Science.gov

Sample records for 51-kda subunit maps

  1. [Topography of ribosomal proteins: reconsideration of of protein map of small ribosomal subunit].

    PubMed

    Spirin, A S; Agafonov, D E; Kolb, V A; Kommer, A

    1996-11-01

    Exposure of proteins on the surface of the small (30S) ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli was studied by the hot tritium bombardment technique. Eight of 21 proteins of the 30 S subunit (S3, S8, S10, S12, S15, S16, S17, and S19) had virtually no groups exposed on the surface of the particle, i.e., they were mainly hidden inside. Seven proteins (S1, S4, S5, S7, S18, S20, and S21) were all well exposed on the surface of the particle, thus being outside proteins. The remaining proteins (S2, S6, S9 and/or S11, S13, and S14) were partially exposed. On the basis of these results a reconcilement of the three-dimensional protein map of the small ribosomal subunit has been done and corrected model is proposed.

  2. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  3. Cytochrome oxidase subunit V gene of Neurospora crassa: DNA sequences, chromosomal mapping, and evidence that the cya-4 locus specifies the structural gene for subunit V.

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, M S; Bertrand, H; Metzenberg, R L; RajBhandary, U L

    1989-01-01

    The sequences of cDNA and genomic DNA clones for Neurospora cytochrome oxidase subunit V show that the protein is synthesized as a 171-amino-acid precursor containing a 27-amino-acid N-terminal extension. The subunit V protein sequence is 34% identical to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subunit V; these proteins, as well as the corresponding bovine subunit, subunit IV, contain a single hydrophobic domain which most likely spans the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Neurospora crassa subunit V gene (cox5) contains two introns, 398 and 68 nucleotides long, which share the conserved intron boundaries 5'GTRNGT...CAG3' and the internal consensus sequence ACTRACA. Two short sequences, YGCCAG and YCCGTTY, are repeated four times each in the cox5 gene upstream of the mRNA 5' termini. The cox5 mRNA 5' ends are heterogeneous, with the major mRNA 5' end located 144 to 147 nucleotides upstream from the translational start site. The mRNA contains a 3'-untranslated region of 186 to 187 nucleotides. Using restriction-fragment-length polymorphism, we mapped the cox5 gene to linkage group IIR, close to the arg-5 locus. Since one of the mutations causing cytochrome oxidase deficiency in N. crassa, cya-4-23, also maps there, we transformed the cya-4-23 strain with the wild-type cox5 gene. In contrast to cya-4-23 cells, which grow slowly, cox5 transformants grew quickly, contained cytochrome oxidase, and had 8- to 11-fold-higher levels of subunit V in their mitochondria. These data suggest (i) that the cya-4 locus in N. crassa specifies structural information for cytochrome oxidase subunit V and (ii) that, in N. crassa, as in S. cerevisiae, deficiencies in the production of nuclearly encoded cytochrome oxidase subunits result in deficiency in cytochrome oxidase activity. Finally, we show that the lower levels of subunit V in cya-4-23 cells are most likely due to substantially reduced levels of translatable subunit V mRNA. Images PMID:2540423

  4. Mass spectrometry reveals modularity and a complete subunit interaction map of the eukaryotic translation factor eIF3.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Sandercock, Alan M; Fraser, Christopher S; Ridlova, Gabriela; Stephens, Elaine; Schenauer, Matthew R; Yokoi-Fong, Theresa; Barsky, Daniel; Leary, Julie A; Hershey, John W; Doudna, Jennifer A; Robinson, Carol V

    2008-11-25

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) plays an important role in translation initiation, acting as a docking site for several eIFs that assemble on the 40S ribosomal subunit. Here, we use mass spectrometry to probe the subunit interactions within the human eIF3 complex. Our results show that the 13-subunit complex can be maintained intact in the gas phase, enabling us to establish unambiguously its stoichiometry and its overall subunit architecture via tandem mass spectrometry and solution disruption experiments. Dissociation takes place as a function of ionic strength to form three stable modules eIF3(c:d:e:l:k), eIF3(f:h:m), and eIF3(a:b:i:g). These modules are linked by interactions between subunits eIF3b:c and eIF3c:h. We confirmed our interaction map with the homologous yeast eIF3 complex that contains the five core subunits found in the human eIF3 and supplemented our data with results from immunoprecipitation. These results, together with the 27 subcomplexes identified with increasing ionic strength, enable us to define a comprehensive interaction map for this 800-kDa species. Our interaction map allows comparison of free eIF3 with that bound to the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site (HCV-IRES) RNA. We also compare our eIF3 interaction map with related complexes, containing evolutionarily conserved protein domains, and reveal the location of subunits containing RNA recognition motifs proximal to the decoding center of the 40S subunit of the ribosome.

  5. Fine mapping of sequential neutralization epitopes on the subunit protein VP8 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs-Nolan, Jennifer; Yoo, Dongwan; Mine, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    The epitopes of the HRV (human rotavirus), especially those involved in virus neutralization, have not been determined in their entirety, and would have significant implications for HRV vaccine development. In the present study, we report on the epitope mapping and identification of sequential neutralization epitopes, on the Wa strain HRV subunit protein VP8, using synthetic overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant Wa VP8 were produced previously in chicken, and purified from egg yolk, which showed neutralizing activity against HRV in vitro. Overlapping VP8 peptide fragments were synthesized and probed with the anti-VP8 antibodies, revealing five sequential epitopes on VP8. Further analysis suggested that three of the five epitopes detected, M1-L10, I55-D66 and L223-P234, were involved in virus neutralization, indicating that sequential epitopes may also be important for the HRV neutralization. The interactions of the antibodies with the five epitopes were characterized by an examination of the critical amino acids involved in antibody binding. Epitopes comprised primarily of hydrophobic amino acid residues, followed by polar and charged residues. The more critical amino acids appeared to be located near the centre of the epitopes, with proline, isoleucine, serine, glutamine and arginine playing an important role in the binding of antibody to the VP8 epitopes. PMID:12901721

  6. cDNA sequence and mapping of the mouse Copb gene encoding the beta subunit of the COPI coatomer complex.

    PubMed

    LI, W; Elliott, R W; Novak, E K; Swank, R T

    1999-05-01

    COPI-coated vesicles are involved in retrograde-directed selective transport of proteins from the Golgi complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as mediate anterograde transport of cargo proteins within the Golgi or in endosomal trafficking. The COPI protein complex contains an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF1) and seven coatamer subunits (alpha, beta, beta', gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta-COP). The localization and function of human beta subunit of coatamer (COPB) suggests it is likely a candidate gene of ruby-eye-2 (ru2), which is a mouse model of human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome characterized by the dysfunction of several subcellular organelles. In this study, we determined the entire coding sequence of mouse (Copb) cDNA by combining an overlapping mouse EST contig with EST walking. beta-COP was found highly conserved in mouse, rat, and human, and it is ubiquitously expressed in mouse. The Copb gene was mapped to mouse Chr 7 at a position of 53.3 cM by radiation hybrid mapping. Our RH mapping data, sequencing of RT-PCR products, and Western blotting exclude the Copb gene as a candidate for ru2.

  7. Gene for the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA-dependent protein kinase maps to the scid locus.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R D; Hogg, J; Ozaki, J H; Gell, D; Jackson, S P; Riblet, R

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) has been proposed recently as a candidate gene for the mouse severe combined immune deficiency (scid) locus. We have used a partial cDNA clone for human DNA-PKcs to map the mouse homologue using a large interspecific backcross panel. We found that the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs does not recombine with scid, consistent with the hypothesis that scid is a mutation in the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479885

  8. Exon junction complex subunits are required to splice Drosophila MAP kinase, a large heterochromatic gene

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The exon junction complex (EJC) is assembled on spliced mRNAs upstream of exon-exon junctions, and can regulate their subsequent translation, localization, or degradation. We isolated mutations in Drosophila mago nashi (mago), which encodes a core EJC subunit, based on their unexpectedly specific effects on photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of Mago prevents Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, due to a large reduction in MAPK mRNA levels. MAPK expression also requires the EJC subunits Y14 and eIF4AIII, and EJC-associated splicing factors. Mago depletion does not affect the transcription or stability of MAPK mRNA, but alters its splicing pattern. MAPK expression from an exogenous promoter requires Mago only when the template includes introns. MAPK is the primary functional target of mago in eye development; in cultured cells, Mago knockdown disproportionately affects other large genes located in heterochromatin. These data support a nuclear role for EJC components in splicing a specific subset of introns. PMID:20946982

  9. Mapping of the gene for the p60 subunit of the human chromatin assembly factor (CAF1A) to the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Blouin, J.L.; Gos, A.; Morris, M.A.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1996-04-15

    Exon trapping was used to clone portions of genes from the Down syndrome critical region (DSCR) of human chromosome 21. One trapped sequence showed complete homology with nucleotide sequence U20980 (GenBank), which corresponds to the gene for the p60 subunit of the human chromatin assembly factor-1 (CAF1A). We mapped this gene to human chromosome 21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, by the use of somatic cell hybrids, and by hybridization to chromosome 21-specific YACs and cosmids. The CAF1A gene localizes to YACs 745H11 and 230E8 of the Chumakov et al. YAC contig, within the DSCR on 21q22. This CAF1A, which belongs to the WD-motif family of genes and interacts with other polypeptide subunits to promote assembly of histones to replicating DNA, may contribute in a gene dosage-dependent manner to the phenotype of Down syndrome. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Genetic contribution to iron status: SNPs related to iron deficiency anaemia and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 calcium channel subunit.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Richer, Carlos; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Blanco-Rojo, Ruth; Toxqui, Laura; Remacha, Angel; Vaquero, M Pilar; López-Parra, Ana M

    2015-12-01

    Numerous studies associate genetic markers with iron- and erythrocyte-related parameters, but few relate them to iron-clinical phenotypes. Novel SNP rs1375515, located in a subunit of the calcium channel gene CACNA2D3, is associated with a higher risk of anaemia. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of this SNP with iron-related parameters and iron-clinical phenotypes, and to explore the potential role of calcium channel subunit region in iron regulation. Furthermore, we aim to replicate the association of other SNPs reported previously in our population. We tested 45 SNPs selected via systematic review and fine mapping of CACNA2D3 region, with haematological and biochemical traits in 358 women of reproductive age. Multivariate analyses include back-step logistic regression and decision trees. The results replicate the association of SNPs with iron-related traits, and also confirm the protective effect of both A allele of rs1800562 (HFE) and G allele of rs4895441 (HBS1L-MYB). The risk of developing anaemia is increased in reproductive age women carriers of A allele of rs1868505 (CACNA2D3) and/or T allele of rs13194491 (HIST1H2BJ). Association of SNPs from fine mapping with ferritin and serum iron suggests that calcium channels could be a potential pathway for iron uptake in physiological conditions.

  11. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants Blocked in the Folding or Subunit Assmbly of the Bacteriophage P22 Tailspike Protein. I. Fine-Structure Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Donna H.; Berget, Peter B.; King, Jonathan

    1980-01-01

    As part of a study of protein folding, we have constructed a fine-structure map of 9 existing and 29 newly isolated UV- and hydroxylamine-induced temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations in gene 9 of Salmonella bacteriophage P22. Gene 9 specifies the polypeptide chain of the multimeric tail spikes, six of which form the cell attachment organelle of the phage. The 38 ts mutants were mapped against deletion lysogens with endpoints in gene 9. They mapped in 10 of the 15 deletion intervals. Two- and three-factor crosses between mutants within each interval indicated that at least 31 ts sites are represented among the 38 mutants. To determine the distribution of ts sites within the physical map, we identified the protein fragments from infection of su- hosts with 10 gene 9 amber mutants. Their molecular weights, ranging from 13,900 to 55,000 daltons, were combined with the genetic data to yield a composite map of gene 9. The 31 ts sites were distributed through most of the gene, but were most densely clustered in the central third.—None of the ts mutant pairs tested exhibited intragenic complementation. Studies of the defective phenotypes of the ts mutants (Goldenberg and King 1981; Smith and King 1981) revealed that most do not affect the thermostability of the mature protein, but instead prevent the folding or subunit assembly of the mutant chains synthesized at restrictive temperature. Thus, many of thes ts mutations identify sites in the polypeptide chain that are critical for the folding or maturation of the tail-spike protein. PMID:7021307

  12. The human B22 subunit of the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase maps to the region of chromosome 8 involved in Branchio-oto-renal syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.Z.; Lin, Xin; Wells, D.E.

    1996-07-01

    To identify candidate genes for Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome, we have made use of a set of cosmids that map to 8q13.3, which has previously been shown to be involved in this syndrome. These cosmids were used as genomic clones in the attempts to isolate corresponding cDNAs using a modified hybrid selection technique. cDNAs using a modified hybrid selection technique. cDNAs from the region were identified and used to search for sequence similarity in human or other species. One cDNA clone was found to have 89% sequence similarity to the bovine B22 subunit of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a mitochondrial protein in the respiratory electron transport chain. Given the history of other mitochondrial mutations being involved in hearing loss syndromes, this gene should be considered a strong candidate for involvement in BOR.

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence and mRNA-mapping of the large subunit gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) from Chlamydomonas moewusii.

    PubMed

    Yang, R C; Dove, M; Seligy, V L; Lemieux, C; Turmel, M; Narang, S A

    1986-01-01

    Nucleotide (nt) sequence of the large subunit (LS) gene of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase from the green alga, Chlamydomonas moewusii, and mapping of transcription ends was achieved by two new strategies. The deduced LS sequence of 475 amino acid residues was compared with similar genes from six other species; cyanobacteria, land plants and a related alga (C. reinhardtii). The most conserved regions are the three ribulose bisphosphate binding sites and the CO2 activator site. The nt sequence conservation outside the coding region is limited to only three segments within the 5'-flanking region: a region of tandem repeats, TATAA box and ribosome-binding site. Termination point of transcription is an 'A' residue 3' to the first of two 18-nt inverted repeats, which has the potential to form a stem-loop hairpin structure. The possible role of these potential regulatory features for transcription and translation, and similar structures in other LS genes is presented.

  14. Tracing the path of DNA substrates in active Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme complexes: mapping of DNA contact sites in the RNA subunit.

    PubMed

    Goldin, Svetlana; Kertesz Rosenfeld, Karin; Manor, Haim

    2012-08-01

    Telomerase, the enzyme that extends single-stranded telomeric DNA, consists of an RNA subunit (TER) including a short template sequence, a catalytic protein (TERT) and accessory proteins. We used site-specific UV cross-linking to map the binding sites for DNA primers in TER within active Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme complexes. The mapping was performed at single-nucleotide resolution by a novel technique based on RNase H digestion of RNA-DNA hybrids made with overlapping complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. These data allowed tracing of the DNA path through the telomerase complexes from the template to the TERT binding element (TBE) region of TER. TBE is known to bind TERT and to be involved in the template 5'-boundary definition. Based on these findings, we propose that upstream sequences of each growing telomeric DNA chain are involved in regulation of its growth arrest at the 5'-end of the RNA template. The upstream DNA-TBE interaction may also function as an anchor for the subsequent realignment of the 3'-end of the DNA with the 3'-end of the template to enable initiation of synthesis of a new telomeric repeat.

  15. Mapping subunit contacts in the regulatory complex of the 26 S proteasome. S2 and S5b form a tetramer with ATPase subunits S4 and S7.

    PubMed

    Gorbea, C; Taillandier, D; Rechsteiner, M

    2000-01-14

    The 19 S regulatory complex (RC) of the 26 S proteasome is composed of at least 18 different subunits, including six ATPases that form specific pairs S4-S7, S6-S8, and S6'-S10b in vitro. One of the largest regulatory complex subunits, S2, was translated in reticulocyte lysate containing [(35)S]methionine and used to probe membranes containing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separated RC subunits. S2 bound to two ATPases, S4 and S7. Association of S2 with regulatory complex subunits was also assayed by co-translation and sedimentation. S2 formed an immunoprecipitable heterotrimer upon co-translation with S4 and S7. The non-ATPase S5b also formed a ternary complex with S4 and S7 and the three proteins assembled into a tetramer with S2. Neither S2 nor S5b formed complexes with S6'-S10b dimers or with S6-S8 oligomers. The use of chimeric ATPases demonstrated that S2 binds the NH(2)-terminal region of S4 and the COOH-terminal two-thirds of S7. Conversely, S5b binds the COOH-terminal two-thirds of S4 and to S7's NH(2)-terminal region. The demonstrated association of S2 with ATPases in the mammalian 19 S regulatory complex is consistent with and extends the recent finding that the yeast RC is composed of two subcomplexes, the lid and the base (Glickman, M. H., Rubin, D. M., Coux, O., Wefes, I., Pfeifer, G., Cejka, Z., Baumeister, W., Fried, V. A., and Finley, D. (1998) Cell 94, 615-623).

  16. The genes for nicein/kalinin 125- and 100-kDa subunits, candidates for junctional epidermiolysis bullosa, map to chromosomes 1q32 and 1q25-q31

    SciTech Connect

    Vailly, J.; Ortonne, J.P.; Meneguzzi, G.; Szepetowski, P.; Pedeutour, F. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Burgeson, R. )

    1994-05-01

    Expression of nicein is specifically hampered in the severe form of junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a recessive genodermatosis characterized by blister formation of integument believed to be due to defects in hemidesmosomes. Nicein genes are therefore the prime candidates for involvement in JEB. To map the gene encoding the 125-kDa subunit of nicein, the authors used the cDNA Kal5.5C coding for the amino-terminal domain of the protein. In situ hybridization was carried out on chromosomes in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. In 100 metaphases examined, 153 silver grains were found associated with chromosomes; 45 (29%) of these were located on chromosome 1, and 33 (73%) of these 45 grains mapped to region 1q32.1-q41 with a maximum in band 1q32. To confirm the regional localization of the genes for nicein subunits of 100 and 125 kDa, fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on normal lymphocytes from two unrelated normal males and fibroblast cell lines GM00257 (karyotype 46,XX, t(1;2)(1q32;2p23)) and GM004088 (46,XY,t(1;4)(q32;p16)). It was thus confirmed that the genes for nicein 125- and 100-kDa subunits are localized at 1q32 and 1q25-q31, respectively. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1978-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the United States increased by about one-quarter in the past year. Examinations of mapping trends were in the following categories: (1) Mapping at scales of 1:100, 000; (2) Metric-scale base maps; (3) International mapping, and (4) Planetary mapping. (MA)

  18. Mapping the domain structure of the influenza A virus polymerase acidic protein (PA) and its interaction with the basic protein 1 (PB1) subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Dong Liping; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Tao, Yizhi J.

    2008-09-15

    The influenza A virus polymerase consists of three subunits (PA, PB1, and PB2) necessary for viral RNA synthesis. The heterotrimeric polymerase complex forms through PA interacting with PB1 and PB1 interacting with PB2. PA has been shown to play critical roles in the assembly, catalysis, and nuclear localization of the polymerase. To probe the structure of PA, we isolated recombinant PA from insect cells. Limited proteolysis revealed that PA contained two domains connected by a 20-residue linker (residues 257-276). Far-UV circular dichroism established that the two domains folded into a mixed {alpha}/{beta} structure when separately expressed. In vitro pull-down assays showed that neither individually nor cooperatively expressed PA domains, without the linker, could assure PA-PB1 interaction. Protease treatment of PA-PB1 complex indicated that its PA subunit was significantly more stable than free PA, suggesting that the linker is protected and it constitutes an essential component of the PA-PB1 interface.

  19. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  20. EMatch: an efficient method for aligning atomic resolution subunits into intermediate-resolution cryo-EM maps of large macromolecular assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Dror, Oranit Lasker, Keren; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim

    2007-01-01

    A method for detecting structural homologs of components in an intermediate resolution cryo-EM map and their spatial configuration is presented. Structural analysis of biological machines is essential for inferring their function and mechanism. Nevertheless, owing to their large size and instability, deciphering the atomic structure of macromolecular assemblies is still considered as a challenging task that cannot keep up with the rapid advances in the protein-identification process. In contrast, structural data at lower resolution is becoming more and more available owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) techniques. Once a cryo-EM map is acquired, one of the basic questions asked is what are the folds of the components in the assembly and what is their configuration. Here, a novel knowledge-based computational method, named EMatch, towards tackling this task for cryo-EM maps at 6–10 Å resolution is presented. The method recognizes and locates possible atomic resolution structural homologues of protein domains in the assembly. The strengths of EMatch are demonstrated on a cryo-EM map of native GroEL at 6 Å resolution.

  1. EMatch: an efficient method for aligning atomic resolution subunits into intermediate-resolution cryo-EM maps of large macromolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Dror, Oranit; Lasker, Keren; Nussinov, Ruth; Wolfson, Haim

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of biological machines is essential for inferring their function and mechanism. Nevertheless, owing to their large size and instability, deciphering the atomic structure of macromolecular assemblies is still considered as a challenging task that cannot keep up with the rapid advances in the protein-identification process. In contrast, structural data at lower resolution is becoming more and more available owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) techniques. Once a cryo-EM map is acquired, one of the basic questions asked is what are the folds of the components in the assembly and what is their configuration. Here, a novel knowledge-based computational method, named EMatch, towards tackling this task for cryo-EM maps at 6–10 Å resolution is presented. The method recognizes and locates possible atomic resolution structural homologues of protein domains in the assembly. The strengths of EMatch are demonstrated on a cryo-EM map of native GroEL at 6 Å resolution. PMID:17164525

  2. The gene for human U2 snRNP auxiliary factor small 35-kDa subunit (U2AF1) maps to the progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) critical region on chromosome 21q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Lalioti, M.D.; Rossier, C.; Antonarakis, S.E.

    1996-04-15

    We used targeted exon trapping to clone portions of genes from human chromosome 21q22.3. One trapped sequence showed complete homology with the cDNA of human U2AF{sup 35} (M96982; HGM-approved nomenclature U2AF1), which encodes for the small 35-kDa subunit of the U2 snRNP auxiliary factor. Using the U2AF1 cDNA as a probe, we mapped this gene to cosmid Q15D2, a P1, and YAC 350F7 of the Chumakov et al. contig, close to the cystathionine-{beta}-synthase gene (CBS) on 21q22.3. This localization was confirmed by PCR using oligonucleotides from the 3{prime} UTR and by FISH. As U2AF1 associated with a number of different factors during mRNA splicing, overexpression in trisomy 21 individuals could contribute to some Down syndrome phenotypes by interfering with the splicing process. Furthermore, because this gene maps in the critical region for the progressive myoclonus epilepsy I locus (EPM1), mutation analysis will be carried out in patients to evaluate the potential role of U2AF1 as a candidate for EPM1. 24 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Mapping of the human cone transducin {alpha} subunit (GNAT2) gene to 1p13 and mutation analysis in patients with Stargardt`s disease

    SciTech Connect

    Magovcevic, I.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C.

    1994-09-01

    Transducin {alpha} subunits are members of a large family of G-proteins and play an important role in phototransduction in rod and cone photoreceptors. We report the localization of the human cone {alpha} transducin (GNAT2) gene using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on chromosome 1 in band p13. The recent assignment of a gene for Stargardt`s disease to the same chromosomal region by linkage analysis prompted us to investigate the possible role of GNAT2 in the pathogenesis of this disease. Stargardt`s disease is characterized by degeneration in late childhood or early adulthood of the macula of the retina, a region rich in cones. We screened patients with Stargardt`s disease, with or without peripheral cone involvement as monitored by the full-field ERG, for mutations in this gene. We investigated 66 unrelated patients including 22 with peripheral cone dysfunction for mutations in the coding region of the GNAT2 gene using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) and direct sequencing. One patient (034-16) was heterozygous for a silent change in exon VI, Asp238Asp (GAT to GAC). Two patients, one (035-005) with peripheral cone involvement and one (071-001) without peripheral cone involvement, were heterozygous for the missense change Val124Met (GTG to ATG) in exon IV. A subsequent screen of 96 unrelated, unaffected controls revealed one individual (N10) who was also heterozygous for the Val124Met alteration. We concluded that Asp238Asp and Val124Met are rare variants not causing Stargardt`s disease. Hence, no disease-specific mutations were found indicating that GNAT2 is probably not involved in the pathogenesis of most cases of Stargardt`s disease.

  4. Gene for the catalytic subunit of the human DNA-activated protein kinase maps to the site of the XRCC7 gene on chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sipley, J.D.; Anderson, C.W.; Menninger, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The DNA-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK) is composed for a large ({approximately}460 kDa) catalytic polypeptide (DNA-PK{sub cs}) and Ku, a heterodimeric DNA-binding component (p70/p80) that targets DNA-PK{sub cs} to DNA. A 41-kbp segment of the DNA-PK{sub cs} gene was isolated, and a 7902-bp segment was sequenced. The sequence contains a polymorphic Pvu II restriction enzyme site, and comparing the sequence with that of the cDNA revealed the positions of nine exons. The DNA-PK{sub cs} gene was mapped to band q11 of chromosome 8 by in situ hybridization. This location is coincident with that of XRCC7, the gene that complements the DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination defects (where V is variable, D is diversity, and J is joining) of hamster V3 and murine severe combined immunodeficient (scid) cells. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Functional mapping of interacting regions of the photoreceptor phosphodiesterase (PDE6) γ-subunit with PDE6 catalytic dimer, transducin, and regulator of G-protein signaling9-1 (RGS9-1).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Jun; Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Yao, Wei; Cote, Rick H

    2012-07-27

    The cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE6) involved in visual transduction in photoreceptor cells contains two inhibitory γ-subunits (Pγ) which bind to the catalytic core (Pαβ) to inhibit catalysis and stimulate cGMP binding to the GAF domains of Pαβ. During visual excitation, interaction of activated transducin with Pγ relieves inhibition. Pγ also participates in a complex with RGS9-1 and other proteins to accelerate the GTPase activity of activated transducin. We studied the structural determinants for these important functions of Pγ. First, we identified two important sites in the middle region of Pγ (amino acids 27-38 and 52-54) that significantly stabilize the overall binding affinity of Pγ with Pαβ. The ability of Pγ to stimulate noncatalytic cGMP binding to the GAF domains of PDE6 has been localized to amino acids 27-30 of Pγ. Transducin activation of PDE6 catalysis critically depends on the presence of Ile54 in the glycine-rich region of Pγ in order to relieve inhibition of catalysis. The central glycine-rich region of Pγ is also required for transducin to increase cGMP exchange at the GAF domains. Finally, Thr-65 and/or Val-66 of Pγ are critical residues for Pγ to stimulate GTPase activity of transducin in a complex with RGS9-1. We propose that the glycine-rich region of Pγ is a primary docking site for PDE6-interacting proteins involved in the activation/inactivation pathways of visual transduction. This functional mapping of Pγ with its binding partners demonstrates the remarkable versatility of this multifunctional protein and its central role in regulating the activation and lifetime of visual transduction.

  6. Epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies to the Escherichia coli F1 ATPase alpha subunit in relation to activity effects and location in the enzyme complex based on cryoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aggeler, R; Capaldi, R A; Dunn, S; Gogol, E P

    1992-08-01

    The interaction of Escherichia coli F1 ATPase (ECF1) with several different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for the alpha subunit has been examined. The epitopes for each of the mAbs have been localized by using molecular biological approaches to generate fragments of the alpha subunit. The binding of several of the mAbs has also been examined by cryoelectron microscopy of ECF1 Fab complexes. One of the mAbs, alpha II, bound in the region Asn 109-Val 153 without affecting ATPase activity. Most of the mAbs bound in the C-terminal third of the alpha subunit. MAb alpha 1 bound between residues Gln 443 and Trp 513. This mAb activated ATPase activity and was visualized in cryoelectron microscopy, superimposed on the alpha subunit, indicating that the epitope was on the top or bottom of ECF1 in the hexagonal projection. Other mAbs to the C-terminus, including alpha D which also activated the enzyme, reacted between Gly 371 and Trp 513 but failed to bind to small overlapping fragments within this sequence. The epitopes for these mAbs are probably formed by the folded polypeptide which occurs only in Western analysis when long stretches of the alpha subunit are present, suggesting that the C-terminus of alpha is a self-folding domain. In cryoelectron microscopy, Fab fragments for alpha D were seen extending from the sides of the ECF1 complex in hexagonal projection. PMID:1378717

  7. Ribitol dehydrogenase from Klebsiella aerogenes. Purification and subunit structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Susan S.; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Hartley, Brian S.

    1974-01-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase has been purified to homogeneity from several strains of Klebsiella aerogenes. One strain yields 3–6g of pure enzyme from 1kg of cells. The enzyme is a tetramer of four subunits, mol.wt. 27000. Preliminary studies of the activity of the enzyme are reported. Peptide `maps' together with the amino acid composition indicate that the subunits are identical. ImagesPLATE 2PLATE 1 PMID:4618776

  8. Gel-based chemical cross-linking analysis of 20S proteasome subunit-subunit interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai; Xiong, Hua; Che, Jing; Xi, Qing-Song; Huang, Liu; Xiong, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in breast tumorigenesis by controlling transcription factors, thus promoting cell cycle growth, and degradation of tumor suppressor proteins. However, breast cancer patients have failed to benefit from proteasome inhibitor treatment partially due to proteasome heterogeneity, which is poorly understood in malignant breast neoplasm. Chemical crosslinking is an increasingly important tool for mapping protein three-dimensional structures and proteinprotein interactions. In the present study, two cross-linkers, bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS(3)) and its water-insoluble analog disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), were used to map the subunit-subunit interactions in 20S proteasome core particle (CP) from MDA-MB-231 cells. Different types of gel electrophoresis technologies were used. In combination with chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry, we applied these gel electrophoresis technologies to the study of the noncovalent interactions among 20S proteasome subunits. Firstly, the CP subunit isoforms were profiled. Subsequently, using native/SDSPAGE, it was observed that 0.5 mmol/L BS(3) was a relatively optimal cross-linking concentration for CP subunit-subunit interaction study. 2-DE analysis of the cross-linked CP revealed that α1 might preinteract with α2, and α3 might pre-interact with α4. Moreover, there were different subtypes of α1α2 and α3α4 due to proteasome heterogeneity. There was no significant difference in cross-linking pattern for CP subunits between BS(3) and DSS. Taken together, the gel-based characterization in combination with chemical cross-linking could serve as a tool for the study of subunit interactions within a multi-subunit protein complex. The heterogeneity of 20S proteasome subunit observed in breast cancer cells may provide some key information for proteasome inhibition strategy. PMID:27465334

  9. Cloning of the cDNA for the human ATP synthase OSCP subunit (ATP5O) by exon trapping and mapping to chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiming; Morris, M.A.; Rossier, C.

    1995-08-10

    Exon trapping was used to clone portions of potential genes from human chromosome 21. One trapped sequence showed striking homology with the bovine and rat ATP synthase OSCP (oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein) subunit. We subsequently cloned the full-length human ATP synthase OSCP cDNA (GDB/HGMW approved name ATP50) from infant brain and muscle libraries and determined its nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence (EMBL/GenBank Accession No. X83218). The encoded polypeptide contains 213 amino acids, with more than 80% identity to bovine and murine ATPase OSCP subunits and over 35% identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sweet potato sequences. The human ATP5O gene is located at 21q22.1-q22.2, just proximal to D21S17, in YACs 860G11 and 838C7 of the Chumakov et al. YAC contig. The gene is expressed in all human tissues examined, most strongly in muscle and heart. This ATP5O subunit is a key structural component of the stalk of the mitochondrial respiratory chain F{sub 1}F{sub 0}-ATP synthase and as such may contribute in a gene dosage-dependent manner to the phenotype of Down syndrome (trisomy 21). 39 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Subunit structure of the dihydrolipoyl transacylase component of branched-chain. cap alpha. -keto acid dehydrogenase complex from bovine liver: mapping of the lipoyl-bearing domain by limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-05

    To characterize the lipoyl-bearing domain of the dihydrolipoyl transacylase (E/sub 2/) component, purified branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase complex from bovine liver was reductively acylated with (U-/sup 14/C)..cap alpha..-ketoisovalerate in the presence of thiamin pyrophosphate and N-ethylmaleimide. Digestion of the modified complex with increasing concentrations of trypsin sequentially cleaved the E/sub 2/ polypeptide chain (M/sub r/ = 52,000) into five radiolabeled lipoyl-containing fragments, L/sub 1/-L/sub 5/. In addition, a lipoate-free inner E/sub 2/ core consisting of fragment A and fragment B was produced. Fragment A contains the active site for transacylation reaction and fragment B is the subunit-binding domain. Fragment L/sub 5/ and fragment B were stable and resistant to further tryptic digestion. Mouse antiserium against E/sub 2/ reacted only with fragments L/sub 1/, L/sub 2/, and L/sub 3/, and did not bind fragments L/sub 4/, L/sub 5/, A, and B as judged by immunoblotting analysis. The anti-E/sub 2/ serum-strongly inhibited the overall reaction catalyzed by the complex, but was without effect on the transacylation activity of E/sub 2/. Measurement of incorporation of (1-/sup 14/C)isobutyryl groups into the E/sub 2/ subunit indicated the presence of 1 lipoyl residue/E/sub 2/ chain.

  11. The genes for the {alpha}-type HC3 (PMSA2) and {beta}-type HC5 (PMSB1) subunits of human proteasomes map to chromosomes 6q27 and 7p12-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Katsuzumi; Nogami, Masahiro; Taguchi, Hiroshi

    1995-05-20

    The authors have determined the locations of the genes for the two subunits, HC3 and HC5, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chromosome spreads were obtained from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated blood lymphocytes of a healthy donor after thymidine synchronization and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation by the method of Takahashi et al. Genomic DNA fragments of HC3 (4.3 kb, including exons 3, 4, and 5) and HC5 (7.5 kb including exons 1 and 2) (11) were labeled with biotin-16-dUTP by nick-translation. In situ hybridization was performed according to Lichter et al. in the presence of COT-1 DNA as a competitor. Hybridized probe was detected with FITC-conjugated avidin without further signal amplification. Comparison of the fluorescence signals and the banding patterns of the chromosomes indicated that the HC3 and HC5 genes were located on chromosome band 6q27 and 7p12-p13, respectively.

  12. Neutron Scattering and the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of E. Coli

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Moore, P. B.; Engelman, D. M.; Langer, J. A.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Schindler, D. G.; Schoenborn, B. P.; Sillers, I. Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-06-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today.

  13. Neutron scattering and the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, P.B.; Engelman, D.M.; Langer, J.A.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Schindler, D.G.; Schoenborn, B.P.; Sillers, I.Y.; Yabuki, S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the progress made in the study of the internal organization of the 30 S ribosomal subunit of E. coli by neutron scattering since 1975. A map of that particle showing the position of 14 of the subunit's 21 proteins is presented, and the methods currently used for collecting and analyzing such data are discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of extending the interpretation of neutron mapping data beyond the limits practical today. 30 references, 5 figures.

  14. Interaction of factor XIII subunits.

    PubMed

    Katona, Eva; Pénzes, Krisztina; Csapó, Andrea; Fazakas, Ferenc; Udvardy, Miklós L; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Orosz, Zsuzsanna Z; Muszbek, László

    2014-03-13

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a heterotetramer consisting of 2 catalytic A subunits (FXIII-A2) and 2 protective/inhibitory B subunits (FXIII-B2). FXIII-B, a mosaic protein consisting of 10 sushi domains, significantly prolongs the lifespan of catalytic subunits in the circulation and prevents their slow progressive activation in plasmatic conditions. In this study, the biochemistry of the interaction between the 2 FXIII subunits was investigated. Using a surface plasmon resonance technique and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding assay, the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for the interaction was established in the range of 10(-10) M. Based on the measured Kd, it was calculated that in plasma approximately 1% of FXIII-A2 should be in free form. This value was confirmed experimentally by measuring FXIII-A2 in plasma samples immunodepleted of FXIII-A2B2. Free plasma FXIII-A2 is functionally active, and when activated by thrombin and Ca(2+), it can cross-link fibrin. In cerebrospinal fluid and tears with much lower FXIII subunit concentrations, >80% of FXIII-A2 existed in free form. A monoclonal anti-FXIII-B antibody that prevented the interaction between the 2 subunits reacted with the recombinant combined first and second sushi domains of FXIII-B, and its epitope was localized to the peptide spanning positions 96 to 103 in the second sushi domain. PMID:24408323

  15. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  16. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the 30S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli can be reconstituted in vitro from individually purified ribosomal proteins and 16S ribosomal RNA, which were isolated from natural 30S subunits. We have developed a 30S subunit reconstitution system that uses only recombinant ribosomal protein components. The genes encoding E. coli ribosomal proteins S2-S21 were cloned, and all twenty of the individual proteins were overexpressed and purified. Reconstitution, following standard procedures, using the complete set of recombinant proteins and purified 16S ribosomal RNA is highly inefficient. Efficient reconstitution of 30S subunits using these components requires sequential addition of proteins, following either the 30S subunit assembly map (Mizushima & Nomura, 1970, Nature 226:1214-1218; Held et al., 1974, J Biol Chem 249:3103-3111) or following the order of protein assembly predicted from in vitro assembly kinetics (Powers et al., 1993, J MoI Biol 232:362-374). In the first procedure, the proteins were divided into three groups, Group I (S4, S7, S8, S15, S17, and S20), Group II (S5, S6, S9, Sll, S12, S13, S16, S18, and S19), and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21), which were sequentially added to 16S rRNA with a 20 min incubation at 42 degrees C following the addition of each group. In the second procedure, the proteins were divided into Group I (S4, S6, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S20), Group II (S7, S8, S9, S13, and S19), Group II' (S5 and S12) and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21). Similarly efficient reconstitution is observed whether the proteins are grouped according to the assembly map or according to the results of in vitro 30S subunit assembly kinetics. Although reconstitution of 30S subunits using the recombinant proteins is slightly less efficient than reconstitution using a mixture of total proteins isolated from 30S subunits, it is much more efficient than reconstitution using proteins that were individually isolated

  17. The Evolution of the Four Subunits of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels: Ancient Roots, Increasing Complexity, and Multiple Losses

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Zakon, Harold H.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels (Cavs) are large transmembrane proteins responsible for crucial physiological processes in excitable cells. They are assisted by three auxiliary subunits that can modulate their electrical behavior. Little is known about the evolution and roles of the various subunits of Cavs in nonbilaterian animals and in nonanimal lineages. For this reason, we mapped the phyletic distribution of the four channel subunits and reconstructed their phylogeny. Although alpha subunits have deep evolutionary roots as ancient as the split between plants and opistokonths, beta subunits appeared in the last common ancestor of animals and their close-relatives choanoflagellates, gamma subunits are a bilaterian novelty and alpha2/delta subunits appeared in the lineage of Placozoa, Cnidaria, and Bilateria. We note that gene losses were extremely common in the evolution of Cavs, with noticeable losses in multiple clades of subfamilies and also of whole Cav families. As in vertebrates, but not protostomes, Cav channel genes duplicated in Cnidaria. We characterized by in situ hybridization the tissue distribution of alpha subunits in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, a nonbilaterian animal possessing all three Cav subfamilies common to Bilateria. We find that some of the alpha subunit subtypes exhibit distinct spatiotemporal expression patterns. Further, all six sea anemone alpha subunit subtypes are conserved in stony corals, which separated from anemones 500 MA. This unexpected conservation together with the expression patterns strongly supports the notion that these subtypes carry unique functional roles. PMID:25146647

  18. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  19. The alpha-subunit of the maize F(1)-ATPase is synthesised in the mitochondrion.

    PubMed

    Hack, E; Leaver, C J

    1983-01-01

    The F(1)-ATPase complex has been purified from maize (Zea mays L.) mitochondria and shown to consist of five subunits with mol. wts. of 58 000 (alpha), 56 000 (beta), 35 000 (gamma), 22 000 (delta) and 8000 (epsilon). The alpha-subunit co-migrates on one- and two- dimensional isoelectric focussing-SDS polyacrylamide gels with the major polypeptide synthesised by isolated mitochondria. One-dimensional proteolytic peptide mapping and immunoprecipitation confirms that the alpha-subunit is a mitochondrial translation product and therefore presumably encoded in mitochondrial DNA. This contrasts with the situation in animal and fungal cells where all five subunits of the F(1)-ATPase are encoded by the nuclear genome and synthesised on cytosolic ribosomes.

  20. Subunit connectivity, assembly determinants, and architecture of the yeast exocyst complex

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Margaret R.; Gu, Mingyu; Duffy, Caroline M.; Mirza, Anne M.; Marcotte, Laura L.; Walls, Alexandra C.; Farrall, Nicholas; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Field, Mark C.; Rout, Michael P.; Frost, Adam; Munson, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The exocyst is a hetero-octameric complex proposed to serve as the tethering complex for exocytosis, although it remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Here, we purified endogenous exocyst from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and show that the purified complexes are stable and consist of all eight subunits with equal stoichiometry. Using a combination of biochemical and auxin-induced degradation experiments in yeast, we mapped the subunit connectivity, identified two stable four-subunit modules within the octamer, and demonstrated that several known exocyst binding partners are not necessary for exocyst assembly and stability. Furthermore, we visualized the structure of the yeast complex using negative stain electron microscopy; our results indicate that exocyst exists predominantly as a stable, octameric complex with an elongated architecture that suggests the subunits are contiguous helical bundles packed together into a bundle of long rods. PMID:26656853

  1. Further characterization of the subunits of the receptor with high affinity for immunoglobulin E

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, G.; Kinet, J.P.; Liu, T.Y.; Metzger, H.

    1987-05-05

    The ..cap alpha.., ..beta.., ..gamma.. subunits of the receptor with high affinity for immunoglobulin E were isolated and their compositions assessed by direct amino acid analysis and by incorporation of radioactive precursors. The compositions show no unusual features other than a rather high content of tryptophan in the ..cap alpha.. chain as assessed from the incorporation studies. The results combined with future sequence data will permit unambiguous determination of the multiplicity of the chains in the receptor. Chymotryptic peptide maps of the extrinsically iodinated subunits show several similar peptides, particularly for ..cap alpha.. and ..beta... However, these putative homologies were not apparent when tryptic maps of the biosynthetically ((/sup 3/H)leucine) labeled subunits were analyzed.

  2. Positions of proteins S14, S18 and S20 in the 30 S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, V; Capel, M; Kjeldgaard, M; Engelman, D M; Moore, P B

    1984-04-01

    A map of the 30 S ribosomal subunit is presented giving the positions of 15 of its 21 proteins. The components located in the map are S1, S3, S4, S5, S6, S7, S8, S9, S10, S11, S12, S14, S15, S18 and S20.

  3. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  4. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  5. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  6. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  7. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  8. Structure, subunit composition, and molecular weight of RD-114 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kung, H J; Bailey, J M; Davidson, N; Nicolson, M O; McAllister, R M

    1975-01-01

    The properties and subunit composition of the RNA extracted from RD-114 virions have been studied. The RNA extracted from the virion has a sedimentation coefficient of 52S in a nondenaturing aqueous electrolyte. The estimated molecular weight by sedimentation in nondenaturing and weakly denaturing media is in the range 5.7 X 10(6) to 7.0 X 10(6). By electron microscopy, under moderately denaturing conditions, the 52S molecule is seen to be an extended single strand with a contour length of about 4.0 mum corresponding to a molecular weight of 5.74 X 10(6). It contains two characteristic secondary structure features: (i) a central Y- or T-shaped structure (the rabbit ears) with a molecular weight of 0.3 X 10(6), (ii) two symmetreically disposed loops on each side of and at equal distance from the center. The 52S molecule consists of two half-size molecules, with molecular weight 2.8 X 10(6), joined together within the central rabbit ears feature. Melting of the rabbit ears with concomitant dissociation of the 52S molecule into subunits, has been caused by either one of two strongly denaturing treatments: incubation in a mixture of CH3HgOH and glyoxal at room temperature, or thermal dissociation in a urea-formamide solvent. When half-size molecules are quenched from denaturing temperatures, a new off-center secondary structure feature termed the branch-like structure is seen. The dissociation behavior of the 52S complex and the molecular weight of the subunits have been confirmed by gel electrophoresis studies. The loop structures melt at fairly low temperatures; the dissociation of the 52S molecule into its two subunits occurs at a higher temperature corresponding to a base composition of about 63% guanosine plus cytosine. Polyadenylic acid mapping by electron microscopy shows that the 52S molecule contains two polyadenylic acid segments, one at each end. It thus appears that 52S RD-114 RNA consists of two 2.8 X 10(6) dalton subunits, each with a characteristic

  9. Structural Characterization of Tip20p and Dsl1p, Subunits of the Dsl1p Vesicle Tethering Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, A.; Ren, Y; Jeffrey, P; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Multisubunit tethering complexes are essential for intracellular trafficking and have been proposed to mediate the initial interaction between vesicles and the membranes with which they fuse. Here we report initial structural characterization of the Dsl1p complex, whose three subunits are essential for trafficking from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Crystal structures reveal that two of the three subunits, Tip20p and Dsl1p, resemble known subunits of the exocyst complex, establishing a structural connection among several multisubunit tethering complexes and implying that many of their subunits are derived from a common progenitor. We show, moreover, that Tip20p and Dsl1p interact directly via N-terminal alpha-helices. Finally, we establish that different Dsl1p complex subunits bind independently to different ER SNARE proteins. Our results map out two alternative protein-interaction networks capable of tethering COPI-coated vesicles, via the Dsl1p complex, to ER membranes.

  10. Subunit arrangement in beef heart complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Halphen, D.; Lindorfer, M.A.; Capaldi, R.A.

    1988-09-06

    Beef heart mitochondrial complex III was separated into 12 polypeptide bands representing 11 different subunits by using the electrophoresis conditions described previously. Eight of the 12 polypeptide bands were identified from their NH/sub 2/-terminal sequences as obtained by electroblotting directly from the NaDodSO/sub 4/-polyacrylamide gel onto a solid support. The topology of the subunits in complex III was explored by three different approaches. (1) Protease digestion experiments of submitochrondial particles in the presence and absence of detergent showed that subunits II and VI are on the M side of the inner membrane and subunits V and XI on the C side. (2) Labeling experiments with the membrane-intercalated probes (/sup 125/I)TID and arylazidoPE indicated that cytochrome b is the predominant bilayer embedded subunit of complex III, while the non-heme iron protein appears to be peripherally located. (3) Cross-linking studies with carbodiimides and homobifunctional cleavable reagents demonstrated that near-neighbor pairs include subunits I+II, II+VI, III+VI, IV+V, V+X, and V+VII. The cytochrome c binding site was found to include subunits IV, VII, and X. The combined data are used to provide an updated model of the topology of beef heart complex III.

  11. Cleft Lip Repair: The Hybrid Subunit Method.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    The unilateral cleft lip repair is one of the most rewarding and challenging of plastic surgery procedures. Surgeons have introduced a variety of straight line, geometric, and rotation-advancement designs, while in practice the majority of North American surgeons have been using hybrids of the rotation-advancement techniques. The anatomic subunit approach was introduced in 2005 by Fisher and has gained popularity, with early adopters of the design touting its simplicity and effectiveness. The objectives of this article are to summarize the basic tenets of respecting the philtral subunit, accurate measurement and planning, and tips for transitioning to this subunit approach.

  12. Cleft Lip Repair: The Hybrid Subunit Method.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    The unilateral cleft lip repair is one of the most rewarding and challenging of plastic surgery procedures. Surgeons have introduced a variety of straight line, geometric, and rotation-advancement designs, while in practice the majority of North American surgeons have been using hybrids of the rotation-advancement techniques. The anatomic subunit approach was introduced in 2005 by Fisher and has gained popularity, with early adopters of the design touting its simplicity and effectiveness. The objectives of this article are to summarize the basic tenets of respecting the philtral subunit, accurate measurement and planning, and tips for transitioning to this subunit approach. PMID:27097136

  13. Conformational flexibility and subunit arrangement of the modular yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase complex.

    PubMed

    Setiaputra, Dheva; Ross, James D; Lu, Shan; Cheng, Derrick T; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yip, Calvin K

    2015-04-17

    The Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase (SAGA) complex is a highly conserved, 19-subunit histone acetyltransferase complex that activates transcription through acetylation and deubiquitination of nucleosomal histones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because SAGA has been shown to display conformational variability, we applied gradient fixation to stabilize purified SAGA and systematically analyzed this flexibility using single-particle EM. Our two- and three-dimensional studies show that SAGA adopts three major conformations, and mutations of specific subunits affect the distribution among these. We also located the four functional modules of SAGA using electron microscopy-based labeling and transcriptional activator binding analyses and show that the acetyltransferase module is localized in the most mobile region of the complex. We further comprehensively mapped the subunit interconnectivity of SAGA using cross-linking mass spectrometry, revealing that the Spt and Taf subunits form the structural core of the complex. These results provide the necessary restraints for us to generate a model of the spatial arrangement of all SAGA subunits. According to this model, the chromatin-binding domains of SAGA are all clustered in one face of the complex that is highly flexible. Our results relate information of overall SAGA structure with detailed subunit level interactions, improving our understanding of its architecture and flexibility.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies to the [alpha]- and [beta]-Subunits of the Plant Mitochondrial F1-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, M. H.; Horak, A.; Elthon, T. E.

    1993-01-01

    We have generated nine monoclonal antibodies against subunits of the maize (Zea mays L.) mitochondrial F1-ATPase. These monoclonal antibodies were generated by immunizing mice against maize mitochondrial fractions and randomly collecting useful hybridomas. To prove that these monoclonal antibodies were directed against ATPase subunits, we tested their cross-reactivity with purified F1-ATPase from pea cotyledon mitochondria. One of the antibodies ([alpha]-ATPaseD) cross-reacted with the pea F1-ATPase [alpha]-subunit and two ([beta]-ATPaseD and [beta]-ATPaseE) cross-reacted with the pea F1-ATPase [beta]-subunit. This established that, of the nine antibodies, four react with the maize [alpha]-ATPase subunit and the other five react with the maize [beta]-ATPase subunit. Most of the monoclonal antibodies cross-react with the F1-ATPase from a wide range of plant species. Each of the four monoclonal antibodies raised against the [alpha]-subunit recognizes a different epitope. Of the five [beta]-subunit antibodies, at least three different epitopes are recognized. Direct incubation of the monoclonal antibodies with the F1-ATPase failed to inhibit the ATPase activity. The monoclonal antibodies [alpha]-ATPaseD and [beta]-ATPaseD were bound to epoxide-glass QuantAffinity beads and incubated with a purified preparation of pea F1-ATPase. The ATPase activity was not inhibited when the antibodies bound the ATPase. The antibodies were used to help map the pea F1-ATPase subunits on a two-dimensional map of whole pea cotyledon mitochondrial protein. In addition, the antibodies have revealed antigenic similarities between various isoforms observed for the [alpha]- and [beta]-subunits of the purified F1-ATPase. The specificity of these monoclonal antibodies, along with their cross-species recognition and their ability to bind the F1-ATPase without inhibiting enzymic function, makes these antibodies useful and invaluable tools for the further purification and characterization of plant

  15. Site Specific Phosphorylation of Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunits I, IVi1 and Vb in Rabbit Hearts Subjected to Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ji-Kang; Prabu, Subbuswamy K.; Sepuri, Naresh B.; Raza, Haider; Anandatheerthavarada, Hindupur K.; Galati, Domenico; Spear, Joseph; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2007-01-01

    We have mapped the sites of ischemia/reperfusion induced phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) subunits in rabbit hearts by using a combination of Blue Native gel/Tricine gel electrophoresis and nano-LC-MS/MS approaches. We used precursor ion scanning combined with neutral loss scanning and found that mature CcO subunit I was phosphorylated at tandem Ser115/Ser116 positions, subunit IVi1 at Thr52 and subunit Vb at Ser40. These sites are highly conserved in mammalian species. Molecular modeling suggests that phosphorylation sites of subunit I face the inter membrane space while those of subunits IVi1 and Vb face the matrix side. PMID:17349628

  16. Studies on ribosomal proteins in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Resolution, nomenclature and molecular weights of proteins in the 40-S and 60-S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Ramagopal, S; Ennis, H L

    1980-04-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and subunit localization of ribosomal proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum. The characterization is based on the resolution of ribosomal proteins by various methods of electrophoresis. 34 and 42 unique proteins were identified in the 40-S and 60-S ribosomal subunits respectively. The total mass of proteins in the 40-S subunit was 746,100 daltons and 981,900 daltons in the 60-S subunit. The molecular weights of individual proteins in the 40-S subunit ranged from 13,200 to 40,900 with a number-average molecular weight of 21,900. The molecular weight range for the 60-S subunit was 13,800--51,100 with a number-average molecular weight of 23,400. The 80-S ribosome contained 78 proteins, two of which were lost upon its dissociation into subunits. All the proteins of the 40-S and 60-S subunits could be identified individually in a 80-S map as well as in unfractionated proteins from whole cells. Purification of ribosomes in high-ionic-strength buffers resulted in non-specific loss of the various proteins from the 40-S and 60-S subunits. In addition, the undissociated ribosomes contained about 10 acidic proteins in the molecular weight range 50,000--100,000, which were retained after washing the ribosomes in high-salt buffers. They were found in polysomes, run-off ribosomes and could also be identified in the 40-S subunit after dissociation.

  17. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  18. Isolation of the mature subunit of delta-aminolaevulinate synthase from embryonic chick liver.

    PubMed Central

    Ades, I Z; Harpe, K G

    1982-01-01

    We presented evidence indicating that the established procedure for purifying delta-aminolaevulinate (ALA) synthase from embryonic-chick liver yielded an enzyme with a partially degraded subunit of molecular weight 51000 [Ades & Harpe (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 9329-9333]. We now report the purification from livers of porphyric embryos of a preparation of ALA synthase which consisted primarily of a 63000-Da polypeptide and a component migrating as a smear of polypeptides with a minimum molecular weight of 52 000. Neither component could be recovered from liver mitochondria of normal embryos, where the amounts of ALA synthase were relatively low. The 52 000-Da component had been established to be the partially degraded subunit of the enzyme. Peptide-mapping analyses indicated that the 63 000- and the 52 000-Da components possessed significant structural homologies, and it was concluded that the 63 000-Da polypeptide represented the mature subunit of ALA synthase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:7138500

  19. Subunit Organisation of In Vitro Reconstituted HOPS and CORVET Multisubunit Membrane Tethering Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhong; Johnston, Wayne; Kovtun, Oleksiy; Mureev, Sergey; Bröcker, Cornelia; Ungermann, Christian; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical and structural analysis of macromolecular protein assemblies remains challenging due to technical difficulties in recombinant expression, engineering and reconstitution of multisubunit complexes. Here we use a recently developed cell-free protein expression system based on the protozoan Leishmania tarentolae to produce in vitro all six subunits of the 600 kDa HOPS and CORVET membrane tethering complexes. We demonstrate that both subcomplexes and the entire HOPS complex can be reconstituted in vitro resulting in a comprehensive subunit interaction map. To our knowledge this is the largest eukaryotic protein complex in vitro reconstituted to date. Using the truncation and interaction analysis, we demonstrate that the complex is assembled through short hydrophobic sequences located in the C-terminus of the individual Vps subunits. Based on this data we propose a model of the HOPS and CORVET complex assembly that reconciles the available biochemical and structural data. PMID:24312556

  20. Distinct expression patterns of glycoprotein hormone subunits in the lophotrochozoan Aplysia: implications for the evolution of neuroendocrine systems in animals.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Andreas; Plachetzki, David; Donelly, Evonne; Gunaratne, Dinuka; Bobkova, Yelena; Jacobson, John; Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Leonid L

    2012-11-01

    Glycoprotein hormones (GPHs) comprise a group of signaling molecules critical for major metabolic and reproductive functions. In vertebrates they include chorionic gonadotropin, LH, FSH, and TSH. The active hormones are characterized by heterodimerization between a common α and hormone-specific β subunit, which activate leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein coupled receptors. To date, genes referred to as GPHα2 and GPHβ5 have been the only glycoprotein hormone subunits identified in invertebrates, suggesting that other GPHα and GPHβ subunits diversified during vertebrate evolution. Still the functions of GPHα2 and GPHβ5 remain largely unknown for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To further understand the evolution and putative function of these subunits, we cloned and analyzed phylogenetically two glycoprotein subunits, AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ, from the sea hare Aplysia californica. Model based three-dimensional predictions of AcaGPHβ confirm the presence of a complete cysteine knot, two hairpin loops, and a long loop. As in the human GPHβ5 subunit the seatbelt structure is absent in AcaGPHβ. We also found that AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ subunits are expressed in larval stages of Aplysia, and we present a detailed expression map of the subunits in the adult central nervous system using in situ hybridizations. Both subunits are expressed in subpopulations of pleural and buccal mechanosensory neurons, suggesting a neuronal modulatory function of these subunits in Aplysia. Furthermore it supports the model of a relatively diffuse neuroendocrine-like system in molluscs, where specific primary sensory neurons release peptides extrasynaptically (paracrine secretion). This is in contrast to vertebrates and insects, in which releasing and stimulating factor from centralized sensory regions of the central nervous system ultimately regulate hormone release in peripheral glands.

  1. Genetic exploration of interactive domains in RNA polymerase II subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Okamura, S; Young, R

    1990-01-01

    The two large subunits of RNA polymerase II, RPB1 and RPB2, contain regions of extensive homology to the two large subunits of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These homologous regions may represent separate protein domains with unique functions. We investigated whether suppressor genetics could provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of RPB1 and RPB2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A plasmid shuffle method was used to screen thoroughly for mutations in RPB2 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb1-1, which is located in region H of RPB1. All six RPB2 mutations that suppress rpb1-1 were clustered in region I of RPB2. The location of these mutations and the observation that they were allele specific for suppression of rpb1-1 suggests an interaction between region H of RPB1 and region I of RPB2. A similar experiment was done to isolate and map mutations in RPB1 that suppress a temperature-sensitive mutation, rpb2-2, which occurs in region I of RPB2. These suppressor mutations were not clustered in a particular region. Thus, fine structure suppressor genetics can provide evidence for interactions between specific segments of two proteins, but the results of this type of analysis can depend on the conditional mutation to be suppressed. Images PMID:2183012

  2. Progesterone receptor subunits are high-affinity substrates for phosphorylation by epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh-Dastidar, P; Coty, W A; Griest, R E; Woo, D D; Fox, C F

    1984-01-01

    Purified preparations of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor were used to test hen oviduct progesterone receptor subunits as substrates for phosphorylation catalyzed by EGF receptor. Both the 80-kilodalton (kDa) (A) and the 105-kDa (B) progesterone receptor subunits were phosphorylated in a reaction that required EGF and EGF receptor. No phosphorylation of progesterone receptor subunits was observed in the absence of EGF receptor, even when Ca2+ was substituted for Mg2+ and Mn2+. Phospho amino acid analysis revealed phosphorylation at tyrosine residues, with no phosphorylation detectable at serine or threonine residues. Two-dimensional maps of phosphopeptides generated from phosphorylated 80- or 105-kDa subunits by tryptic digestion revealed similar patterns, with resolution of two major, several minor, and a number of very minor phosphopeptides. The Km of progesterone receptor for phosphorylation by EGF-activated EGF receptor was 100 nM and the Vmax was 2.5 nmol/min per mg of EGF receptor protein at 0 degrees C. The stoichiometry of phosphorylation/hormone binding for progesterone receptor subunits was 0.31 at ice-bath temperature and approximately 1.0 at 22 degrees C. Images PMID:6200881

  3. Localization of the regulatory particle subunit Sem1 in the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Stefan; Sakata, Eri; Beck, Florian; Pathare, Ganesh R.; Schnitger, Jérôme; Nágy, Istvan; Baumeister, Wolfgang Förster, Friedrich

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •26S proteasome subunit Sem1 was mapped using cryo-EM and cross-linking data. •C-terminal helix of Sem1 located near winged helix motif of Rpn7. •N-terminal part of Sem1 tethers Rpn7, Rpn3 and lid helical bundle. •Sem1 binds differently to PCI-domains of proteasome subunit Rpn7 and TREX-2 subunit Thp1. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin–proteasome system is responsible for regulated protein degradation in the cell with the 26S proteasome acting as its executive arm. The molecular architecture of this 2.5 MDa complex has been established recently, with the notable exception of the small acidic subunit Sem1. Here, we localize the C-terminal helix of Sem1 binding to the PCI domain of the subunit Rpn7 using cryo-electron microscopy single particle reconstruction of proteasomes purified from yeast cells with sem1 deletion. The approximate position of the N-terminal region of Sem1 bridging the cleft between Rpn7 and Rpn3 was inferred based on site-specific cross-linking data of the 26S proteasome. Our structural studies indicate that Sem1 can assume different conformations in different contexts, which supports the idea that Sem1 functions as a molecular glue stabilizing the Rpn3/Rpn7 heterodimer.

