues in the soil enrichment for lettuce growth promotion and soil remediation. Organic matter and C content of both SMSs were high. Fresh A. subrufescens SMS was a good source of N, P and K. On the other hand, L. edodes SMS presented a lower concentration of these nutrients and a high level of immaturity. Both SMSs presented high electric conductivity values (2.5-3.4 mS/cm). Microbiological analysis, based upon enumeration of culturable bacteria (thermophilic and mesophilic) and fungi, and also evolution of CO(2), showed that SMSs played higher microbial diversity than soil control. Laccase activity from A. subrufescens SMS tended to remain constant during a 2-month period, while L. edodes SMS presented low laccase activity throughout the same period. Agaricus subrufescens and L. edodes were able to grow on a PDA (Potato Dextrose Agar) media supplemented with different concentrations of atrazine (1-50 microg/ml), degraded the herbicide, attaining rates of 35% and 26%, respectively. On experiments of lettuce growth promotion using a soil-based potting media with different SMS rates, 5% and 10% (dw) rates of A. subrufescens SMS resulted in higher lettuce aerial dry weights than the rates of 25% and 40%, the chemical fertilization (NPK) and the control (soil). At 10% supplementation, lettuce aerial dry weight increased 2.2 and 1.3 times compared to the control and the NPK treatment, respectively. Protein content increased along with SMS rates. Fresh A. subrufescens SMS was an excellent supplement for lettuce growth promotion and showed potential for remediation of biocides possibly due to improved microbial diversity and enzymatic activity. Fresh L. edodes SMS was not a good fertilizer, at least under the conditions tested

  3. Environmental Controls of Soil Organic Carbon in Soils Across Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Paz, Claudia; Phillips, Oliver; Nonato Araujo Filho, Raimundo; Lloyd, Jon

    2015-04-01

    Amazonian forests store and cycle a significant amount of carbon on its soils and vegetation. Yet, Amazonian forests are now subject to strong environmental pressure from both land use and climate change. Some of the more dramatic model projections for the future of the Amazon predict a major change in precipitation followed by savanization of most currently forested areas, resulting in major carbon losses to the atmosphere. However, how soil carbon stocks will respond to climatic and land use changes depend largely on how soil carbon is stabilized. Amazonian soils are highly diverse, being very variable in their weathering levels and chemical and physical properties, and thus it is important to consider how the different soils of the Basin stabilize and store soil organic carbon (SOC). The wide variation in soil weathering levels present in Amazonia, suggests that soil groups with contrasting pedogenetic development should differ in their predominant mechanism of SOC stabilization. In this study we investigated the edaphic, mineralogical and climatic controls of SOC concentration in 147 pristine forest soils across nine different countries in Amazonia, encompassing 14 different WRB soil groups. Soil samples were collected in 1 ha permanent plots used for forest dynamics studies as part of the RAINFOR project. Only 0-30 cm deep averages are reported here. Soil samples were analyzed for carbon and nitrogen and for their chemical (exchangeable bases, phosphorus, pH) and physical properties, (particle size, bulk density) and mineralogy through standard selective dissolution techniques (Fe and Al oxides) and by semi-quantitative X-Ray diffraction. In Addition, selected soils from each soil group had SOC fractionated by physical and chemical techniques. Our results indicate that different stabilization mechanisms are responsible for SOC stabilization in Amazonian soils with contrasting pedogenetic level. Ferralsols and Acrisols were found to have uniform mineralogy

  4. Soil fauna community in the black soil of northeast China under different conservation tillage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fauna is an important component in soil ecosystem. Through the soil moisture changes, soil environment is changed under different tillage systems, and then the population of soil fauna also is changed. This study tested whether conservation tillage or conventional tillage (CT) of black soil fie...

  5. SOIL moisture data intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Yann; Rodriguez-Frenandez, Nemesio; Al-Yaari, Amen; Parens, Marie; Molero, Beatriz; Mahmoodi, Ali; Mialon, Arnaud; Richaume, Philippe; Bindlish, Rajat; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite (SMOS) was launched in November 2009 and started delivering data in January 2010. Subsequently, the satellite has been in operation for over 6 years while the retrieval algorithms from Level 1 to Level 2 underwent significant evolutions as knowledge improved. Other approaches for retrieval at Level 2 over land were also investigated while Level 3 and 4 were initiated. In this présentation these improvements are assessed by inter-comparisons of the current Level 2 (V620) against the previous version (V551) and new products either using neural networks or Level 3. In addition a global evaluation of different SMOS soil moisture (SM) products is performed comparing products with those of model simulations and other satellites (AMSR E/ AMSR2 and ASCAT). Finally, all products were evaluated against in situ measurements of soil moisture (SM). The study demonstrated that the V620 shows a significant improvement (including those at level1 improving level2)) with respect to the earlier version V551. Results also show that neural network based approaches can yield excellent results over areas where other products are poor. Finally, global comparison indicates that SMOS behaves very well when compared to other sensors/approaches and gives consistent results over all surfaces from very dry (African Sahel, Arizona), to wet (tropical rain forests). RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) is still an issue even though detection has been greatly improved while RFI sources in several areas of the world are significantly reduced. When compared to other satellite products, the analysis shows that SMOS achieves its expected goals and is globally consistent over different eco climate regions from low to high latitudes and throughout the seasons.

  6. Saxton soil remediation project

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Facility (SNEF) consists of a 23-MW(thermal) pressurized light water thermal reactor located in south central Pennsylvania. The Saxton Nuclear Experimental Corporation (SNEC), a wholly owned subsidiary of the General Public Utilities (GPU) Corporation, is the licensee for the SNEF. Maintenance and decommissioning activities at the site are conducted by GPU Nuclear, also a GPU subsidiary and operator of the Three Mile Island and Oyster Creek nuclear facilities. The remediation and radioactive waste management of contaminated soils is described.

  7. Soil on Phoenix's TEGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows soil on the doors of the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) onboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The image was taken by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera on the 131st Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Oct. 7, 2008). This sample delivered to TEGA was named 'Rosy Red.'

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Oil degradation in soil.

