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Sample records for 51-kilodalton antigen gene

  1. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  2. Analysis of antigen receptor genes in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, C A; Pringle, J H; Naylor, J; West, K P; Lauder, I

    1993-01-01

    AIM--To analyse the configuration of the antigen receptor genes in Hodgkin's disease. METHODS--DNA extracted from 45 samples of Hodgkin's disease was analysed using Southern blotting and DNA hybridisation, using probes to the joining region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene, the constant region of kappa immunoglobulin light chain gene, and the constant region of the beta chain of the T cell receptor gene. RESULTS--A single case of nodular sclerosing disease showed clonal rearrangement of the immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes, all other samples having germline immunoglobulin genes. The nature of the clonal population in the diseased tissue is uncertain, because the intensity of the rearranged bands did not correlate with the percentage of Reed-Sternberg cells present. The T cell receptor genes were in germline configuration in all the samples. CONCLUSIONS--Antigen receptor gene rearrangement is a rare finding in unselected cases of Hodgkin's disease. Images PMID:8388407

  3. Nucleotide Sequence of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus Anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-02

    transcription and translation of the Bacillus megaterium protein C gene. J. Bacteriol. 158:e09-813. 9. Friedlander, A, M. 1986. Macrophages are sensitive to...of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus anthracis 6. pEaltranalO opl. AMPOA’T B*u~iA S. L. Welkos, J. R. Lowe, F. Eden-McCutchan, M. Vodkin, S. M... Bacillus anthracls and the 5’ and 3’ flanking sequences were determined. Protective antigen ie one of three proteins comprising anthrax toxin. The open

  4. Cloning of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    of the complicated precedents of duplicate toxin genes in chro- muumm mosomall and plasmid DNA of B. thuringiensis (Schnepf and Whitely, 1981; Klier...OiL V4. 34. S-W7. SW 1v 99 CwI 0193 by MT 0 009-7483/06O-002.00/0 mU"- - 1*;)-0Cloning of the Protective Antigen Gene OCT 19 MI L Sof Bacillus ...Sumnler uncertain, it is probably caused by other Bacillus antigens, 4 t which may include LF and EF. PA produced from recom- A The - "w t of a

  5. Molecular cloning of Taenia taeniaeformis oncosphere antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Cougle, W G; Lightowlers, M W; Bogh, H O; Rickard, M D; Johnson, K S

    1991-03-01

    Infection of mice with the cestode Taenia taeniaeformis exhibits several important features common to other cestode infections, including the ability to vaccinate with crude antigen mixtures. Partial purification of the protective oncosphere antigens has been reported with a cutout from deoxycholate (DOC) acrylamide gels; this cutout was called fraction II (FII), and comprises approximately 10% of total DOC-soluble oncosphere antigen. Western blots of DOC gels probed with anti-FII antisera revealed a series of 3-5 discrete bands within the FII region. Further fractionation of the FII antigens on DOC gels was impractical due to limitations in supply of oncospheres, so a cDNA library was constructed from 150 ng of oncosphere mRNA and screened with alpha-FII antisera. Two distinct clone families were identified, oncA and oncB. Antibodies affinity-purified on either of two representative members, oncA1 and oncB1, recognised all the FII bands. Individual FII bands excised from a DOC gel resolved into an overlapping series of molecules when re-run on SDS-PAGE, indicating that each FII band consisted of several polypeptides of differing molecular weight. Immunoprecipitates resolved on SDS-PAGE revealed that alpha-FII recognised 3 major oncosphere antigens, of 62, 34 and 25 kDa; antisera against oncB precipitated both the 34- and 25-kDa antigens, whereas alpha-oncA antisera precipitated the 62-kDa antigen. We conclude that oncA and oncB encode the major antigens in the FII complex. The 62-kDa antigen encoded by oncA1 was the only common antigen precipitated by anti-FII and two other antisera raised against different protective extracts, suggesting that it may be a protective component in all three. Southern blot results indicate that oncA and oncB are distinct genes present at low copy number in the genome. Evidence is also presented suggesting that some cestode mRNAs, including oncA, may use variant polyadenylation signals.

  6. Evolutionary History of the Cancer Immunity Antigen MAGE Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Katsura, Yukako; Satta, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary mode of a multi-gene family can change over time, depending on the functional differentiation and local genomic environment of family members. In this study, we demonstrate such a change in the melanoma antigen (MAGE) gene family on the mammalian X chromosome. The MAGE gene family is composed of ten subfamilies that can be categorized into two types. Type I genes are of relatively recent origin, and they encode epitopes for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in cancer cells. Type II genes are relatively ancient and some of their products are known to be involved in apoptosis or cell proliferation. The evolutionary history of the MAGE gene family can be divided into four phases. In phase I, a single-copy state of an ancestral gene and the evolutionarily conserved mode had lasted until the emergence of eutherian mammals. In phase II, eight subfamily ancestors, with the exception for MAGE-C and MAGE-D subfamilies, were formed via retrotransposition independently. This would coincide with a transposition burst of LINE elements at the eutherian radiation. However, MAGE-C was generated by gene duplication of MAGE-A. Phase III is characterized by extensive gene duplication within each subfamily and in particular the formation of palindromes in the MAGE-A subfamily, which occurred in an ancestor of the Catarrhini. Phase IV is characterized by the decay of a palindrome in most Catarrhini, with the exception of humans. Although the palindrome is truncated by frequent deletions in apes and Old World monkeys, it is retained in humans. Here, we argue that this human-specific retention stems from negative selection acting on MAGE-A genes encoding epitopes of cancer cells, which preserves their ability to bind to highly divergent HLA molecules. These findings are interpreted with consideration of the biological factors shaping recent human MAGE-A genes. PMID:21695252

  7. Changes in repeat number, sequence, and reading frame in S-antigen genes of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Saint, R B; Coppel, R L; Cowman, A F; Brown, G V; Shi, P T; Barzaga, N; Kemp, D J; Anders, R F

    1987-01-01

    The S antigens from different isolates of Plasmodium falciparum exhibit extensive size, charge, and serological diversity. We show here that the S-antigen genes behave as multiple alleles of a single locus. The size heterogeneity results from different numbers, lengths, and/or sequences of tandem repeat units encoded within the S-antigen genes. Two genes studied here encode antigenically different S antigens but nevertheless have closely related tandem repeat sequences. We show that antigenic differences can arise because repeats are translated in different reading frames. Images PMID:3313007

  8. Recombinant Carcinoembryonic Antigen as a Reporter Gene for Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kenanova, Vania; Barat, Bhaswati; Olafsen, Tove; Chatziioannou, Arion; Herschman, Harvey R.; Braun, Jonathan; Wu, Anna M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Reporter genes can provide a way of non-invasively assessing gene activity in vivo. However, current reporter gene strategies may be limited by the immunogenicity of foreign reporter proteins, endogenous expression or unwanted biological activity. We have developed a reporter gene based on carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a human protein with limited normal tissue expression. Methods To construct a CEA reporter gene for PET, a CEA minigene (N-A3) was fused to the extracellular and transmembrane domains of the human FcγRIIb receptor. The NA3-FcγRIIb recombinant gene, driven by a CMV promoter, was transfected in Jurkat (human T cell leukemia) cells. Expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and microPET imaging. Results Flow cytometry identified Jurkat clones stably expressing NA3-FcγRIIb at low, medium, and high levels. High and medium NA3-FcγRIIb expression could also be detected by Western blot. Reporter gene positive and negative Jurkat cells were used to establish xenografts in athymic mice. IHC showed staining of the tumor with high reporter gene expression; medium and low N-A3 expression was not detected. MicroPET imaging, using an anti-CEA 124I-labeled scFv-Fc antibody fragment, demonstrated that only high N-A3 expression could be detected. Specific accumulation of activity was visualized at the N-A3 positive tumor as early as 4h. MicroPET image quantitation showed tumor activity of 1.8(±0.2), 15.2(±1.3) and 4.6(±1.2) %ID/g at 4h, 20h and 48h, respectively. Biodistribution at 48h, demonstrated tumor uptake of 4.8(±0.8) %ID/g. Conclusion The CEA N-A3 minigene has the potential to be used as a reporter gene for imaging cells in vivo. PMID:18719907

  9. Regulation of cancer germline antigen gene expression: implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2010-05-01

    Cancer germline (CG; also known as cancer-testis) antigen genes are normally expressed in germ cells and trophoblast tissues and are aberrantly expressed in a variety of human malignancies. CG antigen genes have high clinical relevance as they encode a class of immunogenic and highly selective tumor antigens. CG antigen-directed immunotherapy is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of a number of solid tumor malignancies and has been demonstrated to be safe, provoke immune responses and be of therapeutic benefit. Achieving an improved understanding of the mechanisms of CG antigen gene regulation will facilitate the continued development of targeted therapeutic approaches against tumors expressing these antigens. Substantial evidence suggests epigenetic mechanisms, particularly DNA methylation, as a primary regulator of CG antigen gene expression in normal and cancer cells as well as in stem cells. The roles of sequence-specific transcription factors and signal transduction pathways in controlling CG antigen gene expression are less clear but are emerging. A combinatorial therapeutic approach involving epigenetic modulatory drugs and CG antigen immunotherapy is suggested based on these data and is being actively pursued. In this article, we review the mechanisms of CG antigen gene regulation and discuss the implications of these mechanisms for the development of cancer immunotherapy approaches targeting CG antigens.

  10. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of two antigenically distinct O antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism pathogens use to avoid immune-mediated competition between closely related strains. Here, we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2 respectively). When 18 additional B. b...

  11. T-cell intracellular antigens function as tumor suppressor genes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Jiménez, C; Ludeña, M D; Izquierdo, J M

    2015-03-05

    Knockdown of T-cell intracellular antigens TIA1 and TIAR in transformed cells triggers cell proliferation and tumor growth. Using a tetracycline-inducible system, we report here that an increased expression of TIA1 or TIAR in 293 cells results in reduced rates of cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of these proteins abolish endogenous TIA1 and TIAR levels via the regulation of splicing of their pre-mRNAs, and partially represses global translation in a phospho-eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha-dependent manner. This is accompanied by cell cycle arrest at G1/S and cell death through caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. Genome-wide profiling illustrates a selective upregulation of p53 signaling pathway-related genes. Nude mice injected with doxycycline-inducible cells expressing TIA1 or TIAR retard, or even inhibit, growth of xenotumors. Remarkably, low expressions of TIA1 and TIAR correlate with poor prognosis in patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma. These findings strongly support the concept that TIA proteins act as tumor suppressor genes.

  12. Molecular and genetic analyses of the putative Proteus O antigen gene locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Torzewska, Agnieszka; Ruan, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaoting; Rozalski, Antoni; Shao, Zhujun; Guo, Xi; Zhou, Haijian; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2010-08-01

    Proteus species are well-characterized opportunistic pathogens primarily associated with urinary tract infections (UTI) of humans. The Proteus O antigen is one of the most variable constituents of the cell surface, and O antigen heterogeneity is used for serological classification of Proteus isolates. Even though most Proteus O antigen structures have been identified, the O antigen locus has not been well characterized. In this study, we identified the putative Proteus O antigen locus and demonstrated this region's high degree of heterogeneity by comparing sequences of 40 Proteus isolates using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). This analysis identified five putative Proteus O antigen gene clusters, and the probable functions of these O antigen-related genes were proposed, based on their similarity to genes in the available databases. Finally, Proteus-specific genes from these five serogroups were identified by screening 79 strains belonging to the 68 Proteus O antigen serogroups. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular characterization of the putative Proteus O antigen locus, and we describe a novel molecular classification method for the identification of different Proteus serogroups.

  13. Proteinase 3, Wegener's autoantigen: from gene to antigen.

    PubMed

    van der Geld, Y M; Limburg, P C; Kallenberg, C G

    2001-02-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is one of four serine protease homologues in the azurophilic granules of neutrophils and granules of monocytes. It is of importance that anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) are mainly directed against PR3 only. Furthermore, PR3 is overexpressed in a variety of acute and chronic myeloid leukemia cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for a PR3-derived peptide have been shown to specifically lyse leukemia cells that overexpress PR3. This review will focus on PR3 and the characteristics of PR3 that might implicate this particular antigen in the pathogenesis of WG and as target for immunotherapy in myeloid leukemias. We will discuss the genetic localization and gene regulation of PR3, the processing, storage, and expression of the PR3 protein, and the physiological functions of PR3, and compare this with the three other neutrophil-derived serine proteases: human leukocyte elastase, cathepsin G, and azurocidin. Three main differences are described between PR3 and the other serine proteases. This makes PR3 a very intriguing protein with a large array of physiological functions, some of which may play a role in ANCA-associated vasculitidis and myeloid leukemia.

  14. A Human Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Resulting from Differential Expression due to a Gene Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Makoto; Warren, Edus H.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2003-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (minor H antigens) are targets of graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia responses after allogeneic human leukocyte antigen identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Only a few human minor H antigens have been molecularly characterized and in all cases, amino acid differences between homologous donor and recipient proteins due to nucleotide polymorphisms in the respective genes were responsible for immunogenicity. Here, we have used cDNA expression cloning to identify a novel human minor H antigen encoded by UGT2B17, an autosomal gene in the multigene UDP-glycosyltransferase 2 family that is selectively expressed in liver, intestine, and antigen-presenting cells. In contrast to previously defined human minor H antigens, UGT2B17 is immunogenic because of differential expression of the protein in donor and recipient cells as a consequence of a homozygous gene deletion in the donor. Deletion of individual members of large gene families is a common form of genetic variation in the population and our results provide the first evidence that differential protein expression as a consequence of gene deletion is a mechanism for generating minor H antigens in humans. PMID:12743171

  15. Novel Aeromonas hydrophila PPD134/91 Genes Involved in O-Antigen and Capsule Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y. L.; Arakawa, E.; Leung, K. Y.

    2002-01-01

    The sequences of the O-antigen and capsule gene clusters of the virulent Aeromonas hydrophila strain PPD134/91 were determined. The O-antigen gene cluster is 17,296 bp long and comprises 17 genes. Seven pathway genes for the synthesis of rhamnose and mannose, six transferase genes, one O unit flippase gene, and one O-antigen chain length determinant gene were identified by amino acid sequence similarity. PCR and Southern blot analysis were performed to survey the distribution of these 17 genes among 11 A. hydrophila strains of different serotypes. A. hydrophila PPD134/91 might belong to serotype O:18, as represented by JCM3980; it contained all the same O-antigen genes as JCM3980 (97 to 100% similarity at the DNA and amino acid levels). The capsule gene cluster of A. hydrophila PPD134/91 is 17,562 bp long and includes 13 genes, which were assembled into three distinct regions similar to those of the group II capsule gene cluster of Escherichia coli and other bacteria. Regions I and III contained four and two capsule transport genes, respectively. Region II had five genes which were highly similar to capsule synthesis pathway genes found in other bacteria. Both the purified O-antigen and capsular polysaccharides increased the ability of the avirulent A. hydrophila strain PPD35/85 to survive in naïve tilapia serum. However, the purified surface polysaccharides had no inhibitory effect on the adhesion of A. hydrophila PPD134/91 to carp epithelial cells. PMID:11953367

  16. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the immunophenotypic profiles displayed by the major clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia, the immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia, and the contributions made by antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to the understanding of T cell neoplasia. Neoplasms belonging to distinct clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia often exhibit characteristic immunophenotypic profiles. Approximately 80% of lymphoblastic lymphomas and 20% of acute lymphoblastic leukemias express phenotypes consistent with prethymic and intrathymic stages of T cell differentiation, including intranuclear terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of mycosis fungoides type usually express pan-T cell antigens CD2, CD5, and CD3, often lack the pan-T cell antigen CD7, and usually express the mature, peripheral helper subset phenotype, CD4+ CD8-. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of nonmycosis fungoides type and peripheral T cell lymphomas often lack one or more pan-T cell antigens and, in addition, occasionally express the anomalous CD4+ CD8+ or CD4- CD8- phenotypes. T gamma-lymphoproliferative disease is divisable into two broad categories: those cases that are CD3 antigen positive and exhibit clonal T cell receptor beta chain (TCR-beta) gene rearrangements and those cases that are CD3 antigen negative and exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) associated Japanese, Carribean, and sporadic adult T cell leukemia/lymphomas usually express pan-T cell antigens, the CD4+ CD8- phenotype, and various T cell-associated activation antigens, including the interleukin-2 receptor (CD25). Immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia include, in increasing order of utility, T cell predominance, T cell subset antigen restriction, anomalous T cell subset antigen expression, and deletion of one or more pan-T cell antigens. Only in

  17. Molecular characterization of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II genes in outbred pig populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune, disease and vaccine responses. Thus, understanding how SLA gene polymorphism affects immunity, especially in outbred pig populations with a diverse genetic background, requires accu...

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of the swine leukocyte antigen - 2 gene for Korean native pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate genetic distances of the SLA-2 gene, to characterize SLA-2 alleles, and to provide basic genetic information of Korean pigs. The swine leukocyte antigen - 2 (SLA-2) gene in the MHC classical region was cloned with spleen tissues from Korean native pigs ...

  19. Improved efficiency in amplification of Escherichia coli o-antigen gene clusters using genome-wide sequence comparison

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: In many bacteria including E. coli, genes encoding O-antigens are clustered in the chromosome, with a 39-bp JUMPstart sequence and gnd gene located upstream and downstream of the cluster, respectively. For determining the DNA sequence of the E. coli O-antigen gene cluster, one set of P...

  20. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Housekeeping Genes and Antigenic Determinant Genes in Bordetella pertussis Strains Isolated in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang-Oun; Moon, Yu Mi; Kim, So-Hyeon; Sung, Hwa Young; Kwon, Seung-Jik; Kang, Yeon Ho; Yu, Jae Yon

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To confirm genotype diversities of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis and to evaluate the risk of pertussis outbreak in Korea. Methods Seven housekeeping genes and 10 antigenic determinant genes from clinical B. pertussis isolates were analyzed by Multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Results More variant pattern was observed in antigenic determinant genes. Especially, PtxS1 gene was the most variant gene; five genotypes were observed from eight global genotypes. In the bacterial type, the number of observed sequence types in the isolates was seven and the most frequent form was type 1 (79.6%). This major sequence type also showed a time-dependent transition pattern. Older isolates (1968 and 1975) showed type 1 and 6 in housekeeping genes and antigenic determinant genes, respectively. However, these were changed to type 2 and 1 in isolates 1999–2008. This transition was mainly attributed to genotype change of PtxS1 and Fim3 gene; the tendency of genotype change was to avoid vaccine-derived genotype. In addition, there was second transition in 2009. In this period, only the sequence type of antigenic determinant genes was changed to type 2. Based Upon Related Sequence Types (BURST) analysis confirmed that there were two clonal complexes (ACCI and ACCII) in the Korean isolates. Moreover, the recently increased sequence type was revealed as AST2 derived from AST 3 in ACCI. Conclusions Genotype changes in Korean distributing strains are still progressing and there was a specific driving force in antigenic determinant genes. Therefore continuous surveillance of genotype change of the distributing strains should be performed to confirm interrelationship of genotype change with vaccine immunity. PMID:24159461

  1. Structure and gene cluster of the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O133.

    PubMed

    Shashkov, Alexander S; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Qiangzheng; Guo, Xi; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Perepelov, Andrei V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-07-22

    The O-specific polysaccharide (O-antigen) of Escherichia coli O133 was obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide of E. coli O133. The structure of the hexasaccharide repeating unit of the polysaccharide was elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, including a two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H ROESY experiment: Functions of genes in the O-antigen gene cluster were putatively identified by comparison with sequences in the available databases and, particularly, an encoded predicted multifunctional glycosyltransferase was assigned to three α-l-rhamnosidic linkages.

  2. Antibodies Raised Against Chlamydial Lipopolysaccharide Antigens Reveal Convergence in Germline Gene Usage and Differential Epitope Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Cory L; Müller-Loennies, Sven; Borisova, Svetlana N.; Brade, Lore; Kosma, Paul; Hirama, Tomoko; MacKenzie, C. Roger; Brade, Helmut; Evans, Stephen V

    2011-01-01

    In order to explore monoclonal antibody recognition carbohydrate antigens, several structures from two monoclonal antibodies directed against carbohydrate epitopes derived from chlamydial LPS have been solved to high resolution. With the exception of CDR H3, antibodies S54-10 and S73-2 are both derived from the same set of germline gene segments as the previously reported structures S25-2 and S45-18. Despite this similarity, the antibodies differ in specificity and the mechanism by which they recognize their cognate antigen. S54-10 uses an unrelated CDR H3 to recognize its antigen in a fashion analogous to S45-18; however, S73-2 recognizes the same antigen as S45-18 and S54-10 in a wholly unrelated manner. Together, these antibody-antigen structures provide snapshots into how the immune system uses the same set of inherited germline gene segments to generate multiple possible specificities that allow for differential recognition of epitopes, and how unrelated CDR H3 sequences can result in convergent binding of clinically-relevant bacterial antigens. PMID:20000757

  3. Characterization of am404, an amber mutation in the simian virus 40 T antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlins, D R; Collis, P; Muzyczka, N

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the biological activity of an amber mutation, am404, at map position 0.27 in the T antigen gene of simian virus 40. Immunoprecipitation of extracts from am404-infected cells demonstrated the presence of an amber protein fragment (am T antigen) of the expected molecular weight (67,000). Differential immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibody demonstrated that am T antigen was missing the carboxy-terminal antigenic determinants. The amber mutant was shown to be defective for most of the functions associated with wild-type T antigen. The mutant did not replicate autonomously, but this defect could be complemented by a helper virus (D. R. Rawlins and N. Muzyczka, J. Virol. 36:611-616, 1980). The mutant failed to transform nonpermissive rodent cells and did not relieve the host range restriction of adenovirus 2 in monkey cells. However, stimulation of host cell DNA, whose functional region domain has been mapped within that portion of the protein synthesized by the mutant, could be demonstrated in am404-infected cells. A number of unexpected observations were made. First, the am T antigen was produced in unusually large amounts in a simian virus 40-transformed monkey cell line (COS-1), but overproduction was not seen in nontransformed monkey cells regardless of whether or not a helper virus was present. This feature of the mutant was presumably the result of the inability of am T antigen to autoregulate, the level of wild-type T antigen in COS-1 cells, and the unusually short half-life of am T antigen in vivo. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that am T antigen had an intracellular half-life of approximately 10 min. In addition, although the am T antigen retained the major phosphorylation site found in simian virus 40 T antigen, it was not phosphorylated. Thus, phosphorylation of simian virus 40 T antigen is not required for the stimulation of host cell DNA synthesis. Finally, fusion of am404-infected monkey cells with Escherichia coli protoplasts

  4. Aberrant Cosmc genes result in Tn antigen expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Du, Zhenzhen; Sun, Xuhong; Shi, Chuanqin; Zhang, Huaixiang; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The Tn antigen, which arises from mutation in the Cosmc gene is one of the most common tumor associated carbohydrate antigens. Cosmc resides in X24 encoded by a single gene and functions as a specific molecular chaperone for T-synthase. While the Tn antigen cannot be detected in normal cells, Cosmc mutations inactivate T-synthase and consequently result in Tn antigen expression within certain cancers. In addition to this Cosmc mutation-induced expression, the Tn antigen is also expressed in such cell lines as Jurkat T, LSC and LS174T. Whether the Cosmc mutation is present in the colon cancer cell line HT-29 is still unclear. Here, we isolate HT-29-Tn+ cells from HT-29 cells derived from a female colon cancer patient. These HT-29-Tn+ cells show a loss of the Cosmc gene coding sequence (CDS) leading to an absence of T-synthase activity and Tn antigen expression. Additionally, almost no methylation of Cosmc CpG islands was detected in HT-29-Tn+ as well as in HT-29-Tn- and Tn- tumor cells from male patients. In contrast, the methylation frequency of CpG island of Cosmc in normal female cells was ~50%. Only one active allele of Cosmc existed in HT-29-Tn+ and HT-29-Tn- cells as based upon detection of SNP sites. These results indicate that Tn antigens expression and T-synthase inactivity in HT-29-Tn+ cells can be related to the absence of CDS in Cosmc active alleles, while an inactive allele deletion of Cosmc in HT-29 cells has no influence on Cosmc function. PMID:26045765

  5. Trypanosome Surface Antigen Genes: Analysis Using Recombinant DNA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-15

    glycoprotein ( VSG ) genes. umerous syringe passaged and cyclically transmitted, frequently expressed VATs have been isolated, monoclonal antibodies prepared...to their VSGs , and he expressed VSG genes have been cloned. We have shown that many diverse tocks express VSG epitopes related to the early IsTst...epitopes. The VSG ene organization in the genome and sequence organization has been haracterized. We have confirmed sequence homology at the 3’ terminus

  6. An evolutionarily mobile antigen receptor variable region gene: doubly rearranging NAR-TcR genes in sharks.

    PubMed

    Criscitiello, Michael F; Saltis, Mark; Flajnik, Martin F

    2006-03-28

    Distinctive Ig and T cell receptor (TcR) chains define the two major lineages of vertebrate lymphocyte yet similarly recognize antigen with a single, membrane-distal variable (V) domain. Here we describe the first antigen receptor chain that employs two V domains, which are generated by separate VDJ gene rearrangement events. These molecules have specialized "supportive" TcRdeltaV domains membrane-proximal to domains with most similarity to IgNAR V. The ancestral NAR V gene encoding this domain is hypothesized to have recombined with the TRD locus in a cartilaginous fish ancestor >200 million years ago and encodes the first V domain shown to be used in both Igs and TcRs. Furthermore, these data support the view that gamma/delta TcRs have for long used structural conformations recognizing free antigen.

  7. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF SWINE LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN (SLA) CLASS I GENES IN OUTBRED PIG POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly polymorphic swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genes are one of the most important determinants in swine immune responses to infectious diseases, vaccines, and in transplantation. Study of SLA influence requires accurate and effective typing methods. We developed a simple and rapid method to t...

  8. No Evidence of Human Leukocyte Antigen Gene Association With Rheumatic Fever Among Children in Samoa.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Guliz; Seifried, Steven E

    2015-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have been implicated in rheumatic fever pathogenesis. This pilot whole genome association study compares genotypes of Samoan children with rheumatic fever to unaffected siblings and unrelated healthy controls. No risk-related genotypes were associated with HLA genes. Thirteen Regions of Interest were identified as candidates for further study.

  9. Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene usage and (super)-antigen drive in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Andreas; Zenz, Thorsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan

    2010-01-15

    Increasing evidence supports the prognostic relevance of specific immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes or stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCR) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The clonotypic BCRs differ in their specificity and affinity toward classical antigens and/or superantigens. The BCR-triggered mechanisms are distinct but could explain in part the different clinical behavior among CLL subgroups.

  10. Neutralization of reovirus: the gene responsible for the neutralization antigen

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The S1 genome segment of reovirus is linked to type specificity as determined by neutralization antibody. This gene segment codes for a minor outer capsid polypeptide (sigma1). Therefore, sigma1 is the peptide responsible for induction of neutralization antibody and confers type specificity. This biologic property of reovirus was defined using hybrid recombinants clones between reovirus types 1 and 3 and 2 and 3. PMID:925604

  11. Alternative haplotypes of antigen processing genes in zebrafish diverged early in vertebrate evolution

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Sean C.; Hernandez, Kyle M.; Wcisel, Dustin J.; Kettleborough, Ross N.; Stemple, Derek L.; Andrade, Jorge; de Jong, Jill L. O.

    2016-01-01

    Antigen processing and presentation genes found within the MHC are among the most highly polymorphic genes of vertebrate genomes, providing populations with diverse immune responses to a wide array of pathogens. Here, we describe transcriptome, exome, and whole-genome sequencing of clonal zebrafish, uncovering the most extensive diversity within the antigen processing and presentation genes of any species yet examined. Our CG2 clonal zebrafish assembly provides genomic context within a remarkably divergent haplotype of the core MHC region on chromosome 19 for six expressed genes not found in the zebrafish reference genome: mhc1uga, proteasome-β 9b (psmb9b), psmb8f, and previously unknown genes psmb13b, tap2d, and tap2e. We identify ancient lineages for Psmb13 within a proteasome branch previously thought to be monomorphic and provide evidence of substantial lineage diversity within each of three major trifurcations of catalytic-type proteasome subunits in vertebrates: Psmb5/Psmb8/Psmb11, Psmb6/Psmb9/Psmb12, and Psmb7/Psmb10/Psmb13. Strikingly, nearby tap2 and MHC class I genes also retain ancient sequence lineages, indicating that alternative lineages may have been preserved throughout the entire MHC pathway since early diversification of the adaptive immune system ∼500 Mya. Furthermore, polymorphisms within the three MHC pathway steps (antigen cleavage, transport, and presentation) are each predicted to alter peptide specificity. Lastly, comparative analysis shows that antigen processing gene diversity is far more extensive than previously realized (with ancient coelacanth psmb8 lineages, shark psmb13, and tap2t and psmb10 outside the teleost MHC), implying distinct immune functions and conserved roles in shaping MHC pathway evolution throughout vertebrates. PMID:27493218

  12. Induction of Human Blood Group A Antigen Expression on Mouse Cells, Using Lentiviral Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaohu; Lang, Haili; Zhou, Xianpei; Zhang, Li; Yin, Rong; Maciejko, Jessica; Giannitsos, Vasiliki; Motyka, Bruce; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ABO histo-blood group system is the most important antigen system in transplantation medicine, yet no small animal model of the ABO system exists. To determine the feasibility of developing a murine model, we previously subcloned the human α-1,2-fucosyltransferase (H-transferase, EC 2.4.1.69) cDNA and the human α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (A-transferase, EC 2.4.1.40) cDNA into lentiviral vectors to study their ability to induce human histo-blood group A antigen expression on mouse cells. Herein we investigated the optimal conditions for human A and H antigen expression in murine cells. We determined that transduction of a bicistronic lentiviral vector (LvEF1-AH-trs) resulted in the expression of A antigen in a mouse endothelial cell line. We also studied the in vivo utility of this vector to induce human A antigen expression in mouse liver. After intrahepatic injection of LvEF1-AH-trs, A antigen expression was observed on hepatocytes as detected by immunohistochemistry and real-time RT-PCR. In human group A erythrocyte-sensitized mice, A antigen expression in the liver was associated with tissue damage, and deposition of antibody and complement. These results suggest that this gene transfer strategy can be used to simulate the human ABO blood group system in a murine model. This model will facilitate progress in the development of interventions for ABO-incompatible transplantation and transfusion scenarios, which are difficult to develop in clinical or large animal settings. PMID:20163247

  13. Structure and expression of a mouse major histocompatibility antigen gene, H-2Ld.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, G A; Margulies, D H; Camerini-Otero, R D; Ozato, K; Seidman, J G

    1982-01-01

    A genomic clone encoding H-2Ld, a mouse major transplantation antigen, has been identified and the structure of the H-2Ld gene has been partially determined. We isolated 35 genomic clones from a BALB/c (H-2d) genomic library by hybridization to mouse or human probes. One of these clones encodes H-2Ld as determined by two criteria. First, the gene encodes a protein that is identical at the 76 known amino acid positions for H-2Ld. Second, when introduced into L cells by DNA-mediated gene transfer, a new H-2 antigen is expressed that is recognized by anti-H-2Ld monoclonal antibodies. The sequence of the H-2Ld protein predicted by the DNA sequences shows more than 80% homology to known H-2 antigens. H-2L-like sequences are found in mutant H-2Kb molecules, suggesting that gene conversion or reciprocal recombination may play a role in the development of H-2 polymorphism. PMID:6952248

  14. Contrasting Population Structures of the Genes Encoding Ten Leading Vaccine-Candidate Antigens of the Human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Alyssa E.; Schultz, Lee; Buckee, Caroline O.; Reeder, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The extensive diversity of Plasmodium falciparum antigens is a major obstacle to a broadly effective malaria vaccine but population genetics has rarely been used to guide vaccine design. We have completed a meta-population genetic analysis of the genes encoding ten leading P. falciparum vaccine antigens, including the pre-erythrocytic antigens csp, trap, lsa1 and glurp; the merozoite antigens eba175, ama1, msp's 1, 3 and 4, and the gametocyte antigen pfs48/45. A total of 4553 antigen sequences were assembled from published data and we estimated the range and distribution of diversity worldwide using traditional population genetics, Bayesian clustering and network analysis. Although a large number of distinct haplotypes were identified for each antigen, they were organized into a limited number of discrete subgroups. While the non-merozoite antigens showed geographically variable levels of diversity and geographic restriction of specific subgroups, the merozoite antigens had high levels of diversity globally, and a worldwide distribution of each subgroup. This shows that the diversity of the non-merozoite antigens is organized by physical or other location-specific barriers to gene flow and that of merozoite antigens by features intrinsic to all populations, one important possibility being the immune response of the human host. We also show that current malaria vaccine formulations are based upon low prevalence haplotypes from a single subgroup and thus may represent only a small proportion of the global parasite population. This study demonstrates significant contrasts in the population structure of P. falciparum vaccine candidates that are consistent with the merozoite antigens being under stronger balancing selection than non-merozoite antigens and suggesting that unique approaches to vaccine design will be required. The results of this study also provide a realistic framework for the diversity of these antigens to be incorporated into the design of next

  15. [Production of marker-free plants expressing the gene of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen].

    PubMed

    Rukavtsova, E B; Gaiazova, A R; Chebotareva, E N; Bur'ianova, Ia I

    2009-08-01

    The pBM plasmid, carrying the gene of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and free of any selection markers of antibiotic or herbicide resistance, was constructed for genetic transformation of plants. A method for screening transformed plant seedlings on nonselective media was developed. Enzyme immunoassay was used for selecting transgenic plants with HBsAg gene among the produced regenerants; this method provides for a high sensitivity detection of HBsAg in plant extracts. Tobacco and tomato transgenic lines synthesizing this antigen at a level of 0.01-0.05% of the total soluble protein were obtained. The achieved level of HBsAg synthesis is sufficient for preclinical trials of the produced plants as a new generation safe edible vaccine. The developed method for selecting transformants can be used for producing safe plants free of selection markers.

  16. Analysis of the Borrelia burgdorferi GeHo fla gene and antigenic characterization of its gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Gassmann, G S; Jacobs, E; Deutzmann, R; Göbel, U B

    1991-01-01

    The fla gene of Borrelia burgdorferi GeHo was analyzed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural gene encodes a flagellar protein of 336 amino acids. Comparative sequence analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed a high degree of sequence conservation with flagellins from both phylogenetically related and unrelated bacteria. The antigenic properties of the B. burgdorferi Fla protein were studied by synthesizing overlapping octapeptides, which were screened by using a battery of different monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies from various species directed against native and denatured flagellar proteins. No single species-independent immunodominant epitope could be located. However, immunoreactive oligopeptides clustered within the variable middle region (N-180 to I-260). This region could constitute a candidate antigen for more specific and sensitive serodiagnosis of Lyme borreliosis. Images PMID:1704884

  17. Cloning of Plasmodium yoelii Genes Expressing Three Different Sporozoite-Specific Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    advances in the development of a recombinant vaccine against Plasmodium falcipatum sporozoites, there is still an urgent need for a reliable rodent model to...carry out complex vaccine protocols difficult to perform in primates or man. The purpose of this research was to clone the P. yoelii genes coding for...sporozoite antigens that have potential as vaccine candidates in a rodent model. Results our positive clones (B10, 885, B143 and 8155) were identified

  18. Gene frequencies of human neutrophil antigens in the Tunisian blood donors and Berbers.

    PubMed

    Abid, S; Zili, M; Bouzid, L; Kibech, R; Foudhaili, N; Joudi, K; Ren Regaya, Z; Abdennaji, B; Mrad, R; Boukef, K

    2001-08-01

    Human neutrophil antigens play an important role in provoking immune neutropenia and transfusion-reactions. The aim of this study was to determine granulocyte-specific antigens on the neutrophil Fc gamma receptor IIIb (Fc gamma RIIIb, CD16b), namely, the HNA-1a(NA1) and HNA-1b(NA2) antigens and their gene frequencies in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers. One hundred and ninety-nine unrelated healthy Tunisian blood donors and Berbers were typed for HNA-1a and HNA-1b(NA1 and NA2), using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). In 24 granulocyte samples, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b phenotypes was additionally determined by the granulocyte immunofluorescence test (GIFT) and correlated with the genotyping results. A subsequent analysis of the genotyping study showed that, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed, were 0.342 and 0.658 for Berbers, and 0.311 and 0.668 for blood donors, respectively. In the genotyping study conducted, it was determined that the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers are similar to those previously reported in other white populations.

  19. Antigen-receptor gene-modified T cells for treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Immunological effector cells and molecules have been shown to access intracranial tumor sites despite the existence of blood brain barrier (BBB) or immunosuppressive mechanisms associated with brain tumors. Recent progress in T-cell biology and tumor immunology made possible to develop strategies of tumor-associated antigen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches such as vaccination with defined antigens and adoptive T-cell therapy with antigen-specific T cells including gene-modified T cells for the treatment of patients with brain tumors. An array of recent reports on the trials of active and passive immunotherapy for patients with brain tumors have documented safety and some preliminary clinical efficacy, although the ultimate judgment for clinical benefits awaits rigorous evaluation in trials of later phases. Nevertheless, treatment with lymphocytes that are engineered to express tumor-specific receptor genes is a promising immunotherapy against glioma, based on the significant efficacy reported in the trials for patients with other types of malignancy. Overcoming the relative difficulty to apply immunotherapeutic approach to intracranial region, current advances in the understanding of human tumor immunology and the gene-therapy methodology will address the development of effective immunotherapy of brain tumors.

  20. The induction of antigen-specific CTL by in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Ariyoshi, Y; Watanabe, M; Eikawa, S; Yamazaki, C; Sadahira, T; Hirata, T; Araki, M; Ebara, S; Nasu, Y; Udono, H; Kumon, H

    2016-05-01

    An adenovirus vector carrying the human Reduced Expression in Immortalized Cell (REIC)/Dkk-3 gene (Ad-REIC) mediates simultaneous induction of cancer-selective apoptosis and augmentation of anticancer immunity. In our preclinical and clinical studies, in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy showed remarkable direct and indirect antitumor effects to realize therapeutic cancer vaccines. We herein aimed to confirm the induction of tumor-associated antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by Ad-REIC. Using an ovalbumin (OVA), a tumor-associated antigen, expressing E.G7 tumor-bearing mouse model, we investigated the induction and expansion of OVA-specific CTLs responsible for indirect, systemic effects of Ad-REIC. The intratumoral administration of Ad-REIC mediated clear antitumor effects with the accumulation of OVA-specific CTLs in the tumor tissues and spleen. The CD86-positive dendritic cells (DCs) were upregulated in the tumor draining lymph nodes of Ad-REIC-treated mice. In a dual tumor-bearing mouse model in the left and right back, Ad-REIC injection in one side significantly suppressed the tumor growth on both sides and significant infiltration of OVA-specific CTLs into non-injected tumor was also detected. Consequently, in situ Ad-REIC gene therapy is expected to realize a new-generation cancer vaccine via anticancer immune activation with DC and tumor antigen-specific CTL expansion.

  1. Induction of interferon-stimulated genes by Simian virus 40 T antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, Abhilasha V.; Cantalupo, Paul G.; Sarkar, Saumendra N.; Pipas, James M.

    2010-10-25

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (TAg) is a multifunctional oncoprotein essential for productive viral infection and for cellular transformation. We have used microarray analysis to examine the global changes in cellular gene expression induced by wild-type T antigen (TAg{sup wt}) and TAg-mutants in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). The expression profile of approximately 800 cellular genes was altered by TAg{sup wt} and a truncated TAg (TAg{sup N136}), including many genes that influence cell cycle, DNA-replication, transcription, chromatin structure and DNA repair. Unexpectedly, we found a significant number of immune response genes upregulated by TAg{sup wt} including many interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as ISG56, OAS, Rsad2, Ifi27 and Mx1. Additionally, we also observed activation of STAT1 by TAg{sup wt}. Our genetic studies using several TAg-mutants reveal an unexplored function of TAg and indicate that the LXCXE motif and p53 binding are required for the upregulation of ISGs.

  2. Widespread balancing selection and pathogen-driven selection at blood group antigen genes

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Cagliani, Rachele; Pozzoli, Uberto; Riva, Stefania; Comi, Giacomo P.; Menozzi, Giorgia; Bresolin, Nereo; Sironi, Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Historically, allelic variations in blood group antigen (BGA) genes have been regarded as possible susceptibility factors for infectious diseases. Since host–pathogen interactions are major determinants in evolution, BGAs can be thought of as selection targets. In order to verify this hypothesis, we obtained an estimate of pathogen richness for geographic locations corresponding to 52 populations distributed worldwide; after correction for multiple tests and for variables different from selective forces, significant correlations with pathogen richness were obtained for multiple variants at 11 BGA loci out of 26. In line with this finding, we demonstrate that three BGA genes, namely CD55, CD151, and SLC14A1, have been subjected to balancing selection, a process, rare outside MHC genes, which maintains variability at a locus. Moreover, we identified a gene region immediately upstream the transcription start site of FUT2 which has undergone non-neutral evolution independently from the coding region. Finally, in the case of BSG, we describe the presence of a highly divergent haplotype clade and the possible reasons for its maintenance, including frequency-dependent balancing selection, are discussed. These data indicate that BGAs have been playing a central role in the host–pathogen arms race during human evolutionary history and no other gene category shows similar levels of widespread selection, with the only exception of loci involved in antigen recognition. PMID:18997004

  3. Widespread balancing selection and pathogen-driven selection at blood group antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Cagliani, Rachele; Pozzoli, Uberto; Riva, Stefania; Comi, Giacomo P; Menozzi, Giorgia; Bresolin, Nereo; Sironi, Manuela

    2009-02-01

    Historically, allelic variations in blood group antigen (BGA) genes have been regarded as possible susceptibility factors for infectious diseases. Since host-pathogen interactions are major determinants in evolution, BGAs can be thought of as selection targets. In order to verify this hypothesis, we obtained an estimate of pathogen richness for geographic locations corresponding to 52 populations distributed worldwide; after correction for multiple tests and for variables different from selective forces, significant correlations with pathogen richness were obtained for multiple variants at 11 BGA loci out of 26. In line with this finding, we demonstrate that three BGA genes, namely CD55, CD151, and SLC14A1, have been subjected to balancing selection, a process, rare outside MHC genes, which maintains variability at a locus. Moreover, we identified a gene region immediately upstream the transcription start site of FUT2 which has undergone non-neutral evolution independently from the coding region. Finally, in the case of BSG, we describe the presence of a highly divergent haplotype clade and the possible reasons for its maintenance, including frequency-dependent balancing selection, are discussed. These data indicate that BGAs have been playing a central role in the host-pathogen arms race during human evolutionary history and no other gene category shows similar levels of widespread selection, with the only exception of loci involved in antigen recognition.

  4. Genes encoding homologous antigens in taeniid cestode parasites: Implications for development of recombinant vaccines produced in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gauci, Charles; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vaccine antigens are being evaluated for their ability to protect livestock animals against cysticercosis and related parasitic infections. Practical use of some of these vaccines is expected to reduce parasite transmission, leading to a reduction in the incidence of neurocysticercosis and hydatid disease in humans. We recently showed that an antigen (TSOL16), expressed in Escherichia coli, confers high levels of protection against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs, which provides a strategy for control of T. solium parasite transmission. Here, we discuss the characteristics of this antigen that may affect the utility of TSOL16 and related antigens for development as recombinant vaccines. We also report that genes encoding antigens closely related to TSOL16 from T. solium also occur in other related species of parasites. These highly homologous antigens have the potential to be used as vaccines and may provide protection against related species of Taenia that cause infection in other hosts.

  5. A gene cluster for the synthesis of serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Saito, Masanori; Kobayashi, Taira; Umezawa, Koji; Nagahama, Fumio; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirasawa, Masatomo; Takada, Kazuko

    2014-04-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen related to aggressively progressive periodontal breakdown in adolescents and adults. The species can be divided into six serotypes (a-f) according to their surface carbohydrate antigens. Recently, a new serotype g of A. actinomycetemcomitans was proposed. The aim of the present study was to sequence the gene cluster associated with the biosynthesis of the serotype g-specific polysaccharide antigen and develop serotype-specific primers for PCR assay to identify serotype g strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The serotype-specific polysaccharide (SSPS) gene cluster of the NUM-Aa 4039 strain contained 21 genes in 21,842-bp nucleotides. The similarity of the SSPS gene cluster sequence was 96.7 % compared with that of the serotype e strain. Seventeen serotype g genes showed more than 90 % homology both in nucleotide and amino acids to the serotype e strain. Three additional genes with 1,579 bp in NUM-Aa 4039 were inserted into the corresponding ORF13 of the serotype e strain. The serotype g-specific primers were designed from the insertion region of NUM-Aa 4039. Serotypes of the a-f strains were not amplified by serotype-specific g primers; only NUM-Aa 4039 showed an amplicon band. The NUM-Aa 4039 strain was three genes in the SSPS gene cluster different from those of serotype e strain. The specific primers derived from these different regions are useful for identification and distribution of serotype g strain among A. actinomycetemcomitans from clinical samples.

  6. A Gene Encoding Antigenic Peptides of Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shichijo, Shigeki; Nakao, Masanobu; Imai, Yasuhisa; Takasu, Hideo; Kawamoto, Mayumi; Niiya, Fumihiko; Yang, Damu; Toh, Yuji; Yamana, Hideaki; Itoh, Kyogo

    1998-01-01

    Except for melanomas, tumor antigens recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are yet unidentified. We have identified a gene encoding antigenic peptides of human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) recognized by human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens (HLA)- A2601–restricted CTLs. This gene showed no similarity to known sequences, and encoded two (125- and 43-kilodalton [kD]) proteins. The 125-kD protein with the leucine zipper motif was expressed in the nucleus of the majority of proliferating cells tested, including normal and malignant cells. The 43-kD protein was expressed in the cytosol of most SCCs from various organs and half of lung adenocarcinomas, but was not expressed in other cancers nor in a panel of normal tissues. The three nonapeptides shared by the two proteins were recognized by the KE4 CTLs, and one of the peptides induced in vitro from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) the CTLs restricted to the autologous tumor cells. The 43-kD protein and this nonapeptide (KGSGKMKTE) may be useful for the specific immunotherapy of HLA-A2601+ epithelial cancer patients. PMID:9449708

  7. Characterization of the lymphocyte activation gene 3-encoded protein. A new ligand for human leukocyte antigen class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), expressed in human activated T and natural killer (NK) cells, is closely related to CD4 at the gene and protein levels. We report here the initial characterization of the LAG-3-encoded protein. We have generated two monoclonal antibodies after immunization of mice with a 30-amino acid peptide that corresponds to an exposed extra loop region present in the LAG-3 immunoglobulin-like first domain. The reactivity of these reagents is directed against LAG-3 since they recognize both membrane-expressed and soluble recombinant LAG-3 molecules produced in a baculovirus expression system. The two antibodies are likely to react with the same or closely related epitope (termed LAG-3.1) exposed on the LAG-3 first domain extra loop, as assessed in competition experiments on LAG-3- expressing activated lymphocytes. Cellular distribution analysis indicated that the LAG-3.1 epitope is expressed on activated T (both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets) and NK cells, and not on activated B cells or monocytes. In immunoprecipitation experiments performed on activated T and NK cell lysates, a 70-kD protein was detected after SDS-PAGE analysis. 45-kD protein species were also immunoprecipitated. Both the 70- and 45-kD proteins were shown to be N-glycosylated. In Western blot analysis, only the former molecule was recognized by the anti-LAG-3 antibodies, demonstrating that it is LAG-3 encoded. These anti-LAG-3 antibodies were used to investigate whether the LAG-3 protein interacts with the CD4 ligands. By using a high-level expression cellular system based on COS-7 cell transfection with recombinant CDM8 vectors and a quantitative cellular adhesion assay, we demonstrate that rosette formation between LAG-3-transfected COS-7 cells and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-bearing B lymphocytes is specifically dependent on LAG-3/HLA class II interaction. In contrast to CD4, LAG-3 does not bind the human immunodeficiency virus gp120. This initial

  8. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism. PMID:27853655

  9. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism.

    PubMed

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-04-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leukocyte antigen/killer - cell immunoglobulin - like receptor complexes are increased in people with autism. We present data, which suggests that an activating cB01/tA01 killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - content haplotype and the cognate ligand human leukocyte antigen - C1k that activates this haplotype is significantly increased in autism. This is an important observation suggesting that the interaction between two proteins encoded on different chromosomes increases natural killer cell killing in autism.

  10. Sir2 paralogues cooperate to regulate virulence genes and antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Christopher J; Carret, Céline K; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Voss, Till S; Ralph, Stuart A; Hommel, Mirja; Duffy, Michael F; Silva, Liliana Mancio da; Scherf, Artur; Ivens, Alasdair; Speed, Terence P; Beeson, James G; Cowman, Alan F

    2009-04-14

    Cytoadherance of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in the brain, organs and peripheral microvasculature is linked to morbidity and mortality associated with severe malaria. Parasite-derived P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein 1 (PfEMP1) molecules displayed on the erythrocyte surface are responsible for cytoadherance and undergo antigenic variation in the course of an infection. Antigenic variation of PfEMP1 is achieved by in situ switching and mutually exclusive transcription of the var gene family, a process that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms. Here we report characterisation of the P. falciparum silent information regulator's A and B (PfSir2A and PfSir2B) and their involvement in mutual exclusion and silencing of the var gene repertoire. Analysis of P. falciparum parasites lacking either PfSir2A or PfSir2B shows that these NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylases are required for silencing of different var gene subsets classified by their conserved promoter type. We also demonstrate that in the absence of either of these molecules mutually exclusive expression of var genes breaks down. We show that var gene silencing originates within the promoter and PfSir2 paralogues are involved in cis spreading of silenced chromatin into adjacent regions. Furthermore, parasites lacking PfSir2A but not PfSir2B have considerably longer telomeric repeats, demonstrating a role for this molecule in telomeric end protection. This work highlights the pivotal but distinct role for both PfSir2 paralogues in epigenetic silencing of P. falciparum virulence genes and the control of pathogenicity of malaria infection.

  11. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas S.; Lisby, Michael; Salanti, Ali; Fordyce, Sarah L.; Jespersen, Jakob S.; Carter, Richard; Deitsch, Kirk W.; Theander, Thor G.; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Arnot, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens undergo antigenic variation to counter host immune defense mechanisms. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most lethal of human malaria parasites, switching of var gene expression results in alternating expression of the adhesion proteins of the Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 class on the infected erythrocyte surface. Recombination clearly generates var diversity, but the nature and control of the genetic exchanges involved remain unclear. By experimental and bioinformatic identification of recombination events and genome-wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens. PMID:24253306

  12. A 55-kilodalton immunodominant antigen of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 has arisen via horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hanley, S A; Aduse-Opoku, J; Curtis, M A

    1999-03-01

    A 55-kDa outer membrane protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 is a significant target of the serum immunoglobulin G antibody response of periodontal disease patients and hence may play an important role in host-bacterium interactions in periodontal disease. The gene encoding the 55-kDa antigen (ragB, for receptor antigen B) was isolated on a 9.5-kb partial Sau3AI fragment of P. gingivalis W50 chromosomal DNA in pUC18 by immunoscreening with a monoclonal antibody to this antigen. The 1.6-kb open reading frame (ORF) encoding RagB was located via subcloning and nested-deletion analysis. Sequence analysis demonstrated the presence of an upstream 3.1-kb ORF (ragA) which is cotranscribed with ragB. A number of genetic characteristics suggest that the ragAB locus was acquired by a horizontal gene transfer event. These include a significantly reduced G+C content relative to that of the P. gingivalis chromosome (42 versus 48%) and the presence of mobility elements flanking this locus in P. gingivalis W50. Furthermore, Southern blotting and PCR analyses showed a restricted distribution of this locus in laboratory and clinical isolates of this bacterium. The association of ragAB+ P. gingivalis with clinical status was examined by PCR analysis of subgingival samples. ragAB+ was not detected in P. gingivalis-positive shallow pockets from periodontal disease patients but was present in 36% of the P. gingivalis-positive samples from deep pockets. These data suggest that the ragAB locus was acquired by certain P. gingivalis strains via horizontal gene transfer and that the acquisition of this locus may facilitate the survival of these strains at sites of periodontal destruction.

  13. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  14. Cloning and characterization of the merozoite surface antigen 1 gene of Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Zhong, H; Fan, J Y; Yang, S; Davidson, E A

    1999-06-01

    Merozoite surface antigen 1 (MSA1) is a promising candidate for vaccine development against malaria parasites. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the precursor to this major surface antigen of Plasmodium berghei strain ANKA using cDNA library screening and polymerase chain reaction techniques. A single open reading frame of 5,376 basepairs encoding a protein with a calculated molecular mass of 197 kD was defined. The protein contains a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids, a membrane anchor sequence of 18 residues, and shows two epidermal growth factor-like domains rich in Cys residues at the C-terminus. There are four repeat sequences of oligopeptides in the molecule: tetrapeptide (Ser-Thr-Thr-Thr), tripeptide (Pro-Thr-Pro and Pro-Ala-Ala), and dipeptide (Ser-Gly). Furthermore, three nine-residue stretches of a motif (Ala-Ser-Asn-Pro-Gly-Ala-Ser-Ala-Ser) are located near each other. All of these repeat sequences are unexceptionally located in the variable regions when compared with other MSA1 molecules. The molecule displays 79% overall identity to the analogous antigen of P. yoelii yoelii strain YM, 70% to that of P. chabaudi chabaudi strain AS, and 38% to that of P. falciparum strain Wellcome.

  15. Predominant role for directly transfected dendritic cells in antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells after gene gun immunization.

    PubMed

    Porgador, A; Irvine, K R; Iwasaki, A; Barber, B H; Restifo, N P; Germain, R N

    1998-09-21

    Cutaneous gene (DNA) bombardment results in substantial expression of the encoded antigen in the epidermal layer as well as detectable expression in dendritic cells (DC) in draining lymph nodes (LNs). Under these conditions, two possible modes of DC antigen presentation to naive CD8+ T cells might exist: (a) presentation directly by gene-transfected DC trafficking to local lymph nodes, and (b) cross-presentation by untransfected DC of antigen released from or associated with transfected epidermal cells. The relative contributions of these distinct modes of antigen presentation to priming for cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses have not been clearly established. Here we show that LN cells directly expressing the DNA-encoded antigen are rare; 24 h after five abdominal skin bombardments, the number of these cells does not exceed 50-100 cells in an individual draining LN. However, over this same time period, the total number of CD11c+ DC increases more than twofold, by an average of 20,000-30,000 DC per major draining node. This augmentation is due to gold bombardment and is independent of the presence of plasmid DNA. Most antigen-bearing cells in the LNs draining the site of DNA delivery appear to be DC and can be depleted by antibodies to an intact surface protein encoded by cotransfected DNA. This finding of predominant antigen presentation by directly transfected cells is also consistent with data from studies on cotransfection with antigen and CD86-encoding DNA, showing that priming of anti-mutant influenza nucleoprotein CTLs with a single immunization is dependent upon coexpression of the DNAs encoding nucleoprotein and B7.2 in the same cells. These observations provide insight into the relative roles of direct gene expression and cross-presentation in CD8+ T cell priming using gene gun immunization, and indicate that augmentation of direct DC gene expression may enhance such priming.

  16. Polymorphism in the gene encoding the Pfs48/45 antigen of Plasmodium falciparum. XI. Asembo Bay Cohort Project.

    PubMed

    Escalante, Ananias A; Grebert, Heather M; Chaiyaroj, Sansanee C; Riggione, Flavia; Biswas, Sukla; Nahlen, Bernard L; Lal, Altaf A

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the genetic diversity of the gene encoding the transmission-blocking vaccine antigen Pfs48/45 of Plasmodium falciparum parasites from western Kenya and compared it with parasite populations from Thailand, India, and Venezuela. We report 44 complete new sequences. Overall, the antigen is less polymorphic as compared with other pre-erythrocytic and blood stage antigens. Contrary to other P. falciparum antigens, the number of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site exceeds the number of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous site. We have found that the Pfs48/45 gene of Kenyan parasites is more polymorphic than parasites from other geographic origins. Our analysis reveals that positive natural selection is involved in the maintenance of the observed polymorphism. No evidence of intragenic recombination was found. F(st) values reveal high levels of gene flow between India and Thailand, however, there are strong constraints in gene flow among Kenyan, Southeast Asian, and Venezuelan parasites. No alleles could be linked to a specific geographic region. The results of this study suggest that this gametocyte antigen, like other asexual blood stage antigens, is under selection pressure.

  17. Consistent quantitative gene product expression: #2. Antigen intensities on bone marrow cells are invariant between individuals

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Andrew P.; Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Fritschle, Wayne; Menssen, Andrew J.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Wells, Denise A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Five reference populations in bone marrow specimens were identified by flow cytometry using specific combinations of reagents in order define the variation of gene product expression intensities both within and between individuals. Mature lymphocytes, uncommitted progenitor cells, promyelocytes, mature monocytes and mature neutrophils can be reproducibly identified as distinct clusters of events in heterogeneous, maturing bone marrow specimens. Support Vector Machines were used to identify the reference populations in order to reduce subjective bias in manually defining boundaries of these populations since they were not discretely separated from the remainder of the cells. Reference populations were identified in 50 randomly selected bone marrow aspirates obtained over a period spanning 3 years and 6 months from pediatric patients following chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The quantitative expression of gene products (cell surface antigens) and light scattering characteristics on these stressed specimens were demonstrated to be tightly regulated both within individuals and between individuals. Within an individual most gene products (CD45, CD34, CD14, CD16, CD64, CD33) demonstrated limited variability with a standard deviation of <0.20 log units while CD13 and CD36 exhibited broader variation >0.25 log units. Surprisingly, with the exception of CD33, the variation of the mean intensities of each antigen between individuals was even less than the variation within an individual. These data confirm that the amounts of gene products expressed on normal developing cells are highly regulated but differ in intensities between different lineages and during the maturational pathway of those lineages. The amounts of gene products expressed at specific stages of development of each lineage are a biologic constant with minimal variation within or between individuals. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  18. Repression of the Drosophila proliferating-cell nuclear antigen gene promoter by zerknuellt protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Hirose, Fumiko; Nishida, Yasuyoshi; Matsukage, Akio )

    1991-10-01

    A 631-bp fragment containing the 5{prime}-flanking region of the Drosophila melanogaster proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene was placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene of a CAT vector. A transient expression assay of CAT activity in Drosophila Kc cells transfected with this plasmid and a set of 5{prime}-deletion derivatives revealed that the promoter function resided within a 192-bp region. Cotransfection with a zerknuellt (zen)-expressing plasmid specifically repressed CAT expression. However, cotransfection with expression plasmids for a nonfunctional zen mutation, even skipped, or bicoid showed no significant effect on CAT expression. RNase protection analysis revealed that the repression by zen was at the transcription step. The target sequence of zen was mapped within the 34-bp region of the PCNA gene promoter, even though it lacked zen protein-binding sites. Transgenic flies carrying the PCNA gene regulatory region fused with lacZ were established. These results indicate that zen indirectly represses PCNA gene expression, probably by regulating the expression of some transcription factor(s) that binds to the PCNA gene promoter.

  19. Mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into antigen presenting dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Sandra S; Plank, Christian; Cotten, Matt; Wagner, Ernst; Zenke, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells and are unique in their ability to prime naïve T cells. Gene modification of dendritic cells is of particular interest for immunotherapy of diseases where the immune system has failed or is aberrantly regulated, such as in cancer or autoimmune disease, respectively. Dendritic cells abundantly express mannose receptor and mannose receptor-related receptors, and receptor-mediated gene transfer via mannose receptor offers a versatile tool for targeted gene delivery into these cells. Accordingly, mannose polyethylenimine DNA transfer complexes were generated and used for gene delivery into dendritic cells. Mannose receptor belongs to the group of scavenger receptors that allow dendritic cells to take up pathogenic material, which is directed for degradation and MHC class II presentation. Therefore, a limiting step of transgene expression by mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery is endosomal degradation of DNA. Several strategies have been explored to overcome this limitation including the addition of endosomolytic components to DNA transfer complexes like adenovirus particles and influenza peptides. Here, we review the current understanding of mannose receptor-mediated gene delivery into dendritic cells and discuss strategies to identify appropriate endosomolytic agents to improve DNA transfer efficacy.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum complicated malaria: Modulation and connectivity between exportome and variant surface antigen gene families.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Pandey, Isha; Kohli, Ramandeep; Karwa, Rohan; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2015-05-01

    In temperate and sub-tropical regions of Asia and Latin America, complicated malaria manifested as hepatic dysfunction or renal dysfunction is seen in all age groups. There has been a concerted focus on understanding the patho-physiological and molecular basis of complicated malaria in children, much less is known about it in adults. We report here, the analysis of data from a custom, cross strain microarray (Agilent Platform) using material from adult patient samples, showing hepatic dysfunction or renal failure. These are the most common manifestations seen in adults along with cerebral malaria. The data has been analyzed with reference to variant surface antigens, encoded by the var, rifin and stevor gene families. The differential regulation profiles of key genes (comparison between Plasmodium falciparum complicated and uncomplicated isolates) have been observed. The exportome has been analyzed using similar parameters. Gene ontology term based functional enrichment of differentially regulated genes identified, up-regulated genes statistically enriched (P<0.05) to critical biological processes like generation of precursor metabolite and energy, chromosome organization and electron transport chain. Systems network based functional enrichment of overall differentially regulated genes yielded a similar result. We are reporting here, up-regulation of var group B and C genes whose proteins are predicted to interact with CD36 receptor in the host, the up-regulation of domain cassette 13 (DC13) containing var group A, as also the up-regulation of group A rifins and many of the stevors. This is contrary to most other reports from pediatric patients, with cerebral malaria where the up-regulation of mostly var A group genes have been seen. A protein-protein interaction based network has been created and analysis performed. This co-expression and text mining based network has shown overall connectivity between the variant surface antigens (VSA) and the exportome. The up

  1. Gene Transfer Efficiency in Gonococcal Biofilms: Role of Biofilm Age, Architecture, and Pilin Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kouzel, Nadzeya; Oldewurtel, Enno R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular DNA is an important structural component of many bacterial biofilms. It is unknown, however, to which extent external DNA is used to transfer genes by means of transformation. Here, we quantified the acquisition of multidrug resistance and visualized its spread under selective and nonselective conditions in biofilms formed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The density and architecture of the biofilms were controlled by microstructuring the substratum for bacterial adhesion. Horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes between cocultured strains, each carrying a single resistance, occurred efficiently in early biofilms. The efficiency of gene transfer was higher in early biofilms than between planktonic cells. It was strongly reduced after 24 h and independent of biofilm density. Pilin antigenic variation caused a high fraction of nonpiliated bacteria but was not responsible for the reduced gene transfer at later stages. When selective pressure was applied to dense biofilms using antibiotics at their MIC, the double-resistant bacteria did not show a significant growth advantage. In loosely connected biofilms, the spreading of double-resistant clones was prominent. We conclude that multidrug resistance readily develops in early gonococcal biofilms through horizontal gene transfer. However, selection and spreading of the multiresistant clones are heavily suppressed in dense biofilms. IMPORTANCE Biofilms are considered ideal reaction chambers for horizontal gene transfer and development of multidrug resistances. The rate at which genes are exchanged within biofilms is unknown. Here, we quantified the acquisition of double-drug resistance by gene transfer between gonococci with single resistances. At early biofilm stages, the transfer efficiency was higher than for planktonic cells but then decreased with biofilm age. The surface topography affected the architecture of the biofilm. While the efficiency of gene transfer was independent of the

  2. Epstein–Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C regulated genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Mar, Jessica C.; Maruo, Seiji; Lee, Sungwook; Gewurz, Benjamin E.; Johannsen, Eric; Holton, Kristina; Rubio, Renee; Takada, Kenzo; Quackenbush, John; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an essential transcription factor for EBV transformed lymphoblast cell line (LCL) growth. To identify EBNA3C-regulated genes in LCLs, microarrays were used to measure RNA abundances in each of three different LCLs that conditionally express EBNA3C fused to a 4-OH-Tamoxifen–dependent estrogen receptor hormone binding domain (EBNA3CHT). At least three RNAs were assayed for each EBNA3CHT LCL under nonpermissive conditions, permissive conditions, and nonpermissive conditions with wild-type EBNA3C transcomplementation. Using a two-way ANOVA model of EBNA3C levels, we identified 550 regulated genes that were at least 1.5-fold up- or down-regulated with false discovery rates < 0.01. EBNA3C-regulated genes overlapped significantly with genes regulated by EBNA2 and EBNA3A consistent with coordinated effects on cell gene transcription. Of the 550 EBNA3C-regulated genes, 106 could be placed in protein networks. A seeded Bayesian network analysis of the 80 most significant EBNA3C-regulated genes suggests that RAC1, LYN, and TNF are upstream of other EBNA3C-regulated genes. Gene set enrichment analysis found enrichment for MAP kinase signaling, cytokine–cytokine receptor interactions, JAK-STAT signaling, and cell adhesion molecules, implicating these pathways in EBNA3C effects on LCL growth or survival. EBNA3C significantly up-regulated the CXCL12 ligand and its CXCR4 receptor and increased LCL migration. CXCL12 up-regulation depended on EBNA3C's interaction with the cell transcription factor, RBPJ, which is essential for LCL growth. EBNA3C also up-regulated MYC 1.3-fold and down-regulated CDKN2A exons 2 and 3, shared by p16 and p14, 1.4-fold, with false discovery rates < 5 × 10−4. PMID:21173222

  3. A Survey of ABO, Rhesus (D) Antigen and Haemoglobin Genes Variants in Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omotosho, Ishiaq

    2015-12-20

    A survey of ABO and Rhesus (Rh D) antigens and variants of haemoglobin genes (HbGen) in Oyo state was carried out. This longitudinal study involved the determination of ABO and Rh(D) antigens in 3241 and HbGen in 2622 male and female adults (aged 26-65years) respectively using standard methods. 94.5% of the subjects were Rh(D) positive while 5.5% were Rh(D) negative respectively based on the detection (Positive) or absence (Negative) of Rh(D) antigen. 22.8% of the subjects had ABO blood group A, 26.4% were group B, 4.1% were group AB while 46.7% were group O. Further analysis revealed that 695 (21.4%) of the group A were Apositive while 44 (1.4%) were Anegative. 800 of these subjects (24.7%) were Bpositive while 56 (1.7%) were group Bnegative. 133 (4.1%) showed group AB out of which 125 (3.8%) were ABpositive and 8 (0.3%) were ABnegative. 1513 (46.7%) were group O out of which 1444 (44.6%) were Opositive while 69 (2.1%) were Onegative. HbGen determination showed that 1933 of the subjects (73.7%) had HbGen AA; 553 (21.1%) were AS; 119 (4.5%) were AC; 11 (0.4%) were SC while 3 subjects representing 0.1% and 0.2% each had HbGen SS and CC respectively. Although the results were similar to earlier ones; however, the need for sustained counselling towards eradication of SS genes and increased research towards identifying artificial blood substitutes was highlighted in this work. The increasing need for blood transfusion especially with the increase in various politically/communally motivated emergency situations underscores this fact.