  4. A human RNA polymerase II subunit is encoded by a recently generated multigene family

    PubMed Central

    Grandemange, Sylvie; Schaller, Sophie; Yamano, Shigeru; Du Manoir, Stanislas; Shpakovski, George V; Mattei, Marie-Geneviève; Kedinger, Claude; Vigneron, Marc

    2001-01-01

    Background The sequences encoding the yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB) subunits are single copy genes. Results While those characterized so far for the human (h) RPB are also unique, we show that hRPB subunit 11 (hRPB11) is encoded by a multigene family, mapping on chromosome 7 at loci p12, q11.23 and q22. We focused on two members of this family, hRPB11a and hRPB11b: the first encodes subunit hRPB11a, which represents the major RPB11 component of the mammalian RPB complex ; the second generates polypeptides hRPB11bα and hRPB11bβ through differential splicing of its transcript and shares homologies with components of the hPMS2L multigene family related to genes involved in mismatch-repair functions (MMR). Both hRPB11a and b genes are transcribed in all human tissues tested. Using an inter-species complementation assay, we show that only hRPB11bα is functional in yeast. In marked contrast, we found that the unique murine homolog of RPB11 gene maps on chromosome 5 (band G), and encodes a single polypeptide which is identical to subunit hRPB11a. Conclusions The type hRPB11b gene appears to result from recent genomic recombination events in the evolution of primates, involving sequence elements related to the MMR apparatus. PMID:11747469

  5. Assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit: positioning ribosomal protein S13 in the S7 assembly branch.

    PubMed

    Grondek, Joel F; Culver, Gloria M

    2004-12-01

    Studies of Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit assembly have revealed a hierarchical and cooperative association of ribosomal proteins with 16S ribosomal RNA; these results have been used to compile an in vitro 30S subunit assembly map. In single protein addition and omission studies, ribosomal protein S13 was shown to be dependent on the prior association of ribosomal protein S20 for binding to the ribonucleoprotein particle. While the overwhelming majority of interactions revealed in the assembly map are consistent with additional data, the dependency of S13 on S20 is not. Structural studies position S13 in the head of the 30S subunit > 100 A away from S20, which resides near the bottom of the body of the 30S subunit. All of the proteins that reside in the head of the 30S subunit, except S13, have been shown to be part of the S7 assembly branch, that is, they all depend on S7 for association with the assembling 30S subunit. Given these observations, the assembly requirements for S13 were investigated using base-specific chemical footprinting and primer extension analysis. These studies reveal that S13 can bind to 16S rRNA in the presence of S7, but not S20. Additionally, interaction between S13 and other members of the S7 assembly branch have been observed. These results link S13 to the 3' major domain family of proteins, and the S7 assembly branch, placing S13 in a new location in the 30S subunit assembly map where its position is in accordance with much biochemical and structural data.

  6. Novel subunit-subunit interactions in the structure of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Almassy, R J; Janson, C A; Hamlin, R; Xuong, N H; Eisenberg, D

    We present an atomic model for glutamine synthetase, an enzyme of central importance in bacterial nitrogen metabolism, from X-ray crystallography. The 12 identical subunits are arranged as the carbon atoms in two face-to-face benzene rings, with unusual subunit contacts. Our model, which places the active sites at the subunit interfaces, suggests a mechanism for the main functional role of glutamine synthetase: how the enzyme regulates the rate of synthesis of glutamine in response to covalent modification and feedback inhibition. PMID:2876389

  7. Localization of a gene for a glutamate binding subunit of a NMDA receptor (GRINA) to 8q24

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, T.B.; DuPont, B.R.; Leach, R.

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on the localization of a gene for a glutamate binding subunit of an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, called GRINA, to human chromosome 8q24 using fluorescence in situ hybridization and radiation hybridization mapping. This gene mapped outside the critical region for benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNC), a rare form of epilepsy; however, GRINA could be the causative genetic factor inducing idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Further studies need to be conducted. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  9. Physical and genetic localization of the [gamma] subunit of the cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase on the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q25)

    SciTech Connect

    Dollfus, H.; Rozet, J.M.; Delrieu, O.; Munnich, A.; Kaplan, J. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1993-08-01

    Cyclic GMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) is a major component of the phosphotransduction cascade that takes place in the outer segment of the rods. This heterotetrameric enzyme is composed of two large catalytic subunits ([alpha] and [beta]) and two small inhibitory [gamma] subunits. The retinal degeneration of the rd mouse has been ascribed to mutations in the [beta] subunit of the PDE complex. Until now, however, no mutations in the [gamma] subunit (PDEG) have been reported. The cDNA encoding the human PDEG has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q21.1). Here, the authors refine the physical mapping of the PDEG gene and provide evidence for a more distal localization (17q25) with respect to previous reports. Moreover, they present genetic data supporting the telomeric location of the gene on the distal long arm of chromosome 17. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Isolation of the alpha subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins by affinity chromatography with immobilized beta gamma subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, I H; Sternweis, P C

    1989-01-01

    Immobilized beta gamma subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to isolate alpha subunits from solubilized membranes of bovine tissues and to separate specific alpha subunits based on their differential affinities for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma subunits were cross-linked to omega-aminobutyl agarose. Up to 7 nmol of alpha subunit could bind to each milliliter of beta gamma-agarose and be recovered by elution with AIF4-. This affinity resin effectively separated the alpha subunits of Gi1 and Gi2 from "contaminating" alpha subunits of Go, the most abundant G protein in bovine brain, by taking advantage of the apparent lower affinity of the alpha subunits of Go for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma-agarose was also used to isolate mixtures of alpha subunits from cholate extracts of membranes from different bovine tissues. alpha subunits of 39-41 kDa (in various ratios) as well as the alpha subunits of Gs were purified. The yields from extracts exceeded 60% for all alpha subunits examined and apparently represented the relative content of alpha subunits in the tissues. This technique can rapidly isolate and identify, from a small amount of sample, the endogenous G proteins in various tissues and cells. So far, only polypeptides in the range of 39-52 kDa have been detected with this approach. If other GTP-binding proteins interact with these beta gamma subunits, the interaction is either of low affinity or mechanistically unique from the alpha subunits isolated in this study. Images PMID:2510152

  11. Dissociation of ribosomes into large and small subunits.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-04-01

    Structural and functional studies of ribosomal subunits require the dissociation of intact ribosomes into individual small and large ribosomal subunits. The dissociation of the prokaryotic 70S ribosomes into the 50S and 30S subunits is achieved by dialysis against a buffer containing a lower Mg(2+) concentration. Eukaryotic 80S ribosomes are dissociated into 60S and 40S subunits by incubation in a buffer containing puromycin and higher KCl and Mg(2+) concentrations.

  12. Planetary maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    An important goal of the USGS planetary mapping program is to systematically map the geology of the Moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury, and the satellites of the outer planets. These geologic maps are published in the USGS Miscellaneous Investigations (I) Series. Planetary maps on sale at the USGS include shaded-relief maps, topographic maps, geologic maps, and controlled photomosaics. Controlled photomosaics are assembled from two or more photographs or images using a network of points of known latitude and longitude. The images used for most of these planetary maps are electronic images, obtained from orbiting television cameras, various optical-mechanical systems. Photographic film was only used to map Earth's Moon.

  13. Escherichia coli rimM and yjeQ null strains accumulate immature 30S subunits of similar structure and protein complement

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Vivian; Kent, Meredith; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ortega, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    Assembly of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits proceeds through multiple parallel pathways. The protein factors RimM, YjeQ, RbfA, and Era work in conjunction to assist at the late stages of the maturation process of the small subunit. However, it is unclear how the functional interplay between these factors occurs in the context of multiple parallel pathways. To understand how these factors work together, we have characterized the immature 30S subunits that accumulate in ΔrimM cells and compared them with immature 30S subunits from a ΔyjeQ strain. The cryo-EM maps obtained from these particles showed that the densities representing helices 44 and 45 in the rRNA were partially missing, suggesting mobility of these motifs. These 30S subunits were also partially depleted in all tertiary ribosomal proteins, particularly those binding in the head domain. Using image classification, we identified four subpopulations of ΔrimM immature 30S subunits differing in the amount of missing density for helices 44 and 45, as well as the amount of density existing in these maps for the underrepresented proteins. The structural defects found in these immature subunits resembled those of the 30S subunits that accumulate in the ΔyjeQ strain. These findings are consistent with an “early convergency model” in which multiple parallel assembly pathways of the 30S subunit converge into a late assembly intermediate, as opposed to the mature state. Functionally related factors will bind to this intermediate to catalyze the last steps of maturation leading to the mature 30S subunit. PMID:23611982

  14. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  15. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. PMID:24755349

  16. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  17. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs.

  18. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts. PMID:9760212

  19. β1-subunit-induced structural rearrangements of the Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Juan P; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; Hyde, H Clark; Zaelzer, Cristian A; Aguayo, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Romina V; Luk, Louis Y P; Kent, Stephen B H; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D; Bezanilla, Francisco; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-06-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels are involved in a large variety of physiological processes. Regulatory β-subunits are one of the mechanisms responsible for creating BK channel diversity fundamental to the adequate function of many tissues. However, little is known about the structure of its voltage sensor domain. Here, we present the external architectural details of BK channels using lanthanide-based resonance energy transfer (LRET). We used a genetically encoded lanthanide-binding tag (LBT) to bind terbium as a LRET donor and a fluorophore-labeled iberiotoxin as the LRET acceptor for measurements of distances within the BK channel structure in a living cell. By introducing LBTs in the extracellular region of the α- or β1-subunit, we determined (i) a basic extracellular map of the BK channel, (ii) β1-subunit-induced rearrangements of the voltage sensor in α-subunits, and (iii) the relative position of the β1-subunit within the α/β1-subunit complex.

  20. Molecular characterization and mutational analysis of the human B17 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Smeitink, J; Loeffen, J; Smeets, R; Triepels, R; Ruitenbeek, W; Trijbels, F; van den Heuvel, L

    1998-08-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex 1) of the mitochondrial respiratory chain consists of about 36 nuclear-encoded subunits. We review the current knowledge of the 15 human complex I subunits cloned so far, and report the 598-bp cDNA sequence, the chromosomal localization and the tissue expression of an additional subunit, the B17 subunit. The cDNA open reading frame of B17 comprises 387 bp and encodes a protein of 128 amino acids (calculated Mr 15.5 kDa). There is 82.7% and 78.1% homology, respectively, at the cDNA and amino acid level with the bovine counterpart. The gene of the B17 subunit has been mapped to chromosome 2. Multiple-tissue dot-blots showed ubiquitous expression of the mRNA with relatively higher expression in tissues known for their high energy demand. Of these, kidney showed the highest expression. Mutational analysis of the subunit revealed no mutations or polymorphisms in 20 patients with isolated enzymatic complex I deficiency in cultured skin fibroblasts.

  1. Self-association of the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase as determined by two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Ayers, N A; Wilkinson, D A; Fitzgerald, T J; Carlson, G M

    1999-12-10

    The structural organization of the (alphabetagammadelta)(4) phosphorylase kinase complex has been studied using the yeast two-hybrid screen for the purpose of elucidating regions of alpha subunit interactions. By screening a rabbit skeletal muscle cDNA library with residues 1-1059 of the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase, we have isolated 16 interacting, independent, yet overlapping transcripts of the alpha subunit containing its C-terminal region. Domain mapping of binary interactions between alpha constructs revealed two regions involved in the self-association of the alpha subunit: residues 833-854, a previously unrecognized leucine zipper, and an unspecified region within residues 1015-1237. The cognate binding partner for the latter domain has been inferred to lie within the stretch from residues 864-1059. Indirect evidence from the literature suggests that the interacting domains contained within the latter two, overlapping regions may be further narrowed to the stretches from 1057 to 1237 and from 864 to 971. Cross-linking of the nonactivated holoenzyme with N-(gamma-maleimidobutyroxy)sulfosuccin-imide ester produced intramolecularly cross-linked alpha-alpha dimers, consistent with portions of two alpha subunits in the holoenyzme being in sufficient proximity to associate. This is the first report to identify potential areas of contact between the alpha subunits of phosphorylase kinase. Additionally, issues regarding the general utility of two-hybrid screening as a method for studying homodimeric interactions are discussed. PMID:10585434

  2. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  3. Arrangement of subunits in microribbons from Giardia.

    PubMed

    Holberton, D V

    1981-02-01

    Ultrasound has been used to disperse the cytoplasm of Giardia muris and Giardia duodenalis trophozoites, releasing disk cytoskeletons for negative staining and study by electron microscopy. Sonication also breaks down the corss-bridges uniting microribbons in disks. Individual ribbons and small bundles of these structures, are found in these preparations and have been imaged both from their edges and in flat face view. The outer layers of ribbons are 2 sheets of regularly arranged globular subunits, held apart by a fibrous inner core. The axial repeat of the microribbon is 15 nm, which is also the distance separating cross-bridge sites along ribbons. Pronounced striping at this interval is a feature of ribbon faces where they are joined in bundles. Subunits in the outer layer are arranged in vertical protofilaments that are set orthogonally to the long axis of the ribbon. Protofilaments bind tannic acid and are seen clearly in sectioned ribbons. Three protofilaments fit into the 15-nm longitudinal spacing. Optical diffraction patterns from ribbon images are dominated by orders of the 15-nm periodicity, including the third-order reflexions expected from protofilaments spacings. Fourth-order reflexions indicate that the ribbon core may also be structured. Ribbon face images give rise to a strong 4-nm layer line, corresponding to the vertical spacing of subunits in protofilaments. Neighbouring protofilaments are staggered by about 0.67 nm. The lattices found in ribbons are consistent with studies of cytoskeleton composition.

  4. Structural and functional consequences of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Rath, E M; Tsang, V H M; Duff, A P; Robinson, B G; Church, W B; Benn, D E; Dwight, T; Clifton-Bligh, R J

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, due to mutations of the gene encoding succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), has been implicated in the development of adrenal phaeochromocytomas, sympathetic and parasympathetic paragangliomas, renal cell carcinomas, gastrointestinal stromal tumours and more recently pituitary tumours. Underlying mechanisms behind germline SDH subunit B (SDHB) mutations and their associated risk of disease are not clear. To investigate genotype-phenotype correlation of SDH subunit B (SDHB) variants, a homology model for human SDH was developed from a crystallographic structure. SDHB mutations were mapped, and biochemical effects of these mutations were predicted in silico. Results of structural modelling indicated that many mutations within SDHB are predicted to cause either failure of functional SDHB expression (p.Arg27*, p.Arg90*, c.88delC and c.311delAinsGG), or disruption of the electron path (p.Cys101Tyr, p.Pro197Arg and p.Arg242His). GFP-tagged WT SDHB and mutant SDHB constructs were transfected (HEK293) to determine biological outcomes of these mutants in vitro. According to in silico predictions, specific SDHB mutations resulted in impaired mitochondrial localisation and/or SDH enzymatic activity. These results indicated strong genotype-functional correlation for SDHB variants. This study reveals new insights into the effects of SDHB mutations and the power of structural modelling in predicting biological consequences. We predict that our functional assessment of SDHB mutations will serve to better define specific consequences for SDH activity as well as to provide a much needed assay to distinguish pathogenic mutations from benign variants. PMID:25972245

  5. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain. PMID:26636753

  6. Gene Expression Switching of Receptor Subunits in Human Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shira, Ossnat; Maor, Ronnie; Chechik, Gal

    2015-12-01

    Synaptic receptors in the human brain consist of multiple protein subunits, many of which have multiple variants, coded by different genes, and are differentially expressed across brain regions and developmental stages. The brain can tune the electrophysiological properties of synapses to regulate plasticity and information processing by switching from one protein variant to another. Such condition-dependent variant switch during development has been demonstrated in several neurotransmitter systems including NMDA and GABA. Here we systematically detect pairs of receptor-subunit variants that switch during the lifetime of the human brain by analyzing postmortem expression data collected in a population of donors at various ages and brain regions measured using microarray and RNA-seq. To further detect variant pairs that co-vary across subjects, we present a method to quantify age-corrected expression correlation in face of strong temporal trends. This is achieved by computing the correlations in the residual expression beyond a cubic-spline model of the population temporal trend, and can be seen as a nonlinear version of partial correlations. Using these methods, we detect multiple new pairs of context dependent variants. For instance, we find a switch from GLRA2 to GLRA3 that differs from the known switch in the rat. We also detect an early switch from HTR1A to HTR5A whose trends are negatively correlated and find that their age-corrected expression is strongly positively correlated. Finally, we observe that GRIN2B switch to GRIN2A occurs mostly during embryonic development, presumably earlier than observed in rodents. These results provide a systematic map of developmental switching in the neurotransmitter systems of the human brain.

  7. Map accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1981-01-01

    An inaccurate map is not a reliable map. "X" may mark the spot where the treasure is buried, but unless the seeker can locate "X" in relation to known landmarks or positions, the map is not very useful.

  8. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes for producing the A and B subunits of cholera toxin and preparations containing so-obtained subunit or subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Harford, N.; De Wilde, M.

    1987-05-19

    A recombinant DNA molecule is described comprising at least a portion coding for subunits A and B of cholera toxin, or a fragment or derivative of the portion wherein the fragment or derivative codes for a polypeptide have an activity which can induce an immune response to subunit A; can induce an immune response to subunit A and cause epithelial cell penetration and the enzymatic effect leading to net loss of fluid into the gut lumen; can bind to the membrane receptor for the B subunit of cholera toxin; can induce an immune response to subunit B; can induce an immune response to subunit B and bind to the membrane receptor; or has a combination of the activities.

  9. Na+ Channel β Subunits: Overachievers of the Ion Channel Family

    PubMed Central

    Brackenbury, William J.; Isom, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) in mammals contain a pore-forming α subunit and one or more β subunits. There are five mammalian β subunits in total: β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4, encoded by four genes: SCN1B–SCN4B. With the exception of the SCN1B splice variant, β1B, the β subunits are type I topology transmembrane proteins. In contrast, β1B lacks a transmembrane domain and is a secreted protein. A growing body of work shows that VGSC β subunits are multifunctional. While they do not form the ion channel pore, β subunits alter gating, voltage-dependence, and kinetics of VGSCα subunits and thus regulate cellular excitability in vivo. In addition to their roles in channel modulation, β subunits are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules and regulate cell adhesion and migration. β subunits are also substrates for sequential proteolytic cleavage by secretases. An example of the multifunctional nature of β subunits is β1, encoded by SCN1B, that plays a critical role in neuronal migration and pathfinding during brain development, and whose function is dependent on Na+ current and γ-secretase activity. Functional deletion of SCN1B results in Dravet Syndrome, a severe and intractable pediatric epileptic encephalopathy. β subunits are emerging as key players in a wide variety of physiopathologies, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and cancer. β subunits mediate multiple signaling pathways on different timescales, regulating electrical excitability, adhesion, migration, pathfinding, and transcription. Importantly, some β subunit functions may operate independently of α subunits. Thus, β subunits perform critical roles during development and disease. As such, they may prove useful in disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22007171

  10. Models for the a subunits of the Thermus thermophilus V/A-ATPase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae V-ATPase enzymes by cryo-EM and evolutionary covariance.

    PubMed

    Schep, Daniel G; Zhao, Jianhua; Rubinstein, John L

    2016-03-22

    Rotary ATPases couple ATP synthesis or hydrolysis to proton translocation across a membrane. However, understanding proton translocation has been hampered by a lack of structural information for the membrane-embedded a subunit. The V/A-ATPase from the eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is similar in structure to the eukaryotic V-ATPase but has a simpler subunit composition and functions in vivo to synthesize ATP rather than pump protons. We determined the T. thermophilus V/A-ATPase structure by cryo-EM at 6.4 Å resolution. Evolutionary covariance analysis allowed tracing of the a subunit sequence within the map, providing a complete model of the rotary ATPase. Comparing the membrane-embedded regions of the T. thermophilus V/A-ATPase and eukaryotic V-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae allowed identification of the α-helices that belong to the a subunit and revealed the existence of previously unknown subunits in the eukaryotic enzyme. Subsequent evolutionary covariance analysis enabled construction of a model of the a subunit in the S. cerevisae V-ATPase that explains numerous biochemical studies of that enzyme. Comparing the two a subunit structures determined here with a structure of the distantly related a subunit from the bovine F-type ATP synthase revealed a conserved pattern of residues, suggesting a common mechanism for proton transport in all rotary ATPases.

  11. Models for the a subunits of the Thermus thermophilus V/A-ATPase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae V-ATPase enzymes by cryo-EM and evolutionary covariance

    PubMed Central

    Schep, Daniel G.; Rubinstein, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Rotary ATPases couple ATP synthesis or hydrolysis to proton translocation across a membrane. However, understanding proton translocation has been hampered by a lack of structural information for the membrane-embedded a subunit. The V/A-ATPase from the eubacterium Thermus thermophilus is similar in structure to the eukaryotic V-ATPase but has a simpler subunit composition and functions in vivo to synthesize ATP rather than pump protons. We determined the T. thermophilus V/A-ATPase structure by cryo-EM at 6.4 Å resolution. Evolutionary covariance analysis allowed tracing of the a subunit sequence within the map, providing a complete model of the rotary ATPase. Comparing the membrane-embedded regions of the T. thermophilus V/A-ATPase and eukaryotic V-ATPase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae allowed identification of the α-helices that belong to the a subunit and revealed the existence of previously unknown subunits in the eukaryotic enzyme. Subsequent evolutionary covariance analysis enabled construction of a model of the a subunit in the S. cerevisae V-ATPase that explains numerous biochemical studies of that enzyme. Comparing the two a subunit structures determined here with a structure of the distantly related a subunit from the bovine F-type ATP synthase revealed a conserved pattern of residues, suggesting a common mechanism for proton transport in all rotary ATPases. PMID:26951669

  12. PKA catalytic subunit mutations in adrenocortical Cushing's adenoma impair association with the regulatory subunit.

    PubMed

    Calebiro, Davide; Hannawacker, Annette; Lyga, Sandra; Bathon, Kerstin; Zabel, Ulrike; Ronchi, Cristina; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin; Lorenz, Kristina; Allolio, Bruno; Kisker, Caroline; Fassnacht, Martin; Lohse, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a high prevalence of mutations affecting the catalytic (Cα) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. The two identified mutations (Leu206Arg and Leu199_Cys200insTrp) are associated with increased PKA catalytic activity, but the underlying mechanisms are highly controversial. Here we utilize a combination of biochemical and optical assays, including fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells, to analyze the consequences of the two mutations with respect to the formation of the PKA holoenzyme and its regulation by cAMP. Our results indicate that neither mutant can form a stable PKA complex, due to the location of the mutations at the interface between the catalytic and the regulatory subunits. We conclude that the two mutations cause high basal catalytic activity and lack of regulation by cAMP through interference of complex formation between the regulatory and the catalytic subunits of PKA. PMID:25477193

  13. 3D Gel Map of Arabidopsis Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katrin; Belt, Katharina; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Complex I has a unique structure in plants and includes extra subunits. Here, we present a novel study to define its protein constituents. Mitochondria were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures, leaves, and roots. Subunits of complex I were resolved by 3D blue-native (BN)/SDS/SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry. Overall, 55 distinct proteins were found, seven of which occur in pairs of isoforms. We present evidence that Arabidopsis complex I consists of 49 distinct types of subunits, 40 of which represent homologs of bovine complex I. The nine other subunits represent special proteins absent in the animal linage of eukaryotes, most prominently a group of subunits related to bacterial gamma-type carbonic anhydrases. A GelMap http://www.gelmap.de/arabidopsis-3d-complex-i/ is presented for promoting future complex I research in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:23761796

  14. Exploring maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    Exploring Maps is an interdisciplinary set of materials on mapping for grades 7-12. Students will learn basic mapmaking and map reading skills and will see how maps can answer fundamental geographic questions: "Where am I?" "What else is here?" "Where am I going?"

  15. Contour Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Ohio State University Center for Mapping, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), developed a system for mobile mapping called the GPSVan. While driving, the users can map an area from the sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. George J. Igel and Company and the Ohio State University Center for Mapping advanced the technology for use in determining the contours of a construction site. The new system reduces the time required for mapping and staking, and can monitor the amount of soil moved.

  16. The proteasomal subunit Rpn6 is a molecular clamp holding the core and regulatory subcomplexes together

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Nagy, István; Bohn, Stefan; Unverdorben, Pia; Hubert, Agnes; Körner, Roman; Nickell, Stephan; Lasker, Keren; Sali, Andrej; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Taiki; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Bracher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes execute the degradation of most cellular proteins. Although the 20S core particle (CP) has been studied in great detail, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which prepares ubiquitylated substrates for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of one of the RP subunits, Rpn6, and we describe its integration into the cryo-EM density map of the 26S holocomplex at 9.1 Å resolution. Rpn6 consists of an α-solenoid-like fold and a proteasome COP9/signalosome eIF3 (PCI) module in a right-handed suprahelical configuration. Highly conserved surface areas of Rpn6 interact with the conserved surfaces of the Pre8 (alpha2) and Rpt6 subunits from the alpha and ATPase rings, respectively. The structure suggests that Rpn6 has a pivotal role in stabilizing the otherwise weak interaction between the CP and the RP. PMID:22187461

  17. The proteasomal subunit Rpn6 is a molecular clamp holding the core and regulatory subcomplexes together.

    PubMed

    Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Nagy, István; Bohn, Stefan; Unverdorben, Pia; Hubert, Agnes; Körner, Roman; Nickell, Stephan; Lasker, Keren; Sali, Andrej; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Taiki; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Bracher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes execute the degradation of most cellular proteins. Although the 20S core particle (CP) has been studied in great detail, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which prepares ubiquitylated substrates for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of one of the RP subunits, Rpn6, and we describe its integration into the cryo-EM density map of the 26S holocomplex at 9.1 Å resolution. Rpn6 consists of an α-solenoid-like fold and a proteasome COP9/signalosome eIF3 (PCI) module in a right-handed suprahelical configuration. Highly conserved surface areas of Rpn6 interact with the conserved surfaces of the Pre8 (alpha2) and Rpt6 subunits from the alpha and ATPase rings, respectively. The structure suggests that Rpn6 has a pivotal role in stabilizing the otherwise weak interaction between the CP and the RP.

  18. The Trypanosoma brucei protein phosphatase gene: polycistronic transcription with the RNA polymerase II largest subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, R; Cornelissen, A W

    1990-01-01

    We have previously described the trypanosomal gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) and found that two almost identical genes are encoded within the Trypanosoma brucei genome. Here we show by Southern analyses that the 5' breakpoint between both loci is located approximately 7.5 kb upstream of the RNAP II genes. Northern analyses revealed that the 5' duplicated segment contains at least four other genes, which are transcribed in both bloodstream and procyclic trypanosomes. The gene located immediately upstream of the RNAP II gene in both loci was characterized by sequence analyses. The deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase class 1 (PP1) genes. S1 mapping provided strong evidence in support of the fact that the PP1 and RNAP II genes belong to a single transcription unit. Images PMID:2169604

  19. [Nose surgical anatomy in six aesthetic subunits].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Lauwers, F; Lopez, R; Saboye, J; André, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J-P

    2013-04-01

    The nose is a complex entity, combining aesthetic and functional roles. Descriptive anatomy is a fundamental science that it can be difficult to relate directly to our daily surgical activity. Reasoning in terms of aesthetic subunits to decide on his actions appeared to us so obvious. The aim of this paper is to resume the anatomical bases relevant to our daily practice in order to fully apprehend the restorative or cosmetic procedures. We discuss the limits of the systematization of these principles in nasal oncology.

  20. Structural model of the 50S subunit of E.Coli ribosomes from solution scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Svergun, D.I.; Koch, M.H.J.; Pedersen, J.S.; Serdyuk, I.N.

    1994-12-31

    The application of new methods of small-angle scattering data interpretation to a contrast variation study of the 50S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli in solution is described. The X-ray data from contrast variation with sucrose are analyzed in terms of the basic scattering curves from the volume inaccessible to sucrose and from the regions inside this volume occupied mainly by RNA and by proteins. From these curves models of the shape of the 50S and its RNA-rich core are evaluated and positioned so that their difference produces a scattering curve which is in good agreement with the scattering from the protein moiety. Basing on this preliminary model, the X-ray and neutron contrast variation data of the 50S subunit in aqueous solutions are interpreted in the frame of the advanced two-phase model described by the shapes of the 50S subunit and its RNA-rich core taking into account density fluctuations inside the RNA and the protein moiety. The shape of the envelope of the 50S subunit and of the RNA-rich core are evaluated with a resolution of about 40A. The shape of the envelope is in good agreement with the models of the 50S subunit obtained from electron microscopy on isolated particles. The shape of the RNA-rich core correlates well with the model of the entire particle determined by the image reconstruction from ordered sheets indicating that the latter model which is based on the subjective contouring of density maps is heavily biased towards the RNA.

  1. Refined crystal structure of phycoerythrin from Porphyridium cruentum at 0.23-nm resolution and localization of the gamma subunit.

    PubMed

    Ficner, R; Huber, R

    1993-11-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the light-harvesting pigment-protein b-phycoerythrin from the red alga Porphyridium cruentum has been determined at 0.23-nm resolution. The b-phycoerythrin structure is very similar to the structure of B-phycoerythrin from Porphyridium sordidum. Besides three non-identical residues there are only small differences between b-phycoerythrin and B-phycoerythrin alpha and beta subunits, respectively. In the crystals b-phycoerythrin forms an (alpha beta)6 hexamer (molecular mass: 236 kDa), whereas B-phycoerythrin additionally contains a 30-kDa gamma subunit. The comparison of the b-phycoerythrin and B-phycoerythrin electron-density maps clearly reveals, that the gamma subunit is located inside the (alpha beta)6 aggregate.

  2. Subunit Arrangement and Function in NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa,H.; Singh, S.; Mancusso, R.; Gouaux, E.

    2005-01-01

    Excitatory neurotransmission mediated by NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors is fundamental to the physiology of the mammalian central nervous system. These receptors are heteromeric ion channels that for activation require binding of glycine and glutamate to the NR1 and NR2 subunits, respectively. NMDA receptor function is characterized by slow channel opening and deactivation, and the resulting influx of cations initiates signal transduction cascades that are crucial to higher functions including learning and memory. Here we report crystal structures of the ligand-binding core of NR2A with glutamate and that of the NR1-NR2A heterodimer with glutamate and glycine. The NR2A-glutamate complex defines the determinants of glutamate and NMDA recognition, and the NR1-NR2A heterodimer suggests a mechanism for ligand-induced ion channel opening. Analysis of the heterodimer interface, together with biochemical and electrophysiological experiments, confirms that the NR1-NR2A heterodimer is the functional unit in tetrameric NMDA receptors and that tyrosine 535 of NR1, located in the subunit interface, modulates the rate of ion channel deactivation.

  3. Strong cooperativity between subunits in voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Koch, Hans P.; Drum, Ben M.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-activated proton (HV) channels are essential components in the innate immune response. HV channels are dimeric proteins with one proton permeation pathway per subunit. It is not known how HV channels are activated by voltage and whether there is any cooperativity between subunits during voltage activation. Using cysteine accessibility measurements and voltage clamp fluorometry, we show data that are consistent with that the fourth transmembrane segment S4 functions as the voltage sensor in HV channels from Ciona intestinalis. Surprisingly, in a dimeric HV channel, S4 in both subunits have to move to activate the two proton permeation pathways. In contrast, if HV subunits are prevented from dimerizing, then the movement of a single S4 is sufficient to activate the proton permeation pathway in a subunit. These results suggest a strong cooperativity between subunits in dimeric HV channels. PMID:20023639

  4. Subunit stoichiometry of the chloroplast photosystem I complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, B.D.; Malkin, R.

    1988-05-25

    A native photosystem I (PS I) complex and a PS I core complex depleted of antenna subunits has been isolated from the uniformly /sup 14/C-labeled aquatic higher plant, Lemna. These complexes have been analyzed for their subunit stoichiometry by quantitative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results for both preparations indicate that one copy of each high molecular mass subunit is present per PS I complex and that a single copy of most low molecular mass subunits is also present. These results suggest that iron-sulfur center X, an early PS I electron acceptor proposed to bind to the high molecular mass subunits, contains a single (4Fe-4S) cluster which is bound to a dimeric structure of high molecular mass subunits, each providing 2 cysteine residues to coordinate this cluster.

  5. Subunit structure of the phycobiliproteins of blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A N; Cohen-Bazire, G

    1971-07-01

    The phycobiliproteins of the blue-green algae Synechococcus sp. and Aphanocapsu sp. were characterized with respect to homogeneity, isoelectric point, and subunit composition. Each of the biliproteins consisted of two different noncovalently associated subunits, with molecular weights of about 20,000 and 16,000 for phycocyanin, 17,500 and 15,500 for allophycocyanin, and 22,000 and 20,000 for phycoerythrin. Covalently bound chromophore was associated with each subunit.

  6. Diversity of heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits in plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of three subunits Gα, Gβ and Gγ are present in most eukaryotes and mediate signaling in numerous biological processes. In plants, Gγ subunits were shown to provide functional selectivity to G-proteins. Three unconventional Gγ subunits were recently reported in Arabidopsis, rice and soybean but no structural analysis has been reported so far. Their relationship with conventional Gγ subunits and taxonomical distribution has not been yet demonstrated. Results After an extensive similarity search through plant genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes we assembled over 200 non-redundant proteins related to the known Gγ subunits. Structural analysis of these sequences revealed that most of them lack the obligatory C-terminal prenylation motif (CaaX). According to their C-terminal structures we classified the plant Gγ subunits into three distinct types. Type A consists of Gγ subunits with a putative prenylation motif. Type B subunits lack a prenylation motif and do not have any cysteine residues in the C-terminal region, while type C subunits contain an extended C-terminal domain highly enriched with cysteines. Comparative analysis of C-terminal domains of the proteins, intron-exon arrangement of the corresponding genes and phylogenetic studies suggested a common origin of all plant Gγ subunits. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses suggest that types C and B most probably originated independently from type A ancestors. We speculate on a potential mechanism used by those Gγ subunits lacking isoprenylation motifs to anchor the Gβγ dimer to the plasma membrane and propose a new flexible nomenclature for plant Gγ subunits. Finally, in the light of our new classification, we give a word of caution about the interpretation of Gγ research in Arabidopsis and its generalization to other plant species. PMID:23113884

  7. Single-particle cryoEM analysis at near-atomic resolution from several thousand asymmetric subunits.

    PubMed

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    A single-particle cryoEM reconstruction of the large ribosomal subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained from a dataset of ∼75,000 particles. The gold-standard and frequency-limited approaches to single-particle refinement were each independently used to determine orientation parameters for the final reconstruction. Both approaches showed similar resolution curves and nominal resolution values for the 60S dataset, estimated at 2.9 Å. The amount of over-fitting present during frequency-limited refinement was quantitatively analyzed using the high-resolution phase-randomization test, and the results showed no apparent over-fitting. The number of asymmetric subunits required to reach specific resolutions was subsequently analyzed by refining subsets of the data in an ab initio manner. With our data collection and processing strategies, sub-nanometer resolution was obtained with ∼200 asymmetric subunits (or, equivalently for the ribosomal subunit, particles). Resolutions of 5.6 Å, 4.5 Å, and 3.8 Å were reached with ∼1000, ∼1600, and ∼5000 asymmetric subunits, respectively. At these resolutions, one would expect to detect alpha-helical pitch, separation of beta-strands, and separation of Cα atoms, respectively. Using this map, together with strategies for ab initio model building and model refinement, we built a region of the ribosomal protein eL6, which was missing in previous models of the yeast ribosome. The relevance for more routine high-resolution structure determination is discussed.

  8. Reexamination of the Three-Dimensional Structure of the Small Subunit of RuBisCo from Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Stefan; Andersson, Inger; Branden, Carl-Ivar

    1989-05-01

    The structure of L8S8 RuBisCo (where L is the large subunit and S is the small subunit) from spinach has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 angstrom by using fourfold averaging of an isomorphous electron density map based on three heavy-atom derivatives. The structure of the S subunit is different from that previously reported for the tobacco S subunit in spite of 75 percent sequence identity. The elements of secondary structure, four antiparallel β strands and two α helices, are the same, but the topology and direction of the polypeptide chain through these elements differ completely. One of these models is clearly wrong. The spinach model has hydrophobic residues in the core between the α helices and β sheet as well as conserved residues in the subunit interactions. The deletion of residues 49 to 62 that is present in the Anabaena sequence removes a loop region in the spinach model. The positions of three mercury atoms in the heavy-atom derivatives agree with the assignment of side chains in the spinach structure.

  9. [Molecular cloning of activin betaA subunit mature peptide from peafowl and its application in taxonomy and phylogeny].

    PubMed

    Zou, Fang-Dong; Tong, Xin-Xin; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-03-01

    The sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide have been amplified from white peafowl, blue peafowl (pavo cristatus) and green peafowl (pavo muticus) genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The target fragments were cloned into the vector pMD18-T and sequenced. The length of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide is 345bp, which encoded a peptide of 115 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide demonstrated that the identity of nucleotide is 98.0% between blue peaflowl and green peafowl, and the identity of that is 98.8% between blue peaflowl and white peafow. Sequences comparison in NCBI revealed that the sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during evolution process. In addition, the restriction enzyme map of activins is high similar between white peafowl and blue peafowl. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with Mega 2 and Clustalxldx software. The result showed that white peafowl has a closer relationship to blue peafowl than to green peafowl. Considered the nucleotide differences of peafowls' activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides, a highly conserved region, we supported that white peafowl was derived from blue peafowl, and it is more possible the hybrid but just the product of color mutation, or maybe as a subspecies of Pavo genus.

  10. [Molecular cloning of activin betaA subunit mature peptide from peafowl and its application in taxonomy and phylogeny].

    PubMed

    Zou, Fang-Dong; Tong, Xin-Xin; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-03-01

    The sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide have been amplified from white peafowl, blue peafowl (pavo cristatus) and green peafowl (pavo muticus) genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The target fragments were cloned into the vector pMD18-T and sequenced. The length of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide is 345bp, which encoded a peptide of 115 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide demonstrated that the identity of nucleotide is 98.0% between blue peaflowl and green peafowl, and the identity of that is 98.8% between blue peaflowl and white peafow. Sequences comparison in NCBI revealed that the sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during evolution process. In addition, the restriction enzyme map of activins is high similar between white peafowl and blue peafowl. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with Mega 2 and Clustalxldx software. The result showed that white peafowl has a closer relationship to blue peafowl than to green peafowl. Considered the nucleotide differences of peafowls' activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides, a highly conserved region, we supported that white peafowl was derived from blue peafowl, and it is more possible the hybrid but just the product of color mutation, or maybe as a subspecies of Pavo genus. PMID:15843351

  11. Polymorphism and structure of the gene coding for the alpha 1 subunit of the Artemia franciscana Na/K-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáez, A; Perona, R; Sastre, L

    1997-01-01

    Genomic clones coding for one of the two identified Artemia franciscana Na/K-ATPase alpha subunits, the alpha 1 subunit, have been isolated. Several overlapping clones were obtained, although their restriction maps showed a large heterogeneity. Sequencing of their exons showed that they differ in up to 3.46% of their nucleotides in translated regions and 8.18% in untranslated regions. Southern blot analysis of DNA purified from different lots of A. franciscana cysts and from isolated individuals suggests that the variation is due to the existence of multiple Na/K-ATPase alpha 1 subunit alleles in A. franciscana. The Na/K-ATPase alpha 1 subunit gene is divided into 15 exons. Ten of the 14 introns are located in identical positions in this gene as in the human Na/K-ATPase alpha 3 subunit gene. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of the gene has allowed identification of the transcription-initiation sites. The adjacent upstream region has been shown to have functional promoter activity in cultured mammalian cells, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of some of the promoter regulatory sequences. PMID:9020888

  12. G-protein beta subunit of Cochliobolus heterostrophus involved in virulence, asexual and sexual reproductive ability, and morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ganem, Sherif; Lu, Shun-Wen; Lee, Bee-Na; Chou, David Yu-Te; Hadar, Ruthi; Turgeon, B Gillian; Horwitz, Benjamin A

    2004-12-01

    Previous work established that mutations in mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (CHK1) and heterotrimeric G-protein alpha (Galpha) subunit (CGA1) genes affect the development of several stages of the life cycle of the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus. The effects of mutating a third signal transduction pathway gene, CGB1, encoding the Gbeta subunit, are reported here. CGB1 is the sole Gbeta subunit-encoding gene in the genome of this organism. cgb1 mutants are nearly wild type in vegetative growth rate; however, Cgb1 is required for appressorium formation, female fertility, conidiation, regulation of hyphal pigmentation, and wild-type virulence on maize. Young hyphae of cgb1 mutants grow in a straight path, in contrast to those of the wild type, which grow in a wavy pattern. Some of the phenotypes conferred by mutations in CGA1 are found in cgb1 mutants, suggesting that Cgb1 functions in a heterotrimeric G protein; however, there are also differences. In contrast to the deletion of CGA1, the loss of CGB1 is not lethal for ascospores, evidence that there is a Gbeta subunit-independent signaling role for Cga1 in mating. Furthermore, not all of the phenotypes conferred by mutations in the MAP kinase CHK1 gene are found in cgb1 mutants, implying that the Gbeta heterodimer is not the only conduit for signals to the MAP kinase CHK1 module. The additional phenotypes of cgb1 mutants, including severe loss of virulence on maize and of the ability to produce conidia, are consistent with CGB1 being unique in the genome. Fluorescent DNA staining showed that there is often nuclear degradation in mature hyphae of cgb1 mutants, while comparable wild-type cells have intact nuclei. These data may be genetic evidence for a novel cell death-related function of the Gbeta subunit in filamentous fungi.

  13. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit 2 is essential for storage substance accumulation and subunit interactions in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Yue; You, Xiao-Man; Kong, Fei; Yan, Hai-Gang; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Wang, Liang; Jin, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xin-Gang; Ma, Jing; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Wen-Wei; Wan, Jian-Min

    2016-08-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) controls a rate-limiting step in the starch biosynthetic pathway in higher plants. Here we isolated a shrunken rice mutant w24. Map-based cloning identified OsAGPL2, a large subunit of the cytosolic AGPase in rice endosperm, as the gene responsible for the w24 mutation. In addition to severe inhibition of starch synthesis and significant accumulation of sugar, the w24 endosperm showed obvious defects in compound granule formation and storage protein synthesis. The defect in OsAGPL2 enhanced the expression levels of the AGPase family. Meanwhile, the elevated activities of starch phosphorylase 1 and sucrose synthase in the w24 endosperm might possibly partly account for the residual starch content in the mutant seeds. Moreover, the expression of OsAGPL2 and its counterpart, OsAGPS2b, was highly coordinated in rice endosperm. Yeast two-hybrid and BiFC assays verified direct interactions between OsAGPL2 and OsAGPS2b as well as OsAGPL1 and OsAGPS1, supporting the model for spatiotemporal complex formation of AGPase isoforms in rice endosperm. Besides, our data provided no evidence for the self-binding of OsAGPS2b, implying that OsAGPS2b might not interact to form higher molecular mass aggregates in the absence of OsAGPL2. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of rice AGPase assembly might differ from that of Arabidopsis. PMID:27297991

  14. RICH MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Michael Goodchild recently gave eight reasons why traditional maps are limited as communication devices, and how interactive internet mapping can overcome these limitations. In the past, many authorities in cartography, from Jenks to Bertin, have emphasized the importance of sim...

  15. Map adventures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1994-01-01

    Map Adventures, with seven accompanying lessons, is appropriate for grades K-3. Students will learn basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand /and use maps.

  16. Historical Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Maps become out of date over time. Maps that are out of date, however, can be useful to historians, attorneys, environmentalists, genealogists, and others interested in researching the background of a particular area. Local historians can compare a series of maps of the same area compiled over a long period of time to learn how the area developed. A succession of such maps can provide a vivid picture of how a place changed over time.

  17. Compilation of small ribosomal subunit RNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Neefs, J M; Van de Peer, Y; De Rijk, P; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contained 1804 nucleotide sequences on April 23, 1993. This number comprises 365 eukaryotic, 65 archaeal, 1260 bacterial, 30 plastidial, and 84 mitochondrial sequences. These are stored in the form of an alignment in order to facilitate the use of the database as input for comparative studies on higher-order structure and for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. The elements of the postulated secondary structure for each molecule are indicated by special symbols. The database is available on-line directly from the authors by ftp and can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library by electronic mail, ftp, and on CD ROM disk. PMID:8332525

  18. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    PubMed Central

    Tandrup Schmidt, Signe; Foged, Camilla; Smith Korsholm, Karen; Rades, Thomas; Christensen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR

  19. Cryo-EM structure of the large subunit of the spinach chloroplast ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tofayel; Yin, Zhan; Bhushan, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis in the chloroplast is mediated by the chloroplast ribosome (chloro-ribosome). Overall architecture of the chloro-ribosome is considerably similar to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) ribosome but certain differences are evident. The chloro-ribosome proteins are generally larger because of the presence of chloroplast-specific extensions in their N- and C-termini. The chloro-ribosome harbours six plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (PSRPs); four in the small subunit and two in the large subunit. Deletions and insertions occur throughout the rRNA sequence of the chloro-ribosome (except for the conserved peptidyl transferase center region) but the overall length of the rRNAs do not change significantly, compared to the E. coli. Although, recent advancements in cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) have provided detailed high-resolution structures of ribosomes from many different sources, a high-resolution structure of the chloro-ribosome is still lacking. Here, we present a cryo-EM structure of the large subunit of the chloro-ribosome from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) at an average resolution of 3.5 Å. High-resolution map enabled us to localize and model chloro-ribosome proteins, chloroplast-specific protein extensions, two PSRPs (PSRP5 and 6) and three rRNA molecules present in the chloro-ribosome. Although comparable to E. coli, the polypeptide tunnel and the tunnel exit site show chloroplast-specific features. PMID:27762343

  20. Regulation of the mammalian elongation cycle by subunit rolling: a eukaryotic-specific ribosome rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Budkevich, Tatyana V.; Giesebrecht, Jan; Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Ramrath, David J.F.; Mielke, Thorsten; Ismer, Jochen; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Tung, Chang-Shung; Nierhaus, Knud H.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The extent to which bacterial ribosomes and the significantly larger eukaryotic ribosomes share the same mechanisms of ribosomal elongation is unknown. Here, we present sub-nanometer resolution cryo-electron microscopy maps of the mammalian 80S ribosome in the post-translocational state and in complex with the eukaryotic eEF1A•Val-tRNA•GMPPNP ternary complex, revealing significant differences in the elongation mechanism between bacteria and mammals. Surprisingly, and in contrast to bacterial ribosomes, a rotation of the small subunit around its long axis and orthogonal to the well-known intersubunit rotation distinguishes the post-translocational state from the classical pre-translocational state ribosome. We term this motion “subunit rolling”. Correspondingly, a mammalian decoding complex visualized in sub-states before and after codon recognition reveals structural distinctions from the bacterial system. These findings suggest how codon recognition leads to GTPase activation in the mammalian system and demonstrate that in mammalia subunit rolling occurs during tRNA selection. PMID:24995983

  1. Mutations at the Subunit Interface of Yeast Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Reveal a Versatile Regulatory Domain

    PubMed Central

    Halmai, Miklos; Frittmann, Orsolya; Szabo, Zoltan; Daraba, Andreea; Gali, Vamsi K.; Balint, Eva; Unk, Ildiko

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays a key role in many cellular processes and due to that it interacts with a plethora of proteins. The main interacting surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae PCNA have been mapped to the interdomain connecting loop and to the carboxy-terminal domain. Here we report that the subunit interface of yeast PCNA also has regulatory roles in the function of several DNA damage response pathways. Using site-directed mutagenesis we engineered mutations at both sides of the interface and investigated the effect of these alleles on DNA damage response. Genetic experiments with strains bearing the mutant alleles revealed that mutagenic translesion synthesis, nucleotide excision repair, and homologous recombination are all regulated through residues at the subunit interface. Moreover, genetic characterization of one of our mutants identifies a new sub-branch of nucleotide excision repair. Based on these results we conclude that residues at the subunit boundary of PCNA are not only important for the formation of the trimer structure of PCNA, but they constitute a regulatory protein domain that mediates different DNA damage response pathways, as well. PMID:27537501

  2. Structural Features of Vps35p Involved in Interaction with Other Subunits of the Retromer Complex

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Ricardo; Zhao, Xiang; Peter, Harald; Zhang, Bao-yan; Arvan, Peter; Nothwehr, Steven F.

    2008-01-01

    The penta-subunit retromer complex of yeast mediates selective retrieval of membrane proteins from the prevacuolar endosome to the trans Golgi network. In this study, we set out to generate a panel of vps35 dominant-negative mutants that disrupt retromer-mediated cargo sorting. Mapping of the mutations revealed two types of alterations leading to dominant-negative behavior of the 944-amino acid protein: (i) mutations at or near the R98 residue or (ii) C-terminal truncations exemplified by a nonsense mutation at codon 733. Both could be suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Vps35p, suggesting that these dominant-negative mutants compete for interactions with other retromer subunits. Interestingly, Vps35-R98W expression destabilized Vps26p while having no effect on Vps29p stability, while Vps35-Q733* expression affected Vps29p stability but had no effect on Vps26p. Measurement of Vps35/Vps26 and Vps35/Vps29 pairwise associations by coimmunoprecipitation in the presence or absence of other retromer subunits indicated that the R98 residue, which is part of a conserved PRLYL motif, is critical for Vps35p binding to Vps26p, while both R98 and residues 733–944 are needed for efficient binding to Vps29p. PMID:17892535

  3. Topographic mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  4. The light subunit of system bo,+ is fully functional in the absence of the heavy subunit

    PubMed Central

    Reig, Núria; Chillarón, Josep; Bartoccioni, Paola; Fernández, Esperanza; Bendahan, Annie; Zorzano, Antonio; Kanner, Baruch; Palacín, Manuel; Bertran, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The heteromeric amino acid transporters are composed of a type II glycoprotein and a non-glycosylated polytopic membrane protein. System bo,+ exchanges dibasic for neutral amino acids. It is composed of rBAT and bo,+AT, the latter being the polytopic membrane subunit. Mutations in either of them cause malfunction of the system, leading to cystinuria. bo,+AT-reconstituted systems from HeLa or MDCK cells catalysed transport of arginine that was totally dependent on the presence of one of the bo,+ substrates inside the liposomes. rBAT was essential for the cell surface expression of bo,+AT, but it was not required for reconstituted bo,+AT transport activity. No system bo,+ transport was detected in liposomes derived from cells expressing rBAT alone. The reconstituted bo,+AT showed kinetic asymmetry. Expressing the cystinuria-specific mutant A354T of bo,+AT in HeLa cells together with rBAT resulted in defective arginine uptake in whole cells, which was paralleled by the reconstituted bo,+AT activity. Thus, subunit bo,+AT by itself is sufficient to catalyse transmembrane amino acid exchange. The polytopic subunits may also be the catalytic part in other heteromeric transporters. PMID:12234930

  5. Epitopes from two soybean glycinin subunits antigenic in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Glycinin is a seed storage protein in soybean (Glycine max) that is allergenic in pigs. Glycinin is a hexamer composed of subunits consisting of a basic and acidic portion joined by disulfide bridges. There are 5 glycinin subunits designated Gy1-Gy5. Results: Twenty seven out of 30 pi...

  6. The Development and Institutionalization of Subunit Power in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeker, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Examines the effects of founding events on the evolution of subunit importance in the semiconductor industry from 1958 to 1985. Distributions of power and subunit importance represent not only influences of current conditions, but also vestiges of earlier events, including the institution's founding. Includes 55 references. (MLH)

  7. Proteopedia Entry: The Large Ribosomal Subunit of "Haloarcula Marismortui"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decatur, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a "Proteopedia" page that shows the refined version of the structure of the "Haloarcula" large ribosomal subunit as solved by the laboratories of Thomas Steitz and Peter Moore. The landmark structure is of great impact as it is the first atomic-resolution structure of the highly conserved ribosomal subunit which harbors…

  8. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  9. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  10. Synaptic GABAA Receptor Clustering without the γ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kerti-Szigeti, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Rapid activation of postsynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is crucial in many neuronal functions, including the synchronization of neuronal ensembles and controlling the precise timing of action potentials. Although the γ2 subunit is believed to be essential for the postsynaptic clustering of GABAARs, synaptic currents have been detected in neurons obtained from γ2−/− mice. To determine the role of the γ2 subunit in synaptic GABAAR enrichment, we performed a spatially and temporally controlled γ2 subunit deletion by injecting Cre-expressing viral vectors into the neocortex of GABAARγ277Ilox mice. Whole-cell recordings revealed the presence of miniature IPSCs in Cre+ layer 2/3 pyramidal cells (PCs) with unchanged amplitudes and rise times, but significantly prolonged decays. Such slowly decaying currents could be evoked in PCs by action potentials in presynaptic fast-spiking interneurons. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling revealed the presence of the α1 and β3 subunits in perisomatic synapses of cells that lack the γ2 subunit. Miniature IPSCs in Cre+ PCs were insensitive to low concentrations of flurazepam, providing a pharmacological confirmation of the lack of the γ2 subunit. Receptors assembled from only αβ subunits were unlikely because Zn2+ did not block the synaptic currents. Pharmacological experiments indicated that the αβγ3 receptor, rather than the αβδ, αβε, or αβγ1 receptors, was responsible for the slowly decaying IPSCs. Our data demonstrate the presence of IPSCs and the synaptic enrichment of the α1 and β3 subunits and suggest that the γ3 subunit is the most likely candidate for clustering GABAARs at synapses in the absence of the γ2 subunit. PMID:25080584

  11. Modification of K+ channel–drug interactions by ancillary subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Glenna C L; Rasmusson, Randall L

    2008-01-01

    Reconciling ion channel α-subunit expression with native ionic currents and their pharmacological sensitivity in target organs has proved difficult. In native tissue, many K+ channel α-subunits co-assemble with ancillary subunits, which can profoundly affect physiological parameters including gating kinetics and pharmacological interactions. In this review, we examine the link between voltage-gated potassium ion channel pharmacology and the biophysics of ancillary subunits. We propose that ancillary subunits can modify the interaction between pore blockers and ion channels by three distinct mechanisms: changes in (1) binding site accessibility; (2) orientation of pore-lining residues; (3) the ability of the channel to undergo post-binding conformational changes. Each of these subunit-induced changes has implications for gating, drug affinity and use dependence of their respective channel complexes. A single subunit may modulate its associated α-subunit by more than one of these mechanisms. Voltage-gated potassium channels are the site of action of many therapeutic drugs. In addition, potassium channels interact with drugs whose primary target is another channel, e.g. the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, the sodium channel blocker quinidine, etc. Even when K+ channel block is the intended mode of action, block of related channels in non-target organs, e.g. the heart, can result in major and potentially lethal side-effects. Understanding factors that determine specificity, use dependence and other properties of K+ channel drug binding are therefore of vital clinical importance. Ancillary subunits play a key role in determining these properties in native tissue, and so understanding channel–subunit interactions is vital to understanding clinical pharmacology. PMID:18096604

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the gene for the b subunit of human factor XIII

    SciTech Connect

    Bottenus, R.E.; Ichinose, A.; Davie, E.W. )

    1990-12-01

    Factor XIII (M{sub r} 320 000) is a blood coagulation factor that stabilizes and strengthens the fibrin clot. It circulates in blood as a tetramer composed of two a subunits (M{sub r} 75 000 each) and two b subunits (M{sub r} 80 000 each). The b subunit consists of 641 amino acids and includes 10 tandem repeats of 60 amino acids known as GP-I structures, short consensus repeats (SCR), or sushi domains. In the present study, the human gene for the b subunit has been isolated from three different genomic libraries prepared in {lambda} phage. Fifteen independent phage with inserts coding for the entire gene were isolated and characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and DNA sequencing. The gene was found to be 28 kilobases in length and consisted of 12 exons (I-XII) separated by 11 intervening sequences. The leader sequence was encoded by exon I, while the carbonyl-terminal region of the protein was encoded by exon XII. Exons II-XI each coded for a single sushi domain, suggesting that the gene evolved through exon shuffling and duplication. The 12 exons in the gene ranged in size from 64 to 222 base pairs, while the introns ranged in size from 87 to 9970 nucleotides and made up 92{percent} of the gene. One nucleotide change was found in the coding region of the gene when its sequence was compared to that of the cDNA. This difference, however, did not result in a change in the amino acid sequence of the protein.

  13. Structural modeling of the catalytic subunit-regulatory subunit dimeric complex of the camp-dependent protein kinase.

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, C-S; Gallagher, S. C.; Walsh, D. A.; Trewhella, J.

    2001-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is a multifunctional kinase that serves as a prototype for understanding second messenger signaling and protein phosphorylation. In the absence of a cAMP signal, PKA exists as a dimer of dimers, consisting of two regulatory (R) and two catalystic (C) subunits. Based on experimentally derived data (i.e., crystal structures of the R and C subunits, mutagenesis data identifying points of subunit-subunit contacts), the neutron scattering derived model for the heterodimer (Zhao et al., 1998) and using a set of computational approaches (homology modeling, Monte Carlo simulation), they have developed a high-resolution model of the RII{alpha}-C{alpha} dimer. The nature of the subunit-subunit interface was studied. The model reveals an averaged size dimer interface (2100 Angstrom{sup 2}) that is distant from the pseudo-substrate binding site on the C subunit. The additional contacts made by the pseudosubstrate increases the stability of the dimeric complex. Based on a set of R-C dimer structures derived using a simulated annealing approach, specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between the two subunits and were identified.

  14. Localization of two potassium channel {beta} subunit genes, KCNA1B and KCNA2B

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.; Smith, L.; Thayer, M.

    1996-02-01

    The gating properties and current amplitudes of mammalian voltage-activated Shaker potassium channels are modulated by at least two associated {beta} subunits (Kv{beta}1.1 and Kv{beta}1.2). The human Kv{beta}1.1 gene (KCNA1B) resides on chromosome 3, as indicated by somatic cell hybrid mapping. More precise localization of KCNA1B to 3q26.1 was obtained with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and was corroborated by PCR screening of the CEPH YAC library. The human Kv{beta}1.2 gene (KCNA2B) resides on chromosome 1, as indicated by somatic cell hybrid mapping, and has been localized by FISH to 1p36.3. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Exploring assembly energetics of the 30S ribosomal subunit using an implicit solvent approach.

    PubMed

    Trylska, Joanna; McCammon, J Andrew; Brooks Iii, Charles L

    2005-08-10

    To explore the relationship between the assembly of the 30S ribosomal subunit and interactions among the constituent components, 16S RNA and proteins, relative binding free energies of the T. thermophilus 30S proteins to the 16S RNA were studied based on an implicit solvent model of electrostatic, nonpolar, and entropic contributions. The late binding proteins in our assembly map were found not to bind to the naked 16S RNA. The 5' domain early kinetic class proteins, on average, carry the highest positive charge, get buried the most upon binding to 16S RNA, and show the most favorable binding. Some proteins (S10/S14, S6/S18, S13/S19) have more stabilizing interactions while binding as dimers. Our computed assembly map resembles that of E. coli; however, the central domain path is more similar to that of A. aeolicus, a hyperthermophilic bacteria.

