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Sample records for 51cr release assays

  1. sup 51 Cr release and oxidative stress in the lens

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart-DeHaan, P.J.; Sanwal, M.; Creighton, M.O.; Inch, W.R.; Trevithick, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    Examination of the opaque areas of human cortical cataracts has shown that a large portion of the opacity could be attributed to the globules found there. We tested models involving globule formation as a result of oxidative damage to rat lens cells in culture and whole chick embryo lenses. When cell monolayers from a lens cell line were exposed to oxidizing conditions they developed globules on the cell surface. The cells were protected from damage by the addition of glutathione and vitamin C. Thirteen-day chick embryo lenses were also incubated in oxidizing conditions and the amount of cellular damage was assessed using a chromium-51 release assay we have developed. After 24 hr the percent 51Cr in the medium increased by an average of 20% as a result of 10 mM hydrogen peroxide treatment. The addition of the 10 mM vitamin C to the hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the 51Cr leakage to the control level. Light microscopy of sections of the lens showed a breakdown of the equatorial fibre arrangement in the presence of H2O2, while addition of vitamin C restored the fibre organization to almost normal. The findings suggest that oxidative stress is an important step in cataractogenesis and point towards the use of water soluble antioxidants as protective agents.

  2. Phagocytosis-induced 51Cr release from activated macrophages and blood mononuclears. Effect of colchicine and antioxidants

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.P.; Hale, A.H.

    1981-09-01

    The chromium-release test was adapted to the measurement of the cellular injury induced when activated macrophages phagocytose particulates. Macrophages obtained from rabbit lungs undergoing BCG-induced chronic inflammation released more chromium when incubated in the presence of phagocytosable particles than when incubated under resting conditions. Blood mononuclear cells, 40-60% monocytes, procured from the same BCG-injected animals, were less susceptible to phagocytosis-induced injury than the macrophages obtained from the lungs. The amount of chromium released by the activated macrophages was proportional to the number of particles present during incubation. In the presence of catalase, the amounts of chromium released by phagocytosing and resting macrophages were similar; in the presence of superoxide dismutase and cytochrome c, the amount of chromium released by phagocytosing macrophages was 13-35% less than the amount of chromium released by macrophages incubated without the antioxidants. In addition, colchicine, an inhibitor of degranulation also exerted partial inhibition of the chromium release. These results suggest that oxygen radicals and lysosomal contents contribute to the cellular injury that results from phagocytosis.

  3. Comparison of europium and chromium release assays: cytotoxicity in healthy individuals and patients with cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    von Zons, P; Crowley-Nowick, P; Friberg, D; Bell, M; Koldovsky, U; Whiteside, T L

    1997-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activities were measured in peripheral blood obtained from healthy women to compare a standard 51Cr release assay with a nonradioactive europium (Eu3+) release assay based on time-resolved fluorescence. The two types of cytotoxicity assays were first compared in paired determinations performed on 28 samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from healthy women who had normal pap smears or no biopsy evidence of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL). Target cells (NK-sensitive K562 and NK-resistant Raji cell lines) were labeled with Eu3+ only, 51Cr only, or both labels and compared in cytotoxicity assays using fresh or interleukin 2 (IL-2)-activated effector cells. Spontaneous release in the Eu3+ release assay was comparable to that observed in the 51Cr release assay, but maximum Eu3+ release always exceeded that of 51Cr. In 4-h assays, specific release of Eu3+ from target cells was more rapid than that of 51Cr, consistently resulting in 30 to 40% higher levels of activity. However, a significant linear correlation (P < 0.001) was observed between cytotoxicity levels based on measurements of Eu3+ and 51Cr release in 4-h assays. The Eu3+ release assay was then used to measure NK and LAK activities in the peripheral blood of women with cervical SIL or cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Mean NK activity of women with advanced SIL (121 lytic units [LU]) or SCC (93 LU) was found to be similar to that of controls (101 LU) or patients with normal cervical biopsies (90 LU), as was the ability to generate IL-2-stimulated NK activity. However, LAK activity during 18 h of incubation in the presence of IL-2 was reduced in patients with cervical SCC (P < 0.05) compared with that in normal controls. Results of 51Cr assays performed in parallel with patient samples gave comparable results. Advantages of EU3+ release assays for routine evaluation of cytotoxicity are discussed. PMID:9067656

  4. Application of non-radioactive europium (Eu3+) release assay to a measurement of human natural killer activity of healthy and patient populations.

    PubMed

    Nagao, F; Yabe, T; Xu, M; Yokoyama, K; Saito, K; Okumura, K

    1996-01-01

    Europium (Eu3+) release assay is a non-radioactive method for a measurement of cytotoxicity of lymphocytes and has several advantages compared with a conventional 51Cr release assay. However, the Eu3+ release assay has not been applied to a natural killer (NK) activity measurement of a large number of the human population mainly due to a lack of comparability with the 51Cr release assay. With some modifications of the procedures and careful manipulation of cells, constant and reproducible results were obtained by the Eu3+ release assay. NK activity of several individuals was measured by the Eu3+ release assay and was compared with data obtained by 51Cr release assay performed simultaneously. The obtained values by the two methods were almost identical. We applied the Eu3+ method to measure NK activity of a large number of individuals, including 68 apparently healthy donors and 36 autoimmune and 21 cancer patients. Some of these diseases are known to show abnormal NK activity. The obtained cytotoxicities were mostly consistent with the previously reported data obtained by the 51Cr release assay. These results indicated that the Eu3+ release assay could be used as an alternative method for a measurement of human NK activity of mass population including patients. PMID:8915687

  5. An improved europium release assay for complement-mediated cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Bystryn, J C

    1992-02-14

    An improved assay for complement-mediated cytolysis is described. The target cells are labeled with europium complexed to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (Eu-DTPA). Cytolysis caused by antibody plus complement leads to the release of the Eu-DTPA complex which is then formed into a highly fluorescent chelate by the addition of 2-naphthoyltrifluoroacetone (2-NTA). The amount of europium chelate formed--a measurement of cell death--is then quantified with a time-resolved fluorometer. The results of the assay are reproducible. Complement-mediated cytolysis when measured by europium release was five times more sensitive than when measured by conventional 51Cr release and three times than when measured by trypan blue exclusion. Because europium does not decay, target cells can be labelled in batches and stored frozen until use, which speeds and simplifies the assay. Thus, europium release assay is a simple and quantitative method to measure complement-mediated cytolysis which is sensitive and more rapid than conventional assays. PMID:1541836

  6. Modified cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor frequency assay by measuring released europium in a time resolved fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Haque, K; Truman, C; Dittmer, I; Laundy, G; Denning-Kendall, P; Hows, J; Feest, T; Bradley, B

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (CTLpf) can be quantified by using the principle of limiting dilution analysis (LDA). Chromium 51 (51Cr) and europium (Eu) release assays are based on the measurement of marker release after lysis of targets by the effector cells. Although, 51Cr release has been widely used to quantify cell lysis since its introduction, it has several disadvantages such as handling and disposal of radioisotopes as well as health risk to personnel involved performing the assay. This situation has led us to adopt a non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay. After 7 days culture the PHA-stimulated targets are labeled with europium DTPA chelate. Lysis of labeled targets by effectors releases the Eu-DTPA complex in culture medium--a highly fluorescent substance. The amount of fluorescence can be measured in a time resolved fluorometer. We describe here some modifications of the original protocol which include optimising IL-2 requirements, reduction of incubation times, addition of an extra spin before 37 degrees C incubation, readjustment of target cells per volume of labeling buffer and other crucial parameters increasing the specificity and sensitivity of CTLpf assay. We are in agreement with others that the Eu-release assay is specific and reproducible. It can be used for the CTLpf estimation as well as other T cell and non-T cell cytotoxicity assays. PMID:9090438

  7. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay. PMID:22933153

  8. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  9. The 51Cr neutrino source and Borexino: a desirable marriage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, N.; Fiorentini, G.; Ricci, B.

    1996-02-01

    Exposure to a 51Cr neutrino source as that used in Gallex will provide an excellent overall performance test of Borexino, which should collect about 1400 source induced events, with an initial rate of about 35 counts per day. This will be particularly important if MSW-small-angle turns out to be the solution of the solar neutrino problem. In addition, if an independent, accurate calibration is available, one will have an interesting experiment on neutrino properties: as an example, a neutrino magnetic moment of the order 5 . 10-11 μB could be detected/excluded at the 90% C.L.

  10. The platelet serotonin-release assay.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Arnold, Donald M; Nazi, Ishac; Kelton, John G

    2015-06-01

    Few laboratory tests are as clinically useful as The platelet serotonin-release assay (SRA): a positive SRA in the appropriate clinical context is virtually diagnostic of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a life- and limb-threatening prothrombotic disorder caused by anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies that activate platelets, thereby triggering serotonin-release. The SRA's performance characteristics include high sensitivity and specificity, although caveats include indeterminate reaction profiles (observed in ∼4% of test sera) and potential for false-positive reactions. As only a subset of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies detectable by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) are additionally platelet-activating, the SRA has far greater diagnostic specificity than the EIA. However, requiring a positive EIA, either as an initial screening test or as an SRA adjunct, will reduce risk of a false-positive SRA (since a negative EIA in a patient with a "positive" SRA should prompt critical evaluation of the SRA reaction profile). The SRA also provides useful information on whether a HIT serum produces strong platelet activation even in the absence of heparin: such heparin-"independent" platelet activation is a marker of unusually severe HIT, including delayed-onset HIT and severe HIT complicated by consumptive coagulopathy with risk for microvascular thrombosis. PMID:25775976

  11. T cell-mediated hepatitis in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Liver cell destruction by H-2 class I-restricted virus-specific cytotoxic T cells as a physiological correlate of the /sup 51/Cr-release assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkernagel, R.M.; Haenseler, E.; Leist, T.; Cerny, A.; Hengartner, H.; Althage, A.

    1986-10-01

    A model for immunologically T cell-mediated hepatitis was established in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of hepatitis was monitored histologically and by determination of changes in serum levels of the enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), and alkaline phosphatase (AP). Kinetics of histological disease manifestations, increases of liver enzyme levels in the serum, and cytotoxic T cell activities in livers and spleens all correlated and were dependent upon several parameters: LCMV-isolate; LCMV-WE caused extensive hepatitis, LCMV-Armstrong virtually none. Virus dose. Route of infection; i.v. or i.p. infection caused hepatitis, whereas infection into the footpad did not. The general genetic background of the murine host; of the strains tested, Swiss mice and A-strain mice were more susceptible than C57BL or CBA mice; BALB/c and DBA/2 mice were least susceptible. The degree of immunocompetence of the murine host; T cell deficient nu/nu mice never developed hepatitis, whereas nu/+ or +/+ mice always did. B cell-depleted anti-IgM-treated mice developed immune-mediated hepatitis comparably or even more extensively than control mice. Local cytotoxic T cell activity; mononuclear cells isolated from livers during the period of overt hepatitis were two to five times more active than equal numbers of spleen cells. Adoptive transfer of nylon wool-nonadherent anti-Thy-1.2 and anti-Lyt-2 plus C-sensitive, anti-L3T4 plus C-resistant lymphocytes into irradiated mice preinfected with LCMV-WE caused a rapid time- and dose-dependent linear increase of serum enzyme levels. This increase was caused by adoptive transfer of lymphocytes if immune cell donors and recipient mice shared class I, but not when they shared class II histocompatibility antigens.

  12. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with Crohn's disease and celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Turck, D.; Ythier, H.; Maquet, E.; Deveaux, M.; Marchandise, X.; Farriaux, J.P.; Fontaine, G.

    1987-07-01

    (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was used as a probe molecule to assess intestinal permeability in 7 healthy control adults, 11 control children, 17 children with Crohn's disease, and 6 children with untreated celiac disease. After subjects fasted overnight, 75 kBq/kg (= 2 microCi/kg) /sup 51/Cr-labeled EDTA was given by mouth; 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the total oral dose. Mean and SD were as follows: control adults 1.47 +/- 0.62, control children 1.59 +/- 0.55, and patients with Crohn's disease or celiac disease 5.35 +/- 1.94. The difference between control children and patients was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). These results show that intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA is increased among children with active or inactive Crohn's disease affecting small bowel only or small bowel and colon, and with untreated celiac disease. The (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA permeability test could facilitate the decision to perform more extensive investigations in children suspected of small bowel disease who have atypical or poor clinical and biological symptomatology.

  13. (51Cr)EDTA intestinal permeability in children with cow's milk intolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Schrander, J.J.; Unsalan-Hooyen, R.W.; Forget, P.P.; Jansen, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Making use of ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA as a permeability marker, we measured intestinal permeability in a group of 20 children with proven cow's milk intolerance (CMI), a group of 17 children with similar complaints where CMI was excluded (sick controls), and a group of 12 control children. ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test results (mean +/- SD) were 6.85 +/- 3.64%, 3.42 +/- 0.94%, and 2.61 +/- 0.67% in the group with CMI, the sick control, and the control group, respectively. When compared to both control groups, patients with cow's milk intolerance (CMI) showed a significantly increased small bowel permeability. We conclude that the ({sup 51}Cr)EDTA test can be helpful for the diagnosis of cow's milk intolerance.

  14. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7040 - Adenosine triphosphate release assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adenosine triphosphate release assay. 864.7040 Section 864.7040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  19. Measuring the activity of a 51Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, V. V.; Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of 51Cr is presented.

  20. Intestinal permeability to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Leclercq-Foucart, J.; Forget, P.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.; Zappitelli, A.

    1986-05-01

    Intestinal permeability was investigated in 14 children with cystic fibrosis making use of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA as probe molecule. Ten normal young adults and 11 children served as controls. After oral administration of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA, 24 h urine was collected. Urinary radioactivity was calculated and results expressed as percentage of oral dose excreted in 24 h urine. Mean and SEM were as follows: 2.51 +/- 0.21, 2.35 +/- 0.24, and 13.19 +/- 1.72 for control children, normal adults, and cystic fibrosis patients, respectively. The permeability differences between cystic fibrosis patients and either control children or control adults are significant (p less than 0.001).

  1. Studies with nonradioisotopic sodium chromate. II. Single- and double-label sup 52 Cr/ sup 51 Cr posttransfusion recovery estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, W.A.; Keegan, T.; Hanbury, C.M.; Holme, S.; Pleban, P. )

    1989-10-01

    A recently developed nonradioisotopic 52Cr technique was used to measure either red cell volume or posttransfusion recovery of stored red cells. The experimental method uses Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry to measure red cell chromium. Results from the 52Cr method were compared with those from 51Cr single-label and 125I-albumin/51Cr double-label procedures using 49-day AS-1 red cell concentrates drawn and prepared according to standard procedures. In the first group of five donors, red cell volume was estimated concurrently with both 52Cr-labeled fresh red cells and 125I-albumin. The latter measured plasma volume from which red cell volume was estimated on the basis of the hematocrit (125I red cell volume). 51Cr-labeled stored red cells were transfused to measure posttransfusion recoveries. The correlation between 52Cr and 125I red cell volumes was significant (r = 0.68, p less than 0.01), and, in this group, the differences were not significant (p less than 0.05). Twenty-four-hour posttransfusion recoveries of 51Cr-labeled stored red cells averaged 66 +/- 5 percent when measured with the 125I/51Cr technique and 69 +/- 8 percent when measured with the 52Cr/51Cr method. In the second group of five donors, red cell volume was estimated by the 125I-albumin technique, and the posttransfusion recovery of stored red cells was quantitated by 51Cr- and 52Cr-labeled stored cells simultaneously. In this group, posttransfusion recoveries with 125I/51Cr averaged 73 +/- 7 percent; with 125I/52Cr, they averaged 75 +/- 10 percent. Using the single-label method of calculation, recoveries averaged 76 +/- 7 and 75 +/- 10 percent for the 51Cr and 52Cr methods, respectively.

  2. After TGN1412: Recent developments in cytokine release assays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The failure of regulatory science to keep pace with and support the development of new biological medicines was very publically highlighted in March 2006 when the first-in-man Phase I clinical trial of the immunomodulatory CD28-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) TGN1412 ended in disaster when all six volunteers suffered a life-threatening adverse reaction termed a ‘Cytokine Storm’. The poor predictive value of standard pre-clinical safety tests and animal models applied to TGN1412 demonstrated the need for a new generation of immunotoxicity assays and animal models that are both sensitive and predictive of clinical outcome in man. The non-predictive result obtained from pre-clinical safety testing in cynomolgus macaques has now been attributed to a lack of CD28 expression on CD4+ effector memory T-cells that therefore cannot be stimulated by TGN1412. In contrast, high levels of CD28 are expressed on human CD4+ effector memory T-cells, the source of most TGN1412-stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokines. Standard in vitro safety tests with human cells were also non-predictive as they did not replicate in vivo presentation of TGN1412. It was subsequently shown that, if an immobilized therapeutic mAb-based assay or endothelial cell co-culture assay was used to evaluate TGN1412, then these would have predicted a pro-inflammatory response in man. New in vitro assays based on these approaches are now being applied to emerging therapeutics to hopefully prevent a repeat of the TGN1412 incident. It has emerged that the mechanism of pro-inflammatory cytokine release stimulated by TGN1412 is different to that of other therapeutic mAbs, such that standard pro-inflammatory markers such as TNFα and IL-8 are not discriminatory. Rather, IL-2 release and lymphoproliferation are optimal readouts of a TGN1412-like pro-inflammatory response. PMID:22967038

  3. Homogeneous time resolved fluorescence assay to measure histamine release.

    PubMed

    Claret, Emmanuel J; Ouled-Diaf, Josy; Seguin, Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine synthesized by the enzymatic decarboxylation of histidine. Implication of histamine in allergy is well described but histamine is also found in some specific neurones, functions as a neurotransmitter and regulates sleep/wake cycles, hormonal secretion, cardiovascular control and thermo-regulation. We have developed a TR-FRET histamine assay, based on the competition between sample histamine and allophycocyanine (XL665) labelled histamine for binding to a Europium cryptate (EuK) labelled antibody. As histamine is a small monoamine molecule, high affinity antibodies have been raised against carrier protein conjugated histamine. Therefore, sample histamine needs to be derivatized in the same way as the conjugated histamine, so that the antibody will have a similar affinity for both molecules. This acylation step is performed directly in wells and does not need to be done in separate vials, making handling easier for large numbers of samples. The incubation takes place at room temperature for 3 hours. The assay covers a measurement range of 1.56 to 400 nM and shows an analytical sensitivity of 1.3nM. We have shown that miniaturization of sample and reagents volumes down to 20 micro l does not alter these performances. This histamine release assay provides a particularly well adapted procedure for HTS and secondary screening compared to current heterogeneous methods. PMID:14683484

  4. Current status of new SAGE project with 51Cr neutrino source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrin, V.; Cleveland, B.; Danshin, S.; Elliott, S.; Gorbachev, V.; Ibragimova, T.; Kalikhov, A.; Knodel, T.; Kozlova, Yu.; Malyshkin, Yu.; Matveev, V.; Mirmov, I.; Nico, J.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Shikhin, A.; Sinclair, D.; Veretenkin, E.; Wilkerson, J.

    2015-03-01

    A very short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with an intense 51Cr neutrino source is currently under construction at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory of the Institute for Nuclear Research RAS (BNO). The experiment, which is based on the existing SAGE experiment, will use an upgraded Gallium-Germanium Neutrino Telescope (GGNT) and an artificial 51Cr neutrino source with activity ˜3 MCi to search for transitions of active neutrinos to sterile states with Δ m 2 ˜1 eV2. The neutrino source will be placed in the center of a liquid Ga metal target that is divided into two concentric zones, internal and external. The average path length of neutrinos in each zone will be the same and the neutrino capture rate will be measured separately in each zone. The oscillation signature, which comes from the ratio of events in the near and far gallium volumes, will be largely free of systematic errors, such as may occur from cross section and source strength uncertainties, and will provide a clean signal of electron neutrino disappearance into a sterile state at baselines of about 0.6 and 2.0 m. The sensitivity to the disappearance of electron neutrinos is expected to be a few percent. Construction of this set of new facilities, including a two-zone tank for irradiation of 50 tons of Ga metal with the intense 51Cr source, as well as additional modules of the GGNT counting and extraction systems, is close to completion. To check the new facilities they will first be used for SAGE solar neutrino measurements.

  5. Calorimetric method for determination of {sup 51}Cr neutrino source activity

    SciTech Connect

    Veretenkin, E. P. Gavrin, V. N.; Danshin, S. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Mirmov, I. N.

    2015-12-15

    Experimental study of nonstandard neutrino properties using high-intensity artificial neutrino sources requires the activity of the sources to be determined with high accuracy. In the BEST project, a calorimetric system for measurement of the activity of high-intensity (a few MCi) neutrino sources based on {sup 51}Cr with an accuracy of 0.5–1% is created. In the paper, the main factors affecting the accuracy of determining the neutrino source activity are discussed. The calorimetric system design and the calibration results using a thermal simulator of the source are presented.

  6. Enhanced intestinal permeability to 51Cr-labeled EDTA in dogs with small intestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Hall, E J; Batt, R M

    1990-01-01

    Intestinal permeability in dogs with small intestinal disease was measured by quantitation of 24-hour urinary excretion of 51Cr-labeled EDTA following intragastric administration. Permeability was high in dogs with a variety of naturally acquired small intestinal diseases including wheat-sensitive enteropathy of Irish Setters, small intestinal bacterial over-growth, and giardiasis, and permeability was decreased after successful treatment. These findings indicate that the assessment of intestinal permeability may be a useful technique for detecting small intestinal disease and for monitoring the efficacy of treatment in dogs. PMID:2104825

  7. An improved assay for antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity based on time resolved fluorometry.

    PubMed

    Patel, A K; Boyd, P N

    1995-07-17

    A new and faster assay for antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity based on release of europium from target cells is described. This has a number of important advantages over the traditional assays based on release of chromium-51 (51Cr). The new method involves labelling of Wein 133 target cells (B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells) which express the antigen, CDw52, with the chelate europium diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (EuDTPA) according to the method of Blomberg et al. (1986). Labelled cells are sensitised (coated) with the anti-lymphocytic monoclonal antibody, Campath-1H. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells are added to mediate lysis of EuDTPA labelled Wein 133 cells by ADCC. Release of EuDTPA from lysed cells is determined by mixing supernatants with enhancement solution containing 2-naphthoyl trifluoroacetone, 2-NTA, to form a highly fluorescent chelate which is measured using time resolved fluorometry. Results obtained with the new EuDPTA release assays were comparable to traditional assays based on the release of the radioisotope 51Cr. It is anticipated that this assay will have a widespread application among laboratories performing ADCC assays. The method is non-hazardous and has been used routinely for over 2 years to monitor production and purification of Campath-1H. PMID:7622867

  8. Reversibility of increased intestinal permeability to 51Cr-EDTA in patients with gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.T.; Jones, D.B.; Goodacre, R.L.; Collins, S.M.; Coates, G.; Hunt, R.H.; Bienenstock, J.

    1987-11-01

    Intestinal permeability in adults with inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases was investigated by measuring the 24-h urinary excretion of orally administered /sup 51/Cr-EDTA. Eighty controls along with 100 patients with Crohn's disease, 46 patients with ulcerative colitis, 20 patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy, and 18 patients with other diseases were studied. In controls, the median 24-h excretion was 1.34%/24 h of the oral dose. Patients with Crohn's disease (median 2.96%/24 h), ulcerative colitis (median 2.12%/24 h), and untreated gluten-sensitive enteropathy (median 3.56%/24 h) had significantly elevated urinary excretion of the probe compared to controls (p less than 0.0001). Increased 24-h urinary excretion of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA had a high association with intestinal inflammation (p less than 0.0001). Test specificity and sensitivity were 96% and 57%, respectively. A positive test has a 96% probability of correctly diagnosing the presence of intestinal inflammation, whereas a negative test has a 50% probability of predicting the absence of disease.

  9. Use of a /sup 51/Cr technique to detect gastrointestinal microbleeding associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; Arsenault, A.; Varady, J.; de Medicis, R.; Lussier, Y.; LeBel, E.

    1987-02-01

    Of techniques used to evaluate gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, use of radiochromium (/sup 51/Cr)-tagged erythrocytes is the most quantitative and scientifically acceptable method. The value of this technique as well as systematic errors possible with its use are discussed. The medical literature concerning /sup 51/Cr evaluation of GI microbleeding with naproxen therapy is critically reviewed. We suggest that future studies using this technique be parallel, randomized, double-blind, and include a 1-week placebo baseline phase for all subjects. Treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should last 3 to 4 weeks. A parallel group of subjects should receive placebo throughout the study. For valid statistical analyses, randomization must achieve baseline comparability of weight, height, age, and sex in the treatment groups. Data transformations may be necessary to satisfy the assumptions of the statistical model. Following these guidelines will enable investigators to better evaluate GI microbleeding during treatment with naproxen or other NSAIDs, and, hopefully, to establish the safety profiles of these drugs.37 references.

  10. Standardization of a micro-cytotoxicity assay for human natural killer cell lytic activity.

    PubMed

    Mariani, E; Monaco, M C; Sgobbi, S; de Zwart, J F; Mariani, A R; Facchini, A

    1994-06-24

    Cytotoxicity assays are widely used to evaluate the functional activity of NK and T cells against tumour target cells and the release of radioactive sodium chromate from labelled target cells is still the most commonly used marker of target lysis in culture supernatants. We describe here the standardization of a micro-cytotoxicity test in which the number of cytolytic effector and tumour target cells have been decreased by a factor of 10. The release obtained by 500 tumour target cells was compared with the release obtained by 5000 target cells in the standard cytotoxicity assay for target:effector cell ratios from 1:1 to 1:100. Both gamma and beta emissions of the 51Cr isotope were evaluated to determine the assay release. The results obtained by the micro-cytotoxicity assay (500 target cells) were comparable to those of the standard assay (5000 target cells) and 51Cr release evaluation using the gamma counter was the most sensitive method of determining lytic activity using 500 tumour target cells. beta counter evaluation using solid phase scintillation was found to be a reproducible alternative method, even if the lytic curves cannot be compared with those obtained using the traditional method. PMID:8034970

  11. Gamma Interferon Release Assays for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Kik, Sandra V.; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Zwerling, Alice; Oxlade, Olivia; Metcalfe, John Z.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David W.; Dheda, Keertan; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) can substantially reduce the risk of developing active disease. However, there is no diagnostic gold standard for LTBI. Two tests are available for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA). Evidence suggests that both TST and IGRA are acceptable but imperfect tests. They represent indirect markers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure and indicate a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB, distinguish reactivation from reinfection, or resolve the various stages within the spectrum of M. tuberculosis infection. Both TST and IGRA have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised patients and have low predictive value for progression to active TB. To maximize the positive predictive value of existing tests, LTBI screening should be reserved for those who are at sufficiently high risk of progressing to disease. Such high-risk individuals may be identifiable by using multivariable risk prediction models that incorporate test results with risk factors and using serial testing to resolve underlying phenotypes. In the longer term, basic research is necessary to identify highly predictive biomarkers. PMID:24396134

  12. Relationship between intestinal permeability to ( sup 51 Cr)EDTA and inflammatory activity in asymptomatic patients with Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pironi, L.; Miglioli, M.; Ruggeri, E.; Levorato, M.; Dallasta, M.A.; Corbelli, C.; Nibali, M.G.; Barbara, L. )

    1990-05-01

    The relationship between intestinal permeability to an oral dose (100 mu Ci) of (51CR)EDTA and the inflammatory activity of Crohn's disease was studied in 63 adult patients (32 unresected and 31 resected) who underwent 162 evaluations. The results of the (51CR)EDTA test were compared with the serum levels of the acute-phase reactant proteins (APRP) and with the result of the (111In)leukocyte scanning, respectively, as an indirect and direct method to assess intestinal inflammation. In a group of healthy adult controls, the upper normal value for the 24-hr urinary (51CR)EDTA excretion was 3.61 (97.5% percentile) and the mean coefficient of variation was 21%. Sensitivity and specificity of the (51CR)EDTA test in identifying active inflammation expressed by increased serum levels of APRP were, respectively, 97% and 54% in the unresected group and 68% and 52% in the resected group of patients. The low specificity of the test was due to the presence of increased (51CR)EDTA urinary excretion in about half the cases with normal serum levels of APRP. The (111In)leukocyte scanning was performed in a subgroup of 11 patients (three unresected and eight resected) with normal serum levels of APRP, six with increased and five with normal (51CR)EDTA urinary excretion. All six patients with increased intestinal permeability had a positive 111In image of mild to moderate degree of activity. A positive 111In scan was present in two of the five patients with normal permeability; these were two resected patients.