  4. Structure and gene cluster of the O-antigen of Enterobacter cloacae G3421.

    PubMed

    Perepelov, Andrei V; Filatov, Andrei V; Wang, Min; Shashkov, Alexander S; Wang, Lei; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-06-02

    The O-polysaccharide was isolated by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Enterobacter cloacae G3421 and studied by sugar analysis along with 1D and 2D (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In addition, partial solvolysis with anhydrous trifluoroacetic acid was applied, which cleaved selectively the α-l-rhamnopyranosidic linkages. The following structure of the branched hexasaccharide repeating unit was established. The O-polysaccharide studied shares the β-l-Rhap-(1→4)-α-l-Rhap-(1→2)-α-l-Rhap trisaccharide fragment with the O-polysaccharide of Shigella boydii type 18. The O-antigen gene cluster of E. cloacae G3421 was sequenced. Functions of genes in the cluster, including those for glycosyltransferases, were tentatively assigned by a comparison with sequences in the available databases and found to be consistent with the O-polysaccharide structure.

  5. Structure elucidation and gene cluster characterization of the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O80.

    PubMed

    Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Guo, Xi; Filatov, Andrei V; Perepelov, Andrei V; Liu, Bin; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-09-02

    Mild alkaline degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O80 afforded a polysaccharide, which was studied by sugar analysis, selective cleavage of glycosidic linkages, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Solvolysis of the polysaccharide with CF3CO2H cleaved the linkages of α-Fuc and β-linked GlcNAc and GalNAc residues to give two disaccharides. The following structure of the hexasaccharide repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: The polysaccharide repeat also contains a minor O-acetyl group but its position was not determined. The O-antigen gene cluster of E. coli O80 between the conserved galF and gnd genes was analyzed and found to be consistent with the O-polysaccharide structure established.

  6. Molecular Pathways: Breaking the Epithelial Cancer Barrier for Chimeric Antigen Receptor and T-cell Receptor Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Christian S

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered to express a tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) or T-cell receptor (TCR) can mediate cancer regression in some patients. CARs are synthetic single-chain proteins that use antibody domains to target cell surface antigens. TCRs are natural heterodimeric proteins that can target intracellular antigens through recognition of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigens. CARs have shown promise in B-cell malignancies and TCRs in melanoma, but neither approach has achieved clear success in an epithelial cancer. Treatment of epithelial cancers may be particularly challenging because of a paucity of target antigens expressed by carcinomas and not by important healthy tissues. In addition, epithelial cancers may be protected by inhibitory ligands and soluble factors in the tumor microenvironment. One strategy to overcome these negative regulators is to modulate expression of T-cell genes to enhance intrinsic T-cell function. Programmable nucleases, which can suppress inhibitory genes, and inducible gene expression systems, which can enhance stimulatory genes, are entering clinical testing. Other work is delineating whether control of genes for immune checkpoint receptors (e.g.,PDCD1, CTLA4) and cytokine and TCR signaling regulators (e.g.,CBLB, CISH, IL12, IL15) can increase the antitumor activity of therapeutic T cells.

  7. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene coding for an antigenic 120-kilodalton protein of Rickettsia conorii.

    PubMed Central

    Schuenke, K W; Walker, D H

    1994-01-01

    Several high-molecular-mass (above 100 kDa) antigens are recognized by sera from humans infected with spotted fever group rickettsiae and may be important stimulators of the host immune response. Molecular cloning techniques were used to make genomic Rickettsia conorii (Malish 7 strain) libraries in expression vector lambda gt11. The 120-kDa R. conorii antigen was identified by monospecific antibodies to the recombinant protein expressed on construct lambda 4-7. The entire gene DNA sequence was obtained by using this construct and two other overlapping constructs. An open reading frame of 3,068 bp with a calculated molecular mass of approximately 112 kDa was identified. Promoters and a ribosome-binding site were identified on the basis of their DNA sequence homology to other rickettsial genes and their relative positions in the sequence. The DNA coding region shares no significant homology with other spotted fever group rickettsial antigen genes (i.e., the R. rickettsii 190-, 135-, and 17-kDa antigen-encoding genes). The PCR technique was used to amplify the gene from eight species of spotted fever group rickettsiae. A 75-kDa portion of the 120-kDa antigen was overexpressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. This polypeptide was recognized by antirickettsial antibodies and may be a useful diagnostic reagent for spotted fever group rickettsioses. Images PMID:8112862

  8. The inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligonucleotides-mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, B; Fournier, R L; Relue, P A

    2000-11-20

    Gene transcription is regulated by transcription factors that can bind to specific regions on DNA. Antigene oligonucleotides (oligos) can bind to specific regions on DNA and form a triplex with the double-stranded DNA. The triplex can competitively inhibit the binding of transcription factors and, as a result, transcription can be inhibited. A genetically structured model has been developed to quantitatively describe the inhibition of the Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by triplex-forming oligos. The model predicts that the effect of triplex-forming oligos on the lac operon gene expression depends on their target sites. Oligonucleotides targeted to the operator are much more effective than those targeted to other regulatory sites on the lac operon. In some cases, the effect of oligo binding is similar to that of a mutation in the lac operon. The model provides insight as to the specific binding site to be targeted to achieve the most effective inhibition of gene expression. The model is also capable of predicting the oligo concentration needed to inhibit gene expression, which is in general agreement with results reported by other investigators.

  9. Detection of circulating tumor cells using GeneScan analysis for antigen receptor gene rearrangements in canine lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    HIYOSHI-KANEMOTO, Saaya; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; FUKUSHIMA, Kenjiro; TAKAHASHI, Masashi; KANEMOTO, Hideyuki; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; FUJINO, Yasuhito; OHNO, Koichi; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) serves as a prognostic marker and indicator of disease relapse, as well as a means of evaluating treatment efficacy in human and canine lymphoma patients. As an extension of our previous study for the construction of clinically useful GeneScan system, we utilized the GeneScan system for detecting CTCs in canine lymphoma patients. Samples from the primary lesion and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 32 dogs with lymphoma at initial diagnosis. All samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) followed by GeneScan analysis. Common clonal rearrangements with identical amplified fragments were detected in both the primary lesion and PBMCs in 19 of the 32 dogs (59.4%). However, the detection rate of CTCs varied among the anatomical classification of lymphoma studied. GeneScan analysis following PARR would facilitate studies on determining the clinical significance of CTCs in canine lymphoma patients. PMID:26888583

  10. Characterization of the Aspergillus nidulans aspnd1 gene demonstrates that the ASPND1 antigen, which it encodes, and several Aspergillus fumigatus immunodominant antigens belong to the same family.

    PubMed Central

    Calera, J A; Ovejero, M C; López-Medrano, R; Segurado, M; Puente, P; Leal, F

    1997-01-01

    For the first time, an immunodominant Aspergillus nidulans antigen (ASPND1) consistently reactive with serum samples from aspergilloma patients has been purified and characterized, and its coding gene (aspnd1) has been cloned and sequenced. ASPND1 is a glycoprotein with four N-glycosidically-bound sugar chains (around 2.1 kDa each) which are not necessary for reactivity with immune human sera. The polypeptide part is synthesized as a 277-amino-acid precursor of 30.6 kDa that after cleavage of a putative signal peptide of 16 amino acids, affords a mature protein of 261 amino acids with a molecular mass of 29 kDa and a pI of 4.24 (as deduced from the sequence). The ASPND1 protein is 53.1% identical to the AspfII allergen from Aspergillus fumigatus and 48% identical to an unpublished Candida albicans antigen. All of the cysteine residues and most of the glycosylation sites are perfectly conserved in the three proteins, suggesting a similar but yet unknown function. Analysis of the primary structure of the ASPND1 coding gene (aspnd1) has allowed the establishment of a clear relationship between several previously reported A. fumigatus and A. nidulans immunodominant antigens. PMID:9119471

  11. BGMUT: NCBI dbRBC database of allelic variations of genes encoding antigens of blood group systems.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Helmberg, Wolfgang; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2012-01-01

    Analogous to human leukocyte antigens, blood group antigens are surface markers on the erythrocyte cell membrane whose structures differ among individuals and which can be serologically identified. The Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation Database (BGMUT) is an online repository of allelic variations in genes that determine the antigens of various human blood group systems. The database is manually curated with allelic information collated from scientific literature and from direct submissions from research laboratories. Currently, the database documents sequence variations of a total of 1251 alleles of all 40 gene loci that together are known to affect antigens of 30 human blood group systems. When available, information on the geographic or ethnic prevalence of an allele is also provided. The BGMUT website also has general information on the human blood group systems and the genes responsible for them. BGMUT is a part of the dbRBC resource of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, USA, and is available online at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/gv/rbc/xslcgi.fcgi?cmd=bgmut. The database should be of use to members of the transfusion medicine community, those interested in studies of genetic variation and related topics such as human migrations, and students as well as members of the general public.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a human sperm antigen gene h-Sp-1.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ri-Ichiro; Komori, Shinji; Sakata, Kazuko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sawai, Hideaki; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki; Koyama, Koji

    2003-08-01

    We isolated and characterized a human sperm antigen gene (h-Sp-1) from human testis complementary DNA using antiserum against the human sperm membrane. Northern blot analysis detected two transcripts (2.3 and 1.1 kb) of the h-Sp-1 gene. The 2.3-kb transcript is ubiquitous, whereas the 1.1-kb transcript is specific to the human testis with a high level of expression. Determination of the base sequence of h-Sp-1 showed a size of 2170 bp and 43.4% homology with human synaptophysin. The base sequence indicates a molecule consisting of 259 amino acids, with four hydrophilic and four hydrophobic regions. In order to further characterize the h-Sp-1 molecule, we synthesized the probable region of amino acids with high antigenicity based on the amino acid sequence (amino acid nos. 174-198) and immunized rabbits to prepare an antiserum. In our experimental model of fertilization between human sperm and zona pellucida-free hamster ova, partial inhibition of fertilization was observed. We were able to synthesize a large quantity of recombinant protein by inserting the h-Sp-1 gene into a baculovirus vector and infecting spodoptera frugiperda culture cells (sf9 insect cells). The synthesized protein had a molecular weight of 30 kDa. We then immunized Balb/c mice with this protein to prepare a monoclonal antibody (G3G9), which was used to localize the h-Sp-1 molecule in sperm and tissues (e.g. testis). The h-Sp-1 molecule was present in the cell membrane from the head to tail of human sperm. Staining of the testis and epididymis also showed h-Sp-1 to be present in spermatogonia, spermatocyte, sperm and epididymal duct epithelium. These findings suggest that the h-Sp-1 molecule is expressed in sperm and testes and plays a role in fertilization.

  13. Effect of Genetic Diversity in Swine Leukocyte Antigen-DRA Gene on Piglet Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Qiaoli; Yuan, Junhu; Liu, Lixia; Sun, Wenyang; Jiang, Yingdi; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Shengwei; Huang, Wangzhou; Gun, Shuangbao

    2016-01-01

    The swine leukocyte antigens (SLAs) are the multigene families related to immune responses. Little is known about the effect of the DRA gene on diarrheal disease. This study reported the genetic diversity of the DRA gene in exons 1, 3 and 4 in 290 Chinese Yantai black pigs. No variation was identified in exon 3. In exon 1, three genotypes and two alleles were identified, generated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In exon 4, there were eight genotypes and five alleles containing seven SNPs were detected with four SNPs being novel SNPs. The low polymorphism found in swine DRA is consistent with the concept that the DRA gene is highly conserved among all mammalian species. Statistical analyses indicated that the genotypes of exon 1 were not significantly associated with piglet diarrhea (p > 0.05); however, genotypes C4C4 (1.80 ± 0.33) and A4E4 (1.66 ± 0.25) of exon 4 were significantly susceptible to diarrhea (p < 0.01). These indicate that the particular genotypes of the DRA gene are susceptible to diarrheal disease, which provides valuable information for disease-resistance breeding in swine. PMID:27429004

  14. In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface antigens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a deadly malignancy resistant to current therapies. It is critical to test new strategies, including tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. This study tested the possibility to target the transfer of a suicide gene in tumor cells using an oncotropic lentiviral vector. Results Three cell surface markers were evaluated to target the transduction of cells by lentiviruses pseudotyped with a modified glycoprotein from Sindbis virus. Only Mucin-4 and the Claudin-18 proteins were found efficient for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells models, Claudin-18 failed to achieve efficient gene transfer but Mucin-4 was found very potent. Human pancreatic tumor cells were modified to express a fluorescent protein detectable in live animals by bioimaging, to perform a direct non invasive and costless follow up of the tumor growth. Targeted gene transfer of a bicistronic transgene bearing a luciferase gene and the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene into orthotopic grafts was carried out with Mucin-4 oncotropic lentiviruses. By contrast to the broad tropism VSV-G carrying lentivirus, this oncotropic lentivirus was found to transduce specifically tumor cells, sparing normal pancreatic cells in vivo. Transduced cells disappeared after ganciclovir treatment while the orthotopic tumor growth was slowed down. Conclusion This work considered for the first time three aspect of pancreatic adenocarcinoma targeted therapy. First, lentiviral transduction of human pancreatic tumor cells was possible when cells were grafted orthotopically. Second, we used a system targeting the tumor cells with cell surface antigens and sparing the normal cells. Finally, the TK/GCV anticancer system showed promising results in vivo. Importantly, the approach presented here appeared to be a safer, much more specific and an as efficient way to perform gene delivery in pancreatic tumors

  15. Altered transcription of genes coding for class I histocompatibility antigens in murine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three murine tumors induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) which exhibited loss of some or all H-2 class I antigens at the cell surface were analyzed at the DNA and RNA level with molecular probes specific of H-2 heavy chains and beta 2-microglobulin sequences. No observable difference could be detected at the DNA level between the tumors and the parent animals. However, a decrease in H-2 mRNA was observed, especially in phenotypically H-2 negative tumor, BM5R, where H-2 transcripts were at least 30-fold less abundant. These results show that an H-2-negative character may result from a general alteration in the transcription of H-2 genes, which could reflect some kind of regulatory process. PMID:6311935

  16. Crosstalk between ABO and Forssman (FORS) blood group systems: FORS1 antigen synthesis by ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Miyako; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2017-01-01

    A and B alleles at the ABO genetic locus specify A and B glycosyltransferases that catalyze the biosynthesis of A and B oligosaccharide antigens, respectively, of blood group ABO system which is important in transfusion and transplantation medicine. GBGT1 gene encodes Forssman glycolipid synthase (FS), another glycosyltransferase that produces Forssman antigen (FORS1). Humans are considered to be Forssman antigen-negative species without functional FS. However, rare individuals exhibiting Apae phenotype carry a dominant active GBGT1 gene and express Forssman antigen on RBCs. Accordingly, FORS system was recognized as the 31st blood group system. Mouse ABO gene encodes a cis-AB transferase capable of producing both A and B antigens. This murine enzyme contains the same GlyGlyAla tripeptide sequence as FSs at the position important for the determination of sugar specificity. We, therefore, transfected the expression construct into appropriate recipient cells and examined whether mouse cis-AB transferase may also exhibit FS activity. The result was positive, confirming the crosstalk between the ABO and FORS systems. Further experiments have revealed that the introduction of this tripeptide sequence to human A transferase conferred some, although weak, FS activity, suggesting that it is also involved in the recognition/binding of acceptor substrates, in addition to donor nucleotide-sugars. PMID:28134301

  17. Characterization of an equine herpesvirus type 1 gene encoding a glycoprotein (gp13) with homology to herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C.

    PubMed

    Allen, G P; Coogle, L D

    1988-08-01

    The molecular structure of the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) gene encoding glycoprotein 13 (gp13) was analyzed. The gene is contained within a 1.8-kilobase AccI-EcoRI restriction fragment mapping at map coordinates 0.136 to 0.148 in the UL region of the EHV-1 genome and is transcribed from right to left. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the DNA fragment revealed a complete transcriptional unit composed of typical regulatory promoter elements upstream to a long open reading frame (1,404 base pairs) that encoded a 468-amino-acid primary translation product of 51 kilodaltons. The predicted protein has the characteristic features of a membrane-spanning protein: an N-terminal signal sequence, a hydrophobic membrane anchor region, a charged C-terminal cytoplasmic tail, and an exterior domain with nine potential N-glycosylation sites. The EHV-1 DNA sequences expressed in lambda gt11 as gp13 epitopes were present in the open reading frame. Amino acid sequences composing a major antigenic site, recognized by 35% of a panel of 42 anti-gp13 monoclonal antibodies, were identified in the N-terminal surface domain of the deduced gp13 molecule. Comparison of the EHV-1 gp13 DNA sequence with that encoding glycoproteins of other alphaherpesviruses revealed no detectable homology. However, a search for homology at the amino acid level showed regions of significant sequence similarity between the amino acids of the carboxy half of EHV-1 gp13 and those of the same region of gC-like glycoproteins of herpes simplex virus (gC-1 and gC-2), pseudorabies herpesvirus (gIII), and varicella-zoster virus (gp66). The sequences of the N-terminal portion of gp13, by contrast, were much less conserved. The results of these studies indicate that EHV-1 gp13 is the structural homolog of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C and further suggest that the epitope-containing N-terminal amino acid sequences of the herpesvirus gC-like glycoproteins have undergone more extensive evolutionary

  18. Gene for the major antigenic structural protein (p100) of human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Neipel, F; Ellinger, K; Fleckenstein, B

    1992-01-01

    A human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) structural protein of 100 kDa (p100) is the polypeptide most frequently and intensively reactive in immunoblotting analyses with human sera on HHV-6-infected cells or partially purified virions. The gene for p100 was identified by screening a bacteriophage lambda library with monospecific rabbit antisera. The gene codes for a polypeptide of 870 amino acids with a calculated molecular size of 97 kDa. Its amino-terminal third is weakly homologous to the immunogenic basic matrix phosphoprotein pp150 of human cytomegalovirus. Five fragments representing more than 93% of HHV-6 p100 were prokaryotically expressed. The antigenic epitopes of p100 were preliminary mapped by immunoblotting with human sera. They are located within the carboxy-terminal part which is neither homologous nor cross-reactive to pp150 of human cytomegalovirus. Availability of the gene for the immunodominant structural protein should provide tools for studies of pathogenesis by HHV-6. Images PMID:1374813

  19. Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 2 contains the gene for a noncapsular serotype 1-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, C T; Maheswaran, S K; Murtaugh, M P

    1995-01-01

    An ssa1-homologous genomic fragment cloned from Pasteurella haemolytica serotype 2 (ST2) enabled transformation of Escherichia coli DH5 alpha to a serotype 1 (ST1) phenotype through expression of the ST1-specific antigen (Ssa1). The Ssa1 protein expressed by ssa1-transformed E. coli was susceptible to heat and protease treatment and was distinct from P. haemolytica ST1-specific capsular polysaccharide. Electrophoretic analysis of in vitro-translated proteins, as well as the predicted amino acid sequence, demonstrated that Ssa1 proteins encoded from either ST1- or ST2-derived ssa1 genes were essentially identical. A comparison of the nucleotide sequences of ssa1 genes derived from P. haemolytica ST1 and ST2 revealed greater than 99% homology. Amino acid sequence homology of the predicted products of ST1- and ST2-derived ssa1 genes was greater than 98%. Northern (RNA) blot studies revealed that the presence of an increased level of ssa1 transcript in P. haemolytica ST1 grown as surface-adherent cultures on solid medium was correlated with a serologically detectable Ssa1 protein. Expression of the ssa1 transcript in ST1 was similarly upregulated by a high iron concentration in the growth medium. PMID:7890392

  20. Adoptive immunotherapy for hematological malignancies using T cells gene-modified to express tumor antigen-specific receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-12-15

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as "cellular drugs". As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs), transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  1. Anti-colorectal cancer effect of interleukin-2 and interferon-β fusion gene driven by carcinoembryonic antigen promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Mengchun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of combined interleukin-2/interferon-β-based gene therapy in colorectal cancer. Transfection of the fusion gene expression plasmid induced significant apoptosis of Lovo cells. Additionally, the fusion gene exhibited strong inhibitory activity against tumor growth and apoptosis when being injected into the nude mice implanted with human colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the tail-vein injection showed a more notable effect than direct injection into tumor. These results suggest that the combined interleukin-2/interferon-β-based gene therapy with the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter might be an effective antitumor strategy. PMID:27313471

  2. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  3. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  4. A common gene pool for the Neisseria FetA antigen.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Julia S; Thompson, Emily A L; Kriz, Paula; Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin C J

    2009-02-01

    Meningococcal FetA is an iron-regulated, immunogenic outer membrane protein and vaccine component. The most diverse region of this protein is a previously defined variable region (VR) that has been shown to be immunodominant. In this analysis, a total of 275 Neisseria lactamica isolates, collected during studies of nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage in infants, were examined for the presence of a fetA gene. The fetA VR nucleotide sequence was determined for 217 of these isolates, with fetA apparently absent from 58 isolates, the majority of which belonged to the ST-624 clonal complex. The VR in N. lactamica was compared to the same region in N. meningitidis, N. gonorrhoeae, and a number of other commensal Neisseria. Identical fetA variable region sequences were identified among commensal and pathogenic Neisseria, suggesting a common gene pool, differing from other antigens in this respect. Carriage of commensal Neisseria species, such as N. lactamica, that express FetA may be involved in the development of natural immunity to meningococcal disease.

  5. A common gene pool for the Neisseria FetA antigen

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Julia S.; Thompson, Emily A. L.; Kriz, Paula; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal FetA is an iron-regulated, immunogenic outer membrane protein and vaccine component. The most diverse region of this protein is a previously defined variable region (VR) that has been shown to be immunodominant. In this analysis, a total of 275 Neisseria lactamica isolates, collected during studies of nasopharyngeal bacterial carriage in infants were examined for the presence of a fetA gene. The fetA VR nucleotide sequence was determined for 217 of these isolates, with fetA apparently absent from 58 isolates, the majority of which belonged to the ST-624 clonal complex. The VR in N. lactamica was compared to the same region in Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and a number of other commensal Neisseria. Identical fetA variable region sequences were identified among commensal and pathogenic Neisseria, suggesting a common gene pool, differing from other antigens in this respect. Carriage of commensal Neisseria species, such as N. lactamica, that express FetA may be involved in the development of natural immunity to meningococcal disease. PMID:18718812

  6. An experimental and theoretical study of the inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, B; Fournier, R L; Relue, P A; Schisler, J

    2001-08-05

    Previously, we have developed a genetically structured mathematical model to describe the inhibition of Escherichia coli lac operon gene expression by antigene oligos. Our model predicted that antigene oligos targeted to the operator region of the lac operon would have a significant inhibitory effect on beta-galactosidase production. In this investigation, the E. coli lac operon gene expression in the presence of antigene oligos was studied experimentally. A 21-mer oligo, which was designed to form a triplex with the operator, was found to be able to specifically inhibit beta-galactosidase production in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast to the 21-mer triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO), several control oligos showed no inhibitory effect. The ineffectiveness of the various control oligos, along with the fact that the 21-mer oligo has no homology sequence with lacZYA, and no mRNA is transcribed from the operator, suggests that the 21-mer oligo inhibits target gene expression by an antigene mechanism. To simulate the kinetics of lac operon gene expression in the presence of antigene oligos, a genetically structured kinetic model, which includes transport of oligo into the cell, growth of bacteria cells, and lac operon gene expression, was developed. Predictions of the kinetic model fit the experimental data quite well after adjustment of the value of the oligonucleotide transport rate constant (9.0 x 10(-)(3) min(-)(1)) and oligo binding affinity constant (1.05 x 10(6) M(-)(1)). Our values for these two adjusted parameters are in the range of reported literature values.

  7. Role of Escherichia coli K-12 rfa genes and the rfp gene of Shigella dysenteriae 1 in generation of lipopolysaccharide core heterogeneity and attachment of O antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Klena, J D; Ashford, R S; Schnaitman, C A

    1992-01-01

    The rfp gene of Shigella dysenteriae 1 and the rfa genes of Escherichia coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 have been studied to determine their relationship to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core heterogeneity and their role in the attachment of O antigen to LPS. It has been inferred from the nucleotide sequence that the rfp gene encodes a protein of 41,864 Da which has a structure similar to that of RfaG protein. Expression of this gene in E. coli K-12 results in the loss of one of the three bands seen in gel analysis of the LPS and in the appearance of a new, more slowly migrating band. This is consistent with the hypothesis that Rfp is a sugar transferase which modifies a subset of core molecules so that they become substrates for attachment of S. dysenteriae O antigen. A shift in gel migration of the bands carrying S. dysenteriae O antigen and disappearance of the Rfp-modified band in strains producing O antigen suggest that the core may be trimmed or modified further before attachment of O antigen. Mutation of rfaL results in a loss of the rough LPS band which appears to be modified by Rfp and prevents the appearance of the Rfp-modified band. Thus, RfaL protein is involved in core modification and is more than just a component of the O-antigen ligase. The products of rfaK and rfaQ also appear to be involved in modification of the core prior to attachment of O antigen, and the sites of rfaK modification are different in E. coli K-12 and S. typhimurium. In contrast, mutations in rfaS and rfaZ result in changes in the LPS core but do not affect the attachment of O antigen. We propose that these genes are involved in an alternative pathway for the synthesis of rough LPS species which are similar to lipooligosaccharides of other species and which are not substrates for O-antigen attachment. All of these studies indicate that the apparent heterogeneity of E. coli K-12 LPS observed on gels is not an artifact but instead a reflection of functional differences among

  8. Extensive Variation in the O-Antigen Gene Cluster within One Salmonella enterica Serogroup Reveals an Unexpected Complex History

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Andrianopoulos, Kanella; Liu, Dan; Popoff, Michel Y.; Reeves, Peter R.

    2002-01-01

    The 46 serogroups of Salmonella enterica have different O-antigens, and each is thought to have a specific form of the O-antigen cluster. Comparison of the 145 serovars of serogroup B revealed much more intraserogroup genetic diversity than expected. The O27 factor, due to an α 1-6 linkage between O units in place of the more common α 1-2 linkage and previously thought to be due to a converting bacteriophage, is now shown to be due to a wzyα(1-6) gene located within the major gene cluster. Surprisingly a remnant of this gene in all O27− serovars shows that the ancestor was O27+. There are six distinct gene cluster forms, five apparently derived by a series of deletions and one by an insertion from an ancestral O27+ form present in 57 serovars. The history of the gene cluster and movement between subspecies I and II can be traced. Two of the derivative forms still have a functional wzyα(1-6) gene, while in three it has been inactivated by deletion or insertion. Two of the forms lacking a functional wzyα(1-6) gene have the wzyα(1-2) gene first described for strain LT2 as rfc, whereas for the third the wzy gene has not been located. PMID:11872718

  9. Cloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus Type-2 Encoded Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-26

    SIE cop AD nCloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus ,4. CJ Type 2 Encoded Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development 0ANNUAL...Type 2 Encoded Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha K. Padmanabhan, Ph.D. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...pVVI and pVVI7 cDNA clones, synthetic peptides homologous to NS5 and NSI regions were synthesized. These peptides are being used at Walter Reed Army

  10. Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen-4 Gene Variants in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with or without Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Javad; Khadempar, Saedeh; Hajilooi, Mehrdad; Rezaei, Hamzeh; Keshavarzi, Fatemeh; Solgi, Ghasem

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene variants are associated with several autoimmune diseases particularly type 1 diabetes. Due to the lack of consistent data for this association with type 2 diabetes (T2D), this study explored the possible influence of CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms at -1722 (T/C), -318 (C/T), and +49 (G/A) positions for susceptibility to T2D in relation with neuropathy. One hundred and eleven unrelated patients with T2D [49 patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and 62 patients without PDN] and 100 healthy ethnic- and gender-matched controls were included in this study. The dimorphisms at -1722 (C/T), -318 (C/T) and +49 (A/G) for CTLA-4 gene were determined using ARMS-PCR. The CTLA-4 (+49 G/G) and (+49 A/A) genotypes were found to be positively and negatively associated with T2D, respectively (p=0.03). The -318 C/T and T/T genotypes were more frequent in patients than controls and -318 C/C genotype was shown to be protective for T2D (p=0.003). ACT and GTT Haplotypes were less and more frequent in controls and patients, respectively (p=3.86×10-7 and p=2.29×10-5). Genotypes distribution among T2D patients with and without DPN compared to healthy controls showed significantly lower frequencies for -318 C/C and +49 A/A genotypes and significantly higher frequencies for -318 C/T and T/T genotypes as well. Our findings indicate that CTLA-4 (+49 A/G) and (-318 C/T) genotypes could be considered as genetic risk factors associated with susceptibility or protection for T2D.

  11. Structure and antigenicity analysis of the IgG gene for Nyctereutes procyonoides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Cui; Guo, Shuyuan; Pang, Xiaoru; Song, Daozhen; Fu, Shijun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Nyctereutes procyonoides immunoglobulin G (IgG) gene is partially cloned. Material and methods In order to obtain a certain length (966bp) of Nyctereutes procyonoides immunoglobulin G (IgG), two pairs of primers are designed according to the conserved nucleotide sequence of canine (GenBank:AF354265, AF354265, AF354266, AF354267) and mink (GenBank: L07789). Using Bioinformatics technology and Western-blot to analyze antigenicity of Nyctereutes procyonoides IgG-B gene. Results The homology for nucleotide sequence of IgG between Nyctereutes procyonoides and canine (IgG A, IgG B, IgG C, IgG D), mink, Homo sapiens, Oryctolagus cuniculus, Mus musculus, Anas platyrhynchos and gallus were respectively (88.1%, 93.6%, 85.4%, 87.2%), 83.7%, 74.8%, 71.8%, 69.2%, 51.6%, 48.4%. It can be seen that there was high homology of aminoacid sequence between IgG of Nyctereutes procyonoides and IgG (A, B, C, D) of canine. And the serum antibody of Nyctereutes procyonoides had obviously cross-reaction with HRP conjugated rabbit anti-dog IgG, compared with those of canine, oryctolagus cuniculus, mus musculus, mink, gallus. Conclusions We successfully got Nyctereutes procyonoides immuneglobulin G (IgG) gene (Gen- Bank: KM010191). There is the closest ties of consanguinity of IgG exist between Nyctereutes procyonoides and canine among the mammal through the genetic evolution. The detection and treament of canine distemper can be used on Nyctereutes procyonoides. PMID:26648768

  12. Association of Polymorphisms in HLA Antigen Presentation-Related Genes with the Outcomes of HCV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaomei; Xu, Yin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Rongbin; Su, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-presentation genes play a vital role in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. However, the relationship of variants of these genes with spontaneous outcomes of HCV infection has not been fully investigated. To explore novel loci in the Chinese population, 34 tagging-SNPs in 9 candidate genes were genotyped for their associations with the outcomes of HCV infection. The distributions of different genotypes and haplotypes were compared among 773 HCV-negative controls, 246 subjects with HCV natural clearance, and 218 HCV persistent carriers recruited from hemodialysis patients and intravenous drug users. Our study implicated that TAP2, HLA-DOA, HLA-DOB, and tapasin loci were novel candidate regions for susceptibility to HCV infection and viral clearance in the Chinese population. Logistic regression analyses showed that TAP2 rs1800454 A (OR = 1.48, P = 0.002) and HLA-DOB rs2071469 G (OR = 1.23, P = 0.048) were significantly associated with increased susceptibility to establishment of HCV infection. However, high-risk behavior exposure and age were stronger predictors of HCV infection. Mutation of tapasin rs9277972 T (OR = 1.57, P =0.043) increased the risk of HCV chronicity, and HLA-DOA rs3128935 C (OR = 0.62, P = 0.019) increased the chance of viral resolution. With regards to the effect of rs3128925, interactions were found with high-risk behavior (P = 0.013) and age (P = 0.035). The risk effect of rs3128925 T for persistent HCV infection was higher in injecting drug users (vs. dialysis patients) and in subjects ≥ 40 years old (vs. < 40 years old). PMID:25874709

  13. [Novel therapy for malignant lymphoma: adoptive immuno-gene therapy using chimeric antigen receptor(CAR)-expressing T lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technology is a novel approach to cancer immuno-gene therapy. CARs are hybrid proteins consisting of target-antigen-specific single-chain antibody fragment fused to intracellular T-cell activation domains (CD28 or CD137/CD3 zeta receptor). CAR-expressing engineered T lymphocytes can directly recognize and kill tumor cells in an HLA independent manner. In the United States, promising results have been obtained in the clinical trials of adoptive immuno-gene therapy using CD19-CAR-T lymphocytes for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this review article, CD19-CAR-T gene therapy for refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma is discussed.

  14. Genomic analysis of isolates from the United Kingdom 2012 pertussis outbreak reveals that vaccine antigen genes are unusually fast evolving.

    PubMed

    Sealey, Katie L; Harris, Simon R; Fry, Norman K; Hurst, Laurence D; Gorringe, Andrew R; Parkhill, Julian; Preston, Andrew

    2015-07-15

    A major outbreak of whooping cough, or pertussis, occurred in 2012 in the United Kingdom (UK), with nearly 10 000 laboratory-confirmed cases and 14 infant deaths attributed to pertussis. A worldwide resurgence of pertussis has been linked to switch to the use of acellular pertussis vaccines and the evolution of Bordetella pertussis away from vaccine-mediated immunity. We have conducted genomic analyses of multiple strains from the UK outbreak. We show that the UK outbreak was polyclonal in nature, caused by multiple distinct but closely related strains. Importantly, we demonstrate that acellular vaccine antigen-encoding genes are evolving at higher rates than other surface protein-encoding genes. This was true even prior to the introduction of pertussis vaccines but has become more pronounced since the introduction of the current acellular vaccines. The fast evolution of vaccine antigen-encoding genes has serious consequences for the ability of current vaccines to continue to control pertussis.

  15. Patterns of human genetic variation inferred from comparative analysis of allelic mutations in blood group antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Santosh Kumar; Blumenfeld, Olga O

    2011-03-01

    Comparative analysis of allelic variation of a gene sheds light on the pattern and process of its diversification at the population level. Gene families for which a large number of allelic forms have been verified by sequencing provide a useful resource for such studies. In this regard, human blood group-encoding genes are unique in that differences of cell surface traits among individuals and populations can be readily detected by serological screening, and correlation between the variant cell surface phenotype and the genotype is, in most cases, unequivocal. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of allelic forms, compiled in the Blood Group Antigen Gene Mutation database, of ABO, RHD/CE, GYPA/B/E and FUT1/2 gene families that encode the ABO, RH, MNS, and H/h blood group system antigens, respectively. These genes are excellent illustrative examples showing distinct mutational patterns among the alleles, and leading to speculation on how their origin may have been driven by recurrent but different molecular mechanisms. We illustrate how alignment of alleles of a gene may provide an additional insight into the DNA variation process and its pathways, and how this approach may serve to catalog alleles of a gene, simplifying the task and content of mutation databases.

  16. In Vitro Generation of Human NK cells Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor through Differentiation of Gene-Modified Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Emily; Truscott, Laurel C.; De Oliveira, Satiro N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary NK cells represent a very promising source for adoptive cellular approaches for cancer immunotherapy, and extensive research has been conducted, including clinical trials. Gene modification of NK cells can direct their specificity and enhance their function, but the efficiency of gene transfer techniques is very limited. Here we describe two protocols designed to generate mature human NK cells from gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells. These protocols use chimeric antigen receptor as the transgene, but could potentially be modified for the expression any particular transgene in human NK cells. PMID:27177671

  17. Analysis of the role of human leukocyte antigen class-I genes to understand the etiopathology of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bisu; Banerjee, Sikta; Bera, Nirmal K.; Nayak, Chitta R.; Chaudhuri, Tapas K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is the paradigmatic illness of psychiatry. The involvement of immunological and immunopathological mechanisms in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia has been a matter of research, with recently increasing effort. Aims: In this study, we investigated the incidence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class I antigens to understand the role of HLA genes in schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: India born schizophrenic patients in and around Siliguri who attended outpatient department (OPD) of Department of Psychiatry, North Bengal Medical College and Hospital were considered for the present study. After the longitudinal follow up, 50 patients were enrolled for the study. The same number of age, sex and ethnically matched healthy subjects were considered as control. Low resolution polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer method was applied for typing the HLA antigens. Statistics: The phenotype frequencies were calculated by direct count. χ2 test was done to compare the frequency of each antigen among the patients and control group and it was followed by Fisher's exact test. Relative risk was estimated by using Haldane's method. Results: The result showed that some of the HLA antigens are associated with the schizophrenia and significant increase were observed for HLA A*03 antigen along with the significant decrease for HLA A*25, A*31 and HLA B*51. Conclusions: The study provides the evidence for the possible existence of susceptibility locus for schizophrenia within the HLA region. This preliminary observation may help to understand the etiological basis of this disorder and the study may further strengthen the HLA antigens as the marker for schizophrenia. PMID:19742184

  18. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  19. Expressed var gene repertoire and variant surface antigen diversity in a shrinking Plasmodium falciparum population.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Bianca C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Menezes, Maria J; Cabral, Fernanda J; Bastos, Marcele F; Costa, Fabio T M; Sousa-Neto, Jayme A; Ribolla, Paulo E M; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Ferreira, Marcelo U

    2016-11-01

    The var gene-encoded erythrocyte membrane protein-1 of Plasmodium falciparum (PfEMP-1) is the main variant surface antigen (VSA) expressed on infected erythrocytes. The rate at which antibody responses to VSA expressed by circulating parasites are acquired depends on the size of the local VSA repertoire and the frequency of exposure to new VSA. Because parasites from areas with declining malaria endemicity, such as the Amazon, typically express a restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire, we hypothesized that Amazonians would rapidly acquire antibodies to most locally circulating VSA. Consistent with our expectations, the analysis of 5878 sequence tags expressed by 10 local P. falciparum samples revealed little PfEMP-1 DBL1α domain diversity. Among the most commonly expressed DBL1α types, 45% were shared by two or more independent parasite lines. Nevertheless, Amazonians displayed major gaps in their repertoire of anti-VSA antibodies, although the breadth of anti-VSA antibody responses correlated positively with their cumulative exposure to malaria. We found little antibody cross-reactivity even when testing VSA from related parasites expressing the same dominant DBL1α types. We conclude that variant-specific immunity to P. falciparum VSAs develops slowly despite the relatively restricted PfEMP-1 repertoire found in low-endemicity settings.

  20. The enterobacterial common antigen-like gene cluster of Haemophilus ducreyi contributes to virulence in humans.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Fortney, Kate R; Baker, Beth; Billings, Steven D; Katz, Barry P; Munson, Robert S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2008-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP contains a cluster of homologues of genes required for the synthesis of enterobacterial common antigen (ECA), suggesting that H. ducreyi may express a putative ECA-like glycoconjugate. WecA initiates the synthesis of ECA by transferring N-acetylglucosamine to undecaprenyl-P, to form lipid I. A wecA mutant (35000HPwecA) was constructed, and 5 volunteers were inoculated at 3 sites with fixed doses of 35000HP on one arm and at 3 sites with varying doses of 35000HPwecA on the other arm. 35000HPwecA caused pustules to form at 3 sites inoculated with a dose 2.5-fold higher than that of 35000HP. However, at sites inoculated with similar doses of 35000HP and 35000HPwecA, pustules developed at 46.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.3%-70.0%) of 15 parent-strain sites and at 8.3% (95% CI, 0.01%-23.6%) of 12 mutant-strain sites (P = .013). Thus, the expression of wecA contributes to the ability of H. ducreyi to cause pustules in humans.

  1. Mapping of the antigenic and allergenic epitopes of Lol p VB using gene fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Ong, E K; Knox, R B; Singh, M B

    1995-03-01

    The recombinant proteins of Lol p VA and Lol p VB expressed in E. coli reacted with IgE antibodies from sera of allergic patients and mAbs FMC A7 and PpV1. Cross-absorption analyses using these recombinant proteins showed that Lol p VA and Lol p VB possess both similar and unique IgE binding determinants. Gene fragmentation was utilized to localize the antigenic and allergenic determinants of Lol p VB. When full-length cDNA of Lol p VB was digested into three fragments and expressed as the fusions from the glutathione transferase of pGEX vectors, fragments Met1-Val196 and Asp197-Val339 bound IgE while fragment Met1-Pro96 did not. The data suggest that there are at least two IgE binding determinants in Lol p VB. In addition, only fragment Met1-Val196 reacted with mAb PpV1. The localization of these determinants was further resolved using random fragment expression libraries. The mAb PpV1 determinant was near the N-terminal region of Lol p VB molecule. The IgE binding determinants were distributed in the central region: region I (amino acids 111-195) and II (199-254). These IgE binding determinants are conserved in Lol p VA.

  2. The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host–parasite interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Otto, Thomas D.; Darby, Alistair; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Xia, Dong; Echaide, Ignacio Eduardo; Farber, Marisa; Gahlot, Sunayna; Gamble, John; Gupta, Dinesh; Gupta, Yask; Jackson, Louise; Malandrin, Laurence; Malas, Tareq B.; Moussa, Ehab; Nair, Mridul; Reid, Adam J.; Sanders, Mandy; Sharma, Jyotsna; Tracey, Alan; Quail, Mike A.; Weir, William; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Hall, Neil; Willadsen, Peter; Lingelbach, Klaus; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Berriman, Matt; Allred, David R.; Pain, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5′ ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct. PMID:24799432

  3. Role of the rfe gene in the synthesis of the O8 antigen in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Rick, P D; Hubbard, G L; Barr, K

    1994-01-01

    The Escherichia coli O8 antigen is a mannan composed of the trisaccharide repeat unit -->3)-alpha-Man-(1-->2)-alpha-Man-(1-->2)-alpha-Man-(1--> (K. Reske and K. Jann, Eur. J. Biochem. 67:53-56, 1972), and synthesis of the O8 antigen is rfe dependent (G. Schmidt, H. Mayer, and P. H. Mäkelä, J. Bacteriol. 127:755-762, 1976). The rfe gene has recently been identified as encoding a tunicamycin-sensitive UDP-GlcNAc:undecaprenylphosphate GlcNAc-1-phosphate transferase (U. Meier-Dieter, K. Barr, R. Starman, L. Hatch, and P. D. Rick, J. Biol. Chem. 267:746-753, 1992). However, the role of rfe in O8 side chain synthesis is not understood. Thus, the role of the rfe gene in the synthesis of the O8 antigen was investigated in an rfbO8+ (rfb genes encoding O8 antigen) derivative of E. coli K-12 mutant possessing a defective phosphoglucose isomerase (pgi). The in vivo synthesis of O8 side chains was inhibited by the antibiotic tunicamycin. In addition, putative lipid carrier-linked O8 side chains accumulated in vivo when lipopolysaccharide outer core synthesis was precluded by growing cells in the absence of exogenously supplied glucose. The lipid carrier-linked O8 antigen was extracted from cells and treated with mild acid in order to release free O8 side chains. The water-soluble O8 side chains were then purified by affinity chromatography using Sepharose-bound concanavalin A. Characterization of the affinity-purified O8 side chains revealed the occurrence of glucosamine in the reducing terminal position of the polysaccharide chains. The data presented suggest that GlcNAc-pyrophosphorylundecaprenol functions as the acceptor of mannose residues for the in vivo synthesis of O8 side chains in E. coli K-12. Images PMID:7514591

  4. Transcript origin analysis identifies antigen-presenting cells as primary targets of socially regulated gene expression in leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Hawkley, Louise C.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Cacioppo, John T.

    2011-01-01

    To clarify the biological rationale for social regulation of gene expression, this study sought to identify the specific immune cell types that are transcriptionally sensitive to subjective social isolation (loneliness). Using reference distributions for the expression of each human gene in each major leukocyte subtype, we mapped the cellular origin of transcripts found to be differentially expressed in the circulating immune cells from chronically lonely individuals. Loneliness-associated genes derived primarily from plasmacytoid dendritic cells, monocytes, and, to a lesser extent, B lymphocytes. Those dynamics reflected per-cell changes in the expression of inducible genes and related more strongly to the subjective experience of loneliness than to objective social network size. Evolutionarily ancient myeloid antigen-presenting cells appear to have evolved a transcriptional sensitivity to socioenvironmental conditions that may allow them to shift basal gene expression profiles to counter the changing microbial threats associated with hostile vs. affine social conditions. PMID:21300872

  5. Inhibition of antigen-specific T lymphocyte activation by structurally related Ir gene-controlled polymers. II. Competitive inhibition of I-E- restricted, antigen-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Our previous studies have defined a highly specific competitive inhibition between a pair of structurally related antigens (GT and GAT) for antigen presentation by accessory cells. The present report investigates this phenomenon in a second antigenic system, which is controlled by a distinct Ir gene product. Two GL phi-specific, I-Ed- restricted, interleukin 2-producing T cell hybridomas were constructed. The antigenic fine specificity of these two hybrid clones was distinct. One hybrid reacted solely with GL phi while the second cross-reacted with GLleu and GLT. These latter two copolymers, as well as the antigen GL, were found to inhibit the GL phi response of the non-cross-reactive hybrid. The structurally related antigen G phi was not inhibitory for this clone's response. The cross-reactive GL phi hybrid could also be inhibited, but, in this case, G phi and not GL caused the inhibition. Reciprocal inhibitions could be demonstrated between these and other hybrids (e.g., GAT responsive), indicating a very high degree of specificity to the inhibition. The inhibition caused by the various copolymers was reversible by increasing the concentration of GL phi, This effect was localized to the antigen-presenting cell and not the T cell hybridoma. Functionally, this competition did not appear to be for antigen uptake or general antigen processing. These findings generalize the phenomenon of antigen competition to a second antigen system in the context of a second Ia molecule. The possible mechanisms accounting for the complex pattern of specificities in this system are discussed. PMID:6210339

  6. IgE-associated IGHV genes from venom and peanut allergic individuals lack mutational evidence of antigen selection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Jackson, Katherine J L; Davies, Janet; Chen, Zhiliang; Gaeta, Bruno A; Rimmer, Janet; Sewell, William A; Collins, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Antigen selection of B cells within the germinal center reaction generally leads to the accumulation of replacement mutations in the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin genes. Studies of mutations in IgE-associated VDJ gene sequences have cast doubt on the role of antigen selection in the evolution of the human IgE response, and it may be that selection for high affinity antibodies is a feature of some but not all allergic diseases. The severity of IgE-mediated anaphylaxis is such that it could result from higher affinity IgE antibodies. We therefore investigated IGHV mutations in IgE-associated sequences derived from ten individuals with a history of anaphylactic reactions to bee or wasp venom or peanut allergens. IgG sequences, which more certainly experience antigen selection, served as a control dataset. A total of 6025 unique IgE and 5396 unique IgG sequences were generated using high throughput 454 pyrosequencing. The proportion of replacement mutations seen in the CDRs of the IgG dataset was significantly higher than that of the IgE dataset, and the IgE sequences showed little evidence of antigen selection. To exclude the possibility that 454 errors had compromised analysis, rigorous filtering of the datasets led to datasets of 90 core IgE sequences and 411 IgG sequences. These sequences were present as both forward and reverse reads, and so were most unlikely to include sequencing errors. The filtered datasets confirmed that antigen selection plays a greater role in the evolution of IgG sequences than of IgE sequences derived from the study participants.

  7. Molecular Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the Sta58 Major Antigen Gene of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi: Sequence homology and Antigenic Comparison of Sta58 to the 60-Kilodalton Family of Stress Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    on the cell envelopes of Rickettsia 29. Messing, J. 1983. New M13 vectors for cloning. Methods prowazekii, Rickettsia rickettsii , and Rickettsia ...gene of Rickettsia tsu sugamushi:Sequence homology and antigenic comparison to the 60-kilodalton family of stresproteins. 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S...IuwRnuiy dy "jmber FIELD GROUP S ROUP Rickettsia tsutsugamushi, antigens, molecular cloning,. FIED_ GROU__ SUB-GROUP scrub typhus, heat-shock proteins

  8. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the Sta58 major antigen gene of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi: sequence homology and antigenic comparison of Sta58 to the 60-kilodalton family of stress proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, C K; Marana, D P; Dasch, G A; Oaks, E V

    1990-01-01

    The scrub typhus 58-kilodalton (kDa) antigen (Sta58) of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi is a major protein antigen often recognized by humans infected with scrub typhus rickettsiae. A 2.9-kilobase HindIII fragment containing a complete sta58 gene was cloned in Escherichia coli and found to express the entire Sta58 antigen and a smaller protein with an apparent molecular mass of 11 kDa (Stp11). DNA sequence analysis of the 2.9-kilobase HindIII fragment revealed two adjacent open reading frames encoding proteins of 11 (Stp11) and 60 (Sta58) kDa. Comparisons of deduced amino acid sequences disclosed a high degree of homology between the R. tsutsugamushi proteins Stp11 and Sta58 and the E. coli proteins GroES and GroEL, respectively, and the family of primordial heat shock proteins designated Hsp10 Hsp60. Although the sequence homology between the Sta58 antigen and the Hsp60 protein family is striking, the Sta58 protein appeared to be antigenically distinct among a sample of other bacterial Hsp60 homologs, including the typhus group of rickettsiae. The antigenic uniqueness of the Sta58 antigen indicates that this protein may be a potentially protective antigen and a useful diagnostic reagent for scrub typhus fever. Images PMID:2108930

  9. Transcriptionally targeted in vivo gene therapy for carcinoembrionic antigen-producing adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Konishi, F; Maeda, H; Yamanishi, Y; Hiyama, K; Ishioka, S; Yamakido, M

    1999-09-01

    Inoperable adenocarcinoma in colon or lung shows resistance to conventional anti-cancer therapy. For these cancers, the feasibility of transcriptionally targeted killing of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. Adenovirus vectors carrying a CEA promoter to express E. coli lacZ (AdCEALacZ) or herpes simplex thymidine kinase (AdCEATK) were made and their in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal effects on CEA-producing or non-producing colon and lung cancer cells were evaluated. In vitro infection with AdCEALacZ showed significantly higher CEA promoter-driven lacZ expression in CEA-producing adenocarcinoma cells including VMRC-LCD and LoVo than in CEA-non-producing cells. AdCEATK-infected LoVo showed higher sensitivity to ganciclovir than control vector-infected LoVo or AdCEATK-infected HeLa both in vitro and in subcutaneously implanted tumors of nude mice. Moreover, total tumor elimination in vivo was achieved by either pre-infection of as few as 30% of cells comprising tumors or by direct in vivo injection of AdCEATK to pre-established LoVo tumors. In addition, CEA promoter-driven lacZ expression in LoVo cells was enhanced by the addition of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in vitro. These results provide a rationale for CEA-promoter-driven, adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for CEA-producing adenocarcinomas in colon and lung with reduced toxicity to normal cells.

  10. Polymorphisms in prostate stem cell antigen gene rs2294008 increase gastric cancer risk in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhirong; Wu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Fanggen; Yu, Jun; Xue, Ling; Hao, Yuantao; Wang, Yiming; Chen, Minhu; Sung, Joseph J Y; Hu, Pinjin

    2011-05-01

    A recent genome-wide study identified a strong association between polymorphisms in the prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene and the risk of diffuse-type of gastric cancer in Japanese and Korean population. In this case-control study, we aimed to investigate the possible association between PSCA rs2294008 C/T with clinicopathological features and the prognosis of gastric cancer in a Southern Chinese population. Genotypes of 460 gastric cancer patients and 549 controls were determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing. We found that individuals with at least one copy of the rs2294008T allele (CT or TT genotype) had an increased risk for gastric cancer compared with CC genotype (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.10-1.82, P = 0.006). Further stratification analyses indicated that the effect of PSCA rs2294008T carriers was noteworthy in intestinal type (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.18-2.04, P = 0.002), poorly differentiated (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.19-2.13, P = 0.002), noncardia (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.17-2.04, P = 0.002) subtypes of gastric cancer. Cox proportional hazards analyses demonstrated that TT genotype (HR = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.22-3.69, P = 0.008) as well as TNM staging were prognostic factors of gastric cancer patients. In conclusion, The T allele of PSCA rs2294008 is associated with increased risk of gastric cancer, especially intestinal type, poorly differentiated, early onset, and noncardia gastric cancer in Chinese population. TNM staging and TT genotype might be involved in the prognosis of gastric cancer patients.

  11. Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived from the Envelope Glycoprotein Gene Sequence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-27

    AD________ AD-A230 976 ARMY PROJECT NO: 89PP9961 TITLE: ANALYSIS OF DENGUE VIRUS ENHANCING EPITOPES USING PEPTIDE ANTIGENS DERIVED FROM THE ENVELOPE...INO. INO r CCESSION NO I1I TITLE (Include Security Classification) Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived From the...necessary and identify by block number) Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) ot dengue (DEN) virus infection in human mononuclear cells in vitro has been

  12. Immunogenicity of recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strains carrying a gene that encodes Eimeria tenella antigen SO7.

    PubMed

    Konjufca, Vjollca; Jenkins, Mark; Wang, Shifeng; Juarez-Rodriguez, Maria Dolores; Curtiss, Roy

    2008-12-01

    Recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccines against avian coccidiosis were developed to deliver Eimeria species antigens to the lymphoid tissues of chickens via the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) and the type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of Salmonella. For antigen delivery via the T3SS, the Eimeria tenella gene encoding sporozoite antigen SO7 was cloned downstream of the translocation domain of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium sopE gene in the parental pYA3868 and pYA3870 vectors to generate pYA4156 and pYA4157. Newly constructed T3SS vectors were introduced into host strain chi8879 (Delta phoP233 Delta sptP1033::xylE Delta asdA16), an attenuated derivative of the highly virulent UK-1 strain. The SopE-SO7 fusion protein was secreted by the T3SS of Salmonella. The vector pYA4184 was constructed for delivery of the SO7 antigen via the T2SS. The SO7 protein was toxic to Salmonella when larger amounts were synthesized; thus, the synthesis of this protein was placed under the control of the lacI repressor gene, whose expression in turn was dependent on the amount of available arabinose in the medium. The pYA4184 vector was introduced into host strain chi9242 (Delta phoP233 Delta asdA16 Delta araBAD23 Delta relA198::araC P(BAD) lacI TT [TT is the T4ipIII transcription terminator]). In addition to SO7, for immunization and challenge studies we used the EAMZ250 antigen of Eimeria acervulina, which was previously shown to confer partial protection against E. acervulina challenge when it was delivered via the T3SS. Immunization of chickens with a combination of the SO7 and EAMZ250 antigens delivered via the T3SS induced superior protection against challenge by E. acervulina. In contrast, chickens immunized with SO7 that was delivered via the T2SS of Salmonella were better protected from challenge by E. tenella.

  13. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells.

  14. The Escherichia coli Serogroup O1 and O2 Lipopolysaccharides Are Encoded by Multiple O-antigen Gene Clusters.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Fleiss, Aubin; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Fach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to serogroups O1 and O2 are frequently associated with human infections, especially extra-intestinal infections such as bloodstream infections or urinary tract infections. These strains can be associated with a large array of flagellar antigens. Because of their frequency and clinical importance, a reliable detection of E. coli O1 and O2 strains and also the frequently associated K1 capsule is important for diagnosis and source attribution of E. coli infections in humans and animals. By sequencing the O-antigen clusters of various O1 and O2 strains we showed that the serogroups O1 and O2 are encoded by different sets of O-antigen encoding genes and identified potentially new O-groups. We developed qPCR-assays to detect the various O1 and O2 variants and the K1-encoding gene. These qPCR assays proved to be 100% sensitive and 100% specific and could be valuable tools for the investigations of zoonotic and food-borne infection of humans with O1 and O2 extra-intestinal (ExPEC) or Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains.

  15. The Escherichia coli Serogroup O1 and O2 Lipopolysaccharides Are Encoded by Multiple O-antigen Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Fleiss, Aubin; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Fach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to serogroups O1 and O2 are frequently associated with human infections, especially extra-intestinal infections such as bloodstream infections or urinary tract infections. These strains can be associated with a large array of flagellar antigens. Because of their frequency and clinical importance, a reliable detection of E. coli O1 and O2 strains and also the frequently associated K1 capsule is important for diagnosis and source attribution of E. coli infections in humans and animals. By sequencing the O-antigen clusters of various O1 and O2 strains we showed that the serogroups O1 and O2 are encoded by different sets of O-antigen encoding genes and identified potentially new O-groups. We developed qPCR-assays to detect the various O1 and O2 variants and the K1-encoding gene. These qPCR assays proved to be 100% sensitive and 100% specific and could be valuable tools for the investigations of zoonotic and food-borne infection of humans with O1 and O2 extra-intestinal (ExPEC) or Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains. PMID:28224115

  16. T-cell receptor gene therapy targeting melanoma-associated antigen-A4 inhibits human tumor growth in non-obese diabetic/SCID/γcnull mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yukari; Wang, Linan; Imai, Naoko; Amaike, Chisaki; Sato, Eiichi; Ito, Mamoru; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with lymphocytes that have been genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We have been exploring the development of TCR gene therapy targeting cancer/testis antigens, including melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family antigens, that are ideal targets for adoptive T-cell therapy. The efficacy of TCR gene therapy targeting MAGE family antigens, however, has not yet been evaluated in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo antitumor activity in immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/SCID/γc(null) (NOG) mice of human lymphocytes genetically engineered to express TCR specific for the MAGE-A4 antigen. Polyclonal T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were transduced with the αβ TCR genes specific for MAGE-A4, then adoptively transferred into NOG mice inoculated with MAGE-A4 expressing human tumor cell lines. The transferred T cells maintained their effector function in vivo, infiltrated into tumors, and inhibited tumor growth in an antigen-specific manner. The combination of adoptive cell therapy with antigen peptide vaccination enhanced antitumor activity, with improved multifunctionality of the transferred cells. These data suggest that TCR gene therapy with MAGE-A4-specific TCR is a promising strategy to treat patients with MAGE-A4-expressing tumors; in addition, the acquisition of multifunctionality in vivo is an important factor to predict the quality of the T-cell response during adoptive therapy with human lymphocytes.