  16. Geologic mapping of Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, R.; Figueredo, P.H.; Williams, D.A.; Chuang, F.C.; Klemaszewski, J.E.; Kadel, S.D.; Prockter, L.M.; Pappalardo, R.T.; Head, J. W.; Collins, G.C.; Spaun, N.A.; Sullivan, R.J.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Senske, D.A.; Tufts, B.R.; Johnson, T.V.; Belton, M.J.S.; Tanaka, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Galileo data enable the major geological units, structures, and surface features to be identified on Europa. These include five primary units (plains, chaos, band, ridge, and crater materials) and their subunits, along with various tectonic structures such as faults. Plains units are the most widespread. Ridged plains material spans a wide range of geological ages, including the oldest recognizable features on Europa, and appears to represent a style of tectonic resurfacing, rather than cryovolcanism. Smooth plains material typically embays other terrains and units, possibly as a type of fluid emplacement, and is among the youngest material units observed. At global scales, plains are typically mapped as undifferentiated plains material, although in some areas differences can be discerned in the near infrared which might be related to differences in ice grain size. Chaos material is composed of plains and other preexisting materials that have been severely disrupted by inferred internal activity; chaos is characterized by blocks of icy material set in a hummocky matrix. Band material is arrayed in linear, curvilinear, wedge-shaped, or cuspate zones with contrasting albedo and surface textures with respect to the surrounding terrain. Bilateral symmetry observed in some bands and the relationships with the surrounding units suggest that band material forms by the lithosphere fracturing, spreading apart, and infilling with material derived from the subsurface. Ridge material is mapped as a unit on local and some regional maps but shown with symbols at global scales. Ridge material includes single ridges, doublet ridges, and ridge complexes. Ridge materials are considered to represent tectonic processes, possibly accompanied by the extrusion or intrusion of subsurface materials, such as diapirs. The tectonic processes might be related to tidal flexing of the icy lithosphere on diurnal or longer timescales. Crater materials include various interior (smooth central

  17. Subunit dissociations in natural and recombinant hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Manning, L R; Jenkins, W T; Hess, J R; Vandegriff, K; Winslow, R M; Manning, J M

    1996-04-01

    A precise and rapid procedure employing gel filtration on Superose-12 to measure the tetramer-dimer dissociation constants of some natural and recombinant hemoglobins in the oxy conformation is described. Natural sickle hemoglobin was chosen to verify the validity of the results by comparing the values with those reported using an independent method not based on gel filtration. Recombinant sickle hemoglobin, as well as a sickle double mutant with a substitution at the Val-6(beta) receptor site, had approximately the same dissociation constant as natural sickle hemoglobin. Of the two recombinant hemoglobins with amino acid replacements in the alpha 1 beta 2 subunit interface, one was found to be extensively dissociated and the other completely dissociated. In addition, the absence of an effect of the allosteric regulators DPG and IHP on the dissociation constant was demonstrated. Thus, a tetramer dissociation constant can now be determined readily and used together with other criteria for characterization of hemoglobins and their interaction with small regulatory molecules. PMID:8845768

  18. α6 integrin subunit regulates cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Giovanni; De Arcangelis, Adèle; Pfister, Véronique; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding several basal lamina components as well as their cellular receptors disrupt normal deposition and remodeling of the cortical basement membrane resulting in a disorganized cerebral and cerebellar cortex. The α6 integrin was the first α subunit associated with cortical lamination defects and formation of neural ectopias. In order to understand the precise role of α6 integrin in the central nervous system (CNS), we have generated mutant mice carrying specific deletion of α6 integrin in neuronal and glia precursors by crossing α6 conditional knockout mice with Nestin-Cre line. Cerebral cortex development occurred properly in the resulting α6fl/fl;nestin-Cre mutant animals. Interestingly, however, cerebellum displayed foliation pattern defects although granule cell (GC) proliferation and migration were not affected. Intriguingly, analysis of Bergmann glial (BG) scaffold revealed abnormalities in fibers morphology associated with reduced processes outgrowth and altered actin cytoskeleton. Overall, these data show that α6 integrin receptors are required in BG cells to provide a proper fissure formation during cerebellum morphogenesis. PMID:23722246

  19. Mapping Van

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) - developed system for satellite mapping has been commercialized for the first time. Global Visions, Inc. maps an area while driving along a road in a sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. Data is fed into a computerized geographic information system (GIS). The resulting amps can be used for tax assessment purposes, emergency dispatch vehicles and fleet delivery companies as well as other applications.

  20. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3′-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5′ external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5′ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  1. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis. PMID:26980190

  2. Stepwise and dynamic assembly of the earliest precursors of small ribosomal subunits in yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Wu, Chen; Cai, Gaihong; Chen, She; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-03-15

    The eukaryotic ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is associated cotranscriptionally with numerous factors into an enormous 90S preribosomal particle that conducts early processing of small ribosomal subunits. The assembly pathway and structure of the 90S particle is poorly understood. Here, we affinity-purified and analyzed the constituents of yeast 90S particles that were assembled on a series of plasmid-encoded 3'-truncated pre-18S RNAs. We determined the assembly point of 65 proteins and the U3, U14, and snR30 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), revealing a stepwise and dynamic assembly map. The 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) alone can nucleate a large complex. When the 18S rRNA is nearly complete, the 90S structure undergoes a dramatic reorganization, releasing U14, snR30, and 14 protein factors that bind earlier. We also identified a reference state of 90S that is fully assembled yet has not undergone 5'ETS processing. The assembly map present here provides a new framework to understand small subunit biogenesis.

  3. Molecular Evolution of Multi-subunit RNA Polymerases: Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, William J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in all cellular organisms is performed by multi-subunit, DNA-dependent RNA polymerases that synthesize RNA from DNA templates. Previous sequence and structural studies have elucidated the importance of shared regions common to all multi-subunit RNA polymerases. In addition RNA polymerases contain multiple lineage-specific domain insertions involved in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. We have created comprehensive multiple sequence alignments using all available sequence data for the multi-subunit RNA polymerase large subunits, including the bacterial β and β′ subunits and their homologues from archaebacterial RNA polymerases, the eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the nuclear-cytoplasmic large double-stranded DNA Virus RNA polymerases, and plant plastid RNA polymerases. In order to overcome technical difficulties inherent to the large subunit sequences, including large sequence length, small and large lineage-specific insertions, split subunits, and fused proteins, we created an automated and customizable sequence retrieval and processing system. In addition, we used our alignments to create a more expansive set of shared sequence regions and bacterial lineage-specific domain insertions. We also analyzed the intergenic gap between the bacterial β and β′ genes. PMID:19895820

  4. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  5. RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Woychik, N; Liao, S M; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation were investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by attaching an epitope coding sequence to a well-characterized RNA polymerase II subunit gene (RPB3) and by immunoprecipitating the product of this gene with its associated polypeptides. The immunopurified enzyme catalyzed alpha-amanitin-sensitive RNA synthesis in vitro. The 10 polypeptides that immunoprecipitated were identical in size and number to those previously described for RNA polymerase II purified by conventional column chromatography. The relative stoichiometry of the subunits was deduced from knowledge of the sequence of the subunits and from the extent of labeling with [35S]methionine. Immunoprecipitation from 32P-labeled cell extracts revealed that three of the subunits, RPB1, RPB2, and RPB6, are phosphorylated in vivo. Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of RPB1 could be distinguished; approximately half of the RNA polymerase II molecules contained a phosphorylated RPB1 subunit. These results more precisely define the subunit composition and phosphorylation of a eucaryotic RNA polymerase II enzyme. Images PMID:2183013

  6. Question Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Josh

    2012-01-01

    After accepting the principal position at Farmersville (TX) Junior High, the author decided to increase instructional rigor through question mapping because of the success he saw using this instructional practice at his prior campus. Teachers are the number one influence on student achievement (Marzano, 2003), so question mapping provides a…

  7. Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Concept maps are graphical ways of working with ideas and presenting information. They reveal patterns and relationships and help students to clarify their thinking, and to process, organize and prioritize. Displaying information visually--in concept maps, word webs, or diagrams--stimulates creativity. Being able to think logically teaches…

  8. Map Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet about maps, with seven accompanying lessons, is appropriate for students in grades K-3. Students learn basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand and use maps. Lessons in the packet center on a story about a little girl, Nikki, who rides in a hot-air balloon that gives her, and…

  9. Purification of glucagon by subunit exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Carrea, G; Pasta, P; Antonini, E

    1985-05-01

    Glucagon was immobilized onto Sepharose matrices activated with CNBr or tresyl chloride, as a function of several parameters including pH of coupling, concentration of added polypeptide, and presence or absence of urea. The hormone was linked to the matrix through a single point per molecule, namely, the epsilon -amino group of Lys(12) when the coupling was carried out at alkaline pH, or the imidazole group of His(1) when the coupling was carried out at acidic pH. Glucagon immobilized at alkaline pH interacted specifically with soluble glucogon. The extent of self-association was similar to that of free glucagon, which exists in solution in a monomer-trimer equilibrium whose association constant is highly dependent on the characteristics of the buffer (pH, ionic strength, and nature of anions). The immobilized hormone proved to be suitable for the purification of the free one from a pancreatic extract. After a preliminary treatment with charcoal-dextran, the extract was percolated on a glucagon-Sepharose column under associating conditions (high concentrations of salting out anions and alkaline pH) and then, following a washing to remove extraneous compounds, the specifically bound hormone was eluted under dissociating conditions (low ionic strength). The subunit exchange chromatography of the extract gave a ca. 90% pure product. The overall recovery of the process was ca. 66%. The leakage of immobilized hormone was 40% in the case of CNBr activation of Sepharose and 15% in the case of tresyl chloride activation, after an eight-day treatment under working conditions.

  10. Atomic-Resolution Structures of the APC/C Subunits Apc4 and the Apc5 N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Nora B.; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Kulkarni, Kiran; Chang, Leifu; Yamano, Hiroyuki; Barford, David

    2015-01-01

    Many essential biological processes are mediated by complex molecular machines comprising multiple subunits. Knowledge on the architecture of individual subunits and their positions within the overall multimeric complex is key to understanding the molecular mechanisms of macromolecular assemblies. The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multisubunit complex that regulates cell cycle progression by ubiquitinating cell cycle proteins for proteolysis by the proteasome. The holo-complex is composed of 15 different proteins that assemble to generate a complex of 20 subunits. Here, we describe the crystal structures of Apc4 and the N-terminal domain of Apc5 (Apc5N). Apc4 comprises a WD40 domain split by a long α-helical domain, whereas Apc5N has an α-helical fold. In a separate study, we had fitted these atomic models to a 3.6-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy map of the APC/C. We describe how, in the context of the APC/C, regions of Apc4 disordered in the crystal assume order through contacts to Apc5, whereas Apc5N shows small conformational changes relative to its crystal structure. We discuss the complementary approaches of high-resolution electron microscopy and protein crystallography to the structure determination of subunits of multimeric complexes. PMID:26343760

  11. Tagging ribosomal protein S7 allows rapid identification of mutants defective in assembly and function of 30 S subunits.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, K; Dunny, G M; Noller, H F

    2000-05-01

    Ribosomal protein S7 nucleates folding of the 16 S rRNA 3' major domain, which ultimately forms the head of the 30 S ribosomal subunit. Recent crystal structures indicate that S7 lies on the interface side of the 30 S subunit, near the tRNA binding sites of the ribosome. To map the functional surface of S7, we have tagged the protein with a Protein Kinase A recognition site and engineered alanine substitutions that target each exposed, conserved residue. We have also deleted conserved features of S7, using its structure to guide our design. By radiolabeling the tag sequence using Protein Kinase A, we are able to track the partitioning of each mutant protein into 30 S, 70 S, and polyribosome fractions in vivo. Overexpression of S7 confers a growth defect, and we observe a striking correlation between this phenotype and proficiency in 30 S subunit assembly among our collection of mutants. We find that the side chain of K35 is required for efficient assembly of S7 into 30 S subunits in vivo, whereas those of at least 17 other conserved exposed residues are not required. In addition, an S7 derivative lacking the N-terminal 17 residues causes ribosomes to accumulate on mRNA to abnormally high levels, indicating that our approach can yield interesting mutant ribosomes.

  12. 4.0-Å resolution cryo-EM structure of the mammalian chaperonin TRiC/CCT reveals its unique subunit arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yao; Baker, Matthew L.; Jakana, Joanita; Woolford, David; Miller, Erik J.; Reissmann, Stefanie; Kumar, Ramya N.; Redding-Johanson, Alyssa M.; Batth, Tanveer S.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Ludtke, Steven J.; Frydman, Judith; Chiu, Wah

    2010-01-01

    The essential double-ring eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT (TCP1-ring complex or chaperonin containing TCP1) assists the folding of ∼5–10% of the cellular proteome. Many TRiC substrates cannot be folded by other chaperonins from prokaryotes or archaea. These unique folding properties are likely linked to TRiC’s unique heterooligomeric subunit organization, whereby each ring consists of eight different paralogous subunits in an arrangement that remains uncertain. Using single particle cryo-EM without imposing symmetry, we determined the mammalian TRiC structure at 4.7-Å resolution. This revealed the existence of a 2-fold axis between its two rings resulting in two homotypic subunit interactions across the rings. A subsequent 2-fold symmetrized map yielded a 4.0-Å resolution structure that evinces the densities of a large fraction of side chains, loops, and insertions. These features permitted unambiguous identification of all eight individual subunits, despite their sequence similarity. Independent biochemical near-neighbor analysis supports our cryo-EM derived TRiC subunit arrangement. We obtained a Cα backbone model for each subunit from an initial homology model refined against the cryo-EM density. A subsequently optimized atomic model for a subunit showed ∼95% of the main chain dihedral angles in the allowable regions of the Ramachandran plot. The determination of the TRiC subunit arrangement opens the way to understand its unique function and mechanism. In particular, an unevenly distributed positively charged wall lining the closed folding chamber of TRiC differs strikingly from that of prokaryotic and archaeal chaperonins. These interior surface chemical properties likely play an important role in TRiC’s cellular substrate specificity. PMID:20194787

  13. 4.0-A resolution cryo-EM structure of the mammalian chaperonin TRiC/CCT reveals its unique subunit arrangement.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yao; Baker, Matthew L; Jakana, Joanita; Woolford, David; Miller, Erik J; Reissmann, Stefanie; Kumar, Ramya N; Redding-Johanson, Alyssa M; Batth, Tanveer S; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Ludtke, Steven J; Frydman, Judith; Chiu, Wah

    2010-03-16

    The essential double-ring eukaryotic chaperonin TRiC/CCT (TCP1-ring complex or chaperonin containing TCP1) assists the folding of approximately 5-10% of the cellular proteome. Many TRiC substrates cannot be folded by other chaperonins from prokaryotes or archaea. These unique folding properties are likely linked to TRiC's unique heterooligomeric subunit organization, whereby each ring consists of eight different paralogous subunits in an arrangement that remains uncertain. Using single particle cryo-EM without imposing symmetry, we determined the mammalian TRiC structure at 4.7-A resolution. This revealed the existence of a 2-fold axis between its two rings resulting in two homotypic subunit interactions across the rings. A subsequent 2-fold symmetrized map yielded a 4.0-A resolution structure that evinces the densities of a large fraction of side chains, loops, and insertions. These features permitted unambiguous identification of all eight individual subunits, despite their sequence similarity. Independent biochemical near-neighbor analysis supports our cryo-EM derived TRiC subunit arrangement. We obtained a Calpha backbone model for each subunit from an initial homology model refined against the cryo-EM density. A subsequently optimized atomic model for a subunit showed approximately 95% of the main chain dihedral angles in the allowable regions of the Ramachandran plot. The determination of the TRiC subunit arrangement opens the way to understand its unique function and mechanism. In particular, an unevenly distributed positively charged wall lining the closed folding chamber of TRiC differs strikingly from that of prokaryotic and archaeal chaperonins. These interior surface chemical properties likely play an important role in TRiC's cellular substrate specificity. PMID:20194787

  14. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    PubMed

    Pfister, K Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  15. A process yields large quantities of pure ribosome subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, M.; Lu, P.; Rich, A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of process for in-vitro protein synthesis from living cells followed by dissociation of ribosomes into subunits is discussed. Process depends on dialysis or use of chelating agents. Operation of process and advantages over previous methods are outlined.

  16. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    A database on large ribosomal subunit RNA is made available. It contains 258 sequences. It provides sequence, alignment and secondary structure information in computer-readable formats. Files can be obtained using ftp. PMID:7524023

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Cytoplasmic Dynein Subunit Families

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles. PMID:16440056

  18. The Linkage Between Oxygenation and Subunit Dissociation in Human Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ackers, Gary K.; Halvorson, Herbert R.

    1974-01-01

    The use of subunit dissociation as a means of probing intersubunit contact energy changes which accompany cooperative ligand binding has been studied for the case of human hemoglobin. An analysis is presented delineating the information that can be obtained from the linkage relationships between ligand binding and subunit dissociation of hemoglobin tetramers into dimers. The analysis defines (a) the variation of the saturation function, Ȳ, with total protein concentration, (b) the variation of the subunit dissociation constant xK2 with ligand concentration (X) and (c) the correlations between changes in dimer-dimer contact energy and the sequential ligand binding steps. Sensitivity of the linkage function has been explored by numerical simulation. It is shown that subunit dissociation may appreciably affect oxygenation curves under usual conditions of measurement and that relying solely on either xK2 or Ȳ may lead to incorrect picutres of the energetics, whereas the combination defines the system much more exactly. PMID:4530985

  19. Subunit-Specific Trafficking of GABAA Receptors during Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Goodkin, Howard P.; Joshi, Suchitra; Mtchedlishvili, Zakaria; Brar, Jasmit; Kapur, Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed that a reduced surface expression of GABAA receptors (GABARs) contributes to the pathogenesis of status epilepticus (SE), a condition characterized by prolonged seizures. This hypothesis was based on the finding that prolonged epileptiform bursting (repetitive bursts of prolonged depolarizations with superimposed action potentials) in cultures of dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons (dissociated cultures) results in the increased intracellular accumulation of GABARs. However, it is not known whether this rapid modification in the surface-expressed GABAR pool results from selective, subunit-dependent or nonselective, subunit-independent internalization of GABARs. In hippocampal slices obtained from animals undergoing prolonged SE (SE-treated slices), we found that the surface expression of the GABARβ2/3 and γ2 subunits was reduced, whereas that of the δ subunit was not. Complementary electrophysiological recordings from dentate granule cells in SE-treated slices demonstrated a reduction in GABAR-mediated synaptic inhibition, but not tonic inhibition. A reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit, but not the δ subunit was also observed in dissociated cultures and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures when incubated in an elevated KCl external medium or an elevated KCl external medium supplemented with NMDA, respectively. Additional studies demonstrated that the reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit was independent of direct ligand binding of the GABAR. These findings demonstrate that the regulation of surface-expressed GABAR pool during SE is subunit-specific and occurs independent of ligand binding. The differential modulation of the surface expression of GABARs during SE has potential implications for the treatment of this neurological emergency. PMID:18322097

  20. Properties of the subunits of wheat germ initiation factor 3.

    PubMed

    Heufler, C; Browning, K S; Ravel, J M

    1988-11-10

    Wheat germ initiation factor 3 (eukaryotic initiation factor 3, eIF-3) contains ten non-identical subunits (p116, p107, p87, p83, p56, p45, p41, p36, p34 and p28). Monoclonal antibodies to all except two of the subunits (p41 and p28) were obtained. None of the monoclonal antibodies react with more than one subunit, and only monoclonal antibodies to p36 inhibit the ability of eIF-3 to support initiation of polypeptide synthesis. Two of the subunits (p116 and p107) are highly basic polypeptides (pI greater than or equal to 8); five (p87, p56, p45, p34 and p28) are acidic polypeptides (pI = 5.4-6.1); and three (p83, p41 and p36) appear to exist in more than one isoelectric form. Eight of the subunits of eIF-3 are iodinated rapidly in vitro; the highest incorporation is into p56 and the lowest incorporation is into p28. No incorporation into p41 or p28 is observed. When eIF-3 is treated with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide, approx. 30 alkyl groups per eIF-3 are incorporated, and the eIF-3 is inactivated. No incorporation into p83 or p28 is observed; incorporation of the alkyl groups into the other eight subunits occurs at different rates. The rate of inactivation of eIF-3 by N-ethylmaleimide is slower than the overall rate of incorporation of alkyl groups. eIF-3 is stable between pH 5.5 and 10. Below pH 5.5, eIF-3 is inactivated and precipitation of protein occurs. Partial dissociation of the subunits and inactivation of eIF-3 is obtained by treatment with 2 M urea. Attempts to reassociate the subunits into an active particle were unsuccessful.

  1. Mapping racism.

    PubMed

    Moss, Donald B

    2006-01-01

    The author uses the metaphor of mapping to illuminate a structural feature of racist thought, locating the degraded object along vertical and horizontal axes. These axes establish coordinates of hierarchy and of distance. With the coordinates in place, racist thought begins to seem grounded in natural processes. The other's identity becomes consolidated, and parochialism results. The use of this kind of mapping is illustrated via two patient vignettes. The author presents Freud's (1905, 1927) views in relation to such a "mapping" process, as well as Adorno's (1951) and Baldwin's (1965). Finally, the author conceptualizes the crucial status of primitivity in the workings of racist thought.

  2. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  3. Effects of Detergents on Ribosomal Precursor Subunits of Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Body, Barbara A.; Brownstein, Bernard H.

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction. PMID:412833

  4. Effects of detergents on ribosomal precursor subunits of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Body, A; Brownstein, B H

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction.

  5. Mapping Biodiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC.

    This document features a lesson plan that examines how maps help scientists protect biodiversity and how plants and animals are adapted to specific ecoregions by comparing biome, ecoregion, and habitat. Samples of instruction and assessment are included. (KHR)

  6. Planetary Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Batson, Raymond M.

    2007-02-01

    Preface; List of contributors; 1. Introduction R. Greeley and R. M. Batson; 2. History of planetary cartography R. M. Batson, E. A. Whitaker and D. E. Wilhelms; 3. Cartography R. M. Batson; 4. Planetary nomenclature M. E. Strobell and H. Masursky; 5. Geodetic control M. E. Davies; 6. Topographic mapping S. S. C. Wu and F. J. Doyle; 7. Geologic mapping D. E. Wilhelms; Appendices R. M. Batson and J. L. Inge; Index.

  7. Map Separates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are printed using up to six colors (black, blue, green, red, brown, and purple). To prepare your own maps or artwork based on maps, you can order separate black-and-white film positives or negatives for any color printed on a USGS topographic map, or for one or more of the groups of related features printed in the same color on the map (such as drainage and drainage names from the blue plate.) In this document, examples are shown with appropriate ink color to illustrate the various separates. When purchased, separates are black-and-white film negatives or positives. After you receive a film separate or composite from the USGS, you can crop, enlarge or reduce, and edit to add or remove details to suit your special needs. For example, you can adapt the separates for making regional and local planning maps or for doing many kinds of studies or promotions by using the features you select and then printing them in colors of your choice.

  8. Venus mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Morgan, H. F.; Sucharski, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Semicontrolled image mosaics of Venus, based on Magellan data, are being compiled at 1:50,000,000, 1:10,000,000, 1:5,000,000, and 1:1,000,000 scales to support the Magellan Radar Investigator (RADIG) team. The mosaics are semicontrolled in the sense that data gaps were not filled and significant cosmetic inconsistencies exist. Contours are based on preliminary radar altimetry data that is subjected to revision and improvement. Final maps to support geologic mapping and other scientific investigations, to be compiled as the dataset becomes complete, will be sponsored by the Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program and/or the Venus Data Analysis Program. All maps, both semicontrolled and final, will be published as I-maps by the United States Geological Survey. All of the mapping is based on existing knowledge of the spacecraft orbit; photogrammetric triangulation, a traditional basis for geodetic control on planets where framing cameras were used, is not feasible with the radar images of Venus, although an eventual shift of coordinate system to a revised spin-axis location is anticipated. This is expected to be small enough that it will affect only large-scale maps.

  9. Random mutagenesis of yeast 25S rRNA identify bases critical for 60S subunit structural integrity and function

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Naoki; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Chowdhury, Wasimul; Kitabatake, Makoto; Shin, Byung-shik; Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Wang, Suzhi; Singh, Chingakham Ranjit; Brown, Susan J.; Ohno, Mutsuhito; Asano, Katsura

    2013-01-01

    In yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 25S rRNA makes up the major mass and shape of the 60S ribosomal subunit. During translation initiation, the 60S subunit joins the 40S initiation complex, producing the 80S initiation complex. During elongation, the 60S subunit binds the CCA-ends of aminoacyl- and peptidyl-tRNAs at the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, transferring the peptide onto the α-amino group of the aminoacyl-tRNA. To study the role of 25S rRNA in translation in vivo, we randomly mutated 25S rRNA and isolated and characterized seven point mutations that affected yeast cell growth and polysome profiles. Four of these mutations, G651A, A1435U, A1446G and A1587G, change a base involved in base triples crucial for structural integrity. Three other mutations change bases near the ribosomal surface: C2879U and U2408C alter the A-loop and P-loop, respectively, and G1735A maps near a Eukarya-specific bridge to the 40S subunit. By polysome profiling in mmslΔ mutants defective in nonfunctional 25S rRNA decay, we show that some of these mutations are defective in both the initiation and elongation phases of translation. Of the mutants characterized, C2879U displays the strongest defect in translation initiation. The ribosome transit-time assay directly shows that this mutation is also defective in peptide elongation/termination. Thus, our genetic analysis not only identifies bases critical for structural integrity of the 60S subunit, but also suggests a role for bases near the peptidyl transferase center in translation initiation. PMID:26824023

  10. Single-particle cryoEM analysis at near-atomic resolution from several thousand asymmetric subunits.

    PubMed

    Passos, Dario Oliveira; Lyumkis, Dmitry

    2015-11-01

    A single-particle cryoEM reconstruction of the large ribosomal subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained from a dataset of ∼75,000 particles. The gold-standard and frequency-limited approaches to single-particle refinement were each independently used to determine orientation parameters for the final reconstruction. Both approaches showed similar resolution curves and nominal resolution values for the 60S dataset, estimated at 2.9 Å. The amount of over-fitting present during frequency-limited refinement was quantitatively analyzed using the high-resolution phase-randomization test, and the results showed no apparent over-fitting. The number of asymmetric subunits required to reach specific resolutions was subsequently analyzed by refining subsets of the data in an ab initio manner. With our data collection and processing strategies, sub-nanometer resolution was obtained with ∼200 asymmetric subunits (or, equivalently for the ribosomal subunit, particles). Resolutions of 5.6 Å, 4.5 Å, and 3.8 Å were reached with ∼1000, ∼1600, and ∼5000 asymmetric subunits, respectively. At these resolutions, one would expect to detect alpha-helical pitch, separation of beta-strands, and separation of Cα atoms, respectively. Using this map, together with strategies for ab initio model building and model refinement, we built a region of the ribosomal protein eL6, which was missing in previous models of the yeast ribosome. The relevance for more routine high-resolution structure determination is discussed. PMID:26470814

  11. Horizontal membrane-intrinsic α-helices in the stator a-subunit of an F-type ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, Matteo; Klusch, Niklas; Mills, Deryck J; Vonck, Janet; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M

    2015-05-14

    ATP, the universal energy currency of cells, is produced by F-type ATP synthases, which are ancient, membrane-bound nanomachines. F-type ATP synthases use the energy of a transmembrane electrochemical gradient to generate ATP by rotary catalysis. Protons moving across the membrane drive a rotor ring composed of 8-15 c-subunits. A central stalk transmits the rotation of the c-ring to the catalytic F1 head, where a series of conformational changes results in ATP synthesis. A key unresolved question in this fundamental process is how protons pass through the membrane to drive ATP production. Mitochondrial ATP synthases form V-shaped homodimers in cristae membranes. Here we report the structure of a native and active mitochondrial ATP synthase dimer, determined by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy at 6.2 Å resolution. Our structure shows four long, horizontal membrane-intrinsic α-helices in the a-subunit, arranged in two hairpins at an angle of approximately 70° relative to the c-ring helices. It has been proposed that a strictly conserved membrane-embedded arginine in the a-subunit couples proton translocation to c-ring rotation. A fit of the conserved carboxy-terminal a-subunit sequence places the conserved arginine next to a proton-binding c-subunit glutamate. The map shows a slanting solvent-accessible channel that extends from the mitochondrial matrix to the conserved arginine. Another hydrophilic cavity on the lumenal membrane surface defines a direct route for the protons to an essential histidine-glutamate pair. Our results provide unique new insights into the structure and function of rotary ATP synthases and explain how ATP production is coupled to proton translocation.

  12. Phosphorylation of ATPase subunits of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Pappin, D; Rivett, A J

    1998-07-01

    The 26S proteasome complex plays a major role in the non-lysosomal degradation of intracellular proteins. Purified 26S proteasomes give a pattern of more than 40 spots on 2D-PAGE gels. The positions of subunits have been identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides and by immunoblotting with subunit-specific antipeptide antibodies. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from [32P]phosphate-labelled human embryo lung L-132 cells revealed the presence of at least three major phosphorylated polypeptides among the regulatory subunits as well as the C8 and C9 components of the core 20S proteasome. Comparison with the positions of the regulatory polypeptides revealed a minor phosphorylated form to be S7 (MSS1). Antibodies against S4, S6 (TBP7) and S12 (MOV34) all cross-reacted at the position of major phosphorylated polypeptides suggesting that several of the ATPase subunits may be phosphorylated. The phosphorylation of S4 was confirmed by double immunoprecipitation experiments in which 26S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated as above and dissociated and then S4 was immunoprecipitated with subunit-specific antibodies. Antibodies against the non-ATPase subunit S10, which has been suggested by others to be phosphorylated, did not coincide with the position of a phosphorylated polypeptide. Some differences were observed in the 2D-PAGE pattern of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from cultured cells compared to purified rat liver 26S proteasomes suggesting possible differences in subunit compositions of 26S proteasomes.

  13. Cytochrome c oxidase: Evolution of control via nuclear subunit addition☆

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Denis; Wildman, Derek E.; Hüttemann, Maik; Markondapatnaikuni, Gopi Chand; Aras, Siddhesh; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    According to theory, present eukaryotic cells originated from a beneficial association between two free-living cells. Due to this endosymbiotic event the pre-eukaryotic cell gained access to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which produces more than 15 times as much ATP as glycolysis. Because cellular ATP needs fluctuate and OXPHOS both requires and produces entities that can be toxic for eukaryotic cells such as ROS or NADH, we propose that the success of endosymbiosis has largely depended on the regulation of endosymbiont OXPHOS. Several studies have presented cytochrome c oxidase as a key regulator of OXPHOS; for example, COX is the only complex of mammalian OXPHOS with known tissue-specific isoforms of nuclear encoded subunits. We here discuss current knowledge about the origin of nuclear encoded subunits and the appearance of different isozymes promoted by tissue and cellular environments such as hypoxia. We also review evidence for recent selective pressure acting on COX among vertebrates, particularly in primate lineages, and discuss the unique pattern of co-evolution between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Finally, even though the addition of nuclear encoded subunits was a major event in eukaryotic COX evolution, this does not lead to emergence of a more efficient COX, as might be expected from an anthropocentric point of view, for the “higher” organism possessing large brains and muscles. The main function of these subunits appears to be “only” to control the activity of the mitochondrial subunits. We propose that this control function is an as yet underappreciated key point of evolution. Moreover, the importance of regulating energy supply may have caused the addition of subunits encoded by the nucleus in a process comparable to a “domestication scenario” such that the host tends to control more and more tightly the ancestral activity of COX performed by the mtDNA encoded subunits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  14. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  15. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  16. Synaptic localization of NMDA receptor subunits in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, E L; Hack, I; Brandstätter, J H; Wässle, H

    2000-04-24

    The distribution and synaptic clustering of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors were studied in the rat retina by using subunit specific antisera. A punctate immunofluorescence was observed in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) for all subunits tested, and electron microscopy confirmed that the immunoreactive puncta represent labeling of receptors clustered at postsynaptic sites. Double labeling of sections revealed that NMDA receptor clusters within the IPL are composed of different subunit combinations: NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, and in a small number of synapses NR1/NR2A/NR2B. The majority of NMDA receptor clusters were colocalized with the postsynaptic density proteins PSD-95, PSD-93, and SAP 102. Double labeling of the NMDA receptor subunit specific antisera with protein kinase C (PKC), a marker of rod bipolar cells, revealed very little colocalization at the rod bipolar cell axon terminal. This suggests that NMDA receptors are important in mediating neurotransmission within the cone bipolar cell pathways of the IPL. The postsynaptic neurons are a subset of amacrine cells and most ganglion cells. Usually only one of the two postsynaptic processes at the bipolar cell ribbon synapses expressed NMDA receptors. In the outer plexiform layer (OPL), punctate immunofluoresence was observed for the NR1C2; subunit, which was shown by electron microscopy to be localized presynaptically within both rod and cone photoreceptor terminals.

  17. A distinct holoenzyme organization for two-subunit pyruvate carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Philip H.; Jo, Jeanyoung; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Min-Han; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) has important roles in metabolism and is crucial for virulence for some pathogenic bacteria. PC contains biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) components. It is a single-chain enzyme in eukaryotes and most bacteria, and functions as a 500 kD homo-tetramer. In contrast, PC is a two-subunit enzyme in a collection of Gram-negative bacteria, with the α subunit containing the BC and the β subunit the CT and BCCP domains, and it is believed that the holoenzyme has α4β4 stoichiometry. We report here the crystal structures of a two-subunit PC from Methylobacillus flagellatus. Surprisingly, our structures reveal an α2β4 stoichiometry, and the overall architecture of the holoenzyme is strikingly different from that of the homo-tetrameric PCs. Biochemical and mutagenesis studies confirm the stoichiometry and other structural observations. Our functional studies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa show that its two-subunit PC is important for colony morphogenesis. PMID:27708276

  18. GABA receptor subunit composition relative to insecticide potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ratra, G S; Casida, J E

    2001-07-01

    Three observations on the 4-[(3)H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB) binding site in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor indicate the specific target for insecticide action in human brain and a possible mechanism for selectivity. First, from published data, alpha-endosulfan, lindane and fipronil compete for the [(3)H]EBOB binding site with affinities of 0.3--7 nM in both human recombinant homooligomeric beta 3 receptors and housefly head membranes. Second, from structure-activity studies, including new data, GABAergic insecticide binding potency on the pentameric receptor formed from the beta 3 subunit correlates well with that on the housefly receptor (r=0.88, n=20). This conserved inhibitor specificity is consistent with known sequence homologies in the housefly GABA receptor and the human GABA(A) receptor beta 3 subunit. Third, as mostly new findings, various combinations of alpha 1, alpha 6, and gamma 2 subunits coexpressed with a beta 1 or beta 3 subunit confer differential insecticide binding sensitivity, particularly to fipronil, indicating that subunit composition is a major factor in insecticide selectivity.

  19. RILP interacts with HOPS complex via VPS41 subunit to regulate endocytic trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaosi; Yang, Ting; Wang, Shicong; Wang, Zhen; Yun, Ye; Sun, Lixiang; Zhou, Yunhe; Xu, Xiaohui; Akazawa, Chihiro; Hong, Wanjin; Wang, Tuanlao

    2014-01-01

    The HOPS complex serves as a tethering complex with GEF activity for Ypt7p in yeast to regulate late endosomal membrane maturation. While the role of HOPS complex is well established in yeast cells, its functional and mechanistic aspects in mammalian cells are less well defined. In this study, we report that RILP, a downstream effector of Rab7, interacts with HOPS complex and recruits HOPS subunits to the late endosomal compartment. Structurally, the amino-terminal portion of RILP interacts with HOPS complex. Unexpectedly, this interaction is independent of Rab7. VPS41 subunit of HOPS complex was defined to be the major partner for interacting with RILP. The carboxyl-terminal region of VPS41 was mapped to be responsible for the interaction. Functionally, either depletion of VPS41 by shRNA or overexpression of VPS41 C-terminal half retarded EGF-induced degradation of EGFR. These results suggest that interaction of RILP with HOPS complex via VPS41 plays a role in endocytic trafficking of EGFR. PMID:25445562

  20. Genome-wide promoter binding profiling of protein phosphatase-1 and its major nuclear targeting subunits.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Toon; Görnemann, Janina; Verbinnen, Iris; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-07-13

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a key regulator of transcription and is targeted to promoter regions via associated proteins. However, the chromatin binding sites of PP1 have never been studied in a systematic and genome-wide manner. Methylation-based DamID profiling in HeLa cells has enabled us to map hundreds of promoter binding sites of PP1 and three of its major nuclear interactors, i.e. RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS. Our data reveal that the α, β and γ isoforms of PP1 largely bind to distinct subsets of promoters and can also be differentiated by their promoter binding pattern. PP1β emerged as the major promoter-associated isoform and shows an overlapping binding profile with PNUTS at dozens of active promoters. Surprisingly, most promoter binding sites of PP1 are not shared with RepoMan, NIPP1 or PNUTS, hinting at the existence of additional, largely unidentified chromatin-targeting subunits. We also found that PP1 is not required for the global chromatin targeting of RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS, but alters the promoter binding specificity of NIPP1. Our data disclose an unexpected specificity and complexity in the promoter binding of PP1 isoforms and their chromatin-targeting subunits. PMID:25990731

  1. Integrative structural analysis of the UTPB complex, an early assembly factor for eukaryotic small ribosomal subunits

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Qi; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Xining; Lin, Jinzhong; Ye, Keqiong

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential and conserved cellular process in eukaryotes that requires numerous assembly factors. The six-subunit UTPB complex is an essential component of the 90S precursor of the small ribosomal subunit. Here, we analyzed the molecular architecture of UTPB using an integrative structural biology approach. We mapped the major interactions that associate each of six UTPB proteins. Crystallographic studies showed that Utp1, Utp21, Utp12 and Utp13 are evolutionarily related and form a dimer of dimers (Utp1–Utp21, Utp12–Utp13) through their homologous helical C-terminal domains. Molecular docking with crosslinking restraints showed that the WD domains of Utp12 and Utp13 are associated, as are the WD domains of Utp1, Utp21 and Utp18. Electron microscopy images of the entire UTPB complex revealed that it predominantly adopts elongated conformations and possesses internal flexibility. We also determined crystal structures of the WD domain of Utp18 and the HAT and deviant HAT domains of Utp6. A structural model of UTPB was derived based on these data. PMID:27330138

  2. Interacting cytoplasmic loops of subunits a and c of Escherichia coli F1F0 ATP synthase gate H+ transport to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Steed, P Ryan; Kraft, Kaitlin A; Fillingame, Robert H

    2014-11-25

    H(+)-transporting F1F0 ATP synthase catalyzes the synthesis of ATP via coupled rotary motors within F0 and F1. H(+) transport at the subunit a-c interface in transmembranous F0 drives rotation of a cylindrical c10 oligomer within the membrane, which is coupled to rotation of subunit γ within the α3β3 sector of F1 to mechanically drive ATP synthesis. F1F0 functions in a reversible manner, with ATP hydrolysis driving H(+) transport. ATP-driven H(+) transport in a select group of cysteine mutants in subunits a and c is inhibited after chelation of Ag(+) and/or Cd(+2) with the substituted sulfhydryl groups. The H(+) transport pathway mapped via these Ag(+)(Cd(+2))-sensitive Cys extends from the transmembrane helices (TMHs) of subunits a and c into cytoplasmic loops connecting the TMHs, suggesting these loop regions could be involved in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm. Here, using select loop-region Cys from the single cytoplasmic loop of subunit c and multiple cytoplasmic loops of subunit a, we show that Cd(+2) directly inhibits passive H(+) transport mediated by F0 reconstituted in liposomes. Further, in extensions of previous studies, we show that the regions mediating passive H(+) transport can be cross-linked to each other. We conclude that the loop-regions in subunits a and c that are implicated in H(+) transport likely interact in a single structural domain, which then functions in gating H(+) release to the cytoplasm.

  3. Separation and characterization of alpha-chain subunits from tilapia (Tilapia zillii) skin gelatin using ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shulin; Tang, Lanlan; Su, Wenjin; Weng, Wuyin; Osako, Kazufumi; Tanaka, Munehiko

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-chain subunits were separated from tilapia skin gelatin using ultrafiltration, and the physicochemical properties of obtained subunits were investigated. As a result, α1-subunit and α2-subunit could be successfully separated by 100 kDa MWCO regenerated cellulose membranes and 150 kDa MWCO polyethersulfone membranes, respectively. Glycine was the most dominant amino acid in both α1-subunit and α2-subunit. However, the tyrosine content was higher in α2-subunit than in α1-subunit, resulting in strong absorption near 280 nm observed in the UV absorption spectrum. Based on the DSC analysis, it was found that the glass transition temperatures of gelatin, α1-subunit and α2-subunit were 136.48 °C, 126.77 °C and 119.43 °C, respectively. Moreover, the reduced viscosity and denaturation temperature of α1-subunit were higher than those of α2-subunit, and the reduced viscosity reached the highest when α-subunits were mixed with α1/α2 ratio of approximately 2, suggesting that α1-subunit plays a more important role in the thermostability of gelatin than α2-subunit.

  4. YphC and YsxC GTPases assist the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and functional core of the 50S ribosomal subunit

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaodan; Davis, Joseph H.; Jain, Nikhil; Razi, Aida; Benlekbir, Samir; McArthur, Andrew G.; Rubinstein, John L.; Britton, Robert A.; Williamson, James R.; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    YphC and YsxC are GTPases in Bacillus subtilis that facilitate the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit, however their roles in this process are still uncharacterized. To explore their function, we used strains in which the only copy of the yphC or ysxC genes were under the control of an inducible promoter. Under depletion conditions, they accumulated incomplete ribosomal subunits that we named 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis and the 5–6 Å resolution cryo-EM maps of the 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles revealed that the two GTPases participate in the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and key RNA helices in the A, P and E functional sites of the 50S subunit. We observed that YphC and YsxC bind specifically to the two immature particles, suggesting that they represent either on-pathway intermediates or that their structure has not significantly diverged from that of the actual substrate. These results describe the nature of these immature particles, a widely used tool to study the assembly process of the ribosome. They also provide the first insights into the function of YphC and YsxC in 50S subunit assembly and are consistent with this process occurring through multiple parallel pathways, as it has been described for the 30S subunit. PMID:27484475

  5. Real-time tracking of CO migration and binding in the α and β subunits of human hemoglobin via 150-ps time-resolved Laue crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Schotte, Friedrich; Cho, Hyun Sun; Soman, Jayashree; Wulff, Michael; Olson, John S.; Anfinrud, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed the method of picosecond Laue crystallography and used this capability to probe ligand dynamics in tetrameric R-state hemoglobin (Hb). Time-resolved, 2 Å-resolution electron density maps of photolyzed HbCO reveal the time-dependent population of CO in the binding (A) and primary docking (B) sites of both α and β subunits from 100 ps to 10 μs. The proximity of the B site in the β subunit is about 0.25 Å closer to its A binding site, and its kBA rebinding rate (~300 μs−1) is six times faster, suggesting distal control of the rebinding dynamics. Geminate rebinding in the β subunit exhibits both prompt and delayed geminate phases. We developed a microscopic model to quantitatively explain the observed kinetics, with three states for the α subunit and four states for the β subunit. This model provides a consistent framework for interpreting rebinding kinetics reported in prior studies of both HbCO and HbO2. PMID:24839343

  6. YphC and YsxC GTPases assist the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and functional core of the 50S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaodan; Davis, Joseph H; Jain, Nikhil; Razi, Aida; Benlekbir, Samir; McArthur, Andrew G; Rubinstein, John L; Britton, Robert A; Williamson, James R; Ortega, Joaquin

    2016-09-30

    YphC and YsxC are GTPases in Bacillus subtilis that facilitate the assembly of the 50S ribosomal subunit, however their roles in this process are still uncharacterized. To explore their function, we used strains in which the only copy of the yphC or ysxC genes were under the control of an inducible promoter. Under depletion conditions, they accumulated incomplete ribosomal subunits that we named 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis and the 5-6 Å resolution cryo-EM maps of the 45SYphC and 44.5SYsxC particles revealed that the two GTPases participate in the maturation of the central protuberance, GTPase associated region and key RNA helices in the A, P and E functional sites of the 50S subunit. We observed that YphC and YsxC bind specifically to the two immature particles, suggesting that they represent either on-pathway intermediates or that their structure has not significantly diverged from that of the actual substrate. These results describe the nature of these immature particles, a widely used tool to study the assembly process of the ribosome. They also provide the first insights into the function of YphC and YsxC in 50S subunit assembly and are consistent with this process occurring through multiple parallel pathways, as it has been described for the 30S subunit. PMID:27484475

  7. Cholera Toxin B: One Subunit with Many Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Baldauf, Keegan J.; Royal, Joshua M.; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT), which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA) and the B subunit (CTB). CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction. PMID:25802972

  8. Chromosomal localization of human RNA polymerase II subunit genes

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, J.; Wintzerith, M.; Vigneron, M.; Kedinger, C. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N.; Depetris, D. )

    1994-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (or B) is composed of 10 to 14 polypeptides ranging from 220 to 10 kDa. To gain further insight into the molecular structure and function of these subunits, the authors have undertaken the molecular cloning of nucleotide sequences corresponding to the human enzyme. The cDNAs of five subunits (hRPB220, hRPB140, hRPB33, hRPB25, and hRPB14.5) have been isolated. Using in situ hybridization, they show that the genes of these subunits have distinct chromosomal locations (17p13, 4q12, 16q13-q21, 19p13.3, and 19q12, respectively). Thus, if assembly of active polymerase molecules requires coordinated expression from these independent genes, mechanisms that ensure tight coregulation of the corresponding promoters must exist. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Dengue vaccine: an update on recombinant subunit strategies.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Hermida, L

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is an increasing public health problem worldwide, with the four serotypes of the virus infecting over 390 million people annually. There is no specific treatment or antiviral drug for dengue, and prevention is largely limited to controlling the mosquito vectors or disrupting the human-vector contact. Despite the considerable progress made in recent years, an effective vaccine against the virus is not yet available. The development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered by many unique challenges, including the need to ensure the absence of vaccine-induced enhanced severity of disease. Recombinant protein subunit vaccines offer a safer alternative to other vaccine approaches. Several subunit vaccine candidates are presently under development, based on different structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. Novel adjuvants or immunopotentiating strategies are also being tested to improve their immunogenicity. This review summarizes the current status and development trends of subunit dengue vaccines.

  10. KAP, the accessory subunit of kinesin-2, binds the predicted coiled-coil stalk of the motor subunits.

    PubMed

    Doodhi, Harinath; Ghosal, Debnath; Krishnamurthy, Mahalakshmi; Jana, Swadhin C; Shamala, Divya; Bhaduri, Anirban; Sowdhamini, R; Ray, Krishanu

    2009-03-17

    Kinesin-2 is an anterograde motor involved in intraflagellar transport and certain other intracellular transport processes. It consists of two different motor subunits and an accessory protein KAP (kinesin accessory protein). The motor subunits were shown to bind each other through the coiled-coil stalk domains, while KAP was proposed to bind the tail domains of the motor subunits. Although several genetic studies established that KAP plays an important role in kinesin-2 functions, its exact role remains unclear. Here, we report the results of a systematic analysis of the KAP binding sites by using recombinant Drosophila kinesin-2 subunits as well as the endogenous proteins. These show that at least one of the coiled-coil stalks is sufficient to bind the N-terminal region of DmKAP. The soluble complex involving the recombinant kinesin-2 fragments is reconstituted in vitro at high salt concentrations, suggesting that the interaction is primarily nonionic. Furthermore, independent distant homology modeling indicated that DmKAP may bind along the coiled-coil stalks through a combination of predominantly hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. These observations led us to propose that KAP would stabilize the motor subunit heterodimer and help assemble a greater kinesin-2 complex in vivo. PMID:19161286

  11. Subunits of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe RNA polymerase II: enzyme purification and structure of the subunit 3 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Y; Yamagishi, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the structure and function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, we purified the enzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The highly purified RNA polymerase II contained more than eleven polypeptides. The sizes of the largest the second-, and the third-largest polypeptides as measured by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were about 210, 150, and 40 kilodaltons (kDa), respectively, and are similar to those of RPB1, 2, and 3 subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II. Using the degenerated primers designed after amino acid micro-sequencing of the 40 kDa third-largest polypeptide (subunit 3), we cloned the subunit 3 gene (rpb3) and determined its DNA sequence. Taken together with the sequence of parts of PCR-amplified cDNA, the predicted coding sequence of rpb3, interrupted by two introns, was found to encode a polypeptide of 297 amino acid residues in length with a molecular weight of 34 kDa. The S. pombe subunit 3 contains four structural domains conserved for the alpha-subunit family of RNA polymerase from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A putative leucine zipper motif was found to exist in the C-terminal proximal conserved region (domain D). Possible functions of the conserved domains are discussed. Images PMID:8367291

  12. Sequence of a functional invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit which can form a chimeric receptor with a vertebrate alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R J; Vreugdenhil, E; Zaman, S H; Bhandal, N S; Usherwood, P N; Barnard, E A; Darlison, M G

    1991-01-01

    The sequence of an invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit is described. This was deduced from a cDNA which was isolated from the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis and which corresponds to a transcript of extremely low abundance. The cDNA was isolated using short exonic sequences from part of the corresponding gene in combination with a variant of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) known as RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). The mature polypeptide has a predicted molecular weight of 54,569 Daltons and exhibits approximately 50% identity to vertebrate GABAA receptor beta subunits. The six intron-exon boundaries determined to date in the molluscan gene occur at the same relative positions as those found in vertebrate GABAA receptor genes. Functional expression, in Xenopus oocytes, of the molluscan cDNA alone results in the formation of GABA-activated chloride ion channels that have a finite open probability even in the absence of agonist. These GABA-evoked currents can be reversibly blocked by the vertebrate GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Surprisingly, the molluscan beta subunit is capable of replacing vertebrate beta subunits in co-expression experiments with the bovine GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit. These findings suggest that invertebrate GABAA receptors exist in vivo as hetero-oligomeric complexes. PMID:1655414

  13. G alpha 12 and G alpha 13 subunits define a fourth class of G protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Strathmann, M P; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) are central to the signaling processes of multicellular organisms. We have explored the diversity of the G protein subunits in mammals and found evidence for a large family of genes that encode the alpha subunits. Amino acid sequence comparisons show that the different alpha subunits fall into at least three classes. These classes have been conserved in animals separated by considerable evolutionary distances; they are present in mammals, Drosophila, and nematodes. We have now obtained cDNA clones encoding two murine alpha subunits, G alpha 12 and G alpha 13, that define a fourth class. The translation products are predicted to have molecular masses of 44 kDa and to be insensitive to ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They share 67% amino acid sequence identity with each other and less than 45% identity with other alpha subunits. Their transcripts can be detected in every tissue examined, although the relative levels of the G alpha 13 message appear somewhat variable. Images PMID:1905812

  14. Localisation of AMPK γ subunits in cardiac and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Katalin; Grignani, Robert T; Watkins, Hugh; Redwood, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The trimeric protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energetic status and cellular stress, and mutations in genes encoding two of the regulatory γ subunits cause inherited disorders of either cardiac or skeletal muscle. AMPKγ2 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with glycogen deposition and conduction abnormalities; mutations in AMPKγ3 result in increased skeletal muscle glycogen. In order to gain further insight into the roles of the different γ subunits in muscle and into possible disease mechanisms, we localised the γ2 and γ3 subunits, along with the more abundant γ1 subunit, by immunofluorescence in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres. The predominant cardiac γ2 variant, γ2-3B, gave a striated pattern in cardiomyocytes, aligning with the Z-disk but with punctate staining similar to T-tubule (L-type Ca(2+) channel) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) markers. In skeletal muscle fibres AMPKγ3 localises to the I band, presenting a uniform staining that flanks the Z-disk, also coinciding with the position of Ca(2+) influx in these muscles. The localisation of γ2-3B- and γ3-containing AMPK suggests that these trimers may have similar functions in the different muscles. AMPK containing γ2-3B was detected in oxidative skeletal muscles which had low expression of γ3, confirming that these two regulatory subunits may be co-ordinately regulated in response to metabolic requirements. Compartmentalisation of AMPK complexes is most likely dependent on the regulatory γ subunit and this differential localisation may direct substrate selection and specify particular functional roles.

  15. Mole Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crippen, Kent J.; Curtright, Robert D.; Brooks, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract nature of the mole and its applications to problem solving make learning the concept difficult for students, and teaching the concept challenging for teachers. Presents activities that use concept maps and graphing calculators as tools for solving mole problems. (ASK)

  16. Memphis Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Stanley; Cox, David; Martin, Cindy

    1998-01-01

    The Memphis Maps program, a collaborative effort of Memphis (Tennessee) educational institutions, public agencies, a bank, and community programs, trains local students in Geographic Information Systems technology and provides the community with valuable demographic and assessment information. The program is described, and factors contributing to…

  17. Advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Naru; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing threat of influenza epidemics and pandemics has emphasized the importance of developing safe and effective vaccines against infections from divergent influenza viruses. In this review, we first introduce the structure and life cycle of influenza A viruses, describing major influenza A virus-caused pandemics. We then compare different types of influenza vaccines and discuss current advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines, particularly those based on nucleoprotein (NP), extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins. We also illustrate potential strategies for improving the efficacy of subunit influenza vaccines. PMID:25529753

  18. Advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naru; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2015-02-01

    The ongoing threat of influenza epidemics and pandemics has emphasized the importance of developing safe and effective vaccines against infections from divergent influenza viruses. In this review, we first introduce the structure and life cycle of influenza A viruses, describing major influenza A virus-caused pandemics. We then compare different types of influenza vaccines and discuss current advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines, particularly those based on nucleoprotein (NP), extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins. We also illustrate potential strategies for improving the efficacy of subunit influenza vaccines.

  19. Micelle-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Trimaille, Thomas; Verrier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the development of subunit vaccines with purified or recombinant antigens for cancer and infectious diseases, the design of improved and safe adjuvants able to efficiently target the antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, represents a crucial challenge. Nanoparticle-based antigen delivery systems have been identified as an innovative strategy to improve the efficacy of subunit vaccines. Among them, self-assembled micellar nanoparticles from amphiphilic (macro)molecules have recently emerged as promising candidates. In this short review, we report on the recent research findings highlighting the versatility and potential of such systems in vaccine delivery. PMID:26426060

  20. [Polymorphism of the gene for subunit 6 of the NADh dehydrogenase complex (ND6) in ethnic russian population in Russia].

    PubMed

    Kornienko, I V; Vodolazhskiĭ, D I; Mikhalkovich, L S; Pavlichenko, G N; Ivanov, P L

    2003-01-01

    A sample of ethnic Russians of Russia was tested for polymorphism of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) gene mapping to the mtDNA region 14,170-14,569. Genetic diversity of ND6 haplotypes was estimated at 0.406, and probability of haplotype random match, at 0.598. Combined with typing the mtDNA control region, analysis of the ND6 gene polymorphism was assumed to improve the reliability of forensic identification. Several point substitutions in the ND6 gene region proved to be associated with particular transitions in the mtDNA control region; the association was characterized with the phi coefficient.

  1. Map projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion. Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection. The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features. Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion. This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.

  2. Characterization of DLC-A and DLC-B, two families of cytoplasmic dynein light chain subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, S R; Cleveland, D W; Schroer, T A

    1994-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a minus-end-directed, microtubule-dependent motor composed of two heavy chains (approximately 530 kDa), three intermediate chains (approximately 74 kDa), and a family of approximately 52-61 kDa light chains. Although the approximately 530 kDa subunit contains the motor and microtubule binding domains of the complex, the functions of the smaller subunits are not known. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and proteolytic mapping, we show here that the light chains are composed of two major families, a higher M(r) family (58, 59, 61 kDa; dynein light chain group A [DLC-A]) and lower M(r) family (52, 53, 55, 56 kDa; dynein light chain group B [DLC-B]). Dissociation of the cytoplasmic dynein complex with potassium iodide reveals that all light chain polypeptides are tightly associated with the approximately 530 kDa heavy chain, whereas the approximately 74 kDa intermediate chain polypeptides are more readily extracted. Treatment with alkaline phosphatase alters the mobility of four of the light chain polypeptides, indicating that these subunits are phosphorylated. Sequencing of a cDNA clone encoding one member of the DLC-A family reveals a predicted globular structure that is not homologous to any known protein but does contain numerous potential phosphorylation sites and a consensus nucleotide-binding motif. Images PMID:7949421

  3. Heterologous expression of plant vacuolar pyrophosphatase in yeast demonstrates sufficiency of the substrate-binding subunit for proton transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.J.; Zhen, R.G.; Rea, P.A. )

    1994-06-21

    The membrane bounding the vacuole of plant cells contains two electrogenic proton pumps. These are the vacuolar H[sup +]-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.3), an enzyme common to all eukaryotes, and a vacuolar H[sup +]-translocating pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1), which is ubiquitous in plants but otherwise known in only a few phototrophic bacteria. Although the substrate-binding subunit of the vacuolar H[sup +]-pyrophosphatase has been identified and purified and cDNAs encoding it have been isolated and characterized, the minimal unit competent in pyrophosphate (PPi)-energized H[sup +] translocation is not known. Here the authors address this question and show that heterologous expression of the cDNA (AVP) encoding the substrate-binding subunit of the vacuolar H[sup +]-pyrophosphatase from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in the production of vacuolarly localized functional enzyme active in PPi-dependent H[sup +] translocation. Since the heterologously expressed pump is indistinguishable from the native plant enzyme with respect to PPi hydrolysis, H[sub +] translocation, activation by potassium, and selective inhibition by calcium and 1,1-diphosphonates, it is concluded that all of the known catalytic functions of the enzyme map to the one subunit encoded by AVP.

  4. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M; Bravo, Javier A; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2014-10-21

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)(-/-) mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression.

  5. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products, and functions.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits - which differ among various taxa - affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating (i) the expression of the biosynthesis apparatus, (ii) the export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and (iii) the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of resulting biofilms, which is particularly important for the interactions of bacteria with higher organisms - leading to rhizosphere colonization and modulating the virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. We review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operon found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms and in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host.

  6. Emergence of ion channel modal gating from independent subunit kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Brendan A; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2016-09-01

    Many ion channels exhibit a slow stochastic switching between distinct modes of gating activity. This feature of channel behavior has pronounced implications for the dynamics of ionic currents and the signaling pathways that they regulate. A canonical example is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) channel, whose regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is essential for numerous cellular processes. However, the underlying biophysical mechanisms that give rise to modal gating in this and most other channels remain unknown. Although ion channels are composed of protein subunits, previous mathematical models of modal gating are coarse grained at the level of whole-channel states, limiting further dialogue between theory and experiment. Here we propose an origin for modal gating, by modeling the kinetics of ligand binding and conformational change in the IP3R at the subunit level. We find good agreement with experimental data over a wide range of ligand concentrations, accounting for equilibrium channel properties, transient responses to changing ligand conditions, and modal gating statistics. We show how this can be understood within a simple analytical framework and confirm our results with stochastic simulations. The model assumes that channel subunits are independent, demonstrating that cooperative binding or concerted conformational changes are not required for modal gating. Moreover, the model embodies a generally applicable principle: If a timescale separation exists in the kinetics of individual subunits, then modal gating can arise as an emergent property of channel behavior. PMID:27551100

  7. Insecticidal Pilin Subunit from the Insect Pathogen Xenorhabdus nematophila

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Puneet; Choudhury, Devapriya; Birah, Ajanta; Reddy, M. K.; Gupta, Gorakh Prasad; Banerjee, Nirupama

    2004-01-01

    Xenorhabdus nematophila is an insect pathogen and produces protein toxins which kill the larval host. Previously, we characterized an orally toxic, large, outer membrane-associated protein complex from the culture medium of X. nematophila. Here, we describe the cloning, expression, and characterization of a 17-kDa pilin subunit of X. nematophila isolated from that protein complex. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was refolded in vitro in the absence of its cognate chaperone by using a urea gradient. The protein oligomerized during in vitro refolding, forming multimers. Point mutations in the conserved N-terminal residues of the pilin protein greatly destabilized its oligomeric organization, demonstrating the importance of the N terminus in refolding and oligomerization of the pilin subunit by donor strand complementation. The recombinant protein was cytotoxic to cultured Helicoverpa armigera larval hemocytes, causing agglutination and subsequent release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The agglutination of larval cells by the 17-kDa protein was inhibited by several sugar derivatives. The biological activity of the purified recombinant protein indicated that it has a conformation similar to that of the native protein. The 17-kDa pilin subunit was found to be orally toxic to fourth- or fifth-instar larvae of an important crop pest, H. armigera, causing extensive damage to the midgut epithelial membrane. To our knowledge, this is first report describing an insecticidal pilin subunit of a bacterium. PMID:15375127

  8. The Essential Anatomical Subunit Approximation Unilateral Cleft Lip Repair.

    PubMed

    Chong, David K; Swanson, Jordan W

    2016-07-01

    The anatomical subunit approximation cleft lip repair advantageously achieves a balanced lip contour, with the line of repair hidden along seams of aesthetic subunits. Dr. David Fisher's original description of the repair reflects the considerable thought that went into the evolution of his design. As his technique has gained acceptance in the intervening 10 years, the authors note several key principles embodied in it that represent a shift in the cleft lip repair paradigm. The authors believe understanding these principles is important to mastery of the anatomical subunit technique, and facilitate its teaching. First, design a plan that adheres to anatomical subunits and perform measurements precisely. Second, identify and adequately release each cleft tissue layer from the lip and nose to enable restoration of balance. Third, drive surgical approximation through inset of the lateral muscle into the superiorly backcut medial orbicularis muscle, followed by skin closure with inferior triangle interposition above the white roll. In this article, the authors present essential components of the technique, and identify several principles that enable its successful execution. PMID:27348690

  9. CMF70 is a subunit of the dynein regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Kabututu, Zakayi P; Thayer, Michelle; Melehani, Jason H; Hill, Kent L

    2010-10-15

    Flagellar motility drives propulsion of several important pathogens and is essential for human development and physiology. Motility of the eukaryotic flagellum requires coordinate regulation of thousands of dynein motors arrayed along the axoneme, but the proteins underlying dynein regulation are largely unknown. The dynein regulatory complex, DRC, is recognized as a focal point of axonemal dynein regulation, but only a single DRC subunit, trypanin/PF2, is currently known. The component of motile flagella 70 protein, CMF70, is broadly and uniquely conserved among organisms with motile flagella, suggesting a role in axonemal motility. Here we demonstrate that CMF70 is part of the DRC from Trypanosoma brucei. CMF70 is located along the flagellum, co-sediments with trypanin in sucrose gradients and co-immunoprecipitates with trypanin. RNAi knockdown of CMF70 causes motility defects in a wild-type background and suppresses flagellar paralysis in cells with central pair defects, thus meeting the functional definition of a DRC subunit. Trypanin and CMF70 are mutually conserved in at least five of six extant eukaryotic clades, indicating that the DRC was probably present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. We have identified only the second known subunit of this ubiquitous dynein regulatory system, highlighting the utility of combined genomic and functional analyses for identifying novel subunits of axonemal sub-complexes. PMID:20876659

  10. Production of Heteromeric Transmembrane Receptors with Defined Subunit Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Furukawa, Hiro

    2016-05-01

    Signal transduction across cell membranes often requires assembly of heteromeric receptors with defined stoichiometry. In this issue of Structure, Morales-Perez et al. (2016) present elegant methods for the expression of heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with a defined α4β2 stoichiometry involving controlled baculovirus-mediated transduction and subunit counting by measurement of two fluorescent signals.