  13. Preliminary results from the {sup 51}Cr neutrino source experiment in GALLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Hampel, W.; Heusser, G.; Kiko, J.

    1996-09-01

    The GALLEX collaboration performed a second {sup 51}Cr neutrino source experiment during fall 1995. The full results from this second source experiment will not be available before the end of 1996. Meanwhile, we present a short description and preliminary results in this informal note. The (preliminary) value of the activity obtained form direct measurements has been found equal to (68.7 {+-}0.7) PBq (with 1-sigma error). This value, which is about 10% higher than the activity of the first source, was achieved by optimizing the irradiation conditions in the Silo{acute e} reactor and doing a longer irradiation of the enriched chromium. Preliminary results show that the ratio, R, of the radiochemically determined activity from {sup 71}Ge counting (57.1 {+-} PBq) to the directly measured activity is (0.83 {+-} 0.10). The combined value of R for the two source experiments is (0.92 {+-} 0.08).

  14. Use of 125I- and 51Cr-Labeled Albumin for the Measurement of Gastrointestinal and Total Albumin Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Robert M.; Bois, John J. Du; Holt, Peter R.

    1967-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous measurement of gastrointestinal protein loss and total albumin turnover entailing the use of a combination of 125iodine- and 51chromium-labeled albumin is described. Albumin turnover was calculated by the measurement of albumin-125I plasma decay and cumulative urinary excretion, and the results obtained agreed closely with previous studies utilizing albumin-131I. Gastrointestinal catabolism was calculated from the rate of fecal excretion of 51Cr and the specific activity of plasma albumin-51Cr, and these data were related to the calculated albumin turnover results. During the period of 6-14 days after administration, the ratio of specific activties of albumin-125I and -51Cr in plasma and in extravascular spaces or gastric and biliary secretions remained almost identical. Fecal excretion of 51Cr was also quite stable at this time. In six normal subjects gastrointestinal catabolism accounted for less than 10% of total albumin catabolism. Excessive gastrointestinal protein losses did not contribute to the low serum albumin in three patients with cirrhosis or in two adults with the nephrotic syndrome. Multiple mechanisms leading to hypoalbuminemia were demonstrated in other subjects with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Images PMID:5630419

  15. Measuring the activity of a {sup 51}Cr neutrino source based on the gamma-radiation spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbachev, V. V. Gavrin, V. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Malyshkin, Yu. M.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-12-15

    A technique for the measurement of activities of intense β sources by measuring the continuous gamma-radiation (internal bremsstrahlung) spectra is developed. A method for reconstructing the spectrum recorded by a germanium semiconductor detector is described. A method for the absolute measurement of the internal bremsstrahlung spectrum of {sup 51}Cr is presented.

  16. Evaluation of Sustained BMP-2 Release Profiles Using a Novel Fluorescence-Based Retention Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun-Hyeog

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a novel fluorescence-based retention assay for the evaluation of the release profile of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) released from bone graft carrier. In this study, we evaluated the binding, release kinetics, and delivery efficacies of BMP-2 incorporated into hydroxyapatite (HA) bone grafts. The evaluation of the release profile of BMP-2 from HA bone grafts using a fluorescence-based retention assay revealed initial burst releases from the HA bone grafts followed by long sustained releases up to 14 weeks. The sustained biological activity of the released BMP-2 from HA bone grafts over the full 14-week period supports a long sustained mechanism via fluorescence-based retention assay. Thus, the results from this study show that BMP-2 could be incorporated into HA bone grafts for sustained release over a prolonged period of time with retention of bioactivity and our fluorescence-based retention assay, which is principally detecting the retention profile of BMP-2 in HA bone grafts, is more accurate than conventionally collecting the released BMP-2 for evaluation of BMP-2 release profiles. PMID:25901352

  17. An optimized lactate dehydrogenase release assay for screening of drug candidates in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Singh, Tulsi; Ghuman, Jasleen K.; Sieck, Erin G.; Koulen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantification of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release is a widely accepted assay for the quantitative determination of cell viability and late-stage apoptosis. Major disadvantages of commercially available LDH assay kits include proprietary formulations, limited options for optimization and high cost, all resulting in limited reproducibility in research applications. New Method Here, we describe a novel, custom LDH assay suitable in the context of plate reader-based screening of drug candidates for glioprotection, but with wide applicability to other cell types and experimental paradigms. Results We developed a novel and highly reproducible LDH release assay that is more cost-effective than commercially available assays with comparable performance. The assay was validated by assessing 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid antioxidant protection against tert-butylhydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress in C6 astroglioma cells. Assay performance was validated by direct comparison and compatible with other methods of measuring cellular viability, namely 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and 6-carboxy-2′, 7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate assays. Comparison with Existing Method(s) There was no statistically significant difference between results obtained with the novel custom assay and a commercially available assay CytoTox96® (Promega, Madison, WI). Conclusions The novel custom LDH release assay allows the reproducible quantification of cell viability and is highly cost-effective when compared to commercially available assays (approximately 25 times cheaper). In addition and in contrast to commercially available assays, the identification and detailed description of all assay components and procedures provide greater control over experimental conditions and design. We provide a detailed standard operating procedure permitting our novel assay to be readily adapted depending on experimental requirements

  18. Permeability of the small intestine to (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA in children with acute gastroenteritis or eczema

    SciTech Connect

    Forget, P.; Sodoyez-Goffaux, F.; Zappitelli, A.

    1985-06-01

    Increased gut permeability to macromolecules is thought to be an important factor in the development of food hypersensitivity. The latter can develop in the course of acute gastroenteritis and could play a role in infantile eczema. The authors studied gut permeability in 10 normal adults, 11 control children, 7 children with acute gastroenteritis, and 8 patients with infantile eczema, making use of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA as probe molecule. (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was given orally (50-100 microCi); 24-h urinary excretion of (/sup 51/Cr)EDTA was measured and expressed as a percentage of the oral dose. Mean and standard error were 2.35 +/- 0.24, 2.51 +/- 0.21, 9.96 +/- 3.44, and 10.90 +/- 2.05 in normal adults, control children, and gastroenteritis and eczema patients, respectively. Differences between controls and either gastroenteritis (p less than 0.001) or eczema (p less than 0.001) patients are significant. The results support the hypothesis that increased gut permeability could play a role in food hypersensitivity.

  19. Sulfite species enhance carbon monoxide release from CO-releasing molecules: implications for the deoxymyoglobin assay of activity.

    PubMed

    McLean, Samantha; Mann, Brian E; Poole, Robert K

    2012-08-01

    Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) emulate the beneficial (e.g., anti-inflammatory) effects of CO in biology. CO release from CO-RMs is routinely determined in the presence of reduced deoxy-myoglobin by measuring the formation of carboxy-myoglobin (Mb-CO). Previous studies have highlighted discrepancies between the apparent CO release rates of some CO-RMs established using this assay versus other experimental data where a slower or more complex mechanism of release is suggested. It has been hypothesized that some CO-RMs require a CO acceptor, believed to be reduced myoglobin in Mb-CO assays, in order to facilitate the release of CO. Here, we show, for the first time, that CO is not liberated from the ruthenium (Ru)-based [Ru(CO)(3)Cl(2)](2) (CORM-2) and [Ru(CO)(3)Cl(glycinate)] (CORM-3) at an appreciable rate in the presence of reduced myoglobin alone. Rather, we confirm that it is the reducing agent sodium dithionite that facilitates release of CO from these CO-RMs. Other sulfite compounds, namely sodium sulfite and potassium metabisulfite, also promote the liberation of CO from CORM-3. We describe an alternative oxy-hemoglobin assay that eliminates dithionite and suggest that the efficacy of CO-RMs results from intracellular interactions with anions that facilitate CO delivery to therapeutic targets. PMID:22561917

  20. Radiolabeled red cell viability. I. Comparison of /sup 51/Cr, /sup 99m/Tc, and /sup 111/In for measuring the viability of autologous stored red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, C.S.; Myhre, B.A.; Angulo, M.C.; Salk, R.D.; Essex, C.E.; Demianew, S.H.

    1987-09-01

    The simultaneous determination of autologous /sup 99m/Tc red cell (RBC) and /sup 51/Cr RBC viability at 24 hours was measured in 19 normal volunteers whose RBCs had been stored in additive media (Nutracel) for 42 or 49 days. The ratio of the /sup 51/Cr:/sup 99m/Tc value was 1.23. In this experiment we also calculated /sup 51/Cr RBC viability by both the single-isotope method (extrapolation) and the double-isotope method (using /sup 125/I human serum albumin for an independent plasma volume) in the same volunteers. The corresponding viability values were not significantly different. The simultaneous determination of autologous /sup 111/In-oxine RBC and /sup 51/Cr RBC viability at 24 hours was measured in 19 other normal volunteers whose RBCs had been stored in citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA-1) for 1 or 15 days. The ratio of the /sup 51/Cr:/sup 111/In value was 1.1. Use of these 24-hour viability ratios as conversion factors permits direct comparison of /sup 99m/Tc or /sup 111/In RBC viability with a /sup 51/Cr standard, and therefore expands the application of these newer RBC radiolabels.

  1. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  2. Interferon-γ release assay for tuberculosis screening of healthcare workers at a Korean tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Kwon, O Jung; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Yoonchang, Sung Won; Kang, Eun-Suk; Koh, Won-Jung

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the annual incidence of tuberculosis infection among newly employed doctors and nurses in Korea. The annual incidence of tuberculosis infection ranged from 3.3% to 5.7%, based on the definition of conversion of an interferon-γ release assay, which suggests that stricter preventive strategies against nosocomial TB infection should be employed. Follow-up interferon-γ levels measured after 3 months of isoniazid and rifampicin treatment showed considerable variation. Therefore, serial testing with interferon-γ release assays after treatment of latent TB infection may be insufficient for evaluating the effects of treatment due to the variable responses. PMID:20936910

  3. Bacterial assay for the rapid assessment of antifouling and fouling release properties of coatings and materials.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Fraddry; Bruin, Anouk; Biersteker, Rens; Donnelly, Glen; Klijnstra, Job; Rentrop, Corne; Willemsen, Peter

    2010-04-01

    An assay has been developed to accurately quantify the growth and release behaviour of bacterial biofilms on several test reference materials and coatings, using the marine bacterium Cobetia marina as a model organism. The assay can be used to investigate the inhibition of bacterial growth and release properties of many surfaces when compared to a reference. The method is based upon the staining of attached bacterial cells with the nucleic acid-binding, green fluorescent SYTO 13 stain. A strong linear correlation exists between the fluorescence of the bacterial suspension measured (RFU) using a plate reader and the total bacterial count measured with epifluorescence microscopy. This relationship allows the fluorescent technique to be used for the quantification of bacterial cells attached to surfaces. As the bacteria proliferate on the surface over a period of time, the relative fluorescence unit (RFU) measured using the plate reader also shows an increase with time. This was observed on all three test surfaces (glass, Epikote and Silastic T2) over a period of 4 h of bacterial growth, followed by a release assay, which was carried out by the application of hydrodynamic shear forces using a custom-made rotary device. Different fixed rotor speeds were tested, and based on the release analysis, 12 knots was used to provide standard shear force. The assay developed was then applied for assessing three different antifouling coatings of different surface roughness. The novel assay allows the rapid and sensitive enumeration of attached bacteria directly on the coated surface. This is the first plate reader assay technique that allows estimation of irreversibly attached bacterial cells directly on the coated surface without their removal from the surface or extraction of a stain into solution. PMID:20039190

  4. The release of rat intestinal cholecystokinin after oral trypsin inhibitor measured by bio-assay.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, S J; Morgan, R G

    1981-01-01

    The distribution, molecular form and release of cholecystokinin (CCK)-like activity in extracts of rat small intestine was studied with an in vitro gall-bladder bio-assay. In contrast to the reported heterogeneity of CCK-like immunoreactivity in the intestine, only a single molecular form of CCK-like activity was detected using the bio-assay. 2. The CCK-like activity eluted from Sephadex G50 with a Kav of 0.69, after the triacontriapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK33) and before cholecystokinin octapeptide 2500, may represent the 22 amino acid peptide of CCK (CCK22). The bio-assay peak of CCK-like activity had pancreozymin activity and CCK/gastrin C terminal immunoreactivity. The CCK-like activity weas readily extracted from the small intestine at neutral pH, but subsequent treatment with cold 0.5 M-acetic acid extracted further CCK-like activity of the same molecular form as that recovered under neutral conditions. 3. The bio-assay detected no CCK-like activity, nor was pancreozymin-like activity found in fractions corresponding to CCK33 or CCK8 after Sephadex G50 chromatography of rat intestinal extracts. 4. Oral trypsin inhibitor was a potent stimulus for the release of CCK-like activity from the upper small intestine of the rat. After oral trypsin inhibitor release, CCK-like activity was rapidly resynthesized. PMID:7320918

  5. A radiolabel-release microwell assay for proteolytic enzymes present in cell culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Rucklidge, G.J.; Milne, G. )

    1990-03-01

    A modified method for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity in cell culture-conditioned media has been developed. Using the release of 3H-labeled peptides from 3H-labeled gelatin the method is performed in microwell plates. The substrate is insolubilized and attached to the wells by glutaraldehyde treatment, thus eliminating the need for a precipitation step at the end of the assay. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and convenient for small sample volumes. The effect of different protease inhibitors on activity can be assessed rapidly allowing an early characterization of the enzyme. It can also be adapted to microplate spectrophotometric analysis by staining residual substrate with Coomassie blue.

  6. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate in homozygous sickle cell disease: a comparison of 51Cr-EDTA clearance, creatinine clearance, serum creatinine and beta 2 microglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, S A; Mojiminiyi, S; Kay, J D; Shepstone, B J; de Ceulaer, K; Serjeant, G R

    1990-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were measured with 51Cr-EDTA in 38 patients (aged 40-75 years) with homozygous sickle cell disease and compared with serum beta 2 microglobulin concentrations in 38 patients and with creatinine clearance in 21 patients. GFR estimated with 51Cr-EDTA was closely correlated with single serum creatinine measurements and the inverse of serum beta 2 microglobulin. Creatinine clearance was also found to be correlated, but values were, on average, 32% below those obtained by the 51Cr-EDTA method, and this difference was significant. It is concluded that measurements of beta 2 microglobulin, single serum creatinine, and creatinine clearance are valuable indicators of GFR in homozygous sickle cell disease. Measurement of beta 2 microglobulin was a useful and reliable method of estimating GFR from single plasma measurements and is therefore a useful means of screening the population. PMID:2115049

  7. Comparison of whole body and tissue blood volumes in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) with 125I bovine serum albumin and 51Cr-erythrocyte tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gingerich, W.H.; Pityer, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Total, packed cell and, plasma volume estimates were made for the whole body and selected tissues of rainbow trout by the simultaneous injection of radiolabelled trout erythrocyte (51Cr-RBC) and radioiodinated bovine serum albumin (125I-BSA) tracers. Blood volumes were estimated with both markers separately by the tracer-hematocrit method and as the combination of the 51Cr-RBC packed cell and 125I-BSA plasma volumes. Mean whole body blood volume was significantly less when calculated from the 51Cr-RBC tracer data (3.52±0.78 ml/100 g; ±SD) than when calculated with the 125I-BSA tracer (5.06±0.86 ml/100 g) or as the sum of the two volumes combined (4.49±0.60 ml/100 g). The whole body hematocrit (28±5%), estimated as the quotient of the 51Cr-RBC volume divided by the sum of the 125I-BSA and the 51Cr-RBC volumes, also was significantly less than the dorsal aortic microhematocrit (36±4%). Estimates of total blood volumes in most tissues were significantly smaller when calculated from the51Cr-RBC data than when calculated by the other two methods. Tissue blood volumes were greatest in highly vascularized and well perfused tissues and least in poorly vascularized tissues. The relative degree of vascularization among tissues generally remained the same regardless of whether the red cell or the plasma tracer was used to calculated blood volume. It is not clear whether the expanded plasma volume is the result of the distribution of erythrocyte-poor blood into the secondary circulation or the result of extravascular exchange of plasma proteins.

  8. Comparative gastrointestinal blood loss associated with placebo, aspirin, and nabumetone as assessed by radiochromium (/sup 51/Cr)

    SciTech Connect

    Lussier, A.; Davis, A.; Lussier, Y.; Lebel, E.

    1989-03-01

    Nabumetone differs from most other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It is presented to the gut as a nonacidic prodrug, and is metabolized to its active form after absorption. Studies in animals and humans suggest it is less irritating to the gastrointestinal mucosa. This study compared the gastrointestinal microbleeding induced by nabumetone to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid, ASA), and placebo in a double blind parallel study using chromium /sup 51/Cr labelled red cells to quantitate fecal blood loss (FBL) in healthy volunteers. Thirty subjects were randomized to treatment with nabumetone (2000 mg), ASA (3.6 g) or placebo for 21 days following a 7 day placebo period. Six subjects served as untreated controls. FBL in nabumetone treated subjects was not significantly different to placebo or untreated subjects. In contrast, ASA-treated subjects exhibited significantly increased FBL than the other 3 groups (P less than .0001).

  9. Evaluation of interferon-γ release assay in the diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongyan; Pan, Liping; Qin, Shibing; Liu, Fei; Du, Fengjiao; Lan, Tinglong; Zhang, Xia; Wei, Rongrong; Du, Boping; Liu, Zhongquan; Huang, Hairong; Zhang, Zongde

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA) (T-SPOT.TB) for patients with suspected osteoarticular tuberculosis (TB) in comparison with conventional and molecular methods. Of 145 patients with suspected osteoarticular TB, recruited from Beijing Chest Hospital between July 2011 and June 2012, 86 (59.3%)had osteoarticular TB (26 with culture-confirmed TB, 60 with probable TB), 24 (16.6%) were not having active TB. The remaining 17 (11.7%) inconclusive TB and 18 (12.4%) possible TB were excluded from final analysis. In addition to conventional tests and molecular method, T-SPOT.TB assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells to examine IFN-γ response to early secretory antigenic target 6 and culture filtrate protein 10 was also performed. The sensitivity and specificity for T-SPOT.TB assay were 94.2% and 70.8%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in sensitivity was found between T-SPOT.TB assay (94.2%) and other tests (acid-fast bacilli smear (19.7%), culture (34.2%), real-time PCR (36.8%); P < 0.01, respectively). These results suggested that the IGRA assay could provide useful aids in the diagnosis of osteoarticular TB. PMID:23647965

  10. Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Pleural Tuberculosis: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ritesh; Gupta, Dheeraj; Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar

    2015-01-01

    The role of interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), although established for identifying latent tuberculosis, is still evolving in the diagnosis of active extrapulmonary tuberculosis. We systematically evaluated the diagnostic performance of blood- and pleural fluid-based IGRAs in tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE). We searched the PubMed and Embase databases for studies evaluating the use of commercially available IGRAs on blood and/or pleural fluid samples for diagnosing TPE. The quality of the studies included was assessed through the QUADAS-2 tool. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were generated using a bivariate random-effects model and examined using forest plots and hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) curves. Indeterminate IGRA results were included for sensitivity calculations. Heterogeneity was explored through subgroup analysis and meta-regression based on prespecified covariates. We identified 19 studies assessing the T.SPOT.TB and/or QuantiFERON assays. There were 20 and 14 evaluations, respectively, of whole-blood and pleural fluid assays, involving 1,085 and 727 subjects, respectively. There was only one good-quality study, and five studies used nonstandard assay thresholds. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for the blood assays were 0.77 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.83) and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65 to 0.76), respectively. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for the pleural fluid assays were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.55 to 0.84) and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65 to 0.87), respectively. There was considerable heterogeneity; however, multivariate meta-regression did not identify any covariate with significant influence. There was no publication bias for blood assays. We conclude that commercial IGRAs, performed either on whole-blood or pleural fluid samples, have poor diagnostic accuracy in patients suspected to have TPE. PMID:25994163

  11. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Methods for ATMP Release.

    PubMed

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Bolis, Sara; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are promising candidates for the development of cell-based therapies for various diseases and are currently being evaluated in a number of clinical trials (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014). MSC for therapeutic applications are classified as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) (Regulation (EC) No 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004) and must be prepared according to good manufacturing practices ( http://ec.europa.eu/health/documents/eudralex/vol-4 ). They may be derived from different starting materials (mainly bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue, or cord blood) and applied as fresh or cryopreserved products, in the autologous as well as an allogeneic context (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014; Sensebé and Bourin, Transplantation 87(9 Suppl):S49-S53, 2009). In any case, they require an approved and well-defined panel of assays in order to be released for clinical use.This chapter describes analytical methods implemented and performed in our cell factory as part of the release strategy for an ATMP consisting of frozen autologous BM-derived MSC. Such methods are designed to assess the safety (sterility, endotoxin, and mycoplasma assays) and identity/potency (cell count and viability, immunophenotype and clonogenic assay) of the final product. Some assays are also applied to the biological starting material (sterility) or carried out as in-process controls (sterility, cell count and viability, immunophenotype, clonogenic assay).The validation strategy for each analytical method is described in the accompanying Chapter 20 . PMID:27236681

  12. Early detection of Toxoplasma gondii-infected cats by interferon-gamma release assay.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing; El-Ashram, Saeed; Liu, Xian-Yong; Suo, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Felines, the only definitive hosts that shed the environmentally-durable oocysts, are the key in the transmission of Toxoplasma gondii to all warm-blooded animals. They seroconvert as late as the third week and begin to shed oocysts as early as 3-8 days after being fed tissue cysts. Early detection of Toxoplasma-infected cats is crucial to evaluate Toxoplasma-contaminated environment and potential risks to public health. Moreover, it is fundamental for Toxoplasma infection control. Interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is a blood-based test assessing the presence of IFN-γ released by the T-lymphocytes directed against specific antigens, which is an ideal assay for early detection of Toxoplasma-infected cats. Here, cats were orally infected with the tissue cysts and blood was collected for toxoplasmic antigen stimulation, and the released IFN-γ was measured by ELISA. Results showed that Toxoplasma-infection was detected by IGRA as early as 4 days post-infection (dpi); while serum Toxoplasma IgM and IgG were detected by ELISA at 10 dpi and 14 dpi, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that IGRA-positive and ELISA-negative samples revealed an early Toxoplasma infection in cats, indicating a new strategy for the early diagnosis of Toxoplasma infection by combining IGRA and ELISA. Therefore, IGRA could emerge as a reliable diagnostic tool for the exploration of cat toxoplasmosis prevalence and its potential risks to public health. PMID:26297953

  13. Simultaneous measurement of 59Fe and 51Cr in iron absorption studies using a whole-body scanner with mobile shielding.

    PubMed

    Marx, J J; van den Beld, B; van Dongen, R; Strackee, L H

    1980-07-01

    A whole-body scanner is described with a mobile shadow shield which affords a considerable reduction in space. The scanner has two NaI(T1) scintillation crystals of 4 x 6", placed at opposite sites of the subject. Background radiation, efficiency and geometric qualities made the scanner very useful for clinical whole-body counting. The equipment was used in iron absorption studies using a double isotope technique with 59Fe and 51Cr. After ingestion of an oral test dose total body kinetics of 59Fe and 51Cr was followed up to 60 days in 4 volunteers. Between days 3 and 10 the 51Cr, which was used as an non-absorbable indicator, had left the body completely. The 59Fe reached a constant value not before day 10, indicating that iron retention cannot be measured before that time. From repeated measurement of 59Fe and 51Cr directly after ingestion until the first defaecation it could be deduced that the coefficient of variation for 59Fe was less than 1.5% with a scanning time of 600 sec, and for 51Cr less than 5%. Extreme variations in geometry, such as measurement of the activity in a beaker and of the same amount after ingestion in the body, yielded practically the same value for 59Fe. The double isotope technique made it possible to measure not only iron retention but also mucosal uptake and mucosal transfer of iron. It is pointed out that measurement of the last two parameters of iron absorption is not possible in patients with serious obstipation or with very low mucosal uptake values. PMID:6780983

  14. Determination of optimal sampling times for a two blood sample clearance method using (51)Cr-EDTA in cats.

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, Eva; De Sadeleer, Carlos; Piepsz, Amy; Ham, Hamphrey R; Dobbeleir, André A; Vermeire, Simon T; Van Hoek, Ingrid M; Daminet, Sylvie; Slegers, Guido; Peremans, Kathelijne Y

    2010-08-01

    Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a useful tool in the evaluation of kidney function in feline medicine. GFR can be determined by measuring the rate of tracer disappearance from the blood, and although these measurements are generally performed by multi-sampling techniques, simplified methods are more convenient in clinical practice. The optimal times for a simplified sampling strategy with two blood samples (2BS) for GFR measurement in cats using plasma (51)chromium ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid ((51)Cr-EDTA) clearance were investigated. After intravenous administration of (51)Cr-EDTA, seven blood samples were obtained in 46 cats (19 euthyroid and 27 hyperthyroid cats, none with previously diagnosed chronic kidney disease (CKD)). The plasma clearance was then calculated from the seven point blood kinetics (7BS) and used for comparison to define the optimal sampling strategy by correlating different pairs of time points to the reference method. Mean GFR estimation for the reference method was 3.7+/-2.5 ml/min/kg (mean+/-standard deviation (SD)). Several pairs of sampling times were highly correlated with this reference method (r(2) > or = 0.980), with the best results when the first sample was taken 30 min after tracer injection and the second sample between 198 and 222 min after injection; or with the first sample at 36 min and the second at 234 or 240 min (r(2) for both combinations=0.984). Because of the similarity of GFR values obtained with the 2BS method in comparison to the values obtained with the 7BS reference method, the simplified method may offer an alternative for GFR estimation. Although a wide range of GFR values was found in the included group of cats, the applicability should be confirmed in cats suspected of renal disease and with confirmed CKD. Furthermore, although no indications of age-related effect were found in this study, a possible influence of age should be included in future studies. PMID:20452793

  15. Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Latent Tuberculosis: What Are the Sources of Variability?