  17. Tandem insertion sequence-like elements define the expression site for variable antigen genes of Borrelia hermsii.

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, A G; Carter, C J; Burman, N; Freitag, C S; Garon, C F; Bergström, S

    1991-01-01

    The spirochete Borrelia hermsii avoids the immune response of its mammalian host through multiphasic antigenic variation. Serotype specificity is determined by variable antigens, Vmp proteins, in the outer membrane. Through nonreciprocal recombination between linear plasmids, a formerly silent vmp gene replaces another vmp gene downstream from a common expression site. To further characterize this activating site, we determined the nucleotide sequence of 6.9 kb of the common upstream expression region of strain HS1 of B. hermsii. Preceding the vmp gene promoter and a poly(dT.dA) run were three imperfectly repeated segments of 2 kb. Each of the 2-kb segments contained 1-kb elements with inverted repeats of approximately 0.2 kb each at their termini. The potential of the 1-kb elements to form stem-and-loop structures was demonstrated by heteroduplex analysis. There was no evidence of the presence of the elements elsewhere in the genome of B. hermsii. One or more of these elements may confer the unidirectionality that characterizes vmp gene switches. Images PMID:1987053

  18. Gene therapy with human and mouse T-cell receptors mediates cancer regression and targets normal tissues expressing cognate antigen

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura A.; Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.; Cassard, Lydie; Yang, James C.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Kammula, Udai S.; Royal, Richard E.; Sherry, Richard M.; Wunderlich, John R.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Schwarz, Susan L.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Bishop, Rachel J.; Kim, Hung; Brewer, Carmen C.; Rudy, Susan F.; VanWaes, Carter; Davis, Jeremy L.; Mathur, Aarti; Ripley, Robert T.; Nathan, Debbie A.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy of human cancer using genetically engineered lymphocytes is dependent on the identification of highly reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) with antitumor activity. We immunized transgenic mice and also conducted high-throughput screening of human lymphocytes to generate TCRs highly reactive to melanoma/melanocyte antigens. Genes encoding these TCRs were engineered into retroviral vectors and used to transduce autologous peripheral lymphocytes administered to 36 patients with metastatic melanoma. Transduced patient lymphocytes were CD45RA− and CD45RO+ after ex vivo expansion. After infusion, the persisting cells displayed a CD45RA+ and CD45RO− phenotype. Gene-engineered cells persisted at high levels in the blood of all patients 1 month after treatment, responding patients with higher ex vivo antitumor reactivity than nonresponders. Objective cancer regressions were seen in 30% and 19% of patients who received the human or mouse TCR, respectively. However, patients exhibited destruction of normal melanocytes in the skin, eye, and ear, and sometimes required local steroid administration to treat uveitis and hearing loss. Thus, T cells expressing highly reactive TCRs mediate cancer regression in humans and target rare cognate–antigen-containing cells throughout the body, a finding with important implications for the gene therapy of cancer. This trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as NCI-07-C-0174 and NCI-07-C-0175. PMID:19451549

  19. Analysis of gene selection in reassortant formation between canine rotavirus K9 and human rotaviruses with different antigenic specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, N; Taniguchi, K; Urasawa, T; Urasawa, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of antigenic mosaic reassortants which have neutralization proteins VP4 and VP7 derived from different parental strains were analysed in order to study gene selection in reassortant formation between animal and human rotaviruses (HRV). These reassortants were isolated from mixed infection of MA-104 cells with canine rotavirus strain K9 (subgroup I and G serotype 3) and HRV strains (with subgroup I or II antigen and G serotype 1-4, 9 or 12 antigen), through repeated selections with anti-VP4 and anti-VP7 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed specifically at HRV and K9, respectively. By serological and genomic analyses, all the isolated clones were found to be antigenic mosaic reassortants possessing VP4 of K9 and VP7 of HRV. In the reassortants between strain K9 and one of the six strains of subgroup II HRV, a single or a few genotypes with particular constellations of RNA segments were predominant, with only a few RNA segments including gene 4 (encoding VP4) being derived from K9. In contrast, in the reassortants between strain K9 and any one of the subgroup I HRV, more than nine different genotypes were identified and various RNA segments, except for segments 8 and 10, were derived from K9. These findings indicated that the RNA segments of K9 might be reassorted more readily with those of subgroup I HRV than with those of subgroup II HRV, suggesting the possible existence of functional mechanisms which determine the extent of diversity of genome selection depending on the pairs of parent strains in the reassortant formation.

  20. fra-1: a serum-inducible, cellular immediate-early gene that encodes a fos-related antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, D R; Curran, T

    1988-01-01

    A set of proteins antigenically related to the c-fos protein (Fos) are induced by serum in fibroblasts. To isolate cDNA clones of genes encoding such proteins, a lambda gt11 expression cDNA library constructed from serum-stimulated rat fibroblasts was screened with antibodies raised against a hydrophilic region (amino acids 127 to 152) of Fos. One of the positive clones identified, termed fra-1 (Fos-related antigen) was characterized. It encoded a protein that shared several regions of extensive amino acid homology with Fos (including the region that showed similarity to both the yeast GCN4 regulatory protein and the protein encoded by the jun oncogene), although its nucleotide sequence was considerably diverged from that of the c-fos gene. Only a subset of the agents and conditions that activated c-fos also induced fra-1. Induction of fra-1 expression following serum stimulation was delayed compared with that of c-fos. However, like c-fos, fra-1 was induced rapidly by serum in the presence of protein synthesis inhibitors. Thus, a family of Fos-related, inducible genes are involved in the cellular immediate-early transcriptional response to extracellular stimuli. Images PMID:3133553

  1. T-cell tolerance toward a transgenic beta-cell antigen and transcription of endogenous pancreatic genes in thymus.

    PubMed Central

    Jolicoeur, C; Hanahan, D; Smith, K M

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing T antigen (Tag) in pancreatic beta cells establish systemic tolerance toward this self-protein. The self-tolerance in two families of rat insulin promoter (RIP)-Tag mice, expressing different levels of Tag protein, has been characterized. These mice have impaired antibody responses to Tag, show diminished Tag-specific T-cell proliferation, and evidence an inability to generate Tag-specific cytotoxic T cells. The existence of systemic tolerance toward a beta-cell-specific protein motivated examination of transgene expression in the thymus. Indeed, low levels of Tag mRNA were detected intrathymically. Remarkably, this expression is a valid property of the insulin gene regulatory region, since insulin RNA was also expressed in the thymus of nontransgenic mice. RNA for other pancreatic genes was also detected in the thymus, thus raising the possibility that many tissue-specific genes could be expressed intrathymically during immunological development and induction of self-tolerance. These results raise important questions for future research into the role of the thymus in tolerance induction toward so-called tissue-specific antigens. Images PMID:8022837

  2. Prostate stem cell antigen gene TT genotype and development of intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Uotani, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Aim Gastric cancer is etiologically related to interactions between Helicobacter pylori infection, environmental, and host factors. Gastric carcinoma is associated with a cascade of increasing atrophic gastric mucosal damage. Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms have been associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Here, we examined the interaction between prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms and H. pylori in the progression of H. pylori gastritis. Methods Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms (TT, TC and CC) among H. pylori infected and uninfected Bhutanese were compared with the severity of H. pylori gastritis (neutrophils, monocytes, atrophy scores, H. pylori density, and the presence and extent of intestinal metaplasia) using the updated Sydney system. Results Biopsies from 339 patients were included. The proportion of biopsies with intestinal metaplasia was also significantly (P<0.05) greater among those with the TT genotype than with either the CT or CC genotype. Despite no significant differences in inflammation or H. pylori density scores, the scores for the premalignant condition, intestinal metaplasia in both the gastric corpus and antrum, among H. pylori infected with the TT genotype was significantly (P <0.05) greater than C allele carriers. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen TT genotype was associated with more than a 3-fold increase in the prevalence and extent of gastric mucosal intestinal metaplasia compared to C allele carriers among H. pylori infected Bhutanese. PMID:26706772

  3. Structure and gene cluster of the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O156 containing a pyruvic acid acetal.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhifeng; Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Guo, Xi; Perepelov, Andrei V; Shashkov, Alexander S; Liu, Bin; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-07-22

    The lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O156 was degraded under mild acidic and alkaline conditions and the resulting polysaccharides were studied by sugar analysis and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the pentasaccharide repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: where Rpyr indicates R-configurated pyruvic acid acetal. Minor O-acetyl groups also were present and tentatively localized on the Gal residues. The gene cluster for biosynthesis of the O-antigen of E. coli O156 was analyzed and shown to be consistent with the O-polysaccharide structure.

  4. [Effective agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) using vector with gene of tuberculosis antigene ESAT6].

    PubMed

    Matveeva, N A; Vasilenko, M Iu; Shakhovskiĭ, A M; Bannikova, M A; Kvasko, O Iu; Kuchuk, N V

    2011-01-01

    The conditions of high efficient chicory transformation with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigene ESAT6 have been determined. Transformation frequency was up to 86% when the cotyledons were cultivated within 3 days without cefotaxime and then 1 day without kanamycine. DNA PCR-analysis has shown the presence both of selective nptII and target esxA genes in all analysed plants. At the same time RT-PCR has shown the presence of nptII transcripts for eight analysed lines and esxA transcripts for only five analysed lines.

  5. Analysis of Dengue Virus Enhancing Epitopes Using Peptide Antigens Derived From the Envelope Glycoprotein Gene Sequence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-29

    AD-A261 707 AD____ ARMY PROJECT ORDER NO: 89PP9961 TITLE: ANALYSIS OF DENGUE VIRUS ENHANCING EPITOPES USING PEPTIDE ANTIGENS DERIVED FROM THE...DATES COVERED 29 Nov 91 Final Report (9/1/89 - 11/30/91) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ana ysis or Dengue Vnrus nancing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Epitopes Using...biological events leading to the development of severe disease manifestations of dengue infections ( dengue hemorrhagic fever/ dengue shock syndrome

  6. Isotypic and allotypic variation of human class II histocompatibility antigen alpha-chain genes.

    PubMed

    Auffray, C; Lillie, J W; Arnot, D; Grossberger, D; Kappes, D; Strominger, J L

    DNA sequences of four human class II histocompatibility antigen alpha chain DNA sequences (derived from cDNA and genomic clones representing DC1 alpha, DC4 alpha, DX alpha and SB alpha) are presented and compared to DR alpha and to mouse I-A alpha and I-E alpha sequences. These data suggest possible mechanisms for the generation of polymorphism and the evolution of the DR, DC and SB families.

  7. The human application of gene therapy to re-program T-cell specificity using chimeric antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Alan D; Moyes, Judy S; Cooper, Laurence JN

    2014-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising approach to treat cancers. Primary human T cells can be modified using viral and non-viral vectors to promote the specific targeting of cancer cells via the introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). This gene transfer displays the potential to increase the specificity and potency of the anticancer response while decreasing the systemic adverse effects that arise from conventional treatments that target both cancerous and healthy cells. This review highlights the generation of clinical-grade T cells expressing CARs for immunotherapy, the use of these cells to target B-cell malignancies and, particularly, the first clinical trials deploying the Sleeping Beauty gene transfer system, which engineers T cells to target CD19+ leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:25189715

  8. Identification of the Drosophila core 1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase gene that synthesizes T antigen in the embryonic central nervous system and hemocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideki; Fuwa, Takashi J; Arima, Mikiko; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Norihiko; Ichimiya, Tomomi; Osawa, Ken-Ichi; Ueda, Ryu; Nishihara, Shoko

    2008-12-01

    T antigen (Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr), the well-known tumor-associated antigen, is a core 1 mucin-type O-glycan structure that is synthesized by core 1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1beta3GalT), which transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to Tn antigen (GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr). Three putative C1beta3GalTs have been identified in Drosophila. However, although all three are expressed in embryos, their roles during embryogenesis have not yet been clarified. In this study, we used P-element inserted mutants to show that CG9520, one of the three putative C1beta3GalTs, synthesizes T antigen expressed on the central nervous system (CNS) during embryogenesis. We also found that T antigen was expressed on a subset of the embryonic hemocytes. CG9520 mutant embryos showed the loss of T antigens on the CNS and on a subset of hemocytes. Then, the loss of T antigens was rescued by precise excision of the P-element inserted into the CG9520 gene. Our data demonstrate that T antigens expressed on the CNS and on a subset of hemocytes are synthesized by CG9520 in the Drosophila embryo. In addition, we found that the number of circulating hemocytes was reduced in third instar larvae of CG9520 mutant. We, therefore, named the CG9520 gene Drosophila core 1 beta1,3-galactosyltransferase 1 because it is responsible for the synthesis and function of T antigen in vivo.

  9. The SPANX gene family of cancer/testis-specific antigens: rapid evolution and amplification in African great apes and hominids.

    PubMed

    Kouprina, Natalay; Mullokandov, Michael; Rogozin, Igor B; Collins, N Keith; Solomon, Greg; Otstot, John; Risinger, John I; Koonin, Eugene V; Barrett, J Carl; Larionov, Vladimir

    2004-03-02

    Human sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome (SPANX) genes comprise a gene family with five known members (SPANX-A1, -A2, -B, -C, and -D), encoding cancer/testis-specific antigens that are potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. These highly similar paralogous genes cluster on the X chromosome at Xq27. We isolated and sequenced primate genomic clones homologous to human SPANX. Analysis of these clones and search of the human genome sequence revealed an uncharacterized group of genes, SPANX-N, which are present in all primates as well as in mouse and rat. In humans, four SPANX-N genes comprise a series of tandem duplicates at Xq27; a fifth member of this subfamily is located at Xp11. Similarly to SPANX-A/D, human SPANX-N genes are expressed in normal testis and some melanoma cell lines; testis-specific expression of SPANX is also conserved in mouse. Analysis of the taxonomic distribution of the long and short forms of the intron indicates that SPANX-N is the ancestral form, from which the SPANX-A/D subfamily evolved in the common ancestor of the hominoid lineage. Strikingly, the coding sequences of the SPANX genes evolved much faster than the intron and the 5' untranslated region. There is a strong correlation between the rates of evolution of synonymous and nonsynonymous codon positions, both of which are accelerated 2-fold or more compared to the noncoding sequences. Thus, evolution of the SPANX family appears to have involved positive selection that affected not only the protein sequence but also the synonymous sites in the coding sequence.

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence of a gene encoding a functional human class I histocompatibility antigen (HLA-CW3).

    PubMed Central

    Sodoyer, R; Damotte, M; Delovitch, T L; Trucy, J; Jordan, B R; Strachan, T

    1984-01-01

    The HLA-CW3 gene contained in a cosmid clone identified by transfection expression experiments has been completely sequenced. This provides, for the first time, data on the structure of HLA-C locus products and constitutes, together with that of the gene coding for HLA-A3, the first complete nucleotide sequences of genes coding for serologically defined class I HLA molecules. In contrast to the organisation of the two class I HLA pseudogenes whose sequences have previously been determined, the sequence of the HLA-CW3 gene reveals an additional cytoplasmic encoding domain, making the organisation of this gene very similar to that of known H-2 class I genes and also the HLA-A3 gene. The deduced amino acid sequences of HLA-CW3 and HLA-A3 now allow a systematic comparison of such sequences of HLA class I molecules from the three classical transplantation antigen loci A, B, C. The compared sequences include the previously determined partial amino acid sequences of HLA-B7, HLA-B40, HLA-A2 and HLA-A28. The comparisons confirm the extreme polymorphism of HLA classical class I molecules, and permit a study of the level of diversity and the location of sequence differences. The distribution of differences is not uniform, most of them being located in the first and second extracellular domains, the third extracellular domain is extremely conserved, and the cytoplasmic domain is also a variable region. Although it is difficult to determine locus-specific regions, we have identified several candidate positions which may be C locus-specific. PMID:6609813

  11. Construction and application of a Korean reference panel for imputing classical alleles and amino acids of human leukocyte antigen genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus are strongly associated with disease susceptibility and prognosis for many diseases, including many autoimmune diseases. In this study, we developed a Korean HLA reference panel for imputing classical alleles and amino acid residues of several HLA genes. An HLA reference panel has potential for use in identifying and fine-mapping disease associations with the MHC locus in East Asian populations, including Koreans. A total of 413 unrelated Korean subjects were analyzed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at the MHC locus and six HLA genes, including HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DPB1, and -DQB1. The HLA reference panel was constructed by phasing the 5,858 MHC SNPs, 233 classical HLA alleles, and 1,387 amino acid residue markers from 1,025 amino acid positions as binary variables. The imputation accuracy of the HLA reference panel was assessed by measuring concordance rates between imputed and genotyped alleles of the HLA genes from a subset of the study subjects and East Asian HapMap individuals. Average concordance rates were 95.6% and 91.1% at 2-digit and 4-digit allele resolutions, respectively. The imputation accuracy was minimally affected by SNP density of a test dataset for imputation. In conclusion, the Korean HLA reference panel we developed was highly suitable for imputing HLA alleles and amino acids from MHC SNPs in East Asians, including Koreans.

  12. Regression of melanoma metastases after immunotherapy is associated with activation of antigen presentation and interferon-mediated rejection genes

    PubMed Central

    Carretero, Rafael; Wang, Ena; Rodriguez, Ana I.; Reinboth, Jennifer; Ascierto, Maria L.; Engle, Alyson M.; Liu, Hui; Camacho, Francisco M.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Garrido, Federico; Cabrera, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a comparative gene expression analysis of 15 metastases (10 regressing and 5 progressing) obtained from 2 melanoma patients with mixed response following different forms of immunotherapy. Whole genome transcriptional analysis clearly indicate that regression of melanoma metastases is due to an acute immune rejection mediated by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and interferon mediated response (STAT-1/IRF-1) in all the regressing metastases from both patients. In contrast, progressing metastases showed low transcription levels of genes involved in these pathways. Histological analysis showed T cells and HLA-DR positive infiltrating cells in the regressing but not in the progressing metastases. Quantitative expression analysis of HLA-A, B and C genes on microdisected tumoral regions indicate higher HLA expression in regressing than in progressing metastases. The molecular signature obtained in melanoma rejection appeared to be similar to that observed in other forms of immune-mediated tissue-specific rejection such as allograft, pathogen clearance, graft versus host or autoimmune disease, supporting the immunological constant of rejection. We favor the idea that the major factor determining the success or failure of immunotherapy is the nature of HLA Class I alterations in tumor cells and not the type of immunotherapy used. If the molecular alteration is reversible by the immunotherapy, the HLA expression will be upregulated and the lesion will be recognized and rejected. In contrast, if the defect is structural the MHC Class I expression will remain unchanged and the lesion will progress. PMID:21964766

  13. Frequency distribution of HLA-antigens, genes and haplotypes in the migrant population of Magadan as a function of length of residence in the region.

    PubMed

    Pereverzeva, V V; Solovenchuk, L L

    1996-09-01

    Peculiarities of the frequency distribution of antigens, genes, and haplotypes at subloci A, B, and Cw of the HLA system in 1429 Slavic inhabitants of Magadan are presented in dependence on length of residence in extreme conditions. No significant differences were revealed with respect to frequency of genes and antigens in inhabitants with different lengths of residence in northeastern Russian conditions. Analysis of gamete associations shows that the revealed positive or negative associativity in some cases is characteristic for Caucasoids on the whole, but an associativity specific to inhabitants of Magadan was also established. Its character depends on the length of residence in extreme conditions.

  14. Mutational analysis of simian virus 40 T antigen: isolation and characterization of mutants with deletions in the T-antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pipas, J M; Peden, K W; Nathans, D

    1983-01-01

    A series of mutants of simian virus 40 has been constructed with deletions in the coding sequence for large T antigen. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicates that 4 mutants have in-phase and 11 have out-of-phase deletions. Mutant DNAs were assayed for the following activities: the ability to form plaques, the ability to produce T antigen as scored by indirect immunofluorescence, viral DNA replication, and morphological transformation of rat cells. Two viable mutants were found, and these had deletions confined to the carboxyl terminus of T antigen. Only those mutants coding for polypeptides greater than 40% of the length of wildtype T antigen produced detectable nuclear fluorescence. The two viable mutants with deletions in the carboxyl terminus of the protein retained the ability both to replicate their DNA, although at a reduced level, and to transform nonpermissive cells. Mutants with sequence changes that result in the loss of more than 117 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus were not viable and were also defective in the DNA replication and transformation functions of T antigen, although several produced detectable nuclear fluorescence. These functions were also sensitive to the removal of amino acids near the amino terminus and in the middle of the protein. Images PMID:6300656

  15. Enhanced expression of HIV and SIV vaccine antigens in the structural gene region of live attenuated rubella viral vectors and their incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Virnik, Konstantin; Ni, Yisheng; Berkower, Ira

    2013-04-19

    Despite the urgent need for an HIV vaccine, its development has been hindered by virus variability, weak immunogenicity of conserved epitopes, and limited durability of the immune response. For other viruses, difficulties with immunogenicity were overcome by developing live attenuated vaccine strains. However, there is no reliable method of attenuation for HIV, and an attenuated strain would risk reversion to wild type. We have developed rubella viral vectors, based on the live attenuated vaccine strain RA27/3, which are capable of expressing important HIV and SIV vaccine antigens. The rubella vaccine strain has demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and long lasting protection in millions of children. Rubella vectors combine the growth and immunogenicity of live rubella vaccine with the antigenicity of HIV or SIV inserts. This is the first report showing that live attenuated rubella vectors can stably express HIV and SIV vaccine antigens at an insertion site located within the structural gene region. Unlike the Not I site described previously, the new site accommodates a broader range of vaccine antigens without interfering with essential viral functions. In addition, antigens expressed at the structural site were controlled by the strong subgenomic promoter, resulting in higher levels and longer duration of antigen expression. The inserts were expressed as part of the structural polyprotein, processed to free antigen, and incorporated into rubella virions. The rubella vaccine strain readily infects rhesus macaques, and these animals will be the model of choice for testing vector growth in vivo and immunogenicity.

  16. Active compounds from Saussurea lappa Clarks that suppress hepatitis B virus surface antigen gene expression in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Chou, C K; Lee, S D; Wang, J C; Yeh, S F

    1995-05-01

    We have examined the antiviral activity of the crude extract prepared from the root of Saussurea lappa Clarks, a Chinese medicinal herb which is widely used for many illnesses including cancer. Two active components, costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone, were identified which show strong suppressive effect on the expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in human hepatoma Hep3B cells, but have little effect on the viability of the cells. Both costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone suppress the HBsAg production by Hep3B cells in a dose-dependent manner with IC50s of 1.0 and 2.0 microM, respectively. Northern blotting analysis shows that the suppression of HBsAg gene expression by both costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone were mainly at the mRNA level. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone on HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), a marker for hepatitis B viral genome replication in human liver cells, was also observed in another human hepatoma cell line HepA2 which was derived from HepG2 cells by transfecting a tandemly repeat hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA. Similarly, the mRNA of HBsAg in HepA2 cells was also suppressed by these two compounds. Our findings suggest that costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone may have potential to develop as specific anti-HBV drugs in the future.

  17. Adoptive T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies using T cells gene-modified to express tumor antigen-specific receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    The functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by effector T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs). Transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors enables polyclonal T cells to redirect toward cancer cells and virally infected cells expressing those defined antigens. Using this technology, a large population of redirected T cells displaying uniform therapeutic properties has been produced, powerfully advancing their clinical application as "cellular drugs" for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using these genetically engineered T cells has an impressive and proven track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells redirected towards B-cell lineage antigen CD19 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and the impressive outcomes in the use of TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a representative cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. In this review, we briefly overview the current status of this treatment option in the context of hematological malignancy, and discuss a number of challenges that still pose an obstacle to the full effectiveness of this strategy.

  18. Expression of the ’Bacillus anthracis’ Protective Antigen Gene by Baculovirus and Vaccinia Virus Recombinants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    T’ansfocl~on Baculovitus Genom . DMA Homoogos vSpodopt...a A~cob~n.ion ~ecob~naonlFrugipoida Coll VERtO Coll IPlatt" Assay 4 3 -GA). PA Gene Postive...localization was not determined. Baculovirus recombinant- genome DNA into SF-9 cells followed by homologous re- infected SF-9 cells were also...baculovirus genome and pAcYMI. The PA gene epitopes defined by a battery of monoclonal antibodies were was inserted into the baculovirus polyhcdrin gene under

  19. Induction of p53-dependent activation of the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene in chromatin by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Shan, Bin; Xu, Jin; Zhuo, Ying; Morris, Cindy A; Morris, Gilbert F

    2003-11-07

    A human fibroblast cell line with conditional p53 expression displayed a p53-dependent increase in both the protein and mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The combination of p53 induction and IR cooperated to activate a transiently expressed human PCNA promoter-reporter gene via a p53-responsive element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with antibodies specific for p53 or p300/CREB-binding protein revealed specific p53-dependent enrichment of PCNA promoter sequences in immunoprecipitates of sheared chromatin prepared from irradiated cells. Maximal and specific association of acetylated histone H4 with the PCNA promoter also depended on p53 induction and exposure to IR. These data demonstrate p53 binding to a target site in the PCNA promoter, recruitment of p300/CREB-binding protein, and localized acetylation of histone H4 in an IR-dependent manner. These molecular events are likely to play a role in mediating activation of PCNA gene expression by p53 during the cellular response to DNA damage. The analyses indicate that the combination of p53 induction and IR activate the PCNA gene via mechanisms similar to that of p21/wild-type p53-activated factor but to a lesser extent. This differential regulation of PCNA and p21/wild-type p53-activated factor may establish the proper ratio of the two proteins to coordinate DNA repair with cell cycle arrest.

  20. Genetic variations in merozoite surface antigen genes of Babesia bovis detected in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Hayashida, Kyoko; Igarashi, Ikuo; Inoue, Noboru; Long, Phung Thang; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich

    2015-03-01

    The genes that encode merozoite surface antigens (MSAs) in Babesia bovis are genetically diverse. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of B. bovis MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes. Blood DNA samples from 258 cattle and 49 water buffaloes reared in the Thua Thien Hue province of Vietnam were screened with a B. bovis-specific diagnostic PCR assay. The B. bovis-positive DNA samples (23 cattle and 16 water buffaloes) were then subjected to PCR assays to amplify the MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes. Sequencing analyses showed that the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences are genetically diverse, whereas MSA-2c is relatively conserved. The nucleotide identity values for these MSA gene sequences were similar in the cattle and water buffaloes. Consistent with the sequencing data, the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences were dispersed across several clades in the corresponding phylogenetic trees, whereas the MSA-2c sequences occurred in a single clade. Cattle- and water-buffalo-derived sequences also often clustered together on the phylogenetic trees. The Vietnamese MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c sequences were then screened for recombination with automated methods. Of the seven recombination events detected, five and two were associated with the MSA-2b and MSA-2c recombinant sequences, respectively, whereas no MSA-1 recombinants were detected among the sequences analyzed. Recombination between the sequences derived from cattle and water buffaloes was very common, and the resultant recombinant sequences were found in both host animals. These data indicate that the genetic diversity of the MSA sequences does not differ between cattle and water buffaloes in Vietnam. They also suggest that recombination between the B. bovis MSA sequences in both cattle and water buffaloes might contribute to the genetic variation in these genes in Vietnam.

  1. Construction and expression of a recombinant DNA gene encoding a polyomavirus middle-size tumor antigen with the carboxyl terminus of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, D.; Voronova, A.; Eckhart, W.

    1984-02-01

    The authors constructed a molecular clone encoding the N-terminal 379 amino acids of the polyomavirus middle-size tumor antigen, followed by the C-terminal 60 amino acids of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G. This hybrid gene contained the coding region for the C-terminal hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain of the G protein in place of the C-terminal hydrophobic domain of the middle-size tumor antigen. The hybrid gene was expressed in COS-1 cells under the control of the simian virus 40 late promoter. The hybrid protein was located in cell membranes and was associated with a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity, as was the middle-size tumor antigen. Plasmids encoding the hybrid protein failed to transform mouse NIH 3T3 or rat F2408 cells.

  2. Escherichia coli O-antigen gene clusters of serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163: DNA sequences and similarity between O62 and O68, and PCR-based serogrouping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DNA sequences of the O-antigen gene clusters of the Escherichia coli serogroups O62, O131, O140, O142 and O163 were determined. There were 9-14 open reading frames (ORFs) identified, encoding genes required for O-antigen sugar biosynthesis, transfer, and processing. Primers based on the wzx (O...

  3. DNA sequence and analysis of the O-antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163 and serogroup-specific PCR assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DNA sequence of the O-antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163 was determined. There were 9 to 12 open reading frames (ORFs) identified, encoding genes required for O-antigen sugar biosynthesis, transfer, and processing. Primers based on the wzx...

  4. Lack of cosegregation of the subgroup II antigens on genes 2 and 6 in porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, L; Padilla-Noriega, L; Taniguchi, K; Greenberg, H B

    1990-01-01

    The rotavirus subgroup I and II specificities associated with gene 2 and 6 products (vp2 and vp6, respectively) were shown not to cosegregate in a number of porcine rotavirus strains. The porcine OSU rotavirus strain and OSU-vp7-like strains were all found to possess a subgroup II-specific region on vp2 and a subgroup I-specific region on vp6. Of interest is the observation that the subgroup II-specific epitope on vp2 appears to be present only in human and porcine rotavirus strains, suggesting a possible human-pig ancestral lineage for gene 2. Images PMID:1688386

  5. Immunoglobulin gene repertoire in ocular adnexal lymphomas: hints on the nature of the antigenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Dagklis, A; Ponzoni, M; Govi, S; Cangi, M G; Pasini, E; Charlotte, F; Vino, A; Doglioni, C; Davì, F; Lossos, I S; Ntountas, I; Papadaki, T; Dolcetti, R; Ferreri, A J M; Stamatopoulos, K; Ghia, P

    2012-04-01

    Evidence from certain geographical areas links lymphomas of the ocular adnexa marginal zone B-cell lymphomas (OAMZL) with Chlamydophila psittaci (Cp) infection, suggesting that lymphoma development is dependent upon chronic stimulation by persistent infections. Notwithstanding that, the actual immunopathogenetical mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. As in other B-cell lymphomas, insight into this issue, especially with regard to potential selecting ligands, could be provided by analysis of the immunoglobulin (IG) receptors of the malignant clones. To this end, we studied the molecular features of IGs in 44 patients with OAMZL (40% Cp-positive), identifying features suggestive of a pathogenic mechanism of autoreactivity. Herein, we show that lymphoma cells express a distinctive IG repertoire, with electropositive antigen (Ag)-binding sites, reminiscent of autoantibodies (auto-Abs) recognizing DNA. Additionally, five (11%) cases of OAMZL expressed IGs homologous with autoreactive Abs or IGs of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a disease known for the expression of autoreactive IGs by neoplastic cells. In contrast, no similarity with known anti-Chlamydophila Abs was found. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that OAMZL may originate from B cells selected for their capability to bind Ags and, in particular, auto-Ags. In OAMZL associated with Cp infection, the pathogen likely acts indirectly on the malignant B cells, promoting the development of an inflammatory milieu, where auto-Ags could be exposed and presented, driving proliferation and expansion of self-reactive B cells.

  6. Dynamics of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells and of Treg induction upon hepatic AAV gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, George Q; Zolotukhin, Irene; Sherman, Alexandra; Biswas, Moanaro; de Jong, Ype P; Terhorst, Cox; Davidoff, Andrew M; Herzog, Roland W

    2016-01-01

    The tolerogenic hepatic microenvironment impedes clearance of viral infections but is an advantage in viral vector gene transfer, which often results in immune tolerance induction to transgene products. Although the underlying tolerance mechanism has been extensively studied, our understanding of antigen presentation to transgene product-specific CD4+ T cells remains limited. To address this, we administered hepatotropic adeno-associated virus (AAV8) vector expressing cytoplasmic ovalbumin (OVA) into wt mice followed by adoptive transfer of transgenic OVA-specific T cells. We find that that the liver-draining lymph nodes (celiac and portal) are the major sites of MHC II presentation of the virally encoded antigen, as judged by in vivo proliferation of DO11.10 CD4+ T cells (requiring professional antigen-presenting cells, e.g., macrophages) and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg induction. Antigen presentation in the liver itself contributes to activation of CD4+ T cells egressing from the liver. Hepatic-induced Treg rapidly disseminate through the systemic circulation. By contrast, a secreted OVA transgene product is presented in multiple organs, and OVA-specific Treg emerge in both the thymus and periphery. In summary, liver draining lymph nodes play an integral role in hepatic antigen presentation and peripheral Treg induction, which results in systemic regulation of the response to viral gene products. PMID:27933310

  7. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACs were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.

  8. Targeted gene delivery to the synovial pannus in antigen-induced arthritis by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xi; Tang, Yuanjiao; Leng, Qianying; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize an ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique to improve the in vivo transfection efficiency of the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the synovial pannus in an antigen-induced arthritis rabbit model. A mixture of microbubbles and plasmids was locally injected into the knee joints of an antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) rabbits. The plasmid concentrations and ultrasound conditions were varied in the experiments. We also tested local articular and intravenous injections. The rabbits were divided into five groups: (1) ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid; (2) ultrasound+plasmid; (3) microbubble+plasmid; (4) plasmid only; (5) untreated controls. EGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscope and immunohistochemical staining in the synovial pannus of each group. The optimal plasmid dosage and ultrasound parameter were determined based on the results of EGFP expression and the present and absent of tissue damage under light microscopy. The irradiation procedure was performed to observe the duration of the EGFP expression in the synovial pannus and other tissues and organs, as well as the damage to the normal cells. The optimal condition was determined to be a 1-MHz ultrasound pulse applied for 5 min with a power output of 2 W/cm(2) and a 20% duty cycle along with 300 μg of plasmid. Under these conditions, the synovial pannus showed significant EGFP expression without significant damage to the surrounding normal tissue. The EGFP expression induced by the local intra-articular injection was significantly more increased than that induced by the intravenous injection. The EGFP expression in the synovial pannus of the ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid group was significantly higher than that of the other four groups (P<0.05). The expression peaked on day 5, remained detectable on day 40 and disappeared on day 60. No EGFP expression was detected in the other tissues and organs. The UTMD

  9. Polymorphism in the Gene Coding for the Immunodominant Antigen gp43 from the Pathogenic Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Flavia V.; Barros, Tânia F.; Fukada, Márcio K.; Cisalpino, Patrícia S.; Puccia, Rosana

    2000-01-01

    The gp43 glycoprotein is an immune-dominant antigen in patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). It is protective against murine PCM and is a putative virulence factor. The gp43 gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis B-339 is located in a 1,329-bp DNA fragment that includes two exons, a 78-bp intron, and a leader peptide-coding region of 105 bp. Polymorphism in gp43 has been suggested by the occurrence, in the same isolate or among different fungal samples, of isoforms with distinct isoelectric points. In the present study we aligned and compared with a consensus sequence the gp43 precursor genes of 17 P. brasiliensis isolates after sequencing two PCR products from each fungal sample. The genotypic types detected showed 1 to 4 or 14 to 15 informative substitution sites, preferentially localized between 578 and 1166 bp. Some nucleotide differences within individual isolates (noninformative sites) resulted in a second isoelectric point for the deduced protein. The most polymorphic sequences were also phylogenetically distant from the others and encoded basic gp43 isoforms. The three isolates in this group were from patients with chronic PCM, and their DNA restriction patterns were distinct in Southern blots. The nucleotides encoding the inner core of the murine T-cell-protective epitope of gp43 were conserved, offering hope for the development of a universal vaccine. PMID:11060052

  10. A non-stop S-antigen gene mutation is associated with late onset hereditary retinal degeneration in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Julie Ann; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the causative mutation of canine progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) segregating as an adult onset autosomal recessive disorder in the Basenji breed of dog. Methods Basenji dogs were ascertained for the PRA phenotype by clinical ophthalmoscopic examination. Blood samples from six affected cases and three nonaffected controls were collected, and DNA extraction was used for a genome-wide association study using the canine HD Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and PLINK. Positional candidate genes identified within the peak association signal region were evaluated. Results The highest -Log10(P) value of 4.65 was obtained for 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms on three chromosomes. Homozygosity and linkage disequilibrium analyses favored one chromosome, CFA25, and screening of the S-antigen (SAG) gene identified a non-stop mutation (c.1216T>C), which would result in the addition of 25 amino acids (p.*405Rext*25). Conclusions Identification of this non-stop SAG mutation in dogs affected with retinal degeneration establishes this canine disease as orthologous to Oguchi disease and SAG-associated retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and offers opportunities for genetic therapeutic intervention. PMID:24019744

  11. Membrane Ia expression and antigen-presenting accessory cell function of L cells transfected with class II major histocompatibility complex genes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    To study the relationship between the structure and function of Ia antigens, as well as the physiologic requirements for antigen presentation to major histocompatibility complex-restricted T cells, class II A alpha and A beta genes from the k and d haplotypes were transfected into Ltk- fibroblasts using the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique. Individually transfected genes were actively transcribed in the L cells without covalent linkage to, or cotransformation with, viral enhancer sequences. However, cell surface expression of detectable I-A required the presence of transfected A alpha dA beta d or A alpha kA beta k pairs in a single cell. The level of I-A expression under these conditions was 1/5-1/10 that of Ia+ B lymphoma cells, or B lymphoma cells expressing transfected class II genes. These I-A-expressing transfectants were tested for accessory cell function and shown to present polypeptide and complex protein antigens to T cell clones and hybridomas in the context of the transfected gene products. One T cell clone, restricted to I-Ak plus GAT (L-glutamic acid60-L-alanine30-L-tyrosine10), had a profound cytotoxic effect on I-Ak- but not I-Ad-expressing transfectants in the presence of specific antigen. Assays of unprimed T cells showed that both Ia+ and Ia- L cells could serve as accessory cells for concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses. These data indicate that L cells can transcribe, translate, and express transfected class II genes and that such I-A-bearing L cells possess the necessary metabolic mechanisms for presenting these antigens to T lymphocytes in the context of their I-A molecules. PMID:6436430

  12. Identification and mapping of Epstein-Barr virus early antigens and demonstration of a viral gene activator that functions in trans.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K M; Levine, A J

    1986-01-01

    The BamHI M DNA fragment of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome was inserted in two orientations into a simian virus 40-based expression vector, and the EBV-specific proteins produced in COS-7 monkey cells were examined. In one orientation, termed BamHI-M rightward reading frame 1 (BMRF1), a set of phosphoproteins ranging in size from 47,000 to 54,000 daltons was synthesized. These proteins reacted with monoclonal and polyclonal antisera, defining them as components of the EBV early antigen diffuse set of proteins (EA-D). The BamHI M DNA fragment in the opposite orientation, termed BamHI-M leftward reading frame 1 (BMLF1), directed the synthesis of a nuclear antigen detected by antibodies in serum from a patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The BMLF1 antigen was not detected by monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies directed against the EA-D complex. A series of deletion mutants were constructed in the BamHI M DNA fragment, and the EA-D complex and BMLF1 antigen were mapped to discrete open reading frames in this DNA fragment. A test for several possible functions of these antigens showed that the BMLF1 antigen had the ability to activate or enhance, in trans, the level of expression of a gene under the control of the adenovirus early region 3 promoter or the simian virus 40 early promoter in the absence of its cis-acting enhancer. These experiments demonstrate a new gene function, encoded by EBV, that may be important in the positive regulation of viral or cellular genes. Images PMID:3018282

  13. Characterization of the genes specifying two metacyclic variable antigen types in Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

    PubMed Central

    Lenardo, M J; Rice-Ficht, A C; Kelly, G; Esser, K M; Donelson, J E

    1984-01-01

    Bloodstream trypanosomes evade the immune system of their mammalian host by sequentially expressing a large number of different variable surface glycoproteins (VSGs). In contrast, metacyclic trypanosomes, the final developmental stage in the tsetse fly, express a much more restricted set of VSGs. These metacyclic VSGs are the first to be exposed to the immune system of the mammalian host after infection and may offer the potential for the eventual development of a vaccine. We have identified cDNAs for two VSGs in cDNA libraries prepared from amplified metacyclic populations of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and show that they correspond to two different metacyclic serotypes. Determination of the cDNA sequences shows that metacyclic VSG mRNAs are similar to VSG mRNAs expressed during the bloodstream stage. Southern blots demonstrate that the metacyclic VSG genes are located near chromosomal telomeres. No evidence of gene rearrangement associated with expression of these VSGs was found. Images PMID:6593722

  14. Structural comparison of O-antigen gene clusters of Legionella pneumophila and its application of a serogroup-specific multiplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Cao, Boyang; Tian, Zhenyang; Wang, Suwei; Zhu, Zhiyan; Sun, Yamin; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2015-12-01

    The Legionella pneumophila serogroups O1, O4, O6, O7, O10 and O13 are pathogenic strains associated with pneumonia. The surface O-antigen gene clusters of L. pneumophila serogroups O4, O6, O7, O10 and O13 were sequenced and analyzed, with the function annotated on the basis of homology to that of the genes of L. pneumophila serogroup O1 (L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila str. Philadelphia 1). The gene locus of the six L. pneumophila serogroups contains genes of yvfE, neuABCD, pseA-like for nucleotide sugar biosynthesis, wecA for sugar transfer, and wzm as well as wzt for O-antigen processing. The detection of O-antigen genes allows the fine differentiation at species and serogroup level without the neccessity of nucleotide sequencing. The O-antigen-processing genes wzm and wzt, which were found to be distinctive for different for different serogroups, have been used as the target genes for the detection and identification of L. pneumophila strains of different O serogroups. In this report, a multiplex PCR assay based on wzm or wzt that diferentiates all the six serogroups by amplicon size was developed with the newly designed specific primer pairs for O1 and O7, and the specific primer pairs for O4, O6, O10, and O13 reported previously. The array was validated by analysis of 34 strains including 15 L. pneumophila O-standard reference strains, eight reference strains of other Legionella non-pneumophila species, six other bacterial species, and five L. pneumophila environmental isolates. The detection sensitivity was one ng genomic DNA. The accurate and sensitive assay is suitable for the identification and detection of strains of these serogroups in environmental and clinical samples.

  15. The simian virus 40 minimal origin and the 72-base-pair repeat are required simultaneously for efficient induction of late gene expression with large tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Hartzell, S W; Byrne, B J; Subramanian, K N

    1984-10-01

    We have studied the temporal regulation of simian virus 40 (SV40) late gene expression by construction and transient expression analysis of plasmids containing the transposon Tn9 chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene placed downstream from the late control region. The SV40 origin region in the early (but not the late) orientation promotes chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression efficiently in monkey cells lacking large tumor (T) antigen. In monkey cells producing T antigen, the promoter activity of the late control region is induced by approximately 1,000-fold above the basal level. By deletion and point mutagenesis, we define two domains of the late control region required for efficient induction with T antigen. Domain I is the minimal replication origin containing T-antigen binding site II. Domain II consists of the 72-base-pair (bp) repeat and a 19-bp downstream sequence up to nucleotide 270. Domains I and II should act synergistically because the absence of either one or the other decreases induction efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude. Though a complete copy of domain II is optimal, the origin-proximal 22-bp portion of this domain is sufficient. The 21-bp repeat, located between domains I and II, is dispensable for this induction, as are sequences located downstream from nucleotide 270 in the late orientation.

  16. Increased expression of TLR-2, COX-2, and SOD-2 genes in the peripheral blood leukocytes of opisthorchiasis patients induced by Opisthorchis viverrini antigen.

    PubMed

    Yongvanit, Puangrat; Thanan, Raynoo; Pinlaor, Somchai; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Loilome, Watcharin; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Dechakhamphu, Somkid

    2012-05-01

    Re-infection with liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, increases proinflammatory molecules involved in inflammation-mediated disease and carcinogenesis in an animal model. To clarify whether these genes respond to parasite antigen in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) of opisthorchiasis patients, we examined the transcriptional level of oxidant-generating (toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-KB), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2)), anti-oxidant-generating (manganese superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) and catalase (CAT)), proinflammatory cytokine (interleukin (IL)-1β), and anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), in PBL exposed to parasite antigen in O. viverrini-infected patients compared with healthy individuals in an in vitro experiment. After O. viverrini antigen-treated PBL, quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that increased expression of cytokines and oxidant-generating genes in PBL was similar between O. viverrini-infected and healthy groups. Interestingly, compared with healthy subjects, increase of TLR-2, COX-2, and SOD-2 and decreased CAT mRNA expression levels were observed in O. viverrini-infected group. The results indicate that O. viverrini antigen induces upregulation of TLR-2, COX-2, and SOD-2 and downregulation of CAT genes in opisthorchiasis patients, suggesting that imbalance of oxidant/anti-oxidant transcripts during re-infection may be involved in the inflammatory-driven carcinogenesis. These molecules may be used as the chemopreventive target for intervention of opisthorchiasis patients in an endemic area.

  17. p53 gene product expression in resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, with studies of concurrent cytological preparations and microwave antigen retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Binks, S; Clelland, C A; Ronan, J; Bell, J

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To document the frequency and extent of p53 gene product expression in paraffin sections of resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and in cytological preparations of the same tumours; to determine the effect of microwave antigen retrieval on antigen detection. METHODS: Representative paraffin sections of 50 non-small cell carcinomas were stained with an antibody to p53 gene product (DO-7) both with and without prior microwave antigen retrieval. Cytoblocks and cell smears obtained from 19 cases were similarly stained. RESULTS: Using a histochemical scoring system (0-300) which takes into account staining intensity and extent, 78% (n = 39) of microwave pretreated paraffin sections and 52% (n = 26) of non-pretreated sections scored between 5 and 300; p = 0.001; 56% (n = 28) of microwave pretreated sections and only 2% (n = 1) of non-pretreated sections scored between 100 and 300 (p = 0.0001); 75% of direct smears of tumours and 80% of cytoblocks stained similarly to the paraffin sections of the resected specimens. No smears or cytoblocks stained positively when the sections of the resected specimen were negative. CONCLUSIONS: As up to 78% of non-small cell lung carcinomas overexpress p53 gene product, this may prove to be a valuable diagnostic method in biopsy or cytological material when the morphological diagnosis is uncertain. Microwave antigen retrieval is effective on formalin fixed tissue. Images PMID:9215149

  18. Comparative antigen-induced gene expression profiles unveil novel aspects of susceptibility/resistance to adjuvant arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hua; Lu, Changwan; Tan, Ming T; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2013-12-01

    Lewis (LEW) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats of the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype (RT.1(l)) display differential susceptibility to adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA). LEW are susceptible while WKY are resistant to AIA. To gain insights into the mechanistic basis of these disparate outcomes, we compared the gene expression profiles of the draining lymph node cells (LNC) of these two rat strains early (day 7) following a potentially arthritogenic challenge. LNC were tested both ex vivo and after restimulation with the disease-related antigen, mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65. Biotin-labeled fragment cRNA was generated from RNA of LNC and then hybridized with an oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray chip. The differentially expressed genes (DEG) were compared by limiting the false discovery rate to <5% and fold change ≥2.0, and their association with quantitative trait loci (QTL) was analyzed. This analysis revealed overall a more active immune response in WKY than LEW rats. Important differences were observed in the association of DEG with QTL in LEW vs. WKY rats. Both the number of upregulated DEG associated with rat arthritis-QTL and their level of expression were relatively higher in LEW when compared to WKY rat; however, the number of downregulated DEG-associated with rat arthritis-QTL as well as AIA-QTL were found to be higher in WKY than in LEW rats. In conclusion, distinct gene expression profiles define arthritis-susceptible versus resistant phenotype of MHC-compatible inbred rats. These results would advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis and might also offer potential novel targets for therapeutic purposes.

  19. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    SciTech Connect

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  20. Genes involved in nonpermissive temperature-induced cell differentiation in Sertoli TTE3 cells bearing temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki . E-mail: ytabu@ms.toyama-mpu.ac.jp; Kondo, Takashi; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Obinata, Masuo

    2005-04-15

    Sertoli TTE3 cells, derived from transgenic mice bearing temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T (tsSV40LT)-antigen, proliferated continuously at a permissive temperature (33 deg C) whereas inactivation of the large T-antigen by a nonpermissive temperature (39 deg C) led to differentiation as judged by elevation of transferrin. To clarify the detailed mechanisms of differentiation, we investigated the time course of changes in gene expression using cDNA microarrays. Of the 865 genes analyzed, 14 genes showed increased levels of expression. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the mRNA levels of p21{sup waf1}, milk fat globule membrane protein E8, heat-responsive protein 12, and selenoprotein P were markedly elevated. Moreover, the differentiated condition induced by the nonpermissive temperature significantly increased mRNA levels of these four genes in several cell lines from the transgenic mice bearing the oncogene. The present results regarding changes in gene expression will provide a basis for a further understanding of molecular mechanisms of differentiation in both Sertoli cells and cell lines transformed by tsSV40LT-antigen.

  1. Vaccine antigen production in transgenic plants: strategies, gene constructs and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sala, Francesco; Manuela Rigano, M; Barbante, Alessandra; Basso, Barbara; Walmsley, Amanda M; Castiglione, Stefano

    2003-01-30

    Stable integration of a gene into the plant nuclear or chloroplast genome can transform higher plants (e.g. tobacco, potato, tomato, banana) into bioreactors for the production of subunit vaccines for oral or parental administration. This can also be achieved by using recombinant plant viruses as transient expression vectors in infected plants. The use of plant-derived vaccines may overcome some of the major problems encountered with traditional vaccination against infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases and tumours. They also offer a convenient tool against the threat of bio-terrorism. State of the art, experimental strategies, safety and perspectives are discussed in this article.

  2. C-fos and IL-2 gene expression in rat brain cells and splenic lymphocytes after nonantigenic and antigenic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Korneva, E A; Barabanova, S V; Golovko, O I; Nosov, M A; Novikova, N S; Kazakova, T B

    2000-01-01

    Immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive stress models were used: (1) rotation stress (RS) and (2) immobilization (restraint) stress (IS). Intravenous injection of tetanus toxoid (anatoxin) (TT) was chosen as the antigenic stimulus (500 micrograms/kg weight), and intravenous injection of saline solution was used as the control. Splenic lymphocytes (CBA mice) or different brain structures (Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats) were analyzed. The c-fos and interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA expression was measured using a digoxigenin (Dig)-labeled cDNA probe by spot or in situ hybridization. Rotation stress stimulated IL-2 mRNA synthesis in lymphocytes in the presence of ConA and rIL-2 by 40%. IL-2 mRNA synthesis in lymphoid cells obtained from animals after IS and after IS in combination with the administration in vitro of the cytotoxic drug CsA to the splenic lymphocytes was inhibited (30% and 99%), accordingly, as compared with control rats. Induction of c-fos mRNA synthesis in rat brain cells was noted 30 minutes after RS in the hypothalamus (lateralis hypothalamic area, LHA), thalamus, corpus collosum, and sensorimotor zone of the brain cortex. IL-2 mRNA synthesis was shown two hours after RS in the same structures. The increased number of c-fos mRNA-positive cells two hours after TT injection was shown in the posterior hypothalamus area (PHA), LHA, dorsomedial nucleus (DMH), ventromedial nucleus (VMH), and anterior hypothalamus area (AHA) as compared to the effect of i.v. saline injection. Moreover, IL-2 mRNA-positive cell induction was noted in the PHA, DMH, and VMH. Six hours after TT injection, c-fos mRNA expression was decreased in the PHA, LHA, and AHA. Activation of c-fos and IL-2 mRNA was detected in the paraventricularis nucleus 6 hours after TT i.v. injection. Thus, inhibition or stimulation of IL-2 gene expression in lymphoid cells depends on the nature of the stressors. RS or antigenic stimuli induce c-fos and IL-2 gene expression in definite structures of the brain

  3. The Cryptococcus neoformans Gene DHA1 Encodes an Antigen That Elicits a Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Reaction in Immune Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, M. Alejandra; Grace, Greg G.; Orsborn, Kris I.; Schafer, Fredda; Murphy, Juneann W.; Orbach, Marc J.; Galgiani, John N.

    2000-01-01

    When mice are vaccinated with a culture filtrate from Cryptococcus neoformans (CneF), they mount a protective cell-mediated immune response as detected by dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to CneF. We have identified a gene (DHA1) whose product accounts at least in part for the DTH reactivity. Using an acapsular mutant (Cap-67) of C. neoformans strain B3501, we prepared a culture filtrate (CneF-Cap67) similar to that used for preparing the commonly used skin test antigen made with C. neoformans 184A (CneF-184A). CneF-Cap67 elicited DTH in mice immunized with CneF-184A. Deglycosylation of CneF-Cap67 did not diminish its DTH activity. Furthermore, size separation by either chromatography or differential centrifugation identified the major DTH activity of CneF-Cap67 to be present in fractions that contained proteins of approximately 19 to 20 kDa. Using N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences derived from the 20-kDa band, oligonucleotide primers were designed, two of which produced a 776-bp amplimer by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using RNA from Cap-67 to prepare cDNA for the template. The amplimer was used as a probe to isolate clones containing the full-length DHA1 gene from a phage genomic library prepared from strain B3501. The full-length cDNA was obtained by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends and RT-PCR. Analysis of DHA1 revealed a similarity between the deduced open reading frame and that of a developmentally regulated gene from Lentinus edodes (shiitake mushroom) associated with fruiting-body formation. Also, the gene product contained several amino acid sequences identical to those determined biochemically from the purified 20-kDa peptide encoded by DHA1. Recombinant DHA1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli was shown to elicit DTH reactions similar to those elicited by CneF-Cap67 in mice immunized against C. neoformans. Thus, DHA1 is the first gene to be cloned from C. neoformans whose product has been shown to possess immunologic

  4. Effect of deletion of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide core and O-antigen synthesis on virulence and immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qingke; Yang, Jiseon; Liu, Qing; Alamuri, Praveen; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major virulence factor of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and is composed of lipid A, core oligosaccharide (C-OS), and O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS). While the functions of the gene products involved in synthesis of core and O-antigen have been elucidated, the effect of removing O-antigen and core sugars on the virulence and immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has not been systematically studied. We introduced nonpolar, defined deletion mutations in waaG (rfaG), waaI (rfaI), rfaH, waaJ (rfaJ), wbaP (rfbP), waaL (rfaL), or wzy (rfc) into wild-type S. Typhimurium. The LPS structure was confirmed, and a number of in vitro and in vivo properties of each mutant were analyzed. All mutants were significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type parent when administered orally to BALB/c mice and were less invasive in host tissues. Strains with ΔwaaG and ΔwaaI mutations, in particular, were deficient in colonization of Peyer's patches and liver. This deficiency could be partially overcome in the ΔwaaI mutant when it was administered intranasally. In the context of an attenuated vaccine strain delivering the pneumococcal antigen PspA, all of the mutations tested resulted in reduced immune responses against PspA and Salmonella antigens. Our results indicate that nonreversible truncation of the outer core is not a viable option for developing a live oral Salmonella vaccine, while a wzy mutant that retains one O-antigen unit is adequate for stimulating the optimal protective immunity to homologous or heterologous antigens by oral, intranasal, or intraperitoneal routes of administration.

  5. Effect of Deletion of Genes Involved in Lipopolysaccharide Core and O-Antigen Synthesis on Virulence and Immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium▿

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qingke; Yang, Jiseon; Liu, Qing; Alamuri, Praveen; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major virulence factor of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and is composed of lipid A, core oligosaccharide (C-OS), and O-antigen polysaccharide (O-PS). While the functions of the gene products involved in synthesis of core and O-antigen have been elucidated, the effect of removing O-antigen and core sugars on the virulence and immunogenicity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium has not been systematically studied. We introduced nonpolar, defined deletion mutations in waaG (rfaG), waaI (rfaI), rfaH, waaJ (rfaJ), wbaP (rfbP), waaL (rfaL), or wzy (rfc) into wild-type S. Typhimurium. The LPS structure was confirmed, and a number of in vitro and in vivo properties of each mutant were analyzed. All mutants were significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type parent when administered orally to BALB/c mice and were less invasive in host tissues. Strains with ΔwaaG and ΔwaaI mutations, in particular, were deficient in colonization of Peyer's patches and liver. This deficiency could be partially overcome in the ΔwaaI mutant when it was administered intranasally. In the context of an attenuated vaccine strain delivering the pneumococcal antigen PspA, all of the mutations tested resulted in reduced immune responses against PspA and Salmonella antigens. Our results indicate that nonreversible truncation of the outer core is not a viable option for developing a live oral Salmonella vaccine, while a wzy mutant that retains one O-antigen unit is adequate for stimulating the optimal protective immunity to homologous or heterologous antigens by oral, intranasal, or intraperitoneal routes of administration. PMID:21768282

  6. The Effect of the Nonionic Block Copolymer Pluronic P85 on Gene Expression in Mouse Muscle and Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaymalov, Zagit Z.; Yang, Zhihui; Pisarev, Vladimir M.; Alakhov, Valery Yu.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be greatly improved by polymer agents that simultaneously increase transgene expression and activate immunity. We describe here Pluronic P85 (P85), a triblock copolymer of ethylene oxide (EO) and propylene oxide (PO) EO26-PO40-EO26,. Using a mouse model we demonstrate that co-administration of a bacterial plasmid DNA with P85 in a skeletal muscle greatly increases gene expression in the injection site and distant organs, especially the draining lymph nodes and spleen. The reporter expression colocalizes with the specific markers of myocytes and keratinocytes in the muscle, as well as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages in the muscle, lymph nodes and spleen. Furthermore, DNA/P85 and P85 alone increase the systemic expansion of CD11c+ (DC), and local expansion of CD11c+, CD14+ (macrophages) and CD49b+ (natural killer) cell populations. DNA/P85 (but not P85) also increases maturation of local DC (CD11c+CD86+, CD11c+CD80+, and CD11c+CD40+). We suggest that DNA/P85 promotes the activation and recruitment of the antigen-presenting cells, which further incorporate, express and carry the transgene to the immune system organs. PMID:19064283

  7. Sequence Variation Analysis of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 1 Gene in the Virus Associated Lymphomas of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lingling; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Liu, Song; Liu, Xia; Sun, Zhifu; Luo, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is the only viral protein expressed in all EBV-positive tumors as it is essential for the maintenance, replication and transcription of the virus genome. According to the polymorphism of residue 487 in EBNA1 gene, EBV isolates can be classified into five subtypes: P-ala, P-thr, V-val, V-leu and V-pro. Whether these EBNA1 subtypes contribute to different tissue tropism of EBV and are consequently associated with certain malignancies remain to be determined. To elucidate the relationship, one hundred and ten EBV-positive lymphoma tissues of different types from Northern China, a non-NPC endemic area, were tested for the five subtypes by nested-PCR and DNA sequencing. In addition, EBV type 1 and type 2 classification was typed by using standard PCR assays across type-specific regions of the EBNA3C genes. Four EBNA1 subtypes were identified: V-val (68.2%, 75/110), P-thrV (15.5%, 17/110), V-leuV (3.6%, 4/110) and P-ala (10.9%, 12/110). The distribution of the EBNA1 subtypes in the four lymphoma groups was not significantly different (p = 0.075), neither was that of the EBV type 1/type 2 (p = 0.089). Compared with the previous data of gastric carcinoma (GC), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and throat washing (TW) from healthy donors, the distribution of EBNA1 subtypes in lymphoma differed significantly (p = 0.016), with a little higher frequency of P-ala subtype. The EBV type distribution between lymphoma and the other three groups was significantly different (p = 0.000, p = 0.000, p = 0.001, respectively). The proportion of type 1 and type 2 mixed infections was higher in lymphoma than that in GC, NPC and TW. In lymphomas, the distribution of EBNA1 subtypes in the three EBV types was not significantly different (p = 0.546). These data suggested that the variation patterns of EBNA1 gene may be geographic-associated rather than tumor-specific and the role of EBNA1 gene variations in tumorigenesis needs more extensive and

  8. Inactivation of the alpha C protein antigen gene, bca, by a novel shuttle/suicide vector results in attenuation of virulence and immunity in group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Kasper, D L; Ausubel, F M; Rosner, B; Michel, J L

    1997-11-25

    The alpha C protein of group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major surface-associated antigen. Although its role in the biology and virulence of GBS has not been defined, it is opsonic and capable of eliciting protective immunity. The alpha C protein is widely distributed among clinical isolates and is a potential protein carrier and antigen in conjugate vaccines to prevent GBS infections. The structural gene for the alpha C protein, bca, has been cloned and sequenced. The protein encoded by bca is related to a class of surface-associated proteins of gram-positive cocci involved in virulence and immunity. To investigate the potential roles of the alpha C protein, bca null mutants were generated in which the bca gene was replaced with a kanamycin resistance cassette via homologous recombination using a novel shuttle/suicide vector. Studies of lethality in neonatal mice showed that the virulence of the bca null mutants was attenuated 5- to 7-fold when compared with the isogenic wild-type strain A909. Significant differences in mortality occurred in the first 24 h, suggesting that the role of the alpha antigen is important in the initial stages of the infection. In contrast to A909, bca mutants were no longer killed by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the presence of alpha-specific antibodies in an in vitro opsonophagocytic assay. In contrast to previous studies, alpha antigen expression does not appear to play a role in resistance to opsonophagocytosis in the absence of alpha-specific antibodies. In addition, antibodies to the alpha C protein did not passively protect neonatal mice from lethal challenge with bca mutants, suggesting that these epitopes are uniquely present within the alpha antigen as expressed from the bca gene. Therefore, the alpha C protein is important in the pathogenesis of GBS infection and is a target for protective immunity in the development of GBS vaccines.

  9. Identification and Validation of HCC-specific Gene Transcriptional Signature for Tumor Antigen Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Caruso, Francesca Pia; Tagliamonte, Maria; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Ceccarelli, Michele; Costa, Valerio; Aprile, Marianna; Esposito, Roberta; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M.; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A novel two-step bioinformatics strategy was applied for identification of signatures with therapeutic implications in hepatitis-associated HCC. Transcriptional profiles from HBV- and HCV-associated HCC samples were compared with non-tumor liver controls. Resulting HCC modulated genes were subsequently compared with different non-tumor tissue samples. Two related signatures were identified, namely “HCC-associated” and “HCC-specific”. Expression data were validated by RNA-Seq analysis carried out on unrelated HCC samples and protein expression was confirmed according to The Human Protein Atlas" (http://proteinatlas.org/), a public repository of immunohistochemistry data. Among all, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10, and IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 3 were found strictly HCC-specific with no expression in 18/20 normal tissues. Target peptides for vaccine design were predicted for both proteins associated with the most prevalent HLA-class I and II alleles. The described novel strategy showed to be feasible for identification of HCC-specific proteins as highly potential target for HCC immunotherapy. PMID:27387388

  10. Cloning, partial sequence, expression, and antigenic analysis of the filamentous hemagglutinin gene of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Delisse-Gathoye, A M; Locht, C; Jacob, F; Raaschou-Nielsen, M; Heron, I; Ruelle, J L; de Wilde, M; Cabezon, T

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), one of the main factors involved in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to ciliated host cells, was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the 3,500-base-pair nucleotide sequence encoding the amino-terminal region was determined. Molecular cloning, together with the characterization of recombinant FHA-related proteins produced in E. coli, revealed that the primary translation product is a protein of about 370 kilodaltons (kDa). The mature 220-kDa FHA polypeptide secreted by B. pertussis is most probably generated by proteolytic processing that eliminates a carboxy-terminal portion of about 150 kDa. The 1,087 amino-terminal residues of the predicted FHA sequence showed a number of remarkable features. Extensive homology to the Serratia marcescens and Proteus mirabilis hemolysin proteins was found between amino acids 91 and 205 of the FHA sequence, suggesting involvement of this FHA domain in host cell binding or secretion of FHA from B. pertussis. In addition, two regions containing repetitive amino acid sequences were identified. One region, extending from residues 382 to 664, was formed by six repeats, and a second, extending from residues 701 to 912, contained three repeats. The reactivities of several recombinant FHA-derived proteins with a panel of monoclonal antibodies identified at least four epitopes composing an immunoreactive domain present in the carboxy-terminal moiety of the mature FHA. Images PMID:1696934

  11. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  12. Expression of E2 gene of bovine viral diarrhea virus in Pichia pastoris: a candidate antigen for indirect Dot ELISA.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuelan; Ma, Tianyi; Ju, Xingyu; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Min; Liu, Teng; Cao, Wenbo; Bao, Yongzhan; Qin, Jianhua

    2015-02-01

    The E2 gene containing the EcoR I and Not I sites of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) was amplified from the plasmid pMD-18T-E2 of the HB-bd isolated, and inserted into Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris) expression vector pPIC9K, and transfected into Escherichia coli DH5α. The recombinant plasmid pPIC9K-E2 was digested by the SalI restriction enzyme and transformed into the P. pastoris strain GS115 by electroporation. High copy integrative transformants were obtained by G418 screening and induced for expression with methanol. The expressed products in the culture medium were identified by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the Western blotting and the antibody test for immunity. An indirect Dot-ELISA for the detection of antibody against BVDV was established by the recombinant E2 protein as the coating antigen. The reaction conditions of the indirect Dot-ELISA were optimized. The coating concentration of the E2 recombinant protein antigen, the dilution of serum sample, the optimal concentration of HRP labeled antibody, the optimal blocking reagent and blocking time were studied. 100 sera samples from cows in the field were tested for the antibody against BVDV by the Dot-ELISA and the IDEXX HerdChek BVDV antibody ELISA kit simultaneously to compare the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy. The results showed that the expressed products in the culture medium resulted in single band of 44kDa by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. The results of the immunogenicity assay indicated that the protein E2 expressed in P. pastoris could induce the experimental animals of the rabbit to produce BVDV specific antibodies. The results of the indirect Dot-ELISA showed that the optimal coating concentration of the E2 recombinant protein was 2.0μg/mL, the bovine serum dilution was 1:100, the optimal concentration of HRP-labeled rabbit anti-bovine antibody IgG was 1:500, and the optimal blocking reagent was 3% glutin-TBS and blocking for 45min. The

  13. Immunogenicity of recombinant attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strains carrying a gene that encodes Eimeria tenella antigen S07

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an attempt to develop an efficacious vaccine against avian coccidiosis, research was conducted using Type III Secretion System (TTSS) of Salmonella to deliver Eimeria antigens into the cytoplasm of host cells. Once delivered, recombinant protein may enter the MHC I antigen processing pathway for...