    PubMed

    Raymond, R L; Hudson, J O; Jamison, V W

    1976-04-01

    The environmental effects of adding certain selected petroleum products to field soils at widely separated geographical locations under optimum conditions for biodegradation were studied. The locations selected for study of soil biodegradation of six oils (used crankcase oil from cars, used crankcase oil from trucks, an Arabian Heavy crude oil, a Coastal Mix crude oil, a home heating oil no. 2, and a residual fuel oil no. 6) were Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania, Tulsa, Oklahoma, and Corpus Christi, Texas. The investigative process, covering a period of 1 year at each location, was conducted in 14 fields plots (1.7 by 3.0 m) to which the oils were added in a single application at a rate of 11.9 m3/4 X 10(3) m2. One-half of the plots at each location were fertilized, and the incorporation of the oils and fertilizers was accomplished with rototillers to a depth of 10 to 15 cm. Concentrations of all oils decreased significantly at all locations. The average reduction ranged from 48.5 to 90.0% depending upon the type of oil and location. Rates of degradation did not exceed 2.4 m3/4 X 10(3) m2 per month. Compositional changes in the oil with time were investigated using silica gel fractionation, gas chromatography, and ultraviolet absorbance. With the possible exception of the two fuel oils, the compositional changes were generally in the same direction for all of the oils. The silica gel fractionation and gravimetric data on residual oils show that all classes of compounds were degraded, but the more polar type degrade more slowly. Analysis of runoff water, leachate, and soils indicated that at the concentration applied no oil less was observed from these plots via water movement. No significant movement of lead compounds added to the soils in the used crankcase oils was observed. Significant increases in hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms were demonstrated in all treated plots using either the pure hydrocarbon, n-hexadecane, or the applied oils as the growth substrate

  9. Manufactured soil screening test

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to provide a screening test that can be used to evaluate the potential for manufacturing artificial soil using dredged material, cellulose waste materials (e.g., yard waste compost, sawdust, wastepaper), and biosolids (e.g., N-Viro-reconditioned sewage sludge, BIONSOIL-reconstituted cow manure). This procedure will allow the most productive blend of any dredged material (uncontaminated or contaminated), cellulose, and biosolids to be determined and recommended for use in an environmentally productive and beneficial manner.

  10. In situ soil pipeflow experiments on contrasting streambank soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil piping has been attributed as a potential mechanism of instability of embankments and streambanks. Limited field work has been conducted on quantifying and modeling pipeflow and internal erosion processes in the field with either natural or artificially created soil pipes. This research utilize...

  11. Copper activity in soil solutions of calcareous soils.

    PubMed

    Ponizovsky, Alexander A; Allen, Herbert E; Ackerman, Amanda J

    2007-01-01

    Copper partitioning was studied in seven calcareous soils at moisture content corresponding to 1.2 times the field moisture content (soil water potential 7.84 J kg(-1)). Copper retention was accompanied by the release in soil solution of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Na(+), and H(+), and the total amount of these cations released was 0.8 to 1.09 times the amount of Cu sorbed (mol(c):mol(c)). The relationships between Cu activity and pH, and the balance of cations in soils correspond with the surface precipitation of CuCO(3) as the main mechanism of Cu retention. The values of ion activity product of surface precipitate were close for all studied soils with the average log(IAP(CuCO(3)))=-15.51. The relationship between copper activity in soil solutions and soil properties is well fit by a regression relating pCu (-log copper ion activity) with soil pH, total Cu, and carbonate content.

  12. Soil carbon sequestration estimated with the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and reliable assessments of the potential of different agricultural management systems to sequester soil organic carbon are needed to promote conservation and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model to parameterize and is currentl...

  13. ECOLOGICAL SOIL SCREENING LEVELS FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES AND PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) are being developed for 24 inorganic and inorganic chemicals for soil invertebrates and plants using procedures developed by a Task Group of the USEPA Eco-SSL Work Group. The Eco-SSL Work Group is a collaboration among USEPA, DoD, DOE, ...

  14. Soil spatial heterogeneity effect on soil electrical resistivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Electrical resistivity (ER) is growing in popularity due to its ease of use and because of its non-invasive techniques, which are used to reveal and map soil heterogeneity. The objective of this work was to evaluate how differing soil properties affect the electric resistivity and to observe these e...

  15. Correlations between soil characteristics and radioactivity content of Vojvodina soil.

    PubMed

    Forkapic, S; Vasin, J; Bikit, I; Mrdja, D; Bikit, K; Milić, S

    2017-01-01

    During the years 2001 and 2010, the content of (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs in agricultural soil and soil geochemical characteristics were measured on 50 locations in Northern Province of Serbia - Vojvodina. The locations for sampling were selected so that they proportionately represent all geomorphologic units in the region. The content of clay and humus varied within wide limits depending on soil type and influence the activity concentrations of radionuclides. In this paper we analyzed correlations between radionuclides content and geochemical characteristics of the soil. Possible influence of fertilizers on (238)U content in soil was discussed. The main conclusion is that measured maximal activity concentrations for (238)U (87 Bq/kg), (226)Ra (44.7 Bq/kg), (232)Th (55.5 Bq/kg) and (137)Cs (29 Bq/kg) at 30 cm depth could not endanger the safety of food production. The process of genesis of soil and cultivation mode plays a dominant role on the characteristics of the soil. The most significant correlation was found between the activity concentrations of (40)K and clay content in agricultural soil.

  16. Biological soil crusts as soil stabilizers: Chapter 16

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Buedel, Burkhard; Weber, Bettina; Buedel, Burkhard; Belnap, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is of particular concern in dryland regions, as the sparse cover of vascular plants results in large interspaces unprotected from the erosive forces of wind and water. Thus, most of these soil surfaces are stabilized by physical or biological soil crusts. However, as drylands are extensively used by humans and their animals, these crusts are often disturbed, compromising their stabilizing abilities. As a result, approximately 17.5% of the global terrestrial lands are currently being degraded by wind and water erosion. All components of biocrusts stabilize soils, including green algae, cyanobacteria, fungi, lichens, and bryophytes, and as the biomass of these organisms increases, so does soil stability. In addition, as lichens and bryophytes live atop the soil surface, they provide added protection from raindrop impact that cyanobacteria and fungi, living within the soil, cannot. Much research is still needed to determine the relative ability of individual species and suites of species to stabilize soils. We also need a better understanding of why some individuals or combination of species are better than others, especially as these organisms become more frequently used in restoration efforts.

  17. Desert soil collection at the JPL soil science laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, G. B.; Cameron, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Collection contains desert soils and other geologic materials collected from sites in the United States and foreign countries. Soils are useful for test purposes in research related to extraterrestrial life detection, sampling, harsh environmental studies, and determining suitable areas for training astronauts for lunar exploration.

  18. Online Soil Science Lesson 3: Soil Forming Factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This lesson explores the five major factors of soil formation, namely: 1) climate; 2) organisms; 3) time; 4) topography; and 5) parent material and their influence in forming soil. The distinction between active and passive factors, moisture and temperature regimes, organism and topographic influen...

  19. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF COPPER IN SOILS AND SOIL MINERALS - I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioavailability and toxicity of Cu in soils is controlled by a number of soil properties and processes. Some of these such as pH, adsorption/desorption and competition with beneficial cations have been extensively studied. However, the effects of natural attenuation (or aging...

  20. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF COPPER IN SOILS AND SOIL MINERALS - II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bioabailability and toxicity of Cu in soils is controlled by a number of soil properties and processes. Some of these such as pH, adsorption/desorption and competition with beneficial cations have been extensively studied. However, the effects of natural attenuation (or aging...