    PubMed

    Banaei, Niaz; Gaur, Rajiv L; Pai, Madhukar

    2016-04-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are blood-based tests intended for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). IGRAs offer logistical advantages and are supposed to offer improved specificity over the tuberculin skin test (TST). However, recent serial testing studies of low-risk individuals have revealed higher false conversion rates with IGRAs than with TST. Reproducibility studies have identified various sources of variability that contribute to nonreproducible results. Sources of variability can be broadly classified as preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, manufacturing, and immunological. In this minireview, we summarize known sources of variability and their impact on IGRA results. We also provide recommendations on how to minimize sources of IGRA variability. PMID:26763969

  16. Evaluation of pollutant toxicity in aquatic environment by assay of enzymes released from lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tabata, Masako; Kobayashi, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shizuo )

    1990-07-01

    To survey aquatic environmental pollution, many workers have attempted to evaluate river pollution using index organisms. These methods reflect the toxicities of river water and sediment directly. In recent years, the monitoring method using enzyme inducement or enzyme depression in fish or other aquatic organisms has been proposed for studying polluted environments. To evaluate toxicity of environmental sample simply, the authors attempted to use biochemical index for assay method. When the membrane of a lysosome is destabilized by chemical action, resident enzymes are released. The effect of chemicals on a lysosome membrane thus can be evaluated by measuring the activity of released enzymes. In the present paper they evaluate environmental sample toxicity for biological membrane using rat liver lysosomes in vitro.

  17. IFN-γ release assays in the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection among immunocompromised adults.

    PubMed

    Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Sepkowitz, Kent A

    2013-08-15

    Immunocompromised persons with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are at increased risk for tuberculosis reactivation compared with the general population. The tuberculin skin test, the traditional assay for diagnosing LTBI, has reduced accuracy in immunocompromised patients. IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are in vitro blood tests that measure T-cell release of IFN-γ after stimulation with antigens unique to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we review the data for the use of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube and T-SPOT.TB, the two currently available IGRAs, in immunocompromised adults, including persons infected with HIV, patients with immune-mediated inflammatory disorders, candidates for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, patients receiving hemodialysis, solid-organ transplant recipients, and patients with cancer. On the basis of the available data, IGRAs have advantages over the tuberculin skin test in specific patient populations and in certain situations. Further studies are needed to more accurately define the usefulness of IGRAs in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23262514

  18. A Cell-Based Assay Reveals Nuclear Translocation of Intracellular Domains Released by SPPL Proteases.

    PubMed

    Mentrup, Torben; Häsler, Robert; Fluhrer, Regina; Saftig, Paul; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    During regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) a membrane-spanning substrate protein is cleaved by an ectodomain sheddase and an intramembrane cleaving protease. A cytoplasmic intracellular domain (ICD) is liberated, which can migrate to the nucleus thereby influencing transcriptional regulation. Signal peptide peptidase-like (SPPL) 2a and 2b have been implicated in RIP of type II transmembrane proteins. Even though SPPL2a might represent a potential pharmacological target for treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmunity, no specific and potent inhibitors for this enzyme are currently available. We report here on the first quantitative cell-based assay for measurement of SPPL2a/b activity. Demonstrating the failure of standard Gal4/VP16 reporter assays for SPPL2a/b analysis, we have devised a novel system employing β-galactosidase (βGal) complementation. This is based on detecting nuclear translocation of the proteolytically released substrate ICDs, which results in specific restoration of βGal activity. Utilizing this potentially high-throughput compatible new setup, we demonstrate nuclear translocation of the ICDs from integral membrane protein 2B (ITM2B), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and CD74 and identify secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2) as potential transcriptional downstream target of the CD74 ICD. We show that the presented assay is easily adaptable to other intramembrane proteases and therefore represents a valuable tool for the functional analysis and development of new inhibitors of this class of enzymes. PMID:25824657

  19. Population tailored modification of tuberculosis specific interferon-gamma release assay

    PubMed Central

    Horvati, Kata; Bősze, Szilvia; Gideon, Hannah P.; Bacsa, Bernadett; Szabó, Tamás G.; Goliath, Rene; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Hudecz, Ferenc; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Wilkinson, Katalin A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Blood-based Interferon-Gamma Release Assays (IGRA) identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) sensitisation with increased specificity, but sensitivity remains impaired in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons. The QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test contains peptide 38–55 of Rv2654c, based on data indicating differential recognition between tuberculosis patients and BCG vaccinated controls in Europe. We aimed to fine map the T cell response to Rv2654c with the view of improving sensitivity. Methods Interferon-gamma ELISpot assay was used in HIV uninfected persons with latent and active tuberculosis to map peptide epitopes of Rv2654c. A modified IGRA was tested in two further groups of 55 HIV uninfected and 44 HIV infected persons, recruited in South Africa. Results The most prominently recognised peptide was between amino acids 51–65. Using p51-65 to boost the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay, the quantitative performance of the modified IGRA increased from 1.83 IU/ml (IQR 0.30–7.35) to 2.83 (IQR 0.28–12.2; p = 0.002) in the HIV uninfected group. In the HIV infected cohort the percentage of positive responders increased from 57% to 64% but only after 3 months of ART (p = ns). Conclusions Our data shows the potential to population tailor detection of MTB sensitization using specific synthetic peptides and interferon-gamma release in vitro. PMID:26632326

  20. Interferon-Gamma Release Assay: An Effective Tool to Detect Early Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbin; Sun, Ximeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Toxoplasma gondii infection before the formation of tissue cysts is vital for treatment, as drugs available for toxoplasmosis cannot kill bradyzoites contained in the cysts. However, current methods, such as antibody-based ELISA, are ineffective for detection of early infection. Here, we developed an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), measuring the IFN-γ released by T lymphocytes stimulated by Toxoplasma antigen peptides in vitro, for the detection of T. gondii infection in mice. Splenocytes isolated from infected mice were stimulated by peptides derived from dense granule proteins GRA4 and GRA6 and rhoptry protein ROP7, and released IFN-γ was measured by ELISA. Results showed that both acute and chronic infection could be detected by IGRA. More importantly, IGRA detected infection as early as the third day post infection; while serum IgM and IgG were detected 9 days and 13 days post infection, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that an IGRA-positive and ELISA-negative sample revealed an early infection, indicating the combination of IGRA and ELISA can be employed for the early diagnosis of T. gondii infection in human beings, cats and livestock. PMID:26378802

  1. Automated assay for screening the enzymatic release of reducing sugars from micronized biomass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To reduce the production cost of bioethanol obtained from fermentation of the sugars provided by degradation of lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., second generation bioethanol), it is necessary to screen for new enzymes endowed with more efficient biomass degrading properties. This demands the set-up of high-throughput screening methods. Several methods have been devised all using microplates in the industrial SBS format. Although this size reduction and standardization has greatly improved the screening process, the published methods comprise one or more manual steps that seriously decrease throughput. Therefore, we worked to devise a screening method devoid of any manual steps. Results We describe a fully automated assay for measuring the amount of reducing sugars released by biomass-degrading enzymes from wheat-straw and spruce. The method comprises two independent and automated steps. The first step is the making of "substrate plates". It consists of filling 96-well microplates with slurry suspensions of micronized substrate which are then stored frozen until use. The second step is an enzymatic activity assay. After thawing, the substrate plates are supplemented by the robot with cell-wall degrading enzymes where necessary, and the whole process from addition of enzymes to quantification of released sugars is autonomously performed by the robot. We describe how critical parameters (amount of substrate, amount of enzyme, incubation duration and temperature) were selected to fit with our specific use. The ability of this automated small-scale assay to discriminate among different enzymatic activities was validated using a set of commercial enzymes. Conclusions Using an automatic microplate sealer solved three main problems generally encountered during the set-up of methods for measuring the sugar-releasing activity of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes: throughput, automation, and evaporation losses. In its present set-up, the robot can autonomously

  2. Experimental and theoretical study for the production of 51Cr using p, d, 3He and 4He projectiles on V, Ti and Cr targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solieman, A. H. M.; Al-Abyad, M.; Ditroi, F.; Saleh, Z. A.

    2016-01-01

    Production of 51Cr (T1/2 = 27.7 d) have been studied experimentally through the reaction of proton and 3He on natV and natTi targets respectively by using a variable energy cyclotrons. Reaction cross sections were obtained at different energies using the stacked-foil technique. High resolution gamma ray spectrometers were used for measuring the γ-ray spectra. Comparison between the present experimental results and the previously reported data has been carried out and discussed. The possibility of producing 51Cr with reasonable yield using different projectiles and different natural targets was studied and reported. Excitation functions for the reactions of proton, deuteron, 3He and 4He particles on natural vanadium, titanium and chromium targets have been evaluated using two theoretical codes TALYS-1.6 and EMPIRE-3.1. The recommended cross-sections and the integral yields as well were obtained.

  3. Development and evaluation of an interferon-γ release assay in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Paudel, Sarad; Villanueva, Marvin A; Mikota, Susan K; Nakajima, Chie; Gairhe, Kamal P; Subedi, Suraj; Rayamajhi, Nabin; Sashika, Mariko; Shimozuru, Michito; Matsuba, Takashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Tsubota, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    We developed an interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) specific for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Whole blood collected from forty captive Asian elephants was stimulated with three different mitogens i.e., phytohemagglutinin (PHA), pokweed mitogen (PWM) and phorbol myristate aceteate/ionomycin (PMA/I). A sandwich ELISA that was able to recognize the recombinant elephant interferon-γ (rEIFN-γ) as well as native interferon-γ from the Asian elephants was performed using anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as capture antibodies and biotinylated anti-elephant IFN-γ rabbit polyclonal antibodies as detection antibodies. PMA/I was the best mitogen to use as a positive control for an Asian elephant IGRA. The development of an Asian elephant-specific IGRA that detects native IFN-γ in elephant whole blood provides promising results for its application as a potential diagnostic tool for diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB) in Asian elephants. PMID:26983683

  4. Diagnostic performance of interferon-γ release assay for lymph node tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongyan; Pan, Liping; Du, Boping; Sun, Qi; Wei, Rongrong; Xing, Aiying; Du, Fengjiao; Sun, Huishan; Zhang, Zongde

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA) (T-SPOT.TB) for patients with suspected lymph node tuberculosis (TB). Of the 405 patients with suspected lymph node TB, enrolled from Beijing Chest Hospital between July 2011 and April 2015, 83 (20.5%) were microbiologically/histopathologically confirmed lymph node TB, and 282 (69.6%) did not have active TB. The remaining 21 inconclusive TB and 19 clinical TB were excluded from the final analysis (9.9%). T-SPOT.TB using peripheral blood mononuclear cells was performed to examine the IFN-γ response to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific antigens early secretory antigenic target 6 and culture filtrate protein 10. The overall sensitivity and specificity for T-SPOT.TB were 90.4% and 70.5%, respectively. Spot-forming cells in the lymph node TB group (184 [48-596/10(6) peripheral blood mononuclear cells {PBMCs}]) were significantly higher than that in the nonactive TB group (0 [0-41]/10(6) PBMCs) (P<0.001). These results suggest that the IGRA assay could be a useful aid in the diagnosis of lymph node TB. PMID:26971638

  5. Gamma interferon release assay for monitoring of treatment response for active tuberculosis: an explosion in the spaghetti factory.

    PubMed

    Denkinger, Claudia M; Pai, Madhukar; Patel, Meena; Menzies, Dick

    2013-02-01

    Few studies have correlated the results of interferon (gamma interferon) release assays (IGRAs) with known markers of tuberculosis (TB) treatment response. We report the results of serial QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube assay (QFT) testing on 149 patients with active tuberculosis and correlate the results with smear and culture conversion. We show that QFT results do not offer much value for treatment monitoring of TB disease. PMID:23175268

  6. Testing for latent tuberculosis infection using interferon gamma release assays in commercial sex workers at an outreach clinic in Birmingham.

    PubMed

    Daly, R; Khatib, N; Larkins, A; Dedicoat, M

    2016-07-01

    This report demonstrates that using interferon gamma release assays to screen for latent tuberculosis infection in female commercial sex workers in an outreach sexual health clinic is feasible and acceptable. Routine interferon gamma release assay use successfully identified high numbers of latent tuberculosis infection. Innovative approaches to treatment and follow up were required to improve treatment adherence in this group. Direct observation of therapy within the sexual health clinic was also feasible. Successful follow up was dependent on the support of outreach workers, interpreters and tuberculosis nurses. PMID:26589629

  7. Application of LDH-release assay to cellular-level evaluation of the toxic potential of harmful algal species.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yanan; Kim, Daekyung; Yagi, Motoaki; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Kurita, Jun; Iida, Takaji; Matsuyama, Yukihiko; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Oda, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-release assay was applied to estimate the toxic potential of harmful algal species at the cellular level. African green monkey kidney (Vero), yellowtail fin epithelia (MJF), and rainbow trout gill (RTgill-W1) cells were used as target cells. A live cell suspension of Karenia mikimotoi (SUO-1) induced the release of LDH from these cell lines, while the activity of another strain, FUK, was much lower. The cell-free culture supernatants and ruptured cell suspensions of both strains of K. mikimotoi were less effective on LDH-release assay. Exposure experiments against abalone and shrimp revealed that SUO-1 showed much stronger lethal effects on these organisms than FUK. Among six phytoplankton species, three species known to be harmful algal species induced the release of LDH to different extents depending on the cell line, whereas the other three species, known to be non-toxic, showed no effects on any cell lines. These results suggest that LDH-release assay is a useful micro-plate assay for estimation of the toxic potential of harmful phytoplankton. PMID:23391929

  8. Carboxylesterase converts Amplex red to resorufin: Implications for mitochondrial H2O2 release assays

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Satomi; Treumann, Achim; Bell, Amy; Vistoli, Giulio; Nelson, Glyn; Hay, Sam; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Amplex Red is a fluorescent probe that is widely used to detect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a reaction where it is oxidised to resorufin by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a catalyst. This assay is highly rated amongst other similar probes thanks to its superior sensitivity and stability. However, we report here that Amplex Red is readily converted to resorufin by a carboxylesterase without requiring H2O2, horseradish peroxidase or oxygen: this reaction is seen in various tissue samples such as liver and kidney as well as in cultured cells, causing a serious distortion of H2O2 measurements. The reaction can be inhibited by Phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) at concentrations which do not disturb mitochondrial function nor the ability of the Amplex Red-HRP system to detect H2O2.In vitro experiments and in silico docking simulations indicate that carboxylesterases 1 and 2 recognise Amplex Red with the same kinetics as carboxylesterase-containing mitochondria. We propose two different approaches to correct for this problem and re-evaluate the commonly performed experimental procedure for the detection of H2O2 release from isolated liver mitochondria. Our results call for a serious re-examination of previous data. PMID:26577176

  9. Implementation of an interferon-gamma release assay to screen for tuberculosis in refugees and immigrants.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Terri; Tomaro, Julie; Jobb, Cynthia

    2013-08-01

    Despite increased use and accuracy of interferon-gamma release assays to detect latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in foreign-born arrivals in the United States, risk characteristics associated with positive results are not well characterized. We conducted a retrospective record review of 541 refugees and immigrants screened for LTBI with QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT) at the Spokane Public Health Clinic from January 2, 2008, through June 5, 2009. Overall, 24 % of the arrivals had a positive QFT-IT, with the greatest frequency of positive results occurring in arrivals from Liberia (100 %) and Bhutan (39 %). More than the expected number of Burmese had indeterminate QFT-IT results. A positive QFT-IT was associated with age, race, ethnicity, and extent of TB burden in the country of origin. QFT-IT is useful to screen for LTBI in foreign-born arrivals, particularly middle-aged adults from high-burden countries. However, the QFT-IT may not yield meaningful results in groups with significant immunocompromise. PMID:23179470

  10. Studies of methotrexate-induced limb dysplasias utilizing a 51chromium release assay

    SciTech Connect

    Brewton, R.G.; MacCabe, J.A. )

    1990-02-01

    The folate antagonist methotrexate (MTX), widely used in chemotherapy, is a well-documented teratogen. However, the mechanism by which it exerts its effects is still unclear. Specifically, we have examined the cytotoxicity of MTX in vivo and in vitro and have looked at the relationship between cytotoxicity and teratogenesis. The chick embryo was utilized to examine the effects of the drug administered to carefully staged embryos. Embryos were exposed at stages 18-22 and examined on day 11 of incubation. Wings were malformed in a stage-dependent manner while legs were affected similarly at each stage used. A modification of the 51chromium-release assay was used to test the toxicity of MTX to limb cells in vitro. None of the tissues tested showed measurable toxicity in vitro even though the drug kills cells in vivo, thereby suggesting that MTX may be metabolized differently in vitro. Malformations induced by MTX do not seem to be due to changes in the amount of cell death taking place in the limb but may be caused by a transient inhibition of cell division.

  11. Carboxylesterase converts Amplex red to resorufin: Implications for mitochondrial H2O2 release assays.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Satomi; Treumann, Achim; Bell, Amy; Vistoli, Giulio; Nelson, Glyn; Hay, Sam; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Amplex Red is a fluorescent probe that is widely used to detect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in a reaction where it is oxidised to resorufin by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a catalyst. This assay is highly rated amongst other similar probes thanks to its superior sensitivity and stability. However, we report here that Amplex Red is readily converted to resorufin by a carboxylesterase without requiring H2O2, horseradish peroxidase or oxygen: this reaction is seen in various tissue samples such as liver and kidney as well as in cultured cells, causing a serious distortion of H2O2 measurements. The reaction can be inhibited by Phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) at concentrations which do not disturb mitochondrial function nor the ability of the Amplex Red-HRP system to detect H2O2.In vitro experiments and in silico docking simulations indicate that carboxylesterases 1 and 2 recognise Amplex Red with the same kinetics as carboxylesterase-containing mitochondria. We propose two different approaches to correct for this problem and re-evaluate the commonly performed experimental procedure for the detection of H2O2 release from isolated liver mitochondria. Our results call for a serious re-examination of previous data. PMID:26577176

  12. Tuberculin Skin Tests versus Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in Tuberculosis Screening among Immigrant Visa Applicants

    PubMed Central

    Chuke, Stella O.; Yen, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Laserson, Kayla F.; Phuoc, Nguyen Huu; Trinh, Nguyen An; Nhung, Duong Thi Cam; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Qui, An Dang; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Loan, Le Thien Huong; Jones, Warren G.; Whitworth, William C.; Shah, J. Jina; Painter, John A.; Mazurek, Gerald H.; Maloney, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Use of tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) as part of tuberculosis (TB) screening among immigrants from high TB-burden countries has not been fully evaluated. Methods. Prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTBI) based on TST, or the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-G), was determined among immigrant applicants in Vietnam bound for the United States (US); factors associated with test results and discordance were assessed; predictive values of TST and QFT-G for identifying chest radiographs (CXRs) consistent with TB were calculated. Results. Of 1,246 immigrant visa applicants studied, 57.9% were TST positive, 28.3% were QFT-G positive, and test agreement was 59.4%. Increasing age was associated with positive TST results, positive QFT-G results, TST-positive but QFT-G-negative discordance, and abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. Positive predictive values of TST and QFT-G for an abnormal CXR were 25.9% and 25.6%, respectively. Conclusion. The estimated prevalence of MTBI among US-bound visa applicants in Vietnam based on TST was twice that based on QFT-G, and 14 times higher than a TST-based estimate of MTBI prevalence reported for the general US population in 2000. QFT-G was not better than TST at predicting abnormal CXRs consistent with TB. PMID:24738031

  13. Effects of acute critical illnesses on the performance of interferon-gamma release assay

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Ku, Shih-Chi; Lee, Pei-Lin; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Chun-Kai; Yang, Ching-Yao; Chien, Ying-Chun; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) is influenced by preanalytical, laboratory and host factors. The data regarding how critical illnesses influence IGRA results are limited. This study aimed to investigate IGRA performance among critically ill patients. Patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively enrolled, and underwent QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube testing on admission and discharge. The associations between patient factors and IGRA results were explored. In total, 118 patients were included. IGRA results on admission were positive, negative and indeterminate for 10(9%), 36(31%) and 72(61%) patients. All indeterminate results were due to a low mitogen response. Indeterminate results were associated with higher disease severity and lower serum albumin levels. Ninety(76%) patients survived to ICU discharge and had repeat IGRA testing 13.3 ± 10.1 days after first ones. Of those, 43(48%) had indeterminate results, and no IGRA conversion or reversion was observed. The majority (35/51, 69%) of ICU survivors with initial indeterminate results still had indeterminates on follow-up testing. Acute critical illnesses exert a significant impact on IGRA performance and a high proportion of indeterminate results was seen in ICU patients. This study highlights limitation of IGRAs in the critically ill and judicious selection of patients to be tested should be considered. PMID:26804487

  14. Evaluation of a domestic interferon-gamma release assay for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongliang; Ou, Mingzhan; He, Shuizhen; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Yanyan; Xiong, Junhui; Zhang, Jun; Ge, Shengxiang

    2015-07-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) have been demonstrated to be useful in the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. However, IGRAs have not been recommended for clinical usage in most low-income countries due to the shortage of clinical data available resulting from their high test cost. Recently, a cheaper domestic TB-IGRA was approved in China. In this study, we compared TB-IGRA with QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) for MTB infection diagnosis in 253 active TB patients, 48 non-TB lung disease patients, 115 healthcare workers and 216 healthy individuals. The proportion of positive TB-IGRA results in active TB patients, patients with non-TB lung disease, healthcare workers and healthy individuals was 88.3%, 27.1%, 40.9% and 17.6%, respectively, which was similar to the results of QFT-GIT, with an overall agreement of 95% (κ = 0.89) and a high correlation between their responses (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) being observed. In conclusion, the TB-IGRA has comparable clinical performance with QFT-GIT. PMID:26055815

  15. Effects of acute critical illnesses on the performance of interferon-gamma release assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Ku, Shih-Chi; Lee, Pei-Lin; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Chun-Kai; Yang, Ching-Yao; Chien, Ying-Chun; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) is influenced by preanalytical, laboratory and host factors. The data regarding how critical illnesses influence IGRA results are limited. This study aimed to investigate IGRA performance among critically ill patients. Patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively enrolled, and underwent QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube testing on admission and discharge. The associations between patient factors and IGRA results were explored. In total, 118 patients were included. IGRA results on admission were positive, negative and indeterminate for 10 (9%), 36 (31%) and 72 (61%) patients. All indeterminate results were due to a low mitogen response. Indeterminate results were associated with higher disease severity and lower serum albumin levels. Ninety (76%) patients survived to ICU discharge and had repeat IGRA testing 13.3 ± 10.1 days after first ones. Of those, 43 (48%) had indeterminate results, and no IGRA conversion or reversion was observed. The majority (35/51, 69%) of ICU survivors with initial indeterminate results still had indeterminates on follow-up testing. Acute critical illnesses exert a significant impact on IGRA performance and a high proportion of indeterminate results was seen in ICU patients. This study highlights limitation of IGRAs in the critically ill and judicious selection of patients to be tested should be considered. PMID:26804487

  16. Executive Summary of the Guidelines for the Use of interferon-gamma Release Assays in the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-09-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guide-line for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health. PMID:27424071

  17. Executive summary of the guidelines for the use of interferon-γ release assays in the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Santin, Miguel; García-García, José-María; Rigau, David; Altet, Neus; Anibarro, Luis; Casas, Irma; Díez, Nuria; García-Gasalla, Mercedes; Martínez-Lacasa, Xavier; Penas, Antón; Pérez-Escolano, Elvira; Sánchez, Francisca; Domínguez, José

    2016-05-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays are widely used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in Spain. However, there is no consensus on their application in specific clinical scenarios. To develop a guideline for their use, a panel of experts comprising specialists in infectious diseases, respiratory diseases, microbiology, pediatrics and preventive medicine, together with a methodologist, conducted a systematic literature search, summarized the findings, rated the quality of the evidence, and formulated recommendations following the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations of Assessment Development and Evaluations) methodology. This document provides evidence-based guidance on the use of interferon-gamma release assays for the diagnosis of tuberculosis infection in patients at the risk of tuberculosis or suspected of having active disease. The guidelines will be applicable to specialist and primary care, and public health. PMID:26926262

  18. New, tritium-release assay for 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1. cap alpha. -hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.J.; Perlman, K.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1986-05-01

    A new, rapid assay for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH-D)-1..cap alpha..-hydroxylase has been developed using 25-OH-(1..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/ as substrate. This compound was prepared by reduction of 1-oxo-25-hydroxycyclovitamin D/sub 3/ with (/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/, separation of the 1..cap alpha..- and 1..beta..-hydroxy products by HPLC, subsequent treatments with methylsulfonylchloride and lithium aluminum hydride, cycloreversion, and saponification. The 1..cap alpha..- and 1..beta..-tritiated substrates were tested in the solubilized and reconstituted chick 1..cap alpha..-hydroxylase system. After incubation, the reaction mixture was passed through a reversed phase silica cartridge to separate (/sup 3/H)H/sub 2/O from the labeled substrate. The cartridges were then washed with methanol to elute all vitamin D metabolites, and the amount of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/(/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/ was measured by HPLC. In addition, identical reaction mixtures using 25-OH-(26,27-/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/ as substrate were extracted and analyzed by HPLC for 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/(/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/. Reactions with 25-OH-(1..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/ produced (/sup 3/H)H/sub 2/O comparable to the amount of 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/(26,27-/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/ and negligible (/sup 3/H) in 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/. Conversely, reactions with 25-OH-(1..beta..-/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/ produced negligible (/sup 3/H)H/sub 2/O but produced 1,25-(OH)/sub 2/(/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/ comparable to that from reactions with 25-OH-(26,27-/sup 3/H)D/sub 3/. The results indicate that 1..cap alpha..-hydroxylation specifically displaces the 1..cap alpha..-hydrogen of 25-OH-D/sub 3/ and that the release of the 1..cap alpha..-/sup 3/H provides an accurate measure of vitamin D 1..cap alpha..-hydroxylation.

  19. Drug release assays from new chitosan/pHEMA membranes obtained by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimiro, M. H.; Gil, M. H.; Leal, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    With the purpose of obtaining a biocompatible and microbiologically safe matrix that simultaneously could be used as wound dressing material and as a controlled drug release system, membranes with different thickness and different contents in chitosan and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) have been prepared by γ irradiation from a 60Co source. Antibiotic release experiments were performed before or after irradiation over amoxicillin loaded chitosan/pHEMA membranes in physiological saline solution, and monitored by UV-Vis spectrometry. Results point out a fast amoxicillin release with similar release profile in all studied membranes. The amount of released drug was shown to be dependent on membranes network crosslinking due composition, radiation and membrane thickness.