  14. Immune response genes controlling responsiveness to major transplantation antigens. Specific major histocompatibility complex-linked defect for antibody responses to class I alloantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, G.W.; Corvalan, J.R.; Licence, D.R.; Howard, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    We have identified two major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-linked Ir genes that control the antibody response made by rats against class I major alloantigens. We have named these genes Ir-RT1Aa and Ir-RT1Ac. These Ir genes determine responsiveness of the immunized animal in a typical codominant fashion. There is no evidence so far for trans-complementation between low-responder haplotypes. Detailed studies of Ir-RT1Aa indicate that it controls the antibody response to at least two distinct alloantigenic determinants on RT1Aa molecules. These class I molecules thus behave like hapten-carrier conjugates when the response against the carrier is under Ir gene control. Analysis of the origin of alloantibody-forming cells in tetraparental radiation chimeras indicates that Ir-RT1Aa must control the provision of effective help to B cells. In many respects therefore, the properties of Ir-RT1Aa are broadly similar to those described for Ir genes controlling antibody responses to conventional antigens. The existence of apparently conventional Ir genes controlling the antibody response to major alloantigens strongly suggest that the processing of these transmembrane molecules by host antigen-presenting cells is a prerequisite for immune induction, and that it is the MHC of the responder rather than that of the allograft to which T helper cells are restricted in alloimmune responses in vivo.

  15. Escherichia coli O-Antigen Gene Clusters of Serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163: DNA Sequences and Similarity between O62 and O68, and PCR-Based Serogrouping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanhong; Yan, Xianghe; DebRoy, Chitrita; Fratamico, Pina M.; Needleman, David S.; Li, Robert W.; Wang, Wei; Losada, Liliana; Brinkac, Lauren; Radune, Diana; Toro, Magaly; Hegde, Narasimha; Meng, Jianghong

    2015-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the O-antigen gene clusters of Escherichia coli serogroups O62, O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163 was determined, and primers based on the wzx (O-antigen flippase) and/or wzy (O-antigen polymerase) genes within the O-antigen gene clusters were designed and used in PCR assays to identify each serogroup. Specificity was tested with E. coli reference strains, field isolates belonging to the target serogroups, and non-E. coli bacteria. The PCR assays were highly specific for the respective serogroups; however, the PCR assay targeting the O62 wzx gene reacted positively with strains belonging to E. coli O68, which was determined by serotyping. Analysis of the O-antigen gene cluster sequences of serogroups O62 and O68 reference strains showed that they were 94% identical at the nucleotide level, although O62 contained an insertion sequence (IS) element located between the rmlA and rmlC genes within the O-antigen gene cluster. A PCR assay targeting the rmlA and rmlC genes flanking the IS element was used to differentiate O62 and O68 serogroups. The PCR assays developed in this study can be used for the detection and identification of E. coli O62/O68, O131, O140, O142, and O163 strains isolated from different sources. PMID:25664526

  16. Co-transfection of dendritic cells with AFP and IL-2 genes enhances the induction of tumor antigen-specific antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Yue; Li, Xiao; Gao, Li; Teng, Zeng-Hui; Liu, Wen-Chao

    2012-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly efficient, specialized antigen-presenting cells and DCs transfected with tumor-related antigens are regarded as promising vaccines in cancer immunotherapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether DCs co-transfected with the α-fetoprotein (AFP) and human interleukin-2 (IL-2) genes were able to induce stronger therapeutic antitumor immunity in transfected DCs. In this study, DCs from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients were co-transfected with the IL-2 gene and/or the AFP gene. The reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) data revealed that the DCs transfected with the adenovirus AdAFP/IL-2 expressed AFP and IL-2. The DCs co-transfected with IL-2 and AFP (AFP/IL-2-DCs) enhanced the cytotoxicities of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and increased the production of IL-2 and interferon-γ significantly compared with their AFP-DC, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-DC, DC or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) counterparts. In vivo data suggested that immunization with AFP-DCs enhances antigen-specific antitumor efficacy more potently than immunization with IL-2-DCs or AFP-DCs. These findings provide a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based tumor vaccines.

  17. Cloning and Expression of Major Surface Antigen 1 Gene of Toxoplasma gondii RH Strain Using the Expression Vector pVAX1 in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdizadeh, Rahman; Maraghi, Sharif; Ghadiri, Ata A.; Tavalla, Mehdi; Shojaee, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic protozoan infection with a high prevalence in a broad range of hosts infecting up to one-third of the world human population. Toxoplasmosis leads to serious medical problems in immunocompromised individuals and fetuses and also induces abortion and mortality in domestic animals. Therefore, there is a huge demand for the development of an effective vaccine. Surface Antigen 1 (SAG1) is one of the important immunodominant surface antigens of Toxoplasma gondii, which interacts with host cells and primarily involved in adhesion, invasion and stimulation of host immune response. Surface antigen 1 is considered as the leading candidate for development of an effective vaccine against toxoplasmosis. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to clone the major surface antigen1 gene (SAG1) from the genotype 1 of T. gondii, RH strain into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 in order to use for a DNA vaccine. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from tachyzoite of the parasite using the QIAamp DNA mini kit. After designing the specific primers, SAG1 gene was amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The purified PCR products were then cloned into a pPrime plasmid vector. The aforementioned product was subcloned into the pVAX1 eukaryotic expression vector. The recombinant pVAX1-SAG1 was then transfected into Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and expression of SAG1 antigen was evaluated using Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA) and Western Blotting (WB). Results: The cloning and subcloning products (pPrime-SAG1 and pVAX1-SAG1 plasmid vectors) of SAG1 gene were verified and confirmed by enzyme digestion and sequencing. A 30 kDa recombinant protein was expressed in CHO cells as shown by IFA and WB methods. Conclusions: The pVAX1 expression vector and CHO cells are a suitable system for high-level recombinant protein production for SAG1 gene from T. gondii parasites

  18. Expression of the developmental I antigen by a cloned human cDNA encoding a member of a beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase gene family.

    PubMed

    Bierhuizen, M F; Mattei, M G; Fukuda, M

    1993-03-01

    The blood group i/I antigens were the first identified alloantigens that display a dramatic change during human development. The i and I antigens are determined by linear and branched poly-N-acetyllactosaminoglycans, respectively. In human erythrocytes during embryonic development, the fetal (i) antigen is replaced by the adult (I) antigen as a result of the appearance of a beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, the I-branching enzyme. Here, we report the cDNA cloning and expression of this branching enzyme that converts linear into branched poly-N-acetyllactosaminoglycans, thus introducing the I antigen in transfected cells. The cDNA sequence predicts a protein with type II membrane topology as has been found for all other mammalian glycosyltransferases cloned to date. The Chinese hamster ovary cells that stably express the isolated cDNA acquire I-branched structures as evidenced by the structural analysis of glycopeptides from these cells. Comparison of the amino acid sequence with those of other glycosyltransferases revealed that this I-branching enzyme and another beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase that forms a branch in O-glycans are strongly homologous in the center of their putative catalytic domains. Moreover, the genes encoding these two beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases were found to be located at the same locus on chromosome 9, band q21. These results indicate that the I-branching enzyme represents a member of a beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase gene family of which expression is controlled by developmental programs.

  19. Expression of the Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 LPS O-antigen and outer core gene clusters is RfaH-dependent.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, Katarzyna; Varjosalo, Markku; Li, Zhilin; Li, Chun-Mei; Skurnik, Mikael

    2015-06-01

    The antiterminator RfaH is required for the expression of LPS, capsule, haemolysin, exotoxin, haemin uptake receptor and F pilus. As these structures are critical for bacterial virulence, loss of RfaH usually leads to attenuation. Here, we inactivated the rfaH gene of Yersinia enterocolitica O:3 to study its role in this enteropathogen. RNA sequencing of the WT and ΔrfaH strain transcriptomes revealed that RfaH acted as a highly specific regulator that enhanced the transcription of the operons involved in biosynthesis of LPS O-antigen and outer core (OC), but did not affect the expression of enterobacterial common antigen. Interestingly, the transcriptome of the ΔrfaH strain was very similar to that of an O-antigen-negative mutant. This indicated that some of the changes seen in the ΔrfaH strain, such as the genes involved in outer membrane homeostasis or in the stress-response-associated Cpx pathway, were actually due to indirect responses via the loss of O-antigen. The decreased amount of LPS on the ΔrfaH strain cell surface resulted in an attenuated stress response, and lower resistance to compounds such as SDS and polymyxin B. However, the ΔrfaH strain was significantly more resistant to complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. Taken together, our results revealed a novel role of RfaH acting as a highly specific regulator of O-antigen and OC of LPS in Y. enterocolitica O:3. It may be speculated that RfaH might have an in vivo role in controlling tissue-specific expression of bacterial surface oligo/polysaccharides.

  20. STAT3 promotes CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation by regulating a critical gene in glycosphingolipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Abhirami K; Liu, Jianyun; Gallo, Richard M; Kaplan, Mark H; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2015-11-01

    Cytokines that regulate the immune response signal through the Janus kinase / signal transducer and activation of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, but whether this pathway can regulate CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation to natural killer T (NKT) cells is unknown. Here, we found that STAT3 promotes antigen presentation by CD1d. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in which STAT3 expression was inhibited exhibited markedly reduced endogenous lipid antigen presentation to NKT cells without an impact on exogenous lipid antigen presentation by CD1d. Consistent with this observation, in APCs where STAT3 was knocked down, dramatically decreased levels of UDP glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG), an enzyme involved in the first step of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis, were observed. Impaired lipid antigen presentation was reversed by ectopic expression of UGCG in STAT3-silenced CD1d(+) APCs. Hence, by controlling a fundamental step in CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation, STAT3 signalling promotes innate immune responses driven by CD1d.

  1. Use of human antigen presenting cell gene array profiling to examine the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax on primary human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Jaya; Kampani, Karan; Datta, Suman; Wigdahl, Brian; Flaig, Katherine E; Jain, Pooja

    2006-02-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia and a progressive demyelinating disorder termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). One of the most striking features of the immune response in HAM/TSP centers on the expansion of HTLV-1-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) compartment in the peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid. More than 90% of the HTLV-1-specific CTLs are directed against the viral Tax (11-19) peptide implying that Tax is available for immune recognition by antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). DCs obtained from HAM/TSP patients have been shown to be infected with HTLV-1 and exhibit rapid maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that presentation of Tax peptides by activated DCs to naIve CD8(+) T cells may play an important role in the induction of a Tax-specific CTL response and neurologic dysfunction. In this study, a pathway-specific antigen presenting cell gene array was used to study transcriptional changes induced by exposure of monocyte-derived DCs to extracellular HTLV-1 Tax protein. Approximately 100 genes were differentially expressed including genes encoding toll-like receptors, cell surface receptors, proteins involved in antigen uptake and presentation and adhesion molecules. The differential regulation of chemokines and cytokines characteristic of functional DC activation was also observed by the gene array analyses. Furthermore, the expression pattern of signal transduction genes was also significantly altered. These results have suggested that Tax-mediated DC gene regulation might play a critical role in cellular activation and the mechanisms resulting in HTLV-1-induced disease.

  2. Isolation of a phylogenetically conserved and testis-specific gene using a monoclonal antibody against the serological H-Y antigen.

    PubMed

    Su, H; Kozak, C A; Veerhuis, R; Lau, Y F; Wiberg, U

    1992-04-01

    Several cDNA clones of a gene termed male-enhanced antigen-2 (Mea-2), have been isolated from a mouse testicular expression cDNA library using a monoclonal histocompatability Y (H-Ys) antibody which detects specific protein(s) present in the mouse testis but not the ovary. The Mea-2 gene is phylogenetically conserved among various mammalian species examined, and is expressed at high levels in adult mouse testis. The expression pattern of Mea-2 is very similar to that of another gene, the male-enhanced antigen-1 (Mea-1), previously isolated using a polyclonal H-Ys antibody. Northern blotting and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that Mea-2 is also expressed in other adult and fetal mouse organs at low levels. The testis-enhanced expression of this gene is associated with germ cell development at mid- to late-meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. Analysis of an intersubspecies mouse backcross has assigned this gene to chromosome 5, between the loci Gus and Hnf-1.

  3. In Vitro Variant Surface Antigen Expression in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites from a Semi-Immune Individual Is Not Correlated with Var Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tschan, Serena; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Koch, Iris; Berger, Jürgen; Kremsner, Peter; Frank, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is considered to be the main variant surface antigen (VSA) of Plasmodium falciparum and is mainly localized on electron-dense knobs in the membrane of the infected erythrocyte. Switches in PfEMP1 expression provide the basis for antigenic variation and are thought to be critical for parasite persistence during chronic infections. Recently, strain transcending anti-PfEMP1 immunity has been shown to develop early in life, challenging the role of PfEMP1 in antigenic variation during chronic infections. In this work we investigate how P. falciparum achieves persistence during a chronic asymptomatic infection. The infected individual (MOA) was parasitemic for 42 days and multilocus var gene genotyping showed persistence of the same parasite population throughout the infection. Parasites from the beginning of the infection were adapted to tissue culture and cloned by limiting dilution. Flow cytometry using convalescent serum detected a variable surface recognition signal on isogenic clonal parasites. Quantitative real-time PCR with a field isolate specific var gene primer set showed that the surface recognition signal was not correlated with transcription of individual var genes. Strain transcending anti-PfEMP1 immunity of the convalescent serum was demonstrated with CD36 selected and PfEMP1 knock-down NF54 clones. In contrast, knock-down of PfEMP1 did not have an effect on the antibody recognition signal in MOA clones. Trypsinisation of the membrane surface proteins abolished the surface recognition signal and immune electron microscopy revealed that antibodies from the convalescent serum bound to membrane areas without knobs and with knobs. Together the data indicate that PfEMP1 is not the main variable surface antigen during a chronic infection and suggest a role for trypsin sensitive non-PfEMP1 VSAs for parasite persistence in chronic infections. PMID:27907004

  4. In Vitro Variant Surface Antigen Expression in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites from a Semi-Immune Individual Is Not Correlated with Var Gene Transcription.

    PubMed

    Bruske, Ellen Inga; Dimonte, Sandra; Enderes, Corinna; Tschan, Serena; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Koch, Iris; Berger, Jürgen; Kremsner, Peter; Frank, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is considered to be the main variant surface antigen (VSA) of Plasmodium falciparum and is mainly localized on electron-dense knobs in the membrane of the infected erythrocyte. Switches in PfEMP1 expression provide the basis for antigenic variation and are thought to be critical for parasite persistence during chronic infections. Recently, strain transcending anti-PfEMP1 immunity has been shown to develop early in life, challenging the role of PfEMP1 in antigenic variation during chronic infections. In this work we investigate how P. falciparum achieves persistence during a chronic asymptomatic infection. The infected individual (MOA) was parasitemic for 42 days and multilocus var gene genotyping showed persistence of the same parasite population throughout the infection. Parasites from the beginning of the infection were adapted to tissue culture and cloned by limiting dilution. Flow cytometry using convalescent serum detected a variable surface recognition signal on isogenic clonal parasites. Quantitative real-time PCR with a field isolate specific var gene primer set showed that the surface recognition signal was not correlated with transcription of individual var genes. Strain transcending anti-PfEMP1 immunity of the convalescent serum was demonstrated with CD36 selected and PfEMP1 knock-down NF54 clones. In contrast, knock-down of PfEMP1 did not have an effect on the antibody recognition signal in MOA clones. Trypsinisation of the membrane surface proteins abolished the surface recognition signal and immune electron microscopy revealed that antibodies from the convalescent serum bound to membrane areas without knobs and with knobs. Together the data indicate that PfEMP1 is not the main variable surface antigen during a chronic infection and suggest a role for trypsin sensitive non-PfEMP1 VSAs for parasite persistence in chronic infections.

  5. Selective killing of lung cancer cells using carcinoembryonic antigen promoter and double suicide genes, thymidine kinase and cytosine deaminase (pCEA-TK/CD).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuan; Peng, Gui-Lin; Liu, Qi-Cai; Li, Fu-Li; Zou, Xu-Sen; He, Jian-Xing

    2012-03-01

    The application of gene therapy in cancer treatment is limited by non-specific targeting. In the present study, we constructed a recombinant plasmid, containing a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) promoter and double suicide genes thymidine kinase (TK) and cytosine deaminase (CD), henceforth referred to as pCEA-TK/CD. Our results showed that the CEA promoter can specifically drive target gene expression in CEA-positive lung cancer cells. In the presence of prodrugs 5-flucytosine and ganciclovir, pCEA-TK/CD transfection decreased inhibitory concentration 50 and increased apoptosis and cyclomorphosis. Our result suggests that gene therapy using pCEA-TK/CD may be a promising new approach for treating lung cancer.

  6. The PANE1 gene encodes a novel human minor histocompatibility antigen that is selectively expressed in B-lymphoid cells and B-CLL

    PubMed Central

    Brickner, Anthony G.; Evans, Anne M.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Xuereb, Suzanne M.; Feng, Xin; Nishida, Tetsuya; Fairfull, Liane; Ferrell, Robert E.; Foon, Kenneth A.; Hunt, Donald F.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Engelhard, Victor H.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Warren, Edus H.

    2006-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAg's) are peptides encoded by polymorphic genes that are presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and recognized by T cells in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants. Here we report that an alternative transcript of the proliferation-associated nuclear element 1 (PANE1) gene encodes a novel human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0301-restricted mHAg that is selectively expressed in B-lymphoid cells. The antigenic peptide is entirely encoded within a unique exon not present in other PANE1 transcripts. Sequencing of PANE1 alleles in mHAg-positive and mHAg-negative cells demonstrates that differential T-cell recognition is due to a single nucleotide polymorphism within the variant exon that replaces an arginine codon with a translation termination codon. The PANE1 transcript that encodes the mHAg is expressed at high levels in resting CD19+ B cells and B-lineage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells, and at significantly lower levels in activated B cells. Activation of B-CLL cells through CD40 ligand (CD40L) stimulation decreases expression of the mHAg-encoding PANE1 transcript and reciprocally increases expression of PANE1 transcripts lacking the mHAg-encoding exon. These studies suggest distinct roles for different PANE1 isoforms in resting compared with activated CD19+ cells, and identify PANE1 as a potential therapeutic target in B-CLL. PMID:16391015

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H.; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F.; Hui, Edwin P.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Lee, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated post-transplant lymphomas and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favour outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV+ lymphomas but not in NPC. Here we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a HLA A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable since 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms we have optimised expression of the TCR and demonstrated high avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, cytokine release) in both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2+ epithelial tumour growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens. PMID:25711537

  8. Stimulation of host centriolar antigen in TC7 cells by simian virus 40: requirement for RNA and protein syntheses and an intact simian virus 40 small-t gene function.

    PubMed

    Shyamala, M; Atcheson, C L; Kasamatsu, H

    1982-08-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV 40) stimulated a host cell antigen in the centriolar region after infection of African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells. The addition of puromycin and actinomycin D to cells infected with SV40 within 5 h after infection inhibited the stimulation of the host cell antigen, indicating that de novo protein and RNA syntheses that occurred within the first 5 h after infection were essential for the stimulation. Early viable deletion mutants of SV40 with deletions mapping between 0.54 and 0.59 map units on the SV40 genome, dl2000, dl2001, dl2003, dl2004, dl2005, dl2006, and dl2007, did not stimulate the centriolar antigen above the level of uninfected cells. This indicated that an intact, functional small-t protein was essential for the SV40-mediated stimulation of the host cell antigen. Our studies, using cells infected with nondefective adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses that lack the small-t gene region of SV40 (Ad2+ND1, Ad2+ND2, Ad2+ND3, Ad2+ND4, and Ad2+ND5), revealed that the lack of small-t gene function of SV40 could be complemented by a gene function of the adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses for the centriolar antigen stimulation. Thus, adenovirus 2 has a gene(s) that is analogous to the small-t gene of SV40 for the stimulation of the host cell antigen in AGMK cells.

  9. Cloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus Type-2 Encoded-Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-12

    Della-Porta and Westaway, 1977; Kitano et al., 1974; Heinz et al., 1981). In order to develop a subunit vaccine against dengue virus, it is important to...Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development DPC TAB 0 A .. asin]o ANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT ’Q;-10.v&,,,d 0 by By SAv.ailability Caote# Radha Krishnan...Type 2 Encoded Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Radha K. Padmanabhan 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED

  10. Stability of multiple antigen receptor gene rearrangements and immunophenotype in Hodgkin's disease-derived cell line L428 and variant subline L428KSA.

    PubMed

    Athan, E S; Paietta, E; Papenhausen, P R; Augenlicht, L; Wiernik, P H; Gallagher, R E

    1989-07-01

    The Hodgkin's disease (HD) derived cell line L428 and a phorbol ester-selected subline L428KSA, which have been independently passaged in tissue culture for several years, were studied for possible antigen receptor gene and immunophenotypic differences. Multiple but identical alterations of these genes were found, including: the deletion of one and rearrangement of the other immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain allele; the rearrangement of one kappa and one lambda light chain allele; and the rearrangement of one T cell receptor (TCR) beta allele. Restriction mapping of the Ig heavy chain locus indicated that rearrangement of the retained allele produced a JH-C gamma 4 fusion product by an isotype switch mechanism. The 14q+ chromosome [t(14q32;?)] present in both cell cultures derived either from translocation 5' (telomeric) to the rearranged JH allele or 3' (centromeric) to the deleted Ig heavy chain allele and did not involve detectable rearrangement of the c-myc, bcl 1, or bcl 2 oncogenes. No differences in the immunophenotype were found between the L428 and L428KSA cells: both expressed leukocyte activation antigens and some determinants associated with myelomonocytic cells but no lymphoid markers. It is postulated that these phenotypic characteristics derived from secondary genetic events/differentiative reprogramming which produced extinction of primary lymphoid characters, including terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) essential to generation of the Ig and TCR gene rearrangements, and expression of an incomplete set of myelomonocytic markers.

  11. A binding site for the transcription factor Grainyhead/Nuclear transcription factor-1 contributes to regulation of the Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Y; Yamagishi, M; Nishimoto, Y; Taguchi, O; Matsukage, A; Yamaguchi, M

    1999-12-03

    The Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen promoter contains multiple transcriptional regulatory elements, including upstream regulatory element (URE), DNA replication-related element, E2F recognition sites, and three common regulatory factor for DNA replication and DNA replication-related element-binding factor genes recognition sites. In nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos, we detected a protein factor, the URE-binding factor (UREF), that recognizes the nucleotide sequence 5'-AAACCAGTTGGCA located within URE. Analyses in Drosophila Kc cells and transgenic flies revealed that the UREF-binding site plays an important role in promoter activity both in cultured cells and in living flies. A yeast one-hybrid screen using URE as a bait allowed isolation of a cDNA encoding a transcription factor, Grainyhead/nuclear transcription factor-1 (GRH/NTF-1). The nucleotide sequence required for binding to GRH was indistinguishable from that for UREF detected in embryo nuclear extracts. Furthermore, a specific antibody to GRH reacted with UREF in embryo nuclear extracts. From these results we conclude that GRH is identical to UREF. Although GRH has been thought to be involved in regulation of differentiation-related genes, this study demonstrates, for the first time, involvement of a GRH-binding site in regulation of the DNA replication-related proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

  12. Screening of early antigen genes of adult-stage Trichinella spiralis using pig serum from different stages of early infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this work was to identify novel, early antigens present in Trichinella spiralis. To this end, a cDNA library generated from 3-day old adult worms (Ad3) was immunologically screened using serum from a pig infected with 20,000 muscle larvae. The serum was obtained from multiple, time cours...

  13. The Modality of Enterobacterial Common Antigen Polysaccharide Chain Lengths Is Regulated by o349 of the wec Gene Cluster of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Kathleen; Klena, John; Rick, Paul D.

    1999-01-01

    The assembly of the phosphoglyceride-linked form of enterobacterial common antigen (ECAPG) occurs by a mechanism that involves modulation of polysaccharide chain length. However, the genetic determinant of this modulation has not been identified. Site-directed mutagenesis of o349 of the Escherichia coli K-12 wec gene cluster revealed that this locus encodes a Wzz protein that specifically modulates the chain length of ECAPG polysaccharides, and we have designated this locus wzzECA. The WzzECA-mediated modulation of ECAPG polysaccharide chains is the first demonstrated example of Wzz regulation involving a polysaccharide that is not linked to the core-lipid A structure of lipopolysaccharide. PMID:10515954

  14. Evidence for Contemporary Switching of the O-Antigen Gene Cluster between Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Strains Colonizing Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Geue, Lutz; Menge, Christian; Eichhorn, Inga; Semmler, Torsten; Wieler, Lothar H.; Pickard, Derek; Berens, Christian; Barth, Stefanie A.

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) comprise a group of zoonotic enteric pathogens with ruminants, especially cattle, as the main reservoir. O-antigens are instrumental for host colonization and bacterial niche adaptation. They are highly immunogenic and, therefore, targeted by the adaptive immune system. The O-antigen is one of the most diverse bacterial cell constituents and variation not only exists between different bacterial species, but also between individual isolates/strains within a single species. We recently identified STEC persistently infecting cattle and belonging to the different serotypes O156:H25 (n = 21) and O182:H25 (n = 15) that were of the MLST sequence types ST300 or ST688. These STs differ by a single nucleotide in purA only. Fitness-, virulence-associated genome regions, and CRISPR/CAS (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR associated sequence) arrays of these STEC O156:H25 and O182:H25 isolates were highly similar, and identical genomic integration sites for the stx converting bacteriophages and the core LEE, identical Shiga toxin converting bacteriophage genes for stx1a, identical complete LEE loci, and identical sets of chemotaxis and flagellar genes were identified. In contrast to this genomic similarity, the nucleotide sequences of the O-antigen gene cluster (O-AGC) regions between galF and gnd and very few flanking genes differed fundamentally and were specific for the respective serotype. Sporadic aEPEC O156:H8 isolates (n = 5) were isolated in temporal and spatial proximity. While the O-AGC and the corresponding 5′ and 3′ flanking regions of these aEPEC isolates were identical to the respective region in the STEC O156:H25 isolates, the core genome, the virulence associated genome regions and the CRISPR/CAS elements differed profoundly. Our cumulative epidemiological and molecular data suggests a recent switch of the O-AGC between isolates with O156:H8 strains having served as DNA donors. Such

  15. A capripoxvirus detection PCR and antibody ELISA based on the major antigen P32, the homolog of the vaccinia virus H3L gene.

    PubMed

    Heine, H G; Stevens, M P; Foord, A J; Boyle, D B

    1999-07-30

    Sheeppoxvirus (SPV), goatpoxvirus (GPV) and lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) of cattle belong to the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family and can cause significant economic losses in countries where they are endemic. Capripox diagnosis by classical virological methods dependent on live capripox virus is not suitable in countries such as Australia where the virus is exotic and live virus is not available. To develop diagnostic tests based on recombinant material, we cloned and sequenced a 3.7 kb viral DNA fragment of SPV that contained open reading frames homologous to the vaccinia virus J6R, H1L, H2R, H3L and H4L genes. A capripoxvirus specific PCR assay was developed that differentiated between SPV and LSDV on the basis of unique restriction sites in the corresponding PCR fragments. The vaccinia virus H3L homolog was identified as the capripoxvirus P32 antigen. The P32 proteins of SPV and LSDV were expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with a poly-histidine tag and affinity purified on metal binding resin. The full-length P32 protein contained a transmembrane region close to the carboxy terminus and was membrane associated but could be solubilised in detergent and used as trapping antigen in an antibody detection ELISA. The ELISA was specific for capripoxvirus as only sera from sheep infected with capripoxvirus but not orf or vaccinia virus reacted with the capripoxvirus P32 antigen.

  16. Establishment of renal proximal tubule cell lines by targeted oncogenesis in transgenic mice using the L-pyruvate kinase-SV40 (T) antigen hybrid gene.

    PubMed

    Cartier, N; Lacave, R; Vallet, V; Hagege, J; Hellio, R; Robine, S; Pringault, E; Cluzeaud, F; Briand, P; Kahn, A

    1993-03-01

    Targeted oncogenesis allowed us to obtain two cell lines which have been derived from the proximal tubule of kidney from transgenic mice harbouring the simian virus (SV40) large T and small t antigens placed under the control of the 5' regulatory sequence from the rat L-type pyruvate kinase (L-PK) gene. The cell lines (PKSV-PCT and PKSV-PR cells) were derived from early (PCT) and late (Pars Recta, PR) microdissected proximal tubules grown in D-glucose-enriched medium. In such conditions of culture, both cell lines exhibited L-PK transcripts, a stable expression of SV40-encoded nuclear large T antigen, a prolonged life span but failed to induce tumors when injected sub-cutaneously into athymic (nu-nu) mice. Confluent cells, grown on plastic support or porous filters, were organized as monolayers of polarized cuboid cells with well developed apical microvilli and formed domes. Both cell lines exhibited morphological features of proximal tubule cells with villin located in the apical brush-border and substantial amounts of hydrolase activity. By immunofluorescence studies using specific antibodies, aminopeptidase N appeared restricted to the apical microvillar domain, whereas the H2 histocompatibility antigen was distributed in the cytoplasm and lateral membranes. These results demonstrate that the proximal morphological phenotype has been fully preserved in these cultured cells derived from tissue-specific targeted oncogenesis in transgenic mice.

  17. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  18. Molecular analysis of region 1 of the Escherichia coli K5 antigen gene cluster: a region encoding proteins involved in cell surface expression of capsular polysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Pazzani, C; Rosenow, C; Boulnois, G J; Bronner, D; Jann, K; Roberts, I S

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of region 1 of the K5 antigen gene cluster of Escherichia coli was determined. This region is postulated to encode functions which, at least in part, participate in translocation of polysaccharide across the periplasmic space and onto the cell surface. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed five genes that encode proteins with predicted molecular masses of 75.7, 60.5, 44, 43, and 27 kDa. The 27-kDa protein was 70.7% homologous to the CMP-2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid synthetase enzyme encoded by the E. coli kdsB gene, indicating the presence of a structural gene for a similar enzyme within the region 1 operon. The 43-kDa protein was homologous to both the Ctrb and BexC proteins encoded by the Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae capsule gene clusters, respectively, indicating common stages in the expression of capsules in these gram-negative bacteria. However, no homology was detected between the 75.7, 60.5-, and 44-kDa proteins and any of the proteins so far described for the H. influenzae and N. meningitidis capsule gene clusters. Images PMID:8397187

  19. Cloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus Type-2 Encoded-Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-26

    necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP cDNA cloning; sequence analysis; E . Coli expression; 06 13 epitope mapping; ELISA titers...antigens in E . coli 6 4.3 Mapping of the neutralization epitope of DEN-2" E protein 7 4.4 Detection of stable secondary structure at the 3-terminus of...based high ievel expression systems and characterize functions of flavivirus proteins. Three notable expression systems are: 1) the E . coli expression

  20. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene coding for the 57kDa soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chien, Maw-Sheng; Gilbert , Teresa L.; Huang, Chienjin; Landolt, Marsha L.; O'Hara, Patrick J.; Winton, James R.

    1992-01-01

    The complete sequence coding for the 57-kDa major soluble antigen of the salmonid fish pathogen, Renibacterium salmoninarum, was determined. The gene contained an opening reading frame of 1671 nucleotides coding for a protein of 557 amino acids with a calculated Mr value of 57190. The first 26 amino acids constituted a signal peptide. The deduced sequence for amino acid residues 27–61 was in agreement with the 35 N-terminal amino acid residues determined by microsequencing, suggesting the protein in synthesized as a 557-amino acid precursor and processed to produce a mature protein of Mr 54505. Two regions of the protein contained imperfect direct repeats. The first region contained two copies of an 81-residue repeat, the second contained five copies of an unrelated 25-residue repeat. Also, a perfect inverted repeat (including three in-frame UAA stop codons) was observed at the carboxyl-terminus of the gene.

  1. DNA hypomethylation-mediated activation of Cancer/Testis Antigen 45 (CT45) genes is associated with disease progression and reduced survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wa; Barger, Carter J; Link, Petra A; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to a lack of early detection approaches coupled with poor outcomes for patients with clinically advanced disease. Cancer-testis (CT) or cancer-germline genes encode antigens known to generate spontaneous anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. CT45 genes are a recently discovered 6-member family of X-linked CT genes with oncogenic function. Here, we determined CT45 expression in EOC and fully defined its epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation. CT45 was silent and hypermethylated in normal control tissues, but a large subset of EOC samples showed increased CT45 expression in conjunction with promoter DNA hypomethylation. In contrast, copy number status did not correlate with CT45 expression in the TCGA database for EOC. CT45 promoter methylation inversely correlated with both CT45 mRNA and protein expression, the latter determined using IHC staining of an EOC TMA. CT45 expression was increased and CT45 promoter methylation was decreased in late-stage and high-grade EOC, and both measures were associated with poor survival. CT45 hypomethylation was directly associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation, and CT45 was frequently co-expressed with other CT antigen genes in EOC. Decitabine treatment induced CT45 mRNA and protein expression in EOC cells, and promoter transgene analyses indicated that DNA methylation directly represses CT45 promoter activity. These data verify CT45 expression and promoter hypomethylation as possible prognostic biomarkers, and suggest CT45 as an immunological or therapeutic target in EOC. Treatment with decitabine or other epigenetic modulators could provide a means for more effective immunological targeting of CT45.

  2. DNA hypomethylation-mediated activation of Cancer/Testis Antigen 45 (CT45) genes is associated with disease progression and reduced survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wa; Barger, Carter J; Link, Petra A; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Miller, Austin; Akers, Stacey N; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a highly lethal malignancy due to a lack of early detection approaches coupled with poor outcomes for patients with clinically advanced disease. Cancer-testis (CT) or cancer-germline genes encode antigens known to generate spontaneous anti-tumor immunity in cancer patients. CT45 genes are a recently discovered 6-member family of X-linked CT genes with oncogenic function. Here, we determined CT45 expression in EOC and fully defined its epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation. CT45 was silent and hypermethylated in normal control tissues, but a large subset of EOC samples showed increased CT45 expression in conjunction with promoter DNA hypomethylation. In contrast, copy number status did not correlate with CT45 expression in the TCGA database for EOC. CT45 promoter methylation inversely correlated with both CT45 mRNA and protein expression, the latter determined using IHC staining of an EOC TMA. CT45 expression was increased and CT45 promoter methylation was decreased in late-stage and high-grade EOC, and both measures were associated with poor survival. CT45 hypomethylation was directly associated with LINE-1 hypomethylation, and CT45 was frequently co-expressed with other CT antigen genes in EOC. Decitabine treatment induced CT45 mRNA and protein expression in EOC cells, and promoter transgene analyses indicated that DNA methylation directly represses CT45 promoter activity. These data verify CT45 expression and promoter hypomethylation as possible prognostic biomarkers, and suggest CT45 as an immunological or therapeutic target in EOC. Treatment with decitabine or other epigenetic modulators could provide a means for more effective immunological targeting of CT45. PMID:26098711

  3. Gene and antigen markers of Shiga-toxin producing E. coli from Michigan and Indiana river water: Occurrence and relation to recreational water quality criteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duris, J.W.; Haack, S.K.; Fogarty, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    The relation of bacterial pathogen occurrence to fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations used for recreational water quality criteria (RWQC) is poorly understood. This study determined the occurrence of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) markers and their relation to FIB concentrations in Michigan and Indiana river water. Using 67 fecal coliform (FC) bacteria cultures from 41 river sites in multiple watersheds, we evaluated the occurrence of five STEC markers: the Escherichia coli (EC) O157 antigen and gene, and the STEC virulence genes eaeA, stx1, and stx2. Simple isolations from selected FC cultures yielded viable EC O157. By both antigen and gene assays, EC O157 was detected in a greater proportion of samples exceeding rather than meeting FC RWQC (P < 0.05), but was unrelated to EC and enterococci RWQC. The occurrence of all other STEC markers was unrelated to any FIB RWQC. The eaeA, stx2, and stx1 genes were found in 93.3, 13.3, and in 46.7% of samples meeting FC RWQC and in 91.7, 0.0, and 37.5% of samples meeting the EC RWQC. Although not statistically significant, the percentage of samples positive for each STEC marker except stx1 was lower in samples that met, as opposed to exceeded, FIB RWQC. Viable STEC were common members of the FC communities in river water throughout southern Michigan and northern Indiana, regardless of FIB RWQC. Our study indicates that further information on the occurrence of pathogens in recreational waters, and research on alternative indicators of their occurrence, may help inform water-resource management and public health decision-making. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  4. Clonally diverse rfb gene clusters are involved in expression of a family of related D-galactan O antigens in Klebsiella species.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, R F; Whitfield, C

    1996-01-01

    Klebsiella species express a family of structurally related lipopolysaccharide O antigens which share a common backbone known as D-galactan I. Serotype specificity results from modification of D-galactan I by addition of domains of altered structure or by substitution with O-acetyl and/or alpha-D-Galp side groups with various linkages and stoichiometries. In the prototype, Klebsiella serotype O1, the his-linked rfb gene cluster is required for synthesis of D-galactan I, but genes conferring serotype specificity are unlinked. The D-galactan I part of the O polysaccharide is O acetylated in Klebsiella serotype O8. By cloning the rfb region from Klebsiella serotype O8 and analyzing the O polysaccharide synthesized in Escherichia coli K-12 hosts, we show that, like rfbO1, the rfbO8 region directs formation of unmodified D-galactan I. The rfbAB genes encode an ATP-binding cassette transporter required for export of polymeric D-galactan I across the plasma membrane prior to completion of the lipopolysaccharide molecule by ligation of the O polysaccharide to lipid A-core. Complementation experiments show that the rfbAB gene products in serotypes O1 and O8 are functionally equivalent and interchangeable. Hybridization experiments and physical mapping of the rfb regions in related Klebsiella serotypes suggest the existence of shared rfb genes with a common organization. However, despite the functional equivalence of these rfb gene clusters, at least three distinct clonal groups were detected in different Klebsiella species and subspecies, on the basis of Southern hybridization experiments carried out under high-stringency conditions. The clonal groups cannot be predicted by features of the O-antigen structure. To examine the relationships in more detail, the complete nucleotide sequence of the serotype O8 rfb cluster was determined and compared with that of the serotype O1 prototype. The nucleotide sequences for the six rfb genes showed variations in moles percent G

  5. Prevalence of genes encoding virulence factors among Escherichia coli with K1 antigen and non-K1 E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzynska, Anna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2012-10-01

    Multiplex PCR was used to detect genes encoding selected virulence determinants associated with strains of Escherichia coli with K1 antigen (K1(+)) and non-K1 E. coli (K1(-)). The prevalence of the fimA, fimH, sfa/foc, ibeA, iutA and hlyF genes was studied for 134 (67 K1(+) and 67 K1(-)) E. coli strains isolated from pregnant women and neonates. The fimA gene was present in 83.6 % of E. coli K1(+) and in 86.6 % of E. coli K1(-) strains. The fimH gene was present in all tested E. coli K1(+) strains and in 97.0 % of non-K1 strains. E. coli K1(+) strains were significantly more likely to possess the following genes than E. coli K1(-) strains: sfa/foc (37.3 vs 16.4 %, P = 0.006), ibeA (35.8 vs 4.5 %, P<0.001), iutA (82.1 vs 35.8 %, P<0.001) and hlyF (28.4 vs 6.0 %, P<0.001). In conclusion, E. coli K1(+) seems to be more virulent than E. coli K1(-) strains in developing severe infections, thereby increasing possible sepsis or neonatal bacterial meningitis.

  6. Tissue-specific expression of cell-surface Qa-2 antigen from a transfected Q7b gene of C57BL/10 mice

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We screened a cDNA library prepared from a BALB.B10 CTL clone that expresses Qa-2 antigen, and isolated four clones derived from Q7b, a Qa region gene of C57BL/10. One of these Q7b cDNAs and the Q7b chromosomal gene were subcloned into expression vectors and transfected into L cells and R1.1 thymoma cells. We found that the chromosomal Q7b gene expresses Qa-2 on the surface of R1.1 cells, but not on L cells while the Q7b cDNA expresses protein on the surface of both cell types. The levels of Qa-2 expression do not correlate with the total levels of Q7b mRNA in these transfectants. Our results suggest that the tissue- specific expression of Qa-2 may be controlled, in part, by mechanisms of alternate RNA splicing. By using hybrid gene constructs, we have mapped the tissue-specific element to the 3' part of the gene, downstream of a site near the middle of exon 4. The hybrid polypeptides differ significantly in their transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. These portions of the protein also may play a role in the tissue- specific expression of Qa-2. PMID:3502706

  7. In Vitro Pre-Clinical Validation of Suicide Gene Modified Anti-CD33 Redirected Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Kentaro; Jamil, Muhammad O.; AL-Obaidi, Mustafa; Pereboeva, Larisa; Salzman, Donna; Erba, Harry P.; Lamb, Lawrence S.; Bhatia, Ravi; Mineishi, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately fifty percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be cured with current therapeutic strategies which include, standard dose chemotherapy for patients at standard risk of relapse as assessed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis, or high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for high-risk patients. Despite allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant about 25% of patients still succumb to disease relapse, therefore, novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Methods and findings We developed an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting the CD33 myeloid antigen, expressed in ~ 85–90% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, using chimeric antigen receptor redirected T-cells. Considering that administration of CAR T-cells has been associated with cytokine release syndrome and other potential off-tumor effects in patients, safety measures were here investigated and reported. We genetically modified human activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with acute myeloid leukemia with retroviral supernatant encoding the inducible Caspase9 suicide gene, a ΔCD19 selectable marker, and a humanized third generation chimeric antigen receptor recognizing human CD33. ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells had a 75±3.8% (average ± standard error of the mean) chimeric antigen receptor expression, were able to specifically lyse CD33+ targets in vitro, including freshly isolated leukemic blasts from patients, produce significant amount of tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, express the CD107a degranulation marker, and proliferate upon antigen specific stimulation. Challenging ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells with programmed-death-ligand-1 enriched leukemia blasts resulted in significant killing like observed for the programmed-death-ligand-1 negative leukemic blasts fraction. Since the administration of 10 nanomolar of a

  8. Polymorphisms within the human leucocyte antigen-E gene and their associations with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis as well as clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Iwaszko, M; Świerkot, J; Kolossa, K; Jeka, S; Wiland, P; Bogunia-Kubik, K

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the non-classical human leucocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) in both innate and acquired immune response suggests its possible role in development of autoimmune pathologies. This study was undertaken to investigate relationships between the HLA-E gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as to evaluate a potential of these polymorphisms to modulate clinical outcome of anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) treatment in female patients. A total of 223 female patients with RA receiving anti-TNF biological therapy and 134 female healthy subjects were enrolled into the study. Genotypings for two SNPs within the HLA-E gene (rs1264457 HLA-E*01:01/01:03; rs1059510 HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:02) were performed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification employing LightSNiP assays. Clinical response was evaluated according to the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria at 12 and 24 weeks after initiation of the therapy. The frequency of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype was decreased significantly in RA patients in comparison to controls (P = 0.031). The presence of the HLA-E*01:01/01:01 genotype in patients correlated with better EULAR response after 12 weeks of anti-TNF treatment, while 01:03 allele carriers were generally unresponsive to the treatment (P = 0.014). The HLA-E*01:03/01:03 genotype was also over-represented among non-responding patients in comparison to HLA-E*01:01/01:01 homozygotes (P = 0.021). With respect to the HLA-E rs1059510 variation, a better response after 12 weeks was observed more frequently in patients carrying the HLA-E*01:03:01/01:03:01 genotype than other genotypes (P = 0.009). The results derived from this study imply that HLA-E polymorphisms may influence RA susceptibility and affect clinical outcome of anti-TNF therapy in female RA patients.

  9. Effects of humanization and gene shuffling on immunogenicity and antigen binding of anti-TAG-72 single-chain Fvs.

    PubMed

    Pavlinkova, G; Colcher, D; Booth, B J; Goel, A; Wittel, U A; Batra, S K

    2001-12-01

    One major constraint in the clinical application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is the development of a human antimurine antibody response. The immunogenicity of MAbs can be minimized by replacing nonhuman regions with corresponding human sequences. The studies reported in our article were undertaken to analyze the immunoreactivity and the immunogenicity of the CC49 single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs): (i) an scFv construct comprised of mouse CC49 VL and VH (m/m scFv), (ii) a light chain shuffled scFv with human VL (Hum4 VL) and mouse CC49 VH (h/m scFv), and (iii) a humanized scFv assembled from Hum4 VL and CC49 VH complementary determining regions (CDRs) grafted onto a VH framework of MAb 21/28' CL (h/CDR scFv). The CC49 scFvs competed for an antigen binding site with CC49 IgG in a similar fashion in a competition radioimmunoassay and were able to inhibit the binding of CC49 IgG to the antigen completely. The immunogenicity of CC49 scFvs was tested using sera with antiidiotypic antibodies to MAb CC49 obtained from patients treated by CC49 IgG in clinical trials. All tested sera exhibited the highest reactivity to the m/m scFv. However, the sera demonstrated differential reactivities to h/CDR scFv and h/m scFv. Replacement of the mouse chain in h/m scFv and h/CDR scFv decreased or completely averted serum reactivity. Our studies compared for the first time the antigen binding and immunogenicity of different scFv constructs containing the mouse, CDR grafted or human variable chains. These results indicate that the humanized CC49 scFv is potentially an important agent for imaging and therapeutic applications with TAG-72-positive tumors.

  10. A serine proteinase inhibitor locus at 18q21.3 contains a tandem duplication of the human squamous cell carcinoma antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, S S; Schick, C; Fish, K E; Miller, E; Pena, J C; Treter, S D; Hui, S M; Silverman, G A

    1995-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) is a member of the ovalbumin family of serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). A neutral form of the protein is found in normal and some malignant squamous cells, whereas an acidic form is detected exclusively in tumor cells and in the circulation of patients with squamous cell tumors. In this report, we describe the cloning of the SCCA gene from normal genomic DNA. Surprisingly, two genes were found. They were tandemly arrayed and flanked by two other closely related serpins, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI2) and maspin at 18q21.3. The genomic structure of the two genes, SCCA1 and SCCA2, was highly conserved. The predicted amino acid sequences were 92% identical and suggested that the neutral form of the protein was encoded by SCCA1 and the acidic form was encoded by SCCA2. Further characterization of the region should determine whether the differential expression of the SCCA genes plays a causal role in development of more aggressive squamous cell carcinomas. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7724531

  11. Drosophila proliferating cell nuclear antigen (cyclin) gene: structure, expression during development, and specific binding of homeodomain proteins to its 5'-flanking region.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, M; Nishida, Y; Moriuchi, T; Hirose, F; Hui, C C; Suzuki, Y; Matsukage, A

    1990-01-01

    The genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila melanogaster proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (cyclin) were isolated and sequenced. The coding sequence for a 260-amino-acid residue polypeptide was interrupted by a single short intron of 60 base pairs (bp), and about 70% of the deduced amino acid sequence of the Drosophila PCNA was identical to the rat and human PCNA polypeptides, with conserved unique repeats of leucine in the C-terminal region. Genomic Southern blot hybridization analysis indicates the presence of a single gene for PCNA per genome. The PCNA mRNA was detected at a high level in adult ovaries, unfertilized eggs, and early embryos and at low levels in the other developmental stages. The major transcription initiation site (cap site) was localized at 89 bp upstream from the ATG codon. Neither a TATA box nor a CAAT box was found within the 600-bp region upstream of the cap site. Clusters of 10 bp of sequence similar to the binding sites for Drosophila proteins containing homeodomains were found in the region from -127 to -413. DNase I footprint analysis revealed that the Drosophila homeodomain proteins coded by even-skipped and zerknüllt genes can specifically bind to these sites. These results suggest that the expression of the PCNA gene is under the control of genes coding for homeodomain proteins. Images PMID:1968224

  12. Stimulation of host centriolar antigen in TC7 cells by simian virus 40: requirement for RNA and protein syntheses and an intact simian virus 40 small-t gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Shyamala, M; Atcheson, C L; Kasamatsu, H

    1982-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV 40) stimulated a host cell antigen in the centriolar region after infection of African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells. The addition of puromycin and actinomycin D to cells infected with SV40 within 5 h after infection inhibited the stimulation of the host cell antigen, indicating that de novo protein and RNA syntheses that occurred within the first 5 h after infection were essential for the stimulation. Early viable deletion mutants of SV40 with deletions mapping between 0.54 and 0.59 map units on the SV40 genome, dl2000, dl2001, dl2003, dl2004, dl2005, dl2006, and dl2007, did not stimulate the centriolar antigen above the level of uninfected cells. This indicated that an intact, functional small-t protein was essential for the SV40-mediated stimulation of the host cell antigen. Our studies, using cells infected with nondefective adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses that lack the small-t gene region of SV40 (Ad2+ND1, Ad2+ND2, Ad2+ND3, Ad2+ND4, and Ad2+ND5), revealed that the lack of small-t gene function of SV40 could be complemented by a gene function of the adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses for the centriolar antigen stimulation. Thus, adenovirus 2 has a gene(s) that is analogous to the small-t gene of SV40 for the stimulation of the host cell antigen in AGMK cells. Images PMID:6180184

  13. HLA class I gene expression on human primary tumours and autologous metastases: demonstration of selective losses of HLA antigens on colorectal, gastric and laryngeal carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    López-Nevot, M. A.; Esteban, F.; Ferrón, A.; Gutiérrez, J.; Oliva, M. R.; Romero, C.; Huelin, C.; Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F.

    1989-01-01

    The expression of HLA class I antigens was studied in 99 primary tumour (colorectal, gastric and laryngeal carcinomas) and 57 autologous metastases using immunohistological techniques and monoclonal antibodies against class I monomorphic determinants, HLA-B isotypic determinants and HLA polymorphic determinants. Fourteen per cent of colorectal, 9.6% of gastric and 20% of laryngeal carcinomas completely lacked class I molecules. Selective losses of HLA-B antigens were also detected in 8.8, 3.4 and 5.8% of these tumours respectively. Taking into account complete and selective loss of HLA-B the average alteration in the class I molecules expression totalled 21%. The comparison of class I expression between primary tumours and autologous metastases showed differences in 24% of the patients. These differences consisted mainly in a decrease of class I expression by metastases. Nevertheless, four types of divergence were detected in laryngeal carcinomas, namely: +/-, +/+, -/+, -/-. In addition, a clear correlation between degree of differentiation and class I expression was observed in laryngeal tumours. Finally, when class I gene RFLPs were compared with DNA from 15 tumours and autologous normal mucosa or peripheral lymphocytes, no differences were detected between these samples. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2649129

  14. Gene cloning of an Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4 antigen which reacts with peripheral blood sera in patients with advanced destructive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, S; Hata, S; Ishikawa, I; Tsuchida, N

    1990-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the aetiology of juvenile periodontitis and advanced destructive periodontitis. Levels of IgG antibody against A. actinomycetemcomitans in peripheral blood sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis are high, as are those against Bacteroides gingivalis. To clone the genes of antigens reactive with sera of such patients, a library of the A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 DNA in lambda L47 was constructed and then screened, using an immunochemical detection method, with serum from a patient with the advanced disease. Six clones from among nearly 1000 reacted with the serum and also with that of another patient. They were designated 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9. Restriction enzyme and Southern blot analyses indicated that clones 8 and 9 were identical and that all the clones were overlapping because they shared in common the 4 and 5 kbp HincII DNA fragments of A. actinomycetemcomitans. The cloned DNA fragment hybridized to the DNA of two other strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans but not to those of six periodontopathic bacteria examined. These findings suggest that a DNA sequence encoding an A. actinomycetemcomitans strain Y4 antigen strongly reactive with sera of patients with advanced destructive periodontitis was cloned. This sequence is present specifically in A. actinomycetemcomitans but not in other bacteria isolated from patients with periodontal diseases. Thus, the cloned DNA could serve as a probe for the diagnosis of periodontitis.

  15. The African buffalo parasite Theileria. sp. (buffalo) can infect and immortalize cattle leukocytes and encodes divergent orthologues of Theileria parva antigen genes

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, R.P.; Hemmink, J.D.; Morrison, W.I.; Weir, W.; Toye, P.G.; Sitt, T.; Spooner, P.R.; Musoke, A.J.; Skilton, R.A.; Odongo, D.O.

    2015-01-01

    African Cape buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is the wildlife reservoir of multiple species within the apicomplexan protozoan genus Theileria, including Theileria parva which causes East coast fever in cattle. A parasite, which has not yet been formally named, known as Theileria sp. (buffalo) has been recognized as a potentially distinct species based on rDNA sequence, since 1993. We demonstrate using reverse line blot (RLB) and sequencing of 18S rDNA genes, that in an area where buffalo and cattle co-graze and there is a heavy tick challenge, T. sp. (buffalo) can frequently be isolated in culture from cattle leukocytes. We also show that T. sp. (buffalo), which is genetically very closely related to T. parva, according to 18s rDNA sequence, has a conserved orthologue of the polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that forms the basis of the diagnostic ELISA used for T. parva serological detection. Closely related orthologues of several CD8 T cell target antigen genes are also shared with T. parva. By contrast, orthologues of the T. parva p104 and the p67 sporozoite surface antigens could not be amplified by PCR from T. sp. (buffalo), using conserved primers designed from the corresponding T. parva sequences. Collectively the data re-emphasise doubts regarding the value of rDNA sequence data alone for defining apicomplexan species in the absence of additional data. ‘Deep 454 pyrosequencing’ of DNA from two Theileria sporozoite stabilates prepared from Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks fed on buffalo failed to detect T. sp. (buffalo). This strongly suggests that R. appendiculatus may not be a vector for T. sp. (buffalo). Collectively, the data provides further evidence that T. sp. (buffalo). is a distinct species from T. parva. PMID:26543804

  16. Tat engagement of p38 MAP kinase and IRF7 pathways leads to activation of interferon-stimulated genes in antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayoung; Kukkonen, Sami; Martinez-Viedma, Maria Del Pilar; Gupta, Sumeet; Aldovini, Anna

    2013-05-16

    As a result of its interaction with transcription factors, HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Tat can modulate the expression of both HIV and cellular genes. In antigen-presenting cells Tat induces the expression of a subset of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs) in the absence of IFNs. We investigated the genome-wide Tat association with promoters in immature dendritic cells and in monocyte-derived macrophages. Among others, Tat associated with the MAP2K6, MAP2K3, and IRF7 promoters that are functionally part of IL-1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. The association correlated with their increased gene expression, increased activation of p38 MAPK and of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), and consequent induction of ISGs. Probing these pathways with RNA interference, pharmacological p38 MAPK inhibition, and in cell lines lacking STAT1s or the type I IFN receptor chain confirmed the role of MAPKKs and IRF7 in Tat-mediated modulation of ISGs and excluded the involvement of IFNs in this modulation. Tat interaction with the 2 MAPKK and IRF7 promoters in HIV-1-infected cells and the resulting persistent activation of ISGs, which include inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, can contribute to the increased immune activation that characterizes HIV infection.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Mongolian Babesia bovis isolates based on the merozoite surface antigen (MSA)-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes.

    PubMed

    Altangerel, Khukhuu; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Battsetseg, Badgar; Battur, Banzragch; Ueno, Akio; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2012-03-23

    We conducted a molecular epidemiological study on Babesia bovis in Mongolia. Three hundred blood samples collected from cattle grazed in seven different districts were initially screened using a previously established diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of B. bovis-specific DNA. Positive samples were then used to amplify and sequence the hyper-variable regions of three B. bovis genes encoding the merozoite surface antigen (MSA)-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c. The diagnostic PCR assay detected B. bovis among cattle populations of all districts surveyed (4.4-26.0%). Sequences of each of the three genes were highly homologous among the Mongolian isolates, and found in a single phylogenetic cluster. In particular, a separate branch was formed only by the Mongolian isolates in the MSA-2b gene-based phylogenetic tree. Our findings indicate that effective preventative and control strategies are essential to control B. bovis infection in Mongolian cattle populations, and suggest that a careful approach must be adopted when using immunization techniques.

  18. DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 and prostate-specific antigen genes expression induced by arsenic, cadmium, and chromium on nontumorigenic human prostate cells.

    PubMed

    El-Atta, Hend M Abo; El-Bakary, Amal A; Attia, Afaf M; Lotfy, Ahmed; Khater, Shery S; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; Abdalla, Hussein Abdelaziz

    2014-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers and the second cause of cancer-related deaths among men. Metals are recognized as chemical carcinogens where chronic exposures to such metals are implicated in the development of cancer, including prostate cancer. This in vitro study demonstrates the relative death sensitivity of prostatic (RWPE-1) cells to arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and chromium (Cr) as environmental pollutants through its apoptotic effects and the effect of these chemicals on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene expression as a marker for their carcinogecity. RWPE-1 cells were divided into three groups that were treated with As, Cd, and Cr in three replicates, at three different concentrations for each metal for 48 h. A control group consisted of untreated RWPE1 cells was used. Apoptosis was assessed using comet assay and caspase 3 gene expression; meanwhile, PSA gene expression was evaluated by semiqualitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR). One of the novel findings of this study is that arsenic and cadmium at low concentrations decreased apoptosis of RWPE-1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner while chromium induced significant concentration-dependent increase in apoptosis. Yet, at the highest concentrations, apoptosis was relatively more induced by all chemicals. Arsenic was the most chemical inhibiting apoptosis in RWPE-1 cells at low concentration. While at the moderate and highest concentrations, cadmium was the most inhibiting chemical of RWPE-1 cells' apoptosis. No distinct differences between treated and untreated cells for PSA gene expression were observed. It can be concluded that As and Cd, at low concentrations, can reduce apoptosis of prostatic cells in a concentration-dependent manner while chromium induced it; however, all metal salts used in this study did not induce PSA gene expression.

  19. Human anti-V3 HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies encoded by the VH5-51/VL lambda genes define a conserved antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Gorny, Miroslaw K; Sampson, Jared; Li, Huiguang; Jiang, Xunqing; Totrov, Maxim; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Williams, Constance; O'Neal, Timothy; Volsky, Barbara; Li, Liuzhe; Cardozo, Timothy; Nyambi, Phillipe; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2011-01-01

    Preferential usage of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes that encode antibodies (Abs) against various pathogens is rarely observed and the nature of their dominance is unclear in the context of stochastic recombination of Ig genes. The hypothesis that restricted usage of Ig genes predetermines the antibody specificity was tested in this study of 18 human anti-V3 monoclonal Abs (mAbs) generated from unrelated individuals infected with various subtypes of HIV-1, all of which preferentially used pairing of the VH5-51 and VL lambda genes. Crystallographic analysis of five VH5-51/VL lambda-encoded Fabs complexed with various V3 peptides revealed a common three dimensional (3D) shape of the antigen-binding sites primarily determined by the four complementarity determining regions (CDR) for the heavy (H) and light (L) chains: specifically, the H1, H2, L1 and L2 domains. The CDR H3 domain did not contribute to the shape of the binding pocket, as it had different lengths, sequences and conformations for each mAb. The same shape of the binding site was further confirmed by the identical backbone conformation exhibited by V3 peptides in complex with Fabs which fully adapted to the binding pocket and the same key contact residues, mainly germline-encoded in the heavy and light chains of five Fabs. Finally, the VH5-51 anti-V3 mAbs recognized an epitope with an identical 3D structure which is mimicked by a single mimotope recognized by the majority of VH5-51-derived mAbs but not by other V3 mAbs. These data suggest that the identification of preferentially used Ig genes by neutralizing mAbs may define conserved epitopes in the diverse virus envelopes. This will be useful information for designing vaccine immunogen inducing cross-neutralizing Abs.

  20. CCL3 and CCL20-recruited dendritic cells modified by melanoma antigen gene-1 induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate whether dendritic cell (DC) precursors, recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) and CCL20, induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer induced by a DC vaccine expressing melanoma antigen gene-1 (MAGE-1) ex vivo and in vivo. Methods B6 mice were injected with CCL3 and CCL20 via the tail vein. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were analyzed by phenotype analysis and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). For adenoviral (Ad)-mediated gene transduction, cultured F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells were incubated with Ad-MAGE-1. Vaccination of stimulated DC induced T lymphocytes. The killing effect of these T cells against gastric carcinoma cells was assayed by MTT. INF-γ production was determined with an INF-γ ELISA kit. In the solid tumor and metastases model, DC-based vaccines were used for immunization after challenge with MFC cells. Tumor size, survival of mice, and number of pulmonary metastatic foci were used to assess the therapeutic effect of DC vaccines. Results F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cell numbers increased after CCL3 and CCL20 injection. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were phenotyically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. These DCs were transduced with Ad-MAGE-1, which were prepared for DC vaccines expressing tumor antigen. T lymphocytes stimulated by DCs transduced with Ad-MAGE-1 exhibited specific killing effects on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high levels of INF-γ ex vivo. In vivo, tumor sizes of the experimental group were much smaller than both the positive control group and the negative control groups (P < 0.05). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that survival of the experimental group mice was significantly longer than the control groups (P < 0.05). In addition, MAGE-1-transduced DCs were also a therapeutic benefit on an established metastatic tumor, resulting in a tremendous decrease in the number of pulmonary

  1. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  2. Mutation of a Salmonella serogroup-C1-specific gene abrogates O7-antigen biosynthesis and triggers NaCl-dependent motility deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiujuan; Liu, Bin; Shi, Chunlei; Shi, Xianming

    2014-01-01

    Several molecular detection marker genes specific for a number of individual Salmonella serogroups have been recently identified in our lab by comparative genomics for the genotyping of diverse serogroups. To further understand the correlation between serotype and genotype, the function of a Salmonella serogroup-C1-specific gene (SC_2092) was analyzed in this study. It was indicated from the topological prediction using the deduced amino acid sequence of SC_2092 that this putative protein was highly similar to the confirmed Wzx flippases. Furthermore, SDS-PAGE revealed that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, specifically O-antigen synthesis, was incomplete in an SC_2092 in-frame deletion mutant, and no agglutination reaction with the O7 antibody was exhibited in this mutant. Therefore, it was revealed that this Salmonella serogroup-C1-specific gene SC_2092 encoded a putative flippase, which was required for O7-polysaccharide biosynthesis, and was designated here as wzxC1. Subsequently, the effects of the deletion of wzxC1 on bacterial motility and sodium chloride (NaCl) tolerance were evaluated. The wzxC1 mutant lacked swarming motility on solid surfaces and was impaired in swimming motility in soft agar. Moreover, microscopic examination and RT-qPCR exhibited that an increased auto-aggregation and a strong defect in flagella expression, respectively, were responsible for the reduced motility in this mutant. In addition, the wzxC1 mutant was more sensitive than the wild-type strain to NaCl, and auto-aggregation of mutant cells was observed immediately up on the addition of 1% NaCl to the medium. Interestingly, the motility deficiency of the mutant strain, as well as the cell agglomeration and the decrease in flagellar expression, were relieved in a NaCl-free medium. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate a connection between a Salmonella serogroup specific gene identified by comparative genomics with the synthesis of a specific O-antigen

  3. Influence of molecular weight upon mannosylated bio-synthetic hybrids for targeted antigen presenting cell gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jones, Charles H; Gollakota, Akhila; Chen, Mingfu; Chung, Tai-Chun; Ravikrishnan, Anitha; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-07-01

    Given the rise of antibiotic resistant microbes, genetic vaccination is a promising prophylactic strategy that enables rapid design and manufacture. Facilitating this process is the choice of vector, which is often situationally-specific and limited in engineering capacity. Furthermore, these shortcomings are usually tied to an incomplete understanding of the structure-function relationships driving vector-mediated gene delivery. Building upon our initial report of a hybrid bacterial-biomaterial gene delivery vector, a comprehensive structure-function assessment was completed using a class of mannosylated poly(beta-amino esters). Through a top-down screening methodology, an ideal polymer was selected on the basis of gene delivery efficacy and then used for the synthesis of a stratified molecular weight polymer library. By eliminating contributions of polymer chemical background, we were able to complete an in-depth assessment of gene delivery as a function of (1) polymer molecular weight, (2) relative mannose content, (3) polymer-membrane biophysical properties, (4) APC uptake specificity, and (5) serum inhibition. In summary, the flexibility and potential of the hybrid design featured in this work highlights the ability to systematically probe vector-associated properties for the development of translational gene delivery candidates.