  1. Underestimation of boreal soil carbon stocks by mathematical soil carbon models linked to soil nutrient status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ťupek, Boris; Ortiz, Carina A.; Hashimoto, Shoji; Stendahl, Johan; Dahlgren, Jonas; Karltun, Erik; Lehtonen, Aleksi

    2016-08-01

    Inaccurate estimate of the largest terrestrial carbon pool, soil organic carbon (SOC) stock, is the major source of uncertainty in simulating feedback of climate warming on ecosystem-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange by process-based ecosystem and soil carbon models. Although the models need to simplify complex environmental processes of soil carbon sequestration, in a large mosaic of environments a missing key driver could lead to a modeling bias in predictions of SOC stock change.We aimed to evaluate SOC stock estimates of process-based models (Yasso07, Q, and CENTURY soil sub-model v4) against a massive Swedish forest soil inventory data set (3230 samples) organized by a recursive partitioning method into distinct soil groups with underlying SOC stock development linked to physicochemical conditions.For two-thirds of measurements all models predicted accurate SOC stock levels regardless of the detail of input data, e.g., whether they ignored or included soil properties. However, in fertile sites with high N deposition, high cation exchange capacity, or moderately increased soil water content, Yasso07 and Q models underestimated SOC stocks. In comparison to Yasso07 and Q, accounting for the site-specific soil characteristics (e. g. clay content and topsoil mineral N) by CENTURY improved SOC stock estimates for sites with high clay content, but not for sites with high N deposition.Our analysis suggested that the soils with poorly predicted SOC stocks, as characterized by the high nutrient status and well-sorted parent material, indeed have had other predominant drivers of SOC stabilization lacking in the models, presumably the mycorrhizal organic uptake and organo-mineral stabilization processes. Our results imply that the role of soil nutrient status as regulator of organic matter mineralization has to be re-evaluated, since correct SOC stocks are decisive for predicting future SOC change and soil CO2 efflux.

  2. The interdisciplinary nature of SOIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, E. C.; Cerdà, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Pereg, L.; Quinton, J. N.; Six, J.; Van Oost, K.

    2015-01-01

    The holistic study of soils requires an interdisciplinary approach involving biologists, chemists, geologists, and physicists, amongst others, something that has been true from the earliest days of the field. In more recent years this list has grown to include anthropologists, economists, engineers, medical professionals, military professionals, sociologists, and even artists. This approach has been strengthened and reinforced as current research continues to use experts trained in both soil science and related fields and by the wide array of issues impacting the world that require an in-depth understanding of soils. Of fundamental importance amongst these issues are biodiversity, biofuels/energy security, climate change, ecosystem services, food security, human health, land degradation, and water security, each representing a critical challenge for research. In order to establish a benchmark for the type of research that we seek to publish in each issue of SOIL, we have outlined the interdisciplinary nature of soil science research we are looking for. This includes a focus on the myriad ways soil science can be used to expand investigation into a more holistic and therefore richer approach to soil research. In addition, a selection of invited review papers are published in this first issue of SOIL that address the study of soils and the ways in which soil investigations are essential to other related fields. We hope that both this editorial and the papers in the first issue will serve as examples of the kinds of topics we would like to see published in SOIL and will stimulate excitement among our readers and authors to participate in this new venture.

  3. Pyrogenic carbon in Australian soils.

    PubMed

    Qi, Fangjie; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi S; Dong, Zhaomin; Yan, Yubo; Lamb, Dane; Bucheli, Thomas D; Choppala, Girish; Duan, Luchun; Semple, Kirk T

    2017-02-16

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC), the combustion residues of fossil fuel and biomass, is a versatile soil fraction active in biogeochemical processes. In this study, the chemo-thermal oxidation method (CTO-375) was applied to investigate the content and distribution of PyC in 30 Australian agricultural, pastoral, bushland and parkland soil with various soil types. Soils were sampled incrementally to 50cm in 6 locations and at another 7 locations at 0-10cm. Results showed that PyC in Australian soils typically ranged from 0.27-5.62mg/g, with three Dermosol soils ranging within 2.58-5.62mg/g. Soil PyC contributed 2.0-11% (N=29) to the total organic carbon (TOC), with one Ferrosol as high as 26%. PyC was concentrated either in the top (0-10cm) or bottom (30-50cm) soil layers, with the highest PyC:TOC ratio in the bottom (30-50cm) soil horizon in all soils. Principal component analysis - multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) suggested the silt-associated organic C factor accounted for 38.5% of the variation in PyC. Our findings suggest that PyC is an important fraction of the TOC (2.0-11%, N=18) and chemically recalcitrant organic C (ROC) obtained by chemical C fractionation method accounts for a significant proportion of soil TOC (47.3-84.9%, N=18). This is the first study comparing these two methods, and it indicates both CTO-375 and C speciation methods can determine a fraction of recalcitrant organic C. However, estimated chemically recalcitrant organic carbon pool (ROC) was approximately an order of magnitude greater than that of thermally stable organic carbon (PyC).

  4. Thermal stability of soils and detectability of intrinsic soil features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, Christian; Kucerik, Jiri

    2014-05-01

    Soils are products of long term pedogenesis in ecosystems. They are characterized by a complex network of interactions between organic and inorganic constituents, which influence soil properties and functions. However, the interrelations cannot easily be determined. Our search for unifying principles of soil formation focuses on water binding. This approach was derived from water-dependent soil formation. It considers the importance of water binding in theories about the origin of genes, in the structural arrangement and functionality of proteins, and in the co-evolution of organism species and the biosphere during the history of earth. We used thermogravimetry as a primary experimental technique. It allows a simple determi-nation of bound water together with organic and inorganic components in whole soil samples without a special preparation. The primary goal was to search for fingerprinting patterns using dynamics of thermal mass losses (TML) caused by water vaporization from natural soils, as a reference base for soil changes under land use. 301 soil samples were collected in biosphere reserves, national parks and other areas as-sumingly untouched by human activity in Siberia, North and South America, Antarctica, and in several long term agricultural experiments. The results did not support the traditional data evaluation procedures used in classical differ-ential thermogravimetry. For example, peak positions and amplitudes did not provide useful information. In contrast, using thermal mass losses (TML) in prefixed smaller, e.g. 10 °C temperature intervals allowed the determination of the content of carbon, clay, nitrogen and carbonates with high accuracy. However, this approach was applicable for soils and neither for soil-like carbon containing mineral substrates without pedogenetic origin, nor for plant residues or soils containing ashes, cinder, or charcoal. Therefore, intrinsic soil regulation processes are discussed as a possible factor causing

  5. Soil washing of fluorine contaminated soil using various washing solutions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Jo, Raehyun; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-03-01

    Bench-scale soil washing experiments were conducted to remove fluoride from contaminated soils. Five washing solutions including hydrochloric acid (HCl), nitric acid (HNO3), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and tartaric acid (C4H6O6) were tested. The concentration of the washing solutions used ranged from 0.1 to 3 M with a liquid to solid ratio of 10. The soil washing results showed that the most effective washing solution for the removal of fluoride from contaminated soils was HCl. The highest fluoride removal results of approximately 97 % from the contaminated soil were obtained using 3 M HCl. The fluoride removal efficiency of the washing solution increases in the following order: C4H6O6 < NaOH < H2SO4 < HNO3 < HCl.