  11. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products, and functions.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits - which differ among various taxa - affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating (i) the expression of the biosynthesis apparatus, (ii) the export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and (iii) the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of resulting biofilms, which is particularly important for the interactions of bacteria with higher organisms - leading to rhizosphere colonization and modulating the virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. We review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operon found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms and in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  12. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Olivia F.; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M.; Bravo, Javier A.; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)−/− mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  13. Chemical crosslinking of the subunits of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Debyser, Z.; De Clercq, E.

    1996-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase (RT) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is composed of two subunits of 66 and 51 kDa in a 1 to 1 ratio. Because dimerization is a prerequisite for enzymatic activity, interference with the dimerization process could constitute an alternative antiviral strategy for RT inhibition. Here we describe an in vitro assay for the study of the dimerization state of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase based on chemical crosslinking of the subunits with dimethylsuberimidate. Crosslinking results in the formation of covalent bonds between the subunits, so that the crosslinked species can be resolved by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked RT species with molecular weight greater than that of the dimeric form accumulate during a 1-15-min time course. Initial evidence suggests that those high molecular weight species represent trimers and tetramers and may be the result of intramolecular crosslinking of the subunits of a higher-order RT oligomer. A peptide that corresponds to part of the tryptophan repeat motif in the connection domain of HIV-1 RT inhibits crosslink formation as well as enzymatic activity. The crosslinking assay thus allows the investigation of the effect of inhibitors on the dimerization of HIV-1 RT. PMID:8745406

  14. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    PubMed Central

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  15. The Biochemistry, Ultrastructure, and Subunit Assembly Mechanism of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) are tetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that play crucial roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Our knowledge about the ultrastructure and subunit assembly mechanisms of intact AMPA-Rs was very limited. However, the new studies using single particle EM and X-ray crystallography are revealing important insights. For example, the tetrameric crystal structure of the GluA2cryst construct provided the atomic view of the intact receptor. In addition, the single particle EM structures of the subunit assembly intermediates revealed the conformational requirement for the dimer-to-tetramer transition during the maturation of AMPA-Rs. These new data in the field provide new models and interpretations. In the brain, the native AMPA-R complexes contain auxiliary subunits that influence subunit assembly, gating, and trafficking of the AMPA-Rs. Understanding the mechanisms of the auxiliary subunits will become increasingly important to precisely describe the function of AMPA-Rs in the brain. The AMPA-R proteomics studies continuously reveal a previously unexpected degree of molecular heterogeneity of the complex. Because the AMPA-Rs are important drug targets for treating various neurological and psychiatric diseases, it is likely that these new native complexes will require detailed mechanistic analysis in the future. The current ultrastructural data on the receptors and the receptor-expressing stable cell lines that were developed during the course of these studies are useful resources for high throughput drug screening and further drug designing. Moreover, we are getting closer to understanding the precise mechanisms of AMPA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity. PMID:21080238

  16. Regulation of Na,K-ATPase Subunit Abundance by Translational Repression*

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Rebecca J.; Kaplan, Jack H.

    2009-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase is an αβ heterodimer responsible for maintaining fluid and electrolyte homeostasis in mammalian cells. We engineered Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines expressing α1FLAG, β1FLAG, or β2MYC subunits via a tetracycline-regulated promoter and a line expressing both stable β1MYC and tetracycline-regulated β1FLAG to examine regulatory mechanisms of sodium pump subunit expression. When overexpression of exogenous β1FLAG increased total β subunit levels by >200% without changes in α subunit abundance, endogenous β1 subunit (β1E) abundance decreased. β1E down-regulation did not occur during β2MYC overexpression, indicating isoform specificity of the repression mechanism. Measurements of RNA stability and content indicated that decreased β subunit expression was not accompanied by any change in mRNA levels. In addition, the degradation rate of β subunits was not altered by β1FLAG overexpression. Cells stably expressing β1MYC, when induced to express β1FLAG subunits, showed reduced β1MYC and β1E subunit abundance, indicating that these effects occur via the coding sequences of the down-regulated polypeptides. In a similar way, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells overexpressing exogenous α1FLAG subunits exhibited a reduction of endogenous α1 subunits (α1E) with no change in α mRNA levels or β subunits. The reduction in α1E compensated for α1FLAG subunit expression, resulting in unchanged total α subunit abundance. Thus, regulation of α subunit expression maintained its native level, whereas β subunit was not as tightly regulated and its abundance could increase substantially over native levels. These effects also occurred in human embryonic kidney cells. These data are the first indication that cellular sodium pump subunit abundance is modulated by translational repression. This mechanism represents a novel, potentially important mechanism for regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. PMID:19553675

  17. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anna; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. PMID:27329756

  18. GABAA receptor beta subunit heterogeneity: functional expression of cloned cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ymer, S; Schofield, P R; Draguhn, A; Werner, P; Köhler, M; Seeburg, P H

    1989-01-01

    Cloned cDNAs encoding two new beta subunits of the rat and bovine GABAA receptor have been isolated using a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on a highly conserved peptide sequence in the second transmembrane domain of GABAA receptor subunits. The beta 2 and beta 3 subunits share approximately 72% sequence identity with the previously characterized beta 1 polypeptide. Northern analysis showed that both beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs are more abundant in the brain than beta 1 mRNA. All three beta subunit encoding cDNAs were also identified in a library constructed from adrenal medulla RNA. Each beta subunit, when co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with an alpha subunit, forms functional GABAA receptors. These results, together with the known alpha subunit heterogeneity, suggest that a variety of related but functionally distinct GABAA receptor subtypes are generated by different subunit combinations. Images PMID:2548852

  19. Arrangement of Kv1 alpha subunits dictates sensitivity to tetraethylammonium.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Shamotienko, Oleg; Dhochartaigh, Sorcha Ni; Muniyappa, Nagesh; Le Berre, Marie; Shaban, Hamdy; Wang, Jiafu; Sack, Jon T; Dolly, J Oliver

    2010-09-01

    Shaker-related Kv1 channels contain four channel-forming alpha subunits. Subfamily member Kv1.1 often occurs oligomerized with Kv1.2 alpha subunits in synaptic membranes, and so information was sought on the influence of their positions within tetramers on the channels' properties. Kv1.1 and 1.2 alpha genes were tandem linked in various arrangements, followed by expression as single-chain proteins in mammalian cells. As some concatenations reported previously seemed not to reliably position Kv1 subunits in their assemblies, the identity of expressed channels was methodically evaluated. Surface protein, isolated by biotinylation of intact transiently transfected HEK-293 cells, gave Kv1.1/1.2 reactivity on immunoblots with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to full-length concatenated tetramers. There was no evidence of protein degradation, indicating that concatemers were delivered intact to the plasmalemma. Constructs with like genes adjacent (Kv1.1-1.1-1.2-1.2 or Kv1.2-1.2-1.1-1.1) yielded delayed-rectifying, voltage-dependent K(+) currents with activation parameters and inactivation kinetics slightly different from the diagonally positioned genes (Kv1.1-1.2-1.1-1.2 or 1.2-1.1-1.2-1.1). Pore-blocking petidergic toxins, alpha dendrotoxin, agitoxin-1, tityustoxin-Kalpha, and kaliotoxin, were unable to distinguish between the adjacent and diagonal concatamers. Unprecedentedly, external application of the pore-blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) differentially inhibited the adjacent versus diagonal subunit arrangements, with diagonal constructs having enhanced susceptibility. Concatenation did not directly alter the sensitivities of homomeric Kv1.1 or 1.2 channels to TEA or the toxins. TEA inhibition of currents generated by channels made up from dimers (Kv1.1-1.2 and/or Kv1.2-1.1) was similar to the adjacently arranged constructs. These collective findings indicate that assembly of alpha subunits can be directed by this optimized concatenation, and that subunit

  20. Mapping the functional topology of the animal fatty acid synthase by mutant complementation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rangan, V S; Joshi, A K; Smith, S

    2001-09-11

    An in vitro mutant complementation approach has been used to map the functional topology of the animal fatty acid synthase. A series of knockout mutants was engineered, each mutant compromised in one of the seven functional domains, and heterodimers generated by hybridizing all possible combinations of the mutated subunits were isolated and characterized. Heterodimers comprised of a subunit containing either a beta-ketoacyl synthase or malonyl/acetyltransferase mutant, paired with a subunit containing mutations in any one of the other five domains, are active in fatty acid synthesis. Heterodimers in which both subunits carry a knockout mutation in either the dehydrase, enoyl reductase, keto reductase, or acyl carrier protein are inactive. Heterodimers comprised of a subunit containing a thioesterase mutation paired with a subunit containing a mutation in either the dehydrase, enoyl reductase, beta-ketoacyl reductase, or acyl carrier protein domains exhibit very low fatty acid synthetic ability. The results are consistent with a model for the fatty acid synthase in which the substrate loading and condensation reactions are catalyzed by cooperation of an acyl carrier protein domain of one subunit with the malonyl/acetyltransferase or beta-ketoacyl synthase domains, respectively, of either subunit. The beta-carbon-processing reactions, responsible for the complete reduction of the beta-ketoacyl moiety following each condensation step, are catalyzed by cooperation of an acyl carrier protein domain with the beta-ketoacyl reductase, dehydrase, and enoyl reductase domains associated exclusively with the same subunit. The chain-terminating reaction is carried out most efficiently by cooperation of an acyl carrier protein domain with the thioesterase domain of the same subunit. These results are discussed in the context of a revised model for the fatty acid synthase.

  1. Chromosomal locations of the human and mouse genes for precursors of epidermal growth factor and the. beta. subunit of nerve growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Zabel, B.U.; Eddy, R.L.; Lalley, P.A.; Scott, J.; Bell, G.I.; Shows, T.B.

    1985-01-01

    DNA probes for pre-pro-epidermal growth factor (EGF) and the precursor of the ..beta.. subunit of nerve growth factor (NGF) were used to chromosomally map human and mouse EGF and NGF genes in panels of human-mouse and mouse-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids. The EGF and NGF genes were mapped to human chromosomes 4 and 1, respectively, by using human-mouse cell hybrids. A combination of regional mapping using a chromosome 1 translocation and comparative gene mapping suggests that the human NGF gene is in the p21-p22.1 region of chromosome 1. In mouse-Chinese hamster cell hybrids, both genes were assigned to mouse chromosome 3. A knowledge of the chromosomal assignment of these genes should help in our understanding of their regulation and role in development and disease.

  2. Cloning of the gene for the 73 kD subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha primase of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Cotterill, S; Lehman, I R; McLachlan, P

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated both cDNA and genomic clones for the 73 kDa subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha primase of Drosophila melanogaster. Analysis of these clones has identified an open reading frame of 1959 bases coding for a protein of 72.5 kDa. Northern analysis has shown the mRNA for the gene to be approximately 2.5 kb, and comparison of the cDNA and the genomic clones shows that the coding region of the gene lacks introns. The 5' end of the transcript has been mapped by primer extension, and the position of the gene in the genome mapped using in situ analysis. Computer analysis has been carried out on both coding and non coding regions of the gene. The protein sequence shows some homology to the analogous subunit in the S. cerevisiae DNA polymerase alpha, however a search of the data banks failed to reveal other homologies, or provide any clues as to the function of the protein. Analysis of the non-coding regions indicates some potential control regions for the gene. The 73 kDa protein has been overproduced, but a preliminary analysis failed to reveal any enzymatic activities. Images PMID:1508723

  3. The mitochondrial F1ATPase alpha-subunit is necessary for efficient import of mitochondrial precursors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Douglas, M G

    1992-07-25

    The mitochondrial import and assembly of the F1ATPase subunits requires, respectively, the participation of the molecular chaperones hsp70SSA1 and hsp70SSC1 and other components operating on opposite sides of the mitochondrial membrane. In previous studies, both the homology and the assembly properties of the F1ATPase alpha-subunit (ATP1p) compared to the groEL homologue, hsp60, have led to the proposal that this subunit could exhibit chaperone-like activity. In this report the extent to which this subunit participates in protein transport has been determined by comparing import into mitochondria that lack the F1ATPase alpha-subunit (delta ATP1) versus mitochondria that lack the other major catalytic subunit, the F1ATPase beta-subunit (delta ATP2). Yeast mutants lacking the alpha-subunit but not the beta-subunit grow much more slowly than expected on fermentable carbon sources and exhibit delayed kinetics of protein import for several mitochondrial precursors such as the F1 beta subunit, hsp60MIF4 and subunits 4 and 5 of the cytochrome oxidase. In vitro and in vivo the F1 beta-subunit precursor accumulates as a translocation intermediate in absence of the F1 alpha-subunit. In the absence of both the ATPase subunits yeast grows at the same rate as a strain lacking only the beta-subunit, and import of mitochondrial precursors is restored to that of wild type. These data indicate that the F1 alpha-subunit likely functions as an "assembly partner" to influence protein import rather than functioning directly as a chaperone. These data are discussed in light of the relationship between the import and assembly of proteins in mitochondria.

  4. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-04-23

    We have found that the methionine repression of the ..beta..-subunit gene expression is not due to degradation of the ..beta..-subunit but is due to an effect on synthesis of the ..beta..-subunit. The effect of methionine on the synthesis of the ..beta..-is due to an inhibition of ..beta..-subunit mRNA synthesis. 3 references, 1 figure.

  5. The alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase are homologous: cDNA cloning and primary structure of the beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Kilimann, M W; Zander, N F; Kuhn, C C; Crabb, J W; Meyer, H E; Heilmeyer, L M

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned cDNA molecules encoding the beta subunit of phosphorylase kinase (ATP:phosphorylase-b phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.38) from rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle and have determined the complete primary structure of the polypeptide by a combination of peptide and DNA sequencing. In the mature beta subunit, the initial methionine is replaced by an acetyl group. The subunit is composed of 1092 amino acids and has a calculated molecular mass of 125,205 Da. Alignment of its sequence with the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase reveals extensive regions of homology, but each molecule also possesses unique sequences. Two of the three phosphorylation sites known for the beta subunit and all seven phosphorylation sites known for the alpha subunit are located in these unique domains. Images PMID:3200826

  6. Reverse Genetics of Drosophila RNA Polymerase II: Identification and Characterization of Rpii140, the Genomic Locus for the Second-Largest Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B. J.; Mortin, M. A.; Greenleaf, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    We have used a reverse genetics approach to isolate genes encoding two subunits of Drosophila melanogaster RNA polymerase II. RpII18 encodes the 18-kDa subunit and maps cytogenetically to polytene band region 83A. RpII140 encodes the 140-kDa subunit and maps to polytene band region 88A10:B1,2. Focusing on RpII140, we used in situ hybridization to map this gene to a small subinterval defined by the endpoints of a series of deficiencies impinging on the 88A/B region and showed that it does not represent a previously known genetic locus. Two recently defined complementation groups, A5 and Z6, reside in the same subinterval and thus were candidates for the RpII140 locus. Phenotypes of A5 mutants suggested that they affect RNA polymerase II, in that the lethal phase and the interaction with developmental loci such as Ubx resemble those of mutants in the gene for the largest subunit, RpII215. Indeed, we have achieved complete genetic rescue of representative recessive lethal mutations of A5 with a P-element construct containing a 9.1-kb genomic DNA fragment carrying RpII140. Interestingly, the initial construct also rescued lethal alleles in the neighboring complementation group, Z6, revealing that the 9.1-kb insert carries two genes. Deleting coding region sequences of RpII140, however, yielded a transformation vector that failed to rescue A5 alleles but continued to rescue Z6 alleles. These results strongly support the conclusion that the A5 complementation group is equivalent to the genomic RpII140 locus. PMID:8325487

  7. Single subunit type of ferritin from visceral mass of Saccostrea cucullata: cloning, expression and cisplatin-subunit analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Lin, Qing; Ke, Cai-Huan; Huang, He-Qing

    2011-09-01

    Ferritin, the iron storage protein, plays a key role in iron metabolism. Here, we have cloned an inducible ferritin cDNA with 516 bp within the open reading frame fragment from the visceral mass of Saccostrea cucullata. The subunit sequence of the ferritin was predicted to be a polypeptide of 171 amino acids with a molecular weight (MW) of 19.9182 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.24. The cDNA sequence of S. cucullata ferritin was constructed into a pET-32a expression system for expressing its relative protein efficiently in the Escherichia coli BL21 strain under isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) induction. The recombinant ferritin, which was further purified on a Ni-NTA resin column and digested with enterokinase, was detected as a single subunit of approximately MW 20 kDa using both SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry. S. cucullata ferritin (ScFer) showed 98% identity with Crassostrea gigas ferritin at the amino acid level. The secondary structure and phosphorylation sites of deduced amino acids were predicted with ExPASy proteomics tools and the NetPhos 2.0 server, respectively, and the subunit space structure of recombinant S. cucullata ferritin (rScFer) was built using the molecular operating environmental software system. The results of both in-gel digestion and identification using MALDI-TOF MS/MS showed that the recombinant protein was ScFer. ICP-MS indicated that rScFer subunit can directly bind to cisplatin[cis-Diaminedichloroplatinum(CDDP)], giving approximately 22.9 CDDP/ferritin subunit for forming a novel complex of CDDP-subunit, which suggests that it constructs a nanometer CDDP core-ferritin for developing a new drug of anti-cancer. The results of both the real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the expression of ScFer mRNA was up-regulated in the oyster under the stress of Cd(2+). In addition, the expression increment of ScFer mRNA under bacterial challenge indicated that ferritin participated in the immune response of S. cucullata. The

  8. Methodology to probe subunit interactions in ribonucleotide reductases†

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A Quamrul; Wang, Yongting; Plate, Lars; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2009-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides, providing the monomeric precursors required for DNA replication and repair. E. coli RNR is a 1:1 complex of two homodimeric subunits: α2 and β2. The interactions between α2 and β2 are thought to be largely associated with the C-terminal 20 amino acids (residues 356-375) of β2. To study subunit interactions, a single reactive cysteine has been introduced into each of fifteen positions along the C-terminal tail of β2. Each cysteine has been modified with the photo cross-linker benzophenone (BP) and the environmentally sensitive fluorophore, dimethylaminonaphthalene (DAN). Each construct has been purified to homogeneity and characterized by SDS PAGE and ESI-MS. Each BP-β2 has been incubated with 1 equivalent of α2, photolyzed, and the results analyzed quantitatively by SDS-PAGE. Each DAN-β2 was incubated with 50-fold excess of α2 and the emission maximum and intensity measured. A comparison of the results from the two sets of probes reveals that sites with most extensive cross-linking are also associated with the greatest changes in fluorescence. Titration of four different DAN-β2 variants (351, 356, 365 and 367) with α2 gave a Kd of ∼0.4 μM for subunit interaction. Disruption of the interaction of α2DAN-β2 complex is accompanied by a decrease in fluorescence intensity and can serve as a high throughput screen for inhibitors of subunit interactions. PMID:19012414

  9. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Caers, A; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1998-01-01

    The rRNA WWW Server at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ now provides a database of 496 large subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. All these sequences are aligned, incorporate secondary structure information, and can be obtained in a number of formats. Other information about the sequences, such as literature references, accession numbers and taxonomic information is also available and searchable. If necessary, the data on the server can also be obtained by anonymous ftp. PMID:9399830

  10. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Our database on large ribosomal subunit RNA contained 334 sequences in July, 1995. All sequences in the database are aligned, taking into account secondary structure. The aligned sequences are provided, together with incorporated secondary structure information, in several computer-readable formats. These data can easily be obtained through the World Wide Web. The files in the database are also available via anonymous ftp. PMID:8594610

  11. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Caers, A; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1998-01-01

    About 8600 complete or nearly complete sequences are now available from the Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA. All these sequences are aligned with one another on the basis of the adopted secondary structure model, which is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. The database can be consulted via the World Wide Web at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ PMID:9399829

  12. Yeast telomerase RNA: a flexible scaffold for protein subunits.

    PubMed

    Zappulla, David C; Cech, Thomas R

    2004-07-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, distinct regions of the 1.2-kb telomerase RNA (TLC1) bind to the catalytic subunit Est2p and to accessory proteins. In particular, a bulged stem structure binds the essential regulatory subunit Est1p. We now show that the Est1p-binding domain of the RNA can be moved to three distant locations with retention of telomerase function in vivo. We present the Est1p relocation experiment in the context of a working model for the secondary structure of the entire TLC1 RNA, based on thermodynamic considerations and comparative analysis of sequences from four species. The model for TLC1 has three long quasihelical arms that bind the Ku, Est1p, and Sm proteins. These arms emanate from a central catalytic core that contains the template and Est2p-binding region. Deletion mutagenesis provides evidence that the Sm arm exists in vivo and can be shortened by 42 predicted base pairs with retention of function; therefore, precise positioning of Sm proteins, like Est1p, is not required within telomerase. In the best-studied ribonucleoprotein enzyme, the ribosome, the RNAs have specific three-dimensional structures that orient the functional elements. In the case of yeast telomerase, we propose that the RNA serves a very different function, providing a flexible tether for the protein subunits. PMID:15226497

  13. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  14. Purification and subunit heterogeneity of pili of Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S W; Way, A W; Osen, E G

    1986-01-01

    Pili were isolated and purified from Bordetella bronchiseptica. Electron microscopic observations revealed that pili are ubiquitous in this species. The occurrence of pili and flagella appeared to correlate with growth phase and colonial morphology. Pili were about 3 to 4 nm in diameter and morphologically similar to pili isolated from other gram-negative bacteria. Internal core structure was not evident. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified pili showed that up to three different pilus subunit variants could be observed on a single strain, depending on the colonial phase and culture condition. Enzyme immunoassay and immunoblot, however, showed that these subunit variants are serologically related. Mice vaccinated with purified pili were protected against a virulent intraperitoneal challenge of B. bronchiseptica. B. bronchiseptica pili were also found to be similar to Bordetella pertussis pili in morphology and in the molecular size and antigenic structure of pilus subunits. The intact pili of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis, however, appeared to have weak serological cross-reactivity. Images PMID:2867974

  15. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  16. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S; Okafor, C Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-15

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  17. Bud23 methylates G1575 of 18S rRNA and is required for efficient nuclear export of pre-40S subunits.

    PubMed

    White, Joshua; Li, Zhihua; Sardana, Richa; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Marcotte, Edward M; Johnson, Arlen W

    2008-05-01

    BUD23 was identified from a bioinformatics analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. Deletion of BUD23 leads to severely impaired growth, reduced levels of the small (40S) ribosomal subunit, and a block in processing 20S rRNA to 18S rRNA, a late step in 40S maturation. Bud23 belongs to the S-adenosylmethionine-dependent Rossmann-fold methyltransferase superfamily and is related to small-molecule methyltransferases. Nevertheless, we considered that Bud23 methylates rRNA. Methylation of G1575 is the only mapped modification for which the methylase has not been assigned. Here, we show that this modification is lost in bud23 mutants. The nuclear accumulation of the small-subunit reporters Rps2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Rps3-GFP, as well as the rRNA processing intermediate, the 5' internal transcribed spacer 1, indicate that bud23 mutants are defective for small-subunit export. Mutations in Bud23 that inactivated its methyltransferase activity complemented a bud23Delta mutant. In addition, mutant ribosomes in which G1575 was changed to adenosine supported growth comparable to that of cells with wild-type ribosomes. Thus, Bud23 protein, but not its methyltransferase activity, is important for biogenesis and export of the 40S subunit in yeast.

  18. Structural and functional studies of the phage Sf6 terminase small subunit reveal a DNA-spooling device facilitated by structural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyan; Kamau, Yvonne N.; Christensen, Theodore E.; Tang, Liang

    2013-01-01

    In many DNA viruses, genome packaging is initiated by the small subunit of the packaging terminase, which specifically binds to the packaging signal on viral DNA and directs assembly of the terminase holoenzyme. We have experimentally mapped the DNA-interacting region on Shigella virus Sf6 terminase small subunit gp1, which occupies extended surface areas encircling the gp1 octamer, indicating that DNA wraps around gp1 through extensive contacts. High resolution structures reveal large-scale motions of the gp1 DNA-binding domain mediated by the curved helix formed by residues 54-81 and an intermolecular salt bridge formed by residues Arg67 and Glu73, indicating remarkable structural plasticity underlying multivalent, pleomorphic gp1:DNA interactions. These results provide spatial restraints for protein:DNA interactions, which enable construction of a three-dimensional pseudo-atomic model for a DNA-packaging initiation complex assembled from the terminase small subunit and the packaging region on viral DNA. Our results suggest that gp1 functions as a DNA-spooling device, which may transform DNA into a specific architecture appropriate for interaction with and cleavage by the terminase large subunit prior to DNA translocation into viral procapsid. This may represent a common mechanism for the initiation step of DNA packaging in tailed dsDNA bacterial viruses. PMID:22858866

  19. Gβ4γ1 as a modulator of M3 muscarinic receptor signalling and novel roles of Gβ1 subunits in the modulation of cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahriar M; Min, Adam; Gora, Sarah; Houranieh, Geeda M; Campden, Rhiannon; Robitaille, Mélanie; Trieu, Phan; Pétrin, Darlaine; Jacobi, Ashley M; Behlke, Mark A; Angers, Stéphane; Hébert, Terence E

    2015-08-01

    Much is known about the how Gβγ subunits regulate effectors in response to G protein-coupled receptor stimulation. However, there is still a lot we don't know about how specific combinations of Gβ and Gγ are wired into different signalling pathways. Here, using an siRNA screen for different Gβ and Gγ subunits, we examined an endogenous M3 muscarinic receptor signalling pathway in HEK 293 cells. We observed that Gβ(4) subunits were critical for calcium signalling and a downstream surrogate measured as ERK1/2 MAP kinase activity. A number of Gγ subunits could partner with Gβ(4) but the best coupling was seen via Gβ(4)γ(1). Intriguingly, knocking down Gβ(1) actually increased signalling through the M3-mAChR most likely via an increase in Gβ(4) levels. We noted that Gβ(1) occupies the promoter of Gβ(4) and may participate in maturation of its mRNA. This highlights a new role for Gβγ signalling beyond their canonical roles in cellular signalling. PMID:25916507

  20. African swine fever virus encodes two genes which share significant homology with the two largest subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez, R J; Boursnell, M; Nogal, M L; Yuste, L; Viñuela, E

    1993-01-01

    A random sequencing strategy applied to two large SalI restriction fragments (SB and SD) of the African swine fever virus (ASFV) genome revealed that they might encode proteins similar to the two largest RNA polymerase subunits of eukaryotes, poxviruses and Escherichia coli. After further mapping by dot-blot hybridization, two large open reading frames (ORFs) were completely sequenced. The first ORF (NP1450L) encodes a protein of 1450 amino acids with extensive similarity to the largest subunit of RNA polymerases. The second one (EP1242L) codes for a protein of 1242 amino acids similar to the second largest RNA polymerase subunit. Proteins NP1450L and EP1242L are more similar to the corresponding subunits of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II than to those of vaccinia virus, the prototype poxvirus, which shares many functional characteristics with ASFV. ORFs NP1450L and EP1242L are mainly expressed late in ASFV infection, after the onset of DNA replication. Images PMID:8506138

  1. Physicochemical properties of β and α'α subunits isolated from soybean β-conglycinin.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiaoqun; Wang, Donghai; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2011-02-23

    Soy protein has shown great potential for use in biobased adhesives. β-Conglycinin is a major component of soy protein; it accounts for 30% of the total storage protein in soybean seeds. β-Conglycinin was isolated and purified, and its subunits' (β, α'α) physicochemical and adhesive properties were characterized. Crude β-conglycinin was isolated from soy flour and then purified by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method. The α'α and β subunits were isolated from the purified β-conglycinin by anion exchange chromatography. Yields of α'α subunits and β subunits from 140 g of soy flour were 1.86 g (1.3%) and 0.95 g (0.67%), respectively. The minimum solubility for α'α subunits, β subunits, and β-conglycinin occurred in pH ranges of 4.1-5.4, 3.5-7.0, and 4.8-5.3, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the β subunits existed as spherical hydrophobic clusters, whereas α'α subunits existed as uniformly discrete particles at pH 5.0. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that β subunits had higher thermal stability than α'α subunits. The pH had a lesser effect on adhesion strength of the β subunits than on that of the α'α subunits. The adhesives made from β subunits also showed greater water resistance than those from α'α subunits and β-conglycinin. Soy protein rich in β subunits is likely a good candidate for developing water-resistant adhesives.

  2. Two-subunit DNA escort mechanism and inactive subunit bypass in an ultra-fast ring ATPase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Ninning; Chistol, Gheorghe; Bustamante, Carlos

    2015-10-09

    SpoIIIE is a homo-hexameric dsDNA translocase responsible for completing chromosome segregation in Bacillus subtilis . Here, we use a single-molecule approach to monitor SpoIIIE translocation when challenged with neutral-backbone DNA and non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs. We show that SpoIIIE makes multiple essential contacts with phosphates on the 5'→3' strand in the direction of translocation. Using DNA constructs with two neutral-backbone segments separated by a single charged base pair, we deduce that SpoIIIE’s step size is 2 bp. Finally, experiments with non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs suggest that SpoIIIE can operate with non-consecutive inactive subunits. We propose a two-subunit escort translocation mechanism thatmore » is strict enough to enable SpoIIIE to track one DNA strand, yet sufficiently compliant to permit the motor to bypass inactive subunits without arrest. We speculate that such a flexible mechanism arose for motors that, like SpoIIIE, constitute functional bottlenecks where the inactivation of even a single motor can be lethal for the cell.« less

  3. Developmental and Regulatory Functions of Na(+) Channel Non-pore-forming β Subunits.

    PubMed

    Winters, J J; Isom, L L

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) isolated from mammalian neurons are heterotrimeric complexes containing one pore-forming α subunit and two non-pore-forming β subunits. In excitable cells, VGSCs are responsible for the initiation of action potentials. VGSC β subunits are type I topology glycoproteins, containing an extracellular amino-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) domain with homology to many neural cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), a single transmembrane segment, and an intracellular carboxyl-terminal domain. VGSC β subunits are encoded by a gene family that is distinct from the α subunits. While α subunits are expressed in prokaryotes, β subunit orthologs did not arise until after the emergence of vertebrates. β subunits regulate the cell surface expression, subcellular localization, and gating properties of their associated α subunits. In addition, like many other Ig-CAMs, β subunits are involved in cell migration, neurite outgrowth, and axon pathfinding and may function in these roles in the absence of associated α subunits. In sum, these multifunctional proteins are critical for both channel regulation and central nervous system development. PMID:27586289

  4. Structure of subcomplex Iβ of mammalian respiratory complex I leads to new supernumerary subunit assignments

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiapeng; King, Martin S.; Yu, Minmin; Klipcan, Liron; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Hirst, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is an essential respiratory enzyme. Mammalian complex I contains 45 subunits: 14 conserved “core” subunits and 31 “supernumerary” subunits. The structure of Bos taurus complex I, determined to 5-Å resolution by electron cryomicroscopy, described the structure of the mammalian core enzyme and allowed the assignment of 14 supernumerary subunits. Here, we describe the 6.8-Å resolution X-ray crystallography structure of subcomplex Iβ, a large portion of the membrane domain of B. taurus complex I that contains two core subunits and a cohort of supernumerary subunits. By comparing the structures and composition of subcomplex Iβ and complex I, supported by comparisons with Yarrowia lipolytica complex I, we propose assignments for eight further supernumerary subunits in the structure. Our new assignments include two CHCH-domain containing subunits that contain disulfide bridges between CX9C motifs; they are processed by the Mia40 oxidative-folding pathway in the intermembrane space and probably stabilize the membrane domain. We also assign subunit B22, an LYR protein, to the matrix face of the membrane domain. We reveal that subunit B22 anchors an acyl carrier protein (ACP) to the complex, replicating the LYR protein–ACP structural module that was identified previously in the hydrophilic domain. Thus, we significantly extend knowledge of how the mammalian supernumerary subunits are arranged around the core enzyme, and provide insights into their roles in biogenesis and regulation. PMID:26371297

  5. Effects of regulatory subunits on the kinetics of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Price, N E; Mumby, M C

    2000-09-19

    Both the scaffold (A) and the regulatory (R) subunits of protein phosphatase 2A regulate enzyme activity and specificity. Heterotrimeric enzymes containing different R-subunits differ in their specific activities for substrates. Kinetic parameters for the dephosphorylation of a phosphopeptide by different oligomeric forms of PP2A were determined to begin to elucidate the molecular basis of regulatory subunit effects on phosphatase activity. Using steady state kinetics and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters, we have explored the effect of the A- and R-subunits on the kinetic and chemical mechanism of PP2A. The regulatory subunits affected a broad range of kinetic parameters. The C-subunit and AC dimer were qualitatively similar with respect to the product inhibition patterns and the pH dependence of kinetic parameters. However, a 22-fold decrease in rate and a 4.7-fold decrease in K(m) can be attributed to the presence of the A-subunit. The presence of the R2alpha (Balpha or PR55alpha) subunit caused an additional decrease in K(m) and changed the kinetic mechanism of peptide dephosphorylation. The R2alpha-subunit also caused significant changes in the pH dependence of kinetic parameters as compared to the free C subunit or AC heterodimer. The data support an important role for the regulatory subunits in determining both the affinity of PP2A heterotrimers for peptide substrates and the mechanism by which they are dephosphorylated.

  6. Reconstitution of thermostable ATPase capable of energy coupling from its purified subunits.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Okamoto, H; Sone, N; Hirata, H; Kagawa, Y

    1977-03-01

    Purified dicyclohexylcarbodiimide-sensitive ATPase (TF0-F1) from thermophilic bacterium PS3 is composed of a water soluble part with ATP hydrolytic activity (TF1) and a water insoluble moiety (TF0). All of the five subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon) of TF1 were isolated. TF1 was reconstituted from the five subunits, which catalyzed an ATP-32Pi exchange and an ATP-driven enhancement of fluorescence of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate, when adsorbed on proteoliposome inlaid with TF0 (TF3-vesicles). Subunit epsilon and/or delta became firmly bound to TF0-vesicles and there was no preferential sequence in the binding. Both subunits were required for binding of the remaining subunits of TF1 to TF0-vesicles, but they did not modify the high H+ -permeability of TF0-vesicles. The addition of gamma but they did not modify the high H+-permeability of TFO-vesicles. The addition of gamma subunit together with epsilon and delta subunits caused a marked decrease of H+ -permeability of TF0-vesicles, similar to that induced by TF1. We conclude tentatively that the epsilon and delta subunits connect TF0 and the other subunits forming a part of a proton pathway, gamma is a gate of proton flow coupled to ATP hydrolysis (or synthesis), and alpha and beta subunits contain the active site for energy transformation. A possible model of subunit structure of TF1 is proposed. PMID:139610

  7. Individual IKs channels at the surface of mammalian cells contain two KCNE1 accessory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Xiong, Dazhi; Dai, Hui; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2014-01-01

    KCNE1 (E1) β-subunits assemble with KCNQ1 (Q1) voltage-gated K+ channel α-subunits to form IKslow (IKs) channels in the heart and ear. The number of E1 subunits in IKs channels has been an issue of ongoing debate. Here, we use single-molecule spectroscopy to demonstrate that surface IKs channels with human subunits contain two E1 and four Q1 subunits. This stoichiometry does not vary. Thus, IKs channels in cells with elevated levels of E1 carry no more than two E1 subunits. Cells with low levels of E1 produce IKs channels with two E1 subunits and Q1 channels with no E1 subunits—channels with one E1 do not appear to form or are restricted from surface expression. The plethora of models of cardiac function, transgenic animals, and drug screens based on variable E1 stoichiometry do not reflect physiology. PMID:24591645

  8. Individual subunits of bacterial luciferase are molten globules and interact with molecular chaperones.

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, G C; Beckers, C J; Baase, W A; Dahlquist, F W

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the assembly of a large heterodimeric protein, bacterial luciferase, by mixing purified subunits expressed separately in bacteria. The individual subunits alpha and beta contain much (66% and 50%, respectively) of the alpha-helix content of the native heterodimer as measured by circular dichroism, yet the alpha subunit lacks observable tertiary structure as measured by NMR. These results are consistent with the alpha subunit existing in a molten globule or collapsed form prior to assembly. The molecular chaperone GroEL binds reversibly to both subunits prior to assembly. Since these observations were obtained under physiological conditions, we propose that the molten globule exists as a stable form during folding or assembly in the cell. Either the molten globule form of the subunits is an authentic folding intermediate or it is in rapid equilibrium with one. GroEL may function by facilitating assembly through stabilization of these incompletely folded subunits. Images Fig. 4 PMID:7902573

  9. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  10. Modulation of BK Channel Function by Auxiliary Beta and Gamma Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q.; Yan, J.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues and displays diverse biophysical or pharmacological characteristics. This diversity is in part conferred by channel modulation with different regulatory auxiliary subunits. To date, two distinct classes of BK channel auxiliary subunits have been identified: β subunits and γ subunits. Modulation of BK channels by the four auxiliary β (β1–β4) subunits has been well established and intensively investigated over the past two decades. The auxiliary γ subunits, however, were identified only very recently, which adds a new dimension to BK channel regulation and improves our understanding of the physiological functions of BK channels in various tissues and cell types. This chapter will review the current understanding of BK channel modulation by auxiliary β and γ subunits, especially the latest findings. PMID:27238261

  11. A conserved domain of the large subunit of replication factor C binds PCNA and acts like a dominant negative inhibitor of DNA replication in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fotedar, R; Mossi, R; Fitzgerald, P; Rousselle, T; Maga, G; Brickner, H; Messier, H; Kasibhatla, S; Hübscher, U; Fotedar, A

    1996-08-15

    Replication factor C (RF-C), a complex of five polypeptides, is essential for cell-free SV40 origin-dependent DNA replication and viability in yeast. The cDNA encoding the large subunit of human RF-C (RF-Cp145) was cloned in a Southwestern screen. Using deletion mutants of RF-Cp145 we have mapped the DNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 to amino acid residues 369-480. This domain is conserved among both prokaryotic DNA ligases and eukaryotic poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and is absent in other subunits of RF-C. The PCNA binding domain maps to amino acid residues 481-728 and is conserved in all five subunits of RF-C. The PCNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 inhibits several functions of RF-C, such as: (i) in vitro DNA replication of SV40 origin-containing DNA; (ii) RF-C-dependent loading of PCNA onto DNA; and (iii) RF-C-dependent DNA elongation. The PCNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 localizes to the nucleus and inhibits DNA synthesis in transfected mammalian cells. In contrast, the DNA binding domain of RF-Cp145 does not inhibit DNA synthesis in vitro or in vivo. We therefore conclude that amino acid residues 481-728 of human RF-Cp145 are critical and act as a dominant negative mutant of RF-C function in DNA replication in vivo.

  12. Synthetic peptides used to locate the. cap alpha. -bungarotoxin binding site and immunogenic regions on. cap alpha. subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ralston, S.; Sarin, V.; Thanh, H.L.; Rivier, J.; Fox, J.L.; Lindstrom, J.

    1987-06-16

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to 57% of the sequence of ..cap alpha.. subunits of acetylcholine receptors from Torpedo californica electric organ and extending from the NH/sub 2/ to the COOCH terminus have been synthesized. The ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin binding site on denatured ..cap alpha.. subunits was mapped within the sequence ..cap alpha..185-199 by assaying binding of /sup 125/I-..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin to slot blots of synthetic peptides. Further studies showed that residues in the sequence ..cap alpha..190-194, especially cysteines-..cap alpha..192,193, were critical for binding ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin. Reduction and alkylation studies suggested that these cysteines must be disulfide linked for ..cap alpha..-bungarotoxin to bind. Binding sites for serum antibodies to native receptors or ..cap alpha.. subunits were mapped by indirect immunoprecipitation of /sup 125/I-peptides. Several antigenic sequences were identified, but a synthetic peptide corresponding to the main immunogenic region (which is highly conformation dependent) was not identified.

  13. Arrangement of subunits in the proteolipid ring of the V-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanru; Cipriano, Daniel J; Forgac, Michael

    2007-11-23

    The vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases) are multisubunit complexes containing two domains. The V(1) domain (subunits A-H) is peripheral and carries out ATP hydrolysis. The V(0) domain (subunits a, c, c', c'', d, and e) is membrane-integral and carries out proton transport. In yeast, there are three proteolipid subunits as follows: subunit c (Vma3p), subunit c' (Vma11p), and subunit c'' (Vma16p). The proteolipid subunits form a six-membered ring containing single copies of subunits c' and c'' and four copies of subunit c. To determine the possible arrangements of proteolipid subunits in V(0) that give rise to a functional V-ATPase complex, a series of gene fusions was constructed to constrain the arrangement of pairs of subunits in the ring. Fusions containing c'' employed a truncated version of this protein lacking the first putative transmembrane helix (which we have shown previously to be functional), to ensure that the N and C termini of all subunits were located on the luminal side of the membrane. Fusion constructs were expressed in strains disrupted in c', c'', or both but containing a wild copy of c to ensure the presence of the required number of copies of subunit c. The c-c''(DeltaTM1), c''(DeltaTM1)-c', and c'-c constructs all complemented the vma(-) phenotype and gave rise to complexes possessing greater than 25% of wild-type levels of activity. By contrast, neither the c-c', the c'-c''(DeltaTM1), nor the c''(DeltaTM1)-c constructs complemented the vma(-) phenotype. These results suggest that functionally assembled V-ATPase complexes contain the proteolipid subunits arranged in a unique order in the ring.

  14. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  15. High-affinity ouabain binding by yeast cells expressing Na+, K(+)-ATPase alpha subunits and the gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase beta subunit.

    PubMed

    Eakle, K A; Kim, K S; Kabalin, M A; Farley, R A

    1992-04-01

    Recently, a beta subunit for the rat gastric H+,K(+)-ATPase (HK beta), which is structurally similar to the beta subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase, has been cloned and characterized. Using heterologous expression in yeast, we have tested the specificity of beta subunit assembly with different isoforms of the alpha subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase. Coexpression in yeast cells of the HK beta with both the sheep alpha 1 subunit and the rat alpha 3 subunit isoforms of Na+, K(+)-ATPase (alpha 1 and alpha 3, respectively) leads to the appearance of high-affinity ouabain-binding sites in yeast membranes. These ouabain-binding sites (alpha 1 plus HK beta, alpha 3 plus HK beta) have a high affinity for ouabain (Kd, 5-10 nM) and are expressed at levels similar to those formed with the rat beta 1 subunit of Na+, K(+)-ATPase (beta 1) (alpha 1 plus beta 1 or alpha 3 plus beta 1). Potassium acts as a specific antagonist of ouabain binding by alpha 1 plus HK beta and alpha 3 plus HK beta just like sodium pumps formed with beta 1. Sodium pumps formed with the HK beta, however, show quantitative differences in their affinity for ouabain and in the antagonism of K+ for ouabain binding. These data suggest that the structure of the beta subunit may play a role in sodium pump function. PMID:1313569

  16. Concept Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Laura K.; Brownson, Ross C.; Kelly, Cheryl; Ivey, Melissa K.; Leviton, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background From 2003 to 2008, 25 cross-sector, multidisciplinary community partnerships funded through the Active Living by Design (ALbD) national program designed, planned, and implemented policy and environmental changes, with complementary programs and promotions. This paper describes the use of concept-mapping methods to gain insights into promising active living intervention strategies based on the collective experience of community representatives implementing ALbD initiatives. Methods Using Concept Systems software, community representatives (n=43) anonymously generated actions and changes in their communities to support active living (183 original statements, 79 condensed statements). Next, respondents (n=26, from 23 partnerships) sorted the 79 statements into self-created categories, or active living intervention approaches. Respondents then rated statements based on their perceptions of the most important strategies for creating community changes (n=25, from 22 partnerships) and increasing community rates of physical activity (n=23, from 20 partnerships). Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling were used to describe data patterns. Results ALbD community partnerships identified three active living intervention approaches with the greatest perceived importance to create community change and increase population levels of physical activity: changes to the built and natural environment, partnership and collaboration efforts, and land-use and transportation policies. The relative importance of intervention approaches varied according to subgroups of partnerships working with different populations. Conclusions Decision makers, practitioners, and community residents can incorporate what has been learned from the 25 community partnerships to prioritize active living policy, physical project, promotional, and programmatic strategies for work in different populations and settings. PMID:23079266

  17. Colocalization of HCN Channel Subunits in Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stradleigh, Tyler W.; Ogata, Genki; Partida, Gloria J.; Oi, Hanako; Greenberg, Kenneth P.; Krempely, Kalen S.; Ishida, Andrew T.

    2011-01-01

    The current-passing pore of mammalian hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ("HCN") channels is formed by subunit isoforms denoted HCN1-4. In various brain areas, antibodies directed against multiple isoforms bind to single neurons and the current ("Ih") passed during hyperpolarizations differs from that of heterologously expressed homomeric channels. By contrast, retinal rod, cone, and bipolar cells appear to use homomeric HCN channels. Here, we assess the generality of this pattern by examining HCN1 and HCN4 immunoreactivity in rat retinal ganglion cells, measuring Ih in dissociated cells, and testing whether HCN1 and HCN4 protein coimmunoprecipitate. Nearly half of the ganglion cells in whole-mounted retinae bound antibodies against both isoforms. Consistent with colocalization and physical association, 8-bromo-cAMP shifted the voltage-sensitivity of Ih less than that of HCN4 channels and more than that of HCN1 channels, and HCN1 coimmunoprecipitated with HCN4 from membrane fraction proteins. Lastly, the immunopositive somata ranged in diameter from the smallest to the largest in rat retina, the dendrites of immunopositive cells arborized at various levels of the inner plexiform layer and over fields of different diameters, and Ih activated with similar kinetics and proportions of fast and slow components in small, medium, and large somata. These results show that different HCN subunits colocalize in single retinal ganglion cells, identify a subunit that can reconcile native Ih properties with the previously reported presence of HCN4 in these cells, and indicate that Ih is biophysically similar in morphologically diverse retinal ganglion cells and differs from Ih in rods, cones, and bipolar cells. PMID:21456027

  18. Human mediator subunit MED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Nakatsubo, Takuya; Nishitani, Saori; Kikuchi, Yuko; Iida, Satoshi; Yamada, Kana; Tanaka, Aki; Ohkuma, Yoshiaki

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the Mediator complex is an essential transcriptional cofactor of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, it contains up to 30 subunits and consists of four modules: head, middle, tail, and CDK/Cyclin. One of the subunits, MED15, is located in the tail module, and was initially identified as Gal11 in budding yeast, where it plays an essential role in the transcriptional regulation of galactose metabolism with the potent transcriptional activator Gal4. For this reason, we investigated the function of the human MED15 subunit (hMED15) in transcriptional activation. First, we measured the effect of hMED15 knockdown on cell growth in HeLa cells. The growth rate was greatly reduced. By immunostaining, we observed the colocalization of hMED15 with the general transcription factors TFIIE and TFIIH in the nucleus. We measured the effects of siRNA-mediated knockdown of hMED15 on transcriptional activation using two different transcriptional activators, VP16 and SREBP1a. Treatment with siRNAs reduced transcriptional activation, and this reduction could be rescued by overexpression of HA/Flag-tagged, wild-type hMED15. To investigate hMED15 localization, we treated human MCF-7 cells with the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3, thus inducing p21 transcription. We found that hMED15 localized to both the p53 binding site and the p21 promoter region, along with TFIIE and TFIIH. These results indicate that hMED15 promotes transcriptional activation.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Cytoplasmic N-Terminal Domain of Subunit I, a Homolog of Subunit a, of V-ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Vyas, Nand K.; Baker, Matthew L.; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2012-02-27

    Subunit 'a' is associated with the membrane-bound (VO) complex of eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPase acidification machinery. It has also been shown recently to be involved in diverse membrane fusion/secretory functions independent of acidification. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal cytosolic domain from the Meiothermus ruber subunit 'I' homolog of subunit a. The structure is composed of a curved long central {alpha}-helix bundle capped on both ends by two lobes with similar {alpha}/{beta} architecture. Based on the structure, a reasonable model of its eukaryotic subunit a counterpart was obtained. The crystal structure and model fit well into reconstructions from electron microscopy of prokaryotic and eukaryotic vacuolar H{sup +}-ATPases, respectively, clarifying their orientations and interactions and revealing features that could enable subunit a to play a role in membrane fusion/secretion.

  20. Maps & minds : mapping through the ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1984-01-01

    Throughout time, maps have expressed our understanding of our world. Human affairs have been influenced strongly by the quality of maps available to us at the major turning points in our history. "Maps & Minds" traces the ebb and flow of a few central ideas in the mainstream of mapping. Our expanding knowledge of our cosmic neighborhood stems largely from a small number of simple but grand ideas, vigorously pursued.

  1. Transcriptional mapping of the DNA polymerase gene of vaccinia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Traktman, P.; Sridhar, P.; Condit, R.C.; Roberts, B.E.

    1984-01-01

    Vaccinia virus DNA polymerase, a single-subunit enzyme of 110,000 molecular weight, is induced early after infection. Genetic analysis suggests that the gene encoding the enzyme maps within a 15-kilobase HindIII fragment located 45 kilobases from the left-hand end of the genome. The authors identified the in vitro translation product with these propeties and mapped the transcript by hybrid selection, RNA filter hybridization, and S1 nuclease mapping. Two mRNAs from this region, 3.4 and 3.9 kilobases in size, could be translated in vitro to yield a 110K polypeptide. The two RNAs shared a common 5' terminus and had staggered 3' ends. Sequences mapping entirely within the gene were shown to be biologically active in rescuing mutants with temperature-sensitive or drug-resistant polymerase activity to the wild-type phenotype.

  2. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Van den Broeck, I; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contains (June 1994) 2824 nucleotide sequences. All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which in turn is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. The complete database is made available to the scientific community through anonymous ftp on our server in Antwerp. A special effort was made to improve electronic retrieval and a program is supplied that allows to create different file formats. The database can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library. PMID:7524022

  3. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1997-01-01

    The latest release of the large ribosomal subunit RNA database contains 429 sequences. All these sequences are aligned, and incorporate secondary structure information. The rRNA WWW Server at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ provides researchers with an easily accessible resource to obtain the data in this database in a number of computer-readable formats. A new query interface has been added to the server. If necessary, the data can also be obtained by anonymous ftp from the same site. PMID:9016517

  4. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Jansen, J; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1997-01-01

    The Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA now offers more than 6000 nucleotide sequences (August 1996). All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Besides the primary and secondary structure information, literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. For ease of use, the complete database is made available to the scientific community via World Wide Web at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ . PMID:9016516

  5. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Nicolaï, S; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    The Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA offers over 4300 nucleotide sequences (August 1995). All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which in turn is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Besides the primary and secondary structure information, literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. The complete database is made available to the scientific community through anonymous ftp and World Wide Web(WWW). PMID:8594609

  6. Mapping: A Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmore, Paul M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of cartography. Describes the contributions of Strabo and Ptolemy in early maps. Identifies the work of Gerhard Mercator as the most important advancement in mapping. Discusses present mapping standards from history. (CW)

  7. Mapping with the Masses: Google Map Maker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfund, J.

    2008-12-01

    After some 15,000 years of map making, which saw the innovations of cardinal directions, map projections for a spherical earth, and GIS analysis, many parts of the world still appear as the "Dark Continent" on modern maps. Google Map Maker intends to shine a light on these areas by tapping into the power of the GeoWeb. Google Map Maker is a website which allows you to collaborate with others on one unified map to add, edit, locate, describe, and moderate map features, such as roads, cities, businesses, parks, schools and more, for certain regions of the world using Google Maps imagery. In this session, we will show some examples of how people are mapping with this powerful tool as well as what they are doing with the data. With Google Map Maker, you can become a citizen cartographer and join the global network of users helping to improve the quality of maps and local information in your region of interest. You are invited to map the world with us!

  8. Stimulation of phospholipase A2 activity in bovine rod outer segments by the beta gamma subunits of transducin and its inhibition by the alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Jelsema, C L; Axelrod, J

    1987-01-01

    In the rod outer segments (ROS) of bovine retina, light activation of phospholipase A2 has been shown to occur by a transducin-dependent mechanism. In this report, the transducin-mediated stimulation of phospholipase A2 is shown to require dissociation of the alpha beta gamma heterotrimer. Addition of transducin to dark-adapted transducin-poor ROS stimulated phospholipase A2 activity only with coincident exposure to white light or, in the dark, with addition of the hydrolysis-resistant GTP analog, guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gamma-S]). Both light and GTP[gamma-S] induced dissociation of the transducin subunits and led to severalfold increases in the phospholipase A2 activity of transducin-rich, but not transducin-poor, ROS. In contrast, pertussis toxin treatment of transducin, which stabilizes the associated state of this G protein, prevented the stimulation of phospholipase A2 by exogenous transducin in the presence of light. Addition of purified transducin subunits to dark-adapted transducin-poor ROS revealed that phospholipase A2 stimulation occurred by action of the beta gamma subunits. This is in contrast to the transducin-mediated increase in cGMP phosphodiesterase activity, where activation occurs by action of the alpha subunit. The alpha subunit, which itself slightly stimulated phospholipase A2 activity, inhibited the beta gamma-induced stimulation of phospholipase A2. This inhibition appears to be the result of subunit reassociation since addition of GTP[gamma-S] abolished the inhibitory effect of the alpha subunit on the beta gamma-induced increase in phospholipase A2, while pertussis toxin treatment of the subunits further inhibited phospholipase A2 activity. Modulation of phospholipase A2 activity by the transducin subunit is, therefore, a mode of action for these subunits in signal transduction. PMID:3108876

  9. Interaction between 25S rRNA A loop and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B promotes subunit joining and ensures stringent AUG selection.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Shin, Byung-Sik; Udagawa, Tsuyoshi; Nemoto, Naoki; Chowdhury, Wasimul; Graham, Jymie; Cox, Christian; Reid, Megan; Brown, Susan J; Asano, Katsura

    2013-09-01

    In yeast, 25S rRNA makes up the major mass and shape of the 60S ribosomal subunit. During the last step of translation initiation, eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) promotes the 60S subunit joining with the 40S initiation complex (IC). Malfunctional 60S subunits produced by misfolding or mutation may disrupt the 40S IC stalling on the start codon, thereby altering the stringency of initiation. Using several point mutations isolated by random mutagenesis, here we studied the role of 25S rRNA in start codon selection. Three mutations changing bases near the ribosome surface had strong effects, allowing the initiating ribosomes to skip both AUG and non-AUG codons: C2879U and U2408C, altering the A loop and P loop, respectively, of the peptidyl transferase center, and G1735A, mapping near a Eukarya-specific bridge to the 40S subunit. Overexpression of eIF5B specifically suppressed the phenotype caused by C2879U, suggesting functional interaction between eIF5B and the A loop. In vitro reconstitution assays showed that C2879U decreased eIF5B-catalyzed 60S subunit joining with a 40S IC. Thus, eIF5B interaction with the peptidyl transferase center A loop increases the accuracy of initiation by stabilizing the overall conformation of the 80S initiation complex. This study provides an insight into the effect of ribosomal mutations on translation profiles in eukaryotes.

  10. Post-translational transformation of methionine to aspartate is catalyzed by heme iron and driven by peroxide: a novel subunit-specific mechanism in hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Strader, Michael Brad; Hicks, Wayne A; Kassa, Tigist; Singleton, Eileen; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mollan, Todd L; Wilson, Michael T; Alayash, Abdu I

    2014-08-01

    A pathogenic V67M mutation occurs at the E11 helical position within the heme pockets of variant human fetal and adult hemoglobins (Hb). Subsequent post-translational modification of Met to Asp was reported in γ subunits of human fetal Hb Toms River (γ67(E11)Val → Met) and β subunits of adult Hb (HbA) Bristol-Alesha (β67(E11)Val → Met) that were associated with hemolytic anemia. Using kinetic, proteomic, and crystal structural analysis, we were able to show that the Met → Asp transformation involves heme cycling through its oxoferryl state in the recombinant versions of both proteins. The conversion to Met and Asp enhanced the spontaneous autoxidation of the mutants relative to wild-type HbA and human fetal Hb, and the levels of Asp were elevated with increasing levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Using H2(18)O2, we verified incorporation of (18)O into the Asp carboxyl side chain confirming the role of H2O2 in the oxidation of the Met side chain. Under similar experimental conditions, there was no conversion to Asp at the αMet(E11) position in the corresponding HbA Evans (α62(E11)Val → Met). The crystal structures of the three recombinant Met(E11) mutants revealed similar thioether side chain orientations. However, as in the solution experiments, autoxidation of the Hb mutant crystals leads to electron density maps indicative of Asp(E11) formation in β subunits but not in α subunits. This novel post-translational modification highlights the nonequivalence of human Hb α, β, and γ subunits with respect to redox reactivity and may have direct implications to α/β hemoglobinopathies and design of oxidatively stable Hb-based oxygen therapeutics.

  11. Fluorescence measurements reveal stoichiometry of K+ channels formed by modulatory and delayed rectifier alpha-subunits.