  20. Bioelimination of /sup 51/Cr and /sup 85/Sr by cockroaches, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Orthoptera: Blaberidae), as affected by mites, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi (parasitiformes: laelapidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, T.D.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes rates of Chromium-51 and Strontium-85 assimilation and bioelimination by the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum), when the symbiotic mite, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi Till, was present or removed. Mite-infested cockroaches had significantly higher rates of /sup 51/Cr elimination relative to mite-free cockroaches, implying more rapid gut clearance times. We did not find a significant mite effect on /sup 85/Sr elimination by the host, but mite effects could have been masked by the apparently unique process of nutrient assimilation and elimination by G. portentosa. Conventional models of radioactive tracer bioelimination predict a rapid initial loss of tracer due to gut clearance, followed by a slower loss due to excretion of assimilated tracer. Our results indicated that assimilated /sup 85/Sr was eliminated earlier than unassimilated /sup 85/Sr was lost by defecation.

  1. Bioelimination of /sup 51/Cr and /sup 85/Sr by cockroaches, Gromphadorhina portentosa (orthoptera: blaberidae), as affected by mites, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi (parasitiformes: laelapidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, T.D.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    The rates of Chromium-51 and Strontium-85 assimilation and bioelimination by the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa (Schaum) are described when the symbiotic mite, Gromphadorholaelaps schaeferi Till, was present or removed. Mite-infested cockroaches had significantly higher rates of /sup 51/Cr elimination relative to mite-free cockroaches, implying more rapid gut clearance times. The authors did not find a significant mite effect on /sup 85/Sr elimination by the host, but mite effects could have been masked by the apparently unique process of nutrient assimilation and elimination by G. portentosa. Conventional models of radioactive tracer bioelimination predict a rapid initial loss of tracer due to gut clearance, followed by a slower loss due to excretion of assimilated tracer. The results indicated that assimilated /sup 85/Sr was eliminated earlier than unassimilated /sup 85/Sr, which was lost by defecation.

  2. Radiokinetic study on nucleation process of 65Zn(OH)2, 65Zn3(PO4)2 and 51CrPO4 crystals in gelatin and agar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecal, Al; Palamaru, M.; Chisca, S.; Balan, A.

    1999-01-01

    The nucleation process of 65Zn(OH)2, 65Zn3(PO4)2, and 51CrPO4 crystals in gelatin and agar was studied by using radioactive tracers. The diffusion rate, constants for 65Zn2+ and 51Cr3+ cations through gel, and the reaction rate constants of nucleation process as well as the beginning time of crystal appearance were established. It was found that the reaction rate constant of the low-soluble crystal is higher, and consequently, in a given colloidal medium this parameter varies as follows: k * Zn(PO4)2> k * Zn(OH) 2> k * CrPO 4

  3. Radiokinetic study on nucleation process of 65Zn(OH)2, 65Zn3(PO4)2 and 51CrPO4 crystals in gelatin and agar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecal, Al; Palamaru, M.; Chisca, S.; Balan, A.

    1999-01-01

    The nucleation process of 65Zn(OH)2, 65Zn3(PO4)2, and 51CrPO4 crystals in gelatin and agar was studied by using radioactive tracers. The diffusion rate, constants for 65Zn2+ and 51Cr3+ cations through gel, and the reaction rate constants of nucleation process as well as the beginning time of crystal appearance were established. It was found that the reaction rate constant of the low-soluble crystal is higher, and consequently, in a given colloidal medium this parameter varies as follows: k * Zn(PO4)2>k * Zn(OH) 2>k * CrPO 4

  4. Martian Superoxide and Peroxide O2 Release (OR) Assay: A New Technology for Terrestrial and Planetary Applications.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Konstantinos; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Quinn, Richard C; McKay, Christopher P; Sun, Henry J

    2016-02-01

    This study presents an assay for the detection and quantification of soil metal superoxides and peroxides in regolith and soil. The O2 release (OR) assay is based on the enzymatic conversion of the hydrolysis products of metal oxides to O2 and their quantification by an O2 electrode based on the stoichiometry of the involved reactions. The intermediate product O₂˙⁻ from the hydrolysis of metal superoxides is converted by cytochrome c to O2 and by superoxide dismutase (SOD) to ½ mol O2 and ½ mol H2O2, which is then converted by catalase (CAT) to ½ mol O2. The product H2O2 from the hydrolysis of metal peroxides and hydroperoxides is converted to ½ mol O2 by CAT. The assay method was validated in a sealed sample chamber by using a liquid-phase Clark-type O2 electrode with known concentrations of O₂˙⁻ and H2O2, and commercial metal superoxide and peroxide mixed with Mars analog Mojave and Atacama Desert soils. Carbonates and perchlorates, both present on Mars, do not interfere with the assay. The assay lower limit of detection, when using luminescence quenching/optical sensing O2-electrodes, is 1 nmol O2 cm(-3) or better. The activity of the assay enzymes SOD and cytochrome c was unaffected up to 6 Gy exposure by γ radiation, while CAT retained 100% and 40% of its activity at 3 and 6 Gy, respectively, which demonstrates the suitability of these enzymes for planetary missions, for example, on Mars or Europa. PMID:26881470

  5. Martian Superoxide and Peroxide O2 Release (OR) Assay: A New Technology for Terrestrial and Planetary Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiou, Christos D.; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Konstantinos; Grintzalis, Kontantinos; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Quinn, Richard C.; McKay, Christopher P.; Sun, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an assay for the detection and quantification of soil metal superoxides and peroxides in regolith and soil. The O2 release (OR) assay is based on the enzymatic conversion of the hydrolysis products of metal oxides to O2, and their quantification by an O2 electrode based on the stoichiometry of the involved reactions: The intermediate product O2 from the hydrolysis of metal superoxides is converted by cytochrome c to O2, and also by superoxide dismutase (SOD) to 1/2 mol O2 and 1/2 mol H2O2, which is then converted by catalase (CAT) to 1/2 mol O2. The product H2O2 from the hydrolysis of metal peroxides and hydroperoxides is converted to 1/2 mol O2 by CAT. The assay-method was validated in a sealed sample chamber using a liquid-phase Clark-type O2 electrode with known concentrations of O2 and H2O2, and with commercial metal superoxide and peroxide mixed with Mars analogue Mojave and Atacama Desert soils. Carbonates and perchlorates, both present on Mars, do not interfere with the assay. The assay lower limit of detection, using luminescence quenching/optical sensing O2-electrodes, is 1 nmol O2 cm(exp. -3) or better. The activity of the assay enzymes SOD and cytochrome c was unaffected up to 6 Gy exposure by gamma-radiation, while CAT retained 100% and 40% of its activity at 3 and 6 Gy, respectively, demonstrating the suitability of these enzymes for planetary missions, e.g., in Mars or Europa.

  6. Diagnostic Usefulness of IFN-Gamma Releasing Assays Compared With Conventional Tests in Patients With Disseminated Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shi Nae; Jung, Jiwon; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Lee, Ju Young; Kim, Sun-Mi; Park, Su Jin; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Sung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Abstract IFN-gamma releasing assays (IGRAs) such as T-SPOT.TB assay and QuantiFERON-TB In-Tube (QFT-GIT) have yielded promising results for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). However, little is known about the usefulness of these assays for diagnosing disseminated TB. We therefore compared their usefulness with traditional tests in patients with disseminated TB. All adult patients with suspected disseminated TB were prospectively enrolled at a tertiary hospital in an intermediate TB-burden country during a 6-year period. Disseminated TB was defined as involvement of the bone marrow or ≥2 noncontiguous organs, or presence of miliary lung lesions. A total of 101 patients with confirmed and probable disseminated TB were finally analyzed. Of these 101 patients, 52 (52%) had miliary TB and the remaining 49 (48%) had nonmiliary disseminated TB. In addition, 63 (62%) had no underlying disease. Chronic granuloma with/without necrosis, acid-fast bacillus staining, Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR, and culture for M tuberculosis were positive in 77% (41/53), 43% (43/101), 70% (67/96), and 72% (73/101), of the patients, respectively. The T-SPOT.TB assay was positive in 90% (91/101) of them. The sensitivity of the T-SPOT.TB assay in patients with miliary TB (90%) was similar to that in patients with nonmiliary TB (90%) (P > 0.99). In a subgroup analysis of the 58 patients in whom both QFT-GIT and the T-SPOT.TB results were available, the sensitivity of QFT-GIT (67%) was lower than that of T-SPOT.TB (95%) (P < 0.001). In conclusion, T-SPOT.TB assay may be a helpful adjunct test for disseminated TB. PMID:26181542

  7. Cytokine release assays for the prediction of therapeutic mAb safety in first-in man trials--Whole blood cytokine release assays are poorly predictive for TGN1412 cytokine storm.

    PubMed

    Vessillier, S; Eastwood, D; Fox, B; Sathish, J; Sethu, S; Dougall, T; Thorpe, S J; Thorpe, R; Stebbings, R

    2015-09-01

    The therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) TGN1412 (anti-CD28 superagonist) caused near-fatal cytokine release syndrome (CRS) in all six volunteers during a phase-I clinical trial. Several cytokine release assays (CRAs) with reported predictivity for TGN1412-induced CRS have since been developed for the preclinical safety testing of new therapeutic mAbs. The whole blood (WB) CRA is the most widely used, but its sensitivity for TGN1412-like cytokine release was recently criticized. In a comparative study, using group size required for 90% power with 5% significance as a measure of sensitivity, we found that WB and 10% (v/v) WB CRAs were the least sensitive for TGN1412 as these required the largest group sizes (n = 52 and 79, respectively). In contrast, the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) solid phase (SP) CRA was the most sensitive for TGN1412 as it required the smallest group size (n = 4). Similarly, the PBMC SP CRA was more sensitive than the WB CRA for muromonab-CD3 (anti-CD3) which stimulates TGN1412-like cytokine release (n = 4 and 4519, respectively). Conversely, the WB CRA was far more sensitive than the PBMC SP CRA for alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) which stimulates FcγRI-mediated cytokine release (n = 8 and 180, respectively). Investigation of potential factors contributing to the different sensitivities revealed that removal of red blood cells (RBCs) from WB permitted PBMC-like TGN1412 responses in a SP CRA, which in turn could be inhibited by the addition of the RBC membrane protein glycophorin A (GYPA); this observation likely underlies, at least in part, the poor sensitivity of WB CRA for TGN1412. The use of PBMC SP CRA for the detection of TGN1412-like cytokine release is recommended in conjunction with adequately powered group sizes for dependable preclinical safety testing of new therapeutic mAbs. PMID:25960173

  8. Identifying Carbohydrate Ligands of a Norovirus P Particle using a Catch and Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N.; Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Klassen, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), the major cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis, recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are present as free oligosaccharides in bodily fluid or glycolipids and glycoproteins on the surfaces of cells. The subviral P particle formed by the protruding (P) domain of the NoV capsid protein serves as a useful model for the study NoV-HBGA interactions. Here, we demonstrate the application of a catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against the P particle to rapidly identify NoV ligands and potential inhibitors. Carbohydrate libraries of 50 and 146 compounds, which included 18 and 24 analogs of HBGA receptors, respectively, were screened against the P particle of VA387, a member of the predominant GII.4 NoVs. Deprotonated ions corresponding to the P particle bound to carbohydrates were isolated and subjected to collision-induced dissociation to release the ligands in their deprotonated forms. The released ligands were identified by ion mobility separation followed by mass analysis. All 13 and 16 HBGA ligands with intrinsic affinities >500 M-1 were identified in the 50 and the 146 compound libraries, respectively. Furthermore, screening revealed interactions with a series of oligosaccharides with structures found in the cell wall of mycobacteria and human milk. The affinities of these newly discovered ligands are comparable to those of the HBGA receptors, as estimated from the relative abundance of released ligand ions.

  9. A Phenotypic High Throughput Screening Assay for the Identification of Pharmacoperones for the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emery; Spicer, Timothy; Chase, Peter; Scampavia, Louis; Janovick, Jo Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe a phenotypic high throughput screening (HTS) calcium flux assay designed to identify pharmacoperones for the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR). Pharmacoperones are target-specific, small molecules that diffuse into cells, rescue misfolded protein mutants, and restore them to function. Rescue is based on correcting the trafficking of mutants that would otherwise be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and unable to function correctly. This approach identifies drugs with a significant degree of novelty, relying on cellular mechanisms that are not currently exploited. Development of such assays is important, since the extensive use of agonist/antagonist screens alone means that useful chemical structures may be present in existing libraries but have not been previously identified using existing methods. Our assay utilizes cell lines stably expressing a GnRHR mutant under the control of a tetracycline (OFF) transactivator. This allows us to quantitate the level of functional and properly trafficked G protein coupled receptors present in each test well. Furthermore, since we are able to turn receptor expression on and off, we can rapidly eliminate the majority of false positives from our screening results. Our data show that this approach is likely to be successful in identifying hits from large chemical libraries. PMID:24831790

  10. Clinical and Diagnostic Developments of a Gamma Interferon Release Assay for Use in Bovine Tuberculosis Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bass, K. E.; Nonnecke, B. J.; Palmer, M. V.; Thacker, T. C.; Hardegger, R.; Schroeder, B.; Raeber, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the Bovigam assay is used as an official supplemental test within bovine tuberculosis control programs. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate two Mycobacterium bovis-specific peptide cocktails and purified protein derivatives (PPDs) from two sources, liquid and lyophilized antigen preparations. PPDs and peptide cocktails were also used for comparison of a second-generation gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay kit with the currently licensed first-generation kit (Bovigam; Prionics AG). Three strains of M. bovis were used for experimental challenge: M. bovis 95-1315, M. bovis Ravenel, and M. bovis 10-7428. Additionally, samples from a tuberculosis-affected herd (i.e., naturally infected) were evaluated. Robust responses to both peptide cocktails, HP (PC-HP) and ESAT-6/CFP10 (PC-EC), and the PPDs were elicited as early as 3 weeks after challenge. Only minor differences in responses to Commonwealth Serum Laboratories (CSL) and Lelystad PPDs were detected with samples from experimentally infected animals. For instance, responses to Lelystad M. avium-derived PPD (PPDa) exceeded the respective responses to the CSL PPDa in M. bovis Ravenel-infected and control animals. However, a 1:4 dilution of stimulated plasma demonstrated greater separation of PPDb from PPDa responses (i.e., PPDb minus PPDa) with the use of Lelystad PPDs, suggesting that Lelystad PPDs provide greater diagnostic sensitivity than CSL PPDs. The responses to lyophilized and liquid antigen preparations did not differ. Responses detected with first- and second-generation IFN-γ release assay kits (Bovigam) did not differ throughout the study. In conclusion, antigens may be stored in a lyophilized state without loss in potency, PC-HP and PC-EC are dependable biomarkers for aiding in the detection of bovine tuberculosis, and second-generation Bovigam kits are comparable to currently used kits. PMID:24132602

  11. Identification of iopanoic acid as substrate of type 1 deiodinase by a novel nonradioactive iodide-release assay.

    PubMed

    Renko, Kostja; Hoefig, Carolin S; Hiller, Franziska; Schomburg, Lutz; Köhrle, Josef

    2012-05-01

    Enzymatic 5'- and 5-deiodination are key reactions for local and systemic activation and inactivation of iodothyronines and thyronamines. Expression of the three deiodinase (DIO) isoenzymes is regulated by a number of parameters, including thyroid status, genotype, micronutrient availability, and disease-related signaling. In addition, DIO are potential targets of pharmacological as well as environmentally derived substances, which might affect their enzymatic activity (endocrine disruptors). With the classical DIO activity assay, testing depends on the availability of radioactively labeled substrates (e.g. (125)I-rT(3)) to monitor the release of radioactive iodide. Recently, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was described as an alternative method apparently resolving this limitation. However, it has a high demand in technical equipment and analytical routine and is limited in sample number by considerable measuring time. We therefore combined the classical deiodination assay with an easily accessible photometric method taking advantage of the Sandell-Kolthoff reaction for measuring iodide release. In brief, iodine works as a catalyst within this redox reaction between Ce(4+) and As(3+) leading to an acceleration of destaining. Furthermore, the protocol was adapted to minimize handling effort and time consumption. Because this method is not dependent on radioactivity, it expands the substrate spectrum of the classical method. Suitability of this assay was tested with tissue samples from animal experiments (hepatic Dio1 activity in hypo- and hyperthyroid mice) and established DIO inhibitors. As a new but not unexpected finding, the alleged inhibitor iopanoic acid turned out to be a DIO substrate. This finding was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and its potential clinical impact requires further studies. PMID:22434082

  12. Survival of density subpopulations of rabbit platelets: use of /sup 51/Cr-or /sup 111/In-labeled platelets to measure survival of least dense and most dense platelets concurrently

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, M.L.; Packham, M.A.; Mustard, J.F.

    1983-02-01

    The origin of the density heterogeneity of platelets was studied by measuring the survival of density subpopulations of rabbit platelets separated by discontinuous Stractan density gradient centrifugation. When a total population of /sup 51/Cr-labelled platelets was injected into recipient rabbits, the relative specific radioactivity of the most dense platelets decreased rapidly. In contrast, that of the least dense platelets had not changed 24 hr after injection, and then decreased slowly. To distinguish between the possibilities that most dense platelets are cleared from the circulation more quickly than least dense platelets or that platelets decrease in density as they age in the circulation, the concurrent survival of least dense and most dense platelets, labelled with either /sup 51/Cr or /sup 111/In-labelled total platelet populations, determined concurrently in the same rabbits, are identical, calculated from 1 hr values as 100%. However, the 1-hr recovery of /sup 111/In-labelled platelets was slightly but significantly less than that of /sup 51/Cr-labelled platelets. Therefore, researchers studied the survival of /sup 51/Cr-labelled least dense and /sup 111/In-labelled most dense platelets as well as that of /sup 111/In-labelled least dense and /sup 51/Cr-labelled most dense platelets. Mean 1-hr recovery of least dense platelets, labelled with either isotope (78% +/- 7%, SD) was similar to that of most dense platelets, labelled with either isotope (77% +/- 8%; SD). Mean survival of least dense platelets was 47.3 +/- 18.7 hr (SD), which was significantly less than that of most dense platelets (76.1 +/- 21.6 hr; SD) (p less than 0.0025). These results indicate that platelets decrease in buoyant density as they age in the circulation and that most dense platelets are enriched in young platelets, and least dense in old.

  13. Lipid Mixing and Content Release in Single-Vesicle, SNARE-Driven Fusion Assay with 1–5 ms Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tingting; Smith, Elizabeth A.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Weisshaar, James C.

    2009-01-01

    A single-vesicle, fluorescence-based, SNARE-driven fusion assay enables simultaneous measurement of lipid mixing and content release with 5 ms/frame, or even 1 ms/frame, time resolution. The v-SNARE vesicles, labeled with lipid and content markers of different color, dock and fuse with a planar t-SNARE bilayer supported on glass. A narrow (<5 ms duration), intense spike of calcein fluorescence due to content release and dequenching coincides with inner-leaflet lipid mixing within 10 ms. The spike provides more sensitive detection of productive hemifusion events than do lipid labels alone. Consequently, many fast events previously thought to be prompt, full fusion events are now reclassified as productive hemifusion. Both full fusion and hemifusion occur with a time constant of 5–10 ms. At 60% phosphatidylethanolamine lipid composition, productive and dead-end hemifusion account for 65% of all fusion events. However, quantitative analysis shows that calcein is released into the space above the bilayer (vesicle bursting), rather than the thin aqueous space between the bilayer and glass. Evidently, at the instant of inner-leaflet mixing, flattening of the vesicle increases the internal pressure beyond the bursting point. This may be related to in vivo observations suggesting that membrane lysis often competes with membrane fusion. PMID:19450483

  14. Cytokine release assays for the prediction of therapeutic mAb safety in first-in man trials — Whole blood cytokine release assays are poorly predictive for TGN1412 cytokine storm

    PubMed Central

    Vessillier, S.; Eastwood, D.; Fox, B.; Sathish, J.; Sethu, S.; Dougall, T.; Thorpe, S.J.; Thorpe, R.; Stebbings, R.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) TGN1412 (anti-CD28 superagonist) caused near-fatal cytokine release syndrome (CRS) in all six volunteers during a phase-I clinical trial. Several cytokine release assays (CRAs) with reported predictivity for TGN1412-induced CRS have since been developed for the preclinical safety testing of new therapeutic mAbs. The whole blood (WB) CRA is the most widely used, but its sensitivity for TGN1412-like cytokine release was recently criticized. In a comparative study, using group size required for 90% power with 5% significance as a measure of sensitivity, we found that WB and 10% (v/v) WB CRAs were the least sensitive for TGN1412 as these required the largest group sizes (n = 52 and 79, respectively). In contrast, the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) solid phase (SP) CRA was the most sensitive for TGN1412 as it required the smallest group size (n = 4). Similarly, the PBMC SP CRA was more sensitive than the WB CRA for muromonab-CD3 (anti-CD3) which stimulates TGN1412-like cytokine release (n = 4 and 4519, respectively). Conversely, the WB CRA was far more sensitive than the PBMC SP CRA for alemtuzumab (anti-CD52) which stimulates FcγRI-mediated cytokine release (n = 8 and 180, respectively). Investigation of potential factors contributing to the different sensitivities revealed that removal of red blood cells (RBCs) from WB permitted PBMC-like TGN1412 responses in a SP CRA, which in turn could be inhibited by the addition of the RBC membrane protein glycophorin A (GYPA); this observation likely underlies, at least in part, the poor sensitivity of WB CRA for TGN1412. The use of PBMC SP CRA for the detection of TGN1412-like cytokine release is recommended in conjunction with adequately powered group sizes for dependable preclinical safety testing of new therapeutic mAbs. PMID:25960173

  15. Cross sections of the 56Fe(n ,α ) 53Cr and 54Fe(n ,α ) 51Cr reactions in the MeV region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhimin; Fan, Xiao; Zhang, Luyu; Bai, Huaiyong; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedysheva, M. V.; Krupa, L.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2015-10-01

    Cross sections of the 56Fe(n ,α ) 53Cr and 54Fe(n ,α )51Cr reactions were measured at En=5.5 and 6.5 MeV and En=4.0 ,4.5 ,5.5 ,and 6.5 MeV , respectively, using a double-section gridded ionization chamber as the α -particle detector. Natural iron and enriched 56Fe and 54Fe foil samples were prepared. A deuterium gas target was used to produce monoenergetic neutrons through the 2H(d ,n )3He reaction. Two rounds of experiments were performed at the 4.5-MV Van de Graaff Accelerator of Peking University. The foreground and background were measured in separate runs. The neutron flux was monitored by a B F3 long counter, and the cross sections of the 238U(n ,f ) reaction were used as the standard. Present results are compared with those of the talys-1.6 code calculations, existing measurements, and evaluations.

  16. Maternal immunocompetence. I. The graft-versus-host reactivity of lymphocytes from pregnant rats and the distribution pattern of 51Cr-labeled lymphocytes in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Harrison, M R

    1976-01-01

    Lymphocytes from the peripheral blood, spleen, or para-aortic lymph nodes of prrimigravida L rats carrying (L X BN) F1 (LBN) fetuses are fully capable of mounting graft-versus-host (GVH) reactions in LBN F1 recipients. The reactivity of lymphocytes from interstrain pregnant (L X BN) or intrastrain pregnant (L X L) rats, or from rats postpartum from these pregnancies, is equivalent to that of normal virgin females over a full dose-response curve, ruling out both specific and nonspecific effects of pregnancy on the intrinsic GVH competence of the maternal thymus-derived (T) lymphocyte. Attempts to block GVH reactivity with serum from pregnant rats were unsuccessful. In addition, when the distribution pattern of 51Cr-labeled syngeneic and semiallogeneic lymphocytes was studied in intact primigravida mice, there was no difference between interstrain and intrastrain pregnant mice, and there was no evidence of immunologically specific 'trapping' in the para-aortic lymph nodes draining the interstrain pregnant uterus. PMID:8832

  17. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  18. Revisiting the IFN-γ release assay: Whole blood or PBMC cultures? - And other factors of influence.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun; Emnéus, Jenny; Wolff, Anders; Jungersen, Gregers

    2016-07-01

    The interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) is a widely used test for the presence of a cell-mediated immune (CMI) response in vitro. This measure is used to test for infection with intracellular pathogens or for validating vaccine efficacy, and it is a widely used test for both human as well as cattle. However, there is no consensus whether to use whole blood cultures or purified PBMCs for the assay, and both cell populations are being used and results compared. Therefore the aim of this study was to compare different culture settings using immune cells from previously vaccinated calves, and to shed light on external factors that could influence the read out in terms of IFN-γ levels. It was found that optimal culture conditions varied between individual animals; when polyclonal activated, cells from whole blood cultures were most responsive, but when activated specifically, the optimal cell concentration/population varied with whole blood, 10×10(6)cells/ml PBMC and 5×10(6)cells/ml PBMC being the highest performing conditions. A further investigation of the distribution of cell populations in PBMCs compared to whole blood was conducted, and a significant (p<0.001) decrease in the percentage of CD3(+) T lymphocytes within the PBMCs was found. More specifically, this reduction was due to a significant (p<0.01) decrease in the percentage of γδ(+) T lymphocytes. Thus measuring immune responses on purified PBMCs might not give a physiologically relevant output. Additionally, it was tested if the choice of incubation plate would interfere with the level of secreted IFN-γ in whole blood cultures from five calves. Six plates (a-f) were tested and no significant difference in absolute levels of IFN-γ was detected in the six plates when cells were polyclonal and specifically activated. However, we observed a significant (p<0.05) higher background level in a flat-bottom plate from Corning® (cat# 3595) (plate d) compared to two different flat-bottom plates from Corning

  19. A summary of meeting proceedings on addressing variability around the cut point in serial interferon-γ release assay testing.

    PubMed

    Daley, Charles L; Reves, Randall R; Beard, Melodie A; Boyle, Jeffrey; Clark, Richard B; Beebe, James L; Catanzaro, Antonino; Chen, Lisa; Desmond, Edward; Dorman, Susan E; Hudson, T Warner; Lardizabal, Alfred A; Kapoor, Hema; Marder, David C; Miranda, Cyndee; Narita, Masahiro; Reichman, Lee; Schwab, Dale; Seaworth, Barbara J; Terpeluk, Paul; Thanassi, Wendy; Kawamura, L Masae

    2013-06-01

    On June 13, 2012, a group of key stakeholders, leaders, and national experts on tuberculosis (TB), occupational health, and laboratory science met in Atlanta, Georgia, to focus national discussion on the higher than expected positive results occurring among low-risk, unexposed healthcare workers undergoing serial testing with interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs). The objectives of the meeting were to present the latest clinical and operational research findings on the topic, to discuss evaluation and treatment algorithms that are emerging in the absence of national guidance, and to develop a consensus on the action steps needed to assist programs and physicians in the interpretation of serial testing IGRA results. This report summarizes its proceedings. PMID:23651895

  20. Renal Distribution Volumes of Indocyanine Green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na in Man during Acute Renal Failure after Shock. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PATHOGENESIS OF ANURIA

    PubMed Central

    Reubi, F. C.; Vorburger, C.; Tuckman, J.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the anuria in acute renal failure after shock is still controversial. Suppressed glomerular filtration and/or tubular back-diffusion of the filtrate are major possible causes. In the present investigation, seven patients with acute anuria, three of these seven again in the polyuric phase, six patients with moderate renal impairment, four patients with chronic renal failure, and eight subjects with normal renal function were studied by a multiple indicator-dilution method in which the total renal blood flow and renal distribution volumes of indocyanine green, [51Cr]EDTA, and 24Na were determined. In normal subjects the average values for one kidney were 582 ml/min, 42 ml, 92 ml, and 139 ml, respectively. The measurements in the patients with moderate renal impairment were similar to those in the normal subjects, but were decreased in chronic renal failure. In acute anuria, the average values were 269 ml/min, 40 ml, 101 ml, and 114 ml and the kidney volume, estimated radiographically, was increased by 40%. When expressed as milliliters per milliliters kidney, the average distribution volume of 24Na was decreased from 0.64 to 0.38. This decrease is consistent with the hypothesis that suppressed filtration is largely responsible for the anuria and that back-diffusion is, at most, a contributory factor. The apparent contradiction between the relatively well-preserved total blood flow and the suppressed filtration may be due to a combination of afferent vasoconstriction and efferent vasodilatation. This view is supported by the observation that low filtration fractions were found in clearance measurements performed during the polyuric phase. PMID:4630601

  1. Identifying Predictors of Interferon-γ Release Assay Results in Pediatric Latent Tuberculosis: A Protective Role of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin?