  6. Estimating root zone soil water content using limited soils information and surface soil moisture data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathman, Gary Claude

    2001-10-01

    The various hydrologic processes of infiltration, redistribution, drainage, evaporation, and water uptake by plants are strongly interdependent, as they occur sequentially or simultaneously. An important state variable that strongly influences the magnitude to which these rate processes occur is the amount of water present within the root zone, and in particular, the top few centimeters near the soil surface. Traditionally, measurements of soil moisture have been limited to point measurements made in the field. In general, averages of point measurements are used to characterize the soil moisture of an area, but these averages seldom yield information that is adequate to characterize large scale hydrologic processes. Recent advancements in remote sensing now make it possible to obtain areal estimates of surface soil moisture. The use of remotely sensed data to estimate surface soil moisture, combined with soil water and hydrologic modeling, provides a unique opportunity to advance our understanding of hydrologic processes at a much larger scale. Standard techniques for measuring soil moisture have been well documented, with commercial instrumentation being widely available. Various computer models have been developed to estimate soil moisture in the root and vadose zone, although their application over large scales is limited due to varying spatial and temporal field conditions. It is the combination of ground-based data (in-situ measurements), near-surface soil moisture data, and modeling that form the basis for this research. The interactive use of field research, remote sensing ground truth data, and integrated systems modeling is used to describe surface and profile soil moisture conditions at several locations within a large watershed. Successful application of this approach should improve our capabilities for estimating soil hydraulic properties and to better estimate water and chemical transport in the root zone, thus enhancing water use efficiency and plant

  7. Sampling and handling of desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, G. B.; Cameron, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Report on sampling and handling desert soils includes sections on selection, characterization, and photography of area, site, and soil, sterilization of sampling equipment and containers, and soil sample collection, transport, storage, and dispersal.

  8. Relating soil biochemistry to sustainable crop production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino acids, amino sugars, carbohydrates, phenols, and fatty acids together comprise appreciable proportions of soil organic matter (SOM). Their cycling contribute to soil processes, including nitrogen availability, carbon sequestration and aggregation. For example, soil accumulation of phenols has ...

  9. Biogeochemistry: Soil carbon in a beer can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.

    2015-10-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter could be an important positive feedback to climate change. Geochemical properties of soils can help determine what fraction of soil carbon may be protected from climate-induced decomposition.

  10. Soil invertebrate fauna affect N2 O emissions from soil.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Imke; de Deyn, Gerlinde B; Thakur, Madhav P; van Groenigen, Jan Willem

    2013-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions from soils contribute significantly to global warming. Mitigation of N2 O emissions is severely hampered by a lack of understanding of its main controls. Fluxes can only partly be predicted from soil abiotic factors and microbial analyses - a possible role for soil fauna has until now largely been overlooked. We studied the effect of six groups of soil invertebrate fauna and tested the hypothesis that all of them increase N2 O emissions, although to different extents. We conducted three microcosm experiments with sandy soil and hay residue. Faunal groups included in our experiments were as follows: fungal-feeding nematodes, mites, springtails, potworms, earthworms and isopods. In experiment I, involving all six faunal groups, N2 O emissions declined with earthworms and potworms from 78.4 (control) to 37.0 (earthworms) or 53.5 (potworms) mg N2 O-N m(-2) . In experiment II, with a higher soil-to-hay ratio and mites, springtails and potworms as faunal treatments, N2 O emissions increased with potworms from 51.9 (control) to 123.5 mg N2 O-N m(-2) . Experiment III studied the effect of potworm density; we found that higher densities of potworms accelerated the peak of the N2 O emissions by 5 days (P < 0.001), but the cumulative N2 O emissions remained unaffected. We propose that increased soil aeration by the soil fauna reduced N2 O emissions in experiment I, whereas in experiment II N2 O emissions were driven by increased nitrogen and carbon availability. In experiment III, higher densities of potworms accelerated nitrogen and carbon availability and N2 O emissions, but did not increase them. Overall, our data show that soil fauna can suppress, increase, delay or accelerate N2 O emissions from soil and should therefore be an integral part of future N2 O studies.

  11. Managing soil remediation problems.

    PubMed

    Okx, J P; Hordijk, L; Stein, A

    1996-12-01

    Soil remediation has only a short history but the problem addressed is a significant one. Cost estimates for the clean-up of contaminated sites in the European Union and the United States are in the order of magnitude of 1,400 billion ECU. Such an enormous operation deserves the best management it can get. Reliable cost estimations per contaminated site are an important prerequisite. This paper addresses the problems related to site-wise estimations.When solving soil remediation problems, we have to deal with a large number of scientific disciplines. Too often solutions are presented from the viewpoint of only one discipline. In order to benefit from the combined disciplinary knowledge and experience, we think that it is necessary to describe the interrelations between these disciplines. This can be realized by developing an adequate model of the desired process which enables to consider and evaluate the essential factors as interdependent components of the total system.The resulting model provides a binding paradigm to the contributing disciplines which will result in improved efficiency and effectivity of the decision and the cost estimation process. In the near future, we will release the "Biosparging and Bioventing Expert Support System", an expert support system for problem owners, consultants and authorities dealing with the design and operation of a biosparging and/or a bioventing system.

  12. Soil Mechanics. Design Manual 7.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    properties. Common soils and rock are discussed as well as special materials such as sub- marine soils and coral, saprolitic soils, lateritic soils...presence of - - noxious or explosive gases should be considered during the construction excavations and tunneling. T-V c. Lateritic Soils. Lateritic soils...are found in tropical climates throughout the world. Typical characteristics are shown in Table 12. For further guidance see Reference 27, Laterite

  13. Proximal soil sensing: global perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of a number of naturally occurring processes and cultural practices, the characteristics of soils demonstrate substantial spatial heterogeneity that affects current land use. From infrastructure development to agriculture, spatial variability in soils must be taken into account in order ...