    PubMed

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel; Soto, Florentina; Stocker, Martin

    2005-04-26

    Modulatory alpha-subunits, which comprise one-fourth of all voltagegated K(+) channel (Kv) alpha-subunits, do not assemble into homomeric channels, but selectively associate with delayed rectifier Kv2 subunits to form heteromeric channels of unknown stoichiometry. Their distinct expression patterns and unique functional properties have made these channels candidate molecular correlates for a broad set of native K(+) currents. Here, we combine FRET and electrophysiological measurements to determine the stoichiometry and geometry of heteromeric channels composed of the delayed rectifier Kv2.1 subunit and the modulatory Kv9.3 alpha-subunit. Kv channel alpha-subunits were fused with GFP variants, and heteromerization of different combinations of tagged and untagged alpha-subunits was studied. FRET, evaluated by acceptor photobleaching, was only observed upon formation of functional channels. Our results, obtained from two independent experimental paradigms, suggest the formation of heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels of fixed stoichiometry consisting of three Kv2.1 subunits and one Kv9.3 subunit. Strikingly, despite this uneven stoichiometry, we find that heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels maintain a pseudosymmetric arrangement of subunits around the central pore. PMID:15827117

  12. Fluorescence measurements reveal stoichiometry of K+ channels formed by modulatory and delayed rectifier α-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel; Soto, Florentina; Stocker, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Modulatory α-subunits, which comprise one-fourth of all voltagegated K+ channel (Kv) α-subunits, do not assemble into homomeric channels, but selectively associate with delayed rectifier Kv2 subunits to form heteromeric channels of unknown stoichiometry. Their distinct expression patterns and unique functional properties have made these channels candidate molecular correlates for a broad set of native K+ currents. Here, we combine FRET and electrophysiological measurements to determine the stoichiometry and geometry of heteromeric channels composed of the delayed rectifier Kv2.1 subunit and the modulatory Kv9.3 α-subunit. Kv channel α-subunits were fused with GFP variants, and heteromerization of different combinations of tagged and untagged α-subunits was studied. FRET, evaluated by acceptor photobleaching, was only observed upon formation of functional channels. Our results, obtained from two independent experimental paradigms, suggest the formation of heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels of fixed stoichiometry consisting of three Kv2.1 subunits and one Kv9.3 subunit. Strikingly, despite this uneven stoichiometry, we find that heteromeric Kv2.1/Kv9.3 channels maintain a pseudosymmetric arrangement of subunits around the central pore. PMID:15827117

  13. Essential 170-kDa subunit for degradation of crystalline cellulose by Clostridium cellulovorans cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Doi, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The cellulase complex from Clostridium cellulovorans has been purified and its subunit composition determined. The complex exhibits cellulase activity against crystalline cellulose as well as carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and cellobiohydrolase activities. Three major subunits are present with molecular masses of 170, 100, and 70 kDa. The 100-kDa subunit is the major CMCase, although at least four other, minor subunits show CMCase activity. The 170-kDa subunit has the highest affinity for cellulose, does not have detectable enzymatic activity, but is necessary for cellulase activity. Immunological studies indicate that the 170-kDa subunit is not required for binding of the catalytic subunits to cellulose and therefore does not function solely as an anchor protein. Thus this core subunit must have multiple functions. The authors propose a working hypothesis that the binding of the 170-kDa subunit converts the crystalline cellulose to a form that is capable of being hydrolyzed in a cooperative fashion by the associated catalytic subunits.

  14. [Fluorescent derivatives of diphtheria toxin subunit B and their interaction with Vero cells].

    PubMed

    Kaberniuk, A A; Labyntsev, A Iu; Kolybo, D V; Oliĭnyk, O S; Redchuk, T A; Korotkevych, N V; Horchev, V F; Karakhim, S O; Komisarenko, S V

    2009-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin's B subunit provides toxin interaction with its receptor on the cell surface and translocation of toxin's A subunit from endosome to cytozole of sensitive cells. Functional analogues of B subunit with fluorescent label are considered as perspective tools for studying the above mentioned processes. The aim of the work was to obtain fluorescent B subunit analogues and to detect the specificity of their interaction with Vero line cells. B subunit fluorescent analogues were obtained in two different ways. The first one was B subunit chemical conjugation with fluorescein isothiocyanate and the second one was genetic fusion of recombinant B subunit chain with enhanced green fluorescent protein chain. Specific interaction of B subunit fluorescent derivatives with Vero cells was studied by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Using competitive analysis it was shown that B subunit fluorescent analogues possessed different affinity for cells. The affinity of EGFP-SbB was higher than FITC-SbB. Our results indicate the possibility to use the fluorescent derivatives of B subunit as tools for identification of diphtheria toxin's receptor (HB-EGF) expression on the cell surface as well as for studying the interaction and penetration of diphtheria toxin to the cell.

  15. Deciphering the function of the CNGB1b subunit in olfactory CNG channels

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Wongsamitkul, Nisa; Kusch, Jana; Zimmer, Thomas; Schwede, Frank; Benndorf, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are key players in the signal transduction cascade of olfactory sensory neurons. The second messengers cAMP and cGMP directly activate these channels, generating a depolarizing receptor potential. Olfactory CNG channels are composed of two CNGA2 subunits and two modulatory subunits, CNGA4, and CNGB1b. So far the exact role of the modulatory subunits for channel activation is not fully understood. By measuring ligand binding and channel activation simultaneously, we show that in functional heterotetrameric channels not only the CNGA2 subunits and the CNGA4 subunit but also the CNGB1b subunit binds cyclic nucleotides and, moreover, also alone translates this signal to open the pore. In addition, we show that the CNGB1b subunit is the most sensitive subunit in a heterotetrameric channel to cyclic nucleotides and that it accelerates deactivation to a similar extent as does the CNGA4 subunit. In conclusion, the CNGB1b subunit participates in ligand-gated activation of olfactory CNG channels and, particularly, contributes to rapid termination of odorant signal in an olfactory sensory neuron. PMID:27405959

  16. Essential 170-kDa subunit for degradation of crystalline cellulose by Clostridium cellulovorans cellulase.

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, O; Doi, R H

    1990-01-01

    The cellulase complex from Clostridium cellulovorans has been purified and its subunit composition determined. The complex exhibits cellulase activity against crystalline cellulose as well as carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) and cellobiohydrolase activities. Three major subunits are present with molecular masses of 170, 100, and 70 kDa. The 100-kDa subunit is the major CMCase, although at least four other, minor subunits show CMCase activity. The 170-kDa subunit has the highest affinity for cellulose, does not have detectable enzymatic activity, but is necessary for cellulase activity. Immunological studies indicate that the 170-kDa subunit is not required for binding of the catalytic subunits to cellulose and therefore does not function solely as an anchor protein. Thus this core subunit must have multiple functions. We propose a working hypothesis that the binding of the 170-kDa subunit converts the crystalline cellulose to a form that is capable of being hydrolyzed in a cooperative fashion by the associated catalytic subunits. Images PMID:2107547

  17. Meta-Analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Strain 195 Transcriptomic Profiles Identify a Respiration Rate-Related Gene Expression Transition Point and Interoperon Recruitment of a Key Oxidoreductase Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Rowe, Annette R.; Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6 ± 0.6 μM Cl−/h)- and fast (22.9 ± 9.6 μM Cl−/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n = 53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID

  18. The cyanobacterial cytochrome b6f subunit PetP adopts an SH3 fold in solution.

    PubMed

    Veit, Sebastian; Nagadoi, Aritaka; Rögner, Matthias; Rexroth, Sascha; Stoll, Raphael; Ikegami, Takahisa

    2016-06-01

    PetP is a peripheral subunit of the cytochrome b(6)f complex (b(6)f) present in both, cyanobacteria and red algae. It is bound to the cytoplasmic surface of this membrane protein complex where it greatly affects the efficiency of the linear photosynthetic electron flow although it is not directly involved in the electron transfer reactions. Despite the crystal structures of the b(6)f core complex, structural information for the transient regulatory b(6)f subunits is still missing. Here we present the first structure of PetP at atomic resolution as determined by solution NMR. The protein adopts an SH3 fold, which is a common protein motif in eukaryotes but comparatively rare in prokaryotes. The structure of PetP enabled the identification of the potential interaction site for b(6)f binding by conservation mapping. The interaction surface is mainly formed by two large loop regions and one short 310 helix which also exhibit an increased flexibility as indicated by heteronuclear steady-state {(1)H}-(15)N NOE and random coil index parameters. The properties of this potential b(6)f binding site greatly differ from the canonical peptide binding site which is highly conserved in eukaryotic SH3 domains. Interestingly, three other proteins of the photosynthetic electron transport chain share this SH3 fold with PetP: NdhS of the photosynthetic NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH-1), PsaE of the photosystem 1 and subunit α of the ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase have, similar to PetP, a great impact on the photosynthetic electron transport. Finally, a model is presented to illustrate how SH3 domains modulate the photosynthetic electron transport processes in cyanobacteria. PMID:27033306

  19. Structural heterogeneity of the alpha subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in relation to agonist affinity alkylation and antagonist binding.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, M; Gullick, W; Spiess, J; Wan, K; Criado, M; Lindstrom, J

    1986-07-29

    The structural basis for the heterogeneity of the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor with respect to antagonist binding and reactivity toward affinity alkylating reagents was investigated. There is one agonist binding site on each of the two alpha subunits in a receptor monomer. One of these sites is easily affinity labeled with bromoacetylcholine, while more extreme conditions are required to label the other. Evidence is presented that the site which is easily labeled with bromoacetylcholine is the site with higher affinity for the antagonist d-tubocurarine. Digestion of purified alpha subunits with staphylococcal V8 protease gave two limit fragments with apparent molecular weights of 17K and 19K. Both of these fragments began at residue 46 of the alpha sequence, and both reacted with monoclonal antibodies specific for the sequence alpha 152-159 but not with antibodies specific for alpha 235-242. Their tryptic peptide maps and reactivity with a number of monoclonal antibodies were virtually identical. Only the 17-kilodalton (17-kDa) fragments stained heavily for sugars with Schiff's reagent. However, both fragments bound 125I-labeled concanavalin A. Complete removal of carbohydrate detectable with concanavalin A from V8 protease digests of alpha subunits resulted in two fragments of lower apparent molecular weights, indicating that these fragments differed not only in carbohydrate content but also in their C-termini or by another covalent modification. Covalent labeling of one of the two agonist sites of the intact receptor with bromo[3H]acetylcholine followed by digestion with V8 protease resulted in labeling of only the 19-kDa fragment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. YC-1 binding to the β subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase overcomes allosteric inhibition by the α subunit.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rahul; Fritz, Bradley G; The, Juliana; Issaian, Aaron; Weichsel, Andrzej; David, Cynthia L; Campbell, Eric; Hausrath, Andrew C; Rassouli-Taylor, Leida; Garcin, Elsa D; Gage, Matthew J; Montfort, William R

    2014-01-14

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric heme protein and the primary nitric oxide receptor. NO binding stimulates cyclase activity, leading to regulation of cardiovascular physiology and making sGC an attractive target for drug discovery. YC-1 and related compounds stimulate sGC both independently and synergistically with NO and CO binding; however, where the compounds bind and how they work remain unknown. Using linked equilibrium binding measurements, surface plasmon resonance, and domain truncations in Manduca sexta and bovine sGC, we demonstrate that YC-1 binds near or directly to the heme-containing domain of the β subunit. In the absence of CO, YC-1 binds with a Kd of 9-21 μM, depending on the construct. In the presence of CO, these values decrease to 0.6-1.1 μM. Pfizer compound 25 bound ∼10-fold weaker than YC-1 in the absence of CO, whereas compound BAY 41-2272 bound particularly tightly in the presence of CO (Kd = 30-90 nM). Additionally, we found that CO binds much more weakly to heterodimeric sGC proteins (Kd = 50-100 μM) than to the isolated heme domain (Kd = 0.2 μM for Manduca β H-NOX/PAS). YC-1 greatly enhanced binding of CO to heterodimeric sGC, as expected (Kd ∼ 1 μM). These data indicate the α subunit induces a heme pocket conformation with a lower affinity for CO and NO. YC-1 family compounds bind near the heme domain, overcoming the α subunit effect and inducing a heme pocket conformation with high affinity. We propose this high-affinity conformation is required for the full-length protein to achieve high catalytic activity.

  1. Subunit gamma of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na(+) pump: interaction with other subunits/domains of the complex and binding site for the Zn(2+) metal ion.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Markus; Wild, Markus R; Dahinden, Pius; Dimroth, Peter

    2002-01-29

    The oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na(+) pump of Klebsiella pneumoniae is an enzyme complex composed of the peripheral alpha subunit and the two integral membrane-bound subunits beta and gamma. The alpha subunit consists of the N-terminal carboxyltransferase domain and the C-terminal biotin domain, which are connected by a flexible proline/alanine-rich linker peptide. To probe interactions between the two domains of the alpha subunit and between alpha-subunit domains and the gamma subunit, the relevant polypeptides were synthesized in Escherichia coli and subjected to copurification studies. The two alpha-subunit domains had no distinct affinity toward each other and could, therefore, not be purified as a unit on avidin-sepharose. The two domains reacted together catalytically, however, performing the carboxyl transfer from oxaloacetate to protein-bound biotin. This reaction was enhanced up to 6-fold in the presence of the Zn(2+)-containing gamma subunit. On the basis of copurification with different tagged proteins, the C-terminal biotin domain but not the N-terminal carboxyltransferase domain of the alpha subunit formed a strong complex with the gamma subunit. Upon the mutation of gamma H78 to alanine, the binding affinity to subunit alpha was lost, indicating that this amino acid may be essential for formation of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase enzyme complex. The binding residues for the Zn(2+) metal ion were identified by site-directed and deletion mutagenesis. In the gamma D62A or gamma H77A mutant, the Zn(2+) content of the decarboxylase decreased to 35% or 10% of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. Less than 5% of the Zn(2+) present in the wild-type enzyme was found if the two C-terminal gamma-subunit residues H82 and P83 were deleted. Corresponding with the reduced Zn(2+) contents in these mutants, the oxaloacetate decarboxylase activities were diminished. These results indicate that aspartate 62, histidine 77, and histidine 82 of the gamma subunit are ligands

  2. Mechanisms underlying subunit independence in pyramidal neuron dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Behabadi, Bardia F.; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neuron (PN) dendrites compartmentalize voltage signals and can generate local spikes, which has led to the proposal that their dendrites act as independent computational subunits within a multilayered processing scheme. However, when a PN is strongly activated, back-propagating action potentials (bAPs) sweeping outward from the soma synchronize dendritic membrane potentials many times per second. How PN dendrites maintain the independence of their voltage-dependent computations, despite these repeated voltage resets, remains unknown. Using a detailed compartmental model of a layer 5 PN, and an improved method for quantifying subunit independence that incorporates a more accurate model of dendritic integration, we first established that the output of each dendrite can be almost perfectly predicted by the intensity and spatial configuration of its own synaptic inputs, and is nearly invariant to the rate of bAP-mediated “cross-talk” from other dendrites over a 100-fold range. Then, through an analysis of conductance, voltage, and current waveforms within the model cell, we identify three biophysical mechanisms that together help make independent dendritic computation possible in a firing neuron, suggesting that a major subtype of neocortical neuron has been optimized for layered, compartmentalized processing under in-vivo–like spiking conditions. PMID:24357611

  3. Overexpression of neurofilament subunit M accelerates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Tung, V W

    2000-06-01

    Neurofilaments are composed of three polypeptide subunits (NF-H, NF-M and NF-L). They are the most abundant cytoskeletal element in large myelinated axons and play a central role in development of axonal caliber. To perform this role, neurofilaments are transported from their site of synthesis, the cell bodies, to the distal axons. Previous studies showed that overexpression of NF-M in transgenic mice led to accumulation of neurofilaments in neurons and a reduction in the number of neurofilaments in axons, suggesting that axonal transport of neurofilaments was slowed. To determine whether this was the case, we measured axonal transport velocities in the wild type and transgenic mice overexpressing NF-M by the classical pulse-labeling method using 35S-methionine. We found that neurofilament transport in peripheral motor axons can be described with a model consistent with two linear velocities. Contrary to expectations, both velocities were accelerated by overexpression of NF-M. These results suggest that subunit composition in neurofilaments play a regulatory role in neurofilament transport. In addition, these results show that there are regional differences in neurofilament transport along long axons and these differences may be the basis for selective regional accumulation of neurofilaments in various neurological disorders.

  4. Fungal mediator tail subunits contain classical transcriptional activation domains.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongle; Myers, Lawrence C

    2015-04-01

    Classical activation domains within DNA-bound eukaryotic transcription factors make weak interactions with coactivator complexes, such as Mediator, to stimulate transcription. How these interactions stimulate transcription, however, is unknown. The activation of reporter genes by artificial fusion of Mediator subunits to DNA binding domains that bind to their promoters has been cited as evidence that the primary role of activators is simply to recruit Mediator. We have identified potent classical transcriptional activation domains in the C termini of several tail module subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans, and Candida dubliniensis Mediator, while their N-terminal domains are necessary and sufficient for their incorporation into Mediator but do not possess the ability to activate transcription when fused to a DNA binding domain. This suggests that Mediator fusion proteins actually are functioning in a manner similar to that of a classical DNA-bound activator rather than just recruiting Mediator. Our finding that deletion of the activation domains of S. cerevisiae Med2 and Med3, as well as C. dubliniensis Tlo1 (a Med2 ortholog), impairs the induction of certain genes shows these domains function at native promoters. Activation domains within coactivators are likely an important feature of these complexes and one that may have been uniquely leveraged by a common fungal pathogen.

  5. Thermostable Cross-Protective Subunit Vaccine against Brucella Species

    PubMed Central

    Barabé, Nicole D.; Grigat, Michelle L.; Lee, William E.; Poirier, Robert T.; Jager, Scott J.; Berger, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 105 CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. PMID:25320267

  6. Phenotypic consequences of deletion of the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, or {beta}{sub 3} subunit of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Culia, C.T.; Stubbs, L.J.; Montgomery, C.S.; Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M.

    1994-03-29

    Three genes (Gabrg3, Gabra5, and Gabrb3) encoding the {gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3} subunits of the type A {gamma}-aminobutyric acid receptor, respectively, are known to map near the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus in mouse chromosome 7. This region shares homology with a segment of human chromosome 15 that is implicated in Angelman syndrome, an inherited neurobehavioral disorder. By mapping Gabrg3-Gabra5-Gabrb3-telomere. Like Gabrb3, neither the Gabra5 nor Gabrg3 gene is functionally imprinted in adult mouse brain. Mice deleted for all three subunits die at birth with a cleft palate, although there are rare survivors ({approximately} 5%) that do not have a cleft palate but do exhibit a neurological abnormality characterized by tremor, jerky gait, and runtiness. The authors have previously suggested that deficiency of the {beta}{sub 3} subunit may be responsible for the clefting defect. Most notably, however, in this report they describe mice carrying two overlapping, complementing p deletions that fail to express the {gamma}{sub 3} transcript, as well as mice from another line that express neither the {gamma}{sub 3} nor {alpha}{sub 5} transcripts. Surprisingly, mice from both of these lines are phenotypically normal and do not exhibit any of the neurological symptoms characteristic of the rare survivors that are deleted for all three ({gamma}{sub 3}, {alpha}{sub 5}, and {beta}{sub 3}) subunits. These mice therefore provide a whole-organism type A {gamma}-aminobutyric-acid receptor background that is devoid of any receptor subtypes that normally contain the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits. The absence of an overt neurological phenotype in mice lacking the {gamma}{sub 3} and/or {alpha}{sub 5} subunits also suggests that mutations in these genes are unlikely to provide useful animal models for Angelman syndrome in humans.

  7. Evaluation of a Subunit Vaccine to Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) Virus, 1984 FY Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, JoAnn Ching

    1985-07-01

    A prototype subunit vaccine to IHN virus is being developed by recombinant DNA techniques. The techniques involve the isolation and characterization of the glycoprotein gene, which encodes the viral protein responsible for inducing a protective immune response in fish. The viral glycoprotein gene has been cloned and a restriction map of the cloned gene has been prepared. Preliminary DNA sequence analysis of the cloned gene has been initiated so that manipulation of the gene for maximum expression in appropriate plasmid vectors is possible. A recombinant plasmid containing the viral gene inserted in the proper orientation adjacent to a very strong lambda promoter and ribosome binding site has been constructed. Evaluation of this recombinant plasmid for gene expression is being conducted. Immunization trials with purified viral glycoprotein indicate that fish are protected against lethal doses of IHNV after immersion and intraperitoneal methods of immunization. In addition, cross protection immunization trials indicate that Type 2 and Type 1 IHN virus produce glycoproteins that are cross-protective.

  8. The casein kinase II beta subunit binds to Mos and inhibits Mos activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, M; Li, D; Krebs, E G; Cooper, J A

    1997-01-01

    Mos is a germ cell-specific serine/threonine kinase and is required for Xenopus oocyte maturation. Active Mos stimulates a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by directly phosphorylating and activating MAPK kinase (MKK). We report here that the Xenopus homolog of the beta subunit of casein kinase II (CKII beta) binds to and regulates Mos. The Mos-interacting region of CKII beta was mapped to the C terminus. Mos bound to CKII beta in somatic cells ectopically expressing Mos and CKII beta as well as in unfertilized Xenopus eggs. CKII beta inhibited Mos-mediated MAPK activation in rabbit reticulocyte lysates and repressed MKK activation by v-Mos in a coupled kinase assay. In addition, microinjection of CKII beta mRNA into Xenopus oocytes inhibited progesterone-induced meiotic maturation and MAPK activation, presumably by binding of CKII beta to Mos and thereby inhibiting MAPK activation. Moreover, this inhibitory phenotype could be rescued by another protein that binds to CKII beta, CKII alpha. The ability of ectopic CKII beta to inhibit meiotic maturation and the detection of a complex between endogenous Mos and CKII beta suggest that CKII beta may act as an inhibitor of Mos during oocyte maturation, perhaps setting a threshold beyond which Mos protein must accumulate before it can activate the MAPK pathway. PMID:9121438

  9. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    An in vitro degradation system has been developed from petunia and soybean polysomes in order to investigate the mechanisms and determinants controlling RNA turnover in higher plants. This system faithfully degrades soybean ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) mRNA into the same products observed in total RNA preparations. In previous years it was shown that the most stable products represent a nested constellation of fragments, which are shortened from their 3{prime} ends, and have intact 5{prime} ends. Exogenous rbcS RNA tagged with novel 5{prime} sequence 15 or 56 bp long were synthesized in vitro as Sp6 and T7 runoff transcripts, respectively. When added to the system they were degraded faithfully into constellation of products which were 15 or 56 bp longer than the endogenous products, respectively. Detailed kinetics on the appearance of these exogenous products confirmed degradation proceeds in an overall 3{prime} to 5{prime} direction but suggested that there are multiple pathways through which the RNA may be degraded. To further demonstrate a precursor product relationships, in vitro synthesized transcripts truncated at their 3{prime} ends were shown to degrade into the expected smaller fragments previously mapped in the 5{prime} portion of the rbcS RNA.

  10. Palmitoylation of the β4-subunit regulates surface expression of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel splice variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Bi, Danlei; Tian, Lijun; McClafferty, Heather; Steeb, Franziska; Ruth, Peter; Knaus, Hans Guenther; Shipston, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Regulatory β-subunits of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels play an important role in generating functional diversity and control of cell surface expression of the pore forming α-subunits. However, in contrast to α-subunits, the role of reversible post-translational modification of intracellular residues on β-subunit function is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the human β4-subunit is S-acylated (palmitoylated) on a juxtamembrane cysteine residue (Cys-193) in the intracellular C terminus of the regulatory β-subunit. β4-Subunit palmitoylation is important for cell surface expression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit of the β4-subunit alone. Importantly, palmitoylated β4-subunits promote the ER exit and surface expression of the pore-forming α-subunit, whereas β4-subunits that cannot be palmitoylated do not increase ER exit or surface expression of α-subunits. Strikingly, however, this palmitoylation- and β4-dependent enhancement of α-subunit surface expression was only observed in α-subunits that contain a putative trafficking motif (… REVEDEC) at the very C terminus of the α-subunit. Engineering this trafficking motif to other C-terminal α-subunit splice variants results in α-subunits with reduced surface expression that can be rescued by palmitoylated, but not depalmitoylated, β4-subunits. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which palmitoylated β4-subunit controls surface expression of BK channels through masking of a trafficking motif in the C terminus of the α-subunit. As palmitoylation is dynamic, this mechanism would allow precise control of specific splice variants to the cell surface. Our data provide new insights into how complex interplay between the repertoire of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms controls cell surface expression of BK channels.

  11. The G protein β subunit controls virulence and multiple growth- and development-related traits in Verticillium dahliae.

    PubMed

    Tzima, Aliki K; Paplomatas, Epaminondas J; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Kang, Seogchan

    2012-04-01

    To gain insight into the role of G protein-mediated signaling in virulence and development of the soilborne, wilt causing fungus Verticillium dahliae, the G protein β subunit gene (named as VGB) was disrupted in tomato race 1 strain of V. dahliae. A resulting mutant strain, 70ΔGb15, displayed drastic reduction in virulence, increased microsclerotia formation and conidiation, and decreased ethylene production compared to the corresponding wild type (wt) strain 70wt-r1. Moreover, 70ΔGb15 exhibited an elongated rather than radial growth pattern on agar media. A transformant of 70ΔGb15 (named as 70ΔGbPKAC1) that carries an extra copy of VdPKAC1, a V. dahliae gene encoding the catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A, exhibited wt growth pattern and conidiation, was unable to form microsclerotia, produced high amounts of ethylene, and exhibited virulence between that of 70ΔGb15 and 70wt-r1 on tomato plants. Phenotypical changes observed in 70ΔGb15 and 70ΔGbPKAC1 correlated with transcriptional changes in several genes involved in signaling (MAP kinase VMK1) and development (hydrophobin VDH1 and ACC synthase ACS1) of V. dahliae. Results from the present work suggest a linkage between VGB and VdPKAC1 signaling pathways in regulating virulence, hormone production and development in V. dahliae.

  12. Mutations in the Proteolipid Subunits of the Vacuolar H+-ATPase Provide Resistance to Indolotryptoline Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Indolotryptoline natural products represent a small family of structurally unique chromopyrrolic acid-derived antiproliferative agents. Like many prospective anticancer agents before them, the exploration of their potential clinical utility has been hindered by the limited information known about their mechanism of action. To study the mode of action of two closely related indolotryptolines (BE-54017, cladoniamide A), we selected for drug resistant mutants using a multidrug resistance-suppressed (MDR-sup) Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain. As fission yeast maintains many of the basic cancer-relevant cellular processes present in human cells, it represents an appealing model to use in determining the potential molecular target of antiproliferative natural products through resistant mutant screening. Full genome sequencing of resistant mutants identified mutations in the c and c′ subunits of the proteolipid substructure of the vacuolar H+-ATPase complex (V-ATPase). This collection of resistance-conferring mutations maps to a site that is distant from the nucleotide-binding sites of V-ATPase and distinct from sites found to confer resistance to known V-ATPase inhibitors. Acid vacuole staining, cross-resistance studies, and direct c/c′ subunit mutagenesis all suggest that indolotryptolines are likely a structurally novel class of V-ATPase inhibitors. This work demonstrates the general utility of resistant mutant selection using MDR-sup S. pombe as a rapid and potentially systematic approach for studying the modes of action of cytotoxic natural products. PMID:25319670

  13. OsGatB, the Subunit of tRNA-Dependent Amidotransferase, Is Required for Primary Root Development in Rice.

    PubMed

    Qin, Cheng; Cheng, Linming; Zhang, Huanhuan; He, Meiling; Shen, Jingqin; Zhang, Yunhong; Wu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A short-root rice mutant was isolated from an ethyl methane sulfonate-mutagenized library. From map-based cloning strategy, a point mutation, resulting in an amino acid change from proline to leucine, was identified in the fourth exon of a glutamyl-tRNA (Gln) amidotransferase B subunit family protein (OsGatB, LOC_Os11g34210). This gene is an ortholog of Arabidopsis GatB and yeast PET112. GatB is a subunit of tRNA-dependent amidotransferase (AdT), an essential enzyme involved in Gln-tRNA(Gln) synthesis in mitochondria. Although previous studies have described that cessation in mitochondrial translation is lethal at very early developmental stages in plants, this point mutation resulted in a non-lethal phenotype of smaller root meristem and shorter root cell length. In the root, OsGatB was predominantly expressed in the root tip and played an important role in cell division and elongation there. OsGatB was localized in the mitochondria, and mitochondrial structure and function were all affected in Osgatb root tip cells. PMID:27200067

  14. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S.; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  15. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  16. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism.

  17. Protein Kinase A Subunit Balance Regulates Lipid Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans and Mammalian Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ji Seul; Kong, Jinuk; Ji, Yul; Lv, Xuchao; Lee, Junho; Li, Peng; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-23

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase composed of catalytic and regulatory subunits and involved in various physiological phenomena, including lipid metabolism. Here we demonstrated that the stoichiometric balance between catalytic and regulatory subunits is crucial for maintaining basal PKA activity and lipid homeostasis. To uncover the potential roles of each PKA subunit, Caenorhabditis elegans was used to investigate the effects of PKA subunit deficiency. In worms, suppression of PKA via RNAi resulted in severe phenotypes, including shortened life span, decreased egg laying, reduced locomotion, and altered lipid distribution. Similarly, in mammalian adipocytes, suppression of PKA regulatory subunits RIα and RIIβ via siRNAs potently stimulated PKA activity, leading to potentiated lipolysis without increasing cAMP levels. Nevertheless, insulin exerted anti-lipolytic effects and restored lipid droplet integrity by antagonizing PKA action. Together, these data implicate the importance of subunit stoichiometry as another regulatory mechanism of PKA activity and lipid metabolism. PMID:27496951

  18. [Chromatographic and spectroscopic characterization of phycocyanin and its subunits purified from Anabaena variabilis CCC421].

    PubMed

    Chakdar, N; Sakha, S; Pabbi, S

    2014-01-01

    Phycocyanin, a high value pigment was purified from diazotrophic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis CCC421 using a strategy involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis and anion exchange chromatography using DEAE-cellulose column. 36% phycocyanin with a purity of 2.75 was recovered finally after anion exchange chromatography. Purified phycocyanin was found to contain 2 subunits of 17 and 18 kDa which were identified as a-and (3 subunits by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOE HPLC method using a C5 column coupled with fluorescence or photodiode-based detection was also developed to separate and detect the A. variabilis CCC421 phycocyanin subunits. The fluorescence method was more sensitive than photodiode one. The purified phycocyanin from A. variabilis CCC421 as well as its subunits was characterized with respect to absorption and IR spectra. Spectral characterization of the subunits revealed that alpha and beta subunits contained one and two phycocyanobilin groups as chromophores, respectively. PMID:25272755

  19. Operon structure and cotranslational subunit association direct protein assembly in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Yu-Wei; Minguez, Pablo; Bork, Peer; Auburger, Josef J; Guilbride, D Lys; Kramer, Günter; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Assembly of protein complexes is considered a posttranslational process involving random collision of subunits. We show that within the Escherichia coli cytosol, bacterial luciferase subunits LuxA and LuxB assemble into complexes close to the site of subunit synthesis. Assembly efficiency decreases markedly if subunits are synthesized on separate messenger RNAs from genes integrated at distant chromosomal sites. Subunit assembly initiates cotranslationally on nascent LuxB in vivo. The ribosome-associated chaperone trigger factor delays the onset of cotranslational interactions until the LuxB dimer interface is fully exposed. Protein assembly is thus directly coupled to the translation process and involves spatially confined, actively chaperoned cotranslational subunit interactions. Bacterial gene organization into operons therefore reflects a fundamental cotranslational mechanism for spatial and temporal regulation that is vital to effective assembly of protein complexes. PMID:26405228

  20. The G protein alpha o subunit alters morphology, growth kinetics, and phospholipid metabolism of somatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, D B; Bonventre, J V; Neer, E J; Seidman, J G

    1989-01-01

    The physiological role of the alpha o subunit of guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein was investigated with a murine adrenal cell line (Y1) transfected with a rat alpha o cDNA cloned in a retroviral expression vector. The parental cell line lacked detectable alpha o subunit. Expression of the alpha o cDNA in transfected cell lines was confirmed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The rat alpha o subunit interacted with murine beta and gamma subunits and associated with cell membranes. Y1 cells containing large amounts of alpha o subunit had altered cellular morphology and reduced rate of cell division. In addition, GTP-gamma S-stimulated release of arachidonic acid from these cells was significantly increased compared with that in control cells. The alpha o subunit appears directly or indirectly to regulate cellular proliferation, morphology, and phospholipid metabolism. Images PMID:2511433

  1. Engineering of an active animal fatty acid synthase dimer with only one competent subunit.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anil K; Rangan, Vangipuram S; Witkowski, Andrzej; Smith, Stuart

    2003-02-01

    Animal fatty acid synthases are large polypeptides containing seven functional domains that are active only in the dimeric form. Inactivity of the monomeric form has long been attributed to the obligatory participation of domains from both subunits in catalysis of substrate loading and condensation reactions. However, we have engineered a fatty acid synthase containing one wild-type subunit and one subunit compromised by mutations in all seven functional domains that is active in fatty acid synthesis. This finding indicates that a single subunit, in the context of a dimer, is able to catalyze the entire biosynthetic pathway and suggests that, in the natural complex, each of the two subunits forms a scaffold that optimizes the conformation of the companion subunit.

  2. The NMDA receptor NR2A subunit regulates proliferation of MKN45 human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Kanako; Kanno, Takeshi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miwa, Hiroto; Tashiro, Chikara; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2008-03-07

    The present study investigated proliferation of MKN28 and MKN45 human gastric cancer cells regulated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit. The NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) inhibited proliferation of MKN45 cells, but not MKN28 cells. Of the NMDA subunits such as NR1, NR2 (2A, 2B, 2C, and 2D), and NR3 (3A and 3B), all the NMDA subunit mRNAs except for the NR2B subunit mRNA were expressed in both MKN28 and MKN45 cells. MKN45 cells were characterized by higher expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA, but MKN28 otherwise by higher expression of the NR1 subunit mRNA and lower expression of the NR2A subunit mRNA. MKN45 cell proliferation was also inhibited by silencing the NR2A subunit-targeted gene. For MKN45 cells, AP5 or knocking-down the NR2A subunit increased the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of cell cycling and decreased the proportion in the S/G{sub 2} phase. The results of the present study, thus, suggest that blockage of NMDA receptors including the NR2A subunit suppresses MKN45 cell proliferation due to cell cycle arrest at the G{sub 1} phase; in other words, the NR2A subunit promotes MKN45 cell proliferation by accelerating cell cycling.

  3. The Role of Auxiliary Subunits for the Functional Diversity of Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Campiglio, Marta; Flucher, Bernhard E

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) represent the sole mechanism to convert membrane depolarization into cellular functions like secretion, contraction, or gene regulation. VGCCs consist of a pore-forming α1 subunit and several auxiliary channel subunits. These subunits come in multiple isoforms and splice-variants giving rise to a stunning molecular diversity of possible subunit combinations. It is generally believed that specific auxiliary subunits differentially regulate the channels and thereby contribute to the great functional diversity of VGCCs. If auxiliary subunits can associate and dissociate from pre-existing channel complexes, this would allow dynamic regulation of channel properties. However, most auxiliary subunits modulate current properties very similarly, and proof that any cellular calcium channel function is indeed modulated by the physiological exchange of auxiliary subunits is still lacking. In this review we summarize available information supporting a differential modulation of calcium channel functions by exchange of auxiliary subunits, as well as experimental evidence in support of alternative functions of the auxiliary subunits. At the heart of the discussion is the concept that, in their native environment, VGCCs function in the context of macromolecular signaling complexes and that the auxiliary subunits help to orchestrate the diverse protein–protein interactions found in these calcium channel signalosomes. Thus, in addition to a putative differential modulation of current properties, differential subcellular targeting properties and differential protein–protein interactions of the auxiliary subunits may explain the need for their vast molecular diversity. J. Cell. Physiol. 999: 00–00, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 2019–2031, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25820299

  4. The NH2-terminal php domain of the alpha subunit of the Escherichia coli replicase binds the epsilon proofreading subunit.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Anna; McHenry, Charles S

    2006-05-01

    The alpha subunit of the replicase of all bacteria contains a php domain, initially identified by its similarity to histidinol phosphatase but of otherwise unknown function (Aravind, L., and Koonin, E. V. (1998) Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 3746-3752). Deletion of 60 residues from the NH2 terminus of the alpha php domain destroys epsilon binding. The minimal 255-residue php domain, estimated by sequence alignment with homolog YcdX, is insufficient for epsilon binding. However, a 320-residue segment including sequences that immediately precede the polymerase domain binds epsilon with the same affinity as the 1160-residue full-length alpha subunit. A subset of mutations of a conserved acidic residue (Asp43 in Escherichia coli alpha) present in the php domain of all bacterial replicases resulted in defects in epsilon binding. Using sequence alignments, we show that the prototypical gram+ Pol C, which contains the polymerase and proofreading activities within the same polypeptide chain, has an epsilon-like sequence inserted in a surface loop near the center of the homologous YcdX protein. These findings suggest that the php domain serves as a platform to enable coordination of proofreading and polymerase activities during chromosomal replication.

  5. Mapping the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  6. Identification of mitochondrial Complex II subunits SDH3 and SDH4 and ATP synthase subunits a and b in Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed

    Mogi, Tatsushi; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2009-11-01

    While most protist mitochondrial enzymes could be identified in database, the membrane anchor subunits of Complex II and F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase of malaria parasites are not annotated. Based on the presence of structural fingerprints or proteomics data from other protists, here we present their candidates. In contrast to canonical subunits, Plasmodium Complex II anchors have two transmembrane helices and may coordinate heme b via Tyr in place of His. Transmembrane helix IV of ATP synthase subunit a lacks an essential Arg residue. Membrane anchors of Plasmodium Complex II and ATP synthase are divergent from orthologs and promising targets for new chemotherapeutics.

  7. Purification and radioimmunoassay of rat lactate dehydrogenase A and B subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Beebee, T J; Carty, D S

    1982-01-01

    We have developed procedures for purifying lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from rat tissues that involve two affinity-chromatography steps and that facilitate the isolation of milligram quantities of highly purified proteins within 2--3 days. Antibodies raised against pure A and B subunits in rabbits and hens were used in radioimmunoassays and showed negligible cross-reactivity with heterologous subunits. The radioimmunoassays provide a sensitive method for measuring nanogram amounts of A-subunit and B-subunit polypeptides in tissue homogenates and were employed to characterize the enzyme purification procedures. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:7138505

  8. Structure–Function Relationships in Fungal Large-Subunit Catalases

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A.; Valdez, V; Rudino-Pinera, E; Horjales, E; Hansberg, W

    2009-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has two large-subunit catalases, CAT-1 and CAT-3. CAT-1 is associated with non-growing cells and accumulates particularly in asexual spores; CAT-3 is associated with growing cells and is induced under different stress conditions. It is our interest to elucidate the structure-function relationships in large-subunit catalases. Here we have determined the CAT-3 crystal structure and compared it with the previously determined CAT-1 structure. Similar to CAT-1, CAT-3 hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) saturation kinetics exhibited two components, consistent with the existence of two active sites: one saturated in the millimolar range and the other in the molar range. In the CAT-1 structure, we found three interesting features related to its unusual kinetics: (a) a constriction in the channel that conveys H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the active site; (b) a covalent bond between the tyrosine, which forms the fifth coordination bound to the iron of the heme, and a vicinal cysteine; (c) oxidation of the pyrrole ring III to form a cis-hydroxyl group in C5 and a cis-{gamma}-spirolactone in C6. The site of heme oxidation marks the starts of the central channel that communicates to the central cavity and the shortest way products can exit the active site. CAT-3 has a similar constriction in its major channel, which could function as a gating system regulated by the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration before the gate. CAT-3 functional tyrosine is not covalently bonded, but has instead the electron relay mechanism described for the human catalase to divert electrons from it. Pyrrole ring III in CAT-3 is not oxidized as it is in other large-subunit catalases whose structure has been determined. Different in CAT-3 from these enzymes is an occupied central cavity. Results presented here indicate that CAT-3 and CAT-1 enzymes represent a functional group of catalases with distinctive structural characteristics that determine similar kinetics.

  9. National Atlas maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1991-01-01

    The National Atlas of the United States of America was published by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1970. Its 765 maps and charts are on 335 14- by 19-inch pages. Many of the maps span facing pages. It's worth a quick trip to the library just to leaf through all 335 pages of this book. Rapid scanning of its thematic maps yields rich insights to the geography of issues of continuing national interest. On most maps, the geographic patterns are still valid, though the data are not current. The atlas is out of print, but many of its maps can be purchased separately. Maps that span facing pages in the atlas are printed on one sheet. The maps dated after 1970 are either revisions of original atlas maps, or new maps published in atlas format. The titles of the separate maps are listed here.

  10. Phylogenetic mapping of bacterial morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siefert, J. L.; Fox, G. E.

    1998-01-01

    The availability of a meaningful molecular phylogeny for bacteria provides a context for examining the historical significance of various developments in bacterial evolution. Herein, the classical morphological descriptions of selected members of the domain Bacteria are mapped upon the genealogical ancestry deduced from comparison of small-subunit rRNA sequences. For the species examined in this study, a distinct pattern emerges which indicates that the coccus shape has arisen and accumulated independently multiple times in separate lineages and typically survived as a persistent end-state morphology. At least two other morphologies persist but have evolved only once. This study demonstrates that although bacterial morphology is not useful in defining bacterial phylogeny, it is remarkably consistent with that phylogeny once it is known. An examination of the experimental evidence available for morphogenesis as well as microbial fossil evidence corroborates these findings. It is proposed that the accumulation of persistent morphologies is a result of the biophysical properties of peptidoglycan and their genetic control, and that an evolved body-plan strategy based on peptidoglycan may have been a fate-sealing step in the evolution of Bacteria. More generally, this study illustrates that significant evolutionary insights can be obtained by examining biological and biochemical data in the context of a reliable phylogenetic structure.

  11. p53 and TFIIEα share a common binding site on the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH

    PubMed Central

    Di Lello, Paola; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Mas, Caroline; Langlois, Chantal; Malitskaya, Elena; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G.

    2008-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIH is recruited to the transcription preinitiation complex through an interaction between its p62/Tfb1 subunit and the α-subunit of the general transcription factor IIE (TFIIEα). We have determined that the acidic carboxyl terminus of TFIIEα (TFIIEα336–439) directly binds the amino-terminal PH domain of p62/Tfb1 with nanomolar affinity. NMR mapping and mutagenesis studies demonstrate that the TFIIEα binding site on p62/Tfb1 is identical to the binding site for the second transactivation domain of p53 (p53 TAD2). In addition, we demonstrate that TFIIEα336–439 is capable of competing with p53 for a common binding site on p62/Tfb1 and that TFIIEα336–439 and the diphosphorylated form (pS46/pT55) of p53 TAD2 have similar binding constants. NMR structural studies reveal that TFIIEα336–439 contains a small domain (residues 395–433) folded in a novel ββααα topology. NMR mapping studies demonstrate that two unstructured regions (residues 377–393 and residues 433–439) located on either side of the folded domain appear to be required for TFIIEα336–439 binding to p62/Tfb1 and that these two unstructured regions are held close to each other in three-dimensional space by the novel structured domain. We also demonstrate that, like p53, TFIIEα336–439 can activate transcription in vivo. These results point to an important interplay between the general transcription factor TFIIEα and the tumor suppressor protein p53 in regulating transcriptional activation that may be modulated by the phosphorylation status of p53. PMID:18160537

  12. p53 and TFIIEalpha share a common binding site on the Tfb1/p62 subunit of TFIIH.

    PubMed

    Di Lello, Paola; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Mas, Caroline; Langlois, Chantal; Malitskaya, Elena; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2008-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIH is recruited to the transcription preinitiation complex through an interaction between its p62/Tfb1 subunit and the alpha-subunit of the general transcription factor IIE (TFIIEalpha). We have determined that the acidic carboxyl terminus of TFIIEalpha (TFIIEalpha(336-439)) directly binds the amino-terminal PH domain of p62/Tfb1 with nanomolar affinity. NMR mapping and mutagenesis studies demonstrate that the TFIIEalpha binding site on p62/Tfb1 is identical to the binding site for the second transactivation domain of p53 (p53 TAD2). In addition, we demonstrate that TFIIEalpha(336-439) is capable of competing with p53 for a common binding site on p62/Tfb1 and that TFIIEalpha(336-439) and the diphosphorylated form (pS46/pT55) of p53 TAD2 have similar binding constants. NMR structural studies reveal that TFIIEalpha(336-439) contains a small domain (residues 395-433) folded in a novel betabetaalphaalphaalpha topology. NMR mapping studies demonstrate that two unstructured regions (residues 377-393 and residues 433-439) located on either side of the folded domain appear to be required for TFIIEalpha(336-439) binding to p62/Tfb1 and that these two unstructured regions are held close to each other in three-dimensional space by the novel structured domain. We also demonstrate that, like p53, TFIIEalpha(336-439) can activate transcription in vivo. These results point to an important interplay between the general transcription factor TFIIEalpha and the tumor suppressor protein p53 in regulating transcriptional activation that may be modulated by the phosphorylation status of p53. PMID:18160537

  13. Google Maps: You Are Here

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Librarians use online mapping services such as Google Maps, MapQuest, Yahoo Maps, and others to check traffic conditions, find local businesses, and provide directions. However, few libraries are using one of Google Maps most outstanding applications, My Maps, for the creation of enhanced and interactive multimedia maps. My Maps is a simple and…

  14. Manipulation of Subunit Stoichiometry in Heteromeric Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Morales-Perez, Claudio L; Noviello, Colleen M; Hibbs, Ryan E

    2016-05-01

    The ability of oligomeric membrane proteins to assemble in different functional ratios of subunits is a common feature across many systems. Recombinant expression of hetero-oligomeric proteins with defined stoichiometries facilitates detailed structural and functional analyses, but remains a major challenge. Here we present two methods for overcoming this challenge: one for rapid virus titration and another for stoichiometry determination. When these methods are coupled, they allow for efficient dissection of the heteromer stoichiometry problem and optimization of homogeneous protein expression. We demonstrate the utility of the methods in a system that to date has proved resistant to atomic-scale structural study, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Leveraging these two methods, we have successfully expressed, purified, and grown diffraction-quality crystals of this challenging target.

  15. The unusually long small subunit ribosomal RNA of Phreatamoeba balamuthi.

    PubMed Central

    Hinkle, G; Leipe, D D; Nerad, T A; Sogin, M L

    1994-01-01

    The small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the anaerobic amoeba Phreatamoeba balamuthi is the longest 16S-like rRNA sequenced to date. Secondary structure analysis suggests that the additional sequence is incorporated in canonical eukaryotic expansion regions and is not due to the presence of introns. Reverse transcriptase sequencing of total RNA extracts confirmed that two uncommonly long expansion regions are present in native P. balamuthi 16S-like rRNA. Primary sequence comparison and similar secondary structure indicate a 61 base stem and loop repeat within an expansion region; a mechanism whereby the repeat may have been incorporated is presented. P. balamuthi provides further evidence that 16S-like rRNA length does not correlate with phylogenetic position. PMID:8127686

  16. Structural diversity of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs. Evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sogin, M L; Gunderson, J H

    1987-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity of the eukaryotic kingdom was assessed by comparing the structural and evolutionary diversity of 18-20S ribosomal RNA genes. The coding regions for cytoplasmic small subunit ribosomal RNA genes vary in length from 1753 to 2305 nucleotides, and they appear to be evolutionary mosaics in which highly and partially conserved sequences are interspersed among regions that display very high rates of genetic drift. Structural similarities between these gene sequences were used to establish a phylogenetic framework for the eukaryotes. The extent of sequence variation within the eukaryotes exceeds that displayed within the eubacterial or archaebacterial lines of descent. The kinetoplastids and euglenoids represent the earliest branchings among the eukaryotes. These branchings preceded the divergence of lineages leading to the slime molds and apicomplexans and far antedate a radiative period that gave rise to the plants, animals, fungi, and other protists.

  17. Map reading tools for map libraries.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenberg, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    Engineers, navigators and military strategists employ a broad array of mechanical devices to facilitate map use. A larger number of map users such as educators, students, tourists, journalists, historians, politicians, economists and librarians are unaware of the available variety of tools which can be used with maps to increase the speed and efficiency of their application and interpretation. This paper identifies map reading tools such as coordinate readers, protractors, dividers, planimeters, and symbol-templets according to a functional classification. Particularly, arrays of tools are suggested for use in determining position, direction, distance, area and form (perimeter-shape-pattern-relief). -from Author

  18. Exchangeability of the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase of Acetabularia acetabulum with the beta subunit of E. coli F1-ATPase: construction of the chimeric beta subunits and complementation studies.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Kadowaki, H; Ikeda, H; Moritani, C; Kanazawa, H

    1997-11-10

    The gene encoding the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase (aclB) was isolated from total RNA and poly(A)+ RNA of Acetabularia acetabulum and sequenced (total nucleotides of 3038 bp and an open reading frame with 478 amino acids). The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to the beta subunit of the F type ATPases, but was different in the N-terminal 120 amino acids. The role of the N-terminal region was investigated using an F -ATPase beta-less mutant of E. coli, JP17. The JP17 strain expressing the aclB could not grow under conditions permitting oxidative phosphorylation, although ACLB was detected in the membrane fraction. The beta subunit was divided into three portions: amino acid position from 1 to 95 (portion A), 96 to 161 (portion B) and 162 to the C-terminus (portion C). The corresponding regions of ACLB were designated as portions A' (from 1 to 106), B' (from 107 to 172) and C' (from 173 to 478). Chimeric proteins with combinations of A-B'-C', A-B-C' and A'-B-C restored the function as the beta subunit in E. coli F0F1-complex, but those with combinations of A'-B'-C and A-B'-C had no function as the beta subunit. These findings suggested that portion B plays an important role in the assembly and function of the beta subunit in the F0F1-complex, while portion B' of ACLB exhibited inhibitory effects on assembly and function. In addition, portion A was also important for interaction of the beta subunit with the alpha subunit in E. coli F0F1-complex. These findings also suggested that the b subunit of the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase of A. acetabulum has a different function in the Cl(-)-translocating ATPase complex, although the primary structure resembled to the beta subunit of the F1-ATPase.

  19. Formalin-inactivated whole virus and recombinant subunit flavivirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Eckels, Kenneth H; Putnak, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of arthropod-borne, enveloped, RNA viruses that contain important human pathogens such as yellow fever (YF), Japanese encephalitis (JE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), West Nile (WN), and the dengue (DEN) viruses. Vaccination is the most effective means of disease prevention for these viral infections. A live-attenuated vaccine for YF, and inactivated vaccines for JE and TBE have significantly reduced the incidence of disease for these viruses, while licensed vaccines for DEN and WN are still lacking despite a significant disease burden associated with these infections. This review focuses on inactivated and recombinant subunit vaccines (non-replicating protein vaccines) in various stages of laboratory development and human testing. A purified, inactivated vaccine (PIV) candidate for DEN will soon be evaluated in a phase 1 clinical trial, and a second-generation JE PIV produced using similar technology has advanced to phase 2/3 trials. The inactivated TBE vaccine used successfully in Europe for almost 30 years continues to be improved by additional purification, new stabilizers, an adjuvant, and better immunization schedules. The recent development of an inactivated WN vaccine for domestic animals demonstrates the possibility of producing a similar vaccine for human use. Advances in flavivirus gene expression technology have led to the production of several recombinant subunit antigen vaccine candidates in a variety of expression systems. Some of these vaccines have shown sufficient promise in animal models to be considered as candidates for evaluation in clinical trials. Feasibility of non-replicating flavivirus vaccines has been clearly demonstrated and further development is now warranted. PMID:14714438

  20. Proteomic analysis of transducin beta-subunit structural heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Clack, James W; Juhl, Martha; Rice, Carol A; Li, Junyu; Witzmann, Frank A

    2003-10-01

    Partially purified transducin was resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Peptide mass fingerprinting of several different spots believed to correspond to the 37 kDa beta-subunit of transducin (T(beta)) was performed. Spots were excised and proteolyzed using modified trypsin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was performed on the peptide mixture resulting from each spot. As many as six spots with different pI, ranging from 5.2 to 6.1, were observed when separated using 2-DE. MALDI peptide mass fingerprinting determined with high probability that all of the spots were the same gene product, guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) beta-subunit 1 (GNB1; T(beta1)). This suggested that post-translational modification was responsible for the differences in pI. Phosphorylation experiments showed that at least one T(beta1) spot was phosphorylated in vitro with [gamma-(32)P]ATP by an endogenous kinase. Treatment of T(beta) with alkaline phosphatase caused a large change in the spot pattern of T(beta), suggesting that phosphorylated T(beta) is a substrate for alkaline phosphatase. We conclude that T(beta1) constitutes over 99% of the T(beta) expressed in bovine rod outer segments and displays structural heterogeneity that is due to post-translational modification. We also conclude that some, but not all, of the heterogeneity observed is due to phosphorylation of Tb1. PMID:14595696

  1. TM2 but not TM4 of subunit c'' interacts with TM7 of subunit a of the yeast V-ATPase as defined by disulfide-mediated cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanru; Inoue, Takao; Forgac, Michael

    2004-10-22

    The vacuolar (H+)-ATPase (or V-ATPase) is an ATP-dependent proton pump which couples the energy released upon ATP hydrolysis to rotational movement of a ring of proteolipid subunits (c, c', and c'') relative to the integral subunit a. The proteolipid subunits each contain a single buried acidic residue that is essential for proton transport, with this residue located in TM4 of subunits c and c' and TM2 of subunit c''. Subunit c'' contains an additional buried acidic residue in TM4 that is not required for proton transport. The buried acidic residues of the proteolipid subunits are believed to interact with an essential arginine residue (Arg735) in TM7 of subunit a during proton translocation. We have previously shown that the helical face of TM7 of subunit a containing Arg735 interacts with the helical face of TM4 of subunit c' bordered by Glu145 and Leu147 (Kawasaki-Nishi et al. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 41908-41913). We have now analyzed interaction of subunits a and c'' using disulfide-mediated cross-linking. The results indicate that the helical face of TM7 of subunit a containing Arg735 interacts with the helical face of TM2 of subunit c'' centered on Ile105, with the essential glutamic acid residue (Glu108) located near the opposite border of this face compared with TM4 of subunit c'. By contrast, TM4 of subunit c'' does not form strong cross-links with TM7 of subunit a, suggesting that these transmembrane segments are not normally in close proximity. These results are discussed in terms of a model involving rotation of interacting helices in subunit a and the proteolipid subunits relative to each other.

  2. Cross-links between ribosomal proteins of 30S subunits in 70S tight couples and in 30S subunits.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J M; Boileau, G; Cover, J A; Traut, R R

    1983-08-01

    Ribosome 70S tight couples and 30S subunits derived from them were modified with 2-iminothiolane under conditions where about two sulfhydryl groups per protein were added to the ribosomal particles. The 70S and 30S particles were not treated with elevated concentrations of NH4Cl, in contrast to those used in earlier studies. The modified particles were oxidized to promote disulfide bond formation. Proteins were extracted from the cross-linked particles by using conditions to preclude disulfide interchange. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were fractionated on the basis of charge by electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/urea gels at pH 5.5. The proteins from sequential slices of the urea gels were analyzed by two-dimensional diagonal polyacrylamide/sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Final identification of proteins in cross-linked complexes was made by radioiodination of the proteins, followed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide/urea gel electrophoresis. Attention was focused on cross-links between 30S proteins. We report the identification of 27 cross-linked dimers and 2 trimers of 30S proteins, all but one of which were found in both 70S ribosomes and free 30S subunits in similar yield. Seven of the cross-links, S3-S13, S13-S21, S14-S19, S7-S12, S9-S13, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21, have not been reported previously when 2-iminothiolane was used. Cross-links S3-S13, S13-S21, S7-S12, S11-S21, and S6-S18-S21 are reported for the first time. The identification of the seven new cross-links is illustrated and discussed in detail. Ten of the dimers reported in the earlier studies of Sommer & Traut (1976) [Sommer, A., & Traut, R. R. (1976) J. Mol. Biol. 106, 995-1015], using 30S subunits treated with high salt concentrations, were not found in the experiments reported here.

  3. Development of glutamatergic synapses in the rat retina: the postnatal expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Hack, Iris; Koulen, Peter; Peichl, Leo; Brandstätter, Johann Helmut

    2002-01-01

    We examined the distribution of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 to GluR4, of the kainate receptor subunits GluR6/7 and KA2, and of the glutamate receptor subunits delta1/2, during postnatal development of the rat retina by immunocytochemistry and light microscopy using receptor subunit specific antisera. The various ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits were expressed early in postnatal rat retina, and most of the subunits, with the exception of delta1/2. were found in both synaptic layers of rat retina. The glutamate receptor subunits studied showed differences in their time of appearance, their spatial distribution patterns, and in their expression levels in the developing rat retina. Interestingly, most of the AMPA receptor subunits were expressed earlier than the kainate receptor subunits in the two synaptic layers of the retina, indicating that AMPA glutamate receptors play an important role in early postnatal glutamatergic synaptic transmission. We also studied the ultrastructural localization of the AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1 to GluR4 by immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy in the inner plexiform layer of the mature rat retina. Most of the subunits were found postsynaptic to the ribbon synapses of OFF-cone, ON-cone, and rod bipolar cells. The results of this study suggest an involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors in processes of synaptic maturation and the formation of synaptic circuitries in the developing plexiform layers of the retina. Furthermore, AMPA and kainate receptors play a role in synaptic processing and in the development of both the scotopic and photopic pathways in the rat retina.

  4. Differential regulation of thyrotropin subunit apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.; Weintraub, B.D.

    1985-04-01

    The regulation of TSH apoprotein and carbohydrate biosynthesis by thyroid hormone was studied by incubating pituitaries from normal and hypothyroid (3 weeks post-thyroidectomy) rats in medium containing (/sup 14/C)alanine and (/sup 3/H) glucosamine. After 6 h, samples were sequentially treated with anti-TSH beta to precipitate TSH and free TSH beta, anti-LH beta to clear the sample of LH and free LH beta, then anti-LH alpha to precipitate free alpha-subunit. Total proteins were acid precipitated. All precipitates were subjected to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, which were then sliced and assayed by scintillation spectrometry. In hypothyroid pituitaries plus medium, (/sup 14/C)alanine incorporation in combined and free beta-subunits was 26 times normal and considerably greater than the 3.4-fold increase seen in total protein; combined and free alpha-subunits showed no specific increase in apoprotein synthesis. (/sup 3/H)Glucosamine incorporation in combined alpha- and beta-subunits in hypothyroid samples was 13 and 21 times normal, respectively, and was greater than the 1.9-fold increase in total protein; free alpha-subunit showed no specific increase in carbohydrate synthesis. The glucosamine to alanine ratio, reflecting relative glycosylation of newly synthesized molecules, was increased in hypothyroidism for combined alpha-subunits, but not for combined beta-subunits, free alpha-subunits, or total proteins. In summary, short term hypothyroidism selectively stimulated TSH beta apoprotein synthesis and carbohydrate synthesis of combined alpha- and beta-subunits. Hypothyroidism also increased the relative glycosylation of combined alpha-subunit. Thus, thyroid hormone deficiency appears to alter the rate-limiting step in TSH assembly (i.e. beta-subunit synthesis) as well as the carbohydrate structure of TSH, which may play important roles in its biological function.

  5. Valine 904, tyrosine 898, and cysteine 908 in Na,K-ATPase alpha subunits are important for assembly with beta subunits.

    PubMed

    Wang, S G; Farley, R A

    1998-11-01

    A 26-amino acid sequence in an extracellular loop of the Na,K-ATPase alpha subunit between membrane-spanning segments 7 and 8 has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of Na,K-ATPase and to promote alphabeta assembly (Lemas, M. V., Hamrick, M., Takeyasu, K., and Fambrough, D. M. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 8255-8259) When this 26-amino acid sequence of the rat Na,K-ATPase alpha3 subunit was replaced by the corresponding sequence of the rat gastric H,K-ATPase alpha subunit, the chimeric alpha subunit assembled preferentially with the rat gastric H,K-ATPase beta subunit (Wang, S.-G., Eakle, K. A., Levenson, R., and Farley, R. A. (1997) Am. J. Physiol. 272, C923-C930). In the present study, these 26 amino acids (Asn886-Ala911) of rat Na,K-ATPase alpha3 were replaced by the corresponding amino acids Asn908-Ala933 of rat distal colon H, K-ATPase. Site-directed mutagenesis of the chimeric alpha subunits and Na,K-ATPase alpha3 showed that Val904, Tyr898, and Cys908 in the Na,K-ATPase alpha3 subunit are key residues in alphabeta subunit interactions. The V904Q mutation in Na,K-ATPase alpha3 reduced the Bmax for ouabain binding and the ATPase activity of alpha3beta1 complexes by approximately 95%, and Y898R reduced the Bmax and ATPase activity by approximately 60%. The complementary mutations Q904V and R898Y increased the amount of ouabain bound by yeast membranes expressing the chimera with the colon H,K-ATPase sequence. The amount of ouabain bound by complexes assembled between Na, K-ATPase alpha3 containing the Y898R,C908G mutations and gastric H, K-ATPase beta was less than 10% of wild type Na,K-ATPase alpha3 expressed with the same beta subunit. The R898Y,G908C mutations in the chimeric alpha subunits also increased ouabain binding. PMID:9792642

  6. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  7. Amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer modelling of the alpha and beta subunits of echicetin from the venom of Echis carinatus (saw-scaled viper).