    PubMed Central

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Altet-Gómez, Neus; Tsolia, Maria; Ruga, Ezia; Velizarova, Svetlana; Kampmann, Beate

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays are widely used to diagnose latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in adults, but their performance in children remains incompletely evaluated to date. Objectives: To investigate factors influencing results of IFN-γ release assays in children using a large European data set. Methods: The Pediatric Tuberculosis Network European Trials group pooled and analyzed data from five sites across Europe comprising 1,128 children who were all investigated for latent tuberculosis infection by tuberculin skin test and at least one IFN-γ release assay. Multivariate analyses examined age, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination status, and sex as predictor variables of results. Subgroup analyses included children who were household contacts. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 1,093 children had a QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay and 382 had a T-SPOT.TB IFN-γ release assay. Age was positively correlated with a positive blood result (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: odds ratio [OR], 1.08 per year increasing age [P < 0.0001]; T-SPOT.TB: OR, 1.14 per year increasing age [P < 0.001]). A positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube result was shown by 5.5% of children with a tuberculin skin test result less than 5 mm, by 14.8% if less than 10 mm, and by 20.2% if less than 15 mm. Prior BCG vaccination was associated with a negative IFN-γ release assay result (QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: OR, 0.41 [P < 0.001]; T-SPOT.TB: OR, 0.41 [P < 0.001]). Young age was a predictor of indeterminate IFN-γ release assay results, but indeterminate rates were low (3.6% in children < 5 yr, 1% in children > 5 yr). Conclusions: Our data show that BCG vaccination may be effective in protecting children against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To restrict use of IFN-γ release assays to children with positive skin tests risks underestimating latent infection. PMID:22700862

  2. High-Throughput Assay Development for Cystine-Glutamate Antiporter (xc-) Highlights Faster Cystine Uptake than Glutamate Release in Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Sattler, Rita; Tendyke, Karen; Loiacono, Kara A.; Hansen, Hans; Sahni, Vishal; Hashizume, Yutaka; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    The cystine-glutamate antiporter (system xc-) is a Na+-independent amino acid transporter that exchanges extracellular cystine for intracellular glutamate. It is thought to play a critical role in cellular redox processes through regulation of intracellular glutathione synthesis via cystine uptake. In gliomas, system xc- expression is universally up-regulated while that of glutamate transporters down-regulated, leading to a progressive accumulation of extracellular glutamate and excitotoxic cell death of the surrounding non-tumorous tissue. Additionally, up-regulation of system xc- in activated microglia has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders mediated by excess glutamate. Consequently, system xc- is a new drug target for brain cancer and neuroinflammatory diseases associated with excess extracellular glutamate. Unfortunately no potent and selective small molecule system xc- inhibitors exist and to our knowledge, no high throughput screening (HTS) assay has been developed to identify new scaffolds for inhibitor design. To develop such an assay, various neuronal and non-neuronal human cells were evaluated as sources of system xc-. Human glioma cells were chosen based on their high system xc- activity. Using these cells, [14C]-cystine uptake and cystine-induced glutamate release assays were characterized and optimized with respect to cystine and protein concentrations and time of incubation. A pilot screen of the LOPAC/NINDS libraries using glutamate release demonstrated that the logistics of the assay were in place but unfortunately, did not yield meaningful pharmacophores. A larger, HTS campaign using the 384-well cystine-induced glutamate release as primary assay and the 96-well 14C-cystine uptake as confirmatory assay is currently underway. Unexpectedly, we observed that the rate of cystine uptake was significantly faster than the rate of glutamate release in human glioma cells. This was in contrast to the same rates of

  3. Cytokine Release Assays as Tests for Exposure to Leishmania, and for Confirming Cure from Leishmaniasis, in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    López-Medrano, Francisco; Salto, Efrén; Fernández, Laura; San Martín, Juan Víctor; Alvar, Jorge; Aguado, Jose María; Moreno, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Spain has one of the world’s largest pools of organ donors and is a global leader in terms of the number of transplants it performs. The current outbreak of leishmaniasis in Fuenlabrada (in the southwest of the region of Madrid, Spain) has involved 600 clinical cases since late 2009 (prevalence 0.2%). It may therefore be wise to monitor the town’s transplanted population for Leishmania infantum; its members are immunosuppressed and at greater risk of infection and relapse following treatment. The present work examines the use of cytokine release assays to determine the prevalence of Leishmania infection in this population, and to confirm recovery following treatment for visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The humoral and cellular immune responses to L. infantum were characterized in 63 solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients from Fuenlabrada, 57 of whom reported no previous episode of VL (NVL subjects), and six of whom had been cured of VL (CVL subjects). Seventeen subjects (12 NVL and 5 CVL) showed a patent lymphoproliferative response to soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA). Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures and of whole blood with SLA led to the production of different combinations of cytokines that might serve to confirm Leishmania infection or recovery from VL and help prevent cured patients from relapsing into this serious condition. PMID:26496365

  4. Performance of the Interferon Gamma Release Assays in Tuberculosis Disease in Children Five Years Old or Less

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qing-qin; Xiao, Jing; Li, Jie-qiong; Guo, Ya-jie; Feng, Guo-shuang; Peng, Xiao-xia; Qi, Hui; Xu, Fang; Jiao, Wei-wei; Shen, Chen; Shen, A-dong

    2015-01-01

    Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) were developed for the indirect or immunologic diagnosis of tuberculosis infection; however, they have also been used to assist in difficult to diagnose cases of tuberculosis disease in adults, and to a lesser extent, in children, especially in those under 5 years old. We evaluated the utility of using an IGRA in pediatric tuberculosis in younger children in a hospital setting. The diagnostic accuracy of T-SPOT.TB and TST was assessed in 117 children with active tuberculosis and 413 children with respiratory tract infection. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the tests used individually and together. Concordance was also calculated. Sensitivity of T-SPOT.TB (82.9%) was higher than TST (78.6% using a 5mm cut-off), especially in children confirmed to have TB. T-SPOT.TB was more specific than TST using a 5mm cut-off (96.1% vs. 70.9%). Combining T-SPOT.TB and TST results improved the sensitivity to 96.6%. In conclusion, the results of the current study indicate that T-SPOT.TB has good sensitivity and specificity, supporting its use among patients of this age. A combination of IGRA and TST would be useful additions to assist in the diagnosis of childhood TB. PMID:26640948

  5. Cytokine Release Assays as Tests for Exposure to Leishmania, and for Confirming Cure from Leishmaniasis, in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Eugenia; Carrasco-Antón, Nerea; López-Medrano, Francisco; Salto, Efrén; Fernández, Laura; San Martín, Juan Víctor; Alvar, Jorge; Aguado, Jose María; Moreno, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Spain has one of the world's largest pools of organ donors and is a global leader in terms of the number of transplants it performs. The current outbreak of leishmaniasis in Fuenlabrada (in the southwest of the region of Madrid, Spain) has involved 600 clinical cases since late 2009 (prevalence 0.2%). It may therefore be wise to monitor the town's transplanted population for Leishmania infantum; its members are immunosuppressed and at greater risk of infection and relapse following treatment. The present work examines the use of cytokine release assays to determine the prevalence of Leishmania infection in this population, and to confirm recovery following treatment for visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The humoral and cellular immune responses to L. infantum were characterized in 63 solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients from Fuenlabrada, 57 of whom reported no previous episode of VL (NVL subjects), and six of whom had been cured of VL (CVL subjects). Seventeen subjects (12 NVL and 5 CVL) showed a patent lymphoproliferative response to soluble Leishmania antigen (SLA). Stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures and of whole blood with SLA led to the production of different combinations of cytokines that might serve to confirm Leishmania infection or recovery from VL and help prevent cured patients from relapsing into this serious condition. PMID:26496365

  6. The Effectiveness of Screening with Interferon-Gamma Release Assays in a University Health Care Setting with a Diverse Global Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Samantha J.; Golbeck, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This analysis examined the effectiveness of utilizing interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) technology in a TB (TB) screening program at a university. Participants: Participants were 2299 students at a Montana university who had presented to the university health center for TB screening during 2012 and 2013. Methods: A retrospective…

  7. Influencial factors of the performance of interferon-γ release assays in the diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Bao, Lei; Diao, Ni; Sun, Feng; Gao, Yan; Wong, Ka-Wing; Xi, Xiuhong; Liu, Xuhui; Wang, Sen; Wu, Jing; Hui, Ma; Fan, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wenhong; Lu, Shuihua

    2015-08-01

    Diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) in children remains difficult. This study aimed at evaluating the ability of interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) in the detection of active TB in human immunodeficiency virus-negative children vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin and investigating the effect of prednisolone treatment on the IGRAs performance. Among the 162 children with suspected TB disease recruited in China, 60 were tested with QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube (QFT-GIT) and 102 were tested with T-SPOT.TB. QFT-GIT presented a sensitivity of 83.9 % (95 % CI 66.9-93.4 %) and a specificity of 88.5 % (95 % CI 70.2-96.8 %), while T-SPOT.TB had a sensitivity of 75.9 % (95 % CI 63.4-85.2 %) and a specificity of 94.7 % (95 % CI 81.8-99.5 %). The positive predictive value was high in both assays, 92.9 % for QFT-GIT and 95.7 % for T-SPOT.TB. In total of these two kinds of IGRAs, false negative rate was significantly higher in children receiving systemic prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) therapy for >1 week (two tested with T-SPOT.TB and five tested with QFT-GIT) than in those with ≤1 week of prednisolone therapy and without prednisolone therapy (57.1 vs. 18.3 %, p = 0.035). There was no significant difference of the positive rate of both tests in children <5 years old compared with those ≥5 years old. Both types of IGRAs showed good diagnostic values in detecting childhood TB before microbiological evidence was available. Glucocorticoids had a significant negative influence on IGRAs if treated for >1 week. Age made no difference on the performance of these tests in children. PMID:24925641

  8. Omega 3 fatty acids increase spontaneous release of cytosolic components from tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jenski, L.J.; Sturdevant, L.K.; Ehringer, W.D.; Stillwell, W. )

    1991-05-01

    Mice fed menhaden (fish) oil or coconut oil-rich diets were inoculated intraperitoneally with a rapidly growing leukemia, T27A. After one week, the tumor cells were harvested, and 51Cr was used to label intracellular molecules. Spontaneous release of 51Cr was used as a measure of plasma membrane permeability. Compared to cells from mice fed coconut oil (rich in saturated fatty acids), tumor cells from mice fed menhaden oil (rich in long chain polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids) showed an increased level of spontaneous 51Cr release, which was exacerbated by increased temperature and reduced by extracellular protein. At physiological salt concentrations, the released 51Cr was detected in particles of approximately 2700 daltons. Enhanced permeability correlated with the incorporation of dietary (fish oil) omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acid into the tumor cells. The results demonstrate that omega 3 fatty acids are incorporated into cellular constituents of tumor cells and change properties associated with the plasma membrane. This result suggests that dietary manipulation may be used to enhance tumor cell permeability and contribute to tumor eradication.

  9. Usefulness of interferon-γ release assay for the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Kwang; Kim, Hae Ryun; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lim, In Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in young children may progress to severe active tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as a reservoir for future transmission of TB disease. There are limited data on interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) performance in young children, which our research aims to address by investigating the usefulness of IGRA for the diagnosis of LTBI. Methods We performed a tuberculin skin test (TST) and IGRA on children who were younger than 18 years and were admitted to Chung-Ang University Hospital during May 2011–June 2015. Blood samples for IGRA were collected, processed, and interpreted according to manufacturer protocol. Results Among 149 children, 31 (20.8%) and 10 (6.7%) were diagnosed with LTBI and active pulmonary TB, respectively. In subjects lacking contact history with active TB patients, TST and IGRA results were positive in 41.4% (29 of 70) and 12.9% (9 of 70) subjects, respectively. The agreement (kappa) of TST and IGRA was 0.123. The control group, consisting of non-TB-infected subjects, showed no correlation between age and changes in interferon-γ concentration after nil antigen, TB-specific antigen, or mitogen stimulation in IGRAs (P=0.384, P=0.176, and P=0.077, respectively). In serial IGRAs, interferon-γ response to TB antigen increased in IGRA-positive LTBI subjects, but did not change considerably in initially IGRA-negative LTBI or control subjects. Conclusion The lack of decrease in interferon-γ response in young children indicates that IGRA could be considered for this age group. Serial IGRA tests might accurately diagnose LTBI in children lacking contact history with active TB patients. PMID:27462354

  10. Risk of Tuberculosis Among Patients on Dialysis: The Predictive Value of Serial Interferon-Gamma Release Assay.

    PubMed

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yu-Feng; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Feng-Jung; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2016-05-01

    Patients on long-term dialysis are at high risk for tuberculosis (TB). Although latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is good target for TB eradication, interferon-gamma release assay-defined LTBI has a high proportion of negative conversion and lacks active TB correlation among patients on dialysis.Patients on long-term dialysis were screened in multiple centers in Taiwan. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) was used to define LTBI and was performed thrice at 6-month intervals. The primary outcome was active TB diagnosed after LTBI screening. The incidence and predictive value of QFT-GIT were analyzed.The 940 dialysis patients enrolled had an average age of 59.3 years. The initial QFT-GIT results were positive in 193, including 49.6% with persistent positive results on second check. In an average follow-up period of 3 years, 7 patients had TB. Three (319.1 per 100,000 person-yrs) and 4 (141.8 per 100,000 person-yrs) of them were prevalent and incident TB cases, respectively. Persistent positive QFT-GIT for 2 and 3 times correlated with increased hazard ratio for TB (14.44 and 20.29, respectively) compared with a single positive result (hazard ratio 10.38). Among those with 3 positive QFT-GIT results, TB development rate was 4.5% and incidence rate was 1352.3 per 100,000 person-years. In contrast, none of the incident TB occurred in those with initial positive and then negative conversion of QFT-GIT.In an area of intermediate TB incidence, dialysis patients have high TB risk. LTBI status is a good predictor of TB development, especially for those with more than 1 positive result. After excluding prevalent TB cases, serial follow-up of LTBI may narrow the target population to reduce treatment costs. PMID:27258523

  11. Monoamine releasers with varying selectivity for dopamine/norepinephrine versus serotonin release as candidate "agonist" medications for cocaine dependence: studies in assays of cocaine discrimination and cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Blough, B E; Baumann, M H; Rothman, R B

    2007-02-01

    Monoamine releasers constitute one class of drugs under investigation as candidate medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse. Promising preclinical and clinical results have been obtained with amphetamine, which has high selectivity for releasing dopamine/norepinephrine versus serotonin. However, use of amphetamine as a pharmacotherapy is complicated by its high abuse potential. Recent preclinical studies suggest that nonselective monoamine releasers or serotonin-selective releasers have lower abuse liability and may warrant evaluation as alternatives to amphetamine. To address this issue, the present study evaluated the effects of five monoamine releasers in assays of cocaine discrimination and cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys. The releasers varied along a continuum from dopamine/norepinephrine-selective to serotonin-selective [m-fluoroamphetamine (PAL-353), methamphetamine, m-methylamphetamine (PAL-314), 1-napthyl-2-aminopropane (PAL-287), fenfluramine]. In drug discrimination studies, rhesus monkeys were trained to discriminate saline from cocaine (0.4 mg/kg i.m.) in a two-key, food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Substitution for cocaine was positively associated with selectivity for dopamine/norepinephrine versus serotonin release. In drug self-administration studies, rhesus monkeys responded for cocaine (0.01 and 0.032 mg/kg/injection) and food (1-g pellets) under a second-order fixed-ratio 2 (variable-ratio 16:S) schedule. In general, monoamine releasers produced dose-dependent and sustained decreases in cocaine self-administration. However, the dopamine/norepinephrine-selective releasers decreased cocaine self-administration with minimal effects on food-maintained responding, whereas the more serotonin-selective releasers produced nonselective reductions in both cocaine- and food-maintained responding. These results are consistent with the conclusion that dopamine/norepinephrine-selective releasers retain cocaine-like abuse

  12. Clinical and diagnostic developments of a gamma interferon release assay for use in bovine tuberculosis control programs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently the Bovigam assay is used as an official supplemental test within the bovine tuberculosis eradication program. This assay measures interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) produced by lymphocytes in response to specific antigens. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate two Mycobacterium ...

  13. Accuracy of the interferon-gamma release assay for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Feng, Mei; Wan, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The best method for diagnosing tuberculous pleurisy (TP) remains controversial. Since a growing number of publications focus on the interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), we meta-analyzed the available evidence on the overall diagnostic performance of IGRA applied to pleural fluid and peripheral blood. Materials and Methods. PubMed and Embase were searched for relevant English papers up to October 31, 2014. Statistical analyses were performed using Stata and Meta-DiSc. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were count. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC) were used to summarize the overall diagnostic performance. Results. Fifteen publications met our inclusion criteria and were included in the meta analysis. The following pooled estimates for diagnostic parameters of pleural IGRA were obtained: sensitivity, 0.82 (95% CI [0.79–0.85]); specificity, 0.87 (95% CI [0.84–0.90]); PLR, 4.94 (95% CI [2.60–9.39]); NLR, 0.22 (95% CI [0.13–0.38]); PPV, 0.91 (95% CI [0.85–0.96]); NPV, 0.79 (95% CI [0.71–0.85]); DOR, 28.37 (95% CI [10.53–76.40]); and AUC, 0.91. The corresponding estimates for blood IGRA were as follows: sensitivity, 0.80 (95% CI [0.76–0.83]); specificity, 0.70 (95% CI [0.65–0.75]); PLR, 2.48 (95% CI [1.95–3.17]); NLR, 0.30 (95% CI [0.24–0.37]); PPV, 0.79 (95% CI [0.60–0.87]); NPV, 0.75 (95% CI [0.62–0.83]); DOR, 9.96 (95% CI [6.02–16.48]); and AUC, 0.89. Conclusions. This meta analysis suggested that pleural IGRA has potential for serving as a complementary method for diagnosing TP; however, its cost, high turn around time, and sub-optimal performance make it unsuitable as a stand-alone diagnostic tool. Better tests for the diagnosis of TP are required. PMID:26038718

  14. Performance of Interferon-Gamma and IP-10 Release Assays for Diagnosing Latent Tuberculosis Infections in Patients with Concurrent Malaria in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Drabe, Camilla H; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Helleberg, Marie; Nyagonde, Nyagonde; Rose, Michala V; Francis, Filbert; Theilgaard, Ola P; Asbjørn, Jens; Amos, Ben; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2016-04-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to detect cellular immune recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis The chemokine IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is an alternative diagnostic biomarker to IFN-γ. Several conditions interfere with IGRA test performance. We aimed to assess the possible influence of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the IGRA test QuantiFERON-TB GOLD® In-Tube (QFT) test and an in-house IP-10 release assay. In total, 241 Tanzanian adults were included; 184 patients with uncomplicated malaria (88 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] coinfected) and 57 HIV-infected patients without malaria infection. Malaria was treated with artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem®). QFT testing was performed before initiation of malaria treatment and at days 7 and 42. In total, 172 patients completed follow-up. IFN-γ and IP-10 was measured in QFT supernatants. We found that during malaria infection IFN-γ and IP-10 levels in the unstimulated samples were elevated, mitogen responsiveness was impaired, and CD4 cell counts were decreased. These alterations reverted after malaria treatment. Concurrent malaria infection did not affect QFT test results, whereas there were more indeterminate IP-10 results during acute malaria infection. We suggest that IGRA and IP-10 release assay results of malaria patients should be interpreted with caution and that testing preferably should be postponed until after malaria treatment. PMID:26834199

  15. A continuous fluorescence displacement assay for the measurement of phospholipase A2 and other lipases that release long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wilton, D C

    1990-01-01

    1. A new continuous fluorescence assay for phospholipase A2 is described which involves the displacement of the highly fluorescent fatty-acid probe 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid from rat liver fatty-acid-binding protein by long-chain fatty acids released as a result of phospholipase A2-catalysed hydrolysis of phospholipids. The initial rate of decrease in fluorescence is linearly related to enzyme activity. 2. The assay will detect enzyme activity down to about 10 pmol/min per ml and gives a linear response up to about 10 nmol/min per ml. 3. The assay will work with all phospholipids that have been tested including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol. Substrates carrying a net negative charge showed the highest rates of hydrolysis. 4. The assay will work, in principle, with an enzyme catalysing the release of long-chain fatty acids from a fatty-acylated substrate. This has been confirmed with pancreatic lipase and cholesterol esterase. PMID:2317197

  16. Determining optimal cytotoxic activity of human Her2neu specific CD8 T cells by comparing the Cr51 release assay to the xCELLigence system.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Courtney L; Henle, Andrea M; Knutson, Keith L

    2012-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8 T cells constitute a subgroup of T cells that are capable of inducing the death of infected or malignant host cells. These cells express a specialized receptor, called the T cell receptor (TCR), which can recognize a specific antigenic peptide bound to HLA class I molecules. Engagement of infected cells or tumor cells through their HLA class I molecule results in production of lytic molecules such as granzymes and perforin resulting in target cell death. While it is useful to determine frequencies of antigen-specific CD8 T cells using assays such as the ELIspot or flow cytometry, it is also helpful to ascertain the strength of CD8 T cell responses using cytotoxicity assays. The most recognizable assay for assessing cytotoxic function is the Chromium Release Assay (CRA), which is considered a standard assay. The CRA has several limitations, including exposure of cells to gamma radiation, lack of reproducibility, and a requirement for large numbers of cells. Over the past decade, there has been interest in adopting new strategies to overcome these limitations. Newer approaches include those that measure caspase release , BLT esterase activity and surface expression of CD107. The impedance-based assay, using the Roche xCelligence system, was examined in the present paper for its potential as an alternative to the CRA. Impedance or opposition to an electric current occurs when adherent tumor cells bind to electrode plates. Tumor cells detach following killing and electrical impedance is reduced which can be measured by the xCelligence system. The ability to adapt the impedance-based approach to assess cell-mediated killing rests on the observation that T cells do not adhere tightly to most surfaces and do not appear to have much impact on impedance thus diminishing any concern of direct interference of the T cells with the measurement. Results show that the impedance-based assay can detect changes in the levels of antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8 T cells

  17. International Society for Cellular Therapy perspective on immune functional assays for mesenchymal stromal cells as potency release criterion for advanced phase clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Jacques; Krampera, Mauro; Barrett, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Deans, Robert J; DeBruijn, Joost; Dominici, Massimo; Fibbe, Willem E; Gee, Adrian P; Gimble, Jeffery M; Hematti, Peiman; Koh, Mickey B C; LeBlanc, Katarina; Martin, Ivan; McNiece, Ian K; Mendicino, Michael; Oh, Steve; Ortiz, Luis; Phinney, Donald G; Planat, Valerie; Shi, Yufang; Stroncek, David F; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Weiss, Daniel J; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as a pharmaceutical for ailments characterized by pathogenic autoimmune, alloimmune and inflammatory processes now cover the spectrum of early- to late-phase clinical trials in both industry and academic sponsored studies. There is a broad consensus that despite different tissue sourcing and varied culture expansion protocols, human MSC-like cell products likely share fundamental mechanisms of action mediating their anti-inflammatory and tissue repair functionalities. Identification of functional markers of potency and reduction to practice of standardized, easily deployable methods of measurements of such would benefit the field. This would satisfy both mechanistic research as well as development of release potency assays to meet Regulatory Authority requirements for conduct of advanced clinical studies and their eventual registration. In response to this unmet need, the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) addressed the issue at an international workshop in May 2015 as part of the 21st ISCT annual meeting in Las Vegas. The scope of the workshop was focused on discussing potency assays germane to immunomodulation by MSC-like products in clinical indications targeting immune disorders. We here provide consensus perspective arising from this forum. We propose that focused analysis of selected MSC markers robustly deployed by in vitro licensing and metricized with a matrix of assays should be responsive to requirements from Regulatory Authorities. Workshop participants identified three preferred analytic methods that could inform a matrix assay approach: quantitative RNA analysis of selected gene products; flow cytometry analysis of functionally relevant surface markers and protein-based assay of secretome. We also advocate that potency assays acceptable to the Regulatory Authorities be rendered publicly accessible in an "open-access" manner, such as through publication or database collection. PMID:26724220

  18. International Society for Cellular Therapy perspective on immune functional assays for mesenchymal stromal cells as potency release criterion for advanced phase clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Jacques; Krampera, Mauro; Barrett, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Deans, Robert J.; Debruijn, Joost; Dominici, Massimo; Fibbe, Willem E.; Gee, Adrian P.; Gimble, Jeffery M.; Hematti, Peiman; Koh, Mickey B.C.; Leblanc, Katarina; Martin, Ivan; Mcniece, Ian K.; Mendicino, Michael; Oh, Steve; Ortiz, Luis; Phinney, Donald G.; Planat, Valerie; Shi, Yufang; Stroncek, David F.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Weiss, Daniel J.; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as a pharmaceutical for ailments characterized by pathogenic autoimmune, alloimmune and inflammatory processes now cover the spectrum of early- to late-phase clinical trials in both industry and academic sponsored studies. There is a broad consensus that despite different tissue sourcing and varied culture expansion protocols, human MSC-like cell products likely share fundamental mechanisms of action mediating their anti-inflammatory and tissue repair functionalities. Identification of functional markers of potency and reduction to practice of standardized, easily deployable methods of measurements of such would benefit the field. This would satisfy both mechanistic research as well as development of release potency assays to meet Regulatory Authority requirements for conduct of advanced clinical studies and their eventual registration. In response to this unmet need, the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) addressed the issue at an international workshop in May 2015 as part of the 21st ISCT annual meeting in Las Vegas. The scope of the workshop was focused on discussing potency assays germane to immunomodulation by MSC-like products in clinical indications targeting immune disorders. We here provide consensus perspective arising from this forum. We propose that focused analysis of selected MSC markers robustly deployed by in vitro licensing and metricized with a matrix of assays should be responsive to requirements from Regulatory Authorities. Workshop participants identified three preferred analytic methods that could inform a matrix assay approach: quantitative RNA analysis of selected gene products; flow cytometry analysis of functionally relevant surface markers and protein-based assay of secretome. We also advocate that potency assays acceptable to the Regulatory Authorities be rendered publicly accessible in an “open-access” manner, such as through publication or database collection. PMID:26724220

  19. Specific receptor for hydrazine: mapping the in situ release of hydrazine in live cells and in an in vitro enzymatic assay.