  14. The Science of Soil Textures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigham, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Off-road motorcycle racing and ATV riding. Gardening and fishing. What do these high-adrenaline and slower-paced pastimes have in common? Each requires soil, and the texture of that soil has an effect on all of them. In the inquiry-based lessons described here, students work both in the field or laboratory and in the classroom to collect soil…

  15. Hydraulic Properties of Unsaturated Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many agrophysical applications require knowledge of the hydraulic properties of unsaturated soils. These properties reflect the ability of a soil to retain or transmit water and its dissolved constituents. The objective of this work was to develop an entry for the Encyclopedia of Agrophysics that w...

  16. Fractal radar scattering from soil.

    PubMed

    Oleschko, Klaudia; Korvin, Gabor; Figueroa, Benjamin; Vuelvas, Marco Antonio; Balankin, Alexander S; Flores, Lourdes; Carreón, Dora

    2003-04-01

    A general technique is developed to retrieve the fractal dimension of self-similar soils through microwave (radar) scattering. The technique is based on a mathematical model relating the fractal dimensions of the georadargram to that of the scattering structure. Clear and different fractal signatures have been observed over four geosystems (soils and sediments) compared in this work.

  17. Profiling soil water content sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) sensor system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles was developed to sense soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity in 20-cm (8 inch) deep layers from the soil surface to depths of 3 m (10 ft) (patent No. 13/404,491 pending). A Cooperative R...

  18. BACTERIAL TRANSPORT THROUGH HOMOGENEOUS SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport of microorganisms in soils is of major importance for bioremediation of subsurface polluted zones and for pollution of groundwater with pathogens. A procedure for evaluating the relative mobility and recovery of bacteria in the soil matrix was developed. In the meth...

  19. Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 4th edition of Soil Microbiology, Ecology, and Biochemistry Edited by Eldor Paul continues in the vein of the 3rd edition by providing an excellent, broad-reaching introduction to soil biology. The new edition improves on the previous by providing extensive supplementary materials, links to outs...

  20. Bottom ash boosts poor soil

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D.

    1993-04-01

    This article describes agricultural uses of fluidized bed bottom ash residue from burning limestone and coal in electric power generating plants: as a limestone substitute, to increase calcium levels in both soil and plants, and as a gypsom-containing soil amendment. Apples and tomatoes are the crops used. The industrial perspective and other uses of bottom ash are also briefly described.

  1. Ants: the supreme soil manipulators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review focuses on the semiochemical interactions between ants and their soil environment. Ants occupy virtually every ecological niche and have evolved mechanisms to not just cope with, but also manipulate soil organisms. The metapleural gland, specific to ants was thought to be the major sourc...

  2. MUTATIONS IN SOIL: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intentional and accidental discharges of toxic pollutants into the lithosphere results in soil contamination. In some cases (e.g., wood preserving wastes, coal-tar, airborne combustion by-products) the contaminated soil constitutes a genotoxic hazard. This work is a comprehen...

  3. Geotechnical characteristics of residual soils

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Residual soils are products of chemical weathering and thus their characteristics are dependent upon environmental factors of climate, parent material, topography and drainage, and age. These conditions are optimized in the tropics where well-drained regions produce reddish lateritic soils rich in iron and aluminum sesquioxides and kaolinitic clays. Conversely, poorly drained areas tend towards montmorillonitic expansive black clays. Andosols develop over volcanic ash and rock regions and are rich in allophane (amorphous silica) and metastable halloysite. The geological origins greatly affect the resulting engineering characteristics. Both lateritic soils and andosols are susceptible to property changes upon drying, and exhibit compaction and strength properties not indicative of their classification limits. Both soils have been used successfully in earth dam construction, but attention must be given to seepage control through the weathered rock. Conversely, black soils are unpopular for embankments. Lateritic soils respond to cement stabilization and, in some cases, lime stabilization. Andosols should also respond to lime treatment and cement treatments if proper mixing can be achieved. Black expansive residual soils respond to lime treatment by demonstrating strength gains and decreased expansiveness. Rainfall induced landslides are typical of residual soil deposits.

  4. Phytoremediation of Soil Trace Elements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter summarizes research progress in development of phytoremediation technologies. Some soils have become contaminated by trace elements enough to kill plants, inhibit soil organisms, and/or threaten wildlife, humans or the environment. Traditional remediation by dig and haul methods are v...

  5. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; ...

    2014-10-30

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous OC stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global C cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil OC stocks to changing climatic conditions. In this review,more » we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of OC stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this OC to permafrost thaw under a warming climate.« less

  6. Approved Practices in Soil Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Albert B.

    This book is written for individuals who wish to apply conservation practices, especially those of soil and water conservation, without technical assistance, to meet one's own conditions, and within his own capability to apply them. To meet these needs, the book includes a discussion and description of soil and water conservation methods for the…

  7. The impact of soil degradation on soil functioning in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanarella, Luca

    2010-05-01

    The European Commission has presented in September 2006 its Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection.The Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection consists of a Communication from the Commission to the other European Institutions, a proposal for a framework Directive (a European law), and an Impact Assessment. The Communication (COM(2006) 231) sets the frame. It defines the relevant soil functions for Europe and identifies the major threats. It explains why further action is needed to ensure a high level of soil protection, sets the overall objective of the Strategy and explains what kind of measures must be taken. It establishes a ten-year work program for the European Commission. The proposal for a framework Directive (COM(2006) 232) sets out common principles for protecting soils across the EU. Within this common framework, the EU Member States will be in a position to decide how best to protect soil and how use it in a sustainable way on their own territory. The Impact Assessment (SEC (2006) 1165 and SEC(2006) 620) contains an analysis of the economic, social and environmental impacts of the different options that were considered in the preparatory phase of the strategy and of the measures finally retained by the Commission. Since 2006 a large amount of new evidence has allowed to further document the extensive negative impacts of soil degradation on soil functioning in Europe. Extensive soil erosion, combined with a constant loss of soil organic carbon, have raised attention to the important role soils are playing within the climate change related processes. Other important processes are related to the loss of soil biodiversity, extensive soil sealing by housing and infrastructure, local and diffuse contamination by agricultural and industrial sources, compaction due to unsustainable agricultural practices and salinization by unsustainable irrigation practices. The extended impact assessment by the European Commission has attempted to quantify in monetary terms the

  8. Soil properties controlling Zn speciation and fractionation in contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquat, Olivier; Voegelin, Andreas; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2009-09-01