    PubMed

    Polgár, J; Magnenat, E M; Peitsch, M C; Wells, T N; Saqi, M S; Clemetson, K J

    1997-04-15

    Echicetin, a heterodimeric protein from the venom of Echis carinatus, binds to platelet glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and so inhibits platelet aggregation or agglutination induced by various platelet agonists acting via GPIb. The amino acid sequence of the beta subunit of echicetin has been reported and found to belong to the recently identified snake venom subclass of the C-type lectin protein family. Echicetin alpha and beta subunits were purified. N-terminal sequence analysis provided direct evidence that the protein purified was echicetin. The paper presents the complete amino acid sequence of the alpha subunit and computer models of the alpha and beta subunits. The sequence of alpha echicetin is highly similar to the alpha and beta chains of various heterodimeric and homodimeric C-type lectins. Neither of the fully reduced and alkylated alpha or beta subunits of echicetin inhibited the platelet agglutination induced by von Willebrand factor-ristocetin or alpha-thrombin. Earlier reports about the inhibitory activity of reduced and alkylated echicetin beta subunit might have been due to partial reduction of the protein. PMID:9163349

  8. Initial bridges between two ribosomal subunits are formed within 9.4 milliseconds, as studied by time-resolved cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Tanvir R; Yassin, Aymen S; Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Meng, Xing; Lu, Toh-Ming; Wagenknecht, Terence; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2014-07-01

    Association of the two ribosomal subunits during the process of translation initiation is a crucial step of protein synthesis. The two subunits (30S and 50S) of the bacterial 70S ribosome are held together by 12 dynamic bridges involving RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. The process of bridge formation, such as whether all these bridges are formed simultaneously or in a sequential order, is poorly understood. To understand such processes, we have developed and implemented a class of microfluidic devices that mix two components to completion within 0.4 ms and spray the mixture in the form of microdroplets onto an electron microscopy grid, yielding a minimum reaction time of 9.4 ms before cryofixation. Using these devices, we have obtained cryo-EM data corresponding to reaction times of 9.4 and 43 ms and have determined 3D structures of ribosomal subunit association intermediates. Molecular analyses of the cryo-EM maps reveal that eight intersubunit bridges (bridges B1a, B1b, B2a, B2b, B3, B7a, B7b, and B8) form within 9.4 ms, whereas the remaining four bridges (bridges B2c, B4, B5, and B6) take longer than 43 ms to form, suggesting that bridges are formed in a stepwise fashion. Our approach can be used to characterize sequences of various dynamic functional events on complex macromolecular assemblies such as ribosomes.

  9. Use of chemical modifications and site-directed mutagenesis to probe the functional role of thiol groups on the. gamma. subunit of Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pradier, L.; Yee, A.S.; McNamee, M.G. )

    1989-08-08

    Alkylation of Torpedo californica purified nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) with N-phenylmaleimide (NPM) under nonreducing conditions led to ion flux inhibition without affecting ligand binding properties. The {gamma} subunit was shown to be preferentially labeled by ({sup 3}H)NPM with partial labeling of the {alpha} subunit at higher NPM concentrations. Alkylation occurs at cysteine residues as confirmed by amino acid analysis. Cyanogen bromide peptide mapping of the {gamma} subunit indicates that at least two residues corresponding to Cys-416, -420, or -451 are labeled. Residues 416 and 420 are part of the proposed amphipathic helix, and the functional role of these two cysteines is further investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of T. californica AChR cDNAs and expression of the mutants in Xenopus laevis oocytes following injection of SP6 transcripts. Several features of SP6 transcripts are shown to be important for efficient translation in vivo. Mutations Cys {yields} Ser{gamma}416,420 and Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416 did not perturb either the receptor functional properties or its expression levels. The double mutant Cys {yields} Phe{gamma}416,420 displayed a 30% decrease of normalized AChR activity. The relatively small effect of large steric mutations in the amphipathic helix argues against its presence in the tightly packed transmembrane domain of the protein.

  10. Mapping the Future of Map Librarianship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Laura

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of electronic versions of maps focuses on TIGER files (i.e., electronic maps distributed by the U.S. Bureau of the Census) and their manipulation using geographic information system (GIS) technology. Topics addressed include applications of GIS software, projects to improve access to TIGER files, and the role of GIS in libraries. (MES)

  11. Mapping Human Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Chloe M.; Ren, Bing

    2013-01-01

    As the second dimension to the genome, the epigenome contains key information specific to every type of cells. Thousands of human epigenome maps have been produced in recent years thanks to rapid development of high throughput epigenome mapping technologies. In this review, we discuss the current epigenome mapping toolkit and utilities of epigenome maps. We focus particularly on mapping of DNA methylation, chromatin modification state and chromatin structures, and emphasize the use of epigenome maps to delineate human gene regulatory sequences and developmental programs. We also provide a perspective on the progress of the epigenomics field and challenges ahead. PMID:24074860

  12. Density Equalizing Map Projections

    1995-07-01

    A geographic map is mathematically transformed so that the subareas of the map are proportional to a given quantity such as population. In other words, population density is equalized over the entire map. The transformed map can be used as a display tool, or it can be statistically analyzed. For example, cases of disease plotted on the transformed map should be uniformly distributed at random, if disease rates are everywhere equal. Geographic clusters of diseasemore » can be readily identified, and their statistical significance determined, on a density equalized map.« less

  13. Analyses of Subnanometer Resolution Cryo-EM Density Maps

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Matthew L.; Baker, Mariah R.; Hryc, Corey F.; DiMaio, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Today, electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) can routinely achieve subnanometer resolutions of complex macromolecular assemblies. From a density map, one can extract key structural and functional information using a variety of computational analysis tools. At subnanometer resolution, these tools make it possible to isolate individual subunits, identify secondary structures, and accurately fit atomic models. With several cryo-EM studies achieving resolutions beyond 5 Å, computational modeling and feature recognition tools have been employed to construct backbone and atomic models of the protein components directly from a density map. In this chapter, we describe several common classes of computational tools that can be used to analyze and model subnanometer resolution reconstructions from cryo-EM. A general protocol for analyzing subnanometer resolution density maps is presented along with a full description of steps used in analyzing the 4.3 Å resolution structure of Mm-cpn. PMID:20888467

  14. All three subunits of soybean beta-conglycinin are potential food allergens.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Kim, Won-Seok; Jang, Sungchan; Kerley, Monty S

    2009-02-11

    Soybeans are recognized as one of the "big 8" food allergens. IgE antibodies from soybean-sensitive patients recognize more than 15 soybean proteins. Among these proteins only the alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, but not the highly homologous alpha'- and beta-subunits, has been shown to be a major allergenic protein. The objective of this study was to examine if the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin can also serve as potential allergens. Immunoblot analysis using sera collected from soybean-allergic patients revealed the presence of IgE antibodies that recognized several soy proteins including 72, 70, 52, 34, and 21 kDa proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis of trypsin-digested 72, 70, and 52 kDa proteins indicated that these proteins were the alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin, respectively. Additionally, purified alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin were recognized by IgE antibodies present in the soybean-allergic patients. The IgE reactivity to the beta-subunit of beta-conglycinin was not abolished when this glycoprotein was either deglycosylated using glycosidases or expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli . The results suggest that in addition to the previously recognized alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin also are potential food allergens. PMID:19138084

  15. The ε Subunit of the Chloroplast Coupling Factor 1 from Euglena gracilis1

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Joseph S.

    1982-01-01

    The coupling factor from chloroplasts (CF1) of Euglena gracilis Z strain is an active ATPase in situ, and its activity cannot be increased by treatment with trypsin or heating as is the case with the CF1 from other sources. The smallest subunit of CF1, the ε subunit, is supposed to be involved in controlling the ATPase activity. We have devised a simple technique for rapid and large-scale isolation of this subunit. The ε subunit from Euglena CF1, although having only a limited inhibitory effect on Euglena CF1, drastically inhibited the ATPase activity of heat-activated spinach CF1. The inhibition of spinach CF1 could be reversed by passage through Sephadex G-50 or by a second heat activation. An antibody to the ε subunit of Euglena CF1 cross-reacted only weakly with CF1 from spinach, Sorghum, Kalanchoë, or Anacystis nidulans, but reacted well with whole Euglena CF1 in addition to its ε subunit. The antibody increased the ATPase activity of Euglena and Anacystis CF1 and of unactivated or partially activated spinach CF1. The results suggest that the function of the ε subunit in Euglena CF1 is similar to its function in CF1 from other sources. The data also suggest that changes induced in spinach CF1 by activation involves modifications in subunits other than the ε one. PMID:16662514

  16. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains.

    PubMed

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L

    2014-01-15

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA-protein particles evolved.

  17. Similar GABAA receptor subunit composition in somatic and axon initial segment synapses of hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerti-Szigeti, Katalin; Nusser, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells (PCs) express many GABAAR subunit types and receive GABAergic inputs from distinct interneurons. Previous experiments revealed input-specific differences in α1 and α2 subunit densities in perisomatic synapses, suggesting distinct IPSC decay kinetics. However, IPSC decays evoked by axo-axonic, parvalbumin- or cholecystokinin-expressing basket cells were found to be similar. Using replica immunogold labeling, here we show that all CA1 PC somatic and AIS synapses contain the α1, α2, β1, β2, β3 and γ2 subunits. In CA3 PCs, 90% of the perisomatic synapses are immunopositive for the α1 subunit and all synapses are positive for the remaining five subunits. Somatic synapses form unimodal distributions based on their immunoreactivity for these subunits. The α2 subunit densities in somatic synapses facing Cav2.1 (i.e. parvalbumin) or Cav2.2 (cholecystokinin) positive presynaptic active zones are comparable. We conclude that perisomatic synapses made by three distinct interneuron types have similar GABAA receptor subunit content. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18426.001 PMID:27537197

  18. All three subunits of soybean beta-conglycinin are potential food allergens.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Kim, Won-Seok; Jang, Sungchan; Kerley, Monty S

    2009-02-11

    Soybeans are recognized as one of the "big 8" food allergens. IgE antibodies from soybean-sensitive patients recognize more than 15 soybean proteins. Among these proteins only the alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, but not the highly homologous alpha'- and beta-subunits, has been shown to be a major allergenic protein. The objective of this study was to examine if the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin can also serve as potential allergens. Immunoblot analysis using sera collected from soybean-allergic patients revealed the presence of IgE antibodies that recognized several soy proteins including 72, 70, 52, 34, and 21 kDa proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis of trypsin-digested 72, 70, and 52 kDa proteins indicated that these proteins were the alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin, respectively. Additionally, purified alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin were recognized by IgE antibodies present in the soybean-allergic patients. The IgE reactivity to the beta-subunit of beta-conglycinin was not abolished when this glycoprotein was either deglycosylated using glycosidases or expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli . The results suggest that in addition to the previously recognized alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin also are potential food allergens.

  19. Emerging evidence for specific neuronal functions of auxiliary calcium channel α2δ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Obermair, Gerald J.

    2015-01-01

    In nerve cells the ubiquitous second messenger calcium regulates a variety of vitally important functions including neurotransmitter release, gene regulation, and neuronal plasticity. The entry of calcium into cells is tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, which consist of a heteromultimeric complex of a pore forming α1, and the auxiliary β and α2δ subunits. Four genes (Cacna2d1-4) encode for the extracellular membrane-attached α2δ subunits (α2δ-1 to α2δ-4), out of which three isoforms (α2δ-1 to -3) are strongly expressed in the central nervous system. Over the years a wealth of studies has demonstrated the classical role of α2δ subunits in channel trafficking and calcium current modulation. Recent studies in specialized neuronal cell systems propose roles of α2δ subunits beyond the classical view and implicate α2δ subunits as important regulators of synapse formation. These findings are supported by the identification of novel human disease mutations associated with α2δ subunits and by the fact that α2δ subunits are the target of the anti-epileptic and anti-allodynic drugs gabapentin and pregabalin. Here we review the recently emerging evidence for specific as well as redundant neuronal roles of α2δ subunits and discuss the mechanisms for establishing and maintaining specificity. PMID:25504062

  20. A hierarchical model for assembly of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit domains

    PubMed Central

    Gamalinda, Michael; Ohmayer, Uli; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Kumcuoglu, Beril; Woolford, Joshua; Mbom, Bertrade; Lin, Lawrence; Woolford, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite having high-resolution structures for eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, it remained unclear how these ribonucleoprotein complexes are constructed in living cells. Nevertheless, knowing where ribosomal proteins interact with ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a strategic platform to investigate the connection between spatial and temporal aspects of 60S subunit biogenesis. We previously found that the function of individual yeast large subunit ribosomal proteins (RPLs) in precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing correlates with their location in the structure of mature 60S subunits. This observation suggested that there is an order by which 60S subunits are formed. To test this model, we used proteomic approaches to assay changes in the levels of ribosomal proteins and assembly factors in preribosomes when RPLs functioning in early, middle, and late steps of pre-60S assembly are depleted. Our results demonstrate that structural domains of eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunits are formed in a hierarchical fashion. Assembly begins at the convex solvent side, followed by the polypeptide exit tunnel, the intersubunit side, and finally the central protuberance. This model provides an initial paradigm for the sequential assembly of eukaryotic 60S subunits. Our results reveal striking differences and similarities between assembly of bacterial and eukaryotic large ribosomal subunits, providing insights into how these RNA–protein particles evolved. PMID:24449272

  1. NMDA receptor surface mobility depends on NR2A-2B subunits

    PubMed Central

    Groc, Laurent; Heine, Martin; Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) varies during development, and this change is important in NMDAR-dependent signaling. In particular, synaptic NMDAR switch from containing mostly NR2B subunit to a mixture of NR2B and NR2A subunits. The pathways by which neurons differentially traffic NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs are poorly understood. Using single-particle and -molecule approaches and specific antibodies directed against NR2A and NR2B extracellular epitopes, we investigated the surface mobility of native NR2A and NR2B subunits at the surface of cultured neurons. The surface mobility of NMDARs depends on the NR2 subunit subtype, with NR2A-containing NMDARs being more stable than NR2B-containing ones, and NR2A subunit overexpression stabilizes surface NR2B-containing NMDARs. The developmental change in the synaptic surface content of NR2A and NR2B subunits was correlated with a developmental change in the time spent by the subunits within synapses. This suggests that the switch in synaptic NMDAR subtypes depends on the regulation of the receptor surface trafficking. PMID:17124177

  2. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  3. Identification of Four Distinct Subunit Types in the Unique 6×6 Hemocyanin of the Centipede Scutigera coleoptrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, W.; Markl, J.

    We isolated 6×6 hemocyanin, dissociated it into subunits, and examined it by electron microscopy. The subunits were separated by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), sodium dodecyl sulfate PAGE, and crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Single subunits were isolated by gel cutting from native PAGE and identified as hemocyanin by measuring their ultraviolet spectrum. A total of four distinct hemocyanin subunits were identified, and the subunit pattern of the three electrophoresis systems assigned to each other. The relative proportion of subunits a:b:c:d were 2 : 2 :>: 1 as determined by densitometry. Presumably, c and d act as linkers between hexamers.

  4. Intracellular dissociation and reassembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase:the alpha-subunits associated with the immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) allowing reassembly with the beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Bulleid, N J

    1996-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) consists of two distinct polypeptides; the catalytically more important alpha-subunit and the beta-subunit, which is identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulphide isomerase. The enzyme appears to be assembled in vivo into an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer from newly synthesized alpha-subunits associating with an endogenous pool of beta-subunits. Using a cell-free system, we have shown previously that enzyme assembly is redox-dependent and that assembled alpha-subunits are intramolecularly disulphide-bonded [John and Bulleid (1994) Biochemistry 33, 14018-14025]. Here we have studied this assembly process within intact cells by expressing both subunits in COS-1 cells. Newly synthesized alpha-subunits were shown to assemble with the beta-subunit, to form insoluble aggregates, or to remain soluble but not associate with the beta-subunit. Treatment of cells with dithiothreitol (DTT) led to dissociation of P4-H into subunits and on removal of DTT the enzyme reassembled. This reassembly was ATP-dependent, suggesting an interaction with an ATP-dependent chaperone. This was confirmed when immunoglobulin-heavy-chain binding protein (BiP) and alpha-subunits were co-immunoprecipitated with antibodies against the alpha-subunit and BiP, respectively. These results indicate that unassembled alpha-subunits are maintained in an assembly-competent form by interacting with the molecular chaperone BiP. PMID:8760347

  5. Mapping of Daedalia Planum Lava Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Carli, Cristian; Massironi, Matteo; Pasquarè, Giorgio; Sgavetti, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Daedalia Planum is one of the Tharsis volcanic plains and is located southwest of the Arsia Mons. MOLA, THEMIS, MOC and OMEGA data have been analysed, providing a multi-scale characterisation of this Martian lava field. According to Mars Global Surveyor's MOLA data, the flanks of Arsia have an average slope <5°, while the surrounding regions, including Daedalia Planum, have slopes <0,5° and commonly <0,1°. Mars Odyssey/THEMIS VIS and IR images show a plain covered by a huge number of lava flows. Older and larger lava flows on the field have a length greater than ~1500 km. Moreover most of the Daedalia flows are associated to wrinkly and ropy surfaces, typical of pahoehoe lavas. On the base of the morphology differences among the flows and through stratigraphic relationships we performed a geological map of the area. MEX/OMEGA spectra were collected in different areas of the lava field. Besides the similar absorption bands OMEGA spectra showed also some differences in reflectance and spectral slope. The spectral map created using the SAM classification reveals that these spectral variations are generally in agreement with the lava flows mapped previously on the base of the flows morphology and stratigraphy. This suggested that such variability is related with different surface textures of the lava flow. Moreover in some cases spectral map highlighted the presence of spectral subunits inside the same stratigraphic unit, due likely to a different mineralogy or rock textures. Therefore spectral analysis revealed useful to improve the geological mapping of the Daedalia Planum region.

  6. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states.

  7. Localisation of the subunits of the photosynthetic reaction centers in the chromatophore membrane of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Zürrer, H; Snozzi, M; Hanselmann, K; Bachofen, R

    1977-05-11

    Reaction centers were isolated with the detergent lauryl dimethyl amine oxide from chromatophore membranes of Rhodospirillum rubrum. The subunit composition of these reaction centers is similar to the one obtained from Rhodopseudomonas spheroides: three subunits with the molecular weights of 21 000, 24 000 and 29 000. Reaction centers prepared from chromatophores labeled with 131I were heavely labeled in their large subunit (H). The smaller subunits (L and M) contained only little label. Sonication during labeling yielded a slightly higher incorporation of 131I in subunit H compared to the smaller ones. It is concluded that the H protein is largely exposed at the cytoplasmic side of the membrane but might also be accessible for iodination on the inside of the membrane while the L and M proteins are almost completely embedded in the membrane. Iodination of spheroplasts results in only a slight binding of 131I to chromatophores and reaction centers.

  8. Synthesis and processing of human chorionic gonadotropin subunits in cultured choriocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddon, R W; Hanson, C A; Addison, N J

    1979-01-01

    Pulse and pulse-chase experiments have identified the presence of partially glycosylated precursors of the alpha and beta subunits of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in cultured JAR choriocarcinoma cells. The alpha subunit precursor has an apparent molecular weight (by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) of 18,000 (compared to 22,000 for fully processed alpha subunit); the beta subunit precursor has an apparent molecular weight of 24,000 (fully processed, 34,000). Both of these precursors appear to have an intracellular half-life of at least 1 hr and to contain the mannose core but not the terminal carbohydrate sequences. Fully processed alpha and beta subunits do not accumulate intracellularly, indicating that further processing of the precursors is followed by rapid secretion. Images PMID:291927

  9. A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1989-01-01

    A protein kinase from wheat germ that phosphorylates the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IIA has been partially purified and characterized. The kinase has a native molecular weight of about 200 kilodaltons. This kinase utilizes Mg2+ and ATP and transfers about 20 phosphates to the heptapeptide repeats Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser-Tyr-Ser in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the 220-kilodalton subunit of soybean RNA polymerase II. This phosphorylation results in a mobility shift of the 220-kilodalton subunits of a variety of eukaryotic RNA polymerases to polypeptides ranging in size from greater than 220 kilodaltons to 240 kilodaltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The phosphorylation is highly specific to the heptapeptide repeats since a degraded subunit polypeptide of 180 kilodaltons that lacks the heptapeptide repeats is poorly phosphorylated. Synthetic heptapeptide repeat multimers inhibit the phosphorylation of the 220-kilodalton subunit. PMID:2535525

  10. Structural characterization of recombinant crustacyanin subunits from the lobster Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Pincolini, Elisa; McClintock, Timothy S; Rössle, Manfred; Berni, Rodolfo; Cianci, Michele

    2012-08-01

    Crustacean crustacyanin proteins are linked to the production and modification of carapace colour, with direct implications for fitness and survival. Here, the structural and functional properties of the two recombinant crustacyanin subunits H(1) and H(2) from the American lobster Homarus americanus are reported. The two subunits are structurally highly similar to the corresponding natural apo crustacyanin CRTC and CRTA subunits from the European lobster H. gammarus. Reconstitution studies of the recombinant crustacyanin proteins H(1) and H(2) with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85-95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits from H. gammarus in complex with astaxanthin. Moreover, correlations between the presence of crustacyanin genes in crustacean species and the resulting carapace colours with the spectral properties of the subunits in complex with astaxanthin confirmed this genotype-phenotype linkage. PMID:22869108

  11. Structural characterization of recombinant crustacyanin subunits from the lobster Homarus americanus

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Pincolini, Elisa; McClintock, Timothy S.; Rössle, Manfred; Berni, Rodolfo; Cianci, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Crustacean crustacyanin proteins are linked to the production and modification of carapace colour, with direct implications for fitness and survival. Here, the structural and functional properties of the two recombinant crustacyanin subunits H1 and H2 from the American lobster Homarus americanus are reported. The two subunits are structurally highly similar to the corresponding natural apo crustacyanin CRTC and CRTA subunits from the European lobster H. gammarus. Reconstitution studies of the recombinant crustacyanin proteins H1 and H2 with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85–95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits from H. gammarus in complex with astaxanthin. Moreover, correlations between the presence of crustacyanin genes in crustacean species and the resulting carapace colours with the spectral properties of the subunits in complex with astaxanthin confirmed this genotype–phenotype linkage. PMID:22869108

  12. Protein kinase A catalytic subunit isoform PRKACA; History, function and physiology.

    PubMed

    Turnham, Rigney E; Scott, John D

    2016-02-15

    Our appreciation of the scope and influence of second messenger signaling has its origins in pioneering work on the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Also called protein kinase A (PKA), this holoenzyme exists as a tetramer comprised of a regulatory (R) subunit dimer and two catalytic (C) subunits. Upon binding of two molecules of the second messenger cAMP to each R subunit, a conformational change in the PKA holoenzyme occurs to release the C subunits. These active kinases phosphorylate downstream targets to propagate cAMP responsive cell signaling events. This article focuses on the discovery, structure, cellular location and physiological effects of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein kinase A (encoded by the gene PRKACA). We also explore the potential role of this essential gene as a molecular mediator of certain disease states. PMID:26687711

  13. Structural characterization of recombinant crustacyanin subunits from the lobster Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Michele; Folli, Claudia; Pincolini, Elisa; McClintock, Timothy S; Rössle, Manfred; Berni, Rodolfo; Cianci, Michele

    2012-08-01

    Crustacean crustacyanin proteins are linked to the production and modification of carapace colour, with direct implications for fitness and survival. Here, the structural and functional properties of the two recombinant crustacyanin subunits H(1) and H(2) from the American lobster Homarus americanus are reported. The two subunits are structurally highly similar to the corresponding natural apo crustacyanin CRTC and CRTA subunits from the European lobster H. gammarus. Reconstitution studies of the recombinant crustacyanin proteins H(1) and H(2) with astaxanthin reproduced the bathochromic shift of 85-95 nm typical of the natural crustacyanin subunits from H. gammarus in complex with astaxanthin. Moreover, correlations between the presence of crustacyanin genes in crustacean species and the resulting carapace colours with the spectral properties of the subunits in complex with astaxanthin confirmed this genotype-phenotype linkage.

  14. Balancing acts of two HEAT subunits of condensin I support dynamic assembly of chromosome axes.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Kazuhisa; Kobayashi, Tetsuya J; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2015-04-01

    Condensin I is a five-subunit protein complex that plays a central role in mitotic chromosome assembly and segregation in eukaryotes. To dissect its mechanism of action, we reconstituted wild-type and mutant complexes from recombinant subunits and tested their abilities to assemble chromosomes in Xenopus egg cell-free extracts depleted of endogenous condensins. We find that ATP binding and hydrolysis by SMC subunits have distinct contributions to the action of condensin I and that continuous ATP hydrolysis is required for structural maintenance of chromosomes. Mutant complexes lacking either one of two HEAT subunits produce abnormal chromosomes with highly characteristic defects and have contrasting structural effects on chromosome axes preassembled with the wild-type complex. We propose that balancing acts of the two HEAT subunits support dynamic assembly of chromosome axes under the control of the SMC ATPase cycle, thereby governing construction of rod-shaped chromosomes in eukaryotic cells.

  15. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-05-02

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA Polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), providing the first description of their physical compositions in plants. AC40 and AC19 subunits are typically common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes whose mutation, in humans, is a cause of the craniofacial disorder, Treacher-Collins Syndrome. Surprisingly, A. thaliana, and related species, express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Pol III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with this functional divergence of Pol I and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit, and either variant can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the twelve subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers.

  16. Subunit compositions of Arabidopsis RNA polymerases I and III reveal Pol I- and Pol III-specific forms of the AC40 subunit and alternative forms of the C53 subunit

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ream, Thomas S.; Haag, Jeremy R.; Pontvianne, Frederic; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2015-05-02

    Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identified the subunits of Arabidopsis thaliana multisubunit RNA Polymerases I and III (abbreviated as Pol I and Pol III), providing the first description of their physical compositions in plants. AC40 and AC19 subunits are typically common to Pol I (a.k.a. Pol A) and Pol III (a.k.a. Pol C) and are encoded by single genes whose mutation, in humans, is a cause of the craniofacial disorder, Treacher-Collins Syndrome. Surprisingly, A. thaliana, and related species, express two distinct AC40 paralogs, one of which assembles into Pol I and the other of which assembles into Polmore » III. Changes at eight amino acid positions correlate with this functional divergence of Pol I and Pol III-specific AC40 paralogs. Two genes encode homologs of the yeast C53 subunit, and either variant can assemble into Pol III. By contrast, only one of two potential C17 variants, and one of two potential C31 variants were detected in Pol III. We introduce a new nomenclature system for plant Pol I and Pol III subunits in which the twelve subunits that are structurally and functionally homologous among Pols I through V are assigned equivalent numbers.« less

  17. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel α1-subunits

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Nicole; Buryi, Vitali; Feron, Olivier; Gomez, Jean-Pierre; Christen, Marie-Odile; Godfraind, Théophile

    1998-01-01

    CHO cells expressing the α1C-a subunit (cardiac isoform) and the α1C-b subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for α1C isoforms.Inward current evoked by the transfected α1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration.Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of α1C-b-subunit than of α1C-a-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of −100 mV than at −50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms.Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on α1C-a than on α1C-b subunit at Vh of −100 mV and −50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages.[3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the α1C-b than for the α1C-a subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the α1C-a subunit than for the α1C-b subunit.These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the α1C-a and α1C-b subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  18. ASSESSMENT OF SUBUNIT-DEPENDENT DIRECT GATING AND ALLOSTERIC MODULATORY EFFECTS OF CARISOPRODOL AT GABAA RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; González, Lorie A.; Dillon, Glenn H.

    2016-01-01

    Carisoprodol is a widely prescribed muscle relaxant, abuse of which has grown considerably in recent years. It directly activates and allosterically modulates α1β2γ2 GABAARs, although the site(s) of action are unknown. To gain insight into the actions of carisoprodol, subunit-dependent effects of this drug were assessed. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from HEK293 cells expressing α1β2, α1β3 or αxβzγ2 (where x = 1–6 and z = 1–3) GABAARs, and in receptors incorporating the δ subunit (modeling extrasynaptic receptors). The ability to directly gate and allosterically potentiate GABA-gated currents was observed for all configurations. Presence or absence of the γ2 subunit did not affect the ability of carisoprodol to directly gate or allosterically modulate the receptor. Presence of the β1 subunit conferred highest efficacy for direct activation relative to maximum GABA currents, while presence of the β2 subunit conferred highest efficacy for allosteric modulation of the GABA response. With regard to α subunits, carisoprodol was most efficacious at enhancing the actions of GABA in receptors incorporating the α1 subunit. The ability to directly gate the receptor was generally comparable regardless of the α subunit isoform, although receptors incorporating the α3 subunit showed significantly reduced direct gating efficacy and affinity. In extrasynaptic (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, carisoprodol had greater efficacy than GABA as a direct gating agonist. In addition, carisoprodol allosterically potentiated both EC20 and saturating GABA concentrations in these receptors. In assessing voltage-dependence, we found direct gating and inhibitory effects were insensitive to membrane voltage, whereas allosteric modulatory effects were affected by membrane voltage. Our findings demonstrate direct and allosteric effects of carisoprodol at synaptic and extrasynpatic GABAARs and that subunit isoform influences these effects. PMID:25896767

  19. Primary structure of the 5 S subunit of transcarboxylase as deduced from the genomic DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C G; Kumar, G K; Shenoy, B C; Haase, F C; Phillips, N F; Park, V M; Magner, W J; Hejlik, D P; Wood, H G; Samols, D

    1993-09-13

    Transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii is a complex biotin-containing enzyme composed of 30 polypeptides of three different types. It is composed of six dimeric outer subunits associated with a central cylindrical hexameric subunit through 12 biotinyl subunits; three outer subunits on each face of the central hexamer. Each outer dimer is termed a 5 S subunit which associates with two biotinyl subunits. The enzyme catalyzes a two-step reaction in which methylmalonyl-CoA and pyruvate form propionyl-CoA and oxalacetate, the 5 S subunit specifically catalyzing one of these reactions. We report here the cloning, sequencing and expression of the monomer of the 5 S subunit. The gene was identified by matching amino acid sequences derived from isolated authentic 5 S peptides with the deduced sequence of an open reading frame present on a cloned P. shermanii genomic fragment known to contain the gene encoding the 1.3 S biotinyl subunit. The cloned 5 S gene encodes a protein of 519 amino acids, M(r) 57,793. The deduced sequence shows regions of extensive homology with that of pyruvate carboxylase and oxalacetate decarboxylase, two enzymes which catalyze the same or reverse reaction. A fragment was subcloned into pUC19 in an orientation such that the 5 S open reading frame could be expressed from the lac promoter of the vector. Crude extracts prepared from these cells contained an immunoreactive band on Western blots which co-migrated with authentic 5 S and were fully active in catalyzing the 5 S partial reaction. We conclude that we have cloned, sequenced and expressed the monomer of the 5 S subunit and that the expressed product is catalytically active. PMID:8365490

  20. The action of calcium channel blockers on recombinant L-type calcium channel alpha1-subunits.

    PubMed

    Morel, N; Buryi, V; Feron, O; Gomez, J P; Christen, M O; Godfraind, T

    1998-11-01

    1. CHO cells expressing the alpha(1C-a) subunit (cardiac isoform) and the alpha(1C-b) subunit (vascular isoform) of the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channel were used to investigate whether tissue selectivity of Ca2+ channel blockers could be related to different affinities for alpha1C isoforms. 2. Inward current evoked by the transfected alpha1 subunit was recorded by the patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. 3. Neutral dihydropyridines (nifedipine, nisoldipine, (+)-PN200-110) were more potent inhibitors of alpha(1C-)b-subunit than of alpha(1C-a)-subunit. This difference was more marked at a holding potential of -100 mV than at -50 mV. SDZ 207-180 (an ionized dihydropyridine) exhibited the same potency on the two isoforms. 4. Pinaverium (ionized non-dihydropyridine derivative) was 2 and 4 fold more potent on alpha(1C-a) than on alpha(1C-b) subunit at Vh of -100 mV and -50 mV, respectively. Effects of verapamil were identical on the two isoforms at both voltages. 5. [3H]-(+)-PN 200-110 binding experiments showed that neutral dihydropyridines had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-b) than for the alpha(1C-a) subunit. SDZ 207-180 had the same affinity for the two isoforms and pinaverium had a higher affinity for the alpha(1C-a) subunit than for the alpha(1C-b) subunit. 6. These results indicate marked differences among Ca2+ channel blockers in their selectivity for the alpha(1C-a) and alpha(1C-b) subunits of the Ca2+ channel. PMID:9846638

  1. New map data catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Map byproducts, including aerial photographs, color separations, map data in computer form, and other materials used in or produced during mapmaking, are described in a new catalog published by the U.S. Geological Survey.The 48-page hardcover catalog is the first listing of the unpublished USGS civilian cartographic holdings. It covers such items as mapping photographs, computer-enhanced LANDSAT pictures of Earth, cartographic data in computer form, microfilm and microfiche records, and a variety of features, including color separations, made in compiling and printing maps. The catalog also describes out-of-print maps available from USGS, along with land-use and land-cover maps, and other unusual items, such as slope maps and orthophotoquads. The catalog explains how to order advance copies of maps before they are published.

  2. Riparian Wetlands: Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands are critical systems that perform functions and provide services disproportionate to their extent in the landscape. Mapping wetlands allows for better planning, management, and modeling, but riparian wetlands present several challenges to effective mapping due t...

  3. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS ... Data Web Services Latest Detected Fire Activity Other MODIS Products Frequently Asked Questions About Active Fire Maps ...

  4. Creative Concept Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Recommends the use of concept mapping in science teaching and proposes that it be presented as a creative activity. Includes a sample lesson plan of a potato stamp concept mapping activity for astronomy. (DDR)

  5. Using maps in genealogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1994-01-01

    In genealogy, maps are most often used as clues to where public or other records about an ancestor are likely to be found. Searching for maps seldom begins until a newcomer to genealogy has mastered basic genealogical routines

  6. Linkage map integration

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, A.; Teague, J.; Morton, N.E.; Keats, B.J.

    1996-08-15

    The algorithms that drive the map+ program for locus-oriented linkage mapping are presented. They depend on the enhanced location database program ldb+ to specify an initial comprehensive map that includes all loci in the summary lod file. Subsequently the map may be edited or order constrained and is automatically improved by estimating the location of each locus conditional on the remainder, beginning with the most discrepant loci. Operating characteristics permit rapid and accurate construction of linkage maps with several hundred loci. The map+ program also performs nondisjunction mapping with tests of nonstandard recombination. We have released map+ on Internet as a source program in the C language together with the location database that now includes the LODSOURCE database. 28 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Cell-free synthesis and assembly of prolyl 4-hydroxylase: the role of the beta-subunit (PDI) in preventing misfolding and aggregation of the alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    John, D C; Grant, M E; Bulleid, N J

    1993-01-01

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4-H) catalyses a vital post-translational modification in the biosynthesis of collagen. The enzyme consists of two distinct polypeptides forming an alpha 2 beta 2 tetramer (alpha = 64 kDa, beta = 60 kDa), the beta-subunit being identical to the multifunctional enzyme protein disulfide isomerase (PDI). By studying the cell-free synthesis of the rat alpha-subunit of P4-H we have shown that the alpha-subunit can be translocated, glycosylated and the signal peptide cleaved by dog pancreatic microsomal membranes to yield both singly and doubly glycosylated forms. When translations were carried out under conditions which prevent disulfide bond formation, the product synthesized formed aggregates which were associated with the immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein (BiP). Translations carried out under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation yielded a product that was not associated with BiP but formed a complex with the endogenous beta-subunit (PDI). Complex formation was detected by co-precipitation of the newly synthesized alpha-subunit with antibodies raised against PDI, by sucrose gradient centrifugation and by chemical cross-linking. When microsomal vesicles were depleted of PDI, BiP and other soluble endoplasmic reticulum proteins, no complex formation was observed and the alpha-subunit aggregated even under conditions that promote disulfide bond formation. We have therefore demonstrated that the enzyme P4-H can be assembled at synthesis in a cell-free system and that the solubility of the alpha-subunit is dependent upon its association with PDI. Images PMID:8385607

  8. What Do Maps Show?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet, appropriate for grades 4-8, features a teaching poster which shows different types of maps (different views of Salt Lake City, Utah), as well as three reproducible maps and reproducible activity sheets which complement the maps. The poster provides teacher background, including step-by-step lesson plans for four geography…

  9. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  10. Oil Exploration Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    After concluding an oil exploration agreement with the Republic of Yemen, Chevron International needed detailed geologic and topographic maps of the area. Chevron's remote sensing team used imagery from Landsat and SPOT, combining images into composite views. The project was successfully concluded and resulted in greatly improved base maps and unique topographic maps.

  11. Applications of Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Simone, Christina

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews three major uses of the concept-mapping strategies for postsecondary learning: the external representation of concept maps as an external scratch pad to represent major ideas and their organization, the mental construction of concept maps when students are seeking a time-efficient tool, and the electronic construction and…

  12. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  13. Mapping with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Warash, Bobbi Gibson

    Techniques for encouraging young children to discover the purpose and use of maps are discussed. Motor activity and topological studies form a base from which the teacher and children can build a mapping program of progressive sophistication. Concepts important to mapping include boundaries, regions, exteriors, interiors, holes, order, point of…

  14. Using maps in genealogy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Maps are one of many sources you may need to complete a family tree. In genealogical research, maps can provide clues to where our ancestors may have lived and where to look for written records about them. Beginners should master basic genealogical research techniques before starting to use topographic maps.

  15. Recessive Mutations in KCNJ13, Encoding an Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Subunit, Cause Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Davidson, Alice E.; Mackay, Donna S.; Li, Zheng; Yang, Xu; Plagnol, Vincent; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations, including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), comprise a group of disorders showing high genetic and allelic heterogeneity. The determination of a full catalog of genes that can, when mutated, cause human retinal disease is a powerful means to understand the molecular physiology and pathology of the human retina. As more genes are found, remaining ones are likely to be rarer and/or unexpected candidates. Here, we identify a family in which all known RP/LCA-related genes are unlikely to be associated with their disorder. A combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identifies a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.496C>T (p.Arg166X), in a gene, KCNJ13, encoding a potassium channel subunit Kir7.1. A screen of a further 333 unrelated individuals with recessive retinal degeneration identified an additional proband, homozygous for a missense mutation, c.722T>C (p.Leu241Pro), in the same gene. The three affected members of the two families have been diagnosed with LCA. All have a distinct and unusual retinal appearance and a similar early onset of visual loss, suggesting both impaired retinal development and progressive retinal degeneration, involving both rod and cone pathways. Examination of heterozygotes revealed no ocular disease. This finding implicates Kir7.1 as having an important role in human retinal development and maintenance. This disorder adds to a small diverse group of diseases consequent upon loss or reduced function of inwardly rectifying potassium channels affecting various organs. The distinct retinal phenotype that results from biallelic mutations in KCNJ13 should facilitate the molecular diagnosis in further families. PMID:21763485

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Glycine Receptor β Subunit (GlyRβ)-interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    del Pino, Isabel; Koch, Dennis; Schemm, Rudolf; Qualmann, Britta; Betz, Heinrich; Paarmann, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in spinal cord and brainstem. They are clustered at inhibitory postsynapses via a tight interaction of their β subunits (GlyRβ) with the scaffolding protein gephyrin. In an attempt to isolate additional proteins interacting with GlyRβ, we performed pulldown experiments with rat brain extracts using a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein encompassing amino acids 378–455 of the large intracellular loop of GlyRβ as bait. This identified syndapin I (SdpI) as a novel interaction partner of GlyRβ that coimmunoprecipitates with native GlyRs from brainstem extracts. Both SdpI and SdpII bound efficiently to the intracellular loop of GlyRβ in vitro and colocalized with GlyRβ upon coexpression in COS-7 cells. The SdpI-binding site was mapped to a proline-rich sequence of 22 amino acids within the intracellular loop of GlyRβ. Deletion and point mutation analysis disclosed that SdpI binding to GlyRβ is Src homology 3 domain-dependent. In cultured rat spinal cord neurons, SdpI immunoreactivity was found to partially colocalize with marker proteins of inhibitory and excitatory synapses. When SdpI was acutely knocked down in cultured spinal cord neurons by viral miRNA expression, postsynaptic GlyR clusters were significantly reduced in both size and number. Similar changes in GlyR cluster properties were found in spinal cultures from SdpI-deficient mice. Our results are consistent with a role of SdpI in the trafficking and/or cytoskeletal anchoring of synaptic GlyRs. PMID:24509844

  17. Canine Chondrodysplasia Caused by a Truncating Mutation in Collagen-Binding Integrin Alpha Subunit 10

    PubMed Central

    Kyöstilä, Kaisa; Lappalainen, Anu K.; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    The skeletal dysplasias are disorders of the bone and cartilage tissues. Similarly to humans, several dog breeds have been reported to suffer from different types of genetic skeletal disorders. We have studied the molecular genetic background of an autosomal recessive chondrodysplasia that affects the Norwegian Elkhound and Karelian Bear Dog breeds. The affected dogs suffer from disproportionate short stature dwarfism of varying severity. Through a genome-wide approach, we mapped the chondrodysplasia locus to a 2-Mb region on canine chromosome 17 in nine affected and nine healthy Elkhounds (praw = 7.42×10−6, pgenome-wide = 0.013). The associated locus contained a promising candidate gene, cartilage specific integrin alpha 10 (ITGA10), and mutation screening of its 30 exons revealed a nonsense mutation in exon 16 (c.2083C>T; p.Arg695*) that segregated fully with the disease in both breeds (p = 2.5×10−23). A 24% mutation carrier frequency was indicated in NEs and an 8% frequency in KBDs. The ITGA10 gene product, integrin receptor α10-subunit combines into a collagen-binding α10β1 integrin receptor, which is expressed in cartilage chondrocytes and mediates chondrocyte-matrix interactions during endochondral ossification. As a consequence of the nonsense mutation, the α10-protein was not detected in the affected cartilage tissue. The canine phenotype highlights the importance of the α10β1 integrin in bone growth, and the large animal model could be utilized to further delineate its specific functions. Finally, this study revealed a candidate gene for human chondrodysplasias and enabled the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes to eradicate the disease from the two dog breeds. PMID:24086591

  18. G protein beta gamma subunits stimulate phosphorylation of Shc adapter protein.

    PubMed Central

    Touhara, K; Hawes, B E; van Biesen, T; Lefkowitz, R J

    1995-01-01

    The mechanism of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation by pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi-coupled receptors is known to involve the beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins (G beta gamma), p21ras activation, and an as-yet-unidentified tyrosine kinase. To investigate the mechanism of G beta gamma-stimulated p21ras activation, G beta gamma-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation was examined by overexpressing G beta gamma or alpha 2-C10 adrenergic receptors (ARs) that couple to Gi in COS-7 cells. Immunoprecipitation of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins revealed a 2- to 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation of two proteins of approximately 50 kDa (designated as p52) in G beta gamma-transfected cells or in alpha 2-C10 AR-transfected cells stimulated with the agonist UK-14304. The latter response was pertussis toxin sensitive. These proteins (p52) were also specifically immunoprecipitated with anti-Shc antibodies and comigrated with two Shc proteins, 46 and 52 kDa. The G beta gamma- or alpha 2-C10 AR-stimulated p52 (Shc) phosphorylation was inhibited by coexpression of the carboxyl terminus of beta-adrenergic receptor kinase (a G beta gamma-binding pleckstrin homology domain peptide) or by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A, but not by a dominant negative mutant of p21ras. Worthmannin, a specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibited phosphorylation of p52 (Shc), implying involvement of PI3K. These results suggest that G beta gamma-stimulated Shc phosphorylation represents an early step in the pathway leading to p21ras activation, similar to the mechanism utilized by growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7568118

  19. Genomic organization of the murine G protein beta subunit genes and related processed pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, J; Wang, X B; Kitanaka, N; Hembree, C M; Uhl, G R

    2001-12-01

    The functional significance of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein) for the many physiological processes including the molecular mechanisms of drug addiction have been described. In investigating the changes of mRNA expression after acute psychostimulant administration, we previously identified a cDNA encoding a G protein beta1 subunit (Gbeta1) that was increased up to four-fold in certain brain regions after administration of psychostimulants. The mouse Gbeta1 gene (the mouse genetic symbol, GNB1) was mapped to chromosome 4, but little was known of its genetic features. To characterize the GNB1 gene further, we have cloned and analyzed the genomic structures of the mouse GNBI gene and its homologous sequences. The GNBI gene spans at least 50 kb, and consists of 12 exons and 11 introns. The exon/intron boundaries were determined and found to follow the GT/AG rule. Exons 3-11 encode the Gbeta1 protein, and the exon 2 is an alternative, resulting in putative two splicing variants. Although intron 11 is additional for GNBI compared with GNB2 and GNB3, the intron positions within the protein coding region of GNB1, GNB2 and GNB3 are identical, suggesting that GNB1 should have diverged from the ancestral gene family earlier than the genes for GNB2 and GNB3. We also found the 5'-truncated processed pseudogenes with 71-89% similarities to GNBI mRNA sequence, suggesting that the truncated cDNA copies, which have been reverse-transcribed from a processed mRNA for GNB1, might have been integrated into several new locations in the mouse genome. PMID:11913780

  20. Human biotin-containing subunit of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase gene (MCCA): cDNA sequence, genomic organization, localization to chromosomal band 3q27, and expression.

    PubMed

    Obata, K; Fukuda, T; Morishita, R; Abe, S; Asakawa, S; Yamaguchi, S; Yoshino, M; Ihara, K; Murayama, K; Shigemoto, K; Shimizu, N; Kondo, I

    2001-03-01

    3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCCase; EC 6.4.1.4) is a mitochondrial biotin enzyme and plays an essential role in the catabolism of leucine and isovalerate in animals, bacterial species, and plants. MCCase consists of two subunits, those that are biotin-containing and non-biotin-containing. The genes responsible for these subunits have been isolated in soybean, Arabidopsis thaliana, and tomatoes, but not in mammals. In humans, MCCase deficiency has been thought to be a rare metabolic disease, but the number of patients with MCCase deficiency appears to be increasing with a wide range of clinical presentations, some that result in a lethal condition and others that are asymptomatic. In this report, we have isolated and carried out chromosomal mapping of the gene for the biotin-containing subunit (A subunit) of the human MCCase gene, MCCA. The cDNA predicts an open reading frame coding for a 725-amino-acid protein with mitochondrial signal peptide, biotin carboxylase, and biotin-carrier domains. The gene is composed of at least 19 exons and covers more than 70 kb of sequence on band q27 of chromosome 3. MCCA was abundantly expressed in mitochondria-rich organs, such as the heart, skeletal muscles, kidney, and liver. In exon 13, we observed a His/Pro polymorphism at codon 464 (an A to C transition at nucleotide position 1391 in the cDNA sequence). Then, we determined the DNA sequences of the 5' untranslated region and entire coding regions in two patients with MCCase deficiency, but no sequence substitution was detected, suggesting that the gene mutations might be in the non-biotin-containing subunit (B subunit) gene, MCCB, in these patients.

  1. Extensions to the D-Cam sub-unit architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Padraig; Connell, Joseph

    2005-06-01

    Multispectral imaging produces large amounts of data which extend processing, transmission and storage systems to their upper limits. Although there are several interface standards specific to image data acquisition, such as CameraLink, it is Firewire which provides a high-speed data bus, integrated control capability, without loss of flexibility, and which is commonly available as a low cost solution. The class of multispectral imaging requires a different treatment of the processing principals than standard imaging. The same spatial region is captured multiple times using different optical wavelengths. This technique finds application in such diverse areas as coastal monitoring, fruit sorting and automated agriculture. Modifications and additional features to the camera operating and configuration parameters are therefore required which are not generally present with conventional imaging sensors. This paper describes extensions to the IIDC Digital Camera (D-Cam) specification in the development of a Firewire technology platform for transmitting the data structures described and for providing real-time, online control of spectral information acquisition. Additionally, it describes how a set of registers in the sub-unit architecture of the Firewire protocol is augmented to accommodate the demands of a multispectral system. The extensions are specification conformant and do not alter underlining compliance with the base standard. The paper also describes the implementation of the extended D-Cam in the Firewire subsystem of a smart multispectral camera used in commercial applications.

  2. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology. PMID:27309817

  3. Formation of Curvature Subunit of Carbon in Combustion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Zhou; Yao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Miao-Miao; Tian, Han-Rui; Xiao, Jun; Xu, Yun-Yan; Lin, Min-Song; Abella, Laura; Tian, Cheng-Bo; Gao, Cong-Li; Zhang, Qianyan; Xie, Su-Yuan; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2016-08-01

    Curvature prevalently exists in the world of carbon materials (e.g., fullerenes, buckyl bowls, carbon nanotubes, and onions), but traditional C2-addition mechanisms fail to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the formation of carbon curvature starting from a pentagonal carbon ring in currently available chemical-physical processes such as combustion. Here, we show a complete series of nascent pentagon-incorporating C5-C18 that are online produced in the flame of acetylene-cyclopentadiene-oxygen and in situ captured by C60 or trapped as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for clarifying the growth of the curved subunit of C20H10. A mechanism regarding C1-substitution and C2-addition has been proposed for understanding the formation of curvature in carbon materials, as exemplified by the typical curved molecule containing a single pentagon completely surrounded by five hexagons. The present mechanism, supported by the intermediates characterized by X-ray crystallography as well as NMR, has been experimentally validated for the rational synthesis of curved molecule in the commercially useful combustion process.

  4. Molecular mechanics of 30S subunit head rotation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Srividya; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F

    2014-09-16

    During ribosomal translocation, a process central to the elongation phase of protein synthesis, movement of mRNA and tRNAs requires large-scale rotation of the head domain of the small (30S) subunit of the ribosome. It has generally been accepted that the head rotates by pivoting around the neck helix (h28) of 16S rRNA, its sole covalent connection to the body domain. Surprisingly, we observe that the calculated axis of rotation does not coincide with the neck. Instead, comparative structure analysis across 55 ribosome structures shows that 30S head movement results from flexing at two hinge points lying within conserved elements of 16S rRNA. Hinge 1, although located within the neck, moves by straightening of the kinked helix h28 at the point of contact with the mRNA. Hinge 2 lies within a three-way helix junction that extends to the body through a second, noncovalent connection; its movement results from flexing between helices h34 and h35 in a plane orthogonal to the movement of hinge 1. Concerted movement at these two hinges accounts for the observed magnitudes of head rotation. Our findings also explain the mode of action of spectinomycin, an antibiotic that blocks translocation by binding to hinge 2.

  5. Structure of the Tribolium castaneum Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis,A.; Schuller, A.; Skordalakes, E.

    2008-01-01

    A common hallmark of human cancers is the overexpression of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that is responsible for maintaining the length and integrity of chromosome ends. Telomere length deregulation and telomerase activation is an early, and perhaps necessary, step in cancer cell evolution. Here we present the high-resolution structure of the Tribolium castaneum catalytic subunit of telomerase, TERT. The protein consists of three highly conserved domains, organized into a ring-like structure that shares common features with retroviral reverse transcriptases, viral RNA polymerases and B-family DNA polymerases. Domain organization places motifs implicated in substrate binding and catalysis in the interior of the ring, which can accommodate seven to eight bases of double-stranded nucleic acid. Modelling of an RNA-DNA heteroduplex in the interior of this ring demonstrates a perfect fit between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate, and positions the 3'-end of the DNA primer at the active site of the enzyme, providing evidence for the formation of an active telomerase elongation complex.

  6. Subunit composition of the human cytoplasmic dynein-2 complex

    PubMed Central

    Asante, David; Stevenson, Nicola L.; Stephens, David J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytoplasmic dynein-2 is the motor for retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), and mutations in dynein-2 are known to cause skeletal ciliopathies. Here, we define for the first time the composition of the human cytoplasmic dynein-2 complex. We show that the proteins encoded by the ciliopathy genes WDR34 and WDR60 are bona fide dynein-2 intermediate chains and are both required for dynein-2 function. In addition, we identify TCTEX1D2 as a unique dynein-2 light chain that is itself required for cilia function. We define several subunits common to both dynein-1 and dynein-2, including TCTEX-1 (also known as DYNLT1) and TCTEX-3 (also known as DYNLT3), roadblock-1 (also known as DYNLRB1) and roadblock-2 (also known as DYNLRB2), and LC8-1 and LC8-2 light chains (DYNLL1 and DYNLL2, respectively). We also find that NudCD3 associates with dynein-2 as it does with dynein-1. By contrast, the common dynein-1 regulators dynactin, LIS1 (also known as PAFAH1B1) and BICD2 are not found in association with dynein-2. These data explain why mutations in either WDR34 or WDR60 cause disease, as well as identifying TCTEX1D2 as a candidate ciliopathy gene. PMID:25205765

  7. NMDA receptor structures reveal subunit arrangement and pore architecture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Lü, Wei; Michel, Jennifer Carlisle; Goehring, April; Du, Juan; Song, Xianqiang; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Summary N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are Hebbian-like coincidence detectors, requiring binding of glycine and glutamate in combination with the relief of voltage-dependent magnesium block to open an ion conductive pore across the membrane bilayer. Despite the importance of the NMDA receptor in the development and function of the brain, a molecular structure of an intact receptor has remained elusive. Here we present x-ray crystal structures of the GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor with the allosteric inhibitor, Ro25-6981, partial agonists and the ion channel blocker, MK-801. Receptor subunits are arranged in a 1-2-1-2 fashion, demonstrating extensive interactions between the amino terminal and ligand binding domains. The transmembrane domains harbor a closed-blocked ion channel, a pyramidal central vestibule lined by residues implicated in binding ion channel blockers and magnesium, and a ~2-fold symmetric arrangement of ion channel pore loops. These structures provide new insights into the architecture, allosteric coupling and ion channel function of NMDA receptors. PMID:25008524

  8. Formation of Curvature Subunit of Carbon in Combustion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin-Zhou; Yao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Miao-Miao; Tian, Han-Rui; Xiao, Jun; Xu, Yun-Yan; Lin, Min-Song; Abella, Laura; Tian, Cheng-Bo; Gao, Cong-Li; Zhang, Qianyan; Xie, Su-Yuan; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2016-08-01

    Curvature prevalently exists in the world of carbon materials (e.g., fullerenes, buckyl bowls, carbon nanotubes, and onions), but traditional C2-addition mechanisms fail to elucidate the mechanism responsible for the formation of carbon curvature starting from a pentagonal carbon ring in currently available chemical-physical processes such as combustion. Here, we show a complete series of nascent pentagon-incorporating C5-C18 that are online produced in the flame of acetylene-cyclopentadiene-oxygen and in situ captured by C60 or trapped as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for clarifying the growth of the curved subunit of C20H10. A mechanism regarding C1-substitution and C2-addition has been proposed for understanding the formation of curvature in carbon materials, as exemplified by the typical curved molecule containing a single pentagon completely surrounded by five hexagons. The present mechanism, supported by the intermediates characterized by X-ray crystallography as well as NMR, has been experimentally validated for the rational synthesis of curved molecule in the commercially useful combustion process. PMID:27377559

  9. Evolution of the primate cytochrome c oxidase subunit II gene.

    PubMed

    Adkins, R M; Honeycutt, R L

    1994-03-01

    We examined the nucleotide and amino acid sequence variation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COII) gene from 25 primates (4 hominoids, 8 Old World monkeys, 2 New World monkeys, 2 tarsiers, 7 lemuriforms, 2 lorisiforms). Marginal support was found for three phylogenetic conclusions: (1) sister-group relationship between tarsiers and a monkey/ape clade, (2) placement of the aye-aye (Daubentonia) sister to all other strepsirhine primates, and (3) rejection of a sister-group relationship of dwarf lemurs (i.e., Cheirogaleus) with lorisiform primates. Stronger support was found for a sister-group relationship between the ring-tail lemur (Lemur catta) and the gentle lemurs (Hapalemur). In congruence with previous studies on COII, we found that the monkeys and apes have undergone a nearly two-fold increase in the rate of amino acid replacement relative to other primates. Although functionally important amino acids are generally conserved among all primates, the acceleration in amino acid replacements in higher primates is associated with increased variation in the amino terminal end of the protein. Additionally, the replacement of two carboxyl-bearing residues (glutamate and aspartate) at positions 114 and 115 may provide a partial explanation for the poor enzyme kinetics in cross-reactions between the cytochromes c and cytochrome c oxidases of higher primates and other mammals. PMID:8006990

  10. Subunit composition of the human cytoplasmic dynein-2 complex.

    PubMed

    Asante, David; Stevenson, Nicola L; Stephens, David J

    2014-11-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein-2 is the motor for retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), and mutations in dynein-2 are known to cause skeletal ciliopathies. Here, we define for the first time the composition of the human cytoplasmic dynein-2 complex. We show that the proteins encoded by the ciliopathy genes WDR34 and WDR60 are bona fide dynein-2 intermediate chains and are both required for dynein-2 function. In addition, we identify TCTEX1D2 as a unique dynein-2 light chain that is itself required for cilia function. We define several subunits common to both dynein-1 and dynein-2, including TCTEX-1 (also known as DYNLT1) and TCTEX-3 (also known as DYNLT3), roadblock-1 (also known as DYNLRB1) and roadblock-2 (also known as DYNLRB2), and LC8-1 and LC8-2 light chains (DYNLL1 and DYNLL2, respectively). We also find that NudCD3 associates with dynein-2 as it does with dynein-1. By contrast, the common dynein-1 regulators dynactin, LIS1 (also known as PAFAH1B1) and BICD2 are not found in association with dynein-2. These data explain why mutations in either WDR34 or WDR60 cause disease, as well as identifying TCTEX1D2 as a candidate ciliopathy gene.

  11. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit protein icosahedron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Yang; Bale, Jacob B.; Gonen, Shane; Shi, Dan; Sheffler, William; Fong, Kimberly K.; Nattermann, Una; Xu, Chunfu; Huang, Po-Ssu; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Yi, Sue; Davis, Trisha N.; Gonen, Tamir; King, Neil P.; Baker, David

    2016-07-01

    The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport. There has been considerable interest in repurposing such structures for applications ranging from targeted delivery to multivalent immunogen presentation. The ability to design proteins that self-assemble into precisely specified, highly ordered icosahedral structures would open the door to a new generation of protein containers with properties custom-tailored to specific applications. Here we describe the computational design of a 25-nanometre icosahedral nanocage that self-assembles from trimeric protein building blocks. The designed protein was produced in Escherichia coli, and found by electron microscopy to assemble into a homogenous population of icosahedral particles nearly identical to the design model. The particles are stable in 6.7 molar guanidine hydrochloride at up to 80 degrees Celsius, and undergo extremely abrupt, but reversible, disassembly between 2 molar and 2.25 molar guanidinium thiocyanate. The icosahedron is robust to genetic fusions: one or two copies of green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be fused to each of the 60 subunits to create highly fluorescent ‘standard candles’ for use in light microscopy, and a designed protein pentamer can be placed in the centre of each of the 20 pentameric faces to modulate the size of the entrance/exit channels of the cage. Such robust and customizable nanocages should have considerable utility in targeted drug delivery, vaccine design and synthetic biology.