    PubMed

    Ali, Firoj; A, Anila H; Taye, Nandaraj; Mogare, Devraj G; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Das, Amitava

    2016-05-01

    We report a new chemodosimetric reagent capable of detecting hydrazine in the presence of several other competing amine derivatives and ionic analytes of biological relevance. This reagent has been utilized for real time monitoring of in situ N2H4 release during the metabolism of a crucial tuberculosis drug, isoniazid, in live HepG2 cells. The fluorescence response of the reagent based on its specific reaction with N2H4 is used for developing an in vitro assay for aminoacylase-1. PMID:27075169

  20. Iron oxide nanoparticles show no toxicity in the comet assay in lymphocytes: A promising vehicle as a nitric oxide releasing nanocarrier in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, R.; Oliveira, J. L.; Murakami, P. S. K.; Molina, M. A. M.; Itri, R.; Haddad, P.; Seabra, A. B.

    2013-04-01

    This work reports the synthesis and toxicological evaluation of surface modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as vehicles to carry and deliver nitric oxide (NO). The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was coated with two thiol-containing hydrophilic ligands: mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) or dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), leading to thiolated MNPs. Free thiols groups on the surface of MSA- or DMSA-MNPs were nitrosated leading to NO-releasing MNPs. The genotoxicity of thiolated-coated MNPs was evaluated towards human lymphocyte cells by the comet assay. No genotoxicity was observed due to exposure of human lymphocytes to MSA- or DMSA-MNPs, indicating that these nanovectors can be used as inert vehicles in drug delivery, in biomedical applications. On the other hand, NO-releasing MPNs showed genotoxicity and apoptotic activities towards human lymphocyte cell cultures. These results indicate that NO-releasing MNPs may result in important biomedical applications, such as the treatment of tumors, in which MNPs can be guided to the target site through the application of an external magnetic field, and release NO directly to the desired site of action.

  1. Excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk following administration of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen, /sup 99/Tc/sup m/-MAA and /sup 51/Cr-EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.; Nosslin, B.; Ahlgren, L.

    1981-06-01

    Very few biokinetic and dosimetric data for estimating the absorbed dose to a breast-feeding child are available in the literature. The few available are usually case reports. We have measured the activity concentration in breast milk from one patient after administration of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen, from two patients after administration of /sup 99/Tc/sup m/-macroaggregated albumin, and from one patient after administration of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA. We have compared our data with earlier published results and estimated the absorbed dose to the breast-feeding child using biokinetic data presented in this work and recently published S-values for new-born children.

  2. Effect of background region of interest and time-interval selection on glomerular filtration ratio estimation by percentage dose uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA in comparison with (51)Cr-EDTA clearance in healthy cats.

    PubMed

    Debruyn, Katrien; Vandermeulen, Eva; Saunders, Jimmy H; Dobbeleir, André A; Ham, Hamphrey R; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2013-08-01

    Evaluation of glomerular function is a useful part of the diagnostic approach in animals suspected of having renal disease. Time-interval and background region of interest (bg ROI) selection are determining factors when calculating the glomerular filtration ratio (GFR) based on percentage uptake of (99m)technetium-labelled diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA). Therefore, three different time intervals (60-120 s, 120-180 s, 60-180 s) and three different bg ROIs (C-shape, caudolateral, cranial + caudal) were investigated. In addition, global GFRs based on percentage dose uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA for the different time-intervals and bg ROIs were compared with the global GFR based on (51)chromium-ethylene diaminic tetra-acetic acid ((51)Cr-EDTA) plasma clearance in nine healthy European domestic shorthair cats. Paired Student's t-tests and linear regression analysis were used to analyse the data. Different time intervals seemed to cause significant variation (P <0.01) in absolute GFR values, regardless of the choice of bg ROI. Significant differences (P <0.01) between bg ROIs were only observed in the 120-180s time interval between the C-shape and cranial + caudal bg ROI, and between the caudolateral and cranial + caudal bg ROI. The caudolateral bg ROI in the 60-180 s time interval showed the highest correlation coefficient (r = 0.882) between (99m)Tc-DTPA and (51)Cr-EDTA, although a significant difference (P <0.05) was present between both techniques. PMID:23349527

  3. Discrimination of the toxic potential of chemically differing topical glucocorticoids using a neutral red release assay with human keratinocytes and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Hülsebus, E; Kerscher, M; Greber, R; Schäfer-Korting, M

    1995-07-01

    In inflammatory skin disease, hydrocortisone and prednisolone double esters are about equipotent to conventional medium potency topical glucocorticoids, such as betamethasone valerate. Local adverse effects, in particular skin atrophy, are a potential problem with topical glucocorticoids. Recently, cell cultures have shown promise as a means of assessing local tolerance. To investigate the toxic potential of hydrocortisone, hydrocortisone-17-butyrate, hydrocortisone aceponate, prednicarbate, triamcinolone acetonide, betamethasone valerate and desoximethasone, human keratinocytes and fibroblasts were exposed to these agents in vitro, using a modified neutral red release assay. In addition, the morphology of these cells was assessed by light microscopy. Although all the topical glucocorticoids tested proved toxic to both cell types, there were major differences between glucocorticoids in their effect on fibroblasts. Hydrocortisone and the non-halogenated double-ester-type glucocorticoids were less toxic than the conventional medium potency topical glucocorticoids tested (betamethasone valerate and desoximethasone). In particular, hydrocortisone aceponate was less toxic than betamethasone valerate (P < or = 0.05). In general, the effect of topical glucocorticoids on the cells, based on neutral red release, was more marked with keratinocytes than with fibroblasts. Although the ranking order with respect to the toxic potential was similar, a clear-cut difference was not observed between non-halogenated double-ester-type glucocorticoids and betamethasone valerate. Morphological changes due to glucocorticoid exposure followed the same pattern with both keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The neutral red release assay is able to discriminate between the cytotoxic effects of chemically differing topical glucocorticoids on human keratinocytes and fibroblasts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7669640

  4. Evaluation of the Immune Response to Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Among BCG Vaccinated Children in East of Egypt: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Beshir, Mohamed Refaat; Zidan, Alaa Ebrahim; El-Saadny, Hosam Fathi; Ramadan, Raghdaa Abdelaziz; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Amin, Ezzat Kamel; Mohamed, Marwa Zakaria; Abdelsamad, Nahla Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) vaccination is used routinely in most of countries, especially developing one. The efficacy of the BCG vaccination generally decreases with time. The tuberculin skin test (TST) is a most popular diagnostic test for suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) in children till now, but it has many false positives. The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is more specific than TST for detection of childhood TB, as it is more specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Evaluate the interferon gamma response and TST reaction in BCG vaccinated children in east of Egypt.150 children were included in the study aged 1 month to 12 years; the collected data from the children included, full history taking, clinical examination, examination for the presence or absence of BCG scar under direct light. All the children had performed TST, IGRA.TST was done for all studied group reveal 51.3% with size of reaction <5 mm, 39.3% with size of reaction = 5 to 9 mm while 9.3% with size of reaction ≥10 mm. Mean size of reaction was 4.07 mm. Interferon gamma release assay was done for all studied group reveal 5 children (3.3%) with positive test. There was significant difference between the size of TST reaction and age (P < 0.01) with old children were more frequent to show positive reaction. Also, children with age range 1 month to 1 year were frequently have negative IGRA test, while children with age range 4 years to 12 years were frequently have positive test (P < 0.01). There was moderate agreement between IGRA and TST results (Kappa [κ] = 0.475). With high agreement between IGRA and TST results in children with absent BCG scar (κ = 1000).Therefore, Interferon gamma release assays have higher specificity and lower cross-reactions with BCG vaccination and nontuberculous Mycobacteraie than TST. PMID:27124042

  5. Evaluation of the Immune Response to Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Among BCG Vaccinated Children in East of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Mohamed Refaat; Zidan, Alaa Ebrahim; El-Saadny, Hosam Fathi; Ramadan, Raghdaa Abdelaziz; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Amin, Ezzat Kamel; Mohamed, Marwa Zakaria; Abdelsamad, Nahla Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) vaccination is used routinely in most of countries, especially developing one. The efficacy of the BCG vaccination generally decreases with time. The tuberculin skin test (TST) is a most popular diagnostic test for suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) in children till now, but it has many false positives. The interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) is more specific than TST for detection of childhood TB, as it is more specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Evaluate the interferon gamma response and TST reaction in BCG vaccinated children in east of Egypt. 150 children were included in the study aged 1 month to 12 years; the collected data from the children included, full history taking, clinical examination, examination for the presence or absence of BCG scar under direct light. All the children had performed TST, IGRA. TST was done for all studied group reveal 51.3% with size of reaction <5 mm, 39.3% with size of reaction = 5 to 9 mm while 9.3% with size of reaction ≥10 mm. Mean size of reaction was 4.07 mm. Interferon gamma release assay was done for all studied group reveal 5 children (3.3%) with positive test. There was significant difference between the size of TST reaction and age (P < 0.01) with old children were more frequent to show positive reaction. Also, children with age range 1 month to 1 year were frequently have negative IGRA test, while children with age range 4 years to 12 years were frequently have positive test (P < 0.01). There was moderate agreement between IGRA and TST results (Kappa [κ] = 0.475). With high agreement between IGRA and TST results in children with absent BCG scar (κ = 1000). Therefore, Interferon gamma release assays have higher specificity and lower cross-reactions with BCG vaccination and nontuberculous Mycobacteraie than TST. PMID:27124042

  6. Measurement of HCV-Specific CD8(+) Cytotoxic T-Cell Activities in the Peripheral Blood by Europium Release Assay.

    PubMed

    Imawari, M

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) contain NK cells, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL), helper T-cells, and B-cells that respond to viral infection and act to eliminate the virus from infected individuals. CTLs are not only thought to be a major host defense against viral infection, but are also implicated in the immunopathogenesis. Classical CTLs are CD8(+) and recognize endogenously synthesized and processed antigen in association with a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecule. The antigens are usually 8-10 amino acids long. HCV-specific CTLs have been demonstrated in the peripheral blood of some of patients with HCV infection by stimulating PBMC with the HCV synthetic peptides (1). The peptides were synthesized as overlapping peptides to encompass a certain region of the HCV antigen (1), on the basis of antigenicity prediction from the amino acid composition of HCV (2), or on the basis of the HLA binding motifs in the HCV antigen (3). Several minimal and optimal epitopes in the HCV antigen and their HLA restriction of recognition by CTLs have been defined. Recently, it has been reported that HCV-specific CTLs may suppress the outgrowth of HCV (4). In this chapter, methods will be discussed that demonstrate HCV-specific CTLs in the peripheral blood of patients with HCV infection. We use nonradioisotope europium (Eu) for assay of CTL activities. PMID:21374383

  7. Tuberculosis screening of new hospital employees: compliance, clearance to work time, and cost using tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Foster-Chang, Sarah A; Manning, Mary L; Chandler, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Selection of the most suitable test(s) for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection should be based on purpose, setting, effectiveness, and cost. Two tests are available to screen for latent TB: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the more recent interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs). Based on the administrative, logistic, and technical ease of use, an IGRA trial was initiated by the occupational health department at an urban Veteran's Administration health care facility for TB screening of new employees. As a result, new employees completing the pre-placement process within the organization's designated 14 days increased from 77% to 97%, new employee clearance to work time decreased from 13.18 to 5.91 days, and new employee TB screening costs were reduced by 40%. The IGRA is an acceptable alternative to the TST and has significant potential to improve the process of pre-placement TB screening. PMID:25207587

  8. From Space to the Patient: A New Cytokine Release Assay to Monitor the Immune Status of HIV Infected Patients and Sepsis Patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, I.; Draenert, R.; Gruber, M.; Feuerecker, M.; Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S. L.; Roider, J.; Pierson, D. L.; Briegel, J. M.; Schelling, G.; Sams, C. F.; Chouker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of humans either in the healthy men under extreme environmental stress like space flight, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients or in sepsis is of critical importance with regard to the timing of adequate therapeutic (counter-)measures. The in vivo skin delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH) served for many years as a tool to evaluate cell mediated immunity. However, this standardised in vivo test was removed from the market in 2002 due to the risk of antigen stabilization. To the best of our knowledge an alternative test as monitoring tool to determine cell mediated immunity is not available so far. For this purpose we tested a new alternative assay using elements of the skin DTH which is based on an ex vivo cytokine release from whole blood and asked if it is suitable and applicable to monitor immune changes in HIV infected patients and in patients with septic shock.

  9. A survey of monitoring and assay systems for release of metals from radiation controlled areas at LANL.

    SciTech Connect

    Gruetzmacher, K. M.; MacArthur, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

  10. Discordance of Tuberculin Skin Test and Interferon Gamma Release Assay in Recently Exposed Household Contacts of Pulmonary TB Cases in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Rodrigo; Kim, Soyeon; Coelho da Silva, Flávia Dias; Uzelac, Aleksandra; Collins, Lauren; Palaci, Moíses; Alland, David; Dietze, Reynaldo; Ellner, Jerrold J.; Jones-López, Edward; Salgame, Padmini

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) such as the Quantiferon Gold In-tube test are in vitro assays that measure IFN-γ release from T cells in response to M. tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific antigens. Unlike the tuberculin skin test (TST), IGRA is specific and able to distinguish Mtb-infection from BCG vaccination. In this study we evaluated the concordance between TST and IGRA and the efficacy of IGRA in diagnosing new Mtb infection in household contacts (HHC) of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases. A total of 357 HHC of TB cases in Vitória, Brazil were studied. A TST was performed within 2 weeks following enrollment of the HHC and if negative a second TST was performed at 8-12 weeks. HHC were categorized as initially TST positive (TST+), persistently TST negative (TST-), or TST converters (TSTc), the latter representative of new infection. IGRA was performed at 8–12 weeks following enrollment and the test results were positive in 82% of TST+, 48% of TSTc, and 12% of TST-, indicating poor concordance between the two test results among HHC in each category. Evaluating CXCL10 levels in a subset of IGRA supernatants or lowering the IGRA cutoff value to define a positive test increased agreement between TST and IGRA test results. However, ROC curves demonstrated that this resulted in a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity of IGRA with respect to TST. Together, the findings suggest that until the basis for the discordance between TST and IGRA is fully understood, it may be necessary to utilize both tests to diagnose new Mtb infection in recently exposed HHC. Operationally, in IGRA negative HHC, it may be useful to employ a lower cutoff value for IGRA to allow closer monitoring for potential conversion. PMID:24819060

  11. In Vitro Immunomodulation of a Whole Blood IFN-γ Release Assay Enhances T Cell Responses in Subjects with Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Rajiv L.; Suhosk, Megan M.; Banaei, Niaz

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of innate immunity via pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) modulates adaptive immune responses. PRR ligands are being exploited as vaccine adjuvants and as therapeutics, but their utility in diagnostics has not been explored. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are functional T cell assays used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI); however, novel approaches are needed to improve their sensitivity. Methods In vitro immunomodulation of a whole blood IGRA (QuantiFERON®-TB GOLD In-Tube) with Toll-like receptor agonists poly(I:C), LPS, and imiquimod was performed on blood from subjects with LTBI and negative controls. Results In vitro immunomodulation significantly enhanced the response of T cells stimulated with M. tuberculosis antigens from subjects with LTBI but not from uninfected controls. Immunomodulation of IGRA revealed T cell responses in subjects with LTBI whose T cells otherwise do not respond to in vitro stimulation with antigens alone. Similar to their in vivo functions, addition of poly(I:C) and LPS to whole blood induced secretion of inflammatory cytokines and IFN-α and enhanced the surface expression of antigen presenting and costimulatory molecules on antigen presenting cells. Conclusions In vitro immunomodulation of whole blood IGRA may be an effective strategy for enhancing the sensitivity of T cells for diagnosis of LTBI. PMID:23144722

  12. A seed coat bedding assay shows that RGL2-dependent release of abscisic acid by the endosperm controls embryo growth in Arabidopsis dormant seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Pyo; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Turecková, Veronika; Strnad, Miroslav; Lopez-Molina, Luis

    2010-11-01

    Seed dormancy is an ecologically important adaptive trait in plants whereby germination is repressed even under favorable germination conditions such as imbibition with water. In Arabidopsis and most plant species, dormancy absolutely requires an unidentified seed coat germination-repressive activity and constitutively higher abscisic acid (ABA) levels upon seed imbibition. The mechanisms underlying these processes and their possible relationship are incompletely understood. We developed a "seed coat bedding" assay monitoring the growth of dissected embryos cultured on a layer of seed coats, allowing combinatorial experiments using dormant, nondormant, and various genetically modified seed coat and embryonic materials. This assay, combined with direct ABA measurements, revealed that, upon imbibition, dormant coats, unlike nondormant coats, actively produce and release ABA to repress embryo germination, whatever the embryo origin, i.e., from dormant, nondormant, or never dormant aba seeds, unable to synthesize ABA. The persistent high ABA levels in imbibed dormant seeds requires the permanent expression of the DELLA gene RGL2, where it remains insensitive to gibberellins (GA) unlike in nondormant seeds. These findings present the seed coat as an organ actively controlling germination upon seed imbibition and provide a framework to investigate how environmental factors break seed dormancy. PMID:20956298

  13. Sensitivity of IFN-γ Release Assay to Detect Latent Tuberculosis Infection Is Retained in HIV-Infected Patients but Dependent on HIV/AIDS Progression

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Farba; Mbow, Fatou; Fletcher, Helen; Senghor, Cheikh S.; Coulibaly, Koura D.; LeFevre, Andrea M.; Ngom Gueye, Ndeye F.; Dieye, Tandakha; Sow, Papa S.; Mboup, Souleymane; Lienhardt, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Detection and treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI) in HIV infected individuals is strongly recommended to decrease morbidity and mortality in countries with high levels of HIV. Objective To assess the validity of a newly developed in-house ELISPOT interferon-γ release assay (IGRA) for the detection of LTBI amongst HIV infected individuals, in comparison with the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST). Methodology/Principal Findings ESAT6/CFP10 (EC) ELISPOT assays were performed, together with a TST, in 285 HIV infected individuals recruited in HIV clinics in Dakar, Senegal, who had no signs of active TB at time of enrolment. Thirty eight of the subjects (13.3%) failed to respond to PHA stimulation and were excluded from the analysis. In the 247 remaining patients, response to PHA did not vary according to CD4 cell count categories (p = 0.51). EC ELISPOT was positive in 125 (50.6%) subjects, while 53 (21.5%) had a positive TST. Concordance between EC ELISPOT and TST was observed in 151 patients (61.1%) (kappa = 0.23). The proportion of subjects with a positive response to the EC ELISPOT assay decreased with declining CD4 counts (p trend = 0.001), but were consistently higher than the proportion of TST responders. In multivariate analysis, the risk of being EC-ELISPOT positive in HIV infected individuals was associated with age, CD4 count and HIV-1 strain. Conclusion Our study indicates that IGRAs using M. tuberculosis specific antigens are likely to retain their validity for the diagnosis of LTBI among HIV positive individuals, but may be impaired by T-cell anergy in severely immuno-suppressed individuals. PMID:18197251

  14. Comparison of cytomegalovirus (CMV) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot and CMV quantiferon gamma interferon-releasing assays in assessing risk of CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Abate, Davide; Saldan, Alda; Mengoli, Carlo; Fiscon, Marta; Silvestre, Cristina; Fallico, Loredana; Peracchi, Marta; Furian, Lucrezia; Cusinato, Riccardo; Bonfante, Luciana; Rossi, Barbara; Marchini, Francesco; Sgarabotto, Dino; Rigotti, Paolo; Palù, Giorgio

    2013-08-01

    Assessing cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) represents an appealing strategy for identifying transplant recipients at risk of infection. In this study, we compared two gamma interferon-releasing assays (IGRAs), Quantiferon-CMV and CMV enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT), to determine the ability of each test to predict protective CMV-specific T-cell responses. Two hundred twenty-one Quantiferon-CMV and ELISPOT tests were conducted on 120 adult kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), including 100 CMV-seropositive transplant recipients (R+) and 20 CMV-seronegative transplant recipients of a CMV-positive donor (D+/R-). As a control cohort, 39 healthy adult subjects (including 33 CMV-seropositive and 6 CMV-seronegative subjects) were enrolled. CMV IgG serology was used as a reference for both tests. In the CMV-seropositive individuals, the ELISPOT and Quantiferon-CMV assays provided 46% concordance with the serology, 12% discordance, 18% disagreement between ELISPOT or Quantiferon-CMV and the serology, and 24% gray areas when one or both tests resulted in weak positives. None of the CMV-seronegative subjects showed detectable responses in the ELISPOT or the Quantiferon-CMV test. In transplant recipients, both the ELISPOT and Quantiferon-CMV assays positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with CMV DNAemia in a significant way (P<0.05). During the antiviral prophylaxis, all 20 D+/R- KTRs we examined displayed undetectable Quantiferon-CMV and ELISPOT results, and there was no evidence of CMV seroconversion. The receiving operator curve (ROC) statistical analysis revealed similar specificities and sensitivities in predicting detectable viremia (areas under the curve [AUC], 0.66 and 0.62 for Quantiferon-CMV and ELISPOT, respectively). ELISPOT and Quantiferon-CMV values of >150 spots/200,000 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and >1 to 6 IU gamma interferon (IFN-γ) were associated with protection from CMV

  15. Should all patients undergoing treatment with biologic agents be screened annually for latent tuberculosis infection with an interferon gamma release assay?

    PubMed

    Johnson, M G; Bialas, R W; Hall, R P; Stout, J E

    2016-08-01

    Systemic biologic therapy has become commonplace for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory dermatologic conditions, particularly psoriasis. Screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is recommended prior to initiation of systemic biologic agents, and an interferon gamma release assays (IGRA) is often used as the screening modality. Annual screening for LTBI is also recommended for patients while on systemic biologic therapy, but the literature does not clearly support how often screening should be performed. In addition, serial testing with IGRAs, particularly among low-risk populations without any new tuberculosis (TB) exposures, has proven to be unreliable with frequent reversions and conversions. We propose that in low-incidence TB regions, repeat LTBI screening should only be considered for patients on systemic biologic therapy if any new TB exposures occurred since initial LTBI screening was performed prior to starting biologic therapy. This strategy aims to reduce false-positive LTBI testing that can expose patients to hazardous antibiotics and result in the unnecessary interruption of systemic biologic therapy. PMID:26652171

  16. Absorption of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene and dieldrin in largemouth bass from a 60-D slow-release pellet and detection using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method for blood plasma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muller, Jennifer K.; Sepulveda, Maria S.; Borgert, Christopher J.; Gross, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes the uptake of two organochlorine pesticides from slow-release pellets by largemouth bass and the utility of a blood plasma enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for exposure verification. We measured blood and tissue levels by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by a novel ELISA method, and present a critical comparison of the results.