    We determined the speciation of Zn in 49 field soils differing widely in pH (4.1-7.7) and total Zn content (251-30,090 mg/kg) by using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. All soils had been contaminated since several decades by inputs of aqueous Zn with runoff-water from galvanized power line towers. Pedogenic Zn species identified by EXAFS spectroscopy included Zn in hydroxy-interlayered minerals (Zn-HIM), Zn-rich phyllosilicates, Zn-layered double hydroxide (Zn-LDH), hydrozincite, and octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated sorbed or complexed Zn. Zn-HIM was only observed in (mostly acidic) soils containing less than 2000 mg/kg of Zn, reflecting the high affinity but limited sorption capacity of HIM. Zn-bearing precipitates, such as Zn-LDH and Zn-rich trioctahedral phyllosilicates, became more dominant with increasing pH and increasing total Zn content relative to available adsorption sites. Zn-LDH was the most abundant Zn-precipitate and was detected in soils with pH > 5.2. Zn-rich phyllosilicates were detected even at lower soil pH, but were generally less abundant than Zn-LDH. Hydrozincite was only identified in two calcareous soils with extremely high Zn contents. In addition to Zn-LDH, large amounts of Zn in highly contaminated soils were mainly accumulated as sorbed/complexed Zn in tetrahedral coordination. Soils grouped according to their Zn speciation inferred from EXAFS spectroscopy mainly differed with respect to soil pH and total Zn content. Clear differences were observed with respect to Zn fractionation by sequential extraction: From Zn-HIM containing soils, most of the total Zn was recovered in the exchangeable and the most recalcitrant fractions. In contrast, from soils containing the highest percentage of Zn-precipitates, Zn was mainly extracted in intermediate extraction steps. The results of this study demonstrate that soil pH and Zn contamination level relative to available adsorption sites are the most important

  9. Mapping specific soil functions based on digital soil property maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pásztor, László; Fodor, Nándor; Farkas-Iványi, Kinga; Szabó, József; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of soil functions and services is a great challenge in itself even if the spatial relevance is supposed to be identified and regionalized. Proxies and indicators are widely used in ecosystem service mapping. Soil services could also be approximated by elementary soil features. One solution is the association of soil types with services as basic principle. Soil property maps however provide quantified spatial information, which could be utilized more versatilely for the spatial inference of soil functions and services. In the frame of the activities referred as "Digital, Optimized, Soil Related Maps and Information in Hungary" (DOSoReMI.hu) numerous soil property maps have been compiled so far with proper DSM techniques partly according to GSM.net specifications, partly by slightly or more strictly changing some of its predefined parameters (depth intervals, pixel size, property etc.). The elaborated maps have been further utilized, since even DOSoReMI.hu was intended to take steps toward the regionalization of higher level soil information (secondary properties, functions, services). In the meantime the recently started AGRAGIS project requested spatial soil related information in order to estimate agri-environmental related impacts of climate change and support the associated vulnerability assessment. One of the most vulnerable services of soils in the context of climate change is their provisioning service. In our work it was approximated by productivity, which was estimated by a sequential scenario based crop modelling. It took into consideration long term (50 years) time series of both measured and predicted climatic parameters as well as accounted for the potential differences in agricultural practice and crop production. The flexible parametrization and multiple results of modelling was then applied for the spatial assessment of sensitivity, vulnerability, exposure and adaptive capacity of soils in the context of the forecasted changes in

  10. Phytoremediation for Oily Desert Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Samir

    This chapter deals with strategies for cleaning oily desert soils through rhizosphere technology. Bioremediation involves two major approaches; seeding with suitable microorganisms and fertilization with microbial growth enhancing materials. Raising suitable crops in oil-polluted desert soils fulfills both objectives. The rhizosphere of many legume and non-legume plants is richer in oil-utilizing micro-organisms than non-vegetated soils. Furthermore, these rhizospheres also harbour symbiotic and asymbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and are rich in simple organic compounds exuded by plant roots. Those exudates are excellent nutrients for oil-utilizing microorganisms. Since many rhizospheric bacteria have the combined activities of hydrocarbon-utilization and nitrogen fixation, phytoremediation provides a feasible and environmentally friendly biotechnology for cleaning oil-polluted soils, especially nitrogen-poor desert soils.

  11. Liquefaction mechanism for layered soils

    SciTech Connect

    Fiegel, G.L.; Kutter, B.L. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    Results from four centrifuge model tests are presented. Three of the model tests involve layered soil deposits subject to base shaking; one model test involves a uniform soil deposit of sand subject to base shaking. The layered soil models consisted of fine sand overlain by a layer of relatively impermeable silica flour (silt). Pore-water pressures, accelerations, and settlements were measured during all four tests. Results from the model tests involving layered soils suggest that during liquefaction a water interlayer or very loose zone of soil may develop at the sand-silt interface due to the difference in permeabilities. In each layered model test, boils were observed on the surface of the silt layer. These boils were concentrated in the thinnest zones of the overlying silt layer and provided a vent for the excess pore-water pressure generated in the fine sand.

  12. Mercury in Yellow-cracking Boletes Xerocomus subtomentosus mushrooms and soils from spatially diverse sites: assessment of bioconcentration potential by species and human intake.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka, Aleksandra; Drewnowska, Małgorzata; Jarzyńska, Grażyna; Nnorom, Innocent C; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the Hg concentrations in Yellow-cracking Boletes Xerocomus subtomentosus mushrooms and beneath soils collected from the wild at twelve sites across Poland. This mushroom species has some potential to bioconcentrate Hg in the fruiting bodies, and the amount of Hg sequestered, depending on geographical location, can pose health risk to consumers. The values of Hg bioconcentration factor (BCF) varied for the sites between 0.80 ± 0.20 and 17 ± 12 in caps and 0.50 ± 0.10 and 7.9 ± 6.6 in stipes of fruiting bodies but decreased as soil Hg content increased from 72 ± 32 to 570 ± 130 ng/g dry weight. The specimens collected from minerals rich area of Złotoryja contained the highest Hg concentration, which reached 630 ± 400 in caps and 420 ± 260 ng/g dw in stipes, while the lowest observed Hg concentrations at the other sites were 72 ± 32 and 57 ± 13 ng/g, for cap and stipes respectively. Available literature data on Hg in Yellow-cracking Boletes was also up-dated.

  13. Paleomicrobiology to investigate copper resistance in bacteria: isolation and description of Cupriavidus necator B9 in the soil of a medieval foundry.

    PubMed

    Gillan, David C; Van Camp, Camille; Mergeay, Max; Provoost, Ann; Thomas, Nicolas; Vermard, Laurent; Billon, Gabriel; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2017-02-01

    Remains of a medieval foundry were excavated by archaeologists in 2013 in Verdun (France). Ancient workshops specialized in brass and copper alloys were found with an activity between 13th to 16th c. Levels of Cu, Zn and Pb reached 20000, 7000 and 6000 mg kg(-1) (dw), respectively, in several soil horizons. The objective of the present work was to examine the microbial community in this contaminated site. A total of 8-22 10(6) reads were obtained by shotgun metagenomics in four soil horizons. Bioinformatic analyses suggest the presence of complex bacterial communities dominated by Proteobacteria. The structure of the community was not affected by metals, contrary to the set of metal-resistance genes. Using selective media, a novel strain of Cupriavidus necator (eutrophus), strain B9, was isolated. Its genome was sequenced and a novel metal resistance gene cluster with Hg resistance genes (merRTPCA) followed by 24 copper-resistance genes (actP, cusCBAF, silP, copK1, copH4QLOFGJH3IDCBARS, copH2H1, copK2) was found. This cluster is partly homologous to the cop genes of Cupriavidus gilardii CR3 and C. metallidurans CH34. Proteomics indicated that the four copH genes were differentially expressed: CopH1 and CopH2 were mostly induced by Cd while CopH4 was highly expressed by Cu.