  4. Molecular cloning, expression, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding a human myeloid membrane antigen (gp150).

    PubMed Central

    Look, A T; Peiper, S C; Rebentisch, M B; Ashmun, R A; Roussel, M F; Lemons, R S; Le Beau, M M; Rubin, C M; Sherr, C J

    1986-01-01

    DNA from a tertiary mouse cell transformant containing amplified human sequences encoding a human myeloid membrane glycoprotein, gp150, was used to construct a bacteriophage lambda library. A single recombinant phage containing 12 kilobases (kb) of human DNA was isolated, and molecular subclones were then used to isolate the complete gp150 gene from a human placental genomic DNA library. The intact gp150 gene, assembled from three recombinant phages, proved to be biologically active when transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Molecular probes from the gp150 locus annealed with a 4.0-kb polyadenylated RNA transcript derived from human myeloid cell lines and from tertiary mouse cell transformants. The gp150 gene was assigned to human chromosome 15, and was subchromosomally localized to bands q25-26 by in situ hybridization. The chromosomal location of the gp150 gene coincides cytogenetically with the region assigned to the c-fes proto-oncogene, another human gene specifically expressed by myeloid cells. Images PMID:2428842

  5. Androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene polymorphisms and breast cancer in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2005-12-01

    Several previous studies have found the CAG repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene to be associated with breast cancer risk among some groups of Caucasian and Asian women. In a population-based case-control study of 488 African-American women (239 cases and 249 controls), we examined this polymorphism along with a polymorphism (-158 G/A) in an androgen-regulated gene (PSA) whose expression has been correlated with breast cancer prognosis. Overall, we did not observe any significant association between the CAG repeat polymorphism and breast cancer risk. However, among women with a first-degree family history of breast cancer, longer CAG repeats were associated with a significantly increased risk. Women carrying at least one longer allele [(CAG)n > or = 22] had a 3-fold increased risk compared to those with two shorter alleles (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-9.36). There was no significant association between the PSA gene polymorphism and breast cancer risk, nor was there significant gene-gene interaction. In summary, our results further support that shorter CAG repeats (stronger AR transactivation activity) may reduce the risk of breast cancer, at least among some groups of women. Our data, however, are unable to provide evidence that PSA is the pathway through which the protective effect of androgens operates.

  6. Use of antibody gene library for the isolation of specific single chain antibodies by ampicillin-antigen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Grenz, Nicole; Heilmann, Katja

    2013-03-01

    Isolation of recombinant antibodies from antibody libraries is commonly performed by different molecular display formats including phage display and ribosome display or different cell-surface display formats. We describe a new method which allows the selection of Escherichia coli cells producing the required single chain antibody by cultivation in presence of ampicillin conjugated to the antigen of interest. The method utilizes the neutralization of the conjugate by the produced single chain antibody which is secreted to the periplasm. Therefore, a new expression system based on the pET26b vector was designed and a library was constructed. The method was successfully established first for the selection of E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) cells expressing a model single chain antibody (anti-fluorescein) by a simple selection assay on LB-agar plates. Using this selection assay, we could identify a new single chain antibody binding biotin by growing E. coli BL21 Star (DE3) containing the library in presence of a biotin-ampicillin conjugate. In contrast to methods as molecular or cell surface display our selection system applies the soluble single chain antibody molecule and thereby avoids undesired effects, e.g. by the phage particle or the yeast fusion protein. By selecting directly in an expression strain, production and characterization of the selected single chain antibody is possible without any further cloning or transformation steps.

  7. Down-regulation of tumor suppressor gene PTEN, overexpression of p53, plus high proliferating cell nuclear antigen index predict poor patient outcome of hepatocellular carcinoma after resection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tsung-Hui; Wang, Chih-Chi; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Chao-Long; Hung, Chao-Hung; Chen, Chien-Hung; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Lee, Chuan-Mo; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2007-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate the interaction of two tumor suppressor genes PTEN and p53 and their relationship with cell cycle protein proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 124 resected HCC paraffin specimens were collected from 1987 to 1999 for immunohistochemistry. Expression of PTEN, p53 and PCNA in HCC were analyzed for clinicopathologic correlation. The study revealed decreased or absent PTEN immunostaining (PTEN down-regulation) in 42.7% and positive p53 (p53+) immunostaining in 41.9% of HCC. There was a positive correlation between PTEN down-regulation and p53 (+) (P=0.001). PTEN down-regulation or p53 (+) correlated with increased HCC dedifferentiation, advanced pathologic stages and high PCNA labeling index (LI) of tumors (P<0.05). Patients with either PTEN down-regulation, p53 (+), or high PCNA LI had shorter survival and higher recurrence rates than patients with intact PTEN expression, p53 (-), or low PCNA LI respectively (P<0.05). By combining the three genes, patients with all PTEN down-regulation (+)/p53 (+)/high PCNA LI had the shortest overall survival (P<0.001) and the highest recurrence rates (P<0.001), followed by patients with two, one and none of three events accordingly. Combination of PTEN/p53/PCNA represented an independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence and disease-specific survival (P<0.05). In conclusion, the down-regulated PTEN expression and p53 over-expression are involved in the pathogenesis of HCC. They correlate with high PCNA expression, HCC de-differentiation and advanced HCC stages. A combination of the three genes predicts patient outcome more powerfully than any of the individual genes.

  8. Molecular and antigenic characterization of reassortant H3N2 viruses from turkeys with a unique constellation of pandemic H1N1 internal genes.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Yohannes; Kehler, Helen; Handel, Katherine; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Xu, Wanhong; Ojkic, Davor; Pasick, John

    2012-01-01

    Triple reassortant (TR) H3N2 influenza viruses cause varying degrees of loss in egg production in breeder turkeys. In this study we characterized TR H3N2 viruses isolated from three breeder turkey farms diagnosed with a drop in egg production. The eight gene segments of the virus isolated from the first case submission (FAV-003) were all of TR H3N2 lineage. However, viruses from the two subsequent case submissions (FAV-009 and FAV-010) were unique reassortants with PB2, PA, nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix (M) gene segments from 2009 pandemic H1N1 and the remaining gene segments from TR H3N2. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA and NA genes placed the 3 virus isolates in 2 separate clades within cluster IV of TR H3N2 viruses. Birds from the latter two affected farms had been vaccinated with a H3N4 oil emulsion vaccine prior to the outbreak. The HAl subunit of the H3N4 vaccine strain had only a predicted amino acid identity of 79% with the isolate from FAV-003 and 80% for the isolates from FAV-009 and FAV-0010. By comparison, the predicted amino acid sequence identity between a prototype TR H3N2 cluster IV virus A/Sw/ON/33853/2005 and the three turkey isolates from this study was 95% while the identity between FAV-003 and FAV-009/10 isolates was 91%. When the previously identified antigenic sites A, B, C, D and E of HA1 were examined, isolates from FAV-003 and FAV-009/10 had a total of 19 and 16 amino acid substitutions respectively when compared with the H3N4 vaccine strain. These changes corresponded with the failure of the sera collected from turkeys that received this vaccine to neutralize any of the above three isolates in vitro.

  9. Association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 +49A/G gene polymorphism with acute rejection risk in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Hua; Chen, Xue-Xia; Chen, Li; Zheng, Dong-Hua; Liu, Qiong-Shan; Xie, Wen-Feng

    2017-03-23

    The conclusions on the association between cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4) +49A/G gene polymorphism and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation are still debated. This meta-analysis was performed to update the association between CTLA4 +49A/G and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation. The association investigations were identified from PubMed and Cochrane Library, and eligible studies were included and synthesized using meta-analysis method. Fourteen reports were included into this meta-analysis for the association of CTLA4 A/G gene polymorphism and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation, consisting of 962 acute rejection patients and 2084 non-acute rejection controls. The association between CTLA4 G allele/GG genotype and acute rejection risk in renal transplantation was found in this meta-analysis (G allele: OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.03-1.44, P=.02; GG genotype: OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.10-1.69, P=.004). However, the AA genotype was not associated with acute rejection risk in renal transplantation. In conclusion, CTLA4 G allele/GG genotype is associated with the acute rejection risk in renal transplantation.

  10. Clonality Analysis of Immunoglobulin Gene Rearrangement by Next-Generation Sequencing in Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma Suggests Antigen Drive Activation of BCR as Opposed to Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Teresa; Abate, Francesco; Piccaluga, Pierpaolo; Iacono, Michele; Fallerini, Chiara; Renieri, Alessandra; De Falco, Giulia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mourmouras, Vaselious; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Rabadan, Roul; Hummel, Michael; Pileri, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Recent studies using next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis disclosed the importance of the intrinsic activation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway in the pathogenesis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL) due to mutations of TCF3/ID3 genes. Since no definitive data are available on the genetic landscape of endemic Burkitt (eBL), we first assessed the mutation frequency of TCF3/ID3 in eBL compared with sBL and subsequently the somatic hypermutation status of the BCR to answer whether an extrinsic activation of BCR signaling could also be demonstrated in Burkitt lymphoma. Methods: We assessed the mutations of TCF3/ID3 by RNAseq and the BCR status by NGS analysis of the immunoglobulin genes (IGs). Results: We detected mutations of TCF3/ID3 in about 30% of the eBL cases. This rate is significantly lower than that detected in sBL (64%). The NGS analysis of IGs revealed intraclonal diversity, suggesting an active targeted somatic hypermutation process in eBL compared with sBL. Conclusions: These findings support the view that the antigenic pressure plays a key role in the pathogenetic pathways of eBL, which may be partially distinct from those driving sBL development. PMID:26712879

  11. Transcription of a subset of human class II major histocompatibility complex genes is regulated by a nucleoprotein complex that contains c-fos or an antigenically related protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ono, S J; Bazil, V; Levi, B Z; Ozato, K; Strominger, J L

    1991-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the human major histocompatibility complex class II genes requires at least two upstream elements, the X and Y boxes, located in the -50- to -150-base-pair region of all class II promoters. The DRA and DPB promoters contain phorbol ester-responsive elements overlapping the 3' side of their X boxes. Mutation of this sequence down-regulates the efficiency of the DRA promoter, suggesting that a positive regulator(s) binds to this site. In this report, anti-sense c-fos RNA and an anti-c-fos antibody were used to show that the product of the protooncogene c-fos or an antigenically related protein is a component of a complex that binds to the X box and is required for maximal transcription from the DRA and DPB promoters. As c-fos (or its related proteins) cannot bind alone to DNA, these results suggest that it may dimerize with other members of the JUN/AP-1 family, such as hXBP1, to participate in the activation of a subset of class II major histocompatibility complex genes. Images PMID:1709740

  12. Differential regulation of Salmonella typhimurium genes involved in O-antigen capsule production and their role in persistence within tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Cox, Clayton E; Xu, Yimin; Noel, Jason T; Giovannoni, James J; Teplitski, Max

    2013-07-01

    Enteric pathogens, including non-typhoidal Salmonella spp. and enterovirulent Escherichia coli, are capable of persisting and multiplying within plants. Yet, little is still known about the mechanisms of these interactions. This study identified the Salmonella yihT gene (involved in synthesis of the O-antigen capsule) as contributing to persistence in immature tomato fruit. Deletion of yihT reduced competitive fitness of S. enterica sv. Typhimurium in green (but not ripe, regardless of color) tomato fruit by approximately 3 logs. The yihT recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET) reporter was strongly activated in unripe tomato fruit, and fitness of the mutant inversely correlated with the level of the yihT gene expression. Expression of yihT in mature tomato fruit was low, and yihT did not affect competitive fitness within mature fruit. To better understand the molecular basis of the phenotype, behaviors of the yihT RIVET reporter and the yihT mutant were tested in tomato fruit defective in ethylene signaling. These experiments suggest a role for functional ethylene-mediated signaling in the persistence of Salmonella spp. within tomato fruit. Furthermore, jasmonic acid and its precursors strongly reduced expression of yihT.

  13. Highly specific antibody to Rous sarcoma virus src gene product recognizes nuclear and nucleolar antigens in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    David-Pfeuty, T; Nouvian-Dooghe, Y

    1995-01-01

    An antiserum to the Rous sarcoma virus-transforming protein pp60v-src, raised in rabbits immunized with the bacterially produced protein alpha p60 serum (M. D. Resh and R. L. Erikson, J. Cell Biol. 100:409-417, 1985) previously reported to detect very specifically a novel population of pp60v-src and pp60c-src molecules associated with juxtareticular nuclear membranes in normal and Rous sarcoma virus-infected cells of avian and mammalian origin, was used here to investigate by immunofluorescence microscopy localization patterns of Src molecules in human cell lines, either normal or derived from spontaneous tumors. We found that the alpha p60 serum reveals nuclear and nucleolar concentrations of antigens in all the human cell lines tested and in two rat and mouse hepatoma cell lines derived from adult tumorous tissues but not in any established rat and mouse cell lines either untransformed or transformed by the src and ras oncogenes. Both the nuclear and nucleolar stainings can be totally extinguished by preincubation of the serum with highly purified chicken c-Src. We show also that the partitioning of the alpha p60-reactive proteins among the whole nucleus and the nucleolus depends mostly on two different parameters: the position in the cell cycle and the degree of cell confluency. Our observations raise the attractive possibility that, in differentiated cells, pp60c-src and related proteins might be involved not only in mediating the transduction of mitogenic signals at the plasma membrane level but also in controlling progression through the cell cycle and entry in mitosis by interacting with cell division cycle regulatory components at the nuclear level. PMID:7853507

  14. pH-sensitive polymer-liposome-based antigen delivery systems potentiated with interferon-γ gene lipoplex for efficient cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yuba, Eiji; Kanda, Yuhei; Yoshizaki, Yuta; Teranishi, Ryoma; Harada, Atsushi; Sugiura, Kikuya; Izawa, Takeshi; Yamate, Jyoji; Sakaguchi, Naoki; Koiwai, Kazunori; Kono, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    Potentiation of pH-sensitive liposome-based antigen carriers with IFN-γ gene lipoplexes was attempted to achieve efficient induction of tumor-specific immunity. 3-Methylglutarylated poly(glycidol) (MGluPG)-modified liposomes and cationic liposomes were used, respectively, for the delivery of antigenic protein ovalbumin (OVA) and IFN-γ-encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA). The MGluPG-modified liposomes and the cationic liposome-pDNA complexes (lipoplexes) formed hybrid complexes via electrostatic interactions after their mixing in aqueous solutions. The hybrid complexes co-delivered OVA and IFN-γ-encoding pDNA into DC2.4 cells, a murine dendritic cell line, as was the case of MGluPG-modified liposomes for OVA or the lipoplexes for pDNA. Both the lipoplexes and the hybrid complexes transfected DC2.4 cells and induced IFN-γ protein production, but transfection activities of the hybrid complexes were lower than those of the parent lipoplexes. Subcutaneous administration of hybrid complexes to mice bearing E.G7-OVA tumor reduced tumor volumes, which might result from the induction of OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, the hybrid complex-induced antitumor effect was the same level of the MGluPG-modified liposome-mediated antitumor immunity. In contrast, an extremely strong antitumor immune response was derived when these liposomes and lipoplexes without complexation were injected subcutaneously at the same site of tumor-bearing mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections revealed that immunization through the liposome-lipoplex combination promoted the infiltration of CTLs to tumors at an early stage of treatment compared with liposomes, resulting in strong therapeutic effects.

  15. Cloning and Expression of Genes for Dengue Virus Type-2 Encoded-Antigens for Rapid Diagnosis and Vaccine Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-11

    of template, 4 unit of Taq polymerase, 125 mM dNTP, I g.M each of primer. The reactions were perFormed for 25 cycles . The amplified DNA were...25 cycles of denaturation, annealing and DNA synthesis was digested with KpnI and then purified by electrophoresis on an agarose gel. For cloning...Lication (Send deletion mnutant) MMH294 MC k. Lysogen carrying wuild type repressor gene * N5 151 Lysogen carrying temperature sensitive mutation in

  16. Structure of the CD59-encoding gene: further evidence of a relationship to murine lymphocyte antigen Ly-6 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Petranka, J G; Fleenor, D E; Sykes, K; Kaufman, R E; Rosse, W F

    1992-01-01

    The gene for CD59 [membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (MIRL), protectin], a phosphatidylinositol-linked surface glycoprotein that regulates the formation of the polymeric C9 complex of complement and that is deficient on the abnormal hematopoietic cells of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, consists of four exons spanning 20 kilobases. The untranslated first exon is preceded by a G+C-rich promoter region that lacks a consensus TATA or CAAT motif. The second exon encodes the hydrophobic leader sequence of the protein, and the third exon encodes the amino-terminal portion of the mature protein. The fourth exon encodes the remainder of the mature protein, including the hydrophobic sequence necessary for glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor attachment. The structure of the CD59 gene is very similar to that encoding Ly-6, a murine glycoprotein with which CD59 has some structural similarity. The striking similarity in gene structure is further evidence that the two proteins belong to a superfamily of proteins that may also include the urokinase plasminogen-activator receptor and a squid glycoprotein of unknown function. Images PMID:1381503

  17. The DNA sequence of the H-2kb gene: evidence for gene conversion as a mechanism for the generation of polymorphism in histocompatibilty antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, E; Golden, L; Zakut, R; Mellor, A; Fahrner, K; Kvist, S; Flavell, R A

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence of the H-2Kb gene of the C57B1/10 mouse. Comparison of this sequence with that of the allelic H-2Kd shows surprisingly that the exons have accumulated more mutations than their introns. Moreover, many of these changes in the exons are clustered in short regions or hot spots. Additional comparison of these sequences with the H-2Ld and H-2Db sequences shows that, in several cases, the altered sequence generated at the hot spot is identical to the corresponding region of a non-allelic H-2 gene. The clustered changes are responsible for 60% of the amino acid differences between the H-2Kb and H-2Kd genes and suggest that micro-gene conversion events occurring within the exons and involving only tens of nucleotides are an important mechanism for the generation of polymorphic differences between natural H-2 alleles. Images Fig. 3. PMID:11894963

  18. Genetic diversity of the Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen I gene in parasite population from the China-Myanmar border area.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaotong; Zhao, Zhenjun; Feng, Yonghui; Li, Peipei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhaoqing; Yan, Guiyun; Fan, Qi; Cao, Yaming; Cui, Liwang

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the genetic diversity of the Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) gene in Southeast Asia, we determined PfAMA1 sequences from 135 field isolates collected from the China-Myanmar border area and compared them with 956 publically available PfAMA1 sequences from seven global P. falciparum populations. This analysis revealed high genetic diversity of PfAMA1 in global P. falciparum populations with a total of 229 haplotypes identified. The genetic diversity of PfAMA1 gene from the China-Myanmar border is not evenly distributed in the different domains of this gene. Sequence diversity in PfAMA1 from the China-Myanmar border is lower than that observed in Thai, African and Oceanian populations, but higher than that in the South American population. This appeared to correlate well with the levels of endemicity of different malaria-endemic regions, where hyperendemic regions favor genetic cross of the parasite isolates and generation of higher genetic diversity. Neutrality tests show significant departure from neutrality in the entire ectodomain and Domain I of PfAMA1 in the China-Myanmar border parasite population. We found evidence supporting a substantial continent-wise genetic structure among P. falciparum populations, with the highest genetic differentiation detected between the China-Myanmar border and the South American populations. Whereas no alleles were unique to a specific region, there were considerable geographical differences in major alleles and their frequencies, highlighting further necessity to include more PfAMA1 alleles in vaccine designs.

  19. Immunogenic Profiling in Mice of a HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidate (MVA-B) Expressing Four HIV-1 Antigens and Potentiation by Specific Gene Deletions

    PubMed Central

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Nájera, José Luis; Gómez, Carmen E.; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S.; Esteban, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Background The immune parameters of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates that might be relevant in protection against HIV-1 infection are still undefined. The highly attenuated poxvirus strain MVA is one of the most promising vectors to be use as HIV-1 vaccine. We have previously described a recombinant MVA expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens from clade B (referred as MVA-B), that induced HIV-1-specific immune responses in different animal models and gene signatures in human dendritic cells (DCs) with immunoregulatory function. Methodology/Principal Findings In an effort to characterize in more detail the immunogenic profile of MVA-B and to improve its immunogenicity we have generated a new vector lacking two genes (A41L and B16R), known to counteract host immune responses by blocking the action of CC-chemokines and of interleukin 1β, respectively (referred as MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R). A DNA prime/MVA boost immunization protocol was used to compare the adaptive and memory HIV-1 specific immune responses induced in mice by the parental MVA-B and by the double deletion mutant MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that both vectors triggered HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, with the CD8+ T-cell compartment responsible for >91.9% of the total HIV-1 responses in both immunization groups. However, MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R enhanced the magnitude and polyfunctionality of the HIV-1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immune responses. HIV-1-specific CD4+ T-cell responses were polyfunctional and preferentially Env-specific in both immunization groups. Significantly, while MVA-B induced preferentially Env-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R induced more GPN-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, with an enhanced polyfunctional pattern. Both vectors were capable of producing similar levels of antibodies against Env. Conclusions/Significance These findings revealed that MVA-B and MVA-B ΔA41L/ΔB16R induced in mice robust, polyfunctional and durable T

  20. DNA binding and antigene activity of a daunomycin-conjugated triplex-forming oligonucleotide targeting the P2 promoter of the human c-myc gene

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Giuseppina M.; McGuffie, Eileen; Napoli, Sara; Flanagan, Courtney E.; Dembech, Chiara; Negri, Umberto; Arcamone, Federico; Capobianco, Massimo L.; Catapano, Carlo V.

    2004-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFO) that bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner might be used as selective repressors of gene expression and gene-targeted therapeutics. However, many factors, including instability of triple helical complexes in cells, limit the efficacy of this approach. In the present study, we tested whether covalent linkage of a TFO to daunomycin, which is a potent DNA-intercalating agent and anticancer drug, could increase stability of the triple helix and activity of the oligonucleotide in cells. The 11mer daunomycin-conjugated GT (dauno-GT11) TFO targeted a sequence upstream of the P2 promoter, a site known to be critical for transcription of the c-myc gene. Band-shift assays showed that the dauno-GT11 formed triplex DNA with enhanced stability compared to the unmodified TFO. Band shift and footprinting experiments demonstrated that binding of dauno-GT11 was highly sequence-specific with exclusive binding to the 11 bp target site in the c-myc promoter. The daunomycin-conjugated TFO inhibited transcription in vitro and reduced c-myc promoter activity in prostate and breast cancer cells. The daunomycin-conjugated TFO was taken up by cells with a distinctive intracellular distribution compared to free daunomycin. However, cationic lipid-mediated delivery was required for enhanced cellular uptake, nuclear localization and biological activity of the TFO in cells. Dauno-GT11 reduced transcription of the endogenous c-myc gene in cells, but did not affect expression of non-target genes, such as ets-1 and ets-2, which contained very similar target sequences in their promoters. Daunomycin-conjugated control oligonucleotides unable to form triplex DNA with the target sequence did not have any effect in these assays, indicating that daunomycin was not directly responsible for the activity of daunomycin-conjugated TFO. Thus, attachment of daunomycin resulted in increased triplex stability and biological activity of the 11mer GT-rich TFO without

  1. Analysis of HLA-DR glycoproteins by DNA-mediated gene transfer. Definition of DR2 beta gene products and antigen presentation to T cell clones from leprosy patients

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    We have used DNA-mediated gene transfer to express HLA class II molecules in mouse L cells for serological, biochemical, and functional analysis. cDNA clones encoding the DR2 beta a and DR2 beta b products of the DR2Dw2 haplotype were subcloned into a mouse Moloney leukemia virus-based expression vector (pJ4) and transfected separately into mouse L cells together with a HLA-DR alpha/pJ4 construct. These transfectants have allowed differential analysis of the two DR2 beta products in a manner normally prohibited by the concomitant expression seen in B cells. Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE analysis of the transfectants defines the more acidic beta chain as the product of the DR2 beta a sequence, and the more basic chain as the product of the DR2 beta b sequence. The LDR2a transfectants present antigen efficiently to M.leprae-specific T cell clones and are capable of presenting synthetic peptide, 65-kD recombinant mycobacterial antigen and M.leprae. Of the DR2Dw2-restricted T cell clones we have tested, all use the DR2 beta a chain as their restriction element. Inhibition studies with mAbs demonstrate the dependence of presentation by the transfectant on class II and CD4, while mAbs against LFA-1, which substantially inhibit presentation by B-lymphoblastoid cell lines, do not inhibit transfectant presentation. PMID:3128633

  2. Association of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the ST3GAL4 Gene with VWF Antigen and Factor VIII Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jaewoo; Xue, Cheng; Preisser, John S.; Cramer, Drake W.; Houck, Katie L.; Liu, Guo; Folsom, Aaron R.; Couper, David; Yu, Fuli; Dong, Jing-fei

    2016-01-01

    VWF is extensively glycosylated with biantennary core fucosylated glycans. Most N-linked and O-linked glycans on VWF are sialylated. FVIII is also glycosylated, with a glycan structure similar to that of VWF. ST3GAL sialyltransferases catalyze the transfer of sialic acids in the α2,3 linkage to termini of N- and O-glycans. This sialic acid modification is critical for VWF synthesis and activity. We analyzed genetic and phenotypic data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study for the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ST3GAL4 gene with plasma VWF levels and FVIII activity in 12,117 subjects. We also analyzed ST3GAL4 SNPs found in 2,535 subjects of 26 ethnicities from the 1000 Genomes (1000G) project for ethnic diversity, SNP imputation, and ST3GAL4 haplotypes. We identified 14 and 1,714 ST3GAL4 variants in the ARIC GWAS and 1000G databases respectively, with 46% being ethnically diverse in their allele frequencies. Among the 14 ST3GAL4 SNPs found in ARIC GWAS, the intronic rs2186717, rs7928391, and rs11220465 were associated with VWF levels and with FVIII activity after adjustment for age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, ever-smoking status, and ABO. This study illustrates the power of next-generation sequencing in the discovery of new genetic variants and a significant ethnic diversity in the ST3GAL4 gene. We discuss potential mechanisms through which these intronic SNPs regulate ST3GAL4 biosynthesis and the activity that affects VWF and FVIII. PMID:27584569

  3. Evolution of the capsid protein genes of foot-and-mouth disease virus: antigenic variation without accumulation of amino acid substitutions over six decades.

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, M A; Dopazo, J; Hernández, J; Mateu, M G; Sobrino, F; Domingo, E; Knowles, N J

    1992-01-01

    The genetic diversification of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) of serotype C over a 6-decade period was studied by comparing nucleotide sequences of the capsid protein-coding regions of viruses isolated in Europe, South America, and The Philippines. Phylogenetic trees were derived for VP1 and P1 (VP1, VP2, VP3, and VP4) RNAs by using the least-squares method. Confidence intervals of the derived phylogeny (significance levels of nodes and standard deviations of branch lengths) were placed by application of the bootstrap resampling method. These procedures defined six highly significant major evolutionary lineages and a complex network of sublines for the isolates from South America. In contrast, European isolates are considerably more homogeneous, probably because of the vaccine origin of several of them. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that FMDV CGC Ger/26 (one of the earliest FMDV isolates available) belonged to an evolutionary line which is now apparently extinct. Attempts to date the origin (ancestor) of the FMDVs analyzed met with considerable uncertainty, mainly owing to the stasis noted in European viruses. Remarkably, the evolution of the capsid genes of FMDV was essentially associated with linear accumulation of silent mutations but continuous accumulation of amino acid substitutions was not observed. Thus, the antigenic variation attained by FMDV type C over 6 decades was due to fluctuations among limited combinations of amino acid residues without net accumulation of amino acid replacements over time. PMID:1316467

  4. CAGE, a novel cancer/testis antigen gene, promotes cell motility by activation ERK and p38 MAPK and downregulating ROS.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyeeun; Shim, Eunsook; Lee, Hansoo; Hahn, Janghee; Kang, Dongmin; Lee, Yun-Sil; Jeoung, Dooil

    2006-06-30

    We previously identified a novel cancer/testis antigen gene CAGE by screening cDNA expression libraries of human testis and gastric cancer cell lines with sera of gastric cancer patients. CAGE is expressed in many cancers and cancer cell lines, but not in normal tissues apart from the testis. In the present study, we investigated its role in the motility of cells of two human cancer cell lines: HeLa and the human hepatic cancer cell line, SNU387. Induction of CAGE by tetracycline or transient transfection enhanced the migration and invasiveness of HeLa cells, but not the adhesiveness of either cell line. Overexpression of CAGE led to activation of ERK and p38 MAPK but not Akt, and inhibition of ERK by PD98059 or p38 MAPK by SB203580 counteracted the CAGE-promoted increase in motility in both cell lines. Overexpression of CAGE also resulted in a reduction of ROS and an increase of ROS scavenging, associated with induction of catalase activity. Inhibition of ERK and p38 MAPK increased ROS levels in cells transfected with CAGE, suggesting that ROS reduce the motility of both cell lines. Inhibition of ERK and p38 MAPK reduced the induction of catalase activity resulting from overexpression of CAGE, and inhibition of catalase reduced CAGE-promoted motility. We conclude that CAGE enhances the motility of cancer cells by activating ERK and p38 MAPK, inducing catalase activity, and reducing ROS levels.

  5. Detection of monoclonality in intestinal lymphoma with polymerase chain reaction for antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to differentiate from enteritis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, S; Leipig, M; Schöpper, I; Hergt, F; Weber, K; Rütgen, B C; Tsujimoto, H; Hermanns, W; Hirschberger, J

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of canine intestinal lymphoma by morphological examination is challenging, especially when endoscopic tissue specimens are used. The utility of detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement by polymerase chain reaction (PARR) in canine lymphoma has been well established, but its usefulness to distinguish enteritis and intestinal lymphoma remains unclear. In this retrospective study we assessed clonality of 29 primary canine intestinal lymphoma, 14 enteritis and 15 healthy control cases by PARR analysis, using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded full-thickness tissue specimens. We could detect monoclonal rearrangements in 22 of 29 canine intestinal lymphomas [76%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 56-90%] and polyclonal rearrangements in all of the enteritis and healthy control cases (100%; CI 88-100%). We revealed a predominance of T-cell phenotype compared to B-cell phenotype (85%; CI 65-96% and 15%; CI 4-35%, respectively). We showed that PARR analysis contributes to differentiation of canine intestinal lymphoma from enteritis and to phenotyping of lymphomas.

  6. Improvement of neurological deficits in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats after transplantation with allogeneic simian virus 40 large tumor antigen gene-induced immortalized dopamine cells

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, Edward D.; Rosa, Francisco G. La; Edwards-Prasad, Judith; Weiland, David A.; Witta, Samir E.; Freed, Curt R.; Prasad, Kedar N.

    1998-01-01

    The replacement of dopamine (DA) by DA neuron transplants in the treatment of advanced Parkinson disease (PD) is a rational approach. Because of limitations associated with fetal tissue transplants, a clone (1RB3AN27) of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (LTa) gene-induced immortalized DA neurons were used in this study. These allogeneic immortalized dopamine neurons, when grafted into striata of normal rats, did not divide, did not form tumors, did not produce LTa, did not extend neurites to host neurons, and were not rejected, for as long as 13 months after transplantation. Grafted cells when recultured in vitro resumed cell proliferation and LTa production, suggesting the presence of a LTa gene-inhibiting factor in the brain. The grafting of undifferentiated and differentiated 1RB3AN27 cells or differentiated murine neuroblastoma (NBP2) cells into striata of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats (an animal model of PD) caused a time-dependent improvement in neurological deficits (reduction in the methamphetamine-induced turning rate). At 3 months after transplantation, 100% of the animals receiving differentiated 1RB3AN27 cells, 63% of the animals receiving undifferentiated 1RB3AN27 cells, 56% of the animals receiving differentiated NBP2 cells, and 0% of the sham-transplanted animals showed improvements in neurological deficits. At 6 months after transplantation, there was a progressive increase in spontaneous recovery in sham-transplanted animals. These results suggest that immortalized DA neurons should be further studied for their potential use in transplant therapy in advanced PD patients. PMID:9448320

  7. Breed differences in development of anti-insulin antibodies in diabetic dogs and investigation of the role of dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes.

    PubMed

    Holder, Angela L; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Administration of insulin for treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs can stimulate an immune response, with a proportion of animals developing anti-insulin antibodies (AIA). For an IgG antibody response to occur, this would require B cell presentation of insulin peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, encoded by dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes, in order to receive T-cell help for class switching. DLA genes are highly polymorphic in the dog population and vary from breed to breed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate AIA reactivity in diabetic dogs of different breeds and to investigate whether DLA genes influence AIA status. Indirect ELISA was used to determine serological reactivity to insulin in diabetic dogs, treated with either a porcine or bovine insulin preparation. DLA haplotypes for diabetic dogs were determined by sequence-based typing of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 loci. Significantly greater insulin reactivity was seen in treated diabetic dogs (n=942) compared with non-diabetic dogs (n=100). Relatively few newly diagnosed diabetic dogs (3/109) were found to be AIA positive, although this provides evidence that insulin autoantibodies might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease in some cases. Of the diabetic dogs treated with a bovine insulin preparation, 52.3% (182/348) were AIA positive, compared with 12.6% (75/594) of dogs treated with a porcine insulin preparation, suggesting that bovine insulin is more immunogenic. Breeds such as dachshund, Cairn terrier, miniature schnauzer and Tibetan terrier were more likely to develop AIA, whereas cocker spaniels were less likely to develop AIA, compared with crossbreed dogs. In diabetic dogs, DLA haplotype DRB1*0015--DQA1*006--DQB1*023 was associated with being AIA positive, whereas the haplotype DLA-DRB1*006--DQA1*005--DQB1*007 showed an association with being AIA negative. These research findings suggest that DLA genes influence AIA responses in treated diabetic

  8. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, Cesar G; Lujan, Hugo D

    2009-12-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, both in vitro and within the intestines of infected individuals. Variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) cover the entire surface of the trophozoites and are the main antigens recognized by the host. Only 1 of about 200 VSP genes encoded by the Giardia genome is expressed on the surface of individual Giardia cells at any time; however, VSP antigen switching occurs spontaneously. In the recent year, significant advances in the knowledge of the antigen switching process have been achieved, which strongly suggests that antigenic variation in Giardia is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a mechanism similar to RNA interference (RNAi). Several enzymes of the RNAi pathway are directly involved in VSP mRNA silencing and/or translational repression. Although several questions remain regarding how individual VSP antigens are selected for expression on the parasite surface, it is clear that an epigenetic mechanism is involved. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of this fascinating mechanism, analyse conflicting information regarding the structure of VSPs as it relates to the host's immune response, and highlight the major issues that need to be resolved to fully understand antigenic variation in this important pathogen.

  9. TCRs Used in Cancer Gene Therapy Cross-React with MART-1/Melan-A Tumor Antigens via Distinct Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Hossain, Moushumi; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-09-18

    T cells engineered to express TCRs specific for tumor Ags can drive cancer regression. The first TCRs used in cancer gene therapy, DMF4 and DMF5, recognize two structurally distinct peptide epitopes of the melanoma-associated MART-1/Melan-A protein, both presented by the class I MHC protein HLA-A*0201. To help understand the mechanisms of TCR cross-reactivity and provide a foundation for the further development of immunotherapy, we determined the crystallographic structures of DMF4 and DMF5 in complex with both of the MART-1/Melan-A epitopes. The two TCRs use different mechanisms to accommodate the two ligands. Although DMF4 binds the two with a different orientation, altering its position over the peptide/MHC, DMF5 binds them both identically. The simpler mode of cross-reactivity by DMF5 is associated with higher affinity toward both ligands, consistent with the superior functional avidity of DMF5. More generally, the observation of two diverging mechanisms of cross-reactivity with the same Ags and the finding that TCR-binding orientation can be determined by peptide alone extend our understanding of the mechanisms underlying TCR cross-reactivity.

  10. TCRs used in cancer gene therapy cross-react with MART-1/Melan-A tumor antigens via distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M; Hossain, Moushumi; Baker, Brian M

    2011-09-01

    T cells engineered to express TCRs specific for tumor Ags can drive cancer regression. The first TCRs used in cancer gene therapy, DMF4 and DMF5, recognize two structurally distinct peptide epitopes of the melanoma-associated MART-1/Melan-A protein, both presented by the class I MHC protein HLA-A*0201. To help understand the mechanisms of TCR cross-reactivity and provide a foundation for the further development of immunotherapy, we determined the crystallographic structures of DMF4 and DMF5 in complex with both of the MART-1/Melan-A epitopes. The two TCRs use different mechanisms to accommodate the two ligands. Although DMF4 binds the two with a different orientation, altering its position over the peptide/MHC, DMF5 binds them both identically. The simpler mode of cross-reactivity by DMF5 is associated with higher affinity toward both ligands, consistent with the superior functional avidity of DMF5. More generally, the observation of two diverging mechanisms of cross-reactivity with the same Ags and the finding that TCR-binding orientation can be determined by peptide alone extend our understanding of the mechanisms underlying TCR cross-reactivity.

  11. Nucleotide sequence and expression of the gene encoding the major 25-kilodalton outer membrane protein of Brucella ovis: Evidence for antigenic shift, compared with other Brucella species, due to a deletion in the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; Verger, J M; Grayon, M; Zygmunt, M S; Grépinet, O

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences encoding the major 25-kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) (omp25 genes) of Brucella ovis 63/290, Brucella melitensis 16M, Brucella suis 1330, Brucella canis RM6/66, and Brucella neotomae 5K33 (all reference strains) were determined and compared with that of Brucella abortus 544 (P. de Wergifosse, P. Lintermans, J. N. Limet, and A. Cloeckaert, J. Bacteriol. 177:1911-1914, 1995). The major difference found was between the omp25 gene of B. ovis and those of the other Brucella species; the B. ovis gene had a 36-bp deletion located at the 3' end of the gene. The corresponding regions of other Brucella species contain two 8-bp direct repeats and two 4-bp inverted repeats, which could have been involved in the genesis of the deletion. The mechanism responsible for the genesis of the deletion appears to be related to the "slipped mispairing" mechanism described in the literature. Expression of the 25-kDa outer membrane protein (Omp25) in Brucella spp. or expression from the cloned omp25 gene in Escherichia coli cells was studied with a panel of anti-Omp25 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). As shown by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoelectron microscopy, Omp25 was exported to the outer membrane in E. coli expressing either the truncated omp25 gene of B. ovis or the entire omp25 genes of the other Brucella species. Size and antigenic shifts due to the 36-bp deletion were demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting and by the differences in binding patterns in ELISA of the anti-Omp25 MAbs at the cell surface of E. coli cells harboring the appropriate gene and of cells of B. ovis and other Brucella species. In particular, MAbs directed against discontinuous epitopes of the entire Omp25 showed the absence of, or a significant reduction in, antibody reactivity with the B. ovis truncated Omp25. The results indicated that, as defined by the MAbs, exported Omp25 probably presents similar

  12. Analysis of the VSG gene silent archive in Trypanosoma brucei reveals that mosaic gene expression is prominent in antigenic variation and is favored by archive substructure.

    PubMed

    Marcello, Lucio; Barry, J David

    2007-09-01

    Trypanosoma brucei evades host acquired immunity through differential activation of its large archive of silent variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes, most of which are pseudogenes in subtelomeric arrays. We have analyzed 940 VSGs, representing one half to two thirds of the arrays. Sequence types A and B of the VSG N-terminal domains were confirmed, while type C was found to be a constituent of type A. Two new C-terminal domain types were found. Nearly all combinations of domain types occurred, with some bias to particular combinations. One-third of encoded N-terminal domains, but only 13% of C-terminal domains, are intact, indicating a particular need for silent VSGs to gain a functional C-terminal domain to be expressed. About 60% of VSGs are unique, the rest occurring in subfamilies of two to four close homologs (>50%-52% peptide identity). We found a subset of VSG-related genes, differing from VSGs in genomic environment and expression patterns, and predict they have distinct function. Almost all (92%) full-length array VSGs have the partially conserved flanks associated with the duplication mechanism that activates silent genes, and these sequences have also contributed to archive evolution, mediating most of the conversions of segments, containing >/=1 VSG, within and between arrays. During infection, intact array genes became activated by duplication after two weeks, and mosaic VSGs assembled from pseudogenes became expressed by week three and predominated by week four. The small subfamily structure of the archive appears to be fundamental in providing the interacting donors for mosaic formation.

  13. Comparison of O-Antigen gene clusters of all O-Serogroups of Escherichia coli and proposal for adopting a new nomenclature for O-Typing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli strains are classified based on O-antigens that are components of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the cell envelope. O-antigens are important virulence factors, targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system, and play a role in host-pathogen interaction. Because they are hi...

  14. A novel baculovirus vector shows efficient gene delivery of modified porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus antigens and elicits specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Karuppannan, Anbu K; Qiang, Jia; Chang, C C; Kwang, Jimmy

    2013-11-04

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically devastating epizootic of porcine species. Current vaccines are inadequate to control the disease burden and outbreaks in the field. We report a novel baculovirus vaccine vector with White spot syndrome virus immediate early 1 shuttle promoter, with strong activity in both insect cells and mammalian cells, for immunization against PRRSV. The insect cell cultured baculovirus vector produces PRRSV envelope glycoproteins ORF2a, ORF3, ORF4 and ORF5, which are similar to the antigens in the infectious PRRS virion, and these antigens are stably incorporated on the surface of the baculovirus. Further, the baculovirus vector efficiently transduces these antigens in cells of porcine origin, thereby simulating a live infection. The baculovirus vectored PRRSV antigens, upon inoculation in mice, elicits robust neutralizing antibodies against the infective PRRS virus. Further, the experiments indicate that hitherto under emphasized ORF2a and ORF4 are important target antigens for neutralizing PRRSV infectivity.

  15. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  16. Cooperation between the polyomavirus Middle-T-antigen gene and the human c-myc oncogene in a rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell line: Model of in vitro progression

    SciTech Connect

    Berlingieri, M.T.; Portella, G.; Grieco, M.; Santoro, M.; Fusco, A.

    1988-05-01

    Two rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell lines, PC CI 3 and PC myc, were infected with the polyoma murine leukemia virus (PyMLV) carrying the Middle-T-antigen gene of polyomavirus. After infection, both cell lines acquired the typical markers of neoplastic transformation; however, the PC myc cells showed a greater malignant phenotype. Furthermore, the thyroid differentiated functions were completely suppressed in PC myc cells transformed by PyMLV, whereas they were, at least partially, retained in PC CI 3 cells transformed by PyMLV, and in particular, thyroglobulin synthesis and secretion were not affected at all. Since no differences in the expression of the middle-T-antigen gene were observed in the two PyMLV-transformed cell lines, the different properties shown by these two infected cell lines must be ascribed to the expression of the c-myc oncogene.

  17. [Features of the distribution of BoLA-A antigens and alleles of the BoLA-DRB3 gene in Black Pied cattle in relation to association with leukemia].

    PubMed

    Ernst, L K; Sulimova, G E; Orlova, A R; Udina, I G; Pavlenko, S P

    1997-01-01

    The character of distribution of BoLA class-I antigens was studied in Black Pied cattle populations differing in status in relation to leukemia. Associative relationships of distinct antigens with resistance and susceptibility to leukemia were revealed. Using the statusmetria method, an integral estimate of predisposition to leukemia (Z) was calculated taking into consideration the contribution of each antigen in the immunogenetic status of the animal. The interval of Z values was determined, which allowed animals to be divided into groups according to resistance or susceptibility to leukemia. Alleles of the BoLA-DRB3 gene were typed in subsamples of animals with leukemia and healthy animals by the PCR-RFLP method. Twenty alleles of the gene were detected, and their frequencies were determined in both subsamples. Alleles mediating resistance of animals to leukemia (BoLA-DRB3.2*11, *23, and *28) were distributed in the group of healthy animals with frequencies of 0.079, 0.132, and 0.053, respectively; they were completely absent in animals with leukemia. The data on the estimate of animal status in relation to leukemia, which were obtained by the method of statusmetria taking in consideration the real contribution of the each class-I antigen in the detection of the disease risk (value Z), and data of allele typing by the PCR-RFLP method were shown to be in good agreement. The possibility of using BoLA class-I antigen typing in herds to determine the number of animals with leukemia was demonstrated.

  18. Antitumor activity of chimeric immunoreceptor gene-modified Tc1 and Th1 cells against autologous carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Sato, Masayoshi; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kuroki, Masahide; Onodera, Masafumi; Miyamoto, Masaki; Kondo, Satoshi; Nishimura, Takashi

    2006-09-01

    To generate tumor-specific and interferon (IFN)-gamma-producing Tc1 and Th1 cells applicable for many cancer patients, we previously developed a protocol for generating carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific Tc1 and Th1 cells from healthy human T cells by transduction with a lentivirus containing a chimeric immunoglobulin T-cell receptor (cIgTCR) gene composed of single-chain variable fragments from an anti-CEA-specific monoclonal antibody fused to an intracellular signaling domain of CD28 and CD3zeta. These cells, designated Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies, respectively, showed strong antitumor activity against CEA-expressing tumor cells in RAG2-/- mice when both of them were transferred. However, it remains unclear whether it is possible to generate Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies from cancer patients with defective T-cell function because of significant immunosuppression. Here, we prepared Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies from T cells of a colon cancer patient, and asked whether these T bodies can exert effective T-cell function against autologous tumor cells. These T bodies showed high cytotoxicity and produced IFN-gamma in response to CEA-expressing autologous tumor cells, even in the presence of soluble CEA. It was also demonstrated that Th1-T bodies supported the survival of Tc1-T bodies through cell-to-cell interactions. Furthermore, our protocol utilized retrovirus for cIgTCR transduction to achieve better induction efficiency compared to lentivirus-mediated transduction. Taken together, our findings here indicate that retrovirally transduced Tc1-T and Th1-T bodies will become a promising strategy for adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer.

  19. Analysis of T cell antigen receptor (TCR) expression by human peripheral blood CD4-8- alpha/beta T cells demonstrates preferential use of several V beta genes and an invariant TCR alpha chain

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    CD4-CD8- (double negative [DN]) alpha/beta T cells are a largely uncharacterized subpopulation of unknown function. To investigate whether these cells are selected to recognize particular antigens or antigen-presenting molecules, DN alpha/beta T cells were purified from the peripheral blood of five normal donors and their T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains were examined. Random cloning of TCR alpha chains by single-sided polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification identified an invariant rearrangement between V alpha 24 and J alpha Q, with no N region diversity, which was expressed preferentially by DN alpha/beta T cells from all donors. Random cloning also identified a precise V alpha 7.2-J alpha (IGRJa14) rearrangement, with two variable amino acids encoded in the V-J junction, which was enriched in the DN alpha/beta T cell preparations from some, but not all, donors. Analysis of TCR beta chains by quantitative PCR amplification demonstrated that the expression of four V beta gene families, V beta 2, 8, 11, and 13, was markedly increased in these DN alpha/beta T cell preparations. The expression of particular TCRs by DN alpha/beta T cells from multiple donors indicates that these cells, or at least a subpopulation of cells with this phenotype, recognize a limited spectrum of antigens and suggests that they may use nonpolymorphic antigen-presenting molecules. PMID:8391057

  20. Construction of a fusion plasmid containing the PSCA gene and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and its anti-tumor effect in an animal model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mai, T.J.; Ma, R.; Li, Z.; Bi, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is a negative regulator of T cell activation, which competes with CD28 for B7.1/B7.2 binding, and which has a greater affinity. Fusion of specific antigens to extracellular domain of CTLA4 represents a promising approach to increase the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In this study, we evaluated this interesting approach for CTLA4 enhancement on prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA)-specific immune responses and its anti-tumor effects in a prostate cancer mouse model. Consequently, we constructed a DNA vaccine containing the PSCA and the CTLA-4 gene. Vaccination with the CTLA4-fused DNA not only induced a much higher level of anti-PSCA antibody, but also increased PSCA-specific T cell response in mice. To evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of the plasmids, murine models with PSCA-expressing tumors were generated. After injection of the tumor-bearing mouse model, the plasmid carrying the CTLA4 and PSCA fusion gene showed stronger inhibition of tumor growth than the plasmid expressing PSCA alone. These observations emphasize the potential of the CTLA4-fused DNA vaccine, which could represent a promising approach for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:27783810

  1. Vγ9 and Vδ2 T cell antigen receptor genes and butyrophilin 3 (BTN3) emerged with placental mammals and are concomitantly preserved in selected species like alpaca (Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Mohindar M; Göbel, Thomas W; Starick, Lisa; Walter, Lutz; Herrmann, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells recognize phosphorylated products of isoprenoid metabolism (phosphoantigens) PAg with TCR comprising Vγ9JP γ-chains and Vδ2 δ-chains dependent on butyrophilin 3 (BTN3) expressed by antigen-presenting cells. They are massively activated in many infections and show anti-tumor activity and so far, they have been considered to exist only in higher primates. We performed a comprehensive analysis of databases and identified the three genes in species of both placental magnorders, but not in rodents. The common occurrence or loss of in silico translatable Vγ9, Vδ2, and BTN3 genes suggested their co-evolution based on a functional relationship. In the peripheral lymphocytes of alpaca (Vicugna pacos), characteristic Vγ9JP rearrangements and in-frame Vδ2 rearrangements were found and could be co-expressed in a TCR-negative mouse T cell hybridoma where they rescued CD3 expression and function. Finally, database sequence analysis of the extracellular domain of alpaca BTN3 revealed complete conservation of proposed PAg binding residues of human BTN3A1. In summary, we show emergence and preservation of Vγ9 and Vδ2 TCR genes with the gene of the putative antigen-presenting molecule BTN3 in placental mammals and lay the ground for analysis of alpaca as candidate for a first non-primate species to possess Vγ9Vδ2 T cells.

  2. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) / Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melissa B.; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M.; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  3. Genes encoding two Theileria parva antigens recognized by CD8+ T-cells exhibit sequence diversity in South Sudanese cattle populations but the majority of alleles are similar to the Muguga component of the live vaccine cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Pelle, Roger; Mwacharo, Joram M.; Njahira, Moses N.; Marcellino, Wani L.; Kiara, Henry; Malak, Agol K.; EL Hussein, Abdel Rahim M.; Bishop, Richard; Skilton, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    East Coast fever (ECF), caused by Theileria parva infection, is a frequently fatal disease of cattle in eastern, central and southern Africa, and an emerging disease in South Sudan. Immunization using the infection and treatment method (ITM) is increasingly being used for control in countries affected by ECF, but not yet in South Sudan. It has been reported that CD8+ T-cell lymphocytes specific for parasitized cells play a central role in the immunity induced by ITM and a number of T. parva antigens recognized by parasite-specific CD8+ T-cells have been identified. In this study we determined the sequence diversity among two of these antigens, Tp1 and Tp2, which are under evaluation as candidates for inclusion in a sub-unit vaccine. T. parva samples (n = 81) obtained from cattle in four geographical regions of South Sudan were studied for sequence polymorphism in partial sequences of the Tp1 and Tp2 genes. Eight positions (1.97%) in Tp1 and 78 positions (15.48%) in Tp2 were shown to be polymorphic, giving rise to four and 14 antigen variants in Tp1 and Tp2, respectively. The overall nucleotide diversity in the Tp1 and Tp2 genes was π = 1.65% and π = 4.76%, respectively. The parasites were sampled from regions approximately 300 km apart, but there was limited evidence for genetic differentiation between populations. Analyses of the sequences revealed limited numbers of amino acid polymorphisms both overall and in residues within the mapped CD8+ T-cell epitopes. Although novel epitopes were identified in the samples from South Sudan, a large number of the samples harboured several epitopes in both antigens that were similar to those in the T. parva Muguga reference stock, which is a key component in the widely used live vaccine cocktail. PMID:28231338

  4. Time-dependent transition of the immunoglobulin G subclass and immunoglobulin E response in cancer patients vaccinated with cholesteryl pullulan-melanoma antigen gene-A4 nanogel

    PubMed Central

    Kyogoku, Noriaki; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Abiko, Takehiro; Fujiwara, Aki; Maki, Takehiro; Yamamura, Yoshiyuki; Ichinokawa, Masaomi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Imai, Naoko; Miyahara, Yoshihiro; Kageyama, Shinichi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    A phase I+II clinical trial of vaccination with MAGE-A4 protein complexed with cholesteryl pullulan melanoma antigen gene-A4 nanogel (CHP-MAGE-A4) is currently underway in patients with MAGE-A4-expressing cancer. In the present study, the primary phase I endpoint was to test the safety of the administration of 300 µg CHP-MAGE-A4 with and without OK-432. Another aim of the study was to clarify the details of the specific humoral immune response to vaccination. The 9 patients enrolled for phase I were vaccinated 6 times, once every 2 weeks: 3 patients with 100 µg and 3 patients with 300 µg CHP-MAGE-A4, and 3 patients with 300 µg CHP-MAGE-A4 plus 0.5 clinical units of OK-432. Toxicities were assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Clinical response was evaluated by modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours. Immunological monitoring of anti-MAGE-A4-specific antibodies was performed by ELISA of pre- and post-vaccination patient sera. The 6 vaccinations produced no severe adverse events. Stable disease was assessed in 4/9 patients. Anti-MAGE-A4 total immunoglobulin (Ig)G titers increased in 7/9 patients. Efficacious anti-MAGE-A4 IgG1, 2 and 3 antibody responses were observed in 7/9 patients. Among them, positive conversions to T helper 2 (Th2)-type antibody responses (IgG4 and IgE) were observed after frequent vaccination in 4/7 patients. The Th2 conversion was possibly associated with undesirable clinical observations, including progressive disease and the appearance of a new relapse lesion. The present study suggested that frequent vaccinations activated a Th2-dominant status in the cancer patients. The identification of a time-dependent IgG subclass and IgE antibody production during vaccination protocols may be a useful surrogate marker indicating a potentially undesirable change of the immunological environment for an effective antitumor immune response in cancer patients. PMID:28105158

  5. Genetic Diversity of the fliC Genes Encoding the Flagellar Antigen H19 of Escherichia coli and Application to the Specific Identification of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli O121:H19.

    PubMed

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-06-15

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O121:H19 belong to a specific clonal type distinct from other classical EHEC and major enteropathogenic E. coli groups and is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. Sequencing of the fliC genes associated with the flagellar antigen H19 (fliCH19) revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH19 gene sequences in E. coli. A cluster analysis of 12 fliCH19 sequences, 4 from O121 and 8 from non-O121 E. coli strains, revealed five different genotypes. All O121:H19 strains fell into one cluster, whereas a second cluster was formed by five non-O121:H19 strains. Cluster 1 and cluster 2 strains differ by 27 single nucleotide exchanges in their fliCH19 genes (98.5% homology). Based on allele discrimination of the fliCH19 genes, a real-time PCR test was designed for specific identification of EHEC O121:H19. The O121 fliCH19 PCR tested negative in 73 E. coli H19 strains that belonged to serogroups other than O121, including 28 different O groups, O-nontypeable H19, and O-rough:H19 strains. The O121 fliCH19 PCR reacted with all 16 tested O121:H19 strains and 1 O-rough:H19 strain which was positive for the O121 wzx gene. A cross-reaction was observed only with E. coli H32 strains which share sequence similarities in the target region of the O121 fliCH19 PCR. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O121 wzx) and the detection of O121 fliCH19 allele type contributes to improving the identification and molecular serotyping of EHEC O121:H19 motile and nonmotile strains and variants of these strains lacking stx genes.

  6. Antigen S1, encoded by the MIC1 gene, is characterized as an epitope of human CD59, enabling measurement of mutagen-induced intragenic deletions in the AL cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. B.; Seilly, D.; Willers, C.; Vannais, D. B.; McGraw, M.; Waldren, C. A.; Hei, T. K.; Davies, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    S1 cell membrane antigen is encoded by the MIC1 gene on human chromosome 11. This antigen has been widely used as a marker for studies in gene mapping or in analysis of mutagen-induced gene deletions/mutations, which utilized the human-hamster hybrid cell-line, AL-J1, carrying human chromosome 11. Evidence is presented here which identifies S1 as an epitope of CD59, a cell membrane complement inhibiting protein. E7.1 monoclonal antibody, specific for the S1 determinant, was found to react strongly with membrane CD59 in Western blotting, and to bind to purified, urinary form of CD59 in ELISAs. Cell membrane expression of S1 on various cell lines always correlated with that of CD59 when examined by immunofluorescent staining. In addition, E7.1 antibody inhibited the complement regulatory function of CD59. Identification of S1 protein as CD59 has increased the scope of the AL cell system by enabling analysis of intragenic mutations, and multiplex PCR analysis of mutated cells is described, showing variable loss of CD59 exons.

  7. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  8. Preparation and diagnostic utility of a hemagglutination inhibition test antigen derived from the baculovirus-expressed hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein gene of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Kye, Soo-Jeong; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Park, Mi-Ja; Kim, Saeromi; Seul, Hee-Jung; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (rHN) protein from Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with hemagglutination (HA) activity was expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells using a baculovirus expression system. The rHN protein extracted from infected cells was used as an antigen in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test for the detection and titration of NDV-specific antibodies present in chicken sera. The rHN antigen produced high HA titers of 2(13) per 25 μL, which were similar to those of the NDV antigen produced using chicken eggs, and it remained stable without significant loss of the HA activity for at least 12 weeks at 4°C. The rHN-based HI assay specifically detected NDV antibodies, but not the sera of other avian pathogens, with a specificity and sensitivity of 100% and 98.0%, respectively, in known positive and negative chicken sera (n = 430). Compared with an NDV-based HI assay, the rHN-based HI assay had a relative sensitivity and specificity of 96.1% and 95.5%, respectively, when applied to field chicken sera. The HI titers of the rHN-based HI assay were highly correlated with those in an NDV-based HI assay (r = 0.927). Overall, these results indicate that rHN protein provides a useful alternative to NDV antigen in HI assays.

  9. A Prospective Study of Comparing Multi-Gene Biomarker Chip and Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen in the Postoperative Surveillance for Patients with Stage I-III Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tang; Huang, Ming-Yii; Yeh, Yung-Sung; Huang, Ching-Wen; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Wang, Jaw-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating biomarkers can predict clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of our multigene biomarker chip for detecting circulating tumor cells for postoperative surveillance of stage I–III colorectal cancer patients. Materials and Methods In total, 298 stage I–III colorectal cancer patients were analyzed after curative resection between June 2010 and October 2014. During each follow-up, a postoperative surveillance strategy, including ESMO Guidelines Working Group recommendations and the biochip, was used. Results After a 28.4-month median follow-up, 48 (16.1%) patients had postoperative relapse. Univariate analysis revealed that the postoperative relapse risk factors were rectal tumor, perineural invasion, elevated preoperative and postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels, and positive biochip results (all P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that postoperative relapse correlated significantly with elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels (odds ratio = 4.136, P = 0.008) and positive biochip results (odds ratio = 66.878, P < 0.001). However, the sensitivity (P = 0.003), specificity (P = 0.003), positive (P = 0.002) and negative (P = 0.006) predictive values, and accuracy (P < 0.001) of the biochip for predicting postoperative relapse were significantly higher than those of elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels. Moreover, the median lead time between positive biochip result and postoperative relapse detection was significantly earlier than that between elevated postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level and postoperative relapse detection (10.7 vs. 2.8 months, P < 0.001). Furthermore, positive biochip results correlated strongly with lower disease-free survival and overall survival of colorectal cancer patients (both P < 0.001). Conclusion Compared with conventional serum carcinoembryonic antigen detection, our multigene

  10. Frequency analysis of functional immunoglobulin C- and V-gene expression by mitogen-reactive B cells in germfree mice fed chemically defined ultra-filtered "antigen-free" diet.

    PubMed

    Hooijkaas, H; van der Linde-Preesman, A A; Bitter, W M; Benner, R; Pleasants, J R; Wostmann, B S

    1985-04-01

    The frequencies of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-reactive B cells and their antibody specificity repertoire have been determined in the spleen and bone marrow (BM) of conventional (CV) and "antigen-free" C3H/HeCr mice of various ages. The antigen-free mice were germfree (GF)-raised and were fed an ultrafiltered solution of chemically defined (CD) low m.w. nutrients, and were thus devoid of exogenous antigenic stimulation. Spleen and BM cells were grown in a limiting dilution culture system that allows the growth and development of every newly formed LPS-reactive B cell into a clone of IgM-secreting cells which are capable of switching to other immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain isotypes (C-gene expression). The secretion of IgM and IgG1 was determined in the protein A plaque assay, whereas specific IgM antibody-secreting cells (V-gene expression) were detected in plaque assays specific for various heterologous erythrocytes and sheep red blood cells (SRBC) coupled with a number of different haptens. The absolute frequency of LPS-reactive B cells and their capacity to switch to IgG1-secretion was not significantly different in 8- to 12-wk-old and 52-wk-old GF-CD mice and their age-matched CV controls. Moreover, no differences were observed in the frequencies of antigen-specific B cells within the pool of LPS reactive B cells. These frequencies ranged from 1 in 20 to 1 in 50 for NIP4-SRBC and NNP2-SRBC, from 1 in 100 to 1 in 150 for NIP0.4-SRBC, from 1 in 50 to 1 in 100 for TNP30-SRBC, and from 1 in 1000 to 1 in 2000 for SRBC and horse red blood cells. Within the limitations of having determined the switching capacity of IgM to IgG1 only and having assessed only a minor fraction of the total B cell antibody-specificity repertoire, the data indicate that young and old GF-CD mice, although devoid of exogenous antigenic and/or mitogenic stimulation, generate B cells with a similar switching capacity and a similar IgM antibody specificity repertoire as CV mice.