  12. Expansion of transducin subunit gene families in early vertebrate tetraploidizations.

    PubMed

    Lagman, David; Sundström, Görel; Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Abalo, Xesús M; Larhammar, Dan

    2012-10-01

    Hundreds of gene families expanded in the early vertebrate tetraploidizations including many gene families in the phototransduction cascade. We have investigated the evolution of the heterotrimeric G-proteins of photoreceptors, the transducins, in relation to these events using both phylogenetic analyses and synteny comparisons. Three alpha subunit genes were identified in amniotes and the coelacanth, GNAT1-3; two of these were identified in amphibians and teleost fish, GNAT1 and GNAT2. Most tetrapods have four beta genes, GNB1-4, and teleosts have additional duplicates. Finally, three gamma genes were identified in mammals, GNGT1, GNG11 and GNGT2. Of these, GNGT1 and GNGT2 were found in the other vertebrates. In frog and zebrafish additional duplicates of GNGT2 were identified. Our analyses show all three transducin families expanded during the early vertebrate tetraploidizations and the beta and gamma families gained additional copies in the teleost-specific genome duplication. This suggests that the tetraploidizations contributed to visual specialisations. PMID:22814267

  13. Subunit structure of 6-phosphofructokinase from brewers' yeast.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, N; Hess, B

    1975-11-01

    An analysis of 6-phosphofructokinase from brewers' yeast in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate reveals the occurrence of four components with the following molecular weights: alpha = 140000, beta = 130000, and alpha' = 92000, beta' = 87000. It was found that the alpha- and beta-components can be converted to the alpha' and beta' components by treatment of the native preparation with hyaluronidase. A comparison of the molecular weight obtained by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration with the results obtained by dodecylsulfate electrophoresis after treatment with hyaluronidase reveals that the alpha' and beta' components are the smallest molecular structures obtained upon dissociation of the native enzyme. The mechanism of action of hyaluronidase suggests a desensitization of the alpha and beta components of the enzyme towards dodecylsulfate. Thus, in the absence of hyaluronidase treatment; only an apparent molecular weight for the alpha and beta component is obtained. The analysis indicates that the native enzyme might be composed of four different subunits with an alpha, beta, alpha' and beta' configuration. It is not excluded that the native enzyme consists only of alpha- and beta-chains.

  14. The Evolutionarily Conserved Mediator Subunit MDT-15/MED15 Links Protective Innate Immune Responses and Xenobiotic Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, Deborah L.; Conery, Annie L.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2014-01-01

    Metazoans protect themselves from environmental toxins and virulent pathogens through detoxification and immune responses. We previously identified a small molecule xenobiotic toxin that extends survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected with human bacterial pathogens by activating the conserved p38 MAP kinase PMK-1 host defense pathway. Here we investigate the cellular mechanisms that couple activation of a detoxification response to innate immunity. From an RNAi screen of 1,420 genes expressed in the C. elegans intestine, we identified the conserved Mediator subunit MDT-15/MED15 and 28 other gene inactivations that abrogate the induction of PMK-1-dependent immune effectors by this small molecule. We demonstrate that MDT-15/MED15 is required for the xenobiotic-induced expression of p38 MAP kinase PMK-1-dependent immune genes and protection from Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We also show that MDT-15 controls the induction of detoxification genes and functions to protect the host from bacteria-derived phenazine toxins. These data define a central role for MDT-15/MED15 in the coordination of xenobiotic detoxification and innate immune responses. PMID:24875643

  15. Structure of a herpesvirus nuclear egress complex subunit reveals an interaction groove that is essential for viral replication.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Kendra E; Sharma, Mayuri; Mansueto, My Sam; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M; Wagner, Gerhard; Coen, Donald M; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2015-07-21

    Herpesviruses require a nuclear egress complex (NEC) for efficient transit of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The NEC orchestrates multiple steps during herpesvirus nuclear egress, including disruption of nuclear lamina and particle budding through the inner nuclear membrane. In the important human pathogen human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), this complex consists of nuclear membrane protein UL50, and nucleoplasmic protein UL53, which is recruited to the nuclear membrane through its interaction with UL50. Here, we present an NMR-determined solution-state structure of the murine CMV homolog of UL50 (M50; residues 1-168) with a strikingly intricate protein fold that is matched by no other known protein folds in its entirety. Using NMR methods, we mapped the interaction of M50 with a highly conserved UL53-derived peptide, corresponding to a segment that is required for heterodimerization. The UL53 peptide binding site mapped onto an M50 surface groove, which harbors a large cavity. Point mutations of UL50 residues corresponding to surface residues in the characterized M50 heterodimerization interface substantially decreased UL50-UL53 binding in vitro, eliminated UL50-UL53 colocalization, prevented disruption of nuclear lamina, and halted productive virus replication in HCMV-infected cells. Our results provide detailed structural information on a key protein-protein interaction involved in nuclear egress and suggest that NEC subunit interactions can be an attractive drug target.

  16. Mutations in SPTLC1, encoding serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit-1, cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Dawkins, J L; Hulme, D J; Brahmbhatt, S B; Auer-Grumbach, M; Nicholson, G A

    2001-03-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN1) is the most common hereditary disorder of peripheral sensory neurons. HSN1 is an autosomal dominant progressive degeneration of dorsal root ganglia and motor neurons with onset in the second or third decades. Initial symptoms are sensory loss in the feet followed by distal muscle wasting and weakness. Loss of pain sensation leads to chronic skin ulcers and distal amputations. The HSN1 locus has been mapped to chromosome 9q22.1-22.3 (refs. 3,4). Here we map the gene SPTLC1, encoding serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit-1, to this locus. Mutation screening revealed 3 different missense mutations resulting in changes to 2 amino acids in all affected members of 11 HSN1 families. We found two mutations to be located in exon 5 (C133Y and C133W) and one mutation to be located in exon 6 of SPTLC1 (V144D). All families showing definite or probable linkage to chromosome 9 had mutations in these two exons. These mutations are associated with increased de novo glucosyl ceramide synthesis in lymphoblast cell lines in affected individuals. Increased de novo ceramide synthesis triggers apoptosis and is associated with massive cell death during neural tube closure, raising the possibility that neural degeneration in HSN1 is due to ceramide-induced apoptotic cell death. PMID:11242114

  17. Epitopes in α8β1 and other RGD-binding integrins delineate classes of integrin-blocking antibodies and major binding loops in α subunits

    PubMed Central

    Nishimichi, Norihisa; Kawashima, Nagako; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Identification of epitopes for integrin-blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has aided our understanding of structure-function relationship of integrins. We mapped epitopes of chicken anti-integrin-α8-subunit-blocking mAbs by mutational analyses, examining regions that harboured all mapped epitopes recognized by mAbs against other α-subunits in the RGD-binding-integrin subfamily. Six mAbs exhibited blocking function, and these mAbs recognized residues on the same W2:41-loop on the top-face of the β-propeller. Loop-tips sufficiently close to W2:41 (<25 Å) contained within a footprint of the mAbs were mutated, and the loop W3:34 on the bottom face was identified as an additional component of the epitope of one antibody, clone YZ5. Binding sequences on the two loops were conserved in virtually all mammals, and that on W3:34 was also conserved in chickens. These indicate 1) YZ5 binds both top and bottom loops, and the binding to W3:34 is by interactions to conserved residues between immunogen and host species, 2) five other blocking mAbs solely bind to W2:41 and 3) the α8 mAbs would cross-react with most mammals. Comparing with the mAbs against the other α-subunits of RGD-integrins, two classes were delineated; those binding to “W3:34 and an top-loop”, and “solely W2:41”, accounting for 82% of published RGD-integrin-mAbs. PMID:26349930

  18. NMR structure of the amino-terminal domain from the Tfb1 subunit of TFIIH and characterization of its phosphoinositide and VP16 binding sites.

    PubMed

    Di Lello, Paola; Nguyen, Bao D; Jones, Tamara N; Potempa, Krzysztof; Kobor, Michael S; Legault, Pascale; Omichinski, James G

    2005-05-31

    General transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is recruited to the preinitiation complex (PIC) through direct interactions between its p62 (Tfb1) subunit and the carboxyl-terminal domain of TFIIEalpha. TFIIH has also been shown to interact with a number of transcriptional activator proteins through interactions with the same p62 (Tfb1) subunit. We have determined the NMR solution structure of the amino-terminal domain from the Tfb1 subunit of yeast TFIIH (Tfb1(1-115)). Like the corresponding domain from the human p62 protein, Tfb1(1-115) contains a PH domain fold despite a low level of sequence identity between the two functionally homologous proteins. In addition, we have performed in vitro binding studies that demonstrate that the PH domains of Tfb1 and p62 specifically bind to monophosphorylated inositides [PtdIns(5)P and PtdIns(3)P]. NMR chemical shift mapping demonstrated that the PtdIns(5)P binding site on Tfb1 (p62) is located in the basic pocket formed by beta-strands beta5-beta7 of the PH domain fold. Interestingly, the structural composition of the PtdIns(5)P binding site is different from the composition of the binding sites for phosphoinositides on prototypic PH domains. We have also determined that the PH domains from Tfb1 and p62 are sufficient for binding to the activation domain of VP16. NMR chemical shift mapping demonstrated that the VP16 binding site within the PH domain of Tfb1 (p62) overlaps with the PtdIns(5)P binding site on Tfb1 (p62). These results provide new information about the recognition of phosphoinositides by PH domains, and point to a potential role for phosphoinositides in VP16 regulation. PMID:15909982

  19. Epitopes in α8β1 and other RGD-binding integrins delineate classes of integrin-blocking antibodies and major binding loops in α subunits.

    PubMed

    Nishimichi, Norihisa; Kawashima, Nagako; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Identification of epitopes for integrin-blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has aided our understanding of structure-function relationship of integrins. We mapped epitopes of chicken anti-integrin-α8-subunit-blocking mAbs by mutational analyses, examining regions that harboured all mapped epitopes recognized by mAbs against other α-subunits in the RGD-binding-integrin subfamily. Six mAbs exhibited blocking function, and these mAbs recognized residues on the same W2:41-loop on the top-face of the β-propeller. Loop-tips sufficiently close to W2:41 (<25 Å) contained within a footprint of the mAbs were mutated, and the loop W3:34 on the bottom face was identified as an additional component of the epitope of one antibody, clone YZ5. Binding sequences on the two loops were conserved in virtually all mammals, and that on W3:34 was also conserved in chickens. These indicate 1) YZ5 binds both top and bottom loops, and the binding to W3:34 is by interactions to conserved residues between immunogen and host species, 2) five other blocking mAbs solely bind to W2:41 and 3) the α8 mAbs would cross-react with most mammals. Comparing with the mAbs against the other α-subunits of RGD-integrins, two classes were delineated; those binding to "W3:34 and an top-loop", and "solely W2:41", accounting for 82% of published RGD-integrin-mAbs. PMID:26349930

  20. Distinctive interactions of the Arabidopsis homolog of the 30 kD subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (AtCPSF30) with other polyadenylation factor subunits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The Arabidopsis ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of the mammalian Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (AtCPSF30) is an RNA-binding endonuclease that is associated with other Arabidopsis CPSF subunits (orthologs of the 160, 100, and 73 kD subunits of CPSF). In order to better u...

  1. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of MxiH, a subunit of the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system needle

    SciTech Connect

    Deane, Janet E.; Cordes, Frank S.; Roversi, Pietro; Johnson, Steven; Kenjale, Roma; Picking, William D.; Picking, Wendy L.; Lea, Susan M.; Blocker, Ariel

    2006-03-01

    A monodisperse truncation mutant of MxiH, the subunit of the S. flexneri type III secretion system needle, has been crystallized. SeMet derivatives and a uranyl derivative have undergone preliminary crystallographic analysis. A monodisperse truncation mutant of MxiH, the subunit of the needle from the Shigella flexneri type III secretion system (TTSS), has been overexpressed and purified. Crystals were grown of native and selenomethionine-labelled MxiH{sub CΔ5} and diffraction data were collected to 1.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 183.4, b = 28.1, c = 27.8 Å, β = 96.5°. An anomalous difference Patterson map calculated with the data from the SeMet-labelled crystals revealed a single peak on the Harker section v = 0. Inspection of a uranyl derivative also revealed one peak in the isomorphous difference Patterson map on the Harker section v = 0. Analysis of the self-rotation function indicates the presence of a twofold non-crystallographic symmetry axis approximately along a. The calculated Matthews coefficient is 1.9 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} for two molecules per asymmetric unit, corresponding to a solvent content of 33%.

  2. Map projections for larger-scale mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    For the U.S. Geological Survey maps at 1:1,000,000-scale and larger, the most common projections are conformal, such as the Transverse Mercator and Lambert Conformal Conic. Projections for these scales should treat the Earth as an ellipsoid. In addition, the USGS has conceived and designed some new projections, including the Space Oblique Mercator, the first map projection designed to permit low-distortion mapping of the Earth from satellite imagery, continuously following the groundtrack. The USGS has programmed nearly all pertinent projection equations for inverse and forward calculations. These are used to plot maps or to transform coordinates from one projection to another. The projections in current use are described.

  3. N-terminal region of the large subunit of Leishmania donovani bisubunit topoisomerase I is involved in DNA relaxation and interaction with the smaller subunit.

    PubMed

    Das, Benu Brata; Sen, Nilkantha; Dasgupta, Somdeb Bose; Ganguly, Agneyo; Majumder, Hemanta K

    2005-04-22

    Leishmania donovani topoisomerase I is an unusual bisubunit enzyme. We have demonstrated earlier that the large and small subunit could be reconstituted in vitro to show topoisomerase I activity. We extend our biochemical study to evaluate the role of the large subunit in topoisomerase activity. The large subunit (LdTOP1L) shows a substantial degree of homology with the core DNA binding domain of the topoisomerase IB family. Two N-terminal truncation constructs, LdTOP1Delta39L (lacking amino acids 1-39) and LdTOP1Delta99L (lacking amino acids 1-99) of the large subunit were generated and mixed with intact small subunit (LdTOP1S). Our observations reveal that residues within amino acids 1-39 of the large subunit have significant roles in modulating topoisomerase I activity (i.e. in vitro DNA relaxation, camptothecin sensitivity, cleavage activity, and DNA binding affinity). Interestingly, the mutant LdTOP1Delta99LS was unable to show topoisomerase I activity. Investigation of the loss of activity indicates that LdTOP1Delta99L was unable to pull down glutathione S-transferase-LdTOP1S in an Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid co-immobilization experiment. For further analysis, we co-expressed LdTOP1L and LdTOP1S in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS cells. The lysate shows topoisomerase I activity. Immunoprecipitation revealed that LdTOP1L could interact with LdTOP1S, indicating the subunit interaction in bacterial cells, whereas immunoprecipitation of bacterial lysate co-expressing LdTOP1Delta99L and LdTOP1S reveals that LdTOP1Delta99L was significantly deficient at interacting with LdTOP1S to reconstitute topoisomerase I activity. This study demonstrates that heterodimerization between the large and small subunits of the bisubunit enzyme appears to be an absolute requirement for topoisomerase activity. The residue within amino acids 1-39 from the N-terminal end of the large subunit regulates DNA topology during relaxation by controlling noncovalent DNA binding or by

  4. Stabilization of the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III ε subunit by the θ subunit favors in vivo assembly of the Pol III catalytic core.

    PubMed

    Conte, Emanuele; Vincelli, Gabriele; Schaaper, Roel M; Bressanin, Daniela; Stefan, Alessandra; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2012-07-15

    Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (HE) contains a core polymerase consisting of three subunits: α (polymerase), ε (3'-5' exonuclease), and θ. Genetic experiments suggested that θ subunit stabilizes the intrinsically labile ε subunit and, furthermore, that θ might affect the cellular amounts of Pol III core and HE. Here, we provide biochemical evidence supporting this model by analyzing the amounts of the relevant proteins. First, we show that a ΔholE strain (lacking θ subunit) displays reduced amounts of free ε. We also demonstrate the existence of a dimer of ε, which may be involved in the stabilization of the protein. Second, θ, when overexpressed, dissociates the ε dimer and significantly increases the amount of Pol III core. The stability of ε also depends on cellular chaperones, including DnaK. Here, we report that: (i) temperature shift-up of ΔdnaK strains leads to rapid depletion of ε, and (ii) overproduction of θ overcomes both the depletion of ε and the temperature sensitivity of the strain. Overall, our data suggest that ε is a critical factor in the assembly of Pol III core, and that this is role is strongly influenced by the θ subunit through its prevention of ε degradation.

  5. Molecular cloning of pituitary glycoprotein alpha-subunit and follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunits from New World squirrel monkey and owl monkey.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Jonathan G; Funkhouser, Jane D; Moyer, Felricia S; Gibson, Susan V; Willis, Donna L

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the gonadotropins expressed in pituitary glands of the New World squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) and owl monkey (Aotus sp.). The various subunits were amplified from total RNA from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the deduced amino acid sequences compared to those of other species. Mature squirrel monkey and owl monkey glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides (96 amino acids in length) were determined to be 80% homologous to the human sequence. The sequences of mature beta subunits of follicle stimulating hormone (FSHbeta) from squirrel monkey and owl monkey (111 amino acids in length) are 92% homologous to human FSHbeta. New World primate glycoprotein hormone alpha-polypeptides and FSHbeta subunits showed conservation of all cysteine residues and consensus N-linked glycosylation sites. Attempts to amplify the beta-subunit of luteinizing hormone from squirrel monkey and owl monkey pituitary glands were unsuccessful. Rather, the beta-subunit of chorionic gonadotropin (CG) was amplified from pituitaries of both New World primates. Squirrel monkey and owl monkey CGbeta are 143 and 144 amino acids in length and 77% homologous with human CGbeta. The greatest divergence is in the C terminus, where all four sites for O-linked glycosylation in human CGbeta, responsible for delayed metabolic clearance, are predicted to be absent in New World primate CGbetas. It is likely that CG secreted from pituitary of New World primates exhibits a relatively short half-life compared to human CG.

  6. Identification of a gamma subunit associated with the adenylyl cyclase regulatory proteins Ns and Ni.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, J D; Codina, J; Risinger, R; Birnbaumer, L

    1984-02-25

    The subunit composition of the Ns and Ni, the human erythrocyte stimulatory and inhibitory regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing discontinuous urea and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis system designed for the study of low molecular weight polypeptides. This system disclosed that these proteins, in addition to their known alpha and beta subunits, contain an additional small peptide of apparent molecular weight of 5,000 (5K). This "5K peptide" is also present in preparations of another protein which we termed "40K protein" on the basis of its hydrodynamic behavior and whose primary protein constituent is the Mr 35,000 beta subunit of the above regulatory proteins. Analyzing Ni, the 5K peptide was functionally related to the protein by showing that its apparent Stokes radius changes from 5.9 to 5.1 nm after treatment with guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate and magnesium in parallel with the alpha and beta subunits. These data are interpreted as evidence for the existence of a third subunit associated with the regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase. We call this subunit gamma and propose a minimum subunit structure for these proteins of the alpha beta gamma type. PMID:6321456

  7. Small things considered: the small accessory subunits of RNA polymerase in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Andy; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent RNA polymerase core enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria consists of seven subunits. Whilst four of them (α2ββ′) are essential, three smaller subunits, δ, ε and ω (∼9–21.5 kDa), are considered accessory. Both δ and ω have been viewed as integral components of RNAP for several decades; however, ε has only recently been described. Functionally these three small subunits carry out a variety of tasks, imparting important, supportive effects on the transcriptional process of Gram-positive bacteria. While ω is thought to have a wide range of roles, reaching from maintaining structural integrity of RNAP to σ factor recruitment, the only suggested function for ε thus far is in protecting cells from phage infection. The third subunit, δ, has been shown to have distinct influences in maintaining transcriptional specificity, and thus has a key role in cellular fitness. Collectively, all three accessory subunits, although dispensable under laboratory conditions, are often thought to be crucial for proper RNAP function. Herein we provide an overview of the available literature on each subunit, summarizing landmark findings that have deepened our understanding of these proteins and their function, and outline future challenges in understanding the role of these small subunits in the transcriptional process. PMID:25878038

  8. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    PubMed

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R

    2001-08-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog. cype is an essential gene whose mutations are lethal and show pleiotropic phenotypes. The 77-amino acid peptide encoded by cype is 46% identical and 59% similar to the human subunit (75 amino acids). The transcripts are expressed maternally and throughout development in localized regions. They are found predominantly in the central nervous system of the embryo; in the central region of imaginal discs; in the germarium, follicular, and nurse cells of the ovary; and in testis. A search in the Genome Annotation Database of Drosophila revealed the absence of subunit VIIb and the presence of 9 putative nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits with high identity scores when compared to the 10 human subunits. PMID:11514451

  9. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R

    2001-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog. cype is an essential gene whose mutations are lethal and show pleiotropic phenotypes. The 77-amino acid peptide encoded by cype is 46% identical and 59% similar to the human subunit (75 amino acids). The transcripts are expressed maternally and throughout development in localized regions. They are found predominantly in the central nervous system of the embryo; in the central region of imaginal discs; in the germarium, follicular, and nurse cells of the ovary; and in testis. A search in the Genome Annotation Database of Drosophila revealed the absence of subunit VIIb and the presence of 9 putative nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits with high identity scores when compared to the 10 human subunits. PMID:11514451

  10. A molecular biology-based approach to resolve the subunit orientation of lipoprotein lipase

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Howard; Yang, Dawn; Hill, John S.; Davis, Richard C.; Nikazy, Judith; Schotz, Michael C.

    1997-01-01

    The subunit orientation of a dimeric enzyme influences the mechanism of action and function. To determine the subunit arrangement of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), a molecular biology-based approach was initiated. An eight amino acid linker region was engineered between two LPL monomers and expressed in COS-7 cells. The resultant tandem-repeat molecule (LPLTR) was lipolytically active and had kinetic parameters, salt inhibition, cofactor-dependent activity, heparin-binding characteristics, and a functional unit size very similar to the expressed native human enzyme. By these criteria, LPLTR was the functional equivalent of native LPL. Considering the length of the linker peptide (no more than 24 Å), monomers in the tethered molecule were restricted to a head-to-tail subunit arrangement. Since LPLTR demonstrated native enzyme-like properties while constrained to this subunit arrangement, these results provide the first compelling evidence that native LPL monomers are arranged in a head-to-tail subunit orientation within the active dimer. Thus, LPL function in physiology, lipolysis, and binding to cell-surface components must now be addressed with this subunit orientation in mind. The utility of the tandem-repeat approach to resolve the subunit arrangement of an obligate dimer has been demonstrated with LPL and could be generalized for use with other oligomeric enzymes. PMID:9159117

  11. Tuning the biological activity profile of antibacterial polymers via subunit substitution pattern.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Chakraborty, Saswata; Lemke, Justin J; Hayouka, Zvi; Chow, Clara; Welch, Rodney A; Weisblum, Bernard; Masters, Kristyn S; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-03-19

    Binary nylon-3 copolymers containing cationic and hydrophobic subunits can mimic the biological properties of host-defense peptides, but relationships between composition and activity are not yet well understood for these materials. Hydrophobic subunits in previously studied examples have been limited mostly to cycloalkane-derived structures, with cyclohexyl proving to be particularly promising. The present study evaluates alternative hydrophobic subunits that are isomeric or nearly isomeric with the cyclohexyl example; each has four sp(3) carbons in the side chains. The results show that varying the substitution pattern of the hydrophobic subunit leads to relatively small changes in antibacterial activity but causes significant changes in hemolytic activity. We hypothesize that these differences in biological activity profile arise, at least in part, from variations among the conformational propensities of the hydrophobic subunits. The α,α,β,β-tetramethyl unit is optimal among the subunits we have examined, providing copolymers with potent antibacterial activity and excellent prokaryote vs eukaryote selectivity. Bacteria do not readily develop resistance to the new antibacterial nylon-3 copolymers. These findings suggest that variation in subunit conformational properties could be generally valuable in the development of synthetic polymers for biological applications. PMID:24601599

  12. Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9 subunits: No simple silent bystanders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Members of the electrically silent voltage-gated K+ (Kv) subfamilies (Kv5, Kv6, Kv8, and Kv9, collectively identified as electrically silent voltage-gated K+ channel [KvS] subunits) do not form functional homotetrameric channels but assemble with Kv2 subunits into heterotetrameric Kv2/KvS channels with unique biophysical properties. Unlike the ubiquitously expressed Kv2 subunits, KvS subunits show a more restricted expression. This raises the possibility that Kv2/KvS heterotetramers have tissue-specific functions, making them potential targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Here, I provide an overview of the expression of KvS subunits in different tissues and discuss their proposed role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes. This overview demonstrates the importance of KvS subunits and Kv2/KvS heterotetramers in vivo and the importance of considering KvS subunits and Kv2/KvS heterotetramers in the development of novel treatments. PMID:26755771

  13. Coordinated nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits and NMD3 in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Christopher R.; Lund, Elsebet; Kahan, Lawrence; Johnson, Arlen W.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2003-01-01

    60S and 40S ribosomal subunits are assembled in the nucleolus and exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm independently of each other. We show that in vertebrate cells, transport of both subunits requires the export receptor CRM1 and Ran·GTP. Export of 60S subunits is coupled with that of the nucleo- cytoplasmic shuttling protein NMD3. Human NMD3 (hNMD3) contains a CRM-1-dependent leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) and a complex, dispersed nuclear localization signal (NLS), the basic region of which is also required for nucleolar accumulation. When present in Xenopus oocytes, both wild-type and export-defective mutant hNMD3 proteins bind to newly made nuclear 60S pre-export particles at a late step of subunit maturation. The export-defective hNMD3, but not the wild-type protein, inhibits export of 60S subunits from oocyte nuclei. These results indicate that the NES mutant protein competes with endogenous wild-type frog NMD3 for binding to nascent 60S subunits, thereby preventing their export. We propose that NMD3 acts as an adaptor for CRM1–Ran·GTP-mediated 60S subunit export, by a mechanism that is conserved from vertebrates to yeast. PMID:12773398

  14. Modular arrangement of a cellulosomal scaffoldin subunit revealed from the crystal structure of a cohesin dyad.

    PubMed

    Noach, Ilit; Levy-Assaraf, Maly; Lamed, Raphael; Shimon, Linda J W; Frolow, Felix; Bayer, Edward A

    2010-06-01

    The cellulosome complex is composed of a conglomerate of subunits, each of which comprises a set of interacting functional modules. Scaffoldin (Sca), a major cellulosomal subunit, is responsible for organizing the cellulolytic subunits into the complex. This is accomplished by the interaction of two complementary classes of modules-a cohesin (Coh) module on the Sca subunit and a dockerin module on each of the enzymatic subunits. Although individual Coh modules from different cellulosomal scaffoldins have been subjected to intensive structural investigation, the Sca subunit in its entirety has not, and there remains a paucity of information on the arrangement and interactions of Cohs within the Sca subunit. In the present work, we describe the crystal structure of a type II Coh dyad from the ScaB "adaptor" Sca of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus. The ScaB Cohs are oriented in an "antiparallel" manner relative to one another, with their dockerin-interacting surfaces (beta-strands 8-3-6-5) facing the same direction-aligned on the same plane. A set of extensive hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond contacts between the Cohs and the short interconnecting linker segment between them stabilizes the modular orientation. This Coh dyad structure provides novel information about Coh-Coh association and arrangement in the Sca and further insight into intermodular linker interactions. Putative structural arrangements of a hexamodular complex, composed of the Coh dyad bound to two X-dockerin modules, were suggested.

  15. Single Expressed Glycine Receptor Domains Reconstitute Functional Ion Channels without Subunit-specific Desensitization Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Meiselbach, Heike; Vogel, Nico; Langlhofer, Georg; Stangl, Sabine; Schleyer, Barbara; Bahnassawy, Lamia'a; Sticht, Heinrich; Breitinger, Hans-Georg; Becker, Cord-Michael; Villmann, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Cys loop receptors are pentameric arrangements of independent subunits that assemble into functional ion channels. Each subunit shows a domain architecture. Functional ion channels can be reconstituted even from independent, nonfunctional subunit domains, as shown previously for GlyRα1 receptors. Here, we demonstrate that this reconstitution is not restricted to α1 but can be transferred to other members of the Cys loop receptor family. A nonfunctional GlyR subunit, truncated at the intracellular TM3–4 loop by a premature stop codon, can be complemented by co-expression of the missing tail portion of the receptor. Compared with α1 subunits, rescue by domain complementation was less efficient when GlyRα3 or the GABAA/C subunit ρ1 was used. If truncation disrupted an alternative splicing cassette within the intracellular TM3–4 loop of α3 subunits, which also regulates receptor desensitization, functional rescue was not possible. When α3 receptors were restored by complementation using domains with and without the spliced insert, no difference in desensitization was found. In contrast, desensitization properties could even be transferred between α1/α3 receptor chimeras harboring or lacking the α3 splice cassette proving that functional rescue depends on the integrity of the alternative splicing cassette in α3. Thus, an intact α3 splicing cassette in the TM3–4 loop environment is indispensable for functional rescue, and the quality of receptor restoration can be assessed from desensitization properties. PMID:25143388

  16. Subunits of the Drosophila actin-capping protein heterodimer regulate each other at multiple levels.

    PubMed

    Amândio, Ana Rita; Gaspar, Pedro; Whited, Jessica L; Janody, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The actin-Capping Protein heterodimer, composed of the α and β subunits, is a master F-actin regulator. In addition to its role in many cellular processes, Capping Protein acts as a main tumor suppressor module in Drosophila and in humans, in part, by restricting the activity of Yorkie/YAP/TAZ oncogenes. We aimed in this report to understand how both subunits regulate each other in vivo. We show that the levels and capping activities of both subunits must be tightly regulated to control F-actin levels and consequently growth of the Drosophila wing. Overexpressing capping protein α and β decreases both F-actin levels and tissue growth, while expressing forms of Capping Protein that have dominant negative effects on F-actin promote tissue growth. Both subunits regulate each other's protein levels. In addition, overexpressing one of the subunit in tissues knocked-down for the other increases the mRNA and protein levels of the subunit knocked-down and compensates for its loss. We propose that the ability of the α and β subunits to control each other's levels assures that a pool of functional heterodimer is produced in sufficient quantities to restrict the development of tumor but not in excess to sustain normal tissue growth.

  17. Structural organization and transcription of the mouse gastric H+, K(+)-ATPase beta subunit gene.

    PubMed Central

    Canfield, V A; Levenson, R

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized the mouse gene encoding the beta subunit of H+, K(+)-ATPase (EC 3.6.1.36). The entire 10.5-kilobase transcription unit of the H+,K(+)-ATPase beta subunit gene was cloned in three overlapping cosmids encompassing approximately 46 kilobases of genomic DNA. A tight cluster of transcription initiation sites has been localized 24-25 nucleotides upstream of the translation start site and 28-29 nucleotides downstream of a TATA-like sequence. The H+, K(+)-ATPase beta subunit gene is split into seven exons encoding predicted structural domains of the beta subunit protein. The intracellular amino-terminal and putative transmembrane domains are encoded by individual exons, and the extracellular carboxyl-terminal domain is encoded by five exons. The exon/intron organization of the mouse H+,K(+)-ATPase beta subunit gene is identical to that of the mouse Na+,K(+)-ATPase beta 2 subunit gene. The conservation of genomic organization, together with the high sequence homology, indicates that the mouse H+,K(+)-ATPase beta and Na+,K(+)-ATPase beta 2 subunit genes originated from a common ancestral gene. Images PMID:1654563

  18. Cartographic mapping study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, C.; Dye, R.; Reed, L.

    1982-01-01

    The errors associated with planimetric mapping of the United States using satellite remote sensing techniques are analyzed. Assumptions concerning the state of the art achievable for satellite mapping systems and platforms in the 1995 time frame are made. An analysis of these performance parameters is made using an interactive cartographic satellite computer model, after first validating the model using LANDSAT 1 through 3 performance parameters. An investigation of current large scale (1:24,000) US National mapping techniques is made. Using the results of this investigation, and current national mapping accuracy standards, the 1995 satellite mapping system is evaluated for its ability to meet US mapping standards for planimetric and topographic mapping at scales of 1:24,000 and smaller.

  19. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Localization of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Subunits during Intoxication of Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damek-Poprawa, Monika; Jang, Jae Yeon; Volgina, Alla; Korostoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt), produced by some clinically important Gram-negative bacterial species, is related to the family of AB-type toxins. Three heterologous proteins (CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC) and a genotoxin mode of action distinguish the Cdt from others in this toxin class. Crystal structures of several species-specific Cdts have provided a basis for predicting subunit interactions and functions. In addition, empirical studies have yielded significant insights into the in vivo interactions of the Cdt subunits. However, there are still critical gaps in information about the intoxication process. In this study, a novel protein tagging technology was used to localize the subunits in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). A tetracysteine motif was engineered in each subunit, and in subunits with mutations in predicted functional domains, to permit detection with the fluorescein arsenical hairpin binding (FlAsH) dye Lumio green. Live-cell imaging, in conjunction with confocal microscopy, was used to capture the locations of the individual subunits in cells intoxicated, under various conditions, with hybrid heterotrimers. Using this approach, we observed the following. (i) The CdtA subunit remains on the cell surface of CHO cells in association with cholesterol-containing and cholesterol-depleted membrane. (ii) The CdtB subunit is exclusively in the cytosol and, after longer exposure times, localizes to the nucleus. (iii) The CdtC subunit is present on the cell surface and, to a greater extent, in the cytosol. These observations suggest that CdtC, but not CdtA, functions as a chaperone for CdtB entry into cells. PMID:22645284

  1. Kv2 subunits underlie slowly inactivating potassium current in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Guan, D; Tkatch, T; Surmeier, D J; Armstrong, W E; Foehring, R C

    2007-06-15

    We determined the expression of Kv2 channel subunits in rat somatosensory and motor cortex and tested for the contributions of Kv2 subunits to slowly inactivating K+ currents in supragranular pyramidal neurons. Single cell RT-PCR showed that virtually all pyramidal cells expressed Kv2.1 mRNA and approximately 80% expressed Kv2.2 mRNA. Immunocytochemistry revealed striking differences in the distribution of Kv2.1 and Kv2.2 subunits. Kv2.1 subunits were clustered and located on somata and proximal dendrites of all pyramidal cells. Kv2.2 subunits were primarily distributed on large apical dendrites of a subset of pyramidal cells from deep layers. We used two methods for isolating currents through Kv2 channels after excluding contributions from Kv1 subunits: intracellular diffusion of Kv2.1 antibodies through the recording pipette and extracellular application of rStromatoxin-1 (ScTx). The Kv2.1 antibody specifically blocked the slowly inactivating K+ current by 25-50% (at 8 min), demonstrating that Kv2.1 subunits underlie much of this current in neocortical pyramidal neurons. ScTx (300 nM) also inhibited approximately 40% of the slowly inactivating K+ current. We observed occlusion between the actions of Kv2.1 antibody and ScTx. In addition, Kv2.1 antibody- and ScTx-sensitive currents demonstrated similar recovery from inactivation and voltage dependence and kinetics of activation and inactivation. These data indicate that both agents targeted the same channels. Considering the localization of Kv2.1 and 2.2 subunits, currents from truncated dissociated cells are probably dominated by Kv2.1 subunits. Compared with Kv2.1 currents in expression systems, the Kv2.1 current in neocortical pyramidal cells activated and inactivated at relatively negative potentials and was very sensitive to holding potential.

  2. Subunit Conformations and Assembly States of a DNA Translocating Motor: The Terminase of Bacteriophage P22

    PubMed Central

    Němeček, Daniel; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Kang, Sebyung; Prevelige, Peter E.; Casjens, Sherwood; Thomas, George J.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriophage P22, a podovirus infecting strains of Salmonella typhimurium, packages a 42 kbp genome using a headful mechanism. DNA translocation is accomplished by the phage terminase, a powerful molecular motor consisting of large and small subunits. Although many of the structural proteins of the P22 virion have been well characterized, little is known about the terminase subunits and their molecular mechanism of DNA translocation. We report here structural and assembly properties of ectopically expressed and highly purified terminase large and small subunits. The large subunit (gp2), which contains the nuclease and ATPase activities of terminase, exists as a stable monomer with an α/β fold. The small subunit (gp3), which recognizes DNA for packaging and may regulate gp2 activity, exhibits a highly α-helical secondary structure and self-associates to form a stable oligomeric ring in solution. For wildtype gp3, the ring contains nine subunits, as demonstrated by hydrodynamic measurements, electron microscopy and native mass spectrometry. We have also characterized a gp3 mutant (Ala 112 → Thr) that forms a ten subunit ring, despite a subunit fold indistinguishable from wildtype. Both the nonameric and decameric gp3 rings exhibit nonspecific DNA binding activity, and gp2 is able to bind strongly to the DNA/gp3 complex but not to DNA alone. We propose a scheme for the roles of P22 terminase large and small subunits in the recruitment and packaging of viral DNA and discuss the model in relation to proposals for terminase-driven DNA translocation in other phages. PMID:17945256

  3. Molecular and pharmacological properties of GABA-rho subunits from white perch retina.

    PubMed

    Qian, H; Dowling, J E; Ripps, H

    1998-11-01

    Five gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-rho subunits were cloned from a white perch retinal cDNA library and expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The deduced amino acid sequences indicated that all are highly homologous to the GABA-rho subunits cloned from mammalian retinas; two clones (perch-rho 1A and perch-rho 1B) were in the rho 1 family, two (perch-rho 2A and perch-rho 2B) were in the rho 2 family, and one clone has been tentatively identified as a perch-rho 3 subunit. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, all but one of the subunits (rho 3) formed functional homooligomeric receptors. However, the receptors expressed by each of the GABA-rho subunits displayed unique response properties that distinguished one from the other. For example, receptors formed by perch-rho 1B subunits were more sensitive to GABA than the receptors formed by other GABA-rho subunits, the dose-response curves for the various receptors revealed different Hill coefficients, and there were differences in the kinetics of the GABA-induced currents. In addition, the GABA-mediated current-voltage curve for rho 2 receptors was approximately linear, whereas the responses from rho 1 receptors showed outward rectification. A further division in the properties of the GABA-rho subunits was revealed in their responses to imidazole-4-acetic acid (I4AA); the drug behaved as an antagonist on A-type rho receptors and a partial agonist on the B-type rho receptors. These results suggest that there is a large diversity of GABAC receptors in the vertebrate retina, probably formed by homooligomeric and heterooligomeric combinations of GABA rho subunits, that exhibit different functional properties. PMID:9805275

  4. Exact Length Distribution of Filamentous Structures Assembled from a Finite Pool of Subunits.

    PubMed

    Harbage, David; Kondev, Jané

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembling filamentous structures made of protein subunits are ubiquitous in cell biology. These structures are often highly dynamic, with subunits in a continuous state of flux, binding to and falling off of filaments. In spite of this constant turnover of their molecular parts, many cellular structures seem to maintain a well-defined size over time, which is often required for their proper functioning. One widely discussed mechanism of size regulation involves the cell maintaining a finite pool of protein subunits available for assembly. This finite pool mechanism can control the length of a single filament by having assembly proceed until the pool of free subunits is depleted to the point when assembly and disassembly are balanced. Still, this leaves open the question of whether the same mechanism can provide size control for multiple filamentous structures that are assembled from a common pool of protein subunits, as is often the case in cells. We address this question by solving the steady-state master equation governing the stochastic assembly and disassembly of multifilament structures made from a shared finite pool of subunits. We find that, while the total number of subunits within a multifilament structure is well-defined, individual filaments within the structure have a wide, power-law distribution of lengths. We also compute the phase diagram for two multifilament structures competing for the same pool of subunits and identify conditions for coexistence when both have a well-defined size. These predictions can be tested in cell experiments in which the size of the subunit pool or the number of filament nucleators is tuned.

  5. P. berghei telomerase subunit TERT is essential for parasite survival.

    PubMed

    Religa, Agnieszka A; Ramesar, Jai; Janse, Chris J; Scherf, Artur; Waters, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA), though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO) homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR) in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF) analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼ 950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert- mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further investigations to

  6. Elongated Polyproline Motifs Facilitate Enamel Evolution through Matrix Subunit Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xianghong; Dangaria, Smit; Walker, Cameron; Allen, Michael; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gibson, Carolyn; Braatz, Richard; Liao, Xiubei; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate body designs rely on hydroxyapatite as the principal mineral component of relatively light-weight, articulated endoskeletons and sophisticated tooth-bearing jaws, facilitating rapid movement and efficient predation. Biological mineralization and skeletal growth are frequently accomplished through proteins containing polyproline repeat elements. Through their well-defined yet mobile and flexible structure polyproline-rich proteins control mineral shape and contribute many other biological functions including Alzheimer's amyloid aggregation and prolamine plant storage. In the present study we have hypothesized that polyproline repeat proteins exert their control over biological events such as mineral growth, plaque aggregation, or viscous adhesion by altering the length of their central repeat domain, resulting in dramatic changes in supramolecular assembly dimensions. In order to test our hypothesis, we have used the vertebrate mineralization protein amelogenin as an exemplar and determined the biological effect of the four-fold increased polyproline tandem repeat length in the amphibian/mammalian transition. To study the effect of polyproline repeat length on matrix assembly, protein structure, and apatite crystal growth, we have measured supramolecular assembly dimensions in various vertebrates using atomic force microscopy, tested the effect of protein assemblies on crystal growth by electron microscopy, generated a transgenic mouse model to examine the effect of an abbreviated polyproline sequence on crystal growth, and determined the structure of polyproline repeat elements using 3D NMR. Our study shows that an increase in PXX/PXQ tandem repeat motif length results (i) in a compaction of protein matrix subunit dimensions, (ii) reduced conformational variability, (iii) an increase in polyproline II helices, and (iv) promotion of apatite crystal length. Together, these findings establish a direct relationship between polyproline tandem repeat fragment

  7. Development of inhibitors of heterotrimeric Gαi subunits

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, Kathryn M.; Bigham, Kevin J.; Lindsey, Christopher C.; Hazard, Starr; Lirjoni, Jonel; Parnham, Stuart; Hennig, Mirko; Peterson, Yuri K.

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are the immediate downstream effectors of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Endogenous protein guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) like AGS3/4 and RGS12/14 function through GPR/Goloco GDI domains. Extensive characterization of GPR domain peptides indicate they function as selective GDIs for Gαi by competing for the GPCR and Gβγ and preventing GDP release. We modified a GPR consensus peptide by testing FGF and TAT leader sequences to make the peptide cell permeable. FGF modification inhibited GDI activity while TAT preserved GDI activity. TAT-GPR suppresses G-protein coupling to the receptor and completely blocked α2-adrenoceptor (α2AR) mediated decreases in cAMP in HEK293 cells at 100 nM. We then sought to discover selective small molecule inhibitors for Gαi. Molecular docking was used to identify potential molecules that bind to and stabilize the Gαi–GDP complex by directly interacting with both Gαi and GDP. Gαi–GTP and Gαq-GDP were used as a computational counter screen and Gαq-GDP was used as a biological counter screen. Thirty-seven molecules were tested using nucleotide exchange. STD NMR assays with compound 0990, a quinazoline derivative, showed direct interaction with Gαi. Several compounds showed Gαi specific inhibition and were able to block α2AR mediated regulation of cAMP. In addition to being a pharmacologic tool, GDI inhibition of Gα subunits has the advantage of circumventing the upstream component of GPCR-related signaling in cases of overstimulation by agonists, mutations, polymorphisms, and expression-related defects often seen in disease. PMID:24818958

  8. Preclinical and clinical development of a dengue recombinant subunit vaccine.

    PubMed

    Manoff, Susan B; George, Sarah L; Bett, Andrew J; Yelmene, Michele L; Dhanasekaran, Govindarajan; Eggemeyer, Linda; Sausser, Michele L; Dubey, Sheri A; Casimiro, Danilo R; Clements, David E; Martyak, Timothy; Pai, Vidya; Parks, D Elliot; Coller, Beth-Ann G

    2015-12-10

    This review focuses on a dengue virus (DENV) vaccine candidate based on a recombinant subunit approach which targets the DENV envelope glycoprotein (E). Truncated versions of E consisting of the N-terminal portion of E (DEN-80E) have been expressed recombinantly in the Drosophila S2 expression system and shown to have native-like conformation. Preclinical studies demonstrate that formulations containing tetravalent DEN-80E adjuvanted with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant induce high titer virus neutralizing antibodies and IFN-γ producing T cells in flavivirus-naïve non-human primates. The preclinical data further suggest that administration of such formulations on a 0, 1, 6 month schedule may result in higher maximum virus neutralizing antibody titers and better durability of those titers compared to administration on a 0, 1, 2 month schedule. In addition, the virus neutralizing antibody titers induced by adjuvanted tetravalent DEN-80E compare favorably to the titers induced by a tetravalent live virus comparator. Furthermore, DEN-80E was demonstrated to be able to boost virus neutralizing antibody titers in macaques that have had a prior DENV exposure. A monovalent version of the vaccine candidate, DEN1-80E, was formulated with Alhydrogel™ and studied in a proof-of-principle Phase I clinical trial by Hawaii Biotech, Inc. (NCT00936429). The clinical trial results demonstrate that both the 10 μg and 50 μg formulations of DEN1-80E with 1.25 mg of elemental aluminum were immunogenic when administered in a 3-injection series (0, 1, 2 months) to healthy, flavivirus-naïve adults. The vaccine formulations induced DENV-1 neutralizing antibodies in the majority of subjects, although the titers in most subjects were modest and waned over time. Both the 10 μg DEN1-80E and the 50 μg DEN1-80E formulations with Alhydrogel™ were generally well tolerated.

  9. Principles of electroanatomic mapping.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Deepak; Miller, John M

    2008-01-01

    Electrophysiologic testing and radiofrequency ablation have evolved as curative measures for a variety of rhythm disturbances. As experience in this field has grown, ablation is progressively being used to address more complex rhythm disturbances. Paralleling this trend are technological advancements to facilitate these efforts, including electroanatomic mapping (EAM). At present, several different EAM systems utilizing various technologies are available to facilitate mapping and ablation. Use of these systems has been shown to reduce fluoroscopic exposure and radiation dose, with less significant effects on procedural duration and success rates. Among the data provided by EAM are chamber reconstruction, tagging of important anatomic landmarks and ablation lesions, display of diagnostic and mapping catheters without using fluoroscopy, activation mapping, and voltage (or scar) mapping. Several EAM systems have specialized features, such as enhanced ability to map non-sustained or hemodynamically unstable arrhythmias, ability to display diagnostic as well as mapping catheter positions, and wide compatibility with a variety of catheters. Each EAM system has its strengths and weaknesses, and the system chosen must depend upon what data is required for procedural success (activation mapping, substrate mapping, cardiac geometry), the anticipated arrhythmia, the compatibility of the system with adjunctive tools (i.e. diagnostic and ablation catheters), and the operator's familiarity with the selected system. While EAM can offer significant assistance during an EP procedure, their incorrect or inappropriate application can substantially hamper mapping efforts and procedural success, and should not replace careful interpretation of data and strict adherence to electrophysiologic principles.

  10. The investigation of substrate-induced changes in subunit interactions in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases by measurement of the kinetics and thermodynamics of subunit exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, H H; Hollaway, M R

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was made of changes in subunit interactions in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase on binding NAD+, NADH and other substrates by using the previously developed method of measurement of rates and extent of subunit exchange between the rabbit enzyme (R4), yeast enzyme (Y4) and rabbit-yeast hybrid (R2Y2) [Osborne & Hollaway (1974) Biochem. J. 143, 651-662]. The free energy of activation for the conversion of tetramer into dimer for the rabbit enzyme (R4 leads to 2R2) is increased by at least 12kJ/mol in the presence of NAD+. This increase is interpreted in terms of an NAD+-induced 'tightening' of the tetrameric structure probably involving increased interaction at the subunit interfaces across the QR plane of the molecule [see Buehner et al. (1974) J. Mol. Biol. 82, 563-585]. This tightening of the structure only occurs on binding the third NAD+ molecule to a given enzyme molecule. Conversely, binding of NADH causes a decrease in the free energy of activation for the R4 leads to 2R2 and Y4 leads to 2Y2 conversions by at least 10kJ/mol. This is interpreted as a NADH-induced 'loosening' of the structures arising from decreased interactions across the subunit interfaces involving the QR dissociation plane. In the presence of NADH the increase in the rate of subunit exchange is such that it is not possible to separate the hybrid from the other species if electrophoresis is carried out with NADH in the separation media. In the presence of a mixture of NADH and NAD+ the effect of NAD+ on subunit exchange is dominant. The results are discussed in terms of the known co-operativty between binding sites in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases. Images PLATE 1(a) PLATE 1(b) PLATE 2(a) PLATE 2(b) PLATE 2(c) PMID:174555

  11. Molecular cloning of the. cap alpha. subunit of human and guinea pig leukocyte adhesion glycoprotein Mo1: Chromosomal localization and homology to the. cap alpha. subunits of integrins

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaout, M.A.; Remold-O'Donnell, E.; Pierce, M.W.; Harris, P.; Tenen, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    The cell surface-glycoprotein Mo1 is a member of the family of leukocyte cell adhesion molecules (Leu-CAMs) that includes lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and p150,95. Each Leu-CAM is a heterodimer with a distinct ..cap alpha.. subunit noncovalently associated with a common ..beta.. subunit. The authors describe the isolation and analysis of two partial cDNA clones encoding the ..cap alpha.. subunit of the Leu-CAM Mo1 in humans and guinea pigs. A monoclonal antibody directed against an epitope in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the guinea pig ..cap alpha.. chain was used for immunoscreening a lambdagt11 expression library. The sequence of a 378-base-pair insert from one immunoreactive clone revealed a single continuous open reading frame encoding 126 amino acids including a 26-amino acid tryptic peptide isolated from the purified guinea pig ..cap alpha.. subunit. A cDNA clone of identical size was isolated from a human monocyte/lymphocyte cDNA library by using the guinea pig clone as a probe. The human clone also encoded a 126-amino acid peptide including the sequence of an additional tryptic peptide present in purified human Mo1..cap alpha.. chain. Southern analysis of DNA from hamster-human hybrids localized the human Mo1..cap alpha.. chain to chromosome 16, which has been shown to contain the gene for the ..cap alpha.. chain of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1. These data suggest that the ..cap alpha.. subunits of Leu-CAMs evolved by gene duplication from a common ancestral gene and strengthen the hypothesis that the ..cap alpha.. subunits of these heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules on myeloid and lymphoid cells, platelets, and fibroblasts are evolutionary related.

  12. rRNA suppressor of a eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 mutant reveals a binding site for translational GTPases on the small ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Kim, Joo-Ran; Acker, Michael G; Maher, Kathryn N; Lorsch, Jon R; Dever, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    The translational GTPases promote initiation, elongation, and termination of protein synthesis by interacting with the ribosome. Mutations that impair GTP hydrolysis by eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5B/initiation factor 2 (eIF5B/IF2) impair yeast cell growth due to failure to dissociate from the ribosome following subunit joining. A mutation in helix h5 of the 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit and intragenic mutations in domain II of eIF5B suppress the toxic effects associated with expression of the eIF5B-H480I GTPase-deficient mutant in yeast by lowering the ribosome binding affinity of eIF5B. Hydroxyl radical mapping experiments reveal that the domain II suppressors interface with the body of the 40S subunit in the vicinity of helix h5. As the helix h5 mutation also impairs elongation factor function, the rRNA and eIF5B suppressor mutations provide in vivo evidence supporting a functionally important docking of domain II of the translational GTPases on the body of the small ribosomal subunit.

  13. Use of affinity-directed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to map the epitopes of a factor VIII inhibitor antibody fraction

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Amy E.; Wang, Wensheng; Hagen, Fred K.; Fay, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Neutralizing factor (F) VIII antibodies develop in ~30% of individuals with hemophilia A and show specificity to multiple sites in the FVIII protein. Methods Reactive epitopes to an immobilized IgG fraction prepared from a high-titer, FVIII inhibitor plasma were determined following immuno-precipitation (IP) of tryptic and chymotryptic peptides derived from digests of the A1 and A2 subunits of FVIIIa and FVIII light chain. Peptides were detected and identified using highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Results Coverage maps of the A1 subunit, A2 subunit and light chain represented 79%, 69% and 90%, respectively, of the protein sequences. Dot blots indicated that the inhibitor IgG reacted with epitopes contained within each subunit of FVIIIa. IP coupled with LC-MS identified 19 peptides representing epitopes from all FVIII A and C domains. The majority of peptides (10) were derived from the A2 domain. Three peptides mapped to the C2 domain, while two mapped to the A1 and A3 domains, and single peptides mapped to the a1 segment and C1 domain. Epitopes were typically defined by peptide sequences of <12 residues. Conclusions IP coupled with LC-MS identified extensive antibody reactivity at high resolution over the entire functional FVIII molecule and yielded sequence lengths of less than 15 residues. A number of the peptides identified mapped to known sequences involved in functionally important protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. PMID:21668738

  14. Complex regulation of γ-secretase: from obligatory to modulatory subunits

    PubMed Central

    Gertsik, Natalya; Chiu, Danica; Li, Yue-Ming

    2014-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a four subunit, 19-pass transmembrane enzyme that cleaves amyloid precursor protein (APP), catalyzing the formation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides that form amyloid plaques, which contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. γ-Secretase also cleaves Notch, among many other type I transmembrane substrates. Despite its seemingly promiscuous enzymatic capacity, γ-secretase activity is tightly regulated. This regulation is a function of many cellular entities, including but not limited to the essential γ-secretase subunits, nonessential (modulatory) subunits, and γ-secretase substrates. Regulation is also accomplished by an array of cellular events, such as presenilin (active subunit of γ-secretase) endoproteolysis and hypoxia. In this review we discuss how γ-secretase is regulated with the hope that an advanced understanding of these mechanisms will aid in the development of effective therapeutics for γ-secretase-associated diseases like AD and Notch-addicted cancer. PMID:25610395

  15. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  16. A pH-dependent conformational change in the coat protein subunits from potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Homer, R B; Dalton, D I

    1976-10-28

    Both the circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra of the dissociated coat protein subunits from potato virus X changed substantially over the pH range 8 to 4, irreversible changes resulted below pH 4, with tyrosyl and tryptophanyl residues affected most. The titration curves show a pKa of about 5.6 and do not require cooperative interactions between the coat protein subunits, thus they are in marked contrast to titrations of tobacco mosaic virus A-protein. The spectra of the intact virus were little changed between pH 8 and 4 and suggested that the coat protein was locked into a conformation similar to that of the subunits in solution at pH 7. It is proposed that the pH induced conformational change is responsible for determining the acidic branch of the pH profile for reconstitution of potato virus X from its dissociated coat protein subunits and RNA.

  17. Extensive subunit contacts underpin herpesvirus capsid stability and interior-to-exterior allostery.

    PubMed

    Huet, Alexis; Makhov, Alexander M; Huffman, Jamie B; Vos, Matthijn; Homa, Fred L; Conway, James F

    2016-06-01

    The herpesvirus capsid is a complex protein assembly that includes hundreds of copies of four major subunits and lesser numbers of several minor proteins, all of which are essential for infectivity. Cryo-electron microscopy is uniquely suited for studying interactions that govern the assembly and function of such large functional complexes. Here we report two high-quality capsid structures, from human herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and the animal pseudorabies virus (PRV), imaged inside intact virions at ~7-Å resolution. From these, we developed a complete model of subunit and domain organization and identified extensive networks of subunit contacts that underpin capsid stability and form a pathway that may signal the completion of DNA packaging from the capsid interior to outer surface, thereby initiating nuclear egress. Differences in the folding and orientation of subunit domains between herpesvirus capsids suggest that common elements have been modified for specific functions.

  18. Developmental expression of cerebellar GABAA-receptor subunit mRNAs. Nature versus nurture.

    PubMed

    Siegel, R E

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that many of the mRNAs encoding GABAA-receptor subunits in the cerebellum exhibit distinct temporal profiles of expression. The levels of six of these subunit transcripts increase severalfold in the second week of postnatal ontogeny. Findings from a variety of experimental systems suggest that the onset and increases in subunit mRNA expression are mediated by the interaction of genetic and epigenetic programs. The initiation of subunit mRNA expression occurs relatively early in cellular maturation and may be directed by intrinsic mechanisms. However, the levels of expression attained in adult animals may be controlled by extrinsic signals received by neurons during the postnatal maturation process. PMID:9777637

  19. Distinct Subunit Domains Govern Synaptic Stability and Specificity of the Kainate Receptor.

    PubMed

    Straub, Christoph; Noam, Yoav; Nomura, Toshihiro; Yamasaki, Miwako; Yan, Dan; Fernandes, Herman B; Zhang, Ping; Howe, James R; Watanabe, Masahiko; Contractor, Anis; Tomita, Susumu

    2016-07-12

    Synaptic communication between neurons requires the precise localization of neurotransmitter receptors to the correct synapse type. Kainate-type glutamate receptors restrict synaptic localization that is determined by the afferent presynaptic connection. The mechanisms that govern this input-specific synaptic localization remain unclear. Here, we examine how subunit composition and specific subunit domains contribute to synaptic localization of kainate receptors. The cytoplasmic domain of the GluK2 low-affinity subunit stabilizes kainate receptors at synapses. In contrast, the extracellular domain of the GluK4/5 high-affinity subunit synergistically controls the synaptic specificity of kainate receptors through interaction with C1q-like proteins. Thus, the input-specific synaptic localization of the native kainate receptor complex involves two mechanisms that underlie specificity and stabilization of the receptor at synapses.

  20. Nucleotide-Protectable Labeling of Sulfhydryl Groups in Subunit I of the ATPhase from Halobacterium Saccharovorum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzner, Michael; Stan-Lotter, Helga; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1992-01-01

    A membrane-bound ATPase from the archaebacterium Halobacterium saccharovorum is inhibited by N-ethyl-maleimide in a nucleotide-protectable manner. When the enzyme was incubated with N-[C-14]jethylmaleimide, the bulk of radioactivity was as- sociated with the 87,000-Da subunit (subunit 1). ATP, ADP, or AMP reduced incorporation of the inhibitor. No charge shift of subunit I was detected following labeling with N-ethylmaleimide, indicating an electroneutral reaction. The results are consistent with the selective modification of sulfhydryl groups in subunit I at or near the catalytic site and are further evidence of a resemblance between this archaebacterial ATPase and the vacuolar-type ATPases.

  1. Activation of Tsk and Btk tyrosine kinases by G protein beta gamma subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Langhans-Rajasekaran, S A; Wan, Y; Huang, X Y

    1995-01-01

    Tsk/Itk and Btk are members of the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain-containing tyrosine kinase family. The PH domain has been demonstrated to be able to interact with beta gamma subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) (G beta gamma) and phospholipids. Using cotransfection assays, we show here that the kinase activities of Tsk and Btk are stimulated by certain G beta gamma subunits. Furthermore, using an in vitro reconstitution assay with purified bovine brain G beta gamma subunits and the immunoprecipitated Tsk, we find that Tsk kinase activity is increased by G beta gamma subunits and another membrane factor(s). These results indicate that this family of tyrosine kinases could be an effector of heterotrimeric G proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7567982

  2. Extensive subunit contacts underpin herpesvirus capsid stability and interior-to-exterior allostery

    PubMed Central

    Huet, Alexis; Makhov, Alexander M.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Vos, Matthijn; Homa, Fred L.; Conway, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The herpesvirus capsid is a complex protein assembly that includes hundreds of copies of four major subunits and lesser numbers of several minor proteins, all essential for infectivity. Cryo-electron microscopy is uniquely suited for studying interactions that govern the assembly and function of such large and functional complexes. Here we report two high quality capsid structures, from human herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and the animal pseudorabies virus (PRV), imaged inside intact virions at ~7 Å resolution. From these we developed a complete model of subunit and domainal organization and identified extensive networks of subunit contacts that underpin capsid stability and form a pathway that may signal the completion of DNA packaging from the capsid interior to outer surface for initiating nuclear egress. Differences in folding and orientation of subunit domains between herpesvirus capsids suggest that common elements have been modified for specific functions. PMID:27111889

  3. Mechanism of release of active alpha subunit from dimeric alpha beta avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Papas, T S; Marciani, D J; Samuel, K; Chirikjian, J G

    1976-01-01

    Storage of the dimeric (alphabeta) form of avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) DNA polymerase in glycerol resulted in the release of the smaller alpha subunit, as detected by glycerol gradient sedimentation. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of enzyme stored in glycerol showed the concomitant appearance of several polypeptides and a lowering in the level of both beta and alpha components. This reduction appears to be the result of cleavages introduced by traces of hydrolytic activity present in glycerol samples. An enhancement of alpha subunit released, as detected by activity profile, was also achieved upon direct but limited exposure of purified avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase to carboxymethyl-cellulose-bound trypsin matrix. Electrophoretic analysis of digested enzyme revealed a progressive fragmentation, with simultaneous increase in the alpha subunit and decrease in the beta subunit. PMID:58080

  4. Differential Targeting of Gβγ-Subunit Signaling with Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Tabetha M.; Mathews, Jennifer L.; Yuan, Chujun; Lehmann, David M.; Malik, Sundeep; Wu, Dianqing; Font, Jose L.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Smrcka, Alan V.