  14. The Presence of Plants Alters the Effect of Soil Moisture on Soil C Decomposition in Two Different Soil Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, F. A.; Cheng, W.

    2005-12-01

    While it is well known that soil moisture directly affects microbial activity and soil C decomposition, it is unclear if the presence of plants alters these effects through rhizosphere processes. We studied soil moisture effects on soil C decomposition with and without sunflower and soybean. Plants were grown in two different soil types with soil moisture contents of 45 and 85% of field capacity in a greenhouse experiment. We continuously labeled plants with depleted 13C, which allowed us to separate plant-derived CO2-C from original soil-derived CO2-C in soil respiration measurements. We observed an overall increase in soil-derived CO2-C efflux in the presence of plants (priming effect) in both soils with on average a greater priming effect in the high soil moisture treatment (60% increase in soil-derived CO2-C compared to control) than in the low soil moisture treatment (37% increase). Greater plant biomass in the high soil moisture treatment contributed to greater priming effects, but priming effects remained significantly higher after correcting for plant biomass. Possibly, root exudation of labile C may have increased more than plant biomass and may have become more effective in stimulating microbial decomposition in the higher soil moisture treatment. Our results indicate that changing soil moisture conditions can significantly alter rhizosphere effects on soil C decomposition.

  15. Soil Phosphorus Stoichiometry Drives Carbon Turnover Along a Soil C Gradient Spanning Mineral and Organic Soils Under Rice Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, W.; Ye, R.; Horwath, W. R.; Tringe, S. G.

    2014-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) cycling is linked to the availability of nutrients like nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). However, the role of soil P in influencing soil C turnover and accumulation is poorly understood, with most models focusing on C:N ratios based on the assumption that terrestrial ecosystems are N limited. To determine the effects of N and P availability on soil C turnover, we compared soil respiration over the course of a growing season in four adjacent rice fields with 5%, 10%, 20% and 25% soil C. In each of these fields, plots were established to test the effect of N additions on plant growth, using control and N addition treatments (80 kg N/ha urea). Although soil P was not manipulated in parallel, prior work has shown soil P concentrations decline markedly with increasing soil C content. Soil CO2 flux was monitored using static chambers at biweekly intervals during the growing season, along with porewater dissolved organic C and ammonium. Soils were collected at the end of the growing season, and tested for total C, N, and P, extractable N and P, pH, base cations and trace metals. Soil DNA was also extracted for 16S rRNA sequencing to profile microbial communities. Soil N additions significantly increased CO2 flux and soil C turnover (seasonal CO2 flux per unit soil C) in 5% and 10% C fields, but not in 20% or 25% C fields. Soil C content was closely related to soil N:P stoichiometry, with N:P ratios of ca. 12, 16, 24, and 56 respectively in the 5, 10, 20 and 25% C fields. Seasonal CO2 fluxes (per m2) were highest in 10% C soils. However, soil C turnover was inversely related to soil C concentrations, with the greatest C turnover at the lowest values of soil C. Soil C turnover showed stronger relationships with soil chemical parameters than seasonal CO2 fluxes alone, and the best predictors of soil C turnover were soil total and extractable N:P ratios, along with extractable P alone. Our results show that soil P availability and stoichiometry influence the

  16. Soil in the City: Sustainably Improving Urban Soils.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuldip; Hundal, Lakhwinder S

    2016-01-01

    Large tracts of abandoned urban land, resulting from the deindustrialization of metropolitan areas, are generating a renewed interest among city planners and community organizations envisioning the productive use of this land not only to produce fresh food but to effectively manage stormwater and mitigate the impact of urban heat islands. Healthy and productive soils are paramount to meet these objectives. However, these urban lands are often severely degraded due to anthropogenic activities and are generally contaminated with priority pollutants, especially heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Characterizing these degraded and contaminated soils and making them productive again to restore the required ecosystem services was the theme of the "Soil in the City- 2014" conference organized by W-2170 Committee (USDA's Sponsored Multi-State Research Project: Soil-Based Use of Residuals, Wastewater, & Reclaimed Water). This special section of comprises 12 targeted papers authored by conference participants to make available much needed information about the characteristics of urban soils. Innovative ways to mitigate the risks from pollutants and to improve the soil quality using local resources are discussed. Such practices include the use of composts and biosolids to grow healthy foods, reclaim brownfields, manage stormwater, and improve the overall ecosystem functioning of urban soils. These papers provide a needed resource for educating policymakers, practitioners, and the general public about using locally available resources to restore fertility, productivity, and ecosystem functioning of degraded urban land to revitalize metropolitan areas for improving the overall quality of life for a large segment of a rapidly growing urban population.

  17. know Soil Know Life - Getting Kids Excited About Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbo, David L.; Robinson, Clay; Kozlowski, Deborah

    2014-05-01

    In the United States soils are often taught in primary school (grade 3-6) but with little excitement or passion. We have been working with schools and teachers to bring our passion about soils to this audience. The methods and message can be conveyed simply and effectively by engaging the students in a dialog and through kinematic learning. Our approach is to begin with a simple question - what are 4 things we cannot live without. The answer - Air, Water, Sunlight, and Soil. Most students say "food, shelter, clothing, plants, animals etc." so we then explain all of those come from soil. This leads us to a quick "dance" illustrating that without soils we would be 'Hungry. Homeless, and Naked". The results are that students and teachers remember this simple message. From this point it is our hope that students will continue to understand the importance of soils and stop treating soils like dirt. Other simple exercises for this younger audience will also be presented.

  18. Evaluation of soil washing for radiologically contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D. II

    1994-03-01

    Soil washing has been applied internationally to decontaminate soils due to the widespread increase in environmental awareness manifested in the United States by promulgation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, yet we continue to lack understanding on why the technique works in one application and not in another. A soil washing process typically integrates a variety of modules, each designed to decontaminate the matrix by destroying a particular phase or segregating a particle size fraction in which the contaminants are concentrated. The more known about how the contaminants are fixed, the more likely the process will succeed. Much can be learned from bioavailability studies on heavy metals in soils. Sequential extraction experiments designed to destroy one fixation mechanism at a time can be used to determine how contaminants are bound. This knowledge provides a technical basis for designing a processing strategy to efficiently decontaminate soil while creating a minimum of secondary wastes. In this study, a soil from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was physically and chemically characterized, then sequentially extracted to determine if soil washing could be effectively used to remove cesium, cobalt and chromium.