  11. Enhancement of the antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing ability in the PMDC11 leukemic plasmacytoid dendritic cell line via lentiviral vector-mediated transduction of the caTLR4 gene.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Minami; Narita, Miwako; Uchiyama, Takayoshi; Iwaya, Shunpei; Oiwa, Eri; Nishizawa, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Bonehill, Aude; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Takizawa, Jun; Takahashi, Masuhiro

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to enhance the efficiency of leukemia immunotherapy by increasing the antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-inducing ability of leukemia cells. The leukemic plasmacytoid dendritic cell line PMDC05 containing the HLA-A02/24 antigen, which was previously established in our laboratory (Laboratory of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan), was used in the present study. It exhibited higher expression levels of CD80 following transduction with lentiviruses encoding the CD80 gene. This CD80-expressing PMDC05 was named PMDC11. In order to establish a more potent antigen-presenting cell for cellular immunotherapy of tumors or severe infections, PMDC11 cells were transduced with a constitutively active (ca) toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene using the Tet-On system (caTLR4-PMDC11). CD8(+) T cells from healthy donors with HLA-A02 were co-cultured with mutant WT1 peptide-pulsed PMDC11, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PMDC11 or caTLR4-PMDC11 cells. Interleukin (IL)-2 (50 IU/ml) and IL-7 (10 ng/ml) were added on day three of culture. Priming with mutant WT1 peptide-pulsed PMDC11, LPS-stimulated PMDC11 or caTLR4-PMDC11 cells was conducted once per week and two thirds of the IL-2/IL-7 containing medium was replenished every 3-4 days. Immediately prior to the priming with these various PMDC11 cells, the cultured cells were analyzed for the secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ in addition to the percentage and number of CD8(+)/WT1 tetramer(+) T cells using flow cytometry. caTLR4-PMDC11 cells were observed to possess greater antigen-presenting abilities compared with those of PMDC11 or LPS-stimulated PMDC11 cells in a mixed leukocyte culture. CD8 T cells positive for the WT1 tetramer were generated following 3-4 weeks of culture and CD8(+)/WT1 tetramer+ T cells were markedly increased in caTLR4-PMDC11-primed CD8(+) T cell culture compared with PMDC11 or LPS-stimulated PMDC11-primed CD8(+) T

  12. Sequence Variations in the Flagellar Antigen Genes fliCH25 and fliCH28 of Escherichia coli and Their Use in Identification and Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O145:H25 and O145:H28.

    PubMed

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) serogroup O145 is regarded as one of the major EHEC serogroups involved in severe infections in humans. EHEC O145 encompasses motile and non-motile strains of serotypes O145:H25 and O145:H28. Sequencing the fliC-genes associated with the flagellar antigens H25 and H28 revealed the genetic diversity of the fliCH25 and fliCH28 gene sequences in E. coli. Based on allele discrimination of these fliC-genes real-time PCR tests were designed for identification of EHEC O145:H25 and O145:H28. The fliCH25 genes present in O145:H25 were found to be very similar to those present in E. coli serogroups O2, O100, O165, O172 and O177 pointing to their common evolution but were different from fliCH25 genes of a multiple number of other E. coli serotypes. In a similar way, EHEC O145:H28 harbor a characteristic fliCH28 allele which, apart from EHEC O145:H28, was only found in enteropathogenic (EPEC) O28:H28 strains that shared some common traits with EHEC O145:H28. The real time PCR-assays targeting these fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] alleles allow better characterization of EHEC O145:H25 and EHEC O145:H28. Evaluation of these PCR assays in spiked ready-to eat salad samples resulted in specific detection of both types of EHEC O145 strains even when low spiking levels of 1-10 cfu/g were used. Furthermore these PCR assays allowed identification of non-motile E. coli strains which are serologically not typable for their H-antigens. The combined use of O-antigen genotyping (O145wzy) and detection of the respective fliCH25[O145] and fliCH28[O145] allele types contributes to improve identification and molecular serotyping of E. coli O145 isolates.

  13. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Zachary P; Crew, Rebecca M; Brandt, Kevin S; Ullmann, Amy J; Schriefer, Martin E; Molins, Claudia R; Gilmore, Robert D

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing.

  14. Identification of human leukocyte antigen-A24-restricted epitope peptides derived from gene products upregulated in lung and esophageal cancers as novel targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suda, Takako; Tsunoda, Takuya; Daigo, Yataro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tahara, Hideaki

    2007-11-01

    For the development of cancer vaccine therapies, we have searched for possible epitope peptides that can elicit cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to the TTK protein kinase (TTK), lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus K (LY6K) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II mRNA binding protein 3 (IMP-3), which were previously identified to be transactivated in the majority of lung and esophageal cancers. We screened 31, 17 and 17 candidate human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*2402-binding peptides to parts of TTK, LY6K and IMP-3, respectively. As a result, we successfully established strong CTL clones stimulated by TTK-567 (SYRNEIAYL), LY6K-177 (RYCNLEGPPI) and IMP-3-508 (KTVNELQNL) that have specific cytotoxic activities against the HLA-A24-positive target cells pulsed with the candidate peptides. Subsequent analysis of the CTL clones also revealed their cytotoxic activities against lung and esophageal tumor cells that endogenously express TTK, LY6K or IMP-3. A cold target inhibition assay further confirmed that the CTL cell clones specifically recognized the MHC class I–peptide complex. Our results strongly imply that TTK, LY6K and IMP-3 are novel tumor-associated antigens recognized by CTL, and TTK-567 (SYRNEIAYL), LY6K-177 (RYCNLEGPPI) and IMP-3-508 (KTVNELQNL) are HLA-A24-restricted epitope peptides that can induce potent and specific immune responses against lung and esophageal cancer cells expressing TTK, LY6K and IMP-3.

  15. Expression of SV40 T antigen polypeptides in cells biochemically transformed by plasmids containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and the genome of an SV40tsA mutant.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Trkula, D; Dubbs, D R

    1981-10-15

    To study the expression of SV40 tsA genomes that had been non-selectively introduced into mouse cells, SV40 tsA207 DNA was cleaved with BamH I and ligated to BamH I-cleaved plasmid pAGO DNA, which contains a functional HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene in the form of 2 kbp Pvu II fragment inserted at the Pvu II site of pBR322. Recombinant plasmids (11-12 kbp) were isolated and amplified in E. coli K12 strain RRI. Restriction nuclease analyses demonstrated that recombinant plasmids pSB15 and pSB10 contained intact SV40 genomes with the polarity of transcription oriented in the same direction (clockwise) or the opposite direction (counterclockwise), respectively, in relation to that of the HSV-1 TK gene. Cla I-cleaved pSB10 and pSB15 DNAs were used to transform LM(TK-) cells to TK+. Serological and disc PAGE analyses showed that clonal lines transformed by these plasmids all expressed the selected marker, HSV-1 TK. Molecular hybridization experiments showed that transformed clonal lines TF pSB10 C7 and TF pSB15 C10 had integrated intact SV40 genomes at one integration site, TF pSB10 C3 had integrated an SV40 genome with a small deletion near the BamH I site, but TF pSB15 Cl had integrated a plasmid from which most of the SV40 nucleotide sequences had been deleted. IF assays with hamster anti-SV40 tumor sera showed that TF pSB10 C7 and TF pSB15 C10 strongly expressed SV40 T antigens in over 90% of the cells, TF pSB10 C3 expressed SV40 T antigens in a minority of the cells, and TF pSB15 C1 did not express SV40 T antigens at all. [35S]-methionine labelling and immunoprecipitation experiments showed that, at 36.5 degrees C: (1) TF pSB10 C7 and TF pSB15 C10 expressed 92K and 20K mol. wt. species of SV40 T antigens and 50-55K cellular protein; (2) expression of all three was reduced in TF pSB10 C3 cells; and (3) TF pSB15 C1 expressed none of the SV40 T antigens, nor did parental LM(TK-) or TF 8-2 transformed cells (which contained the HSV-1 TK gene but not SV40 DNA). At 40

  16. Presence of interchain disulfide bonds between two gene products that compose the secreted form of an antigen-specific suppressor factor

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The secreted form of the suppressor T cell factor specific for keyhole limpet hemocyanin derived from the hybridoma 34S-704 was found to consist of the two distinct polypeptide chains, i.e., the antigen- binding and the I-J-encoded chains. They were linked in covalent association with disulfide bonds. The two chains were cleaved by the reduction with dithiothreitol and were easy to reconstitute the active form of TsF. The association of the two distinct chains was suggested to be essential for the expression of the TsF activity. PMID:6166720

  17. A Luciferase Gene Driven by an Alphaherpesviral Promoter Also Responds to Immediate Early Antigens of the Betaherpesvirus HCMV, Allowing Comparative Analyses of Different Human Herpesviruses in One Reporter Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Villinger, Clarissa; Schubert, Axel; Walther, Paul; Sinzger, Christian; Lieber, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Widely used methods for quantification of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in cell culture such as immunoblotting or plaque reduction assays are generally restricted to low throughput and require time-consuming evaluation. Up to now, only few HCMV reporter cell lines have been generated to overcome these restrictions and they are afflicted with other limitations because permanently expandable cell lines are normally not fully permissive to HCMV. In this work, a previously existing epithelial cell line hosting a luciferase gene under control of a Varicella-zoster virus promoter was adopted to investigate HCMV infection. The cells were susceptible to different HCMV strains at infection efficiencies that corresponded to their respective degree of epithelial cell tropism. Expression of early and late viral antigens, formation of nuclear inclusions, release of infectious virus progeny, and focal growth indicated productive viral replication. However, viral release and spread occurred at lower levels than in primary cell lines which appears to be due to a malfunction of virion morphogenesis during the nuclear stage. Expression of the luciferase reporter gene was specifically induced in HCMV infected cultures as a function of the virus dose and dependent on viral immediate early gene expression. The level of reporter activity accurately reflected infection efficiencies as determined by viral antigen immunostaining, and hence could discriminate the cell tropism of the tested virus strains. As proof-of-principle, we demonstrate that this cell line is applicable to evaluate drug resistance of clinical HCMV isolates and the neutralization capacity of human sera, and that it allows comparative and simultaneous analysis of HCMV and human herpes simplex virus type 1. In summary, the permanent epithelial reporter cell line allows robust, rapid and objective quantitation of HCMV infection and it will be particularly useful in higher throughput analyses as well as in

  18. TL antigen as a transplantation antigen recognized by TL-restricted cytotoxic T cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to broadly expressed classical class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, structurally closely related TL antigens are expressed in a highly restricted fashion. Unlike classical class I antigens, TL antigens are not known to be targets of cytotoxic T cells or to mediate graft rejection. Whereas classical class I antigens function as antigen-presenting molecules to T cell receptors (TCR), the role of TL is yet to be defined. To elucidate the function of TL, we have derived transgenic mice expressing TL in most tissues including skin by introducing a TL gene, T3b of C57BL/6 mouse origin, driven by the H-2Kb promoter. By grafting the skin of transgenic mice, we demonstrate that TL can serve as a transplantation antigen and mediate a TCR-alpha/beta+ CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response. This T cell recognition of TL does not require antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. Furthermore, we show that C57BL/6 F1 mice develop CD8+ T cells that are cytotoxic for C57BL/6 TL+ leukemia cells, providing further support for the concept that aberrantly expressed nonmutated proteins such as TL can be recognized as tumor antigens. PMID:8113675

  19. Detection of aberrant transcription of major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation genes in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia identifies HLA-DOA mRNA as a prognostic factor for survival.

    PubMed

    Souwer, Yuri; Chamuleau, Martine E D; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Tolosa, Eva; Jorritsma, Tineke; Muris, Jettie J F; Dinnissen-van Poppel, Marion J; Snel, Sander N; van de Corput, Lisette; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Meijer, Chris J L M; Neefjes, Jacques J; Marieke van Ham, S

    2009-05-01

    In human B cells, effective major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-antigen presentation depends not only on MHC class II, but also on the invariant chain (CD74 or Ii), HLA-DM (DM) and HLA-DO (DO), the chaperones regulating the antigen loading process of MHC class II molecules. We analysed immediate ex vivo expression of HLA-DR (DR), CD74, DM and DO in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction demonstrated a highly significant upregulation of DRA, CD74, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA in purified malignant cells compared to B cells from healthy donors. The increased mRNA levels were not translated into enhanced protein levels but could reflect aberrant transcriptional regulation. Indeed, upregulation of DRA, DMB, DOA and DOB mRNA correlated with enhanced expression of class II transactivator (CIITA). In-depth analysis of the various CIITA transcripts demonstrated a significant increased activity of the interferon-gamma-inducible promoter CIITA-PIV in B-CLL. Comparison of the aberrant mRNA levels with clinical outcome identified DOA mRNA as a prognostic indicator for survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that the prognostic value of DOA mRNA was independent of the mutational status of the IGHV genes. Thus, aberrant transcription of DOA forms a novel and additional prognostic indicator for survival in B-CLL.

  20. Age-related changes in the gene expression profile of antigen-specific mouse CD8+ T cells can be partially reversed by blockade of the BTLA/CD160 pathways during vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Dawany, Noor; Parzych, Elizabeth M; Showe, Louise C; Ertl, Hildegund CJ

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed gene expression profiles of young and aged mouse CD8+ T cells specific for the nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A/PR8/34 virus. CD8+ T cells were stimulated either by the NP antigen expressed in its native form or fused into the herpes virus (HSV)-1 glycoprotein D (gD) protein, which blocks signaling through the immunoinhibitory B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 pathways. We show that NP-specific CD8+ T cells from aged mice exhibit numerous differences in gene expression compared to NP-specific CD8+ T cells from young mice, including a significant reduction of expression in genes involved in T cell receptor (TcR) and CD28 signaling. We also show that these changes can be reversed in a sub-population (∼50%) of the aged mice by a BTLA/CD160 checkpoint blockade. These results suggest that BTLA/CD160 checkpoint blockade has potential value as a vaccine additive to induce better CD8+ T cell responses in the aged. PMID:27922818

  1. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  2. Mosaic VSGs and the Scale of Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, James P. J.; Wang, Huanhuan; Barry, J. David

    2013-01-01

    A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct ‘mosaic’ VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection. PMID:23853603

  3. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  4. Identification of functional domains of adenovirus tumor-specific transplantation antigen in types 5 and 12 by viable viruses carrying chimeric E1A genes.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Y; Rasková, J; Fujinaga, K; Raska, K

    1994-05-15

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A gene induces in immunized animals a strong tumor transplantation (TSTA) immunity against Ad tumors. Such immunity with group-A and group-C viruses is highly group-specific and no cross-protection is detected between serotypes 5 and 12. This fact was used to map the domains of the Ad5 and Ad12 E1A gene products, respectively, which control the TSTA. We constructed a library of 8 recombinant viruses (H5sub1101 through H5sub1108) which carry chimeric Ad5/Ad12 E1A genes in the background of Ad5. The chimeric genes are functional and these viruses are viable. Some of these constructs induce strong and highly specific tumor syngraft immunity in immunized rats. The viruses carrying the 5' terminus of the first E1A exon derived from Ad12 (viruses H5sub1101, H5sub1102 and H5sub1103) induce strong protection against Ad12 tumors irrespective of the rest of their E1A sequence. The viruses which carry the second exon of the Ad5 E1A gene (viruses H5sub1101, H5sub1102 and H5sub1106) protect against group-C tumors, regardless of the origin of the rest of their E1A gene. The 2 viruses that carry the 5' E1A terminus of the first exon of Ad12 and the second exon of Ad5 (H5sub1101 and H5sub1102) are thus effective in inducing immunity against Ad12 tumors as well as against Ad2 tumors. The viruses which carry the 5' terminus of the first exon derived from Ad5 and the second exon of Ad12 (H5sub1107 and H5sub 1108) fail to induce immunity against either tumor. Expression of only the truncated 5' terminus of the Ad12 E1A gene (viruses H5sub1104 and H5sub1105) is sufficient for induction of Ad12 TSTA. Our results provide direct and unequivocal in vivo evidence that TSTA activities of adenovirus groups A and C are controlled by different domains of their respective E1A genes. The Ad12 TSTA is a function of the 5' terminus of the first E1A exon, while the Ad5 TSTA is coded for by the 3' exon of its E1A gene.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum genetic diversity can be characterised using the polymorphic merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA-2) gene as a single locus marker.

    PubMed

    Prescott, N; Stowers, A W; Cheng, Q; Bobogare, A; Rzepczyk, C M; Saul, A

    1994-02-01

    The genetic diversity of Solomon Island Plasmodium falciparum isolates was examined using MSA-2 as a single locus marker. Amplification of MSA-2 gene fragments showed size polymorphism and the presence of mixed infections. Sequence analysis indicated a global representation of MSA-2 alleles with representatives of 3D7/CAMP allelic subfamilies and the FCQ-27 allelic family being identified. A simplified method of characterisation, utilising PCR-RFLPs of MSA-2 gene fragments, was developed. The RFLPs allowed identification of allelic families and further distinction within the 3D7/CAMP family. The amplification of MSA-2 gene fragments from culture derived lines revealed a loss of diversity for a number of Solomon Island isolates. Genomic diversity was confirmed for Solomon Island lines, along with Papua New Guinean and Thai lines, by the generation of 7H8/6 fingerprints. All lines were distinct and band sharing frequencies and Wagner tree construction failed to identify any geographic clustering.

  6. Consensus HIV-1 FSU-A Integrase Gene Variants Electroporated into Mice Induce Polyfunctional Antigen-Specific CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krotova, Olga; Starodubova, Elizaveta; Petkov, Stefan; Kostic, Linda; Agapkina, Julia; Hallengärd, David; Viklund, Alecia; Latyshev, Oleg; Gelius, Eva; Dillenbeck, Tomas; Karpov, Vadim; Gottikh, Marina; Belyakov, Igor M.; Lukashov, Vladimir; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective is to create gene immunogens targeted against drug-resistant HIV-1, focusing on HIV-1 enzymes as critical components in viral replication and drug resistance. Consensus-based gene vaccines are specifically fit for variable pathogens such as HIV-1 and have many advantages over viral genes and their expression-optimized variants. With this in mind, we designed the consensus integrase (IN) of the HIV-1 clade A strain predominant in the territory of the former Soviet Union and its inactivated derivative with and without mutations conferring resistance to elvitegravir. Humanized IN gene was synthesized; and inactivated derivatives (with 64D in the active site mutated to V) with and without elvitegravir-resistance mutations were generated by site-mutagenesis. Activity tests of IN variants expressed in E coli showed the consensus IN to be active, while both D64V-variants were devoid of specific activities. IN genes cloned in the DNA-immunization vector pVax1 (pVaxIN plasmids) were highly expressed in human and murine cell lines (>0.7 ng/cell). Injection of BALB/c mice with pVaxIN plasmids followed by electroporation generated potent IFN-γ and IL-2 responses registered in PBMC by day 15 and in splenocytes by day 23 after immunization. Multiparametric FACS demonstrated that CD8+ and CD4+ T cells of gene-immunized mice stimulated with IN-derived peptides secreted IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α. The multi-cytokine responses of CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells correlated with the loss of in vivo activity of the luciferase reporter gene co-delivered with pVaxIN plasmids. This indicated the capacity of IN-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells to clear IN/reporter co-expressing cells from the injection sites. Thus, the synthetic HIV-1 clade A integrase genes acted as potent immunogens generating polyfunctional Th1-type CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Generation of such response is highly desirable for an effective HIV-1 vaccine as it offers a possibility to attack virus-infected cells via both MHC

  7. Rapid and accurate typing of Bordetella pertussis targeting genes encoding acellular vaccine antigens using real time PCR and High Resolution Melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wai-Fong; Maharjan, Ram P; Reeves, Peter R; Sintchenko, Vitali; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Lan, Ruiting

    2009-06-01

    Real Time-PCR (RT-PCR) and high resolution melt (HRM) analyses were used for rapid typing of genes encoding components of the pertussis acellular vaccine, namely prn, ptxA, fhaB, fim2 and fim3. The length polymorphisms in prn were detected by RT-PCR followed by HRM; single nucleotide polymorphisms in prn and other genes were detected by hairpin primer RT-PCR. These rapid methods are suitable for large-scale studies of vaccine-driven evolution of Bordetella pertussis.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of malaria in Cameroon. XVIII. Polymorphisms of the Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface antigen-2 gene in isolates from symptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Basco, Leonardo K; Tahar, Rachida; Escalante, Ananias

    2004-03-01

    Merozoite surface antigen-2 (MSA-2) is a polymorphic genetic marker that is highly discriminatory for characterizing Plasmodium falciparum field isolates. Genetic diversity of isolates obtained from symptomatic patients residing in Yaounde, Cameroon was analyzed by an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of amplification products. Of 137 isolates, 25 (18%) had only FC27-type alleles, 40 (29%) had only 3D7-type alleles, and 72 (53%) had multiple parasite populations with both alleles. Of 295 fragments, 145 (49.2%) and 150 (50.8%) belonged to FC27 and 3D7 alleles, respectively. There were 23 different MSA-2 alleles (10 FC27-type and 13 3D7-type that yielded 44 different combinations in multiple infections). DNA sequencing showed distinct individual sequences. Sequences belonging to the FC27 allelic family were relatively conserved, with most of the polymorphism arising from differences in the number of repeat units. In contrast, the sequences within the GSA-rich region in 3D7 allelic family were less conserved, but many of the sequences in Cameroonian isolates have been identified in other isolates from geographically distant origins. Our results show an extensive diversity of the central region of MSA-2 in size, allelic family, combinations of these two features in multiple infections, and sequence variations underlying the complex population structure of P. falciparum clinical isolates in Yaounde, Cameroon.

  9. Simultaneous expression of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and hepatitis B surface antigen/somatostatin (HBsAg/SS) fusion genes in a construct in the skeletal muscle enhances rabbit weight gain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian-wei; Liu, Song-cai; Hao, Lin-lin; Zhang, Yong-liang; Zhang, Qianqian; Ren, Xiao-hui; Jiang, Qing-yan

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin (SS) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) are synthesized and secreted by the hypothalamus, which can control the synthesis and secretion of the growth hormone (GH) from the hypophysis as well as regulate the GH concentrations in animals and humans. In this article, we describe the regulation of animal growth using plasmid DNA encoding both the GHRH gene and the SS gene fused with the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) gene. We constructed a series of expression plasmids to express the GHRH and HBsAg-SS fusion genes individually as well as collectively. The fusion gene and GHRH were successfully expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, as proven by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting tests. Poly D, L-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) plasmid-encapsulating microspheres were prepared and injected intramuscularly into the leg skeletal muscles of rabbits. Weight gain/day and the levels of insulinlike growth factor-I (IGF-I), SS, and hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) were monitored. During days 30 postinjection, increase in weight gain/day and IGF- I concentration and decrease in SS were observed in treatment groups. From days 15 to 30 postinjection, the weight gain/day significantly increased (P < 0.05) by 129.13%, 106.8%, and 72.82% relative to the control group in the co-expression GHRH and fusion gene (named P-G-HS), fusion gene (named P-HS), and GHRH (named P-G) groups, respectively. And most importantly, the P-G-HS group showed significant weight gain/day (P < 0.05) relative to the P-G and P-HS groups. A significant increase in the IGF-I concentration and decrease in the SS level relative to the control group were also observed. The results indicated that the combination of plasmid-mediated GHRH supplementation and positive immunization against SS led to more robust weight gain/day in rabbits.

  10. DMA and DMB are the only genes in the class II region of the human MHC needed for class II-associated antigen processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ceman, S.; Rudersdorf, R.A.; Petersen, J.M.

    1995-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that homozygous mutations between the LMP2 and DNA loci in the human MHC cause class II molecules to be abnormally conformed and unstable in the presence of SDS at low temperature, and impede class II-associated Ag processing and presentation. These abnormalities result from impaired ability to form intracellular class II/peptide complexes that predominate in normal cells. We show in this work that this defect results from deficient expression of either the DMA or the DMB gene. Human B-LCL.174 (DR3) cells, which have a deletion of all known expressible genes in the class II region, express transgene-encoded HLA-DR3, but have the abnormalities. Transfer of cosmid HA14, which contains the DMA and DMB genes, into .174 (DR3) cells restored normal DR3 conformation, stability in 0.4% SDS at 0{degrees}, and ability to process and present tetanus toxoid, but only when both DMA and DMB mRNAs were present. The requirement for both genetic expressions in engendering normal phenotypes was confirmed by transferring the cloned genes into .174 (DR3) cells separately or together. Because normal phenotypes were fully restored in transferent cells expressing DMA plus DMB, other genes in the {approximately} 1-mb homozygous class II region deletion in .174 (DR3) cells either do not participate in or are dispensable for apparently normal production of intracellular class II/peptide complexes. The properties of DM-deficient EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) suggest ways of identifying humans in whom DM deficiency contributes to congenital immunodeficiency and malignancy. 67 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Two amino acid substitutions in apolipoprotein B are in complete allelic association with the antigen group (x/y) polymorphism: Evidence for little recombination in the 3' end of the human gene

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Alison M.; Renges, Helmut-H.; Xu, Chun-Fang; Peacock, Rachel; Brasseur, Robert; Laxer, Gerald; Tikkanen, Matti J.; Bütler, Réné; Saha, N.; Hamsten, Anders; Rosseneu, Maryvonne; Talmud, Philippa; Humphries, Steve E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the identification of an A-to-G base change, in exon 29 of the apolipoprotein B (apo B) gene, that results in the substitution of serine for asparagine at residue 4311 of mature apo B100. In a recent publication, Huang et al. have reported a C-to-T base change in exon 26 that causes the substitution of leucine for proline at residue 2712 of apo B. We have found complete linkage disequilibrium between the alleles at both these sites and an immunochemical polymorphism of LDL designated antigen group (x/y) (Ag(x/y)) in a sample of 118 Finnish individuals. This implies that either one of these substitutions–or both of them combined–could be the molecular basis of the Ag(x/y) antigenic determinants, with the allele encoding serine4311 plus leucine2712 representing the Ag(x) epitope, and that encoding asparagine4311 plus proline2712 the Ag(y) epitope. In a sample of 90 healthy Swedish individuals the Leu2712/Ser4311 allele is associated both with reduced serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and apo B and with raised levels of HDL. However, these differences are of smaller effect than those associated with the XbaI RFLP of the apo B gene in this sample. We have also genotyped 523 individuals from European, Asian, Chinese, and Afro-Caribbean populations and have found complete association between the sites encoding residues 2712 and 4311 in all of these samples, although there are large allele frequency differences between these populations. In addition, there is strong linkage disequilibrium with allelic association between the alleles of these sites and those of the XbaI RFLP in all the populations examined. Taken together, these data suggest that, since the divergence of the major ethnic groups, there has been little or no recombination in the 3' end of the human apo B gene. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:1370364

  12. Superexpression of tuberculosis antigens in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Sheveleva, Anna A; Frolova, Olga Y; Komarova, Tatjana V; Zvereva, Anna S; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    Recent developments in genetic engineering allow the employment of plants as factories for 1/foreign protein production. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) ESAT6 antigen was expressed in different plant systems, but the level of vaccine protein accumulation was extremely low. We describe the technology for superexpression of TB vaccine proteins (Ag85B, ESAT6, and ESAT6:Ag85B fusion) in plant leaves which involves: (i) construction of tobacco mosaic virus-based vectors with the coat protein genes substituted by those for TB antigens; (ii) Agrobacterium-mediated delivery to plant leaf tissues of binary vectors containing the cDNA copy of the vector virus genome; and (iii) replication of virus vectors in plant cells under conditions suppressing the virus-induced gene silencing. This technology enables efficient production of the TB vaccine proteins in plants; in particular, the level of Ag85B antigen accumulation was not less than 800 mg/kg of fresh leaves. Expression of TB antigens in plant cells as His(6)-tagged proteins promoted their isolation and purification by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Deletion of transmembrane domains from Ag85B caused a dramatic increase in its intracellular stability. We propose that the strategy of TB antigens superproduction in a plant might be used as a basis for the creation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against TB.

  13. Antigen presentation by Hodgkin's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Cossman, J; Diehl, V; Volkman, D J

    1985-11-01

    The L428 tumor cell line is a long-term tissue culture of Reed-Sternberg cells which was derived from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease. The L428 cells express all known cell surface antigens, cytochemical staining, and cytologic features of freshly explanted Reed-Sternberg cells. In addition to the previously described HLA-DR cell surface antigens, the L428 cells are now demonstrated to express both DS and SB alloantigens. Thus, the L428 cells express all of the known subclasses of the human immune response genes that are located in the major histocompatibility complex. Furthermore, the L428 cells are capable of presenting soluble antigen to T cells in a genetically restricted fashion. T cell lines were established from normal donors previously immunized with tetanus toxoid. The T cells utilized were incapable of tetanus toxoid-induced proliferation unless antigen-presenting cells were added to the cultures. However, T cells from the two normal donors, which like the L428 cells expressed HLA-DR 5, demonstrated significant proliferative responses when cultured with tetanus toxoid and L428 cells. No proliferative response was observed when the L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells for a DR (4,-), DR (2,-) or DR (1,7) T cell line. The tetanus toxoid dose-response curve was similar regardless of whether autologous mononuclear leukocytes or L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells. The T cell proliferation induced by soluble antigen was also blocked by anti-HLA-DR antibody. Thus, functionally, Hodgkin's disease may be classified as a tumor of antigen-presenting cells.

  14. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  15. Genetic Analysis and Detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 Genes Coding for Serologically Closely Related Flagellar Antigens in Human and Animal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Beutin, Lothar; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The E. coli flagellar types H1 and H12 show a high serological cross-reactivity and molecular serotyping appears an advantageous method to establish a clear discrimination between these flagellar types. Analysis of fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene sequences showed that they were 97.5% identical at the nucleotide level. Because of this high degree of homology we developed a two-step real-time PCR detection procedure for reliable discrimination of H1 and H12 flagellar types in E. coli. In the first step, a real-time PCR assay for common detection of both fliCH1 and fliCH12 genes is used, followed in a second step by real-time PCR assays for specific detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12, respectively. The real-time PCR for common detection of fliCH1 and fliCH12 demonstrated 100% sensitivity and specificity as it reacted with all tested E. coli H1 and H12 strains and not with any of the reference strains encoding all the other 51 flagellar antigens. The fliCH1 and fliCH12 gene specific assays detected all E. coli H1 and all E. coli H12 strains, respectively (100% sensitivity). However, both assays showed cross-reactions with some flagellar type reference strains different from H1 and H12. The real-time PCR assays developed in this study can be used in combination for the detection and identification of E. coli H1 and H12 strains isolated from different sources. PMID:26913025

  16. Targeted Disruption of a Ring-infected Erythrocyte Surface Antigen (RESA)-like Export Protein Gene in Plasmodium falciparum Confers Stable Chondroitin 4-Sulfate Cytoadherence Capacity*

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Suchi; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Miao, Jun; Cui, Liwang; Salanti, Ali; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Gowda, D. Channe

    2014-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family proteins mediate the adherence of infected erythrocytes to microvascular endothelia of various organs, including the placenta, thereby contributing to cerebral, placental, and other severe malaria pathogenesis. Several parasite proteins, including KAHRP and PfEMP3, play important roles in the cytoadherence by mediating the clustering of PfEMP1 in rigid knoblike structures on the infected erythrocyte surface. The lack of a subtelomeric region of chromosome 2 that contains kahrp and pfemp3 causes reduced cytoadherence. In this study, microarray transcriptome analysis showed that the absence of a gene cluster, comprising kahrp, pfemp3, and four other genes, results in the loss of parasitized erythrocytes adhering to chondroitin 4-sulfate (C4S). The role of one of these genes, PF3D7_0201600/PFB0080c, which encodes PHISTb (Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric b) domain-containing RESA-like protein 1 expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface, was investigated. Disruption of PFB0080c resulted in increased var2csa transcription and VAR2CSA surface expression, leading to higher C4S-binding capacity of infected erythrocytes. Further, PFB0080c-knock-out parasites stably maintained the C4S adherence through many generations of growth. Although the majority of PFB0080c-knock-out parasites bound to C4S even after culturing for 6 months, a minor population bound to both C4S and CD36. These results strongly suggest that the loss of PFB0080c markedly compromises the var gene switching process, leading to a marked reduction in the switching rate and additional PfEMP1 expression by a minor population of parasites. PFB0080c interacts with VAR2CSA and modulates knob-associated Hsp40 expression. Thus, PFB0080c may regulate VAR2CSA expression through these processes. Overall, we conclude that PFB0080c regulates PfEMP1 expression and the parasite's cytoadherence. PMID:25342752

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of the Ehrlichia chaffeensis variable-length PCR target: an antigen-expressing gene that exhibits interstrain variation.

    PubMed

    Sumner, J W; Childs, J E; Paddock, C D

    1999-05-01

    A clone expressing an immunoreactive protein with an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa was selected from an Ehrlichia chaffeensis Arkansas genomic library by probing with anti-E. chaffeensis hyperimmune mouse ascitic fluid. Nucleotide sequencing revealed an open reading frame (ORF) capable of encoding a 198-amino-acid polypeptide. The ORF contained four imperfect, direct, tandem 90-bp repeats. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences did not show close homologies to entries in the molecular databases. PCR with primers whose sequences matched the sequences flanking the ORF was performed with DNA samples extracted from cell cultures infected with nine different isolates of E. chaffeensis, blood samples from seven patients with monocytic ehrlichiosis, and Amblyomma americanum ticks collected in four different states. The resulting amplicons varied in length, containing three to six repeat units. This gene, designated the variable-length PCR target, is useful for PCR detection of E. chaffeensis and differentiation of isolates.

  18. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  19. Probing the human antibody repertoire to exogenous antigens: Characterization of the H and L chain V region gene segments from anti-hepatitis B virus antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Andris, J.S.; Capra, J.D. ); Ehrlich, P.H.; Oestberg, L. )

    1992-12-15

    Structural studies of human antibody V regions have been largely limited to those involving the fetal repertoire, autoantibodies, and malignant cell rearrangements, leaving the normal' repertoire relatively unexplored. In this study the authors describe the nucleotide sequences of the H and L chain V regions of four antibodies specific for the surface Ag of the hepatitis B virus. Monoclonal cell lines were derived from healthy individuals who received standard immunizations with the serum-derived or recombinant hepatitis B virus vaccines by fusion of PBL to a heterohybridoma cell line, SPAZ-4. They utilized the polymerase chain reaction to aimplify the H and L chain V regions for cloning and sequencing. The four antibodies express the following V region combinations: V[sub H]III/V[lambda]V, V[sub H]III/V[kappa]II, V[sub H]IV/V[kappa]I, V[sub H]V/V[lambda]III. When compared to germline genes with the closest sequence homology, all of the V regions appear to have undergone somatic mutation, ranging from 3.4 to 11.3% for the H chain, and 5.1 to 9.2% for the L chain. Analysis of the mutations shows them to be typical for an Ag-driven immune response. 50 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Genetic diversity and antigenicity variation of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Takemae, Hitoshi; Simking, Pacharathon; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe clinical disease in cattle worldwide. The genetic diversity of parasite antigens often results in different immune profiles in infected animals, hindering efforts to develop immune control methodologies against the B. bovis infection. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the merozoite surface antigen-1 (msa-1) gene using 162 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from cattle populations reared in different geographical regions of Thailand. The identity scores shared among 93 msa-1 gene sequences isolated by PCR amplification were 43.5-100%, and the similarity values among the translated amino acid sequences were 42.8-100%. Of 23 total clades detected in our phylogenetic analysis, Thai msa-1 gene sequences occurred in 18 clades; seven among them were composed of sequences exclusively from Thailand. To investigate differential antigenicity of isolated MSA-1 proteins, we expressed and purified eight recombinant MSA-1 (rMSA-1) proteins, including an rMSA-1 from B. bovis Texas (T2Bo) strain and seven rMSA-1 proteins based on the Thai msa-1 sequences. When these antigens were analyzed in a western blot assay, anti-T2Bo cattle serum strongly reacted with the rMSA-1 from T2Bo, as well as with three other rMSA-1 proteins that shared 54.9-68.4% sequence similarity with T2Bo MSA-1. In contrast, no or weak reactivity was observed for the remaining rMSA-1 proteins, which shared low sequence similarity (35.0-39.7%) with T2Bo MSA-1. While demonstrating the high genetic diversity of the B. bovis msa-1 gene in Thailand, the present findings suggest that the genetic diversity results in antigenicity variations among the MSA-1 antigens of B. bovis in Thailand.

  1. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function.

    PubMed

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS.

  2. The MS Risk Allele of CD40 Is Associated with Reduced Cell-Membrane Bound Expression in Antigen Presenting Cells: Implications for Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Field, Judith; Shahijanian, Fernando; Schibeci, Stephen; Johnson, Laura; Gresle, Melissa; Laverick, Louise; Parnell, Grant; Stewart, Graeme; McKay, Fiona; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Butzkueven, Helmut; Booth, David

    2015-01-01

    Human genetic and animal studies have implicated the costimulatory molecule CD40 in the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the cell specific gene and protein expression variation controlled by the CD40 genetic variant(s) associated with MS, i.e. the T-allele at rs1883832. Previously we had shown that the risk allele is expressed at a lower level in whole blood, especially in people with MS. Here, we have defined the immune cell subsets responsible for genotype and disease effects on CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein level. In cell subsets in which CD40 is most highly expressed, B lymphocytes and dendritic cells, the MS-associated risk variant is associated with reduced CD40 cell-surface protein expression. In monocytes and dendritic cells, the risk allele additionally reduces the ratio of expression of full-length versus truncated CD40 mRNA, the latter encoding secreted CD40. We additionally show that MS patients, regardless of genotype, express significantly lower levels of CD40 cell-surface protein compared to unaffected controls in B lymphocytes. Thus, both genotype-dependent and independent down-regulation of cell-surface CD40 is a feature of MS. Lower expression of a co-stimulator of T cell activation, CD40, is therefore associated with increased MS risk despite the same CD40 variant being associated with reduced risk of other inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Our results highlight the complexity and likely individuality of autoimmune pathogenesis, and could be consistent with antiviral and/or immunoregulatory functions of CD40 playing an important role in protection from MS. PMID:26068105

  3. Diagnostic Antigens of Leishmania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-31

    braziliensis (MHOM/BR/75/M2903), L. chagasi (MJOM/BR/82/BA-2,C 1), L. donovani (MHOMiEt/67iHU3), Leishmania guyanensis (MIHOMJBR/75/M4147), L. infantum (IPT-1...comparative test to a variety of other recombinant Leishmania antigens including L. chagasi hsp70, L. braziliensis hsp83/90, L. braziliensis eIF4A, L...34 4. AD CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-92-C-2082 EC•£ 2 j 994 ’i, L TITLE: DIAGNOSTIC ANTIGENS OF LEISHMANIA L PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven G. Reed, Ph.D

  4. Genetic regulation of variable Vi antigen expression in a strain of Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed Central

    Snellings, N J; Johnson, E M; Kopecko, D J; Collins, H H; Baron, L S

    1981-01-01

    Certain strains of the genus Citrobacter exhibit a variable expression of the Vi surface antigen that appears to involve a special mechanism for regulation of gene expression. Two nonlinked chromosomal loci, viaA and viaB, are known to determine nonvariable Vi antigen expression in strains of Salmonella. To confirm the presence of analogous loci in Citrobacter and to ascertain whether either of them is involved in variable Vi antigen expression in this organism, donor strains were constructed from Citrobacter freundii WR7004 and used to transfer their Vi antigen-determining genes to ViaA- and ViaB- Salmonella typhi recipient strains. Vi antigen expression in C. freundii was found to be controlled by loci analogous to the Salmonella via genes. S. typhi recipients of the C. freundii viaA+ genes were restored to the full, continuous expression of the Vi antigen normally seen in S. typhi. Thus, the C. freundii viaA genes appeared to play no role in the variable expression of the Vi antigen. In contrast, S. typhi recipients of the C. freundii viaB+ genes exhibited the rapid, reversible alternation between full Vi antigen expression and markedly reduced Vi antigen expression that was seen to occur in the C. freundii parent. The C. freundii viaB locus was thus identified as the one whose genes are regulated so as to produce variable Vi antigen expression. Genes determining another C. freundii surface antigen, the synthesis of which is not affected by the mechanism regulating Vi expression, were coinherited with the C. freundii viaB+ genes. An invertible, insertion sequence element located within the C. freundii viaB locus is proposed to account for the regulation of variable Vi antigen expression. Images PMID:6161917

  5. Sequence heterogeneity in the equi merozoite antigen gene (ema-1) of Theileria equi and development of an ema-1-specific TaqMan MGB assay for the detection of T. equi.

    PubMed

    Bhoora, Raksha; Quan, Melvyn; Matjila, Paul T; Zweygarth, Erich; Guthrie, Alan J; Collins, Nicola E

    2010-08-27

    detected in more samples and at lower C(q) values when the new assay was used. Phylogenetic analyses of the 18S rRNA gene sequences and ema-1 amino acid sequences from the same samples showed inconsistencies between the clades, indicating that the T. equi 18S rRNA genetic groups previously identified in South Africa may not represent distinct T. equi lineages. It is possible that the different T. equi ema-1 genotypes could be related to antigenic variability and pathogenicity and may be associated with clinical differences in equine piroplasmosis cases, but this remains to be elucidated.

  6. Antigenic evaluation of a recombinant baculovirus-expressed Sarcocystis neurona SAG1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G D; Lakritz, J; Saville, W J; Livingston, R S; Dubey, J P; Middleton, J R; Marsh, A E

    2004-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary parasite associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). This is a commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in the Americas that infects the central nervous system of horses. Current serologic assays utilize culture-derived parasites as antigen. This method requires large numbers of parasites to be grown in culture, which is labor intensive and time consuming. Also, a culture-derived whole-parasite preparation contains conserved antigens that could cross-react with antibodies against other Sarcocystis species and members of Sarcocystidae such as Neospora spp., Hammondia spp., and Toxoplasma gondii. Therefore, there is a need to develop an improved method for the detection of S. neurona-specific antibodies. The sera of infected horses react strongly to surface antigen 1 (SnSAG1), an approximately 29-kDa protein, in immunoblot analysis, suggesting that it is an immunodominant antigen. The SnSAG1 gene of S. neurona was cloned, and recombinant S. neurona SAG1 protein (rSnSAG1-Bac) was expressed with the use of a baculovirus system. By immunoblot analysis, the rSnSAG1-Bac antigen detected antibodies to S. neurona from naturally infected and experimentally inoculated equids, cats, rabbit, mice, and skunk. This is the first report of a baculovirus-expressed recombinant S. neurona antigen being used to detect anti-S. neurona antibodies in a variety of host species.

  7. Hetero-organic thymus antigens.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnezditskaya, E V

    1985-01-01

    The use of sera containing antibodies to tissue-specific antigens of highly specialized organs (skeletal muscles, heart, skin, excretory glands) enabled us to detect, by immunofluorescence, cells capable of synthesizing analogous antigens (i.e. hetero-organic thymus antigens) in human and animal thymus. Detection of hetero-organic antigens in the thymus is the basis for the hypothesis that natural immunological tolerance to tissue self antigens is formed within the thymus in the course of T-lymphocyte maturation, with thymus antigens taking part in the process.

  8. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  9. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  10. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells.

  11. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  12. HLA-DR antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with specificity of autoantibody responses to nuclear antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J S; Klippel, J H; Penner, E; Reichlin, M; Steinberg, A D; Chused, T M; Scherak, O; Graninger, W; Hartter, E; Zielinski, C C

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens and autoantibodies to the nuclear or cytoplasmic antigens Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Sm, and RNP were determined in North American and Austrian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Analysis of the association of antibodies to these ribonucleic acid (RNA)-protein antigens with HLA-DR antigens showed that HLA-DR3 was related to the presence of anti-Ro/SSA or anti-La/SSB, or both. In contrast, anti-Sm or anti-RNP, or both were associated with HLA-DR4. HLA-DR5 was associated with absence of these autoantibodies. The data extend evidence for the complexity and heterogeneity of SLE. Moreover, they indicate that, in SLE, genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR antigens, are related to the specificity of autoantibody responses rather than to the primary immunological abnormalities of this disorder. PMID:3498447

  13. Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) did not affect cell viability despite increased androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen gene expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP.

    PubMed

    Díaz, P; Cardenas, H; Orihuela, P A

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether aqueous extract of Lepidium meyenii (red Maca) could inhibit growth, potentiate apoptotic activity of two anticancer drugs Taxol and 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) or change mRNA expression for the androgen target genes, androgen receptor (Ar) and prostate-specific antigen (Psa) in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Red Maca aqueous extract at 0, 10, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml was added to LNCaP cells, and viability was evaluated by the MTS assay at 24 or 48 hr after treatment. Furthermore, LNCaP cells were treated with 80 μg/ml of red Maca plus Taxol or 2ME 5 μM and viability was assessed 48 hr later. Finally, LNCaP cells were treated with red Maca 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/ml, and 12 hr later, mRNA level for Ar or Psa was assessed by real-time PCR. Treatment with red Maca did not affect viability of LNCaP cells. Apoptotic activity induced by Taxol and 2ME in LNCaP cells was not altered with red Maca treatment. Relative expression of the mRNA for Ar and Psa increased with red Maca 20 and 40 μg/ml, but not at 80 μg/ml. We conclude that red Maca aqueous extract does not have toxic effects, but stimulates androgen signalling in LNCaP cells.

  14. Enhancing the Immune Response to Recombinant Plague Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing the Immune Response to Recombinant Plague Antigens 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-2-0058 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...mally integrated copy of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen gene protects mice against an anthrax spore challenge. Infect Im- mun 2003;71(7):3831...multiplying the empirically determined aerosol exposure concentration (CFU/liter air) in the chamber by the amount of air that was estimated to have been

  15. Immunochemical analysis of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, D D; Saint, R B; Rickard, M D; Mitchell, G F

    1986-12-01

    Previously we reported the isolation of several Escherichia coli clones expressing fragments of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens as beta-galactosidase fused proteins (Bowtell, Saint, Rickard & Mitchell, 1984). Here we describe the isolation of additional antigen-expressing clones from a larval cDNA library and the assignment of these clones to 7 antigen families. These were isolated with a polyspecific rabbit antiserum raised to the oncosphere. Since this serum was capable of reacting with a large number of antigens, it was important to develop techniques for rapidly determining the identity of the native T. taeniaeformis molecule corresponding to a cloned antigen gene. These included active immunization of rabbits with fused proteins and several techniques involving affinity purification on immobilized fused proteins. The reactivity of the antigen-positive clones with sera from humans infected with related parasites was also assessed. Finally, immunization of mice with several fused proteins failed to protect against subsequent infection, although antigens previously identified as candidate host-protective antigens (Bowtell, Mitchell, Anders, Lightowlers & Rickard, 1983) have yet to be identified in the expression library.

  16. Antigen Loss Variants: Catching Hold of Escaping Foes

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Maulik; Müller, Rolf; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-1990s, the field of cancer immunotherapy has seen steady growth and selected immunotherapies are now a routine and preferred therapeutic option of certain malignancies. Both active and passive cancer immunotherapies exploit the fact that tumor cells express specific antigens on the cell surface, thereby mounting an immune response specifically against malignant cells. It is well established that cancer cells typically lose surface antigens following natural or therapy-induced selective pressure and these antigen-loss variants are often the population that causes therapy-resistant relapse. CD19 and CD20 antigen loss in acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, respectively, and lineage switching in leukemia associated with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements are well-documented evidences in this regard. Although increasing number of novel immunotherapies are being developed, majority of these do not address the control of antigen loss variants. Here, we review the occurrence of antigen loss variants in leukemia and discuss the therapeutic strategies to tackle the same. We also present an approach of dual-targeting immunoligand effectively retargeting NK cells against antigen loss variants in MLL-associated leukemia. Novel immunotherapies simultaneously targeting more than one tumor antigen certainly hold promise to completely eradicate tumor and prevent therapy-resistant relapses. PMID:28286501

  17. Sequence analysis of the clpG gene, which codes for surface antigen CS31A subunit: evidence of an evolutionary relationship between CS31A, K88, and F41 subunit genes.

    PubMed Central

    Girardeau, J P; Bertin, Y; Martin, C; Der Vartanian, M; Boeuf, C

    1991-01-01

    The clpG gene coding for the CS31A subunit was localized on a 0.9-kb SphI fragment from the recombinant plasmid pAG315. This was established by testing the ability of subclones to hybridize with a 17-meric oligonucleotide probe obtained from N-terminal analysis of the CS31A subunit. The nucleotide sequence of the region coding for CS31A was determined. From primer extension analysis, two initiation translation start sites were detected. Two possible promoterlike sequences were identified; the ribosome binding site and the translation terminator are proposed. Inverted repeat sequences leading to the formation of possible hairpin structures of the transcripts were found on the 5' untranslated region of clpG. The deduced amino acid composition was in close agreement with the chemical amino acid composition and sequence match with the first 25 N-terminal amino acids from the published N-terminal sequence of the purified CS31A subunit. The clpG gene codes for a mature protein of 257 amino acids with a molecular size of 26,777 Da. An obvious homology was observed when the amino acid sequence of CS31A was compared with those of K88 and F41. This homology includes five different conserved sequences of up to 19 identical amino acids, which is associated with conserved proline. An extensive change in the CS31A region homologous to that identified to contain the K88 receptor binding site might be responsible for the functional divergence between CS31A and K88. Images FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:1938963

  18. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  19. Genetics of O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Rocchetta, H. L.; Burrows, L. L.; Lam, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce an elaborate assortment of extracellular and cell-associated bacterial products that enable colonization and establishment of infection within a host. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules are cell surface factors that are typically known for their protective role against serum-mediated lysis and their endotoxic properties. The most heterogeneous portion of LPS is the O antigen or O polysaccharide, and it is this region which confers serum resistance to the organism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of concomitantly synthesizing two types of LPS referred to as A band and B band. The A-band LPS contains a conserved O polysaccharide region composed of d-rhamnose (homopolymer), while the B-band O-antigen (heteropolymer) structure varies among the 20 O serotypes of P. aeruginosa. The genes coding for the enzymes that direct the synthesis of these two O antigens are organized into two separate clusters situated at different chromosomal locations. In this review, we summarize the organization of these two gene clusters to discuss how A-band and B-band O antigens are synthesized and assembled by dedicated enzymes. Examples of unique proteins required for both A-band and B-band O-antigen synthesis and for the synthesis of both LPS and alginate are discussed. The recent identification of additional genes within the P. aeruginosa genome that are homologous to those in the A-band and B-band gene clusters are intriguing since some are able to influence O-antigen synthesis. These studies demonstrate that P. aeruginosa represents a unique model system, allowing studies of heteropolymeric and homopolymeric O-antigen synthesis, as well as permitting an examination of the interrelationship of the synthesis of LPS molecules and other virulence determinants. PMID:10477307

  20. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  1. Update on antigen-specific immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2015-06-01

    Among the few drugs that have shown a benefit for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in randomized clinical trials over the last several decades is the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). Undoubtedly, this experience has highlighted the value of antigen-specific immunotherapy in AML. A wide variety of therapeutics directed against several different antigens on AML cells are currently explored in preclinical and early clinical studies. On the one hand, these include passive strategies such as unconjugated antibodies targeting one or more antigens, antibodies armed with drugs, toxic proteins, or radionuclides, or adoptive immunotherapies, in particular utilizing T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or modified T cell receptor (TCR) genes; on the other hand, these include active strategies such as vaccinations. With the documented benefit for GO and the emerging data with several classes of therapeutics in other leukemias, in particular small bispecific antibodies and CAR T cells, the future is bright. Nevertheless, a number of important questions related to the choice of target antigen(s), patient population, exact treatment modality, and supportive care needs remain open. Addressing such questions in upcoming studies will ultimately be required to optimize the clinical use of antigen-specific immunotherapies in AML and ensure that such treatments become an effective, versatile tool for this disease for which the outcomes have remained unsatisfactory in many patients.

  2. Phenotypic H-Antigen Typing by Mass Spectrometry Combined with Genetic Typing of H Antigens, O Antigens, and Toxins by Whole-Genome Sequencing Enhances Identification of Escherichia coli Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Huixia; Domish, Larissa; Sloan, Angela; Hernandez, Drexler; McCorrister, Stuart; Robinson, Alyssia; Walker, Matthew; Peterson, Lorea A. M.; Majcher, Miles; Ratnam, Sam; Haldane, David J. M.; Bekal, Sadjia; Wylie, John; Chui, Linda; Tyler, Shaun; Xu, Bianli; Reimer, Aleisha; Nadon, Celine; Knox, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phenotypic H-antigen typing (MS-H) combined with whole-genome-sequencing-based genetic identification of H antigens, O antigens, and toxins (WGS-HOT) was used to type 60 clinical Escherichia coli isolates, 43 of which were previously identified as nonmotile, H type undetermined, or O rough by serotyping or having shown discordant MS-H and serotyping results. Whole-genome sequencing confirmed that MS-H was able to provide more accurate data regarding H antigen expression than serotyping. Further, enhanced and more confident O antigen identification resulted from gene cluster based typing in combination with conventional typing based on the gene pair comprising wzx and wzy and that comprising wzm and wzt. The O antigen was identified in 94.6% of the isolates when the two genetic O typing approaches (gene pair and gene cluster) were used in conjunction, in comparison to 78.6% when the gene pair database was used alone. In addition, 98.2% of the isolates showed the existence of genes for various toxins and/or virulence factors, among which verotoxins (Shiga toxin 1 and/or Shiga toxin 2) were 100% concordant with conventional PCR based testing results. With more applications of mass spectrometry and whole-genome sequencing in clinical microbiology laboratories, this combined phenotypic and genetic typing platform (MS-H plus WGS-HOT) should be ideal for pathogenic E. coli typing. PMID:27307455

  3. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  4. Characterization of New Breast Tumor-Specific Antigens Using a Novel Antigen Discovery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    The tyrosinase gene codes for an antigen recognized by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes on HLA-A2 melanomas. JExp Med 178, no. 2:489. 2. Coulie...cold PBS, pelleted and stored at -800 C for later use. Detergent lysis buffer (1% CHAPS) and a cocktail of protease inhibitors (2 mM PMSF, 100 gM...40 REFERENCES 1. Brichard, V., Van Pel, A., Wolfel, T., Wolfel, C., De Plaen, E., Lethe, B., Coulie, P., and Boon, T. The tyrosinase gene codes for

  5. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  6. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  7. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  8. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  9. Characterization of O-antigen delivered by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) vaccine candidates against nontyphoidal Salmonella.

    PubMed

    De Benedetto, G; Alfini, R; Cescutti, P; Caboni, M; Lanzilao, L; Necchi, F; Saul, A; MacLennan, C A; Rondini, S; Micoli, F

    2017-01-11

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease (iNTS) is a leading cause of death and morbidity in Africa. The most common pathogens are Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The O-antigen portion of their lipopolysaccharide is a target of protective immunity and vaccines targeting O-antigen are currently in development. Here we investigate the use of Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens (GMMA) as delivery system for S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis O-antigen. Gram-negative bacteria naturally shed outer membrane in a blebbing process. By deletion of the tolR gene, the level of shedding was greatly enhanced. Further genetic modifications were introduced into the GMMA-producing strains in order to reduce reactogenicity, by detoxifying the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide. We found that genetic mutations can impact on expression of O-antigen chains. All S. Enteritidis GMMA characterized had an O-antigen to protein w/w ratio higher than 0.6, while the ratio was 0.7 for S. Typhimurium ΔtolR GMMA, but decreased to less than 0.1 when further mutations for lipid A detoxification were introduced. Changes were also observed in O-antigen chain length and level and/or position of O-acetylation. When tested in mice, the GMMA induced high levels of anti-O-antigen-specific IgG functional antibodies, despite variation in density and O-antigen structural modifications. In conclusion, simplicity of manufacturing process and low costs of production, coupled with encouraging immunogenicity data, make GMMA an attractive strategy to further investigate for the development of a vaccine against iNTS.

  10. Novel chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine against cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuren; Zhang, Youhui

    2008-04-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in immune induction. Dendritic cells perform antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T cells only when they are matured and in the functional state. In the development of a vaccine, it is of utmost importance to consider how to make dendritic cells' functions immunologically adequate. In this paper, we report the development of a series of antitumor DNA vaccines with similar structural framework, in which a gene encoding tumor-associated antigenic peptide is ligated upstream to the gene coding secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine and downstream to the gene encoding the Fc portion of IgG (named chemotactic-antigen DNA vaccine [CADV]). CCR7(+) T, B, natural killer and dendritic cells can be attracted by secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine, and Fc facilitates antigen uptake via Fc receptors expressed on dendritic cells. In a series of experiments in mice vaccinated by CADV with such tumor-associated antigenic specificities as HPV-16 E7, PSA-PSM-PAP, HER-2/neu, p53 and hTERT, CADV can attract immune cells to the vaccine inoculation site, remarkably inhibit tumor growth and extend survival time in tumor-bearing mice. The antitumor effect is more efficacious than that in mice treated with SLC-Ag or Ag-Fc hybrid gene. Tumor-associated antigenic-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be induced by in vitro experiment in a human system. When combined with measures blocking the negative immune feedback circuits, the therapeutic effect of the vaccine can be further enhanced. Large-scale production of CADV is possible for clinical application.

  11. Antigenic structures stably expressed by recombinant TGEV-derived vectors.

    PubMed

    Becares, Martina; Sanchez, Carlos M; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zuñiga, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are positive-stranded RNA viruses with potential as immunization vectors, expressing high levels of heterologous genes and eliciting both secretory and systemic immune responses. Nevertheless, its high recombination rate may result in the loss of the full-length foreign gene, limiting their use as vectors. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was engineered to express porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) small protein domains, as a strategy to improve heterologous gene stability. After serial passage in tissue cultures, stable expression of small PRRSV protein antigenic domains was achieved. Therefore, size reduction of the heterologous genes inserted in CoV-derived vectors led to the stable expression of antigenic domains. Immunization of piglets with these TGEV vectors led to partial protection against a challenge with a virulent PRRSV strain, as immunized animals showed reduced clinical signs and lung damage. Further improvement of TGEV-derived vectors will require the engineering of vectors with decreased recombination rate.

  12. [HL-A antigens in dust allergy in children].

    PubMed

    Seignalet, J; Levallois, C; Lapinski, H; Jean, R

    1976-12-01

    The distribution of 29 HLA antigens has been compared in 60 unrelated children presenting a dust allergy and in 300 healthy controls. We observed an increased frequency for HLA-Aw19 and HLA-B5 in patients. Yet, the differences are not very significant and there is probably no association between one HLA gene and the dust allergy.

  13. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  14. Cancer testis antigen expression in testicular germ cell tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bode, Peter K; Thielken, Andrea; Brandt, Simone; Barghorn, André; Lohe, Bernd; Knuth, Alexander; Moch, Holger

    2014-06-01

    Cancer testis antigens are encoded by germ line-associated genes that are present in normal germ cells of testis and ovary but not in differentiated tissues. Their expression in various human cancer types has been interpreted as 're-expression' or as intratumoral progenitor cell signature. Cancer testis antigen expression patterns have not yet been studied in germ cell tumorigenesis with specific emphasis on intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified as a precursor lesion for testicular germ cell tumors. Immunohistochemistry was used to study MAGEA3, MAGEA4, MAGEC1, GAGE1 and CTAG1B expression in 325 primary testicular germ cell tumors, including 94 mixed germ cell tumors. Seminomatous and non-seminomatous components were separately arranged and evaluated on tissue microarrays. Spermatogonia in the normal testis were positive, whereas intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified was negative for all five CT antigens. Cancer testis antigen expression was only found in 3% (CTAG1B), 10% (GAGE1, MAGEA4), 33% (MAGEA3) and 40% (MAGEC1) of classic seminoma but not in non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumors. In contrast, all spermatocytic seminomas were positive for cancer testis antigens. These data are consistent with a different cell origin in spermatocytic seminoma compared with classic seminoma and support a progression model with loss of cancer testis antigens in early tumorigenesis of testicular germ cell tumors and later re-expression in a subset of seminomas.

  15. Antigen processing and presentation: evolution from a bird's eye view.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Jim

    2013-09-01

    Most detailed knowledge of the MHC outside of mammals has come from studies of chickens, originally due to the economic importance of the poultry industry. We have used our discoveries about the chicken MHC to develop a framework for understanding the evolution of the MHC, based on the importance of genomic organisation for gene co-evolution. In humans, MHC class I molecules are polymorphic and determine the specificity of peptide presentation, while the molecules involved in antigen processing are functionally monomorphic. The genes for tapasin, transporters associated with antigen presentation (TAPs) and inducible proteasome components (LMPs) are located in and beyond the class II region, far away from the class I genes in the class I region. In contrast, chickens express only one class I locus at high levels, which can result in strong MHC associations with resistance to particular infectious pathogens. The chicken TAP and tapasin genes are located very close to the class I genes, and have high levels of allelic polymorphism and moderate sequence diversity, co-evolving their specificities to work optimally with the dominantly expressed class I molecule. The salient features of the chicken MHC are found in many if not most non-mammalian species examined, and are likely to represent the ancestral organisation of the MHC. Comparison with the MHC organisation of humans and typical mammals suggests that a large inversion brought the class III region into the middle of the MHC, separating the antigen processing genes from the class I gene, breaking the co-evolutionary relationships and allowing a multigene family of well-expressed class I genes. Such co-evolution in the primordial MHC was likely responsible for the appearance of the antigen presentation pathways and receptor-ligand interactions at the birth of the adaptive immune system. Of course, much further work is required to understand this evolutionary framework in more detail.