  17. Evaluation of the Prognostic Value of IFN-γ Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test in Household Contacts of Infectious Tuberculosis Cases in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Lienhardt, Christian; Fielding, Katherine; Hane, Abdoul A.; Niang, Aliou; Ndao, Cheikh T.; Karam, Farba; Fletcher, Helen; Mbow, Fatou; Gomis, Jules-François; Diadhiou, Roger; Toupane, Maxime; Dieye, Tandakha; Mboup, Souleymane

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemoprophylaxis of contacts of infectious tuberculosis (TB) cases is recommended for TB control, particularly in endemic countries, but is hampered by the difficulty to diagnose latent TB infection (LTBI), classically assessed through response to the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST). Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) are proposed new tools to diagnose LTBI, but there are limited data on their ability to predict the development of active TB disease. To address this, we investigated the response to TST and IGRA in household contacts of infectious TB cases in a TB high-burden country and the potential correlation with development of TB. Methodology/Principal Findings Prospective household contacts study conducted in two health centres in Dakar, Senegal. A total of 2679 household contacts of 206 newly detected smear and/or culture positive index TB cases aged 18 years or greater were identified A TST was performed in each contact and an ESAT6/CFP10 ELISPOT assay performed in a random sample of those. Contacts were followed-up for 24 months. TB was diagnosed in 52 contacts, an incidence rate of 9.27/1000 person-years. In univariable analysis, the presence of positive TST (≥10 mm) and ELISPOT (>32 SFC/million PBMC) responses at baseline were associated with active TB during follow-up: Rate Ratio [RR] = 2.32 (95%CI:1.12–4.84) and RR = 2.09 (95%CI:0.83–5.31), respectively. After adjustment for age, sex and proximity to index case, adjusted RRs were 1.51 (95%CI:0.71–3.19) and 1.98 (95%CI:0.77–5.09), respectively. Restricting analysis to the 40 microbiologically confirmed cases, the adjusted RR for positive ELISPOT was 3.61 (95%CI:1.03–12.65). The median ELISPOT response in contacts who developed TB was 5-fold greater than in those who did not develop TB (p = 0.02). Conclusions/Significance TST and IGRAs are markers of a contact of the immune system with tubercle bacilli. In a TB endemic area, a high ELISPOT response may reflect increased

  18. Combined Antigen-Specific Interferon-γ and Interleukin-2 Release Assay (FluoroSpot) for the Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chesov, Dumitru; Lange, Christoph; Daduna, Franziska; Crudu, Valeriu; Preyer, Rosemarie; Ernst, Martin; Kalsdorf, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ secreting T-cells in parallel for the differentiation of latent infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) from active tuberculosis. Methods Following ex-vivo stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with M. tuberculosis-specific antigens early secretory antigenic target (ESAT)-6 and culture filtrate protein (CFP)-10, immune responses were assessed by enzyme-linked immunospot IFN-γ release assay (EliSpot-IGRA) and a novel dual cytokine detecting fluorescence-linked immunospot (FluoroSpot) in 18 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, 10 persons with previously cured tuberculosis, 25 individuals with LTBI and 16 healthy controls. Results Correlation of IFN- γ+ spot-forming cells in EliSpot-IGRA and FluoroSpot were R2 = 0.67 for ESAT-6 and R2 = 0.73 for CFP-10. The number of IL-2- IFN- γ+ producing cells was higher in patients with tuberculosis compared with past tuberculosis (CFP-10-induced p = 0.0068) or individuals with LTBI (ESAT-6-induced p = 0.0136). A cutoff value of >16 CFP-10-induced IFN-γ+ secreting cells/200.000 PBMC in the EliSpot-IGRA discriminated with highest sensitivity and specificity (89% and 76%, respectively). However, overlap in cytokine responses precludes distinction between the cohorts on an individual basis. Conclusions Combined analysis of IFN-γ and IL-2 secretion by antigen specific T-cells does not allow a reliable differentiation between different states of M. tuberculosis infection in clinical practice. PMID:25785445

  19. HLA-G1-transfected K562 cells do not inhibit NK-cell-mediated lysis in europium release cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Sapak, M; Buc, M

    2003-01-01

    The class Ia of HLA molecules are recognised by NK-cells either by inhibitory or stimulatory NK-receptors. When inhibitory signals prevail over stimulatoryones, the target cells expressing the class Ia of HLA molecules are not lysed by NK-cells. Similarly, class Ib of HLA molecules have been reported to induce the inhibitory signal in NK-cells. The cell line K562 is deprived of both class Ia and class Ib of HLA molecules, respectively, the fact of which enhances the lysis of K562 cells when they are co-cultivated with NK-cells. To study the role of HLA-G molecules in NK-cell cytotoxic activity, HLA-G tranfected K562 cells were used as target cells. NK-cells were isolated from the peripheral blood of 4 unrelated persons using Miltenyi's Biotec isolation system. The purity of directly isolated NK cells (CD56 Multisort kit) was 74.1%, and that of indirectly isolated NK-cells (NK-cell isolation kit) 69.4%. The europium release cytotoxicity assay was used in all experiments. The percentage of cytotoxicity ranged from 19% to 24% when K562 target cells were used. Similar results were obtained with the HLA-G1-transfected target cells: the percentage of cytotoxicity ranged from 17% to 29%. Our preliminary results indicate that NK-cells are able to lyse both, K562 cells and the HLA-G1-transfected K562 cells. (Tab. 1, Fig. 8, Ref. 21.). PMID:15055728

  20. Added Value of Long-Term Cytokine Release Assays to Detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in HIV-Infected Subjects in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Dirix, Violette; Schepers, Kinda; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Worodria, William; Colebunders, Robert; Singh, Mahavir; Locht, Camille; Kestens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether mycobacterial antigen–induced cytokine secretions are helpful in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection in a cohort of HIV-infected patients living in a country with a high burden of Mtb and HIV infections, and to determine their predictive value for the development of tuberculosis (TB)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Design: A total of 352 HIV-infected patients (186 with active TB) were prospectively enrolled when initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Sequential blood samples were collected during the first 6 months of ART. Eighty-three HIV-uninfected subjects (39 with active TB) were enrolled as controls. Methods: The concentrations of 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants from blood mononuclear cells in vitro stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) or early secreted antigen-6 (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10), and results were compared with those of tuberculin skin tests (TST). Results: The best detection of Mtb infection was achieved by ESAT-6/CFP-10–induced interferon-γ concentrations, but results were often negative for patients with CD4+ T-cell counts <50 per cubic millimeters. Patients with active TB were identified by high ESAT-6/CFP-10–induced interleukin-6. Conversions of interferon-γ-release assays (IGRA) and TST occurred under ART, and combined TB and antiretroviral treatments of coinfected patients resulted in a decrease of ESAT-6/CFP-10–induced and an increase of HBHA-induced interferon-γ responses. No Mtb antigen–induced cytokines allowed us to predict TB–immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome or ART-associated TB. Conclusions: In Uganda, ESAT-6/CFP-10–IGRA is better in detecting Mtb infection than TST and, when combined with an HBHA–IGRA, could help to evaluate anti-TB treatment success. PMID:27306506

  1. Body Fluid Interferon-γ Release Assay for Diagnosis of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Ya-Lan; Zhai, Kan; Shi, Huan-Zhong; Tong, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is difficult. In recent years, T-cell interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) are widely used in diagnosing tuberculosis. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of body fluid IGRAs in diagnosing EPTB. The PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane bibliographies were searched for English language articles. 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of body fluid IGRAs for diagnosing EPTB were 0.87 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83–0.92] and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.79–0.90), respectively. For the fluid T-SPOT.TB, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.88–0.95) and 0.85 (95% CI: 0.78–0.91), respectively. The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of the fluid T-SPOT.TB was 46.99 (95% CI: 13.69–161.28) for tuberculosis pleurisy, 26.46 (95% CI: 11.38–61.56) for tuberculosis peritonitis, and 97.86 (95% CI: 25.31–378.45) for tuberculosis meningitis. The application of T-SPOT. TB in the diagnosis of EPTB performed better in the body fluid than in the blood. The diagnostic values of the fluid T-SPOT.TB varied for different fluid categories. However, the utility of T-SPOT.TB was limited due to its suboptimal accuracy and higher cost compared with conventional tests. PMID:26503802

  2. Screening of latent tuberculosis infection by interferon-γ release assays in rheumatic patients: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Qiaoling; Zhang, Shu; Ai, Jingwen; Shao, Lingyun; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic value of interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients with rheumatic disease before receiving biologic agents. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were used for searching studies concerning the evaluation on the performance of IGRAs [QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB] in rheumatic patients before biological therapy. After assessing the quality of all studies included in the review, we summarized the results in subgroups using forest plots and calculated pooled estimates if applicable. The search identified 11 studies with a total sample size of 1940 individuals. Compared with the tuberculin skin test (TST), the pooled agreements in QFT-G/GIT and T-SPOT.TB were 72 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 65, 78 %) and 75 % (95 % CI 67, 83 %), respectively. BCG vaccination was positively correlated with positive rates of TST (pooled odds ratio (OR) 1.64, 95 % CI 1.06, 2.53). Compared with TST, IGRAs were better associated with the presentence of one or more tuberculosis (TB) risk factors. Neither steroid nor disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) significantly affect positive IGRA results. In contrast, TST positivity was significantly impacted by the use of steroid (pooled OR 0.45, 95 % CI 0.30, 0.69), but less significantly by the use of DMARDs (pooled OR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.50, 1.21). In conclusion, in rheumatic patients with previous BCG vaccination or currently on steroid therapy, IGRAs would be the better choice to identify LTBI by decreasing the false-positivity and false-negativity rate compared with conventional TST. PMID:25376466

  3. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis outbreak in an Italian prison: tolerance of pyrazinamide plus levofloxacin prophylaxis and serial interferon gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Bedini, A; Garlassi, E; Stentarelli, C; Petrella, S; Meacci, M; Meccugni, B; Meschiari, M; Franceschini, E; Cerri, S; Brasacchio, A; Rumpianesi, F; Richeldi, L; Mussini, C

    2016-07-01

    The optimal treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in subjects exposed to multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) remains unclear, and the change in response of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QTB-IT) test during and after treatment is unknown. Between May 2010 and August 2010, 39 prisoners at the 'Casa Circondariale' of Modena, Italy, were exposed to a patient with active pulmonary MDR TB. All contacts were tested with the tuberculin skin test and QTB-IT. Upon exclusion of active TB, subjects positive to both tests were offered 6 months' treatment with pyrazinamide (PZA) and levofloxacin (LVX). QTB-IT testing was repeated at 3 and 6 months after initial testing in all subjects who were offered LTBI treatment. Seventeen (43.5%) of 39 subjects tested positive to both tuberculin skin test and QTB-IT test, and 12 (70.5%) agreed to receive therapy with PZA and LVX at standard doses. Only five (41.6%) of 12 subjects completed 6 months' treatment. Reasons for discontinuation were asymptomatic hepatitis, gastritis and diarrhoea. The QTB-IT values decreased in all subjects who completed the treatment, in two (33%) of six of those who received treatment for less than 3 months and in one (50%) of two patients who discontinued therapy after 3 months. The QTB-IT test results never turned negative. Despite the small number of subjects, the study confirmed that PZA plus LVX is a poorly tolerated option for MDR LTBI treatment. We observed a large degree of variation in the results of the QTB-IT test results among participants. The study confirmed that the interferon gamma release assay is not a reliable tool for monitoring the treatment of MDR LTBI in clinical practice. PMID:27222718

  4. Use of a T cell interferon gamma release assay in the investigation for suspected active tuberculosis in a low prevalence area

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In settings with low background prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) infection, interferon-γ release assays (IGRA) could be useful for diagnosing active TB. This study aims to evaluate the performance of QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-G) in the investigation for suspected active TB, with particular attention to patients originating in high-incidence countries. Furthermore, factors associated with QFT-G results in patients with active TB were assessed. Methods From patients investigated for clinically suspected active TB, blood was obtained for QFT-G testing, in addition to routine investigations. Positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values for QFT-G were calculated, comparing patients with confirmed TB and those with other final diagnoses. QFT-G results in TB patients originating from countries with intermediate or high TB incidence were compared with QFT-G results from a control group of recently arrived asymptomatic immigrants from high-incidence countries. Factors associated with QFT-G outcome in patients with confirmed TB were assessed. Results Among 141 patients, 41/70 (58.6%) with confirmed TB had a positive QFT-G test, compared to 16/71 (22.6%) patients with other final diagnoses, resulting in overall PPV of 71.9% and NPV of 67.6%. For patients with pulmonary disease, PPV and NPV were 61.1% and 67.7%, respectively, and 90.5% and 66.7% for subjects with extrapulmonary manifestations. Comparing patients from high-incidence countries with controls yielded a PPV for active TB of 76.7%, and a NPV of 82.7%. Patients with confirmed TB and positive QFT-G results were characterized by a lower median peripheral white blood cell count (5.9 × 109/L vs. 8.8 × 109/L; P < 0.001) and a higher median body mass index (22.7 vs. 20.7; P = 0.043) as compared to QFT-G-negative TB patients. Conclusion The overall PPV and NPV of QFT-G for identifying active TB were unsatisfactory, especially for pulmonary disease. Thus, the usefulness of QFT-G for this purpose is

  5. Comparison of Interferon-γ Release Assay to Two Cut-Off Points of Tuberculin Skin Test to Detect Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Primary Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fernanda Mattos; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; Pinheiro, Jair dos Santos; Peres, Renata Lyrio; Lacerda, Thamy Carvalho; Loureiro, Rafaela Borge; Carvalho, Jose Américo; Fregona, Geisa; Dias, Elias Santos; Cosme, Lorrayne Beliqui; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Riley, Lee Wood; Maciel, Ethel Leonor Noia

    2014-01-01

    Background An interferon-γ release assay, QuantiFERON-TB (QFT) test, has been introduced an alternative test for the diagnosis of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Here, we compared the performance of QFT with tuberculin skin test (TST) measured at two different cut-off points among primary health care work (HCW) in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among HCWs in four Brazilian cities with a known history of high incidence of TB. Results of the QFT were compared to TST results based on both ≥5 mm and ≥10 mm as cut-off points. Results We enrolled 632 HCWs. When the cut-off value of ≥10 mm was used, agreement between QFT and TST was 69% (k = 0.31), and when the cut-off of ≥5 mm was chosen, the agreement was 57% (k = 0.22). We investigated possible factors of discordance of TST vs QFT. Compared to the TST−/QFT− group, risk factors for discordance in the TST+/QFT− group with TST cut-off of ≥5 mm included age between 41–45 years [OR = 2.70; CI 95%: 1.32–5.51] and 46–64 years [OR = 2.04; CI 95%: 1.05–3.93], BCG scar [OR = 2.72; CI 95%: 1.40–5.25], and having worked only in primary health care [OR = 2.30; CI 95%: 1.09–4.86]. On the other hand, for the cut-off of ≥10 mm, BCG scar [OR = 2.26; CI 95%: 1.03–4.91], being a household contact of a TB patient [OR = 1.72; CI 95%: 1.01–2.92] and having had a previous TST [OR = 1.66; CI 95%: 1.05–2.62], were significantly associated with the TST+/QFT− group. No statistically significant associations were found among the TST−/QFT+ discordant group with either TST cut-off value. Conclusions Although we identified BCG vaccination to contribute to the discordance at both TST cut-off measures, the current Brazilian recommendation for the initiation of LTBI treatment, based on information gathered from medical history, TST, chest radiograph and physical examination, should not be changed. PMID:25137040

  6. Screening for latent tuberculosis in Norwegian health care workers: high frequency of discordant tuberculin skin test positive and interferon-gamma release assay negative results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) presents globally a significant health problem and health care workers (HCW) are at increased risk of contracting TB infection. There is no diagnostic gold standard for latent TB infection (LTBI), but both blood based interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) and the tuberculin skin test (TST) are used. According to the national guidelines, HCW who have been exposed for TB should be screened and offered preventive anti-TB chemotherapy, but the role of IGRA in HCW screening is still unclear. Methods A total of 387 HCW working in clinical and laboratory departments in three major hospitals in the Western region of Norway with possible exposure to TB were included in a cross-sectional study. The HCW were asked for risk factors for TB and tested with TST and the QuantiFERON®TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT). A logistic regression model analyzed the associations between risk factors for TB and positive QFT or TST. Results A total of 13 (3.4%) demonstrated a persistent positive QFT, whereas 214 (55.3%) had a positive TST (≥ 6 mm) and 53 (13.7%) a TST ≥ 15 mm. Only ten (4.7%) of the HCW with a positive TST were QFT positive. Origin from a TB-endemic country was the only risk factor associated with a positive QFT (OR 14.13, 95% CI 1.37 - 145.38, p = 0.026), whereas there was no significant association between risk factors for TB and TST ≥ 15 mm. The five HCW with an initial positive QFT that retested negative all had low interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) responses below 0.70 IU/ml when first tested. Conclusions We demonstrate a low prevalence of LTBI in HCW working in hospitals with TB patients in our region. The “IGRA-only” seems like a desirable screening strategy despite its limitations in serial testing, due to the high numbers of discordant TST positive/IGRA negative results in HCW, probably caused by BCG vaccination or boosting due to repetitive TST testing. Thus, guidelines for TB screening in HCW should be updated in order to

  7. Interferon Gamma Release Assay versus Tuberculin Skin Testing among Healthcare Workers of Highly Diverse Origin in a Moderate Tuberculosis Burden Country

    PubMed Central

    Al Hajoj, Sahal; Varghese, Bright; Datijan, Alria; Shoukri, Mohammed; Alzahrani, Ali; Alkhenizan, Abdallah; AlSaif, Abdulaziz; Althawadi, Sahar; Fernandez, Grace; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers (HCW’s) are always at an increased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB) infection. In Saudi Arabia, Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) has not been evaluated as a screening tool for latent TB infection (LTBI) among HCW’s considering their high demographic diversity. During February 2012 to January 2015 a cross sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary care center with maximum demographically diverse staff population in the capital city-Riyadh. After a short interview and consenting, all the candidates were subjected to tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB gold In-tube test (QFT). A logistic regression analysis was carried out for establishing the associations between putative risk factors and the diagnostic tests. The candidates were classified according to geographical origin and a detailed analysis was conducted on the impact of their origin towards the results of TST and QFT. Of the 1595 candidates enrolled, 90.6% were BCG vaccinated, female (67.9%) and mainly nurses (53.2%). Candidates with high risk of suspected or confirmed TB patient exposure were 56.1% and 76.5% of them had <10 year’s work experience. TST positivity was observed in 503 (31.5%) candidates, while QFT was positive among 399 (25%). Majority of the candidates were non-Saudi (83%) and predominantly (52.4%) from Western Pacific region. Concordant results were obtained in 14.2% of positive cases and 57.7% negative cases. The disagreements between the two tests were relatively high (kappa co-efficient-0.312±0.026, p value- <0.00001) as TST positive/QFT negative discordance was 54.8% while TST negative/QFT positive discordance was 15.7%. Age of the candidates, BCG vaccination, and South East Asian origin were associated with TST positivity while Occupational TB exposure and geographical origin of the candidates were associated with QFT positivity. A regular follow up on recently TST converted candidates showed no progression to active TB. The putative

  8. The Significance of Sensitive Interferon Gamma Release Assays for Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Patients Receiving Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antagonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yu Jung; Woo, Hye In; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Jang, Dong Kyoung; Cha, Hoon Suk; Koh, Eun Mi; Lee, Nam Yong; Kang, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Objective We compared two interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) and T-SPOT.TB, for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in patients before and while receiving tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonist therapy. This study evaluated the significance of sensitive IGRAs for LTBI screening and monitoring. Methods Before starting TNF-α antagonist therapy, 156 consecutive patients with rheumatic diseases were screened for LTBI using QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB tests. According to our study protocol, QFT-GIT-positive patients received LTBI treatment. Patients positive by any IGRAs were subjected to follow-up IGRA tests after completing LTBI-treatment and/or during TNF-α antagonist therapy. Results At the initial LTBI screening, 45 (28.9%) and 70 (44.9%) patients were positive by QFT-GIT and T-SPOT.TB, respectively. The agreement rate between IGRA results was 78.8% (k = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.43 to 0.68). Of 29 patients who were positive only by T-SPOT.TB in the initial screening, 83% (19/23) were persistently positive by T-SPOT.TB, while QFT-GIT testing showed that 36% (9/25) had conversion during TNF-α antagonist therapy. By the end of the follow-up period (218 to 1,264 days), four patients (4/137, 2.9%) developed active tuberculosis (TB) diseases during receiving TNF-α antagonist therapy. Among them, one was Q-T+, one was Q+T-, and the remaining two were Q-T- at the initial screening (Q, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube; T, T-SPOT.TB; +, positive; -, negative). Two (2/4, 50%) patients with TB reactivation had at least one prior risk factor consistent with previous TB infection. Conclusion This study demonstrated the need to capitalize on sensitive IGRAs to monitor for LTBI in at-risk patients for a more sensitive diagnosis in countries with an intermediate TB burden. PMID:26474294

  9. Interferon Gamma Release Assay versus Tuberculin Skin Testing among Healthcare Workers of Highly Diverse Origin in a Moderate Tuberculosis Burden Country.

    PubMed

    Al Hajoj, Sahal; Varghese, Bright; Datijan, Alria; Shoukri, Mohammed; Alzahrani, Ali; Alkhenizan, Abdallah; AlSaif, Abdulaziz; Althawadi, Sahar; Fernandez, Grace; Alrajhi, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers (HCW's) are always at an increased risk of contracting tuberculosis (TB) infection. In Saudi Arabia, Interferon Gamma Release Assay (IGRA) has not been evaluated as a screening tool for latent TB infection (LTBI) among HCW's considering their high demographic diversity. During February 2012 to January 2015 a cross sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary care center with maximum demographically diverse staff population in the capital city-Riyadh. After a short interview and consenting, all the candidates were subjected to tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB gold In-tube test (QFT). A logistic regression analysis was carried out for establishing the associations between putative risk factors and the diagnostic tests. The candidates were classified according to geographical origin and a detailed analysis was conducted on the impact of their origin towards the results of TST and QFT. Of the 1595 candidates enrolled, 90.6% were BCG vaccinated, female (67.9%) and mainly nurses (53.2%). Candidates with high risk of suspected or confirmed TB patient exposure were 56.1% and 76.5% of them had <10 year's work experience. TST positivity was observed in 503 (31.5%) candidates, while QFT was positive among 399 (25%). Majority of the candidates were non-Saudi (83%) and predominantly (52.4%) from Western Pacific region. Concordant results were obtained in 14.2% of positive cases and 57.7% negative cases. The disagreements between the two tests were relatively high (kappa co-efficient-0.312±0.026, p value- <0.00001) as TST positive/QFT negative discordance was 54.8% while TST negative/QFT positive discordance was 15.7%. Age of the candidates, BCG vaccination, and South East Asian origin were associated with TST positivity while Occupational TB exposure and geographical origin of the candidates were associated with QFT positivity. A regular follow up on recently TST converted candidates showed no progression to active TB. The putative factors

  10. Utility of the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Interferon-γ–Release Assay to Predict the Risk of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nesher, Lior; Shah, Dimpy P.; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J.; Azzi, Jacques M.; Siddiqui, Hala K.; Ghantoji, Shasank S.; Marsh, Lisa Y.; Michailidis, Lamprinos; Makedonas, George; Rezvani, Katy; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Chemaly, Roy F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to distinguish allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients at risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation from those who are not is central for optimal CMV management strategies. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) produced by CMV-challenged T cells may serve as an immune marker differentiating these 2 populations. We prospectively monitored 63 CMV-seropositive allo-HCT recipients with a CMV-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and for CMV infection from the period before transplantation to day 100 after transplantation. Assay results above certain thresholds (50 spots per 250 000 cells for immediate early 1 or 100 spots per 250 000 cells for phosphoprotein 65) identified patients who were protected against CMV infection as long as they had no graft-versus-host disease and/or were not receiving systemic corticosteroids. Based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, the only significant factor for preventing CMV reactivation was a CMV-specific ELISPOT response above the determined thresholds (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .05–.97; P = .046). Use of this assay as an additional tool for managing allo-HCT recipients at risk for CMV reactivation needs further validation in future studies. Application of this new approach may reduce the duration and intensity of CMV monitoring and the duration of prophylaxis or treatment with antiviral agents in those who have achieved CMV-specific immune reconstitution. PMID:26908740

  11. Utility of the Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Interferon-γ-Release Assay to Predict the Risk of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Lior; Shah, Dimpy P; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Azzi, Jacques M; Siddiqui, Hala K; Ghantoji, Shasank S; Marsh, Lisa Y; Michailidis, Lamprinos; Makedonas, George; Rezvani, Katy; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2016-06-01

    The ability to distinguish allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (allo-HCT) recipients at risk for cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation from those who are not is central for optimal CMV management strategies. Interferon γ (IFN-γ) produced by CMV-challenged T cells may serve as an immune marker differentiating these 2 populations. We prospectively monitored 63 CMV-seropositive allo-HCT recipients with a CMV-specific enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay and for CMV infection from the period before transplantation to day 100 after transplantation. Assay results above certain thresholds (50 spots per 250 000 cells for immediate early 1 or 100 spots per 250 000 cells for phosphoprotein 65) identified patients who were protected against CMV infection as long as they had no graft-versus-host disease and/or were not receiving systemic corticosteroids. Based on the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model, the only significant factor for preventing CMV reactivation was a CMV-specific ELISPOT response above the determined thresholds (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% confidence interval, .05-.97; P = .046). Use of this assay as an additional tool for managing allo-HCT recipients at risk for CMV reactivation needs further validation in future studies. Application of this new approach may reduce the duration and intensity of CMV monitoring and the duration of prophylaxis or treatment with antiviral agents in those who have achieved CMV-specific immune reconstitution. PMID:26908740

  12. Use of a tritium release assay to measure 6-N-trimethyl-L-lysine hydroxylase activity: synthesis of 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)Trimethyl-DL-lysine

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, R.; England, S.

    1981-09-01

    6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)Trimethyl-DL-lysine was synthesized from 6-N-acetyl-L-lysine by the following chemical scheme: 6-N-acetyl-L-lysine ..-->.. 2-keto-6-N-acetylcaproic acid ..-->.. 2-(3-/sup 3/H)keto-6-N-acetylcaproic acid ..-->.. 2-(3-/sup 3/H)keto-6-N-acetylcaproic acid oxime ..-->.. 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)acetyl-DL-lysine ..-->.. DL-(3-/sup 3/H)lysine ..-->.. 2-N-(3-/sup 3/H)formyl-DL-lysine ..-->.. 2-(3-/sup 3/H)formyl-6-N-trimethyl-DL-lysine ..-->.. 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)trimethyl-DL-lysine. Using a 70% ammonium sulfate fraction obtained from a high-speed rate kidney supernatant, the cosubstrate and cofactor requirements for 6-N-trimethyl-L-lysine hydroxylase activity as measured by tritium release from 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)trimethyl-DL-lysine were: ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate, ferrous ions, L-ascorbate, and oxygen, with added catalase showing a slight but distinct stimulatory effect. On incubation with the crude rat kidney preparation, the release of tritium from 6-N-(3-/sup 3/H)trimethyl-DL-lysine was linear with both time of incubation and protein concentration. Hydroxylation of 6-N-trimethyl-L-lysine, as measured by tritium release from the labeled substrate, was examined in rat kidney, heart, liver, and skeletal muscle tissues, and found to be most active in the kidney.

  13. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  14. The role of interferon-gamma release assays in predicting the emergence of active tuberculosis in the setting of biological treatment: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Scrivo, Rossana; Sauzullo, Ilaria; Mengoni, Fabio; Riccieri, Valeria; Altieri, Alfonso Maria; Cantoro, Laura; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Valesini, Guido

    2016-05-01

    Conversions and reversions of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) were observed when these tests were repeated over time in the same individuals, including those treated with biological agents. In most studies, the variability of IFN-γ plasma levels was not paralleled by clinical change, but a few exceptions exist, in which IGRA conversion predicted the emergence of active tuberculosis (TB). We report the case of a Peruvian patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease scheduled for treatment with adalimumab. TB screening demonstrated latent TB infection (LTBI), and the patient was started on isoniazid (INH) for 9 months. Adalimumab was initiated after 1 month since INH. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, one of the IGRAs currently available, was serially repeated to monitor the status of TB infection during treatment with the biological agent. The patient developed active TB preceded by progressively rising levels of released IFN-γ. We came to know that she had withdrawn INH after 2 months on her own initiative. Considering the low rate of INH completion, serial IGRAs may help in the clinical vigilance during prophylaxis as well as anti-TNF treatment, at least in patients presenting other risk factors aside from the state of immunosuppression. PMID:24827875

  15. Mechanism and kinetics of the loss of poorly soluble drugs from liposomal carriers studied by a novel flow field-flow fractionation-based drug release-/transfer-assay.

    PubMed

    Hinna, Askell Hvid; Hupfeld, Stefan; Kuntsche, Judith; Bauer-Brandl, Annette; Brandl, Martin

    2016-06-28

    Liposomes represent a versatile drug formulation approach e.g. for improving the water-solubility of poorly soluble drugs but also to achieve drug targeting and controlled release. For the latter applications it is essential that the drug remains associated with the liposomal carrier during transit in the vascular bed. A range of in vitro test methods has been suggested over the years for prediction of the release of drug from liposomal carriers. The majority of these fail to give a realistic prediction for poorly water-soluble drugs due to the intrinsic tendency of such compounds to remain associated with liposome bilayers even upon extensive dilution. Upon i.v. injection, in contrast, rapid drug loss often occurs due to drug transfer from the liposomal carriers to endogenous lipophilic sinks such as lipoproteins, plasma proteins or membranes of red blood cells and endothelial cells. Here we report on the application of a recently introduced in vitro predictive drug transfer assay based on incubation of the liposomal drug carrier with large multilamellar liposomes, the latter serving as a biomimetic model sink, using flow field-flow fractionation as a tool to separate the two types of liposomes. By quantifying the amount of drug remaining associated with the liposomal drug carrier as well as that transferred to the acceptor liposomes at distinct times of incubation, both the kinetics of drug transfer and release to the water phase could be established for the model drug p-THPP (5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)21H,23H-porphine). p-THPP is structurally similar to temoporfin, a photosensitizer which is under clinical evaluation in a liposomal formulation. Mechanistic insights were gained by varying the donor-to-acceptor lipid mass ratio, size and lamellarity of the liposomes. Drug transfer kinetics from one liposome to another was found rate determining as compared to redistribution from the outermost to the inner concentric bilayers, such that the overall

  16. Subcutaneous administration of carrier erythrocytes: slow release of entrapped agent

    SciTech Connect

    DeLoach, J.R.; Corrier, D.E.