  19. Effects of soil tillage on the microwave emission of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Koopman, G. J.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the interactions of soil properties and microwave emission better, a series of field experiments were conducted in 1984. Small plots were measured with a truck-mounted passive microwave radiometer operating at 1.4 GHz. These data were collected concurrent with ground observations of soil moisture and bulk density. Treatment effects studied included different soil moisture contents and bulk densities. Evaluations of the data have shown that commonly used models of the dielectric properties of wet soils do not explain the observations obtained in these experiments. This conclusion was based on the fact that the roughness parameters determined through optimization were significantly larger than those observed in similar investigations. These discrepancies are most likely due to the soil structure. Commonly used models assume a homogeneous three phase mixture of soil solids, air and water. Under tilled conditions the soil is actually a two phase mixture of aggregates and voids. Appropriate dielectric models for this tilled condition were evaluated and found to explain the observations. These results indicate that previous conclusions concerning the effects of surface roughness in tilled fields may be incorrect, and they may explain some of the inconsistencies encountered in roughness modeling.

  20. Toxicological effects, mechanisms, and implied toxicity thresholds in the roots of Vicia faba L. seedlings grown in copper-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianghua; Huang, Zhicheng; Wang, Chengrun; Zhong, Li; Tian, Yuan; Li, Dongdong; Zhang, Gaojian; Shi, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Copper (Cu) contamination has become a global concern because of industrial, agricultural, and other anthropogenic activities. In the present experiments, the toxicological effects, mechanisms, and potential toxicity thresholds were investigated in the roots of Vicia faba L. seedlings that were cultivated in Cu-amended soils (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 600 mg kg(-1)) for 20 days, based on an analysis of the soil physicochemical properties, native Cu, available Cu, and root-enriched Cu contents. The superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and guaiacol peroxidase (POD) isozymes and activities, as well as glutathione (GSH) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), changed like biphasic dose-response curves, cooperating to control the redox homeostasis. The APX and POD enzymes exhibited enhanced activities and became H2O2 scavengers primarily when the catalase (CAT) activities tended to decrease. Endoprotease (EP) isozymes and activities might be enhanced to degrade carbonylated proteins and alleviate metabolic disturbance in the roots. Additionally, HSP70 may not be suitable as a biomarker for relatively higher soil Cu concentrations and relatively longer exposure times for the roots. As a result, the isozymes and activities of SOD, CAT, and EP, as well as GSH, can be adopted as the most sensitive biomarkers. The toxicity threshold is estimated as 0.76-1.21 mg kg(-1) of available Cu in the soils or 25.04-36.65 μg Cu g(-1) dry weights (DW) in the roots.

  1. Uncertainty in soil carbon accounting due to unrecognized soil erosion.

    PubMed

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Chappell, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The movement of soil organic carbon (SOC) during erosion and deposition events represents a major perturbation to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the recognized impact soil redistribution can have on the carbon cycle, few major carbon accounting models currently allow for soil mass flux. Here, we modified a commonly used SOC model to include a soil redistribution term and then applied it to scenarios which explore the implications of unrecognized erosion and deposition for SOC accounting. We show that models that assume a static landscape may be calibrated incorrectly as erosion of SOC is hidden within the decay constants. This implicit inclusion of erosion then limits the predictive capacity of these models when applied to sites with different soil redistribution histories. Decay constants were found to be 15-50% slower when an erosion rate of 15 t soil ha(-1)  yr(-1) was explicitly included in the SOC model calibration. Static models cannot account for SOC change resulting from agricultural management practices focused on reducing erosion rates. Without accounting for soil redistribution, a soil sampling scheme which uses a fixed depth to support model development can create large errors in actual and relative changes in SOC stocks. When modest levels of erosion were ignored, the combined uncertainty in carbon sequestration rates was 0.3-1.0 t CO2  ha(-1)  yr(-1) . This range is similar to expected sequestration rates for many management options aimed at increasing SOC levels. It is evident from these analyses that explicit recognition of soil redistribution is critical to the success of a carbon monitoring or trading scheme which seeks to credit agricultural activities.

  2. Soil mesofauna of taiga burozems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryuntal', S. Yu.

    2009-11-01

    In the burozems of the plains, the composition of the invertebrates and saprophages (the prevailing primary destroyers) differed from that in the mountainous soils only by the absence of millipedes of the Geophilomorpha order. At the same time, the differences in these characteristics between the burozems and soddypodzolic soils of the neighboring coniferous-broad-leaved forests were more significant: in the latter, the composition of the ecological groups of earthworms was more diverse. Among the earthworms, secondary destroyers (detritophages) consuming well-decomposed residues of plants and animals predominated: Aporrectodea caliginosa, A. rosea, and Octolasium lacteum. In the taiga burozems, among the secondary destroyers, very few O. lacteum among the earthworms, and Polyzonium germanicum among the millipede diplopods were found. Primary destroyers that only comminute plant tissues ( Dendrobaena octaedra and Dendrodrilus rubidus f. tenuis) were the main representatives in the invertebrate population of these soils. The differences also concerned the group composition and the proportion between the life forms of the earthworms. In the southern taiga burozems, only the litter ( Dendrobaena octaedra and Dendrodrilus rubidus f. tenuis) earthworms and species of the upper soil layer ( Octolasium lacteum) were present. In the mountainous burozems of the Transcarpathian region, litter inhabitants ( Dendrobaena attemsi and Aporrectodea submontana), soil-litter inhabitants ( Dendrobaena alpina—Transcarpathian region), and inhabitants of the upper ( Helodrilus cernosvitovianus) and middle ( Aporrectodea carpathica and A. sturanyi) soil layers (in the Primorskii region, only the soil-litter Eisenia nordenskioldi) were identified. In the soddy-podzolic soils, dwellers of the middle soil layers ( Aporrectodea caliginosa, A. rosea, and Lumbricus terrestris) were constantly present along with the species dwelling in the litter and in the upper soil layers (in the litter

  3. Developments and departures in the philosophy of soil science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional soil science curriculums provide comprehensive instruction on soil properties, soil classification, and the physical, chemical, and biological processes that occur in soils. This reductionist perspective is sometimes balanced with a more holistic perspective that focuses on soils as natu...

  4. Comparing global soil models to soil carbon profile databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koven, C. D.; Harden, J. W.; He, Y.; Lawrence, D. M.; Nave, L. E.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Treat, C.; Sulman, B. N.; Kane, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    As global soil models begin to consider the dynamics of carbon below the surface layers, it is crucial to assess the realism of these models. We focus on the vertical profiles of soil C predicted across multiple biomes form the Community Land Model (CLM4.5), using different values for a parameter that controls the rate of decomposition at depth versus at the surface, and compare th