  16. K99 surface antigen of Escherichia coli: antigenic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R E

    1978-01-01

    K99 prepared by acid precipitation hemagglutinated guinea pig erythrocytes, whereas K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex did not. K99 purified by either procedure hemagglutinated horse erythrocytes. K99 prepared by acid precipitation contained a second antigen not presnet in the K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. This antigen could be detected by immunoprecipitation with some, but not all, sera prepared against K99-positive Escherichia coli strains. It was assumed that this second antigen is not K99 and is responsible for the guinea pig erythrocyte hemagglutination reaction. Furthermore, the second antigen has an isoelectric point of 4.2, which has been reported by Morris and co-workers to be the isoelectric point of K99. Images PMID:83300

  17. O-Antigen Modulates Infection-Induced Pain States

    PubMed Central

    Yaggie, Ryan E.; Pavlov, Vladimir I.; Done, Joseph; Heckman, Charles J.; Whitfield, Christopher; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Klumpp, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular initiators of infection-associated pain are not understood. We recently found that uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) elicited acute pelvic pain in murine urinary tract infection (UTI). UTI pain was due to E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and its receptor, TLR4, but pain was not correlated with inflammation. LPS is known to drive inflammation by interactions between the acylated lipid A component and TLR4, but the function of the O-antigen polysaccharide in host responses is unknown. Here, we examined the role of O-antigen in pain using cutaneous hypersensitivity (allodynia) to quantify pelvic pain behavior and using sacral spinal cord excitability to quantify central nervous system manifestations in murine UTI. A UPEC mutant defective for O-antigen biosynthesis induced chronic allodynia that persisted long after clearance of transient infections, but wild type UPEC evoked only acute pain. E. coli strains lacking O-antigen gene clusters had a chronic pain phenotype, and expressing cloned O-antigen gene clusters altered the pain phenotype in a predictable manner. Chronic allodynia was abrogated in TLR4-deficient mice, but inflammatory responses in wild type mice were similar among E. coli strains spanning a wide range of pain phenotypes, suggesting that O-antigen modulates pain independent of inflammation. Spinal cords of mice with chronic allodynia exhibited increased spontaneous firing and compromised short-term depression, consistent with centralized pain. Taken together, these findings suggest that O-antigen functions as a rheostat to modulate LPS-associated pain. These observations have implications for an infectious etiology of chronic pain and evolutionary modification of pathogens to alter host behaviors. PMID:22899994

  18. Blood group ABO and Lewis antigens in bladder tumors: correlation between glycosyltransferase activity and antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Orntoft, T F; Wolf, H

    1988-01-01

    Pronounced changes in the expression of ABO and Lewis antigens have been observed in transitional cell carcinomas compared with normal urothelium. These changes are associated with changes in the activity of blood-group gene-encoded glycosyltransferases. This paper describes the correlation between blood-group antigen expression and the activity of glycosyltransferases in transitional cell carcinomas. Examined individuals were A1A2BO, Lewis, and secretor typed by the use of blood and saliva. The activity of alpha-2-, and alpha-4-L-fucosyltransferases as well as the alpha-3-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase were determined as p-moles of labelled sugar incorporated by Lacto-N-biose I and 2'-fucosyllactose, respectively, per 100,000 carcinoma cells. In 3 non-secretors whose erythrocytes types as Le(a+b-), the alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase activity was similar to that in 3 secretors, and the Leb antigen could be demonstrated to be present by monoclonal antibodies, both by immunohistological and immunochemical means. In 11 tumors from A individuals, the A1-transferase was severely reduced in 9 individuals who showed a loss of A antigen expression, and present in 2 individuals with A antigen expression in cytoplasmic vesicles. In conclusion, we demonstrate a good correlation between individual glycosyltransferase activity and expression of blood group Leb and loss of expression of blood group A in transitional cell carcinomas. Immunostaining of neutral glycolipids separated by TLC showed the Leb-active glycolipids to be simple hexa-saccharides in both secretors and non-secretors.

  19. Genetics and Evolution of the Salmonella Galactose-Initiated Set of O Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Peter R.; Cunneen, Monica M.; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    This paper covers eight Salmonella serogroups, that are defined by O antigens with related structures and gene clusters. They include the serovars that are now most frequently isolated. Serogroups A, B1, B2, C2-C3, D1, D2, D3 and E have O antigens that are distinguished by having galactose as first sugar, and not N-acetyl glucosamine or N-acetyl galactosamine as in the other 38 serogroups, and indeed in most Enterobacteriaceae. The gene clusters for these galactose-initiated appear to have entered S. enterica since its divergence from E. coli, but sequence comparisons show that much of the diversification occurred long before this. We conclude that the gene clusters must have entered S. enterica in a series of parallel events. The individual gene clusters are discussed, followed by analysis of the divergence for those genes shared by two or more gene clusters, and a putative phylogenic tree for the gene clusters is presented. This set of O antigens provides a rare case where it is possible to examine in detail the relationships of a significant number of O antigens. In contrast the more common pattern of O-antigen diversity within a species is for there to be only a few cases of strains having related gene clusters, suggesting that diversity arose through gain of individual O-antigen gene clusters by lateral gene transfer, and under these circumstances the evolution of the diversity is not accessible. This paper on the galactose-initiated set of gene clusters gives new insights into the origins of O-antigen diversity generally. PMID:23874940

  20. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  1. Potentially conflicting selective forces that shape the vls antigenic variation system in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Brisson, Dustin

    2014-10-01

    Changing environmental conditions present an evolutionary challenge for all organisms. The environment of microbial pathogens, including the adaptive immune responses of the infected host, changes rapidly and is lethal to the pathogen lineages that cannot quickly adapt. The dynamic immune environment creates strong selective pressures favoring microbial pathogen lineages with antigenic variation systems that maximize the antigenic divergence among expressed antigenic variants. However, divergence among expressed antigens may be constrained by other molecular features such as the efficient expression of functional proteins. We computationally examined potential conflicting selection pressures on antigenic variation systems using the vls antigenic variation system in Borrelia burgdorferi as a model system. The vls system alters the sequence of the expressed antigen by recombining gene fragments from unexpressed but divergent 'cassettes' into the expression site, vlsE. The in silico analysis of natural and altered cassettes from seven lineages in the B. burgdorferi sensu lato species complex revealed that sites that are polymorphic among unexpressed cassettes, as well as the insertion/deletion mutations, are organized to maximize divergence among the expressed antigens within the constraints of translational ability and high translational efficiency. This study provides empirical evidence that conflicting selection pressures on antigenic variation systems can limit the potential antigenic divergence in order to maintain proper molecular function.

  2. Comprehensive red blood cell and platelet antigen prediction from whole genome sequencing: proof of principle

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Connie M.; Uy, Jon Michael; Aguad, Maria; Smeland‐Wagman, Robin; Kaufman, Richard M.; Rehm, Heidi L.; Green, Robert C.; Silberstein, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are 346 serologically defined red blood cell (RBC) antigens and 33 serologically defined platelet (PLT) antigens, most of which have known genetic changes in 45 RBC or six PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression. Polymorphic sites associated with antigen expression in the primary literature and reference databases are annotated according to nucleotide positions in cDNA. This makes antigen prediction from next‐generation sequencing data challenging, since it uses genomic coordinates. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS The conventional cDNA reference sequences for all known RBC and PLT genes that correlate with antigen expression were aligned to the human reference genome. The alignments allowed conversion of conventional cDNA nucleotide positions to the corresponding genomic coordinates. RBC and PLT antigen prediction was then performed using the human reference genome and whole genome sequencing (WGS) data with serologic confirmation. RESULTS Some major differences and alignment issues were found when attempting to convert the conventional cDNA to human reference genome sequences for the following genes: ABO, A4GALT, RHD, RHCE, FUT3, ACKR1 (previously DARC), ACHE, FUT2, CR1, GCNT2, and RHAG. However, it was possible to create usable alignments, which facilitated the prediction of all RBC and PLT antigens with a known molecular basis from WGS data. Traditional serologic typing for 18 RBC antigens were in agreement with the WGS‐based antigen predictions, providing proof of principle for this approach. CONCLUSION Detailed mapping of conventional cDNA annotated RBC and PLT alleles can enable accurate prediction of RBC and PLT antigens from whole genomic sequencing data. PMID:26634332

  3. Comparative Analysis of Gingival Tissue Antigen Presentation Pathways in Aging and Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, O.A.; Novak, M.J.; Kirakodu, S.; Orraca, L.; Chen, K.C.; Strom-berg, A.; Gonzalez-Martinez, J.; Ebersole, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Gingival tissues of periodontitis lesions contribute to local elevations in mediators, including both specific T cell and antibody immune responses to oral bacterial antigens. Thus, antigen processing and presentation activities must exist in these tissues to link antigen-presenting cells with adaptive immunity. We hypothesized that alterations in the transcriptome of antigen processing and presentation genes occur in aging gingival tissues and that periodontitis enhances these differences reflecting tissues less capable of immune resistance to oral pathogens. Materials and Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=34) from 3–23 years of age were examined. A buccal gingival sample from healthy or periodontitis sites were obtained, total RNA isolated, and microarray analysis was used to describe the transcriptome. Results The results demonstrated increased transcription of genes related to the MHC class II and negative regulation of NK cells with aging in healthy gingival tissues. In contrast, both adult and aging periodontitis tissues showed decreased transcription of genes for MHC class II antigens, coincident with up-regulation of MHC class I-associated genes. Conclusion These transcriptional changes suggest a response of healthy aging tissues through the class II pathway (i.e., endocytosed antigens) and altered responses in periodontitis that could reflect host-associated self-antigens or targeting cytosolic intra-cellular microbial pathogens. PMID:24304139

  4. DNA segment containing C/sub. beta. 1/, a gene for the constant region of the. beta. chain of the T-cell antigen receptor, was inserted into chromosome 6 in cells from one patients with human T-cell leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ino, T.; Kurosawa, Y.; Yoshida, M.C.; Hirano, M.

    1987-06-01

    DNA rearrangements that occurred in the vicinity of T-cell antigen receptor ..beta..-chain gene clusters residing on chromosome 7 were examined in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In one patient, it was observed that, for the T-cell receptor ..beta..-chain genes, a D/sub ..beta.. 1/-J/sub ..beta..2.3/ (where D is diversity and J is joining) junction was found on one chromosome, while the other chromosome kept the germ-line configuration. If this D/sub ..beta../-J/sub ..beta../ junction was formed by the customary deletion mechanism, the C/sub ..beta..1/ gene (where C is constant) located between the D/sub ..beta..1/ and J/sub BETA2.3/ loci should have disappeared from this chromosome. The C/sub ..beta..1/ gene indeed was absent from the rearranged chromosome 7, but it was found on chromosome 6 as an inserted segment. The implications of the observations are discussed.

  5. Common antigen structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y.; Tanigaki, N.; Yagi, Y.; Pressman, D.

    1973-01-01

    Antigenic determinants recognizable by rabbits were found to be present on the molecular fragments (48,000 Daltons) which were obtained by papain-solubilization of the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells and which carried the HL-A determinants. Results were obtained which suggest that these antigenic determinants are present in common on these molecular fragments carrying HL-A determinants regardless of their HL-A specificity and are restricted to the molecular fragments which carry HL-A determinants. The study was made by use of radioimmune methods involving the binding of radioiodine-labelled soluble HL-A antigen preparations by anti-HL-A alloantisera and by rabbit antisera raised against the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells. PMID:4119543

  6. Novel cancer-testis antigen expression on glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Komiyama, Masaru; Miyata, Haruo; Yagoto, Mika; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Iizuka, Akira; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Nogami, Masahiro; Ito, Ichiro; Watanabe, Reiko; Sugino, Takashi; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most malignant and aggressive tumors, and has a very poor prognosis with a mean survival time of <2 years, despite intensive treatment using chemo-radiation. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches including immunotherapy have been developed against GBM. For the purpose of identifying novel target antigens contributing to GBM treatment, we developed 17 primary glioma cell lines derived from high-grade glioma patients, and analyzed the expression of various tumor antigens and glioma-associated markers using a quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). A quantitative PCR using 54 cancer-testis (CT) antigen-specific primers showed that 36 CT antigens were positive in at least 1 of 17 serum-derived cell lines, and 17 antigens were positive in >50% cell lines. Impressively, 6 genes (BAGE, MAGE-A12, CASC5, CTAGE1, DDX43 and IL-13RA2) were detected in all cell lines. The expression of other 13 glioma-associated antigens than CT genes were also investigated, and 10 genes were detected in >70% cell lines. The expression of CT antigen and glioma-associated antigen genes with a high frequency were also verified in IHC analysis. Moreover, a relationship of antigen gene expressions with a high frequency to overall survival was investigated using the Repository of Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT) database of the National Cancer Institute, and expression of 6 genes including IL-13RA2 was inversely correlated to overall survival time. Furthermore, 4 genes including DDX43, TDRD1, HER2 and gp100 were identified as MGMT-relevant factors. In the present study, several CT antigen including novel genes were detected in high-grade glioma primary cell lines, which might contribute to developing novel immunotherapy and glioma-specific biomarkers in future.

  7. How does antigen retrieval work?

    PubMed

    Leong, Trishe Y-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of antigen retrieval has enabled immunohistology to become an integral component of morphologic diagnosis, routinely employed in cancer diagnosis, and for the identification of therapeutic and prognostic markers. The mechanism of antigen retrieval, however, remains speculative with the key to our understanding embedded in the actions of formaldehyde on proteins. One commonly held concept is that heat primarily breaks down protein cross-linkages that occur with aldehyde fixation, thus "unmasking" protein epitopes of interest. Enzymatic pretreatment is also thought to have a similar action whereas such "breakages" are the result of extremely rapid molecular movement induced by microwaves and ultrasound. The formation of rigid cagelike calcium complexes during formaldehyde fixation is another suggested mechanism of antigen masking requiring chelating agents for reversal. A more recent suggestion for the antigen retrieval phenomenon has evoked the Mannich reaction, which occurs with the cross-linking of some proteins. Such cross-linkages can be hydrolyzed by heat or alkalis so that the process of antigen retrieval may be the simple removal of such cross-linked proteins that are sterically interfering with the binding of antibodies to linear protein epitopes in the tissue section. We are clearly not yet in possession of all the answers to the problem.

  8. HLA antigens and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Houssin, A; Soulillou, J P; Denis, J; Guimbretiere, J; Guenel, J

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the frequencies of HLA-A, -B antigens in 73 Berger's disease patients, plus HLA-DR antigens in 35 of them, and compared the percentages of antigens frequencies with those of a local and national panel. This study does not confirm the positive associations with HLA-Bw35 or HLA-B12 which have been previously reported. The HLA-DR typing only showed increased frequency of blanks in the patients (P smaller than 0.01, but no significant corr.P). Patients with Berger's disease and renal failure have a higher (but still not significant) HLA-Bw35 frequency than those without renal failure. The reasons for the discrepancy between our group and others are analysed.

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies Identify Novel Neural Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Richard; Niday, Evelyn; Matus, Andrew

    1982-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were raised against synaptic plasma membranes from rat cerebellum. The hybridomas were screened with a solid-phase immunoassay, the positive lines were characterized by their immunoperoxidase staining pattern on cerebellum, and the specific polypeptide antigens were identified on protein blots. Among the Mabs described are some that stain only neurons or only glia and others that react with specific parts of cells, such as axons, dendrites, and synapses. Many Mabs reveal novel relationships between antigens and the cells in which they occur. For example, a Mab designated 7D5 reacts with a family of > 30 proteins but stains only glial cells. Several Mabs stain punctate sites of synaptic size and distribution in the cerebellar cortex but each reacts with a different subset of polypeptides. One of the most restricted cytological staining patterns is given by 12D5, which stains punctate sites in the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex and reacts with a single polypeptide band of apparent Mr 270,000. These results illustrate the feasibility of raising Mabs that can be used to follow the expression of specific gene products during brain development.

  10. The human E48 antigen, highly homologous to the murine Ly-6 antigen ThB, is a GPI-anchored molecule apparently involved in keratinocyte cell-cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The E48 antigen, a putative human homologue of the 20-kD protein present in desmosomal preparations of bovine muzzle, and formerly called desmoglein III (dg4), is a promising target antigen for antibody- based therapy of squamous cell carcinoma in man. To anticipate the effect of high antibody dose treatment, and to evaluate the possible biological involvement of the antigen in carcinogenesis, we set out to molecularly characterize the antigen. A cDNA clone encoding the E48 antigen was isolated by expression cloning in COS cells. Sequence analysis revealed that the clone contained an open reading frame of 128 amino acids, encoding a core protein of 13,286 kD. Database searching showed that the E48 antigen has a high level of sequence similarity with the mouse ThB antigen, a member of the Ly-6 antigen family. Phosphatidylinositol-specific (PI-specific) phospholipase-C treatment indicated that the E48 antigen is glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored (GPI-anchored) to the plasma membrane. The gene encoding the E48 antigen is a single copy gene, located on human chromosome 8 in the 8q24-qter region. The expression of the gene is confined to keratinocytes and squamous tumor cells. The putative mouse homologue, the ThB antigen, originally identified as an antigen on cells of the lymphocyte lineage, was shown to be highly expressed in squamous mouse epithelia. Moreover, the ThB expression level is in keratinocytes, in contrast to that in lymphocytes, not mouse strain related. Transfection of mouse SV40-polyoma transformed mouse NIH/3T3 cells with the E48 cDNA confirmed that the antigen is likely to be involved in cell-cell adhesion. PMID:7790363

  11. Genetic mapping identifies novel highly protective antigens for an apicomplexan parasite.

    PubMed

    Blake, Damer P; Billington, Karen J; Copestake, Susan L; Oakes, Richard D; Quail, Michael A; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Shirley, Martin W; Smith, Adrian L

    2011-02-10

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp.) was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed 'immune mapped protein-1' (IMP-1). Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s) of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate protective antigen

  12. Isolation and characterization of NIH 3T3 cells expressing polyomavirus small T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Noda, T.; Satake, M.; Robins, T.; Ito, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The polyomavirus small T-antigen gene, together with the polyomavirus promoter, was inserted into retrovirus vector pGV16 which contains the Moloney sarcoma virus long terminal repeat and neomycin resistance gene driven by the simian virus 40 promoter. This expression vector, pGVST, was packaged into retrovirus particles by transfection of PSI2 cells which harbor packaging-defective murine retrovirus genome. NIH 3T3 cells were infected by this replication-defective retrovirus containing pGVST. Of the 15 G418-resistant cell clones, 8 express small T antigen at various levels as revealed by immunoprecipitation. A cellular protein with an apparent molecular weight of about 32,000 coprecipitates with small T antigen. Immunofluorescent staining shows that small T antigen is mainly present in the nuclei. Morphologically, cells expressing small T antigen are indistinguishable from parental NIH 3T3 cells and have a microfilament pattern similar to that in parental NIH 3T3 cells. Cells expressing small T antigen form a flat monolayer but continue to grow beyond the saturation density observed for parental NIH 3T3 cells and eventually come off the culture plate as a result of overconfluency. There is some correlation between the level of expression of small T antigen and the growth rate of the cells. Small T-antigen-expressing cells form small colonies in soft agar. However, the proportion of cells which form these small colonies is rather small. A clone of these cells tested did not form tumors in nude mice within 3 months after inoculation of 10/sup 6/ cells per animal. Thus, present studies establish that the small T antigen of polyomavirus is a second nucleus-localized transforming gene product of the virus (the first one being large T antigen) and by itself has a function which is to stimulate the growth of NIH 3T3 cells beyond their saturation density in monolayer culture.

  13. Modulation of the Immune Response to DNA Vaccine Encoding Gene of 8-kDa Subunit of Echinococcus granulosus Antigen B Using Murine Interleukin-12 Plasmid in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    AZIZI, Hakim; KAZEMI, Bahram; BANDEHPOUR, Mojgan; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; KHAMESIPOUR, Ali; ARYAEIPOUR, Mojgan; YAGHOOBI, Hajar; ROKNI, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Background: The current study was designed to evaluate immune responses induced by DNA vaccines encoding 8-kDa subunit of antigen B (HydI) of Echinococcus granulosus and murine interleukin 12 (IL-12) as genetic adjuvants in BALB/c mice. Methods: Expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 containing HydI (pcHyd1) as vaccine along with the murine interleukin 12 (pcMIL12) as adjuvant were used. Thirty-five mice in the five experimental groups received PBS, empty pcDNA3.1, pcHydІ, pcMIL-12, and pcHydІ+ pcMIL-12 in days zero, 14th and 28th. Two weeks after the last immunization, evaluation of the immune response was performed by evaluating the proliferation of splenic lymphocytes, IFN-γ and IL-4, determination of IgG isotyping titer. Results: Mice that received the pcHydI+pcMIL12 exhibited higher levels of lymphocyte proliferation compared to mice that received the pcHydI alone (P<0.001), and produced significantly more IFN-γ in comparison to other groups (P< 0.001). In addition, they produced significantly less IL-4 than mice receiving the PBS and the empty plasmid (P<0.023). The IgG2a levels were clearly higher in pcHydI+pcMIL12 group in comparison with the groups of pcHydI alone, empty plasmid, and PBS. In contrast, IgG1 was elevated in the group of pcHydI. Conclusion: Co-delivery of IL-12 with DNA encoding 8-kDa subunit of antigen B was effective significantly in inducing the immune response in mice. PMID:28127359

  14. Mature IgM-expressing plasma cells sense antigen and develop competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Pascal; Moro-Sibilot, Ludovic; Barthly, Lucas; Jagot, Ferdinand; This, Sébastien; de Bernard, Simon; Buffat, Laurent; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Colisson, Renaud; Hobeika, Elias; Fest, Thierry; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Sicard, Antoine; Mondière, Paul; Genestier, Laurent; Nutt, Stephen L.; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Dogma holds that plasma cells, as opposed to B cells, cannot bind antigen because they have switched from expression of membrane-bound immunoglobulins (Ig) that constitute the B-cell receptor (BCR) to production of the secreted form of immunoglobulins. Here we compare the phenotypical and functional attributes of plasma cells generated by the T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent forms of the hapten NP. We show that the nature of the secreted Ig isotype, rather than the chemical structure of the immunizing antigen, defines two functionally distinct populations of plasma cells. Fully mature IgM-expressing plasma cells resident in the bone marrow retain expression of a functional BCR, whereas their IgG+ counterparts do not. Antigen boost modifies the gene expression profile of IgM+ plasma cells and initiates a cytokine production program, characterized by upregulation of CCL5 and IL-10. Our results demonstrate that IgM-expressing plasma cells can sense antigen and acquire competence for cytokine production upon antigenic challenge. PMID:27924814

  15. Minor histocompatibility antigens--targets of graft versus leukemia responses.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Stanley R; Murata, M; Bryant, S; Warren, E H

    2002-08-01

    Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells by donor T cells recognizing recipient minor H antigens contributes to the curative potential of allogeneic HCT. The importance of the allogeneic response to a successful outcome is clearly illustrated by the results of stem cell transplant for malignancy after nonmyeloablative conditioning. Remarkably little is understood about the molecular nature of minor H antigens and this has impeded efforts to determine the role of specific disparities in graft versus tumor reactions or to manipulate T cell responses to augment antitumor activity without exacerbating GVHD. The isolation of minor H antigen-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cell clones from recipients of allogeneic HCT has provided the reagents to characterize their expression on leukemic progenitors and to identify the genes encoding these antigens. Using cDNA expression cloning, genetic polymorphisms in the human IFI-75, Uty, KIAA0020, and UGT2B17 genes have been identified to encode new minor H antigens presented by HLA A3, B8, A2, and A29 respectively. Two of these genes are preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells including leukemic progenitors suggesting it may be possible to augment T cell responses to promote a selective graft versus leukemia effect. A third gene, UGT2B17 is highly expressed in liver and GI tract and may be a target for GVHD in these organs. The studies to identify the molecular nature of minor H antigens have provided insights into the complexities of the graft versus host response associated with allogeneic HCT, but the challenge for the future will be to develop strategies that can selectively induce durable graft versus tumor effects without GVHD. A critical issue in developing specific immunotherapy to augment GVL responses is to determine which minor H antigens are expressed on leukemic stem cells. Studies using transplantation of human AML into SCID mice have identified a putative leukemic stem cell which is contained in the CD34+ CD38

  16. Expression and structural characterization of anti-T-antigen single-chain antibodies (scFvs) and analysis of their binding to T-antigen by surface plasmon resonance and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Noriyuki; Koyama, Tsubasa; Subedi, Ganesh P; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2013-12-01

    T-antigen (Galβ1-3GalNAcα-1-Ser/Thr), also known as Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (TF antigen), is an oncofetal antigen commonly found in cancerous tissues. Availability of anti-T-antigen human antibodies could lead to the development of cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Four groups of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) genes were previously isolated from a phage library (Matsumoto-Takasaki et al. (2009) Isolation and characterization of anti-T-antigen single chain antibodies from a phage library. BioSci Trends 3:87-95.). Here, four anti-T-antigen scFv genes belonging to Group 1-4 were expressed and produced in a Drosophila S2 cell expression system. ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses confirmed the binding activity of 1E8 scFv protein to various T-antigen presenting conjugates. NMR experiments provided evidence of the folded nature of the 1E8 scFv protein. ScFv-ligand contact was identified by STD NMR, indicating that the galactose unit of T-antigen at the non-reducing end was primarily recognized by 1E8 scFv. This thus provides direct evidence of T-antigen specificity.

  17. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression of the M Antigen of Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Reiss, Errol; Lott, Timothy J.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Deepe, George S.

    1999-01-01

    The major diagnostic antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum are the H and M antigens, pluripotent glycoproteins that elicit both humoral and T-cell-mediated immune responses. These antigens may play a role in the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. M antigen is considered immunodominant because antibodies against it are the first precipitins to arise in acute histoplasmosis and are commonly present during all phases of infection. The biological activity of monomolecular M antigen and its ability to elicit a protective immune response to H. capsulatum are largely unknown. A molecular approach was used to identify the biological nature of M antigen, including its purification from histoplasmin, partial digestion with proteinases, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to separate the released peptides. The amino acid sequences of the purified peptides were obtained by Edman degradation, and using degenerate oligonucleotide primers for PCR, a 321-bp fragment of the gene encoding the M antigen was amplified from genomic H. capsulatum DNA. This fragment was used to screen an H. capsulatum genomic DNA library, leading to the isolation, cloning, and sequencing of the full-length gene. The M gene consists of 2,187-bp DNA encoding a protein of 80,719 Da, which has significant homology to catalases from Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus niger, and Eimericella nidulans. A cDNA was generated by reverse transcription-PCR and cloned into the expression vector pQE40. The identity of the cloned, expressed protein was confirmed by Western blotting. The recombinant fusion protein was immunoreactive with monoclonal antibodies raised against M antigen, with polyclonal mouse anti-M antiserum, and with a serum sample from a patient with histoplasmosis. The gene encoding the major immunodominant M antigen of H. capsulatum is a presumptive catalase, and the recombinant protein retains serodiagnostic activity. PMID:10085041

  18. Identification of Novel Pre-Erythrocytic Malaria Antigen Candidates for Combination Vaccines with Circumsporozoite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Tejram; Malkov, Vlad; Morrison, Robert; Pei, Ying; Juompan, Laure; Milman, Neta; Zarling, Stasya; Anderson, Charles; Wong-Madden, Sharon; Wendler, Jason; Ishizuka, Andrew; MacMillen, Zachary W.; Garcia, Valentino; Kappe, Stefan H. I.; Krzych, Urszula; Duffy, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria vaccine development has been hampered by the limited availability of antigens identified through conventional discovery approaches, and improvements are needed to enhance the efficacy of the leading vaccine candidate RTS,S that targets the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of the infective sporozoite. Here we report a transcriptome-based approach to identify novel pre-erythrocytic vaccine antigens that could potentially be used in combination with CSP. We hypothesized that stage-specific upregulated genes would enrich for protective vaccine targets, and used tiling microarray to identify P. falciparum genes transcribed at higher levels during liver stage versus sporozoite or blood stages of development. We prepared DNA vaccines for 21 genes using the predicted orthologues in P. yoelii and P. berghei and tested their efficacy using different delivery methods against pre-erythrocytic malaria in rodent models. In our primary screen using P. yoelii in BALB/c mice, we found that 16 antigens significantly reduced liver stage parasite burden. In our confirmatory screen using P. berghei in C57Bl/6 mice, we confirmed 6 antigens that were protective in both models. Two antigens, when combined with CSP, provided significantly greater protection than CSP alone in both models. Based on the observations reported here, transcriptional patterns of Plasmodium genes can be useful in identifying novel pre-erythrocytic antigens that induce protective immunity alone or in combination with CSP. PMID:27434123

  19. Mutations that impair a posttranscriptional step in expression of HLA-A and -B antigens.

    PubMed Central

    DeMars, R; Rudersdorf, R; Chang, C; Petersen, J; Strandtmann, J; Korn, N; Sidwell, B; Orr, H T

    1985-01-01

    Mutations can interfere with posttranscriptional expression of the HLA-A and -B genes. B-lymphoblastoid cells that contain one copy of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) were subjected to mutagenesis and immunoselection for MHC antigen-loss mutants. Some mutations partially reduced surface expression of HLA-A and eliminated HLA-B expression concurrently, although the HLA-A and -B genes were present and transcribed. Antigen expression was fully restored in hybrids of these mutants with other B-lymphoblastoid cells. Therefore, normal cell surface expression of the HLA-A and -B antigens on B lymphoblasts requires (i) execution of at least one trans-active step in the production of the antigens after transcription of the HLA-A and -B genes or (ii) association of the class I antigens with other molecules. DNA analysis of one mutant suggests the possibility that a locus required for the normal expression of the HLA-A and -B antigens is located between the MHC complement genes and the HLA-DP alpha II locus. Images PMID:3906658

  20. RNAi screen for kinases and phosphatases that play a role in antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Moita, Catarina F; Chora, Ângelo; Hacohen, Nir; Moita, Luis F

    2012-07-01

    Effective CD8(+) T-cell responses against tumor or microbial antigens that are not directly expressed in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) depend on the cross-presentation of these antigens on MHC class I in APCs. To identify signaling molecules that regulate cross-presentation, we used lentiviral-based RNA interference to test the roles of hundreds of kinases and phosphatases in this process. Our study uncovered eight previously unknown genes, consisting of one positive and seven negative regulators of antigen cross-presentation. Depletion of Acvr1c, a type I receptor for TGF-β family of signaling molecules, led to an increase in CD80 and CD86 co-stimulator surface expression and secreted IL-12 in mouse bone marrow-derived DCs, as well as antigen-specific T-cell proliferation.

  1. Immunological fingerprinting of group B streptococci: from circulating human antibodies to protective antigens.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Andreas L; Senn, Beatrice M; Visram, Zehra; Henics, Tamás Z; Minh, Duc Bui; Schüler, Wolfgang; Neubauer, Christina; Gelbmann, Dieter; Noiges, Birgit; Sinzinger, Jan; Hanner, Markus; Dewasthaly, Shailesh; Lundberg, Urban; Hordnes, Knut; Masoud, Helga; Sevelda, Paul; von Gabain, Alexander; Nagy, Eszter

    2010-10-08

    Group B streptococcus is one of the most important pathogens in neonates, and causes invasive infections in non-pregnant adults with underlying diseases. Applying a genomic approach that relies on human antibodies we identified antigenic GBS proteins, among them most of the previously published protective antigens. In vitro analyses allowed the selection of conserved candidate antigens that were further evaluated in murine lethal sepsis models using several GBS strains. In active and passive immunization models, we identified four protective GBS antigens, FbsA and BibA, as well as two hypothetical proteins, all shown to contribute to virulence based on gene deletion mutants. These protective antigens have the potential to be components of novel vaccines or targets for passive immune prophylaxis against GBS disease.

  2. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia is regulated by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Slavin, Ileana; Quiroga, Rodrigo; Elías, Eliana V; Rivero, Fernando D; Saura, Alicia; Carranza, Pedro G; Luján, Hugo D

    2008-12-11

    Giardia lamblia (also called Giardia intestinalis) is one of the most common intestinal parasites of humans. To evade the host's immune response, Giardia undergoes antigenic variation-a process that allows the parasite to develop chronic and recurrent infections. From a repertoire of approximately 190 variant-specific surface protein (VSP)-coding genes, Giardia expresses only one VSP on the surface of each parasite at a particular time, but spontaneously switches to a different VSP by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that regulation of VSP expression involves a system comprising RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, Dicer and Argonaute, known components of the RNA interference machinery. Clones expressing a single surface antigen efficiently transcribe several VSP genes but only accumulate transcripts encoding the VSP to be expressed. Detection of antisense RNAs corresponding to the silenced VSP genes and small RNAs from the silenced but not for the expressed vsp implicate the RNA interference pathway in antigenic variation. Remarkably, silencing of Dicer and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase leads to a change from single to multiple VSP expression in individual parasites.

  3. New Data on Vaccine Antigen Deficient Bordetella pertussis Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bouchez, Valérie; Hegerle, Nicolas; Strati, Francesco; Njamkepo, Elisabeth; Guiso, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of Bordetella pertussis is driven by natural and vaccine pressures. Isolates circulating in regions with high vaccination coverage present multiple allelic and antigenic variations as compared to isolates collected before introduction of vaccination. Furthermore, during the last epidemics reported in regions using pertussis acellular vaccines, isolates deficient for vaccine antigens, such as pertactin (PRN), were reported to reach high proportions of circulating isolates. More sporadic filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) or pertussis toxin (PT) deficient isolates were also collected. The whole genome of some recent French isolates, deficient or non-deficient in vaccine antigens, were analyzed. Transcription profiles of the expression of the main virulence factors were also compared. The invasive phenotype in an in vitro human tracheal epithelial (HTE) cell model of infection was evaluated. Our genomic analysis focused on SNPs related to virulence genes known to be more likely to present allelic polymorphism. Transcriptomic data indicated that isolates circulating since the introduction of pertussis vaccines present lower transcription levels of the main virulence genes than the isolates of the pre-vaccine era. Furthermore, isolates not producing FHA present significantly higher expression levels of the entire set of genes tested. Finally, we observed that recent isolates are more invasive in HTE cells when compared to the reference strain, but no multiplication occurs within cells. PMID:26389958

  4. O-antigens of bacteria of the genus providencia: structure, serology, genetics, and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, O G; Rozalski, A; Liu, B; Knirel, Y A

    2013-07-01

    The genus Providencia consists of eight species of opportunistic pathogenic enterobacteria that can cause enteric diseases and urinary tract infections. The existing combined serological classification scheme of three species, P. alcalifaciens, P. stuartii, and P. rustigianii, is based on the specificity of O-antigens (O-polysaccharides) and comprises 63 O-serogroups. Differences between serogroups are related to polymorphism at a specific genome locus, the O-antigen gene cluster, responsible for O-antigen biosynthesis. This review presents data on structures of 36 O-antigens of Providencia, many of which contain unusual monosaccharides and non-carbohydrate components. The structural data correlate with the immunospecificity of the O-antigens and enable substantiation on a molecular level of serological relationships within the genus Providencia and between strains of Providencia and bacteria of the genera Proteus, Escherichia, and Salmonella. Peculiar features of the O-antigen gene cluster organization in 10 Providencia serogroups and biosynthetic pathways of nucleotide precursors of specific monosaccharide components of the O-antigens also are discussed.

  5. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  6. [Distribution of the ABO blood group system and D antigen in Macedonia].

    PubMed

    Stefanovska, V; Stojceska, N; Milenkov, V; Sotirovska, L; Toplicanec, N

    1978-01-01

    The authors have made a serious effort to present the distribution of ABO and D antigens in SRM for the first time after many uers of these antigens in a representative group in a whole population and according to different nationalities. Also, the comparison as done between obtained results and some others (results from some other countries and from other republics in Yugoslavia). The gene frequency of ABO system was analised.

  7. Identification of novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis CD4 T-cell antigens via high throughput proteome screening

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Kaustuv; Jing, Lichen; Russell, Ronnie M.; Davies, D. Huw; Hermanson, Gary; Molina, Douglas M.; Liang, Xiaowu; Sherman, David R.; Kwok, William W.; Yang, Junbao; Kenneth, John; Ahamed, Syed F.; Chandele, Anmol; Kaja, Murali-Krishna; Koelle, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Elicitation of CD4 IFN-gamma T cell responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a rational vaccine strategy to prevent clinical tuberculosis. Diagnosis of MTB infection is based on T-cell immune memory to MTB antigens. The MTB proteome contains over four thousand open reading frames (ORFs). We conducted a pilot antigen identification study using 164 MTB proteins and MTB-specific T-cells expanded in vitro from 12 persons with latent MTB infection. Enrichment of MTB-reactive T-cells from PBMC used cell sorting or an alternate system compatible with limited resources. MTB proteins were used as single antigens or combinatorial matrices in proliferation and cytokine secretion readouts. Overall, our study found that 44 MTB proteins were antigenic, including 27 not previously characterized as CD4 T-cell antigens. Antigen truncation, peptide, NTM homology, and HLA class II tetramer studies confirmed malate synthase G (encoded by gene Rv1837) as a CD4 T-cell antigen. This simple, scalable system has potential utility for the identification of candidate MTB vaccine and biomarker antigens. PMID:25857935

  8. HIV Antigens for Disease Intervention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and the transmembrane protein gp41 . HIV-1 vaccine development efforts conducted in this contract include developing strategies of modifying the...antigenicity of HIV envelope protein. The approaches adopted involve analysis of the possible function for N-linked glycosylation sites of gp 120 and gp41 ... gp41 . The role of N-linked sugars. a leucine zipper structure motif and the long cytoplasmic domain of gp4l in virus assembly, virus infectivity and

  9. Allergy to cockroach antigens in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Romański, B; Dziedziczko, A; Pawlik-Miskiewicz, K; Wilewska-Klubo, T; Zbikowska-Gotz, M

    1981-01-01

    Cockroach allergy was investigated in a group of 56 patients with atopic bronchial asthma (37 men and 19 women with ages ranging from 16 to 65) all allergic to house dust antigen. In all patients, both intracutaneous tests and bronchial provocation tests were performed with cockroach antigen prepared from the species most common in Poland, Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis. Positive skin reactions to cockroach antigen were found in 17 patients while an immediate bronchoconstrictive response was noted in 11. In the authors opinion, cockroach antigens may be partly responsible for the antigenic properties of house dust and may play a causative role in some cases of atopic asthma.

  10. In Vitro Generation of Antigen-Specific T Cells from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Antigen-Specific T Cell Origin.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells derived from T lymphocyte (T-iPS cells) preserve the T cell receptor (TCR) α and β gene rearrangements identical to the original T cell clone. Re-differentiated CD8 single positive αβ T cells from the T-iPS cells exhibited antigen-specific cytotoxicity, improved proliferative response, and elongation of telomere indicating rejuvenation of antigen specific T cell immunity in vitro. To regenerate antigen specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), first, we have optimized a method for reprogramming-resistant CD8 T cell clones into T-iPS cells by using sendaiviral vectors. Second, we have optimized stepwise differentiation methods for inducing hematopoietic progenitor cells, T cell progenitors, and functionally matured CD8 single positive CTL. These protocols provide useful in vitro tools and models both for research of antigen-specific T cell immunotherapy and for research of normal and pathological thymopoiesis.

  11. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  12. Immunization with viral antigens: infectious haematopoietic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Winton, J R

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  13. Characterization of Ewing sarcoma associated cancer/testis antigens.

    PubMed

    Mahlendorf, Dorothea E; Staege, Martin Sebastian

    2013-03-01

    The prognosis of patients suffering from tumors of the Ewing family (EFT) is still poor. Immunotherapy strategies are pursued and EFT-specific antigens have to be identified as targets for cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). Due to the lack of expression of cancer/testis antigens (CTA) in normal tissues, these antigens are partially able to induce immune responses in cancer patients. Therefore, they are promising targets for immunotherapy. EFT are characterized by chromosomal rearrangements involving members of the TET (translocated in liposarcoma, Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1, TATA box binding protein-associated factor 15) family of RNA binding proteins and members of the E-26 (ETS) family of transcription factors. The resulting onco-fusion proteins are highly specific for EFT and downstream targets of TET-ETS represent candidate tumor specific antigens. In order to identify new EFT-associated CTA, we analyzed microarray-data sets from EFT and normal tissues from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The impact of TET-ETS on expression of CTA was analyzed using GEO data sets from transgenic mesenchymal stem cells. One CTA with high specificity for EFT is lipase I (LIPI, membrane-associated phospholipase A1-β). CTL specific for LIPI-derived peptides LDYTDAKFV and NLLKHGASL were able to lyse HLA-A2 positive EFT cells in vitro which confirms the possible role of LIPI and other CTA for EFT-immunotherapy.

  14. Identification of human cancers deficient in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Intracellular antigens must be processed before presentation to CD8+ T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Using a recombinant vaccinia virus (Vac) to transiently express the Kd molecule, we studied the antigen processing efficiency of 26 different human tumor lines. Three cell lines, all human small cell lung carcinoma, consistently failed to process endogenously synthesized proteins for presentation to Kd-restricted, Vac-specific T cells. Pulse- chase experiments showed that MHC class I molecules were not transported by these cell lines from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. This finding suggested that peptides were not available for binding to nascent MHC molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. Northern blot analysis of these cells revealed low to nondetectable levels of mRNAs for MHC-encoded proteasome components LMP-7 and LMP-2, as well as the putative peptide transporters TAP-1 and TAP-2. Treatment of cells with interferon gamma enhanced expression of these mRNAs and reversed the observed functional and biochemical deficits. Our findings suggest that downregulation of antigen processing may be one of the strategies used by tumors to escape immune surveillance. Potential therapeutic applications of these findings include enhancing antigen processing at the level of the transcription of MHC-encoded proteasome and transporter genes. PMID:8426105

  15. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  16. Genetic and antigenic diversity of the surface protective antigen proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    To, Ho; Nagai, Shinya

    2007-07-01

    The surface protective antigen (Spa) protein of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae has been shown to be highly immunogenic and is a potential candidate for a new vaccine against erysipelas. In this study, we cloned and sequenced spa genes from all E. rhusiopathiae serovar reference strains as well as from a serovar 18 strain which was not classified as any species in the genus Erysipelothrix. Sequence analysis revealed that the Spa proteins could be classified into three molecular species, including SpaA, which was previously found in serovars 1a and 2, and the newly designated SpaB and SpaC proteins. The SpaA protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 1a, 1b, 2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, and N, the SpaB protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 4, 6, 11, 19, and 21, and the SpaC protein is produced only by serovar 18. The amino acid sequence similarity was high among members of each Spa type (96 to 99%) but low between different Spa types ( approximately 60%). The greatest diversity in Spa proteins was found in the N-terminal half of the molecule (50 to 57% similarity), which was shown to be involved in immunoprotection. Coinciding with this, immunoblot analysis revealed that rabbit antisera specific to each Spa reacted strongly with the homologous Spa protein but weakly with heterologous Spa proteins. A mouse cross-protection study showed that the three recombinant Spa (rSpa) proteins elicited complete protection against challenge with homologous strains but that the level of protection against challenge with heterologous strains varied depending on the rSpa protein used for immunization. Our study is the first to demonstrate sequence and antigenic diversity in Spa proteins and to indicate that rSpaC may be the most promising antigen for use as a vaccine component because of its broad cross-protectiveness.

  17. Regulation of antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Rivero, Fernando D; Luján, Hugo D

    2011-01-01

    Antigenic variation, a clonal phenotypic variation developed by microorganisms, involves the permanent switching of homologous, antigenically different cell surface molecules. In pathogenic microorganisms, antigenic variation is often described as a mechanism to evade the host immune system and therefore is responsible for the generation of chronic and/or recurrent infections. However, antigenic variation has also been involved in expanding host diversity and differential courses of the diseases. The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation through the continuous exchange of approximately 200 variant-specific surface proteins. Here we review the principal issues regarding the significance of antigenic variation during Giardia infections, the particular features of the variant-specific surface proteins, and the current knowledge on the mechanisms that regulate this process, as well as the relevance of disrupting antigenic variation as a novel approach to design effective antiparasitic vaccines.

  18. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  19. Expression of protective antigen in transgenic plants: a step towards edible vaccine against anthrax.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mohd Azhar; Singh, Samer; Anand Kumar, P; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2002-12-06

    Protective antigen (PA) is the most potent molecule for vaccination against anthrax. In the present study, we have successfully integrated protective antigen gene in nuclear genome of tobacco plants by Agrobacterium mediated leaf-disc transformation method. Expression of protective antigen gene was detected by immunoblot analysis using antisera raised against purified PA. A distinct band of approximately 83kDa lighted up in the protein extracted from transformed plants while there was no such band in untransformed plants. The plant expressed PA showed biological activity just like native PA, which was demonstrated by cytolytic assay on macrophage like cell lines with lethal factor. This study establishes for the first time expression of PA gene in a plant system and thus marks the first milestone towards developing edible vaccine against anthrax.

  20. Overlapping IgG4 responses to self and environmental antigens in endemic pemphigus foliaceus

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ye; Jeong, Joseph S.; Ye, Jian; Dang, Bim; Abdeladhim, Maha; Aoki, Valeria; Hans-Filhio, Gunter; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Diaz, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of human autoimmune diseases in general remains largely unknown, although the genetic and environmental interplay may be relevant. This applies to the autoimmune diseases of the skin such as the pemphigus phenotypes and others. In this group, there is an endemic form of pemphigus foliaceus [also known as Fogo Selvagem (FS)] where the pathogenic IgG4 autoantibody response to the self-antigen, Desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) cross-react with the LJM11 sand fly salivary gland antigen. In this investigation we dissected the IgG4 autoantibody repertoires utilized by FS patients in response to endogenous self Dsg1 and exogenous LJM11 sand fly antigen. Based on analyses of the genetic clonal signatures of these antibodies, our results indicate that there is a significant overlap between these two responses as all identified IgG4 monoclonal antibodies cross-react to both Dsg1 and LJM11 antigens. Germline H and L chain V gene antibodies generated according to mutated cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies preserved their reactivity to both antigens. Our findings suggest that both Dsg1 autoantigen and LJM11 environmental antigen could be the initial antigenic stimulants for the IgG4 autoimmune responses in FS. These results support our hypothesis that LJM11 antigen plays a substantial role in triggering the IgG4 autoantibody development in FS, and provide new insights on how non-infectious environmental antigen(s) may drive the generation of autoantibodies in IgG4-related autoimmune diseases. PMID:26826247

  1. Leukemia-associated minor histocompatibility antigen discovery using T-cell clones isolated by in vitro stimulation of naive CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Marie; Otterud, Brith E; Richardt, Julia L; Mollerup, Audrey D; Hudecek, Michael; Nishida, Tetsuya; Chaney, Colette N; Warren, Edus H; Leppert, Mark F; Riddell, Stanley R

    2010-06-10

    T-cell immunotherapy that targets minor histocompatibility (H) antigens presented selectively by recipient hematopoietic cells, including leukemia, could prevent and treat leukemic relapse after hematopoietic cell transplantation without causing graft-versus-host disease. To provide immunotherapy that can be applied to a majority of transplantation recipients, it is necessary to identify leukemia-associated minor H antigens that result from gene polymorphisms that are balanced in the population and presented by common human leukocyte antigen alleles. Current approaches for deriving minor H antigen-specific T cells, which provide essential reagents for the molecular identification and characterization of the polymorphic genes that encode the antigens, rely on in vivo priming and are often unsuccessful. We show that minor H antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors are found predominantly in the naive CD8(+) T-cell subset and provide an efficient strategy for in vitro priming of native T cells to generate T cells to a broad diversity of minor H antigens presented with common human leukocyte antigen alleles. We used this approach to derive a panel of stable cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones for discovery of genes that encode minor H antigens and identify a novel antigen expressed on acute myeloid leukemia stem cells and minimally in graft-versus-host disease target tissues.

  2. Coexistence of hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-HBs in Chinese chronic hepatitis B virus patients relating to genotype C and mutations in the S and P gene reverse transcriptase region.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiwei; Hu, Tingting; Wang, Xinyu; Chen, Yuming; Huang, Minying; Yuan, Chao; Guan, Ming

    2012-04-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of the coexistence of HBsAg and anti-HBs and to analyze the clinical and virological features of infection, including amino acid (aa) patterns of the S gene and reverse transcriptase (RT) region in Chinese chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Fifty-four (2.90%) CHB patients who were positive for both HBsAg and anti-HBs were tested, and sequences were obtained from 52 of them as well as 48 patients from a control group. S gene and RT region sequences were amplified and sequenced using in-house protocols. There was no significant difference between patients with and without anti-HBs with regard to age, gender, alanine aminotransferase level, and the proportion positive for HBeAg and HBcAb. The occurrence of genotype C (P = 0.001) and anti-HBeAb positivity (P = 0.027) was significantly higher in HBsAg+/anti-HBs+ individuals. In the S gene, the number of mutated residues in the HBsAg+/anti-HBs+ group was markedly higher than in control patients (1.88 versus 1.02 substitutions per 100 amino acids, P = 0.022). The amino acid exchange occurred mostly within the N-terminal region (2.15 versus 0.87 substitutions per 100 amino acids, P = 0.023) and the "a" determinant (3.61 versus 1.56 substitutions per 100 amino acids, P = 0.049) in the two groups. In the RT region, the mean number of substitution per 100 aa showed a tendency to be significantly higher in HBsAg+/anti-HBs+ patients than in controls (2.34 versus 1.46, P = 0.040). This study showed a prevalence of coexistence of anti-HBs in HBsAg-positive patients and an increased frequency of genotype C and aa variability within both HBsAg and RT involving functionally important regions of those proteins.

  3. Novel antigen identification method for discovery of protective malaria antigens by rapid testing of DNA vaccines encoding exons from the parasite genome.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Diana; Bilcikova, Erika; Witney, Adam A; Carlton, Jane M; White, Charles E; Blair, Peter L; Chattopadhyay, Rana; Russell, Joshua; Abot, Esteban; Charoenvit, Yupin; Aguiar, Joao C; Carucci, Daniel J; Weiss, Walter R

    2004-03-01

    We describe a novel approach for identifying target antigens for preerythrocytic malaria vaccines. Our strategy is to rapidly test hundreds of DNA vaccines encoding exons from the Plasmodium yoelii yoelii genomic sequence. In this antigen identification method, we measure reduction in parasite burden in the liver after sporozoite challenge in mice. Orthologs of protective P. y. yoelii genes can then be identified in the genomic databases of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax and investigated as candidate antigens for a human vaccine. A pilot study to develop the antigen identification method approach used 192 P. y. yoelii exons from genes expressed during the sporozoite stage of the life cycle. A total of 182 (94%) exons were successfully cloned into a DNA immunization vector with the Gateway cloning technology. To assess immunization strategies, mice were vaccinated with 19 of the new DNA plasmids in addition to the well-characterized protective plasmid encoding P. y. yoelii circumsporozoite protein. Single plasmid immunization by gene gun identified a novel vaccine target antigen which decreased liver parasite burden by 95% and which has orthologs in P. vivax and P. knowlesi but not P. falciparum. Intramuscular injection of DNA plasmids produced a different pattern of protective responses from those seen with gene gun immunization. Intramuscular immunization with plasmid pools could reduce liver parasite burden in mice despite the fact that none of the plasmids was protective when given individually. We conclude that high-throughput cloning of exons into DNA vaccines and their screening is feasible and can rapidly identify new malaria vaccine candidate antigens.

  4. Antigenic Variation of Campylobacter Flagella

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Cultures were grown at 37"C zation, the flagellum is a major antigen of the campylobacter in anaerobic jars on chocolate -blood agar plates. An atmo- cell...Protein epitopes to the serospecificity of the LIO 8 serogroup. This solubilized in sample buffer was stacked in 4.5% acrylamide thermolabile serogroup...were grown for 24 h and then streaked ELISA. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on one side of a chocolate -blood agar plate from which a was

  5. T-cell intracellular antigens in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Carmen; Izquierdo, José M

    2015-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) and TIA1-related/like protein (TIAR/TIAL1) are 2 proteins discovered in 1991 as components of cytotoxic T lymphocyte granules. They act in the nucleus as regulators of transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. In the cytoplasm, TIA1 and TIAR regulate and/or modulate the location, stability and/or translation of mRNAs. As knowledge of the different genes regulated by these proteins and the cellular/biological programs in which they are involved increases, it is evident that these antigens are key players in human physiology and pathology. This review will discuss the latest developments in the field, with physiopathological relevance, that point to novel roles for these regulators in the molecular and cell biology of higher eukaryotes. PMID:26036275

  6. T-cell intracellular antigens in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Carmen; Izquierdo, José M

    2015-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1) and TIA1-related/like protein (TIAR/TIAL1) are 2 proteins discovered in 1991 as components of cytotoxic T lymphocyte granules. They act in the nucleus as regulators of transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. In the cytoplasm, TIA1 and TIAR regulate and/or modulate the location, stability and/or translation of mRNAs. As knowledge of the different genes regulated by these proteins and the cellular/biological programs in which they are involved increases, it is evident that these antigens are key players in human physiology and pathology. This review will discuss the latest developments in the field, with physiopathological relevance, that point to novel roles for these regulators in the molecular and cell biology of higher eukaryotes.

  7. Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens using recombinant DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R A; Bloom, B R; Grosskinsky, C M; Ivanyi, J; Thomas, D; Davis, R W

    1985-01-01

    A recombinant DNA strategy has been used systematically to survey the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for sequences that encode specific antigens detected by monoclonal antibodies. M. tuberculosis genomic DNA fragments with randomly generated endpoints were used to construct a large lambda gt11 recombinant DNA expression library. Sufficient numbers of recombinants were produced to contain inserts whose endpoints occur at nearly every base pair in the pathogen genome. Protein antigens specified by linear segments of pathogen DNA and produced by the recombinant phage of Escherichia coli were screened with monoclonal antibody probes. This approach was coupled with an improved detection method for gene isolation using antibodies to clonally isolate DNA sequences that specify polypeptide components of M. tuberculosis. The methodology described here, which is applicable to other pathogens, offers possibilities for the development of more sensitive and specific immunodiagnostic and seroepidemiological tests for tuberculosis and, ultimately, for the development of more effective vaccines. Images PMID:2581251

  8. Allogeneic H-2 antigen expression is insufficient for tumor rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G A; Cole, G A; Clements, V K; Garcia, E P; Ostrand-Rosenberg, S

    1987-01-01

    Murine A strain (KkDdLd) sarcoma I (SaI) tumor cells have been transfected with a cloned H-2Kb gene. The resulting clones (SKB clones) stably express high levels of a molecule that is serologically and biochemically indistinguishable from the H-2Kb antigen. SKB clones are not susceptible to cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated lysis by H-2Kb-specific bulk, cloned, or H-2Kb-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-specific effectors. Survival times of A/J and B10.A mice challenged i.p. with the H-2Kb-expressing transfectants and the parental SaI cells are similar, suggesting that the presence of an allogeneic major histocompatibility complex class I antigen on the surface of this tumor line is insufficient for tumor rejection. Images PMID:3500477

  9. A melanoma immune response signature including Human Leukocyte Antigen-E.

    PubMed

    Tremante, Elisa; Ginebri, Agnese; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Benassi, Barbara; Frascione, Pasquale; Grammatico, Paola; Cappellacci, Sandra; Catricalà, Caterina; Arcelli, Diego; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Di Filippo, Franco; Mottolese, Marcella; Visca, Paolo; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Paired cultures of early-passage melanoma cells and melanocytes were established from metastatic lesions and the uninvolved skin of five patients. In this stringent autologous setting, cDNA profiling was used to analyze a subset of 1477 genes selected by the Gene Ontology term 'immune response'. Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E) was ranked 19th among melanoma-overexpressed genes and was embedded in a transformation signature including its preferred peptide ligand donors HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-G. Mostly undetectable in normal skin and 39 nevi (including rare and atypical lesions), HLA-E was detected by immunohistochemistry in 17/30 (57%) and 32/48 (67%) primary and metastatic lesions, respectively. Accordingly, surface HLA-E was higher on melanoma cells than on melanocytes and protected the former (6/6 cell lines) from lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, functionally counteracting co-expressed triggering ligands. Although lacking HLA-E, melanocytes (4/4 cultures) were nevertheless (and surprisingly) fully protected from NK cell lysis.

  10. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A.; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  11. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 specifically induces expression of the B-cell activation antigen CD23

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.; Gregory, C.D.; Rowe, M.; Rickinson, A.B.; Wang, D.; Birkenbach, M.; Kikutani, H.; Kishimoto, T.; Kieff, E.

    1987-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of EBV-negative Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells includes some changes similar to those seen in normal B lymphocytes that have been growth transformed by EBV. The role of individual EBV genes in this process was evaluated by introducing each of the viral genes that are normally expressed in EBV growth-transformed and latently infected lymphoblasts into an EBV-negative BL cell line, using recombinant retrovirus-mediated transfer. Clones of cells were derived that stably express the EBV nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1), EBNA-2, EBNA-3, EBNA-leader protein, or EBV latent membrane protein (LMP). These were compared with control clones infected with the retrovirus vector. All 10 clones converted to EBNA-2 expression differed from control clones or clones expressing other EBV proteins by growth in tight clumps and by markedly increased expression of one particular surface marker of B-cell activation, CD23. Other activation antigens were unaffected by EBNA-2 expression, as were markers already expressed on the parent BL cell line. The results indicate that EBNA-2 is a specific direct or indirect trans-activator of CD23. This establishes a link between an EBV gene and cell gene expression. Since CD23 has been implicated in the transduction of B-cell growth signals, its specific induction by EBNA-2 could be important in EBV induction of B-lymphocyte transformation.

  12. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  13. Identification, sequencing, and expression of Mycobacterium leprae superoxide dismutase, a major antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Thangaraj, H S; Lamb, F I; Davis, E O; Jenner, P J; Jeyakumar, L H; Colston, M J

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding a major 28-kilodalton antigen of Mycobacterium leprae has now been sequenced and identified as the enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) on the basis of the high degree of homology with known SOD sequences. The deduced amino acid sequence shows 67% homology with a human manganese-utilizing SOD and 55% homology with the Escherichia coli manganese-utilizing enzyme. The gene is not expressed from its own promoter in E. coli but is expressed from its own promoter in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The amino acid sequences of epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies against the 28-kilodalton antigen have been determined. Images PMID:1692812

  14. Antigenic heterogeneity of vascular endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Page, C.; Rose, M.; Yacoub, M.; Pigott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic status of vascular endothelium from different sites of the normal adult and fetal human cardiovascular system was investigated. Tissues included aorta (n = 9), pulmonary artery (n = 8), coronary artery (n = 6), ventricle/atrium (n = greater than 10), lymph node (n = 2), fetal whole heart (n = 3), and umbilical cord (n = 7). Frozen sections were studied using monoclonal antibodies recognizing endothelial markers (EN4, vWf, Pal-E, and 44G4), vascular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ELAM, VCAM, and PECAM), the monocyte/endothelial marker (OKM5), and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (class I and class II). Results demonstrate that capillary endothelium is phenotypically different from endothelial cells (EC) lining large vessels. Capillary EC strongly express MHC classes I and II, ICAM, and OKM5, which are variably weak to undetectable on large vessels. In contrast, the large vessels strongly express vWf and appear to constitutively express ELAM-1. This suggests that the capillary EC may be more efficient at antigen presentation or more susceptible to immune attack in vivo. Interestingly, normal coronary arteries, unlike all other large vessels, express MHC class II and VCAM molecules. Future studies should concentrate on comparative functional studies between capillary, coronary, and large vessel EC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519671

  15. The symbiotic role of O-antigen of Burkholderia symbiont in association with host Riptortus pedestris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Park, Ha Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-07-01

    Riptortus pedestris harboring Burkholderia symbiont is a useful symbiosis model to study the molecular interactions between insects and bacteria. We recently reported that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen is absent in the Burkholderia symbionts isolated from Riptortus guts. Here, we investigated the symbiotic role of O-antigen comprehensively in the Riptortus-Burkholderia model. Firstly, Burkholderia mutant strains deficient of O-antigen biosynthesis genes were generated and confirmed for their different patterns of the lipopolysaccharide by electrophoretic analysis. The O-antigen-deficient mutant strains initially exhibited a reduction of infectivity, having significantly lower level of symbiont population at the second-instar stage. However, both the wild-type and O-antigen mutant symbionts exhibited a similar level of symbiont population from the third-instar stage, indicating that the O-antigen deficiency did not affect the bacterial persistence in the host midgut. Taken together, we showed that the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen of gut symbiont plays an exclusive role in the initial symbiotic association.

  16. Antigenic diversity is generated by distinct evolutionary mechanisms in African trypanosome species.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Andrew P; Berry, Andrew; Aslett, Martin; Allison, Harriet C; Burton, Peter; Vavrova-Anderson, Jana; Brown, Robert; Browne, Hilary; Corton, Nicola; Hauser, Heidi; Gamble, John; Gilderthorp, Ruth; Marcello, Lucio; McQuillan, Jacqueline; Otto, Thomas D; Quail, Michael A; Sanders, Mandy J; van Tonder, Andries; Ginger, Michael L; Field, Mark C; Barry, J David; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Berriman, Matthew

    2012-02-28

    Antigenic variation enables pathogens to avoid the host immune response by continual switching of surface proteins. The protozoan blood parasite Trypanosoma brucei causes human African trypanosomiasis ("sleeping sickness") across sub-Saharan Africa and is a model system for antigenic variation, surviving by periodically replacing a monolayer of variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) that covers its cell surface. We compared the genome of Trypanosoma brucei with two closely related parasites Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax, to reveal how the variant antigen repertoire has evolved and how it might affect contemporary antigenic diversity. We reconstruct VSG diversification showing that Trypanosoma congolense uses variant antigens derived from multiple ancestral VSG lineages, whereas in Trypanosoma brucei VSG have recent origins, and ancestral gene lineages have been repeatedly co-opted to novel functions. These historical differences are reflected in fundamental differences between species in the scale and mechanism of recombination. Using phylogenetic incompatibility as a metric for genetic exchange, we show that the frequency of recombination is comparable between Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma brucei but is much lower in Trypanosoma vivax. Furthermore, in showing that the C-terminal domain of Trypanosoma brucei VSG plays a crucial role in facilitating exchange, we reveal substantial species differences in the mechanism of VSG diversification. Our results demonstrate how past VSG evolution indirectly determines the ability of contemporary parasites to generate novel variant antigens through recombination and suggest that the current model for antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei is only one means by which these parasites maintain chronic infections.

  17. Definition of target antigens for naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Kato, Takuma; Tawara, Isao; Saito, Kanako; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Kuribayashi, Kagemasa; Allen, Paul M; Schreiber, Robert D; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Old, Lloyd J; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2005-03-07

    The antigenic targets recognized by naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells (T reg cells) have been elusive. We have serologically defined a series of broadly expressed self-antigens derived from chemically induced mouse sarcomas by serological identification of antigens by recombinant expression cloning (SEREX). CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells from mice immunized with SEREX-defined self-antigens had strong suppressive activity on peptide-specific proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells and CD8(+) T cells. The suppressive effect was observed without in vitro T cell stimulation. Foxp3 expression in these CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells from immunized mice was 5-10 times greater than CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells derived from naive mice. The suppressive effect required cellular contact and was blocked by anti-glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related gene antibody. In vitro suppressive activity essentially disappeared 8 wk after the last immunization. However, it was regained by in vitro restimulation with cognate self-antigen protein but not with control protein. We propose that SEREX-defined self-antigens such as those used in this study represent self-antigens that elicit naturally occurring CD4(+) CD25(+) T reg cells.

  18. Protective cellular antigen of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Stonger, K A

    1980-04-01

    Cellular antigens of Clostridium chauvoei, strain IRP-128, were demonstrated to be important in induction of immunity against this bacterium in guinea pigs. At least one major component of the cellular antigen complex was heat-labile. Acid extraction of the bacterial cells, followed by selective purification for flagella, led to the preparation of an acid extract antigen that possessed a high degree of immunogenicity. The acid extract antigen contained flagellar components and was resolved into two major and approximately five minor protein components by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  19. [Antigenic relationships between Debaryomyces strains (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aksoycan, N

    1980-01-01

    The results of the agglutinations between homologous and heterologous Debaryomyces strains and their agglutinating sera are shown in table I. According to these findings, D. hansenii and D. marama are antigenically different from other Debaryomyces strains in this genus. In a previous study Aksoycan et al. have shown a common antigenic factor between D. hansenii, D. marama strains and Salmonella 0:7 antigen. This factor was not present in other six strains of Debaryomyces. These results also show that D. tamarii does not have any antigenic relationship with the other seven species of Debaryomyces in this genus.