    2006-04-01

    G protein βγ subunits have potential as a target for therapeutic treatment of a number of diseases. We performed virtual docking of a small-molecule library to a site on Gβγ subunits that mediates protein interactions. We hypothesized that differential targeting of this surface could allow for selective modulation of Gβγ subunit functions. Several compounds bound to Gβγ subunits with affinities from 0.1 to 60 μM and selectively modulated functional Gβγ-protein-protein interactions in vitro, chemotactic peptide signaling pathways in HL-60 leukocytes, and opioid receptor-dependent analgesia in vivo. These data demonstrate an approach for modulation of G protein-coupled receptor signaling that may represent an important therapeutic strategy.

  5. The subunit composition of hinokiresinol synthase controls geometrical selectivity in norlignan formation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shiro; Yamamura, Masaomi; Hattori, Takefumi; Nakatsubo, Tomoyuki; Umezawa, Toshiaki

    2007-12-26

    The selective formation of E- or Z-isomers is an important process in natural product metabolism. We show that the subunit composition of an enzyme can alter the geometrical composition of the enzymatic products. Hinokiresinol synthase, purified from Asparagus officinalis cell cultures, is responsible for the conversion of (7E,7'E)-4-coumaryl 4-coumarate to (Z)-hinokiresinol, the first step in norlignan formation. The protein is most likely a heterodimer composed of two distinct subunits, which share identity with members of the phloem protein 2 gene superfamily. Interestingly, each recombinant subunit of hinokiresinol synthase expressed in Escherichia coli solely converted (7E,7'E)-4-coumaryl 4-coumarate to the unnatural (E)-hinokiresinol, the E-isomer of (Z)-hinokiresinol. By contrast, a mixture of recombinant subunits catalyzed the formation of (Z)-hinokiresinol from the same substrate. PMID:18093914

  6. Head-to-head coiled arrangement of the subunits of the animal fatty acid synthase.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Ghosal, Alokesh; Joshi, Anil K; Witkowska, H Ewa; Asturias, Francisco J; Smith, Stuart

    2004-12-01

    The role of the beta-ketoacyl synthase domains in dimerization of the 2505 residue subunits of the multifunctional animal FAS has been evaluated by a combination of crosslinking and characterization of several truncated forms of the protein. Polypeptides containing only the N-terminal 971 residues can form dimers, but polypeptides lacking only the N-terminal 422 residue beta-ketoacyl synthase domain cannot. FAS subunits can be crosslinked with spacer lengths as short as 6 A, via cysteine residues engineered near the N terminus of the full-length polypeptides. The proximity of the N-terminal beta-ketoacyl synthase domains and their essential role in dimerization is consistent with a revised model for the FAS in which a head-to-head arrangement of two coiled subunits facilitates functional interactions between the dimeric beta-ketoacyl synthase and the acyl carrier protein domains of either subunit.

  7. Modulation of the Na,K-pump function by beta subunit isoforms

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To study the role of the Na,K-ATPase beta subunit in the ion transport activity, we have coexpressed the Bufo alpha 1 subunit (alpha 1) with three different isotypes of beta subunits, the Bufo Na,K-ATPase beta 1 (beta 1NaK) or beta 3 (beta 3NaK) subunit or the beta subunit of the rabbit gastric H,K-ATPase (beta HK), by cRNA injection in Xenopus oocyte. We studied the K+ activation kinetics by measuring the Na,K- pump current induced by external K+ under voltage clamp conditions. The endogenous oocyte Na,K-ATPase was selectively inhibited, taking advantage of the large difference in ouabain sensitivity between Xenopus and Bufo Na,K pumps. The K+ half-activation constant (K1/2) was higher in the alpha 1 beta 3NaK than in the alpha 1 beta 1NaK groups in the presence of external Na+, but there was no significant difference in the absence of external Na+. Association of alpha 1 and beta HK subunits produced active Na,K pumps with a much lower apparent affinity for K+ both in the presence and in the absence of external Na+. The voltage dependence of the K1/2 for external K+ was similar with the three beta subunits. Our results indicate that the beta subunit has a significant influence on the ion transport activity of the Na,K pump. The small structural differences between the beta 1NaK and beta 3NaK subunits results in a difference of the apparent affinity for K+ that is measurable only in the presence of external Na+, and thus appears not to be directly related to the K+ binding site. In contrast, association of an alpha 1 subunit with a beta HK subunit results in a Na,K pump in which the K+ binding or translocating mechanisms are altered since the apparent affinity for external K+ is affected even in the absence of external Na+. PMID:8057080

  8. Heat Capacity Mapping Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsson, C. S.; Andrews, J. C.; Scully-Power, P.; Ball, S.; Speechley, G.; Latham, A. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Tasman Front was delineated by airborne expendable bathythermograph survey; and an Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) IR image on the same day shows the same principal features as determined from ground-truth. It is clear that digital enhancement of HCMM images is necessary to map ocean surface temperatures and when done, the Tasman Front and other oceanographic features can be mapped by this method, even through considerable scattered cloud cover.

  9. Mapping the Hydrogen Bond Networks in the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Kinase A Using H/D Fractionation Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Geoffrey C; Srivastava, Atul K; Kim, Jonggul; Taylor, Susan S; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-07-01

    Protein kinase A is a prototypical phosphoryl transferase, sharing its catalytic core (PKA-C) with the entire kinase family. PKA-C substrate recognition, active site organization, and product release depend on the enzyme's conformational transitions from the open to the closed state, which regulate its allosteric cooperativity. Here, we used equilibrium nuclear magnetic resonance hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) fractionation factors (φ) to probe the changes in the strength of hydrogen bonds within the kinase upon binding the nucleotide and a pseudosubstrate peptide (PKI5-24). We found that the φ values decrease upon binding both ligands, suggesting that the overall hydrogen bond networks in both the small and large lobes of PKA-C become stronger. However, we observed several important exceptions, with residues displaying higher φ values upon ligand binding. Notably, the changes in φ values are not localized near the ligand binding pockets; rather, they are radiated throughout the entire enzyme. We conclude that, upon ligand and pseudosubstrate binding, the hydrogen bond networks undergo extensive reorganization, revealing that the open-to-closed transitions require global rearrangements of the internal forces that stabilize the enzyme's fold. PMID:26030372

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus Resistance to Deoxyribosylindole Nucleosides Maps to a Transversion Mutation in the Terminase Subunit-Encoding Gene UL89

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Quang; Hall, Ellie D.; Breitenbach, Julie M.; Borysko, Katherine Z.; Kamil, Jeremy P.; Townsend, Leroy B.; Drach, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can cause severe illnesses, including encephalopathy and mental retardation, in immunocompromised and immunologically immature patients. Current pharmacotherapies for treating systemic HCMV infections include ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet. However, long-term administration of these agents can result in serious adverse effects (myelosuppression and/or nephrotoxicity) and the development of viral strains with reduced susceptibility to drugs. The deoxyribosylindole (indole) nucleosides demonstrate a 20-fold greater activity in vitro (the drug concentration at which 50% of the number of plaques was reduced with the presence of drug compared to the number in the absence of drug [EC50] = 0.34 μM) than ganciclovir (EC50 = 7.4 μM) without any observed increase in cytotoxicity. Based on structural similarity to the benzimidazole nucleosides, we hypothesize that the indole nucleosides target the HCMV terminase, an enzyme responsible for packaging viral DNA into capsids and cleaving the DNA into genome-length units. To test this hypothesis, an indole nucleoside-resistant HCMV strain was isolated, the open reading frames of the genes that encode the viral terminase were sequenced, and a G766C mutation in exon 1 of UL89 was identified; this mutation resulted in an E256Q change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein. An HCMV wild-type strain, engineered with this mutation to confirm resistance, demonstrated an 18-fold decrease in susceptibility to the indole nucleosides (EC50 = 3.1 ± 0.7 μM) compared to that of wild-type virus (EC50 = 0.17 ± 0.04 μM). Interestingly, this mutation did not confer resistance to the benzimidazole nucleosides (EC50 for wild-type HCMV = 0.25 ± 0.04 μM, EC50 for HCMV pUL89 E256Q = 0.23 ± 0.04 μM). We conclude, therefore, that the G766C mutation that results in the E256Q substitution is unique for indole nucleoside resistance and distinct from previously discovered substitutions that confer both indole and benzimidazole nucleoside resistance (D344E and A355T). PMID:25348532

  11. Human cytomegalovirus resistance to deoxyribosylindole nucleosides maps to a transversion mutation in the terminase subunit-encoding gene UL89.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Brian G; Phan, Quang; Hall, Ellie D; Breitenbach, Julie M; Borysko, Katherine Z; Kamil, Jeremy P; Townsend, Leroy B; Drach, John C

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection can cause severe illnesses, including encephalopathy and mental retardation, in immunocompromised and immunologically immature patients. Current pharmacotherapies for treating systemic HCMV infections include ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet. However, long-term administration of these agents can result in serious adverse effects (myelosuppression and/or nephrotoxicity) and the development of viral strains with reduced susceptibility to drugs. The deoxyribosylindole (indole) nucleosides demonstrate a 20-fold greater activity in vitro (the drug concentration at which 50% of the number of plaques was reduced with the presence of drug compared to the number in the absence of drug [EC50] = 0.34 μM) than ganciclovir (EC50 = 7.4 μM) without any observed increase in cytotoxicity. Based on structural similarity to the benzimidazole nucleosides, we hypothesize that the indole nucleosides target the HCMV terminase, an enzyme responsible for packaging viral DNA into capsids and cleaving the DNA into genome-length units. To test this hypothesis, an indole nucleoside-resistant HCMV strain was isolated, the open reading frames of the genes that encode the viral terminase were sequenced, and a G766C mutation in exon 1 of UL89 was identified; this mutation resulted in an E256Q change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein. An HCMV wild-type strain, engineered with this mutation to confirm resistance, demonstrated an 18-fold decrease in susceptibility to the indole nucleosides (EC50 = 3.1 ± 0.7 μM) compared to that of wild-type virus (EC50 = 0.17 ± 0.04 μM). Interestingly, this mutation did not confer resistance to the benzimidazole nucleosides (EC50 for wild-type HCMV = 0.25 ± 0.04 μM, EC50 for HCMV pUL89 E256Q = 0.23 ± 0.04 μM). We conclude, therefore, that the G766C mutation that results in the E256Q substitution is unique for indole nucleoside resistance and distinct from previously discovered substitutions that confer both indole and benzimidazole nucleoside resistance (D344E and A355T).

  12. Investigation of molluscan phylogeny using large-subunit and small-subunit nuclear rRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Passamaneck, Yale J; Schander, Christoffer; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2004-07-01

    The Mollusca represent one of the most morphologically diverse animal phyla, prompting a variety of hypotheses on relationships between the major lineages within the phylum based upon morphological, developmental, and paleontological data. Analyses of small-ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequence have provided limited resolution of higher-level relationships within the Mollusca. Recent analyses suggest large-subunit (LSU) rRNA gene sequences are useful in resolving deep-level metazoan relationships, particularly when combined with SSU sequence. To this end, LSU (approximately 3.5 kb in length) and SSU (approximately 2 kb) sequences were collected for 33 taxa representing the major lineages within the Mollusca to improve resolution of intraphyletic relationships. Although the LSU and combined LSU+SSU datasets appear to hold potential for resolving branching order within the recognized molluscan classes, low bootstrap support was found for relationships between the major lineages within the Mollusca. LSU+SSU sequences also showed significant levels of rate heterogeneity between molluscan lineages. The Polyplacophora, Gastropoda, and Cephalopoda were each recovered as monophyletic clades with the LSU+SSU dataset. While the Bivalvia were not recovered as monophyletic clade in analyses of the SSU, LSU, or LSU+SSU, the Shimodaira-Hasegawa test showed that likelihood scores for these results did not differ significantly from topologies where the Bivalvia were monophyletic. Analyses of LSU sequences strongly contradict the widely accepted Diasoma hypotheses that bivalves and scaphopods are closely related to one another. The data are consistent with recent morphological and SSU analyses suggesting scaphopods are more closely related to gastropods and cephalopods than to bivalves. The dataset also presents the first published DNA sequences from a neomeniomorph aplacophoran, a group considered critical to our understanding of the origin and early radiation of the Mollusca

  13. Regularity of mappings inverse to Sobolev mappings

    SciTech Connect

    Vodop'yanov, Sergei K

    2012-10-31

    For homeomorphisms {phi}:{Omega}{yields}{Omega}' on Euclidean domains in R{sup n}, n{>=}2, necessary and sufficient conditions ensuring that the inverse mapping belongs to a Sobolev class are investigated. The result obtained is used to describe a new two-index scale of homeomorphisms in some Sobolev class such that their inverses also form a two-index scale of mappings, in another Sobolev class. This scale involves quasiconformal mappings and also homeomorphisms in the Sobolev class W{sup 1}{sub n-1} such that rankD{phi}(x){<=}n-2 almost everywhere on the zero set of the Jacobian det D{phi}(x). Bibliography: 65 titles.

  14. First asymmetric synthesis of the cyclohexanone subunit of baconipyrones A and B. Revision of its structure.

    PubMed

    Turks, Māris; Murcia, M Carmen; Scopelliti, Rosario; Vogel, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    [reaction: see text] An asymmetric synthesis of the 3,5-dihydroxycyclohexanone subunit of baconipyrones A and B, as well as that of the hydroxydiketone subunit of baconipyrones C and D ((-)-(4S,6S)-4,6-dimethyl-5-hydroxynonan-3,7-dione), is described. Key steps include sulfur dioxide-induced additions of enoxysilanes to 1,3-dioxy-1,3-dienes, followed by retro-ene desulfitations (retro-ene elimination of SO(2)).

  15. Crystal Structure of the Oxazolidinone Antibiotic Linezolid Bound to the 50S Ribosomal Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito,J.; Kanyo, Z.; Wang, D.; Franceschi, F.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.; Duffy, E.

    2008-01-01

    The oxazolidinone antibacterials target the 50S subunit of prokaryotic ribosomes. To gain insight into their mechanism of action, the crystal structure of the canonical oxazolidinone, linezolid, has been determined bound to the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. Linezolid binds the 50S A-site, near the catalytic center, which suggests that inhibition involves competition with incoming A-site substrates. These results provide a structural basis for the discovery of improved oxazolidinones active against emerging drug-resistant clinical strains.

  16. 3D reconstruction of the hemocyanin subunit dimer from the chiton Acanthochiton fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Meissner, Ulrich; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Markl, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Procedures are presented for the purification of the subunit dimer from Acanthochiton fasicularis hemocyanin. Electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens revealed a uniform population of macromolecules possessing the characteristic "boat shape". A 3D reconstruction from this EM data generated a approximately 3 nm resolution model that correlates well with earlier data of the purported subunit dimer, extracted from the 3D reconstruction of the didecamer of Haliotis tuberculata hemocyanin type 1.

  17. Crystal structure of Agaricus bisporus mushroom tyrosinase: identity of the tetramer subunits and interaction with tropolone.

    PubMed

    Ismaya, Wangsa T; Rozeboom, Henriëtte J; Weijn, Amrah; Mes, Jurriaan J; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Wichers, Harry J; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2011-06-21

    Tyrosinase catalyzes the conversion of phenolic compounds into their quinone derivatives, which are precursors for the formation of melanin, a ubiquitous pigment in living organisms. Because of its importance for browning reactions in the food industry, the tyrosinase from the mushroom Agaricus bisporus has been investigated in depth. In previous studies the tyrosinase enzyme complex was shown to be a H(2)L(2) tetramer, but no clues were obtained of the identities of the subunits, their mode of association, and the 3D structure of the complex. Here we unravel this tetramer at the molecular level. Its 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure is the first structure of the full fungal tyrosinase complex. The complex comprises two H subunits of ∼392 residues and two L subunits of ∼150 residues. The H subunit originates from the ppo3 gene and has a fold similar to other tyrosinases, but it is ∼100 residues larger. The L subunit appeared to be the product of orf239342 and has a lectin-like fold. The H subunit contains a binuclear copper-binding site in the deoxy-state, in which three histidine residues coordinate each copper ion. The side chains of these histidines have their orientation fixed by hydrogen bonds or, in the case of His85, by a thioether bridge with the side chain of Cys83. The specific tyrosinase inhibitor tropolone forms a pre-Michaelis complex with the enzyme. It binds near the binuclear copper site without directly coordinating the copper ions. The function of the ORF239342 subunits is not known. Carbohydrate binding sites identified in other lectins are not conserved in ORF239342, and the subunits are over 25 Å away from the active site, making a role in activity unlikely. The structures explain how calcium ions stabilize the tetrameric state of the enzyme. PMID:21598903

  18. 3D reconstruction of the hemocyanin subunit dimer from the chiton Acanthochiton fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Meissner, Ulrich; Gebauer, Wolfgang; Markl, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Procedures are presented for the purification of the subunit dimer from Acanthochiton fasicularis hemocyanin. Electron microscopy of negatively stained specimens revealed a uniform population of macromolecules possessing the characteristic "boat shape". A 3D reconstruction from this EM data generated a approximately 3 nm resolution model that correlates well with earlier data of the purported subunit dimer, extracted from the 3D reconstruction of the didecamer of Haliotis tuberculata hemocyanin type 1. PMID:15036283

  19. L-type calcium channel β subunit modulates angiotensin II responses in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Moreno, Cristian; Itfinca, Mircea; Altier, Christophe; Armisén, Ricardo; Stutzin, Andres; Zamponi, Gerald W; Varela, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II regulation of L-type calcium currents in cardiac muscle is controversial and the underlying signaling events are not completely understood. Moreover, the possible role of auxiliary subunit composition of the channels in Angiotensin II modulation of L-type calcium channels has not yet been explored. In this work we study the role of Ca(v)β subunits and the intracellular signaling responsible for L-type calcium current modulation by Angiotensin II. In cardiomyocytes, Angiotensin II exposure induces rapid inhibition of L-type current with a magnitude that is correlated with the rate of current inactivation. Semi-quantitative PCR of cardiomyocytes at different days of culture reveals changes in the Ca(v)β subunits expression pattern that are correlated with the rate of current inactivation and with Angiotensin II effect. Over-expression of individual b subunits in heterologous systems reveals that the magnitude of Angiotensin II inhibition is dependent on the Ca(v)β subunit isoform, with Ca(v)β(1b) containing channels being more strongly regulated. Ca(v)β(2a) containing channels were insensitive to modulation and this effect was partially due to the N-terminal palmitoylation sites of this subunit. Moreover, PLC or diacylglycerol lipase inhibition prevents the Angiotensin II effect on L-type calcium channels, while PKC inhibition with chelerythrine does not, suggesting a role of arachidonic acid in this process. Finally, we show that in intact cardiomyocytes the magnitude of calcium transients on spontaneous beating cells is modulated by Angiotensin II in a Ca(v)β subunit-dependent manner. These data demonstrate that Ca(v)β subunits alter the magnitude of inhibition of L-type current by Angiotensin II. PMID:21525790

  20. A Single Mutation in the Acetylcholine Receptor δ-Subunit Causes Distinct Effects in Two Types of Neuromuscular Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jee-Young; Mott, Meghan; Williams, Tory; Ikeda, Hiromi; Wen, Hua; Linhoff, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in AChR subunits, expressed as pentamers in neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), cause various types of congenital myasthenic syndromes. In AChR pentamers, the adult ε subunit gradually replaces the embryonic γ subunit as the animal develops. Because of this switch in subunit composition, mutations in specific subunits result in synaptic phenotypes that change with developmental age. However, a mutation in any AChR subunit is considered to affect the NMJs of all muscle fibers equally. Here, we report a zebrafish mutant of the AChR δ subunit that exhibits two distinct NMJ phenotypes specific to two muscle fiber types: slow or fast. Homozygous fish harboring a point mutation in the δ subunit form functional AChRs in slow muscles, whereas receptors in fast muscles are nonfunctional. To test the hypothesis that different subunit compositions in slow and fast muscles underlie distinct phenotypes, we examined the presence of ε/γ subunits in NMJs using specific antibodies. Both wild-type and mutant larvae lacked ε/γ subunits in slow muscle synapses. These findings in zebrafish suggest that some mutations in human congenital myasthenic syndromes may affect slow and fast muscle fibers differently. PMID:25080583

  1. Isolated noncatalytic and catalytic subunits of F1-ATPase exhibit similar, albeit not identical, energetic strategies for recognizing adenosine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Guillermo; Cano-Sánchez, Patricia; de Gómez-Puyou, Marietta Tuena; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; García-Hernández, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The function of F1-ATPase relies critically on the intrinsic ability of its catalytic and noncatalytic subunits to interact with nucleotides. Therefore, the study of isolated subunits represents an opportunity to dissect elementary energetic contributions that drive the enzyme's rotary mechanism. In this study we have calorimetrically characterized the association of adenosine nucleotides to the isolated noncatalytic α-subunit. The resulting recognition behavior was compared with that previously reported for the isolated catalytic β-subunit (N.O. Pulido, G. Salcedo, G. Pérez-Hernández, C. José-Núñez, A. Velázquez-Campoy, E. García-Hernández, Energetic effects of magnesium in the recognition of adenosine nucleotides by the F1-ATPase β subunit, Biochemistry 49 (2010) 5258-5268). The two subunits exhibit nucleotide-binding thermodynamic signatures similar to each other, characterized by enthalpically-driven affinities in the μM range. Nevertheless, contrary to the catalytic subunit that recognizes MgATP and MgADP with comparable strength, the noncatalytic subunit much prefers the triphosphate nucleotide. Besides, the α-subunit depends more on Mg(II) for stabilizing the interaction with ATP, while both subunits are rather metal-independent for ADP recognition. These binding behaviors are discussed in terms of the properties that the two subunits exhibit in the whole enzyme.

  2. Chaotic Polynomial Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu

    This paper introduces a class of polynomial maps in Euclidean spaces, investigates the conditions under which there exist Smale horseshoes and uniformly hyperbolic invariant sets, studies the chaotic dynamical behavior and strange attractors, and shows that some maps are chaotic in the sense of Li-Yorke or Devaney. This type of maps includes both the Logistic map and the Hénon map. For some diffeomorphisms with the expansion dimension equal to one or two in three-dimensional spaces, the conditions under which there exist Smale horseshoes and uniformly hyperbolic invariant sets on which the systems are topologically conjugate to the two-sided fullshift on finite alphabet are obtained; for some expanding maps, the chaotic region is analyzed by using the coupled-expansion theory and the Brouwer degree theory. For three types of higher-dimensional polynomial maps with degree two, the conditions under which there are Smale horseshoes and uniformly hyperbolic invariant sets are given, and the topological conjugacy between the maps on the invariant sets and the two-sided fullshift on finite alphabet is obtained. Some interesting maps with chaotic attractors and positive Lyapunov exponents in three-dimensional spaces are found by using computer simulations. In the end, two examples are provided to illustrate the theoretical results.

  3. BOREAS Hardcopy Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nelson, Elizabeth; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) hardcopy maps are a collection of approximately 1,000 hardcopy maps representing the physical, climatological, and historical attributes of areas covering primarily the Manitoba and Saskatchewan provinces of Canada. These maps were collected by BOREAS Information System (BORIS) and Canada for Remote Sensing (CCRS) staff to provide basic information about site positions, manmade features, topography, geology, hydrology, land cover types, fire history, climate, and soils of the BOREAS study region. These maps are not available for distribution through the BOREAS project but may be used as an on-site resource. Information is provided within this document for individuals who want to order copies of these maps from the original map source. Note that the maps are not contained on the BOREAS CD-ROM set. An inventory listing file is supplied on the CD-ROM to inform users of the maps that are available. This inventory listing is available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). For hardcopies of the individual maps, contact the sources provided.

  4. Lifelong ethanol consumption and brain regional GABAA receptor subunit mRNA expression in alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Sarviharju, Maija; Hyytiä, Petri; Hervonen, Antti; Jaatinen, Pia; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Korpi, Esa R

    2006-11-01

    Brain regional gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subunit mRNA expression was studied in ethanol-preferring AA (Alko, Alcohol) rats after moderate ethanol drinking for up to 2 years of age. In situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes specific for 13 different subunits was used with coronal cryostat sections of the brains. Selective alterations were observed by ethanol exposure and/or aging in signals for several subunits. Most interestingly, the putative highly ethanol-sensitive alpha4 and beta3 subunit mRNAs were significantly decreased in several brain regions. The age-related alterations in alpha4 subunit expression were parallel to those caused by lifelong ethanol drinking, whereas aging had no significant effect on beta3 subunit expression. The results suggest that prolonged ethanol consumption leading to blood concentrations of about 10 mM may downregulate the mRNA expression of selected GABAA receptor subunits and that aging might have partly similar effects.

  5. Arrangement of subunits and domains within the Octopus dofleini hemocyanin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, K I; Schabtach, E; van Holde, K E

    1990-01-01

    Native Octopus dofleini hemocyanin appears as a hollow cylinder in the electron microscope. It is composed of 10 polypeptide subunits, each folded into seven globular oxygen-binding domains. The native structure reassociates spontaneously from subunits in the presence of Mg2+ ions. We have selectively removed the C-terminal domain and purified the resulting six-domain subunits. Although these six-domain subunits do not associate efficiently at pH 7.2, they undergo nearly complete reassociation at pH 8.0. The resulting molecule looks like the native cylindrical whole molecule but lacks the usual fivefold protrusions into the central cavity. Partially reassociated mixtures show dimers of the subunit that have a characteristic parallelogram shape when lying flat on the electron microscope grid, and a "boat" form in side view. Removal of the C-terminal domain from monomers results in the removal of two characteristically placed domains in the dimers. These observations allow the development of a model for the arrangement of the subunits within the whole molecule. The model predicts exactly the views seen in the electron microscope of both whole molecule and dimeric intermediates. Images PMID:2304914

  6. Arrangement of subunits and domains within the Octopus dofleini hemocyanin molecule.

    PubMed

    Miller, K I; Schabtach, E; van Holde, K E

    1990-02-01

    Native Octopus dofleini hemocyanin appears as a hollow cylinder in the electron microscope. It is composed of 10 polypeptide subunits, each folded into seven globular oxygen-binding domains. The native structure reassociates spontaneously from subunits in the presence of Mg2+ ions. We have selectively removed the C-terminal domain and purified the resulting six-domain subunits. Although these six-domain subunits do not associate efficiently at pH 7.2, they undergo nearly complete reassociation at pH 8.0. The resulting molecule looks like the native cylindrical whole molecule but lacks the usual fivefold protrusions into the central cavity. Partially reassociated mixtures show dimers of the subunit that have a characteristic parallelogram shape when lying flat on the electron microscope grid, and a "boat" form in side view. Removal of the C-terminal domain from monomers results in the removal of two characteristically placed domains in the dimers. These observations allow the development of a model for the arrangement of the subunits within the whole molecule. The model predicts exactly the views seen in the electron microscope of both whole molecule and dimeric intermediates. PMID:2304914

  7. Archaeal Mo-Containing Glyceraldehyde Oxidoreductase Isozymes Exhibit Diverse Substrate Specificities through Unique Subunit Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Masayuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Archaea use glycolytic pathways distinct from those found in bacteria and eukaryotes, where unique enzymes catalyze each reaction step. In this study, we isolated three isozymes of glyceraldehyde oxidoreductase (GAOR1, GAOR2 and GAOR3) from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii. GAOR1–3 belong to the xanthine oxidoreductase superfamily, and are composed of a molybdo-pyranopterin subunit (L), a flavin subunit (M), and an iron-sulfur subunit (S), forming an LMS hetero-trimer unit. We found that GAOR1 is a tetramer of the STK17810/STK17830/STK17820 hetero-trimer, GAOR2 is a dimer of the STK23390/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer, and GAOR3 is the STK24840/STK05620/STK05610 hetero-trimer. GAOR1–3 exhibited diverse substrate specificities for their electron donors and acceptors, due to their different L-subunits, and probably participate in the non-phosphorylative Entner-Doudoroff glycolytic pathway. We determined the crystal structure of GAOR2, as the first three-dimensional structure of an archaeal molybdenum-containing hydroxylase, to obtain structural insights into their substrate specificities and subunit assemblies. The gene arrangement and the crystal structure suggested that the M/S-complex serves as a structural scaffold for the binding of the L-subunit, to construct the three enzymes with different specificities. Collectively, our findings illustrate a novel principle of a prokaryotic multicomponent isozyme system. PMID:26808202

  8. Heterogeneous distribution of AMPA glutamate receptor subunits at the photoreceptor synapses of rodent retina.

    PubMed

    Hack, I; Frech, M; Dick, O; Peichl, L; Brandstätter, J H

    2001-01-01

    In the retina the segregation of different aspects of visual information starts at the first synapse in signal transfer from the photoreceptors to the second-order neurons, via the neurotransmitter glutamate. We examined the distribution of the four AMPA glutamate receptor subunits GluR1-GluR4 at the photoreceptor synapses in mouse and rat retinae by light and immunoelectron microscopy and serial section reconstructions. On the dendrites of OFF-cone bipolar cells, which make flat, noninvaginating contacts postsynaptic at cone synaptic terminals, the subunits GluR1 and GluR2 were predominantly found. Horizontal cell processes postsynaptic at both rod and cone synaptic terminals preferentially expressed the subunits GluR2, GluR2/3 and GluR4. An intriguing finding was the presence of GluR2/3 and GluR4 subunits on dendrites of putative rod bipolar cells, which are thought to signal through the sign-inverting metabotropic glutamate receptor 6, mGluR6. Furthermore, at the rod terminals, horizontal cell processes and rod bipolar cell dendrites showed labelling for the AMPA receptor subunits at the ribbon synaptic site or perisynaptically at their site of invagination into the rod terminal. The wide distribution of AMPA receptor subunits at the photoreceptor synapses suggests that AMPA receptors play an important role in visual signal transfer from the photoreceptors to their postsynaptic partners.

  9. Kinetics of Spontaneous and EF-G-Accelerated Rotation of Ribosomal Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Heena; Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Belardinelli, Riccardo; Peske, Frank; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-08-23

    Ribosome dynamics play an important role in translation. The rotation of the ribosomal subunits relative to one another is essential for tRNA-mRNA translocation. An important unresolved question is whether subunit rotation limits the rate of translocation. Here, we monitor subunit rotation relative to peptide bond formation and translocation using ensemble kinetics and single-molecule FRET. We observe that spontaneous forward subunit rotation occurs at a rate of 40 s(-1), independent of the rate of preceding peptide bond formation. Elongation factor G (EF-G) accelerates forward subunit rotation to 200 s(-1). tRNA-mRNA movement is much slower (10-40 s(-1)), suggesting that forward subunit rotation does not limit the rate of translocation. The transition back to the non-rotated state of the ribosome kinetically coincides with tRNA-mRNA movement. Thus, large-scale movements of the ribosome are intrinsically rapid and gated by its ligands such as EF-G and tRNA. PMID:27524615

  10. Structural basis for translational surveillance by the large ribosomal subunit-associated protein quality control complex

    PubMed Central

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Oliveira dos Passos, Dario; Tahara, Erich B.; Webb, Kristofor; Bennett, Eric J.; Vinterbo, Staal; Potter, Clinton S.; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.

    2014-01-01

    All organisms have evolved mechanisms to manage the stalling of ribosomes upon translation of aberrant mRNA. In eukaryotes, the large ribosomal subunit-associated quality control complex (RQC), composed of the listerin/Ltn1 E3 ubiquitin ligase and cofactors, mediates the ubiquitylation and extraction of ribosome-stalled nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. How RQC recognizes stalled ribosomes and performs its functions has not been understood. Using single-particle cryoelectron microscopy, we have determined the structure of the RQC complex bound to stalled 60S ribosomal subunits. The structure establishes how Ltn1 associates with the large ribosomal subunit and properly positions its E3-catalytic RING domain to mediate nascent chain ubiquitylation. The structure also reveals that a distinguishing feature of stalled 60S particles is an exposed, nascent chain-conjugated tRNA, and that the Tae2 subunit of RQC, which facilitates Ltn1 binding, is responsible for selective recognition of stalled 60S subunits. RQC components are engaged in interactions across a large span of the 60S subunit surface, connecting the tRNA in the peptidyl transferase center to the distally located nascent chain tunnel exit. This work provides insights into a mechanism linking translation and protein degradation that targets defective proteins immediately after synthesis, while ignoring nascent chains in normally translating ribosomes. PMID:25349383

  11. In vivo degradation of RNA polymerase II largest subunit triggered by alpha-amanitin.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, V T; Giannoni, F; Dubois, M F; Seo, S J; Vigneron, M; Kédinger, C; Bensaude, O

    1996-01-01

    Alpha-Amanitin is a well-known specific inhibitor of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) in vitro and in vivo. It is a cyclic octapeptide which binds with high affinity to the largest subunit of RNAPII, RPB1. We have found that in murine fibroblasts exposure to alpha-amanitin triggered degradation of the RPB1 subunit, while other RNAPII subunits, RPB5 and RPB8, remained almost unaffected. Transcriptional inhibition in alpha-amanitin-treated cells was slow and closely followed the disappearance of RPB1. The degradation rate of RPB1 was alpha-amanitin dose dependent and was not a consequence of transcriptional arrest. Alpha-Amanitin-promoted degradation of RPB1 was prevented in cells exposed to actinomycin D, another transcriptional inhibitor. Epitope-tagged recombinant human RPB1 subunits were expressed in mouse fibroblasts. In cells exposed to alpha-amanitin the wild-type recombinant subunit was degraded like the endogenous protein, but a mutated alpha-amanitin-resistant subunit remained unaffected. Hence, alpha-amanitin did not activate a proteolytic system, but instead its binding to mRPB1 likely represented a signal for degradation. Thus, in contrast to other inhibitors, such as actinomycin D or 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole, which reversibly act on transcription, inhibition by alpha-amanitin cannot be but an irreversible process because of the destruction of RNAPII. PMID:8760875

  12. Role of subunit-9 of mitochondrial ATP synthase in Batten disease

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Speier, S.; Qian, W.H.

    1995-06-05

    The role of subunit-9 of mitochondrial ATP synthase in Batten disease was defined by characterizing the expression of genes encoding this protein in human tissues. Two genetically distinct neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL) comprise Batten disease: the late-infantile (LINCL) and juvenile (JNCL) types. We tested cell lines and tissues from both types of patients, along with normal controls. Differences in expression between diseased and normal samples were found for both mRNA and protein. Antibody staining of subunit-9 protein was detected in LINCL and JNCL tissues, and in 6 LINCL and 4 of 5 JNCL fibroblast lines. No immunoreactivity was seen in fibroblasts from obligate carriers, normal controls, and 6 other storage disease controls, with the exception of faint staining in Niemann-Pick, type C cells. There was an appreciable difference in staining pattern in both tissue sections and fibroblasts between LINCL and JNCL. Three subunit-9 transcripts (Hum1, Hum2, and Hum3) were specifically detected in NCL and normal human tissue from heart, liver, brain, muscle, and pancreas. Transcriptional regulation of subunit-9 genes was found to be altered in Batten disease. Pseudogenes related to each of the subunit-9 genes were isolated. Sequence analysis of cDNAs spanning the protein-coding regions of the Hum1, Hum2, and Hum3 genes showed conclusively that the primary defect(s) causing NCL are not mutations in the protein-coding regions of the 3 known subunit-9 genes. 29 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. The Role of Preassembled Cytoplasmic Complexes in Assembly of Flagellar Dynein Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Fowkes, Mary Elizabeth; Mitchell, David Rees

    1998-01-01

    Previous work has revealed a cytoplasmic pool of flagellar precursor proteins capable of contributing to the assembly of new flagella, but how and where these components assemble is unknown. We tested Chlamydomonas outer-dynein arm subunit stability and assembly in the cytoplasm of wild-type cells and 11 outer dynein arm assembly mutant strains (oda1-oda11) by Western blotting of cytoplasmic extracts, or immunoprecipitates from these extracts, with five outer-row dynein subunit-specific antibodies. Western blots reveal that at least three oda mutants (oda6, oda7, and oda9) alter the level of a subunit that is not the mutant gene product. Immunoprecipitation shows that large preassembled flagellar complexes containing all five tested subunits (three heavy chains and two intermediate chains) exist within wild-type cytoplasm. When the preassembly of these subunits was examined in oda strains, we observed three patterns: complete coassembly (oda 1, 3, 5, 8, and 10), partial coassembly (oda7 and oda11), and no coassembly (oda2, 6, and 9) of the four tested subunits with HCβ. Our data, together with previous studies, suggest that flagellar outer-dynein arms preassemble into a complete Mr ≃ 2 × 106 dynein arm that resides in a cytoplasmic precursor pool before transport into the flagellar compartment. PMID:9725897

  14. Significant prognostic values of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial complex I subunits in tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Li, L D; Sun, H F; Bai, Y; Gao, S P; Jiang, H L; Jin, W

    2016-01-01

    In cancer biology, it remains still open question concerning the oncogenic versus oncosuppressor behavior of metabolic genes, which includes those encoding mitochondrial complex I (CI) subunits. The prognostic value of nuclear genome mRNAs expression of CI subunits is to be evaluated in the tumor patients. We used the Kaplan Meier plotter database, the cBio Cancer Genomics Portal, and the Oncomine in which gene expression data and survival information were from thousands of tumor patients to assess the relevance of nuclear genome mRNAs level of CI subunits to patients' survival, as well as their alterations in gene and expression level in tumors. We presented that the relative expression level of overwhelming majority of the nuclear genes of CI subunits with survival significance (overall survival, relapse free survival, progression free survival, distant metastasis free survival, post progression survival, and first progression), had consistent effects for patients in each type of four tumors separately, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, and gastric cancer. However, in gene level, frequent cumulative or individual alteration of these genes could not significantly affect patients' survival and the overexpression of the individual gene was not ubiquitous in tumors versus normal tissues. Given that reprogrammed energy metabolism was viewed as an emerging hallmark of tumor, thus tumor patients' survival might potentially to be evaluated by certain threshold for overall expression of CI subunits. Comprehensive understanding of the nuclear genome encoded CI subunits may have guiding significance for the diagnosis and prognosis in tumor patients.

  15. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of cholera toxin B subunit pentamer: Choleragenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M.L.; Maulik, P.R.; Reed, R.A.; Shipley, G.; Westbrook, E.M. |; Scott, D.L.; Otwinowski, Z.

    1996-02-01

    Cholera toxin, a heterohexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin released by Vibrio cholera, induces a profuse secretory diarrhea in susceptible hosts. Choleragenoid, the B subunit pentamer of cholera toxin, directs the enzymatic A subunit to its target by binding to GM{sub 1} gangliosides exposed on the luminal surface of intestinal epithelial cells. We have solved the crystal structure of choleragenoid at 2.3 {Angstrom} resolution by combining single isomorphous replacement with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The structure of the B subunits, and their pentameric arrangement, closely resembles that reported for the intact holotoxin (choleragen), the heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, and for a choleragenoid-GM{sub 1} pentasaccharide complex. In the absence of the A subunit the central cavity of the B pentamer is a highly solvated channel. The binding of the A subunit or the receptor pentasaccharide to choleragenoid has only a modest effect on the local stereochemistry and does not perceptibly alter the subunit interface.

  16. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) gonadotrophin-I and -II subunits.

    PubMed

    Hassin, S; Elizur, A; Zohar, Y

    1995-08-01

    Two types of cDNA, each encoding a different beta-subunit of striped bass (Morone saxatilis, Teleostei) gonadotrophins (GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta), as well as the glycoprotein alpha-subunit, were cloned by screening a striped bass pituitary cDNA library. The probes used for screening the library were cloned cDNA fragments, generated by PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed mRNA obtained from two pituitaries. The nucleotide sequences of the alpha-subunit, GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta are 626, 524 and 580 bases long, encoding peptides of 117, 120 and 147 amino acids respectively. Striped bass GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta share a sequence identity of 48% at the nucleic acid level, and 30% at the amino acid level. A cluster analysis of vertebrate pituitary glycoprotein beta-subunits suggests that teleost GTH-II beta is more closely related to tetrapod LH than to FSH. Administration of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue ([D-Ala6,Pro9Net]-LHRH) to juvenile striped resulted in ten-, two- and fivefold increases in the expression of the alpha-subunit, GTH-I beta and GTH-II beta respectively. These results suggest that each of the GTH subunits is differentially regulated, and further corroborate the functional duality of teleost gonadotrophins.

  17. Molecular mechanism for 3:1 subunit stoichiometry of rod cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Shuart, Noah G.; Haitin, Yoni; Camp, Stacey S.; Black, Kevin D.; Zagotta, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular determinants of ion channel tetramerization are well characterized, but those involved in heteromeric channel assembly are less clearly understood. The heteromeric composition of native channels is often precisely controlled. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels from rod photoreceptors exhibit a 3:1 stoichiometry of CNGA1 and CNGB1 subunits that tunes the channels for their specialized role in phototransduction. Here we show, using electrophysiology, fluorescence, biochemistry, and X-ray crystallography, that the mechanism for this controlled assembly is the formation of a parallel 3-helix coiled-coil domain of the carboxy-terminal leucine zipper region of CNGA1 subunits, constraining the channel to contain three CNGA1 subunits, followed by preferential incorporation of a single CNGB1 subunit. Deletion of the carboxy-terminal leucine zipper domain relaxed the constraint and permitted multiple CNGB1 subunits in the channel. The X-ray crystal structures of the parallel 3-helix coiled-coil domains of CNGA1 and CNGA3 subunits were similar, suggesting that a similar mechanism controls the stoichiometry of cone CNG channels. PMID:21878911

  18. The TCP1γ subunit of Leishmania donovani forms a biologically active homo-oligomeric complex.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar; Mitra, Kalyan; Kuldeep, Jitendra; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Goyal, Neena

    2015-12-01

    Chaperonins are a class of molecular chaperons that encapsulate nascent or stress-denatured proteins and assist their intracellular assembly and folding in an ATP-dependent manner. The ubiquitous eukaryotic chaperonin, TCP1 ring complex is a hetero-oligomeric complex comprising two rings, each formed of eight subunits that may have distinct substrate recognition and ATP hydrolysis properties. In Leishmania, only the TCP1γ subunit has been cloned and characterized. It exhibited differential expression at various growth stages of promastigotes. In the present study, we expressed the TCP1γ subunit in Escherichia coli to investigate whether it forms chaperonin-like complexes and plays a role in protein folding. LdTCP1γ formed high-molecular-weight complexes within E. coli cells as well as in Leishmania cell lysates. The recombinant protein is arranged into two back-to-back rings of seven subunits each, as predicted by homology modelling and observed by negative staining electron microscopy. This morphology is consistent with that of the oligomeric double-ring group I chaperonins found in mitochondria. The LdTCP1γ homo-oligomeric complex hydrolysed ATP, and was active as assayed by luciferase refolding. Thus, the homo-oligomer performs chaperonin reactions without partner subunit(s). Further, co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that LdTCP1γ interacts with actin and tubulin proteins, suggesting that the complex may have a role in maintaining the structural dynamics of the cytoskeleton of parasites. PMID:26395202

  19. Two classes of regulatory subunits coassemble in the same BK channel and independently regulate gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J.

    2015-09-01

    High resolution proteomics increasingly reveals that most native ion channels are assembled in macromolecular complexes. However, whether different partners have additive or cooperative functional effects, or whether some combinations of proteins may preclude assembly of others are largely unexplored topics. The large conductance Ca2+-and-voltage activated potassium channel (BK) is well-suited to discern nuanced differences in regulation arising from combinations of subunits. Here we examine whether assembly of two different classes of regulatory proteins, β and γ, in BK channels is exclusive or independent. Our results show that both γ1 and up to four β2-subunits can coexist in the same functional BK complex, with the gating shift caused by β2-subunits largely additive with that produced by the γ1-subunit(s). The multiplicity of β:γ combinations that can participate in a BK complex therefore allow a range of BK channels with distinct functional properties tuned by the specific stoichiometry of the contributing subunits.

  20. Mutations in the three largest subunits of yeast RNA polymerase II that affect enzyme assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Young, R A

    1991-01-01

    Mutations in the three largest subunits of yeast RNA polymerase II (RPB1, RPB2, and RPB3) were investigated for their effects on RNA polymerase II structure and assembly. Among 23 temperature-sensitive mutations, 6 mutations affected enzyme assembly, as assayed by immunoprecipitation of epitope-tagged subunits. In all six assembly mutants, RNA polymerase II subunits synthesized at the permissive temperature were incorporated into stably assembled, immunoprecipitable enzyme and remained stably associated when cells were shifted to the nonpermissive temperature, whereas subunits synthesized at the nonpermissive temperature were not incorporated into a completely assembled enzyme. The observation that subunit subcomplexes accumulated in assembly-mutant cells at the nonpermissive temperature led us to investigate whether these subcomplexes were assembly intermediates or merely byproducts of mutant enzyme instability. The time course of assembly of RPB1, RPB2, and RPB3 was investigated in wild-type cells and subsequently in mutant cells. Glycerol gradient fractionation of extracts of cells pulse-labeled for various times revealed that a subcomplex of RPB2 and RPB3 appears soon after subunit synthesis and can be chased into fully assembled enzyme. The RPB2-plus-RPB3 subcomplexes accumulated in all RPB1 assembly mutants at the nonpermissive temperature but not in an RPB2 or RPB3 assembly mutant. These data indicate that RPB2 and RPB3 form a complex that subsequently interacts with RPB1 during the assembly of RNA polymerase II. Images PMID:1715023

  1. Wheat gluten: high molecular weight glutenin subunits--structure, genetics, and relation to dough elasticity.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Khan, Moazzam Rafiq; Din, Ahmad; Saeed, Muhammad; Pasha, Imran; Arshad, Muhammad Umair

    2007-04-01

    Gluten proteins, representing the major protein fraction of the starchy endosperm, are predominantly responsible for the unique position of wheat amongst cereals. These form a continuous proteinaceous matrix in the cells of the mature dry grain and form a continuous viscoelastic network during the mixing process of dough development. These viscoelastic properties underline the utilization of wheat to prepare bread and other wheat flour based foodstuffs. One group of gluten proteins is glutenin, which consists of high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) subunits. The HMW glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are particularly important for determining dough elasticity. The common wheat possesses 3 to 5 HMW subunits encoded at the Glu-1 loci on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes (1A, 1B, and 1D). The presence of certain HMW subunits is positively correlated with good bread-making quality. Glutamine-rich repetitive sequences that comprise the central part of the HMW subunits are actually responsible for the elastic properties due to extensive arrays of interchain hydrogen bonds. Genetic engineering can be used to manipulate the amount and composition of the HMW subunits, leading to either increased dough strength or more drastic changes in gluten structure and properties.

  2. The subunit structure of potato tuber ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.; Nakata, P.A.; Anderson, J.M. ); Sowokinos, J. ); Morell, M.; Preiss, J. )

    1990-06-01

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase has been extensively purified from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber tissue to study its structure. By employing a modified published procedure together with Mono Q chromatography, a near homogeneous enzyme preparation was obtained with substantial improvement in enzyme yield and specific activity. In single dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels, the enzyme migrated as a single polypeptide band with a mobility of about 50,000 daltons. Analysis by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, however, revealed the presence of two types of subunits which could be distinguished by their slight differences in net charge and molecular weight. The smaller potato tuber subunit was recognized by antiserum prepared against the smaller spinach leaf 51 kilodalton ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase subunit. In contrast, the anti-54 kilodalton raised against the spinach leaf subunit did not significantly react to the tuber enzyme subunits. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the potato tuber ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase is not composed of a simple homotetramer as previously suggested, but is a product of two separate and distinct subunits as observed for the spinach leaf and maize enzymes.

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of inhibin/activin subunits in the wild ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt) ovary.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xia; Weng, Jiaju; Zhang, Haolin; Li, Xiaonan; Zhang, Mengyuan; Xu, Meiyu; Weng, Qiang; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The intraovarian function of gonadally produced inhibin and activin has been extensively studied in experimental models for decades, yet their presence and function have been rarely reported in wild rodents. With our seasonal breeding model, the wild ground squirrel, we aimed to investigate the possible roles of these peptides in the seasonal folliculogenesis. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting have been used to detect the cellular localization and expression patterns of inhibin/activin subunits (α, β(A) and β(B)). In the breeding season ovary, all three subunits were present in granulosa cells, theca cells of antral follicles and interstitial cells, with the strongest immunostaining in granulosa cells. Following ovulation, the corpora lutea become a major site of inhibin/activin synthesis. In the nonbreeding season ovary, inhibin/activin α and β(A) subunits were weakly immunopositive in granulosa cells of early stage follicles, while β(B) subunit was undetectable. The expression level of inhibin/activin subunit proteins were generally higher in the ovaries of the breeding season, and then decreased to a relatively low level during the nonbreeding season. The dynamic expression of inhibin/activin subunits indicated that they might play important paracrine and/or autocrine roles during the seasonal folliculogenesis of the wild ground squirrel.

  4. Regulation of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Subunit through Epigenetic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kayla A.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome-shortening is characteristic of normal cells, and is known as the end replication problem. Telomerase is the enzyme responsible for extending the ends of the chromosomes in de novo synthesis, and occurs in germ cells as well as most malignant cancers. There are three subunits of telomerase: human telomerase RNA (hTERC), human telomerase associated protein (hTEP1), or dyskerin, and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). hTERC and hTEP1 are constitutively expressed, so the enzymatic activity of telomerase is dependent on the transcription of hTERT. DNA methylation, histone methylation, and histone acetylation are basic epigenetic regulations involved in the expression of hTERT. Non-coding RNA can also serve as a form of epigenetic control of hTERT. This epigenetic-based regulation of hTERT is important in providing a mechanism for reversibility of hTERT control in various biological states. These include embryonic down-regulation of hTERT contributing to aging and the upregulation of hTERT playing a critical role in over 90% of cancers. Normal human somatic cells have a non-methylated/hypomethylated CpG island within the hTERT promoter region, while telomerase-positive cells paradoxically have at least a partially methylated promoter region that is opposite to the normal roles of DNA methylation. Histone acetylation of H3K9 within the promoter region is associated with an open chromatin state such that transcription machinery has the space to form. Histone methylation of hTERT has varied control of the gene, however. Mono- and dimethylation of H3K9 within the promoter region indicate silent euchromatin, while a trimethylated H3K9 enhances gene transcription. Non-coding RNAs can target epigenetic-modifying enzymes, as well as transcription factors involved in the control of hTERT. An epigenetics diet that can affect the epigenome of cancer cells is a recent fascination that has received much attention. By combining portions of this diet with

  5. Identification of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase subunits modified by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Musatov, Andrej; Carroll, Christopher A; Liu, Yuan-Chao; Henderson, George I; Weintraub, Susan T; Robinson, Neal C

    2002-06-25

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was inactivated by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with pseudo-first-order kinetics. Cytochrome c oxidase electron transport activity decreased by as much as 50% when the enzyme was incubated for 2 h at room temperature with excess HNE (300-500 microM). HNE-modified CcO subunits were identified by two mass spectrometric methods: electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). All of the experimentally determined molecular masses were in excellent agreement with published sequence values with an accuracy of approximately 1 part per 10000 mass units for subunits smaller than 20 kDa and approximately 1 part per 1000 mass units for the three subunits larger than 20 kDa. Both MS methods detected six CcO subunits with an increased mass of 156 Da after reaction with HNE (subunits II, IV, Vb, VIIa, VIIc, and VIII); this result indicates a single Michael-type reaction site on either a lysine or histidine residue within each subunit. Reaction of HNE with either subunit VIIc or subunit VIII (modified approximately 30% and 50-75%, respectively) must be responsible for CcO inhibition. None of the other subunits were modified more than 5% and could not account for the observed loss of activity. Reaction of HNE with His-36 of subunit VIII is most consistent with the approximately 50% inhibition of CcO: (1) subunit VIII is modified more than any other subunit by HNE; (2) the time dependence of subunit VIII modification is consistent with the percent inhibition of CcO; (3) His-36 was identified as the HNE-modified amino acid residue within subunit VIII by tandem MS analysis. PMID:12069614

  6. Topology of subunits of the mammalian cytochrome c oxidase: Relationship to the assembly of the enzyme complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yu-Zhong Zhang; Ewart, G.; Capaldi, R.A. )

    1991-04-16

    The arrangement of three subunits of beef heart cytochrome c oxidase, subunits Va, VIa, and VIII, has been explored by chemical labeling and protease digestion studies. Subunit Va is an extrinsic protein located on the C side of the mitochondrial inner membrane. This subunit was found to label with N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl)-2-aminoethane({sup 35}S)sulfonate and sodium methyl 4-({sup 3}H)formylphenyl phosphate in reconstituted vesicles in which 90% of cytochrome c oxidase complexes were oriented with the C domain outermost. Subunit VIa was cleaved by trypsin both in these reconstituted vesicles and in submitochondrial particles, indicating a transmembrane orientation. The epitope for a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to subunit VIa was lost or destroyed when cleavage occurred in reconstituted vesicles. This epitope was localized to the C-terminal part of the subunit by antibody binding to a fusion protein consisting of glutathione S-transferase (G-ST) and the C-terminal amino acids 55-85 of subunit VIa. No antibody binding was obtained with a fusion protein containing G-ST and the N-terminal amino acids 1-55. The mAb reaction orients subunit VIa with its C-terminus in the C-domain. Subunit VIII was cleaved by trypsin in submitochondrial particles but not in reconstituted vesicles. N-Terminal sequencing of the subunit VIII cleavage produce from submitochondrial particles gave the same sequence as the untreated subunit, i.e., ITA, indicating that it is the C-terminus which is cleaved from the M side. Subunits Va and VIII each contain N-terminal extensions or leader sequences in the precursor polypeptides; subunit VIa is made without an N-terminal extension.

  7. The Drosophila 110-kDa transcription factor TFIID subunit directly interacts with the N-terminal region of the 230-kDa subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, T; Gong, D W; Roeder, R G; Horikoshi, M; Nakatani, Y

    1993-01-01

    Transcription initiation factor TFIID is a multimeric protein complex that plays a central role in transcriptional regulation by facilitating promoter responses to various activators. cDNAs encoding the 110-kDa subunit of Drosophila TFIID (p110) were isolated with a degenerate oligodeoxynucleotide probe based on an amino acid sequence of the purified protein. The entire cDNA sequence contains an open reading frame encoding a 921-amino acid polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 99,337 Da. The recombinant protein expressed in Sf9 cells via a baculovirus vector interacts directly with the 230-kDa subunit of TFIID (p230). Together with the previous observation that the TATA box-binding subunit of TFIID (TFIID tau or TBP) interacts directly with only p230 among the TFIID subunits, this result suggests that p110 forms a complex with TFIID tau via p230. A binding study using various p230 mutants indicated that both p110 and TFIID tau interact with the N-terminal 352-amino acid portion of p230, suggesting a functional communication between p110 and TFIID tau via p230 interactions. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8327460

  8. Maps and Map Learning in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednarz, Sarah Witham; Acheson, Gillian; Bednarz, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of maps and other graphic representations has become more important to geography and geographers. This is due to the development and widespread diffusion of geographic (spatial) technologies. As computers and silicon chips have become more capable and less expensive, geographic information systems (GIS), global positioning satellite…

  9. Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) Brightness Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Gladstone, G.; Stern, S.; Egan, A. F.; Miles, P. F.; Parker, J. W.; Greathouse, T. K.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Kaufmann, D. E.; Versteeg, M. H.; Feldman, P. D.; Hurley, D. M.; Pryor, W. R.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2010-10-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) is an ultraviolet (UV) spectrograph on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) that is designed to map the lunar albedo at far-UV wavelengths. LAMP primarily measures interplanetary Hydrogen Lyman-alpha sky-glow and far-UV starlight reflected from the night-side lunar surface, including permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near the poles. Dayside observations are also obtained. Brightness maps sorted by wavelength (including the Lyman-alpha wavelength of 121.6 nm) are reported for the polar regions, with a few regions of interest reported in more detail. LAMP's spectral range of 58 nm to 196 nm includes a water ice spectral feature near 160 nm, which provides a diagnostic tool for detecting water on the lunar surface that is complementary to recent discoveries using infrared and radio frequency techniques. Progress towards producing far-UV albedo maps and searching for water ice signatures will be reported. We'll discuss how LAMP data may address questions regarding how water is formed on the moon, transported through the lunar atmosphere, and deposited in the PSRs.

  10. Maps--Map Reading and Aerial Photography. [2 Units].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haakonsen, Harry O., Ed.

    Included in this set of materials are two units: (1) Maps and Map Reading and (2) Aerial Photography. Each unit includes student guide sheets, reference material, and tape script. A set of 35mm slides and audiotapes are usually used with the materials. The unit on Maps and Map Reading is designed to develop map reading skills and the use of these…

  11. Mapping Symbolic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Martha Davis; Wolf, Dennie Palmer

    In an investigation of the development of mapping as distinct from drawing, 39 middle and lower class Cambridge, Massachusetts children in kindergarten and first- and second-grades were shown a small three-dimensional model town, asked to make a smaller, three-dimensional copy of the model, and then asked to make a map showing each item in the…

  12. Mapping Microbial Biodiversity

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Daphne Lisabet; Micah C. Geary; White, Luke James; Lee, Randy Dean; Brizzee, Julie Ann; Rodman, A. C.; Rope, Ronald C

    2001-09-01

    We report the development of a prototype database that "maps" microbial diversity in the context of the geochemical and geological environment and geographic location. When it is fully implemented, scientists will be able to conduct database searches, construct maps containing the information of interest, download files, and enter data over the Internet.

  13. Chizu Task Mapping Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-07-01

    Chizu is a tool for Mapping MPI processes or tasks to physical processors or nodes for optimizing communication performance. It takes the communication graph of a High Performance Computing (HPC) application and the interconnection topology of a supercomputer as input. It outputs a new MPI rand to processor mapping, which can be used when launching the HPC application.

  14. Map Skills with Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Paula; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents hands-on activities to help teach elementary students map skills during Geography Awareness Week. The map skills are made fun by being incorporated into meaningful activities like learning about global resources, tracking the progress of sports teams, and conducting climate experiments in faraway places. (SM)

  15. MAP3K1

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Trang T.; Angus, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    MAP3K1 is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) family of serine/threonine kinases. MAP3K1 regulates JNK activation and is unique among human kinases in that it also encodes an E3 ligase domain that ubiquitylates c-Jun and ERK1/2. Full length MAP3K1 regulates cell migration and contributes to pro-survival signaling while its caspase 3-mediated cleavage generates a C-terminal kinase domain that promotes apoptosis. The critical function of MAP3K1 in cell fate decisions suggests that it may be a target for deregulation in cancer. Recent large-scale genomic studies have revealed that MAP3K1 copy number loss and somatic missense or nonsense mutations are observed in a significant number of different cancers, being most prominent in luminal breast cancer. The alteration of MAP3K1 in diverse cancer types demonstrates the importance of defining phenotypes for possible therapeutic targeting of tumor cell vulnerabilities created when MAP3K1 function is lost or gained. PMID:24386504

  16. Site and Watershed Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Environmental Education, Cleveland, OH.

    Presented as part of a larger unit on watershed investigations are a slideshow script and a map and compass unit intended to help high school students better visualize the relationship between a water sampling site, the entire stream, community, and watershed. The script discusses features of a topographical map, shows how to read one, and…

  17. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  18. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  19. The Map Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheyney, Arnold B.; Capone, Donald L.

    This teaching resource is aimed at helping students develop the skills necessary to locate places on the earth. Designed as a collection of map skill exercises rather than a sequential program of study, this program expects that students have access to and some knowledge of how to use globes, maps, atlases, and encyclopedias. The volume contains 6…

  20. Handmade Multitextured Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevelyan, Simon

    1984-01-01

    Tactile maps for visually impaired persons can be made by drawing lines with an aqueous adhesive solution, dusting with thermoengraving powder, and exposing the card to a source of intense heat (such as a heat gun or microwave oven). A raised line map results. (CL)