  20. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  1. Genetic analysis for the lack of expression of the O157 antigen in an O Rough:H7 Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Rump, Lydia V; Feng, Peter C H; Fischer, Markus; Monday, Steven R

    2010-02-01

    The O-antigen (rfb) operon and related genes of MA6, an O rough:H7 Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli strain, were examined to determine the cause of the lack of O157 expression. A 1,310-bp insertion, homologous to IS629, was observed within its gne gene. trans complementation with a functional gne gene from O157:H7 restored O157 antigen expression in MA6.

  2. Radial immunodiffusion: a simple and rapid method for detection of Marek's disease antigen(s).

    PubMed

    Marquardt, W W

    1972-05-01

    A qualitative radial immunodiffusion technique is described which detects antigen(s) in feathers from live or dead chickens infected with Marek's disease herpesvirus. Antiserum, which is incorporated into a support medium, reacts with antigen(s) in the feather tip producing a radial precipitin ring. Antigen(s) was detected in 93.3% of experimentally inoculated chickens 21 days postinoculation and in 100% of infected birds subsequently tested through 6 weeks. No antigen was detectable in the feathers of uninoculated control chickens. The technique is simple and rapid to perform. Positive tests could be detected after 1 to 2 hours of incubation. Antigen detection by the radial immunodiffusion test correlated well with other criteria of infection. This technique should have application as a laboratory research tool and as an adjunct for a rapid flock diagnosis of Marek's disease.

  3. Stimulation of IgY responses in gene gun immunized laying hens by combined administration of vector DNA coding for the target antigen Botulinum toxin A1 and for avian cytokine adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Niederstadt, Lars; Hohn, Oliver; Dorner, Brigitte G; Schade, Rüdiger; Bannert, Norbert

    2012-08-31

    DNA immunization is a convenient and effective way of inducing a specific antibody response. In mammals, co-administration of vectors encoding immunostimulatory cytokines can enhance the humoral response resulting in elevated antibody titers. We therefore set out to investigate the effect using avian interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and avian interleukin 6 (IL-6) as genetic adjuvants when immunizing laying hens. A BoNT A1 holotoxoid DNA immunogen carrying two inactivating mutations was evaluated for its ability to induce a specific and sustained IgY antibody response. Both the holotoxoid and the cytokine sequences were codon-optimized. In vitro, the proteins were efficiently expressed in transfected HEK 293T cells and the cytokines were secreted into the culture supernatants. Whereas eggs from hens immunized via gene gun using a prime boost strategy showed no differences in their total IgY content, the specific αBoNT A1 response was slightly elevated up to 1.4× by the IL-1β adjuvant vector and increased by 3.8× by the IL-6 vector. Finally, although hens receiving the IL-1β adjuvant had laying capacities above the average, hens receiving the IL-6 adjuvant experienced laying problems.

  4. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  5. Research progress on surface antigen 1 (SAG1) of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasitic protozoan that has a wide host range and causes a zoonotic parasitosis called toxoplasmosis. This infection causes significant morbidity, costs for care and loss of productivity and suffering. The most effective measures to minimize this parasite’s harm to patients are prompt diagnosis and treatment and preventing infection. A parasite surface antigen, SAG1, is considered an important antigen for the development of effective diagnostic tests or subunit vaccines. This review covers several aspects of this antigen, including its gene structure, contribution to host invasion, mechanisms of the immune responses and its applications for diagnosis and vaccine development. This significant progress on this antigen provides foundations for further development of more effective and precise approaches to diagnose toxoplasmosis in the clinic, and also have important implications for exploring novel measures to control toxoplasmosis in the near future. PMID:24726014

  6. Lamprey VLRB response to influenza virus supports universal rules of immunogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Altman, Meghan O; Bennink, Jack R; Yewdell, Jonathan W; Herrin, Brantley R

    2015-08-07

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) are a crown jewel of jawed vertebrate evolution. Through recombination and mutation of small numbers of genes, Igs can specifically recognize a vast variety of natural and man-made organic molecules. Jawless vertebrates evolved a parallel system of humoral immunity, which recognizes antigens not with Ig, but with a structurally unrelated receptor called the variable lymphocyte receptor B (VLRB). We exploited the convergent evolution of Ig and VLRB antibodies (Abs) to investigate if intrinsic chemical features of foreign proteins determine their antigenicity and immunogenicity. Surprisingly, we find lamprey VLRB and mouse Ig responses to influenza A virus are extremely similar. Each focuses ~80% of the response on hemagglutinin (HA), mainly through recognition of the major antigenic sites in the HA globular head domain. Our findings predict basic conservation of Ab responses to protein antigens, strongly supporting the use of animal models for understanding human Ab responses to viruses and protein immunogens.

  7. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  8. Antigen-Presenting Cells and Antigen Presentation in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Catherine E.; Benson, Robert A.; Bedaj, Marija; Maffia, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) form in territorialized niches of peripheral tissues characterized by the presence of antigens; however, little is known about mechanism(s) of antigen handling by ectopic lymphoid structures. In this mini review, we will discuss the role of antigen-presenting cells and mechanisms of antigen presentation in TLOs, summarizing what is currently known about this facet of the formation and function of these tissues as well as identifying questions yet to be addressed. PMID:27872626

  9. Serologic cross-reactivity between Class I MHC molecules and an H-2- linked differentiation antigen as detected by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of anti-Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) monoclonal antibodies by immunofluorescence and flow microfluorometry demonstrated an unexpected cross-reactivity. Two of fifteen antibodies examined (20-8-4, anti-Kb,Kd,r,s and 34-1-2, antiKd,Dd,Kb,r,s,q,p) were observed to detect an antigen determined by gene(s) mapping to the right of H-2D. Two-color immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that this antigen, unlike classical H-2K and D antigens, was expressed in high amounts on peripheral T cells, but only weakly on Ia-positive cells and on small subpopulations of thymus and bone marrow cells. Mapping, absorption, blocking, and tissue distribution studies suggested that the cross-reactive antigen is Qa-like, but distinct from previously described Qa antigens. Thus, these data demonstrate serological cross-reactivity between a Class I MHC antigen and a differentiation antigen determined by genes linked to H-2. It seems likely that the gene responsible for this new antigen is one of the numerous Class I-like sequences detected by DNA hybridization analyses, but previously undefined in terms of tissue expression. These data suggest that many of these DNA sequences may be expressed in specific tissues and that cross-reactions of anti-Class I MAbs may provide useful probes for studying the products of such homologous genes. PMID:6363595

  10. Host antigens on avian oncoviruses: evidence for virus envelope antigens related to specific chicken erythrocyte membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Aupoix, M; Vigier, P; Blanchet, J P

    1980-01-01

    Avian sarcoma viruses (ASV) of subgroups A to D, produced by chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), are inactivated to a high degree by rabbit antisera to the membrane antigens of adult chicken and chick embryo erythrocytes, notably by antisera to an antigen of embryo erythrocytes, which is lost by adult erythrocytes and to another antigen specific to the latter erythrocytes. Contrary to virus inactivation by anti-CEF serum reported earlier, virus inactivation by the antisera to these two age-specific antigens does not require complement and is not paralleled by virolysis but by aggregation of virions. The two antigens related, or identical, to the age-specific erythrocyte membrane antigens thus shown to be present on the virus envelope do not pre-exist, or pre-exist only in a low amount, on the CEF membrane, since the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is not removed by absorption with CEF. Their appearance on the virus does not depend on cell transformation but only on infection, since both antigens are found on a ts ASV mutant produced at restrictive temperature by untransformed CEF and the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is removed by absorption with CEF infected with Rous-associated virus (RAV-1). These findings suggest that infection of CEF by avian oncoviruses may elicit the appearance, or enhance the expression at the cell surface of antigens characteristic of another cell type which may contribute to the formation of specific virus budding sites.

  11. Structural, serological, and genetic characterization of the O-antigen of Providencia alcalifaciens O40.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Liu, Bin; Guo, Dan; Kocharova, Nina A; Bialczak-Kokot, Magdalena; Shashkov, Alexander S; Feng, Lu; Rozalski, Antoni; Wang, Lei; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2012-12-01

    The O-polysaccharide chain of the lipopolysaccharide (O-antigen) on the bacterial cell surface is one of the most structurally variable cell components and serves as a basis for serotyping of Gram-negative bacteria, including human opportunistic pathogens of the genus Providencia. In this work, the O-antigen of Providencia alcalifaciens O40 was obtained by mild acid degradation of the isolated lipopolysaccharide and studied by chemical methods and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the O-polysaccharide was established: →4)-β-D-Quip3NFo-(1→3)-α-D-Galp-(1→3)-β-D-GlcpA-(1→3)-β-D-GalpNAc-(1→, where GlcA stands for glucuronic acid and Qui3NFo for 3,6-dideoxy-3-formamidoglucose. The O40-antigen was found to be structurally and serologically related to the O-antigens of P. alcalifaciens O5 and Providencia stuartii O18. The O40-antigen gene cluster between cpxA and yibK was sequenced, and the gene functions were predicted in silico. In agreement with the O-polysaccharide structure established, the genes for the synthesis of dTDP-D-Qui3NFo, UDP-D-Gal, UDP-D-GlcA, and UDP-D-GalNAc as well as those encoding three glycosyltransferases, flippase (Wzx), and O-antigen polymerase (Wzy) were recognized. In addition, homologues of wza, wzb, and wzc genes, which are required for the surface expression of capsular polysaccharides, were found within the gene cluster, suggesting that the O-polysaccharide studied is a part of the capsule-related form of the lipopolysaccharide called K(LPS).

  12. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  13. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Modification Impact on Serum Resistance and Antibody Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Christian; Black, Ian; Donohue, Nicholas; Brown, Naj; Davies, Mark R.; Azadi, Parastoo; Baker, Stephen; Kaye, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is a human-restricted Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for causing an estimated 27 million cases of typhoid fever annually, leading to 217,000 deaths, and current vaccines do not offer full protection. The O-antigen side chain of the lipopolysaccharide is an immunodominant antigen, can define host-pathogen interactions, and is under consideration as a vaccine target for some Gram-negative species. The composition of the O-antigen can be modified by the activity of glycosyltransferase (gtr) operons acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Here we investigate the role of two gtr operons that we identified in the S. Typhi genome. Strains were engineered to express specific gtr operons. Full chemical analysis of the O-antigens of these strains identified gtr-dependent glucosylation and acetylation. The glucosylated form of the O-antigen mediated enhanced survival in human serum and decreased complement binding. A single nucleotide deviation from an epigenetic phase variation signature sequence rendered the expression of this glucosylating gtr operon uniform in the population. In contrast, the expression of the acetylating gtrC gene is controlled by epigenetic phase variation. Acetylation did not affect serum survival, but phase variation can be an immune evasion mechanism, and thus, this modification may contribute to persistence in a host. In murine immunization studies, both O-antigen modifications were generally immunodominant. Our results emphasize that natural O-antigen modifications should be taken into consideration when assessing responses to vaccines, especially O-antigen-based vaccines, and that the Salmonella gtr repertoire may confound the protective efficacy of broad-ranging Salmonella lipopolysaccharide conjugate vaccines. PMID:28167670

  14. Cloning, molecular analysis and epitopics prediction of a new chaperone GroEL Brucella melitensis antigen

    PubMed Central

    Sekhavati, Mohammad Hadi; Heravi, Reza Majidzadeh; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Yousefi, Soheil; Abbassi-Daloii, Tooba; Akbari, Rahebe

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Brucellosis is a well-known domestic animal infectious disease, which is caused by Brucella bacterium. GroEL antigen increases Brucella survival and is one of the major antigens that stimulates the immune system. Hence, the objective of the present study was cloning and bioinformatics analysis of GroEL gene. Materials and Methods: The full-length open reading frame of this gene was amplified by specific primers and cloned into pTZ57R/T vector. Also, the sequence of this gene in the Brucella melitensis strain Rev 1 was submitted to the NCBI gene bank for the first time. Several prediction software applications were also used to predict B and T-cell epitopes, secondary and tertiary structures, antigenicity ability and enzymatic degradation sites. The used software applications validated experimental results. Results: The results of phylogenetic analysis showed that the GroEL sequence had near homology with other species instead of other Brucella spp. The bioinformatics tools used in the current study were validated by the results of four different experimental epitope predictions. Bioinformatics analysis identified eight B and seven T-cell epitopes. Conclusion: According to the antigenic ability and proteasomal cleavage sites, four (150-160, 270-285,351-361 and 385-395) common epitopes were predicted for GroEL gene. Bioinformatics analysis showed that these regions had proper epitope characterization and so may be useful for stimulation of cell-mediated and humoral immunity system. PMID:26124937

  15. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  16. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  17. [Immune response genes products in human physiology].

    PubMed

    Khaitov, R M; Alekseev, L P

    2012-09-01

    Current data on physiological role of human immune response genes' proteomic products (antigens) are discussed. The antigens are specified by a very high level of diversity that mediates a wide specter ofphysiological functions. They actually provide integrity and biological stability of human as species. These data reveal new ideas on many pathological processes as well as drafts new approaches for prophylaxis and treatment.

  18. [Clonality lymphoid study through rearrangement analysis of antigen receptor].

    PubMed

    Villamizar-Rivera, Nicolás; Olaya, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    As a rule, malignant lymphoid proliferations are clonal. While most of the time the biological potential can be established through routine pathologic examination and auxiliary techniques, some cases are difficult to classify. Moreover, there are situations in which there are dominant clones whose analysis are important, such as occur in autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiency. This paper presents in an understandable way the main techniques for the study of clonality in lymphoid lesions, i.e. the analysis of rearrangements of antigen receptor genes by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based tests.

  19. Analyzing Neisseria gonorrhoeae Pilin Antigenic Variation Using 454 Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Ella; Webber, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many pathogens use homologous recombination to vary surface antigens in order to avoid immune surveillance. Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea, achieves this in part by changing the sequence of the major subunit of the type IV pilus in a process termed pilin antigenic variation (Av). The N. gonorrhoeae chromosome contains one expression locus (pilE) and many promoterless, partial-coding silent copies (pilS) that act as reservoirs for variant pilin information. Pilin Av occurs by high-frequency gene conversion reactions, which transfer pilS sequences into the pilE locus. We have developed a 454 sequencing-based assay to analyze the frequency and characteristics of pilin Av that allows a more robust analysis of pilin Av than previous assays. We used this assay to analyze mutations and conditions previously shown to affect pilin Av, confirming many but not all of the previously reported phenotypes. We show that mutations or conditions that cause growth defects can result in Av phenotypes when analyzed by phase variation-based assays. Adapting the 454 sequencing to analyze pilin Av demonstrates the utility of this technology to analyze any diversity generation system that uses recombination to develop biological diversity. IMPORTANCE Measuring and analyzing complex recombination-based systems constitute a major barrier to understanding the mechanisms used to generate diversity. We have analyzed the contributions of many gonococcal mutations or conditions to the process of pilin antigenic variation. PMID:27381912

  20. Characterization of defectiveness in endogenous antigen presentation of novel murine cells established from methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, K; Yamashina, K; Kitatani, N; Kagishima, A; Hamaoka, T; Hosaka, Y

    1995-01-01

    Three cell lines (4A1, 4C2 and 6D1 cells) derived from fibrosarcoma induced by the inoculation of 3-methylcholanthrene into C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice were examined for their ability to present antigens to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). 6D1 and 4C2 cells were deficient in presenting endogenously synthesized influenza virus antigens to CTL, but they were able to present antigens when they were sensitized with a synthetic epitope peptide. The expression of the H-2 Kk gene in 4C2 and 6D1 cells was much reduced and was detectable only with Northern blot hybridization. The expression of two transporter genes (TAP1 and TAP2), examined by Northern hybridization, was also reduced in both cells, and negligible particularly in 4C2 cells. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) treatment of these cells induced expression of Kk, TAP1 and TAP2 genes and rescued the defect of class I-restricted antigen presentation in 4C2 and 6D1 cells. Even after this treatment, however, antigen-presentation capability of 4C2 cells was still much lower than that of normal 4A1 cells. This finding suggests that 4C2 cells might have an additional defective gene(s), whose products are involved in the processing of class I-restricted antigen, besides the Kk and TAP genes, and this may explain the difficulty of 4C2 cells to induce tumour-specific immunity, as described previously. To our knowledge, the 4C2 cell is the first tumour cell postulated to have more than three defective genes involved in class I-restricted antigen presentation. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7890298

  1. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains.

  2. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  3. CD1 antigen presentation: how it works.

    PubMed

    Barral, Duarte C; Brenner, Michael B

    2007-12-01

    The classic concept of self-non-self discrimination by the immune system focused on the recognition of fragments from proteins presented by classical MHC molecules. However, the discovery of MHC-class-I-like CD1 antigen-presentation molecules now explains how the immune system also recognizes the abundant and diverse universe of lipid-containing antigens. The CD1 molecules bind and present amphipathic lipid antigens for recognition by T-cell receptors. Here, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of how the processes of CD1 assembly, trafficking, lipid-antigen binding and T-cell activation are achieved and the new insights into how lipid antigens differentially elicit CD1-restricted innate and adaptive T-cell responses.

  4. Antigenicity of two turkey astrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Saif, Y M

    2004-12-01

    Astroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. These viruses cause gastroenteritis in humans and in a variety of animal species, including turkey poults. Only human astroviruses are well characterized antigenically. In the current study, two turkey astrovirus isolates, TAstV1987 and TAstV2001, were antigenically compared using cross-neutralization tests in turkey embryos, as well as cross-reactivity of the two isolates by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antigenic relatedness values (R) were calculated using the Archetti and Horsfall formula. The R value based on the cross-neutralization tests was 0.56%, which indicates that TAstV1987 and TAstV2001 belong to different serotypes; the R value of the two viruses based on ELISA was 70.7%, which suggests these two viruses share common antigen(s).

  5. Regulation of ABO gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Hata, Yukiko; Matsui, Kazuhiro; Takizawa, Hisao

    2005-07-01

    The ABO blood group system is important in blood transfusions and in identifying individuals during criminal investigations. Two carbohydrate antigens, the A and B antigens, and their antibodies constitute this system. Although biochemical and molecular genetic studies have demonstrated the molecular basis of the histo-blood group ABO system, some aspects remain to be elucidated. To explain the molecular basis of how the ABO genes are controlled in cell type-specific expression, during normal cell differentiation, and in cancer cells with invasive and metastatic potential that lack A/B antigens, it is essential to understand the regulatory mechanism of ABO gene transcription. We review the transcriptional regulation of the ABO gene, including positive and negative elements in the upstream region of the gene, and draw some inferences that help to explain the phenomena described above.

  6. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes: the importance of chromosomal and nuclear context in VSG expression control.

    PubMed

    Glover, Lucy; Hutchinson, Sebastian; Alsford, Sam; McCulloch, Richard; Field, Mark C; Horn, David

    2013-12-01

    African trypanosomes are lethal human and animal parasites that use antigenic variation for evasion of host adaptive immunity. To facilitate antigenic variation, trypanosomes dedicate approximately one third of their nuclear genome, including many minichromosomes, and possibly all sub-telomeres, to variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes and associated sequences. Antigenic variation requires transcription of a single VSG by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I), with silencing of other VSGs, and periodic switching of the expressed gene, typically via DNA recombination with duplicative translocation of a new VSG to the active site. Thus, telomeric location, epigenetic controls and monoallelic transcription by Pol-I at an extranucleolar site are prominent features of VSGs and their expression, with telomeres, chromatin structure and nuclear organization all making vitally important contributions to monoallelic VSG expression control and switching. We discuss VSG transcription, recombination and replication control within this chromosomal and sub-nuclear context.

  7. Conservation and variation in the hemagglutinins of Hong Kong subtype influenza viruses during antigenic drift.

    PubMed Central

    Both, G W; Sleigh, M J

    1981-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence was determined for the hemagglutinin gene of the Hong Kong subtype influenza strain A/Bangkok/1/79. The amino acid sequence predicted from these data shows a total of 36 amino acid changes as compared with hemagglutinin for a 1968 Hong Kong strain, 11 more than had occurred in a 1975 strain. The distribution of these changes confirmed that there are conserved and highly variable regions in hemagglutinin as the viral gene evolves during antigenic drift in the Hong Kong subtype. Of the four variable regions found in this study, only two have been seen previously. Correlation of highly variable areas in the hemagglutinins of Hong Kong subtype field strains with sites of amino acid changes in antigenically distinct influenza variants enabled us to predict likely antigenic regions of the protein. The results support and extend similar predictions made recently, based on the three-dimensional arrangement of hemagglutinin from a 1968 influenza strain. Images PMID:6169840

  8. Molecular cloning, characterization and antigenicity of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (Babesia cf. motasi) apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Guan, Guiquan; Pan, Yuping; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-12-12

    Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) has been described as a potential vaccine candidate in apicomplexan parasites. Here we characterize the ama-1 gene. The full-length ama-1 gene of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (BLTAMA-1) is 1785 bp, which contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 65-kDa protein of 594 amino acid residues; by definition, the 5' UTR precedes the first methionine of the ORF. Phylogenetic analysis based on AMA-1 amino acid sequences clearly separated Piroplasmida from other Apicomplexa parasites. The Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 sequence is most closely associated with that of B. ovata and B. bigemina, with high bootstrap value. A recombinant protein encoding a conserved region and containing ectodomains I and II of BLTAMA-1 was constructed. BLTrAMA-1-DI/DII proteins were tested for reactivity with sera from sheep infected by Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan). In Western-blot analysis, native Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 proteins were recognized by antibodies raised in rabbits against BLTrAMA-1 in vitro. The results of this study are discussed in terms of gene characterization, taxonomy and antigenicity.

  9. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  10. Inactivation of T Antigen-Forming Capacities of Simian Virus 40 and Adenovirus 12 by Ultraviolet Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shimojo, Hiroto

    1971-01-01

    Methods to measure T antigen-forming capacities of simian virus 40 (SV40) and adenovirus 12 (Ad12) were investigated, and a method to measure the capacity in terms of T antigen-forming units was employed by the use of cytosine arabinoside. Plaque-forming units and T antigen-forming units of SV40, SV40 deoxyribonucleic acid, or Ad12 were inactivated by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation at the same rate, roughly following a single-hit curve. T-antigen formation by UV-irradiated SV40 and Ad12 was enhanced in cells multiply infected and in cells in a growing state. These observations showed that it was difficult or impossible to estimate the size of the gene for T antigen by UV inactivation. PMID:4329559

  11. Analysis of cellular phenotype during in vitro immunization of murine splenocytes for generating antigen-specific immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Takashi; Yoshimi, Tatsunari; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2013-03-01

    Although various in vitro immunization methods to generate antigen-specific antibodies have been described, a highly effective method that can generate high-affinity immunoglobulins has not yet been reported. Herein, we analyzed a cellular phenotype during in vitro immunization of murine splenocytes for generating antigen-specific immunoglobulins. We identified a combination of T cell-dependent stimuli (IL-4, IL-5, anti-CD38 and anti-CD40 antibodies) plus lipopolysaccharides (LPS) that stimulates antigen-exposed splenocytes in vitro, followed by induction of the cells phenotypically equivalent to germinal center B cells. We also observed that LPS induced high expression levels of mRNA for activation-induced cytidine deaminase. We stimulated antigen-exposed splenocytes, followed by the accumulation of mutations in immunoglobulin genes. From the immunized splenocytes, hybridoma clones secreting antigen-specific immunoglobulins were obtained.

  12. Diverse Endogenous Antigens for Mouse Natural Killer T Cells: Self-Antigens That Are Not Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bo; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Butters, Terry; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer T cells with an invariant antigen receptor (iNKT cells) represent a highly conserved and unique subset of T lymphocytes having properties of innate and adaptive immune cells. They have been reported to regulate a variety of immune responses, including the response to cancers and the development of autoimmunity. The development and activation of iNKT cells is dependent on self-antigens presented by the CD1d antigen-presenting molecule. It is widely believed that these self-antigens are glycosphingolipids (GSLs), molecules that contain ceramide as the lipid backbone. Here we used a variety of methods to show that mammalian antigens for mouse iNKT cells need not be GSLs, including the use of cell lines deficient in GSL biosynthesis and an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis. Presentation of these antigens required the expression of CD1d molecules that could traffic to late endosomes, the site where self-antigen is acquired. Extracts of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) contain a self-antigen that could stimulate iNKT cells when added to plates coated with soluble, recombinant CD1d molecules. The antigen(s) in these extracts are resistant to sphingolipid-specific hydrolase digestion, consistent with the results using live APCs. Lyosphosphatidylcholine, a potential self-antigen that activated human iNKT cell lines, did not activate mouse iNKT cell hybridomas. Our data indicate that there may be more than one type of self-antigen for iNKT cells, that the self-antigens comparing mouse and human may not be conserved, and that the search to identify these molecules should not be confined to GSLs. PMID:21191069

  13. Prostate Stem Cell Antigen DNA Vaccination Breaks Tolerance to Self-antigen and Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sarfraz; Casey, Garrett; Sweeney, Paul; Tangney, Mark; O'Sullivan, Gerald C

    2009-01-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) is a cell surface antigen expressed in normal human prostate and over expressed in prostate cancer. Elevated levels of PSCA protein in prostate cancer correlate with increased tumor stage/grade, with androgen independence and have higher expression in bone metastases. In this study, the PSCA gene was isolated from the transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate cell line (TRAMPC1), and a vaccine plasmid construct was generated. This plasmid PSCA (pmPSCA) was delivered by intramuscular electroporation (EP) and induced effective antitumor immune responses against subcutaneous TRAMPC1 tumors in male C57 BL/6 mice. The pmPSCA vaccination inhibited tumor growth, resulting in cure or prolongation in survival. Similarly, the vaccine inhibited metastases in PSCA expressing B16 F10 tumors. There was activation of Th-1 type immunity against PSCA, indicating the breaking of tolerance to a self-antigen. This immunity was tumor specific and was transferable by adoptive transfer of splenocytes. The mice remained healthy and there was no evidence of collateral autoimmune responses in normal tissues. EP-assisted delivery of the pmPSCA evoked strong specific responses and could, in neoadjuvant or adjuvant settings, provide a safe and effective immune control of prostate cancer, given that there is significant homology between human and mouse PSCA. PMID:19337234

  14. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in transgenic banana plants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G B Sunil; Ganapathi, T R; Revathi, C J; Srinivas, L; Bapat, V A

    2005-10-01

    Embryogenic cells of bananan cv. Rasthali (AAB) have been transformed with the 's' gene of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using Agrobacterium mediated transformation. Four different expression cassettes (pHBS, pHER, pEFEHBS and pEFEHER) were utilized to optimize the expression of HBsAg in banana. The transgenic nature of the plants and expression of the antigen was confirmed by PCR, Southern hybridization and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. The expression levels of the antigen in the plants grown under in vitro conditions as well as the green house hardened plants were estimated by ELISA for all the four constructs. Maximum expression level of 38 ng/g F.W. of leaves was noted in plants transformed with pEFEHBS grown under in vitro conditions, whereas pHER transformed plants grown in the green house showed the maximum expression level of 19.92 ng/g F.W. of leaves. Higher monoclonal antibody binding of 67.87% of the antigen was observed when it was expressed with a C-terminal ER retention signal. The buoyant density in CsCl of HBsAg derived from transgenic banana leaves was determined and found to be 1.146 g/ml. HBsAg obtained from transgenic banana plants is similar to human serum derived one in buoyant density properties. The transgenic plants were grown up to maturity in the green house and the expression of HBsAg in the fruits was confirmed by RT-PCR. These transgenic plants were multiplied under in vitro using floral apex cultures. Attempts were also made to enhance the expression of HBsAg in the leaves of transgenic banana plants by wounding and/or treatment with plant growth regulators. This is the first report on the expression of HBsAg in transgenic banana fruits.

  15. Serine Proteases Enhance Immunogenic Antigen Presentation on Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Haley L; Tripathi, Satyendra C; Kerros, Celine; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Garber, Haven R; St John, Lisa S; Federico, Lorenzo; Meraz, Ismail M; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Majidi, Mourad; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Roszik, Jason; Gibbons, Don L; Heymach, John V; Swisher, Stephen G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Alatrash, Gheath; Hanash, Samir; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-02

    Immunotherapies targeting immune checkpoints have proven efficacious in reducing the burden of lung cancer in patients; however, the antigenic targets of these reinvigorated T cells remain poorly defined. Lung cancer tumors contain tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and neutrophils, which release the serine proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (P3) into the tumor microenvironment. NE and P3 shape the antitumor adaptive immune response in breast cancer and melanoma. In this report, we demonstrate that lung cancer cells cross-presented the tumor-associated antigen PR1, derived from NE and P3. Additionally, NE and P3 enhanced the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on lung cancer cells and induced unique, endogenous peptides in the immunopeptidome, as detected with mass spectrometry sequencing. Lung cancer patient tissues with high intratumoral TAMs were enriched for MHC class I genes and T-cell markers, and patients with high TAM and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration had improved overall survival. We confirmed the immunogenicity of unique, endogenous peptides with cytotoxicity assays against lung cancer cell lines, using CTLs from healthy donors that had been expanded against select peptides. Finally, CTLs specific for serine proteases-induced endogenous peptides were detected in lung cancer patients using peptide/HLA-A2 tetramers and were elevated in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Thus, serine proteases in the tumor microenvironment of lung cancers promote the presentation of HLA class I immunogenic peptides that are expressed by lung cancer cells, thereby increasing the antigen repertoire that can be targeted in lung cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(4); 1-11. ©2017 AACR.

  16. Recombinant antigens for serodiagnosis of cysticercosis and echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Sako, Yasuhito; Nakao, Minoru; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Ito, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Diagnosis of cysticercosis/echinococcosis is primarily based on imaging techniques. These imaging techniques are sometimes limited by the small size of visualized lesions and atypical images, which are difficult to be distinguished from abscesses or neoplasms. Therefore, efforts have been directed toward identification and characterization of specific antigens of parasites for development of serodiagnostic method that can detect specific antibody. For cysticercosis, glycoproteins of 10-26 kDa in cyst fluid of Taenia solium have been widely accepted for serodiagnosis purpose. The glycoproteins consist of a very closely related family of 8-kDa proteins. We identified four genes (designated Ag1, Ag1V1, Ag2 and Ag2V1) encoding the 7- and 10-kDa polypeptides. Based on the antigenicities of these clones, Ag1V1 and Ag2 were chosen as ELISA antigens and the Ag1V1/Ag2 chimeric protein was expressed. The Ag1V1/Ag2 chimeric protein showed the similar sensitivity and specificity as the native glycoproteins. For alveolar echinococcosis, the 65-kDa protein of Echinococcus multilocularis protoscolices and Em18 has been considered as serodiagnostic antigens. The sensitivity and specificity of Em18 are very compatible to those of the recombinant 65-kDa protein. Recently, we demonstrated that Em18 was the proteolytic product of the 65-kDa protein following the action by cysteine proteinases. From the information of N-terminal amino acid sequences, molecular size and isoelectric point of Em18, recombinant Em18 ((349)K to (508)K of the 65-kDa protein, RecEm18) was expressed and evaluated for serodiagnostic value. RecEm18 has the potential for use in the differential serodiagnosis of alveolar echinococcosis.

  17. Characterization of co-circulating swine influenza A viruses in North America and the identification of a novel H1 genetic clade with antigenic significance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple genetically and antigenically distinct hemagglutinin genes of the H1 and H3 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes co-circulate in North American swine. This diversity has evolved by repeated transmission of IAVs from humans to swine and subsequent antigenic drift in swine. To understand the evol...

  18. Direct Introduction of Genes into Rats and Expression of the Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenisty, Nissim; Reshef, Lea

    1986-12-01

    A method of introducing actively expressed genes into intact mammals is described. DNA precipitated with calcium phosphate has been injected intraperitoneally into newborn rats. The injected genes have been taken up and expressed by the animal tissues. To examine the generality of the method we have injected newborn rats with the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase prokaryotic gene fused with various viral and cellular gene promoters and the gene for hepatitis B surface antigen, and we observed appearance of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity and hepatitis B surface antigen in liver and spleen. In addition, administration of genes coding for hormones (insulin or growth hormone) resulted in their expression.

  19. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  20. Transcriptome analysis of antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum - var silencing is not dependent on antisense RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stuart A; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Mattei, Denise; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Guigon, Ghislaine; Coppee, Jean-Yves; David, Peter H; Scherf, Artur

    2005-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most severe form of malaria, undergoes antigenic variation through successive presentation of a family of antigens on the surface of parasitized erythrocytes. These antigens, known as Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) proteins, are subject to a mutually exclusive expression system, and are encoded by the multigene var family. The mechanism whereby inactive var genes are silenced is poorly understood. To investigate transcriptional features of this mechanism, we conducted a microarray analysis of parasites that were selected to express different var genes by adhesion to chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) or CD36. Results In addition to oligonucleotides for all predicted protein-coding genes, oligonucleotide probes specific to each known var gene of the FCR3 background were designed and added to the microarray, as well as tiled sense and antisense probes for a subset of var genes. In parasites selected for adhesion to CSA, one full-length var gene (var2csa) was strongly upregulated, as were sense RNA molecules emanating from the 3' end of a limited subset of other var genes. No global relationship between sense and antisense production of var genes was observed, but notably, some var genes had coincident high levels of both antisense and sense transcript. Conclusion Mutually exclusive expression of PfEMP1 proteins results from transcriptional silencing of non-expressed var genes. The distribution of steady-state sense and antisense RNA at var loci are not consistent with a silencing mechanism based on antisense silencing of inactive var genes. Silencing of var loci is also associated with altered regulation of genes distal to var loci. PMID:16277748

  1. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  2. Multivalent Chromosomal Expression of the Clostridium botulinum Serotype A Neurotoxin Heavy-Chain Antigen and the Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen in Lactobacillus acidophilus

    PubMed Central

    Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent toxins that cause severe disease in humans. New and improved vaccines are needed for both of these pathogens. For mucosal vaccine delivery using lactic acid bacteria, chromosomal expression of antigens is preferred over plasmid-based expression systems, as chromosomal expression circumvents plasmid instability and the need for antibiotic pressure. In this study, we constructed three strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM expressing from the chromosome (i) the nontoxic host receptor-binding domain of the heavy chain of Clostridium botulinum serotype A neurotoxin (BoNT/A-Hc), (ii) the anthrax protective antigen (PA), and (iii) both the BoNT/A-Hc and the PA. The BoNT/A-Hc vaccine cassette was engineered to contain the signal peptide from the S-layer protein A from L. acidophilus and a dendritic-cell-targeting peptide. A chromosomal region downstream of lba0889 carrying a highly expressed enolase gene was selected for insertion of the vaccine cassettes. Western blot analysis confirmed the heterologous expression of the two antigens from plasmid and chromosome locations. Stability assays demonstrated loss of the vaccine cassettes from expression plasmids without antibiotic maintenance. RNA sequencing showed high expression of each antigen and that insertion of the vaccine cassettes had little to no effect on the transcription of other genes in the chromosome. This study demonstrated that chromosomal integrative recombinant strains are promising vaccine delivery vehicles when targeted into high-expression chromosomal regions. Levels of expression match high-copy-number plasmids and eliminate the requirement for antibiotic selective maintenance of recombinant plasmids. IMPORTANCE Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus anthracis produce potent neurotoxins that pose a biochemical warfare concern; therefore, effective vaccines against these bacteria are required. Chromosomal expression of antigens is

  3. Bacteriophage-mediated Glucosylation Can Modify Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigens Synthesized by an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter-dependent Assembly Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mann, Evan; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; King, Jerry D; Whitfield, Chris

    2015-10-16

    Lysogenic bacteriophages may encode enzymes that modify the structures of lipopolysaccharide O-antigen glycans, altering the structure of the bacteriophage receptor and resulting in serotype conversion. This can enhance virulence and has implications for antigenic diversity and vaccine development. Side chain glucosylation is a common modification strategy found in a number of bacterial species. To date, glucosylation has only been observed in O-antigens synthesized by Wzy-dependent pathways, one of the two most prevalent O-antigen synthesis systems. Here we exploited a heterologous system to study the glucosylation potential of a model O-antigen produced in an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter-dependent system. Although O-antigen production is cryptic in Escherichia coli K-12, because of a mutation in the synthesis genes, it possesses a prophage glucosylation cluster, which modifies the GlcNAc residue in an α-l-Rha-(1→3)-d-GlcNAc motif found in the original O16 antigen. Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 produces an O-antigen possessing the same disaccharide motif, but its assembly uses an ABC transporter-dependent system. E. coli harboring the R. terrigena O-antigen biosynthesis genes produced an O-antigen displaying reduced reactivity toward antisera raised against the native R. terrigena repeat structure, indicative of an altered chemical structure. Structural determination using NMR revealed the addition of glucose side chains to the repeat units. O-antigen modification was dependent on a functional ABC transporter, consistent with modification in the periplasm, and was eliminated by deletion of the glucosylation genes from the E. coli chromosome, restoring native level antisera sensitivity and structure. There are therefore no intrinsic mechanistic barriers for bacteriophage-mediated O-antigen glucosylation in ABC transporter-dependent pathways.

  4. Characterization of antigenically and genetically similar influenza C viruses isolated in Japan during the 1999-2000 season.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Y.; Takao, S.; Shimada, S.; Mizuta, K.; Sugawara, K.; Takashita, E.; Muraki, Y.; Hongo, S.; Nishimura, H.

    2004-01-01

    Between October 1999 and May 2000, a total of 28 strains of influenza C virus were isolated in four Japanese prefectures: Yamagata, Miyagi, Saitama and Hiroshima. Antigenic analysis showed that the 28 isolates were divided into three distinct antigenic groups, and viruses belonging to different antigenic groups were co-circulating in each of the four prefectures. Phylogenetic analysis of the seven protein genes demonstrated that the viruses having a similar genome composition spread in various areas of Japan during the same period. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis showed that most of the influenza C viruses isolated in various areas of the world between the 1970s and 1980s were closely related to the contemporary Japanese viruses in all gene segments. These observations suggest that the influenza C viruses cause epidemics in some communities during the same season and that antigenically and genetically similar influenza C viruses spread throughout Japan and may be circulating worldwide. PMID:15310173

  5. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Benjamin S.; Abrahamsson, Thomas R.; Bernstein, Charles N.; Duck, L. Wayne; Mannon, Peter J.; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C.; Elson, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Background While immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response to the immune response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods Human serum was collected from adults and from children followed from birth to seven years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed using a novel protein microarray. Results Nearly every individual tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age, and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic individuals. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota may be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26014812

  6. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  7. Characterization of thymus-derived lymphocytes expressing Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta- eta antigen receptor isoforms: analysis by gene transfection

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the function of the CD3 eta subunit of the T cell receptor (TCR), we have used cDNAs encoding CD3 zeta, CD3 eta, or both to reconstitute a variant of a cytochrome c-specific, I-Ek-restricted murine T cell hybridoma, termed MA5.8, which lacks CD3 zeta and CD3 eta proteins. We provide direct evidence that assembly and surface expression of TCRs can be mediated by either of these subunits separately or together. However, the level of TCR expression on zeta transfectants is up to one order of magnitude greater than that on eta transfectants, implying that CD3 eta is weakly associated with the pentameric Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon complex and/or inefficient at salvaging the incomplete TCR from lysosomal degradation. As a component of the TCR, the CD3 eta subunit preferentially forms a heterodimer with CD3 zeta, but is also able to form a CD3 eta-eta homodimer. Crosslinking of Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta- zeta, Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon eta-eta, or Ti alpha-beta CD3 gamma delta epsilon zeta-zeta/zeta-eta TCR isotypes with anti-CD3 epsilon monoclonal antibody or a cytochrome c peptide epitope on I-Ek antigen-presenting cells mediates signal transduction resulting in reversible cell-cycle arrest of transfected clones. Given the potential for diversity of signals generated by these functional TCR isotypes and the expression of the CD3 eta gene product in the thymus, CD3 eta is likely to play a role in selection and/or activation of thymocytes during development. PMID:2145389

  8. Genetic engineering of chimeric antigen receptors using lamprey derived variable lymphocyte receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moot, Robert; Raikar, Sunil S; Fleischer, Lauren; Querrey, Melissa; Tylawsky, Daniel E; Nakahara, Hirotomo; Doering, Christopher B; Spencer, H Trent

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are used to redirect effector cell specificity to selected cell surface antigens. Using CARs, antitumor activity can be initiated in patients with no prior tumor specific immunity. Although CARs have shown promising clinical results, the technology remains limited by the availability of specific cognate cell target antigens. To increase the repertoire of targetable tumor cell antigens we utilized the immune system of the sea lamprey to generate directed variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs). VLRs serve as membrane bound and soluble immune effectors analogous but not homologous to immunoglobulins. They have a fundamentally different structure than immunoglobulin (Ig)-based antibodies while still demonstrating high degrees of specificity and affinity. To test the functionality of VLRs as the antigen recognition domain of CARs, two VLR-CARs were created. One contained a VLR specific for a murine B cell leukemia and the other contained a VLR specific for the human T cell surface antigen, CD5. The CAR design consisted of the VLR sequence, myc-epitope tag, CD28 transmembrane domain, and intracellular CD3ζ signaling domain. We demonstrate proof of concept, including gene transfer, biosynthesis, cell surface localization, and effector cell activation for multiple VLR-CAR designs. Therefore, VLRs provide an alternative means of CAR-based cancer recognition. PMID:27933313

  9. A Mutant Library Approach to Identify Improved Meningococcal Factor H Binding Protein Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Monica; Rossi, Raffaella; Walter, Helen; Pajon, Rolando; Beernink, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Factor H binding protein (FHbp) is a virulence factor used by meningococci to evade the host complement system. FHbp elicits bactericidal antibodies in humans and is part of two recently licensed vaccines. Using human complement Factor H (FH) transgenic mice, we previously showed that binding of FH decreased the protective antibody responses to FHbp vaccination. Therefore, in the present study we devised a library-based method to identify mutant FHbp antigens with very low binding of FH. Using an FHbp sequence variant in one of the two licensed vaccines, we displayed an error-prone PCR mutant FHbp library on the surface of Escherichia coli. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate FHbp mutants with very low binding of human FH and preserved binding of control anti-FHbp monoclonal antibodies. We sequenced the gene encoding FHbp from selected clones and introduced the mutations into a soluble FHbp construct. Using this approach, we identified several new mutant FHbp vaccine antigens that had very low binding of FH as measured by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The new mutant FHbp antigens elicited protective antibody responses in human FH transgenic mice that were up to 20-fold higher than those elicited by the wild-type FHbp antigen. This approach offers the potential to discover mutant antigens that might not be predictable even with protein structural information and potentially can be applied to other microbial vaccine antigens that bind host proteins. PMID:26057742

  10. Erythrocyte Membrane Antigen Frequencies in Patients with Type II Congenital Smell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Stateman, William A.; Henkin, Robert I.; Knöppel, Alexandra; Flegel, Willy A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine whether there are genetic factors associated with Type II congenital smell loss. STUDY DESIGN The expression frequencies of 16 erythrocyte antigens among patients with Type II congenital smell loss were determined and compared to those of a large control group. METHODS Blood samples were obtained from 99 patients with Type II congenital smell loss. Presence of the erythrocyte surface antigens A, B, M, N, S, s, Fya, Fyb, D, C, c, E, e, K, Jka, and Jkb was analyzed by blood group serology. Comparisons of expression frequencies of these antigens were made between the patients and a large control group. RESULTS Patients tested for the Duffy b antigen (Fyb haplotype) exhibited a statistically significant 11% decrease in expression frequency compared to the controls. There were no significant differences between patients and controls in the expression frequencies for all other erythrocyte antigens (A, B, M, N, S, s, Fya, D, C, c, E, e, K, Jka, or Jkb). CONCLUSIONS These findings describe the presence of a previously unrevealed genetic tendency among patients with Type II congenital smell loss related to erythrocyte surface antigen expression. The deviation in expression rate of Duffy b suggests a target gene and chromosome region in which future research into this form of congenital smell loss may reveal a more specific genetic basis for Type II congenital smell loss. PMID:25456515

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  12. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  13. Serum immunoglobulin levels in Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, C. J.; Johnson, K. M.

    1972-01-01

    Ig levels were determined by radial immunodiffusion in uncomplicated cases of acute hepatitis with or without Australia antigenaemia. Initial sera from Australia antigen negative cases showed a striking elevation in IgM levels when compared to Australia antigen positive cases (6·5 versus 1·9 mg/ml). None of twenty-four Australia antigen positive cases exceeded 3 mg/ml IgM, and only 3/58 Australia antigen negative cases exhibited values below 3 mg/ml. Intial sera from Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative subjects did not differ in concentration of IgG, IgA, or IgD. Serial determinations of IgG revealed a transient fall in patients with Australia antigen positive hepatitis, and a rise in Australia antigen negative cases. Asymptomatic, Australia antigen positive, Guaymi Indian subjects were compared to matched Australia antigen negative controls from the same indigenous group and no differences in the concentration of IgG, IgM, IgA or IgD were found, although elevations of IgG and IgM were common in both groups. No evidence of abnormal proteins was found when sera were tested by cellulose acetate electrophoresis or by immunoelectrophoresis versus immunoglobulin-specific antisera. Ultracentrifugal analysis failed to detect `7S' IgM. PMID:4625396

  14. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. Thismore » “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.« less

  15. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.

  16. Limited Antigenic Diversity in Contemporary H7 Avian-Origin Influenza A Viruses from North America

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yifei; Bailey, Elizabeth; Spackman, Erica; Li, Tao; Wang, Hui; Long, Li-Ping; Baroch, John A.; Cunningham, Fred L.; Lin, Xiaoxu; Jarman, Richard G.; DeLiberto, Thomas J.; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Subtype H7 avian–origin influenza A viruses (AIVs) have caused at least 500 confirmed human infections since 2003 and culling of >75 million birds in recent years. Here we antigenically and genetically characterized 93 AIV isolates from North America (85 from migratory waterfowl [1976–2010], 7 from domestic poultry [1971–2012], and 1 from a seal [1980]). The hemagglutinin gene of these H7 viruses are separated from those from Eurasia. Gradual accumulation of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions was observed in the hemagglutinin of H7 AIVs from waterfowl and domestic poultry. Genotype characterization suggested that H7 AIVs in wild birds form diverse and transient internal gene constellations. Serologic analyses showed that the 93 isolates cross-reacted with each other to different extents. Antigenic cartography showed that the average antigenic distance among them was 1.14 units (standard deviation [SD], 0.57 unit) and that antigenic diversity among the H7 isolates we tested was limited. Our results suggest that the continuous genetic evolution has not led to significant antigenic diversity for H7 AIVs from North America. These findings add to our understanding of the natural history of IAVs and will inform public health decision-making regarding the threat these viruses pose to humans and poultry. PMID:26858078

  17. Limited Antigenic Diversity in Contemporary H7 Avian-Origin Influenza A Viruses from North America.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifei; Bailey, Elizabeth; Spackman, Erica; Li, Tao; Wang, Hui; Long, Li-Ping; Baroch, John A; Cunningham, Fred L; Lin, Xiaoxu; Jarman, Richard G; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2016-02-09

    Subtype H7 avian-origin influenza A viruses (AIVs) have caused at least 500 confirmed human infections since 2003 and culling of >75 million birds in recent years. Here we antigenically and genetically characterized 93 AIV isolates from North America (85 from migratory waterfowl [1976-2010], 7 from domestic poultry [1971-2012], and 1 from a seal [1980]). The hemagglutinin gene of these H7 viruses are separated from those from Eurasia. Gradual accumulation of nucleotide and amino acid substitutions was observed in the hemagglutinin of H7 AIVs from waterfowl and domestic poultry. Genotype characterization suggested that H7 AIVs in wild birds form diverse and transient internal gene constellations. Serologic analyses showed that the 93 isolates cross-reacted with each other to different extents. Antigenic cartography showed that the average antigenic distance among them was 1.14 units (standard deviation [SD], 0.57 unit) and that antigenic diversity among the H7 isolates we tested was limited. Our results suggest that the continuous genetic evolution has not led to significant antigenic diversity for H7 AIVs from North America. These findings add to our understanding of the natural history of IAVs and will inform public health decision-making regarding the threat these viruses pose to humans and poultry.

  18. Expression and functional properties of the Streptococcus intermedius surface protein antigen I/II.

    PubMed

    Petersen, F C; Pasco, S; Ogier, J; Klein, J P; Assev, S; Scheie, A A

    2001-07-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is associated with deep-seated purulent infections. In this study, we investigated expression and functional activities of antigen I/II in S. intermedius. The S. intermedius antigen I/II appeared to be cell surface associated, with a molecular mass of approximately 160 kDa. Northern blotting indicated that the S. intermedius NCTC 11324 antigen I/II gene was transcribed as a monocistronic message. Maximum expression was seen during the early exponential phase. Insertional inactivation of the antigen I/II gene resulted in reduced hydrophobicity during early exponential phase, whereas no effect was detected during mid- and late exponential phases. Binding to human fibronectin and laminin was reduced in the isogenic mutant, whereas binding to human collagen types I and IV and to rat collagen type I was not significant for either the wild type or the mutant. Compared to the wild type, the capacity of the isogenic mutant to induce interleukin 8 (IL-8) release by THP-1 monocytic cells was significantly reduced. The results indicate that the S. intermedius antigen I/II is involved in adhesion to human receptors and in IL-8 induction.

  19. A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0535 TITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...different between aggressive and indolent tumors. For the third year of the grant, we evaluated the gene expression of these 8 CTAs in PCa and benign

  20. CT10: a new cancer-testis (CT) antigen homologous to CT7 and the MAGE family, identified by representational-difference analysis.

    PubMed

    Güre, A O; Stockert, E; Arden, K C; Boyer, A D; Viars, C S; Scanlan, M J; Old, L J; Chen, Y T

    2000-03-01

    Assays relying on humoral or T-cell-based recognition of tumor antigens to identify potential targets for immunotherapy have led to the discovery of a significant number of immunogenic gene products, including cancer-testis (CT) antigens predominantly expressed in cancer cells and male germ cells. The search for cancer-specific antigens has been extended via the technique of representational-difference analysis and SK-MEL-37, a melanoma cell line expressing a broad range of CT antigens. Using this approach, we have isolated CT antigen genes, genes over-expressed in cancer, e. g., PRAME and KOC, and genes encoding neuro-ectodermal markers. The identified CT antigen genes include the previously defined MAGE-A6, MAGE-A4a, MAGE-A10, CT7/MAGE-C1, as well as a novel gene designated CT10, which shows strong homology to CT7/MAGE-C1 both at cDNA and at genomic levels. Chromosome mapping localized CT10 to Xq27, in close proximity to CT7/MAGE-C1 and MAGE-A genes. CT10 mRNA is expressed in testis and in 20 to 30% of various human cancers. A serological survey identified 2 melanoma patients with anti-CT10 antibody, demonstrating the immunogenicity of CT10 in humans.

  1. [The carcinoembryonic antigen: apropos of an old friend].

    PubMed

    Téllez-Avila, Félix Ignacio; García-Osogobio, Sandra Minerva

    2005-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is glycoprotein localized in the apical surface of mature enterocytes. The members of the CEA gene family are clustered on chromosome 19q13.2. It is formed by 29 genes, of which 18 are expressed. Many functions of CEA have been known in healthy indiuiduals, however its role as cell adhesion molecule is the most studied. Besides the colon, CEA is expressed in the stomach, tongue, oesophagus, cervix, and prostate. The most important clinical function is in colorectal, gastric and ovary cancer. It is used as prognosis marker, staging system, recurrence, treatment response and liver metastases. There are many non-neoplasic diseases that enhance CEA value. Actually, CEA is being studying as target of immunotherapy.

  2. Allergens/Antigens, toxins and polyketides of important Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Bhetariya, Preetida J; Madan, Taruna; Basir, Seemi Farhat; Varma, Anupam; Usha, Sarma P

    2011-04-01

    The medical, agricultural and biotechnological importance of the primitive eukaryotic microorganisms, the Fungi was recognized way back in 1920. Among various groups of fungi, the Aspergillus species are studied in great detail using advances in genomics and proteomics to unravel biological and molecular mechanisms in these fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus terreus are some of the important species relevant to human, agricultural and biotechnological applications. The potential of Aspergillus species to produce highly diversified complex biomolecules such as multifunctional proteins (allergens, antigens, enzymes) and polyketides is fascinating and demands greater insight into the understanding of these fungal species for application to human health. Recently a regulator gene for secondary metabolites, LaeA has been identified. Gene mining based on LaeA has facilitated new metabolites with antimicrobial activity such as emericellamides and antitumor activity such as terrequinone A from A. nidulans. Immunoproteomic approach was reported for identification of few novel allergens for A. fumigatus. In this context, the review is focused on recent developments in allergens, antigens, structural and functional diversity of the polyketide synthases that produce polyketides of pharmaceutical and biological importance. Possible antifungal drug targets for development of effective antifungal drugs and new strategies for development of molecular diagnostics are considered.

  3. Characterization of the O-antigen polymerase (Wzy) of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Sebastian, Shite; Pinkham, Jessica T; Ross, Robin A; Blalock, LeeAnn T; Kasper, Dennis L

    2010-09-03

    The O-antigen polymerase of gram-negative bacteria has been difficult to characterize. Herein we report the biochemical and functional characterization of the protein product (Wzy) of the gene annotated as the putative O-antigen polymerase, which is located in the O-antigen biosynthetic locus of Francisella tularensis. In silico analysis (homology searching, hydropathy plotting, and codon usage assessment) strongly suggested that Wzy is an O-antigen polymerase whose function is to catalyze the addition of newly synthesized O-antigen repeating units to a glycolipid consisting of lipid A, inner core polysaccharide, and one repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide (O-PS). To characterize the function of the Wzy protein, a non-polar deletion mutant of wzy was generated by allelic replacement, and the banding pattern of O-PS was observed by immunoblot analysis of whole-cell lysates obtained by SDS-PAGE and stained with an O-PS-specific monoclonal antibody. These immunoblot analyses showed that O-PS of the wzy mutant expresses only one repeating unit of O-antigen. Further biochemical characterization of the subcellular fractions of the wzy mutant demonstrated that (as is characteristic of O-antigen polymerase mutants) the low molecular weight O-antigen accumulates in the periplasm of the mutant. Site-directed mutagenesis based on protein homology and topology, which was carried out to locate a catalytic residue of the protein, showed that modification of specific residues (Gly(176), Asp(177), Gly(323), and Tyr(324)) leads to a loss of O-PS polymerization. Topology models indicate that these amino acids most likely lie in close proximity on the bacterial surface.

  4. How Antigen Quantity and Quality Determine T-Cell Decisions in Lymphoid Tissue▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huan; Jin, Bo; Henrickson, Sarah E.; Perelson, Alan S.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2008-01-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) express T-cell receptor (TCR) molecules on their surface that can recognize peptides (p) derived from antigenic proteins bound to products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. The pMHC molecules are expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs). T cells first encounter antigen on DCs in lymph nodes (LN). Intravital microscopy experiments show that upon entering the LN containing antigen, CD8+ T cells first move rapidly. After a few hours, they stop and make extended contacts with DCs. The factors that determine when and how this transition occurs are not well understood. We report results from computer simulations that suggest that the duration of phase one is related to the low probability of productive interactions between T cells and DCs. This is demonstrated by our finding that the antigen dose and type determine when such a transition occurs. These results are in agreement with experimental observations. TCR-pMHC binding characteristics and the antigen dose determine the time required for a productive T-cell-DC encounter (resulting in sustained contact). We find that the ratio of this time scale and the half-life of the pMHC complex itself provide a consolidated measure of antigen quantity and type. Results obtained upon varying different measures of antigen quantity and type fall on one curve when graphed against this ratio of time scales. Thus, we provide a mechanism for how the effects of varying one set of parameters are influenced by other prevailing conditions. This understanding should help guide future experimentation. PMID:18426917

  5. Characterization of the O-antigen Polymerase (Wzy) of Francisella tularensis*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hyun; Sebastian, Shite; Pinkham, Jessica T.; Ross, Robin A.; Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2010-01-01

    The O-antigen polymerase of Gram-negative bacteria has been difficult to characterize. Herein we report the biochemical and functional characterization of the protein product (Wzy) of the gene annotated as the putative O-antigen polymerase, which is located in the O-antigen biosynthetic locus of Francisella tularensis. In silico analysis (homology searching, hydropathy plotting, and codon usage assessment) strongly suggested that Wzy is an O-antigen polymerase whose function is to catalyze the addition of newly synthesized O-antigen repeating units to a glycolipid consisting of lipid A, inner core polysaccharide, and one repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide (O-PS). To characterize the function of the Wzy protein, a non-polar deletion mutant of wzy was generated by allelic replacement, and the banding pattern of O-PS was observed by immunoblot analysis of whole-cell lysates obtained by SDS-PAGE and stained with an O-PS-specific monoclonal antibody. These immunoblot analyses showed that O-PS of the wzy mutant expresses only one repeating unit of O-antigen. Further biochemical characterization of the subcellular fractions of the wzy mutant demonstrated that (as is characteristic of O-antigen polymerase mutants) the low molecular weight O-antigen accumulates in the periplasm of the mutant. Site-directed mutagenesis based on protein homology and topology, which was carried out to locate a catalytic residue of the protein, showed that modification of specific residues (Gly176, Asp177, Gly323, and Tyr324) leads to a loss of O-PS polymerization. Topology models indicate that these amino acids most likely lie in close proximity on the bacterial surface. PMID:20605777

  6. Antigen affinity and antigen dose exert distinct influences on CD4 T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keck, Simone; Schmaler, Mathias; Ganter, Stefan; Wyss, Lena; Oberle, Susanne; Huseby, Eric S; Zehn, Dietmar; King, Carolyn G

    2014-10-14

    Cumulative T-cell receptor signal strength and ensuing T-cell responses are affected by both antigen affinity and antigen dose. Here we examined the distinct contributions of these parameters to CD4 T-cell differentiation during infection. We found that high antigen affinity positively correlates with T helper (Th)1 differentiation at both high and low doses of antigen. In contrast, follicular helper T cell (TFH) effectors are generated after priming with high, intermediate, and low affinity ligand. Unexpectedly, memory T cells generated after priming with very low affinity antigen remain impaired in their ability to generate secondary Th1 effectors, despite being recalled with high affinity antigen. These data challenge the view that only strongly stimulated CD4 T cells are capable of differentiating into the TFH and memory T-cell compartments and reveal that differential strength of stimulation during primary T-cell activation imprints unique and long lasting T-cell differentiation programs.

  7. Novel methods for expression of foreign antigens in live vector vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Harley, Regina H.; Galen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial live vector vaccines represent a vaccine development strategy that offers exceptional flexibility. In this approach, genes encoding protective antigens of unrelated bacterial, viral or parasitic pathogens are expressed in an attenuated bacterial vaccine strain that delivers these foreign antigens to the immune system, thereby eliciting relevant immune responses. Rather than expressing these antigens using low copy expression plasmids, here we pursue expression of foreign proteins from the live vector chromosome. Our strategy is designed to compensate for the inherent disadvantage of loss of gene dosage (vs. plasmid-based expression) by integrating antigen-encoding gene cassettes into multiple chromosomal sites already inactivated in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine candidate. We tested expression of a cassette encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) integrated separately into native guaBA, htrA or clyA chromosomal loci. Using single integrations, we show that expression levels of GFPuv are significantly affected by the site of integration, regardless of the inclusion of additional strong promoters within the incoming cassette. Using cassettes integrated into both guaBA and htrA, we observe cumulative synthesis levels from two integration sites superior to single integrations. Most importantly, we observe that GFPuv expression increases in a growth phase-dependent manner, suggesting that foreign antigen synthesis may be “tuned” to the physiology of the live vaccine. We expect this novel platform expression technology to prove invaluable in the development of a wide variety of multivalent live vector vaccines, capable of expressing multiple antigens from both chromosomal and plasmid-based expression systems within a single strain. PMID:23406777

  8. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  9. HLA Immune Function Genes in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Anthony R.; Westover, Jonna B.; Rosenspire, Allen J.

    2012-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes on chromosome 6 are instrumental in many innate and adaptive immune responses. The HLA genes/haplotypes can also be involved in immune dysfunction and autoimmune diseases. It is now becoming apparent that many of the non-antigen-presenting HLA genes make significant contributions to autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, it has been reported that autism subjects often have associations with HLA genes/haplotypes, suggesting an underlying dysregulation of the immune system mediated by HLA genes. Genetic studies have only succeeded in identifying autism-causing genes in a small number of subjects suggesting that the genome has not been adequately interrogated. Close examination of the HLA region in autism has been relatively ignored, largely due to extraordinary genetic complexity. It is our proposition that genetic polymorphisms in the HLA region, especially in the non-antigen-presenting regions, may be important in the etiology of autism in certain subjects. PMID:22928105

  10. Molecular Characterization of a Fully Human Chimeric T-Cell Antigen Receptor for Tumor-Associated Antigen EpCAM

    PubMed Central

    Shirasu, Naoto; Yamada, Hiromi; Shibaguchi, Hirotomo; Kuroki, Motomu; Kuroki, Masahide

    2012-01-01

    The transduction of T cells to express chimeric T-cell antigen receptor (CAR) is an attractive strategy for adaptive immunotherapy for cancer, because the CAR can redirect the recognition specificity of T cells to tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) on the surface of target cells, thereby avoiding the limitations of HLA restriction. However, there are considerable problems with the clinical application of CAR, mostly due to its xenogeneic components, which could be immunogenic in humans. Moreover, while extensive studies on the CARs have been performed, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of CAR-grafted T cells remain unclear. In order to eliminate potential immunogenicity and investigate the molecular basis of the CAR-mediated T-cell activation, we constructed a novel CAR (CAR57-28ζ) specific for one of the most important TAAs, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), using only human-derived genes. We revealed that in Jurkat T cells, lentivirally expressed CAR57-28ζ can transmit the T-cell-activating signals sufficient to induce IL-2 production upon EpCAM stimulation. An immunofluorescent analysis clearly showed that the CAR57-28ζ induces the formation of signaling clusters containing endogenous CD3ζ at the CAR/EpCAM interaction interface. These results suggest that this CAR gene may be safely and effectively applied for adaptive T-cell immunotherapy. PMID:22547929

  11. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  12. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  13. Computer aided selection of candidate vaccine antigens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immunoinformatics is an emergent branch of informatics science that long ago pullulated from the tree of knowledge that is bioinformatics. It is a discipline which applies informatic techniques to problems of the immune system. To a great extent, immunoinformatics is typified by epitope prediction methods. It has found disappointingly limited use in the design and discovery of new vaccines, which is an area where proper computational support is generally lacking. Most extant vaccines are not based around isolated epitopes but rather correspond to chemically-treated or attenuated whole pathogens or correspond to individual proteins extract from whole pathogens or correspond to complex carbohydrate. In this chapter we attempt to review what progress there has been in an as-yet-underexplored area of immunoinformatics: the computational discovery of whole protein antigens. The effective development of antigen prediction methods would significantly reduce the laboratory resource required to identify pathogenic proteins as candidate subunit vaccines. We begin our review by placing antigen prediction firmly into context, exploring the role of reverse vaccinology in the design and discovery of vaccines. We also highlight several competing yet ultimately complementary methodological approaches: sub-cellular location prediction, identifying antigens using sequence similarity, and the use of sophisticated statistical approaches for predicting the probability of antigen characteristics. We end by exploring how a systems immunomics approach to the prediction of immunogenicity would prove helpful in the prediction of antigens. PMID:21067543

  14. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a