    1988-08-01

    Carrier erythrocytes administered subcutaneously in mice release encapsulated molecules at the injection site and through cells that escape the injection site. One day postinjection, the efflux of encapsulated (/sup 14/C)sucrose, (/sup 3/H)inulin, and /sup 51/Cr-hemoglobin from the injection site was 45, 55, and 65%, respectively. Intact carrier erythrocytes escaped the injection site and entered the blood circulation carrying with them the encapsulated molecules. Most of the encapsulated (/sup 3/H)inulin that reached whole blood circulated within erythrocytes. Small but measurable numbers of encapsulated molecules were trapped within lymph nodes. Subcutaneous injection of carrier erythrocytes may allow for limited extravascular tissue targeting of drugs.

  17. Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M A G; Spina, F G; Weckx, L Y; Lederman, H M; De Moraes-Pinto, M I

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection was evaluated in Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents exposed and unexposed (control group) to adults with active pulmonary TB. Both groups were analysed by clinical and radiological assessment, TST, QFT-IT and T-SPOT.TB. The three tests were repeated after 8 weeks in the TB-exposed group if results were initially negative. Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were treated and tests were repeated after treatment. Fifty-nine TB-exposed and 42 controls were evaluated. Rate of infection was 69·5% and 9·5% for the exposed and control groups, respectively. The exposed group infection rate was 61% assessed by TST, 57·6% by T-SPOT.TB, and 59·3%, by QFT-IT. No active TB was diagnosed. Agreement between the three tests was 83·1% and 92·8% in the exposed and control groups, respectively. In the exposed group, T-SPOT.TB added four TB diagnoses [16%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6-30·4] and QFT-IT added three TB diagnoses (12%, 95% CI 0-24·7) in 25 individuals with negative tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk factors associated to TB infection were contact with an adult with active TB [0-60 days: odds ratio (OR) 6·9; >60 days: OR 27·0] and sleeping in the same room as an adult with active TB (OR 5·2). In Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents, TST had a similar performance to interferon-gamma release assays and detected a high rate of LTBI. PMID:26234295

  18. Helicase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Diaz, Jason; You, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Helicases are a class of enzymes which are motor proteins using energy derived from ATP hydrolysis to move directionally along a nucliec acid phosphodiester backbone (such as DNA, RNA and DNA-RNA hybrids) and separate two annealed nucleic acid strands. Many cellular processes, such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair involve helicase activity. Here, we provide a protocol to analyze helicase activities in vitro. In this protocol, the DNA helicase protein Merkel cell polyomavirus large T-antigen was expressed in the mammalian cell line HEK293 and immoblized on an IgG resin. The helicase assay is performing while the protein is immoblized on IgG resin.

  19. Angiogenesis Assays.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  20. Uveitis with occult choroiditis due to Mycobacterium kansasii: limitations of interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) tests (case report and mini-review on ocular non-tuberculous mycobacteria and IGRA cross-reactivity).

    PubMed

    Kuznetcova, Tatiana I; Sauty, Alain; Herbort, Carl P

    2012-10-01

    Ocular tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose but should be suspected when uveitis fails to respond to inflammation suppressive therapy. Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) represent a substantial help to diagnose suspected ocular tuberculosis especially in non-endemic areas. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) is able to detect clinically silent choroiditis that, when associated with a positive IGRA test, should lead the clinician to suspect ocular tuberculosis, warranting specific therapy. The fact that IGRA tests can also react with some atypical strains of mycobacteria is not always known. We report here a case with resistant post-operative inflammation that presented with occult ICGA-detected choroiditis and a positive IGRA test that was most probably due to the non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) Mycobacterium kansasii. A 66 year-old man presented with a resistant cystoid macular oedema (CMO) in his left eye after combined cataract and epiretinal membrane surgery. At entry, his best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.5 for far and near OS. Intraocular inflammation measured by laser flare photometry was elevated in the left eye (54.4 ph/ms) and also in the right eye (50.9 ph/ms). Four subTenon's injections of 40 mg of triamcinolone did not produce any substantial improvement. Therefore a complete uveitis work-up was performed. Fluorescein angiography showed CMO OS and ICGA showed numerous hypofluorescent dots and fuzziness of choroidal vessels in both eyes. Among performed laboratory tests, the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold test was positive. After a pulmonological examination disclosing a right upper lobe infiltrate, the patient was started on a triple anti-tuberculous therapy. Bronchial aspirate, obtained during bronchoscopy, was Ziehl-positive and culture grew M. kansasii. Nine months later, BCVA OS increased to 1.0 and flare decreased to 40.2 ph/ms. The CMO OS resolved angiographically and did not recur with a macula still slightly thickened on OCT

  1. Effect of drug release rate on therapeutic outcomes: formulation dependence of gastrointestinal toxicity of diclofenac in the rat.

    PubMed

    Khazaeinia, Tahereh; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2004-01-01

    - The use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, diclofenac, is associated with occasional serious side effects in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. We examined the effect of altering the site of release of diclofenac sodium on GI tract side effects. Dissolution and pharmacokinetic studies were carried out to substantiate the sustained-release nature of crushed sustained release tablet. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered diclofenac 10 mg/kg orally as either immediate-release or sustained-release preparations. Upper and lower GI permeability, as a surrogate marker of toxicity, were measured using sucrose and 51Cr-EDTA, respectively. Immediate- and sustained-release preparations similarly increased upper GI permeability. The induced toxicity in the lower GI tract, however, caused by the sustained-release formulation lasted longer than that of the immediate release formulation. Since both immediate- and sustained-release preparations of diclofenac increased sucrose permeability, the upper GI damage caused by diclofenac may be attributable mainly to a systemic mechanism. The prolonged lower GI toxicity following the sustained-release preparation may be related to a greater residence time therein. PMID:15035780

  2. Assessment of human natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell cytotoxicity against Toxoplasma gondii trophozoites and brain cysts

    SciTech Connect

    Dannemann, B.R.; Morris, V.A.; Araujo, F.G.; Remington, J.S. )

    1989-10-15

    Because previous work has suggested that NK cells may be important in host resistance against the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii we examined whether human NK cells and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells have activity against trophozoites and cysts of this organism in vitro. A method to radiolabel Toxoplasma trophozoites with 51Cr was developed and direct cytotoxic activity was determined by using modifications of the standard 51Cr release assay. Viability of 51Cr-labeled trophozoites assessed by both methylene blue staining and trypan blue exclusion was greater than 90%. Significantly more 51Cr was released by anti-Toxoplasma antibody and C than by antibody in the absence of C. Incubation of trophozoites with freshly isolated human NK cells or NK cells activated with either rIL-2 or rIFN-alpha did not result in significant release of 51Cr (specific lysis was 0 to 2.3%). In contrast, the average specific lysis of radiolabeled trophozoites by LAK cells was significant. In a series of separate experiments, preincubation of radiolabeled trophozoites with heat-inactivated normal or Toxoplasma antibody-positive human serum increased the cytotoxicity of LAK cells from a mean specific lysis of 15% +/- 4.5 to 39% +/- 8.5, respectively, as assessed by 51Cr release. Because previous work has shown that radioisotope release from parasites may be nonspecific, separate experiments were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of LAK cells against antibody-coated trophozoites by using ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining to assess effector cell damage. LAK cells had a mean specific lysis of 51% against antibody-coated trophozoites by ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining. Preincubation with heat-inactivated Toxoplasma-antibody positive human serum did not increase activity of rIL-2-activated NK cells against 51CR-labeled trophozoites.

  3. IN VITRO AUGMENTATION OF NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY BY MANGANESE CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The in vitro cultivation of murine spleen cells with MnCl2 resulted in the enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity as measured in a 4-h (51)Cr-release assay. Optimal enhancement of NK activity was observed at concentrations of 10-20 micrograms MnCl2 culture (72-144 micro...

  4. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES MURINE CELL-MEDIATED CYTOTOXICITY: EFFECTS ON NATURAL KILLER CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity of mice given a single injection of manganese chloride (MnCl2) was significantly enhanced as measured in a 4-hr in vitro 51Cr release assay. Enhanced activity persisted for several days after injection. This cytotoxic activity was associated with...

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro cytotoxic effects of K4 (PtCl2ATP)

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, K.K.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Maity, P. )

    1991-03-01

    An antineoplastic agent, cis-K4 (PtCl2ATP) has been synthesized and characterized, using elemental analysis, solution conductance, thermoanalysis, infrared, NMR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism studies. The in vitro cytotoxic effect imparted by this compound on Dalton's Lymphoma cells has been assessed by Trypan blue dye exclusion method and 51Cr release assays.

  6. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  7. Microbiologic assay of space hardware.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favero, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Review of the procedures used in the microbiological examination of space hardware. The general procedure for enumerating aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms and spores is outlined. Culture media and temperature-time cycles used for incubation are reviewed, along with assay systems designed for the enumeration of aerobic and anaerobic spores. The special problems which are discussed are involved in the precise and accurate enumeration of microorganisms on surfaces and in the neutralization of viable organisms buried inside solid materials that could be released to a planet's surface if the solid should be fractured. Special attention is given to sampling procedures including also the indirect techniques of surface assays of space hardware such as those using detachable or fallout strips. Some data on comparative levels of microbial contamination on lunar and planetary spacecraft are presented.

  8. Insecticidal and sterilizing effect of Olyset Duo®, a permethrin and pyriproxyfen mixture net against pyrethroid-susceptible and -resistant strains of Anopheles gambiae s.s.: a release-recapture assay in experimental huts.

    PubMed

    Djènontin, Armel; Ahoua Alou, Ludovic P; Koffi, Alphonsine; Zogo, Barnabas; Duarte, Elves; N'Guessan, Raphael; Moiroux, Nicolas; Pennetier, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the widespread distribution of pyrethroid resistance among malaria vectors, we did a release-recapture trial in experimental huts to investigate the insecticidal and sterilizing effects of a novel long-lasting net (LN), Olyset® Duo, incorporating a mixture of permethrin (PER) and the insect growth regulator (IGR), pyri-proxyfen (PPF). An LN containing PPF alone and a classic Olyset® Net were tested in parallel as positive controls. The effect of progressive number of holes (6, 30, or 150) that may accrue in nets over time was simulated. We used two laboratory Anopheles gambiae s.s. strains: the susceptible Kisumu strain and the pyrethroid-resistant VK-Per strain having solely kdr as resistance mechanism. The effect of these nets on the reproductive success of blood-fed females that survived the different LNs conditions was recorded. Regardless of the mosquito strain, the LNs containing PPF alone with as many as 30 holes drastically reduced the number of eggs laid by females succeeding in feeding, i.e. fecundity by 98% and egg hatching rate (fertility) by 93% relative to untreated control net. Very few of the resistant females blood fed and survived under the Olyset® Duo with similar number of holes (up to 30) but of these few, the inhibition of reproductive success was 100%. There was no evidence that the Olyset® Duo LN with 150 holes impacted fecundity or fertility of the resistant colony. The efficacy of Olyset® Duo is encouraging and clearly illustrates that this new net might be a promising tool for malaria transmission control and resistance management. PMID:26489479

  9. Insecticidal and sterilizing effect of Olyset Duo®, a permethrin and pyriproxyfen mixture net against pyrethroid-susceptible and -resistant strains of Anopheles gambiae s.s.: a release-recapture assay in experimental huts

    PubMed Central

    Djènontin, Armel; Ahoua Alou, Ludovic P.; Koffi, Alphonsine; Zogo, Barnabas; Duarte, Elves; N’Guessan, Raphael; Moiroux, Nicolas; Pennetier, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the widespread distribution of pyrethroid resistance among malaria vectors, we did a release-recapture trial in experimental huts to investigate the insecticidal and sterilizing effects of a novel long-lasting net (LN), Olyset® Duo, incorporating a mixture of permethrin (PER) and the insect growth regulator (IGR), pyri-proxyfen (PPF). An LN containing PPF alone and a classic Olyset® Net were tested in parallel as positive controls. The effect of progressive number of holes (6, 30, or 150) that may accrue in nets over time was simulated. We used two laboratory Anopheles gambiae s.s. strains: the susceptible Kisumu strain and the pyrethroid-resistant VK-Per strain having solely kdr as resistance mechanism. The effect of these nets on the reproductive success of blood-fed females that survived the different LNs conditions was recorded. Regardless of the mosquito strain, the LNs containing PPF alone with as many as 30 holes drastically reduced the number of eggs laid by females succeeding in feeding, i.e. fecundity by 98% and egg hatching rate (fertility) by 93% relative to untreated control net. Very few of the resistant females blood fed and survived under the Olyset® Duo with similar number of holes (up to 30) but of these few, the inhibition of reproductive success was 100%. There was no evidence that the Olyset® Duo LN with 150 holes impacted fecundity or fertility of the resistant colony. The efficacy of Olyset® Duo is encouraging and clearly illustrates that this new net might be a promising tool for malaria transmission control and resistance management. PMID:26489479

  10. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shackleton, D R; Hulmes, D J

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware. PMID:1971160

  11. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas Joseph (Inventor); Yang, Robert Alexander (Inventor); Brown, Christopher William (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a pyrotechnic actuated release mechanism which is mechanically two fault tolerant for effecting release. It is particularly well suited for releasably connecting structures to be used in the space environment or in other aerospace applications. The device comprises a fastener plate and fastener body, each attachable to either one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate and the body are fastenable by a toggle supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end, which is received in a central opening in the fastener body and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein, the toggle is restrained by three retractable latching pins. Each pin is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge. While retraction of all three pins releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt is mounted on the fastener plate as a support for the socket mounting of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for pre-loading the toggle.

  12. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOEpatents

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  15. Separation of effector cells mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) to erythrocyte targets from those mediating ADC to tumor targets.

    PubMed

    Pollack, S B; Nelson, K; Grausz, J D

    1976-04-01

    Murine spleen cells mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADC) both to erythrocyte targets in a 51Cr release assay and to syngeneic tumor targets in a microcytotoxicity assay. The effector cells active in the two ADC assays can be separated by passage of the spleen cells through columns of Sephadex G-10 at 37 degrees C. Cells mediating ADC to sarcoma cells did not adhere to the G-10 and were recovered in the column effluent. These nonadherent cells were not cytotoxic to antibody-coated chicken red blood cells. Spleen cells which mediated ADC in a 51Cr release assay to the red cell targets adhered to G-10. Adherent effector cells could subsequently be recovered from the columns by elution with 5 X 10(-4) M EDTA. PMID:815438

  16. Immunochromatographic assay on thread.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Gina; Mao, Xun; Juncker, David

    2012-09-18

    Lateral-flow immunochromatographic assays are low-cost, simple-to-use, rapid tests for point-of-care screening of infectious diseases, drugs of abuse, and pregnancy. However, lateral flow assays are generally not quantitative, give a yes/no answer, and lack multiplexing. Threads have recently been proposed as a support for transporting and mixing liquids in lateral-flow immunochromatographic assays, but their use for quantitative high-sensitivity immunoassays has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we introduce the immunochromatographic assay on thread (ICAT) in a cartridge format that is suitable for multiplexing. The ICAT is a sandwich assay performed on a cotton thread knotted to a nylon fiber bundle, both of which are precoated with recognition antibodies against one target analyte. Upon sample application, the assay results become visible to the eye within a few minutes and are quantified using a flatbed scanner. Assay conditions were optimized, the binding curves for C-reactive protein (CRP) in buffer and diluted serum were established and a limit of detection of 377 pM was obtained. The possibility of multiplexing was demonstrated using three knotted threads coated with antibodies against CRP, osteopontin, and leptin proteins. The performance of the ICAT was compared with that of the paper-based and conventional assays. The results suggest that thread is a suitable support for making low-cost, sensitive, simple-to-use, and multiplexed diagnostic tests. PMID:22889381

  17. Rapid mercury assays

    SciTech Connect

    Szurdoki, S.; Kido, H.; Hammock, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    We have developed rapid assays with the potential of detecting mercury in environmental samples. our methods combine the simple ELISA-format with the selective, high affinity complexation of mercuric ions by sulfur-containing ligands. The first assay is based on a sandwich chelate formed by a protein-bound ligand immobilized on the wells of a microliter plate, mercuric ion of the analyzed sample, and another ligand conjugated to a reporter enzyme. The second assay involves competition between mercuric ions and an organomercury-conjugate to bind to a chelating conjugate. Several sulfur containing chelators (e.g., dithiocarbamates) and organomercurials linked to macromolecular carriers have been investigated in these assay formats. The assays detect mercuric ions in ppb/high ppt concentrations with high selectivity.

  18. Broad base biological assay using liquid based detection assays

    SciTech Connect

    Milanovich, F; Albala, J; Colston, B; Langlois, R; Venkateswaren, K

    2000-10-31

    The release of a biological agent by terrorists represents a serious threat to the safety of US citizens. At present there are over 50 pathogens and toxins on various agency threat lists. Most of these pathogens are rarely seen by public health personnel so the ability to rapidly identify their infection is limited. Since many pathogenic infections have symptomatic delays as long as several days, effective treatment is often compromised. This translates into two major deficiencies in our ability to counter biological terrorism (1) the lack of any credible technology to rapidly detect and identify all the pathogens or toxins on current threat lists and (2) the lack of a credible means to rapidly diagnose thousands of potential victims. In this SI we are developing a rapid, flexible, inexpensive, high throughput, and deeply multiplex-capable biological assay technology. The technology, which we call the Liquid Array (LA), utilizes optical encoding of small diameter beads which serve as the templates for biological capture assays. Once exposed to a fluid sample these beads can be identified and probed for target pathogens at rates of several thousand beads per second. Since each bead can be separately identified, one can perform parallel assays by assigning a different assay to each bead in the encoded set. The goal for this development is a detection technology capable of simultaneously identifying 100s of different bioagents and/or of rapidly diagnosing several thousand individuals. We are pursuing this research in three thrusts. In the first we are exploring the fundamental interactions of the beads with proteins and nucleic acids in complex mixtures. This will provide us with a complete understanding of the limits of the technology with respect to throughput and complex environment. A major spin-off of this activity is in the rapidly emerging field of proteomics where we may be able to rapidly assess the interactions responsible for cell metabolism, structural

  19. Interruption of the Sequential Release of Small and Large Molecules from Tumor Cells by Low Temperature During Cytolysis Mediated by Immune T-Cells or Complement

    PubMed Central

    Martz, Eric; Burakoff, Steven J.; Benacerraf, Baruj

    1974-01-01

    Specific lysis of tumor cells by thymus-derived lymphocytes from alloimmunized mice (T-effector specific lysis) was studied with target cells labeled with isotopes attached to both small (14C-labeled nicotinamide) and large (51Cr-labeled) molecules. The results confirm and extend previous reports that target cells release small molecules considerably earlier than large molecules during T-effector specific lysis. After interruption of T-effector specific lysis by specific antibody and complement directed against the killer cells, or by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, release of both isotopes continued, eventually reaching identical levels of specific release, the value of which represents the fraction of the target cell population which had been committed to die at the time these treatments were applied. On the other hand, release of both isotopes during T-effector specific lysis stops immediately when the cultures are cooled to 0°. Thus, while ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or specific complement-mediated lysis of the killer cells merely prevents the initiation of any new damage to target cells, cooling to 0° also stops the lytic process in already-damaged target cells. The colloid osmotic phase of target cell lysis induced by specific antibody and complement was similarly stopped at 0° in tumor cells, but not in erythrocytes. Thus, in tumor target cells, both T-effector specific lysis and complement cause a sequential release of progressively larger molecules which can be immediately stopped at any point by cooling to 0°. PMID:4359327

  20. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  1. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  2. Lateral flow assays

    PubMed Central

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  3. Doped colorimetric assay liposomes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides compositions comprising colorimetric assay liposomes. The present invention also provides methods for producing colorimetric liposomes and calorimetric liposome assay systems. In preferred embodiments, these calorimetric liposome systems provide high levels of sensitivity through the use of dopant molecules. As these dopants allow the controlled destabilization of the liposome structure, upon exposure of the doped liposomes to analyte(s) of interest, the indicator color change is facilitated and more easily recognized.

  4. SNAP Assay Technology.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Thomas P

    2015-12-01

    The most widely used immunoassay configuration is the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) because the procedure produces highly sensitive and specific results and generally is easy to use. By definition, ELISAs are immunoassays used to detect a substance (typically an antigen or antibody) in which an enzyme is attached (conjugated) to one of the reactants and an enzymatic reaction is used to amplify the signal if the substance is present. Optimized ELISAs include several steps that are performed in sequence using a defined protocol that typically includes application of sample and an enzyme-conjugated antibody or antigen to an immobilized reagent, followed by wash and enzyme reaction steps. The SNAP assay is an in-clinic device that performs each of the ELISA steps in a timed sequential fashion with little consumer interface. The components and mechanical mechanism of the assay device are described. Detailed descriptions of features of the assay, which minimize nonspecific binding and enhance the ability to read results from weak-positive samples, are given. Basic principles used in assays with fundamentally different reaction mechanisms, namely, antigen-detection, antibody-detection, and competitive assays are given. Applications of ELISA technology, which led to the development of several multianalyte SNAP tests capable of testing for up to 6 analytes using a single-sample and a single-SNAP device are described. PMID:27154596

  5. Rover waste assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J.

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    PubMed Central

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  7. Lateral flow strip assay

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  8. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  9. Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L. (Inventor); Stowe, Raymond P. (Inventor); Koeing, David W. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for conducting an in vitro cell assay using a tetrazolium indicator is disclosed. The indicator includes a nonionic detergent which solubilizes a tetrazolium reduction product in vitro and has low toxicity for the cells. The incubation of test cells in the presence of zolium bromide and octoxynol (TRITON X-100) permits kinetics of the cell metabolism to be determined.

  10. Macroautophagic cargo sequestration assays.

    PubMed

    Seglen, Per O; Luhr, Morten; Mills, Ian G; Sætre, Frank; Szalai, Paula; Engedal, Nikolai

    2015-03-01

    Macroautophagy, the process responsible for bulk sequestration and lysosomal degradation of cytoplasm, is often monitored by means of the autophagy-related marker protein LC3. This protein is linked to the phagophoric membrane by lipidation during the final steps of phagophore assembly, and it remains associated with autophagic organelles until it is degraded in the lysosomes. The transfer of LC3 from cytosol to membranes and organelles can be measured by immunoblotting or immunofluorescence microscopy, but these assays provide no information about functional macroautophagic activity, i.e., whether the phagophores are actually engaged in the sequestration of cytoplasmic cargo and enclosing this cargo into sealed autophagosomes. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggest that macroautophagy can proceed independently of LC3. There is therefore a need for alternative methods, preferably effective cargo sequestration assays, which can monitor actual macroautophagic activity. Here, we provide an overview of various approaches that have been used over the last four decades to measure macroautophagic sequestration activity in mammalian cells. Particular emphasis is given to the so-called "LDH sequestration assay", which measures the transfer of the autophagic cargo marker enzyme LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) from the cytosol to autophagic vacuoles. The LDH sequestration assay was originally developed to measure macroautophagic activity in primary rat hepatocytes. Subsequently, it has found use in several other cell types, and in this article we demonstrate a further validation and simplification of the method, and show that it is applicable to several cell lines that are commonly used to study autophagy. PMID:25576638

  11. Determination of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursor frequencies using europium labeling as a nonradioactive alternative to labeling with chromium-51.

    PubMed

    Bouma, G J; van der Meer-Prins, P M; van Bree, F P; van Rood, J J; Claas, F H

    1992-10-01

    We report on the use of europium (Eu) as a suitable nonradioactive alternative for target cell labeling in limiting dilution analysis (LDA) assays set up to determine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte precursor (CTLp) frequencies. A nonradioactive alternative to the commonly used chromium-51 (51Cr) release assay seems desirable because working with radioisotopes has some major disadvantages concerning possible health risks, environmental load, costs of facilities necessary for working with radioisotopes, and shelf life. Some groups have successfully applied the Eu release assay based on detection by time-resolved fluorometry, to tests in which NK- or LAK-cell activity or cytotoxic T-lymphocyte reactions were measured. This led to the investigation whether this method could also be applicable to the more specific determination of CTLp frequencies in LDA assays. After optimal labeling conditions had been established, the sensitivity of the Eu release assay was determined by performing several LDA assays in which the target cells were labeled with either Eu or radioactive 51Cr. When CTLp frequencies were compared, it was shown that the Eu release assay is at least as sensitive and specific as the 51Cr release assay. Moreover, although the labeling procedure takes longer, sample processing is much faster: only 1 second per sample. The fact that the Eu release assay is not radioactive enables the assay to be performed at any laboratory and even--because the frequency of CTLps may have implications for organ graft survival and for donor selection in bone marrow transplantation--to do so on a routine basis. PMID:1286979

  12. Kinetic Tetrazolium Microtiter Assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Stowe, Raymond; Koenig, David

    1993-01-01

    Kinetic tetrazolium microtiter assay (KTMA) involves use of tetrazolium salts and Triton X-100 (or equivalent), nontoxic, in vitro color developer solubilizing colored metabolite formazan without injuring or killing metabolizing cells. Provides for continuous measurement of metabolism and makes possible to determine rate of action of antimicrobial agent in real time as well as determines effective inhibitory concentrations. Used to monitor growth after addition of stimulatory compounds. Provides for kinetic determination of efficacy of biocide, greatly increasing reliability and precision of results. Also used to determine relative effectiveness of antimicrobial agent as function of time. Capability of generating results on day of test extremely important in treatment of water and waste, disinfection of hospital rooms, and in pharmaceutical, agricultural, and food-processing industries. Assay also used in many aspects of cell biology.

  13. Radioreceptor assay for oxyphenonium.

    PubMed

    Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1984-01-01

    The development of a radioreceptor assay for the quaternary anticholinergic drug, oxyphenonium, in plasma is reported. It is based on competition between this drug and 3H-dexetimide for binding to muscarinic receptors. After ion pair extraction and reextraction, the drug can be determined in plasma at concentrations down to a value of 100 pg/ml. This permits pharmacokinetic studies to be made after inhalation of oxyphenonium. PMID:6428927

  14. Robust quantitative scratch assay

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Andrea; Angeli, Marc; Pastrello, Chiara; McQuaid, Rosanne; Li, Han; Jurisicova, Andrea; Jurisica, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing assay (or scratch assay) is a technique frequently used to quantify the dependence of cell motility—a central process in tissue repair and evolution of disease—subject to various treatments conditions. However processing the resulting data is a laborious task due its high throughput and variability across images. This Robust Quantitative Scratch Assay algorithm introduced statistical outputs where migration rates are estimated, cellular behaviour is distinguished and outliers are identified among groups of unique experimental conditions. Furthermore, the RQSA decreased measurement errors and increased accuracy in the wound boundary at comparable processing times compared to previously developed method (TScratch). Availability and implementation: The RQSA is freely available at: http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RQSA_Scripts.zip. The image sets used for training and validation and results are available at: (http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/trainingSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/validationSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSetResults.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975Results.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip). Supplementary Material is provided for detailed description of the development of the RQSA. Contact: juris@ai.utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26722119

  15. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, L.J.; Dayton, B.D.; Moore, M.L.; Shu, A.Y.; Heys, J.R.; Meek, T.D. )

    1990-08-01

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources.

  16. A rapid and sensitive fluorometric microassay for determining cell mediated cytotoxicity to adherent growing cell lines.

    PubMed

    Krüger-Krasagakes, S; Garbe, C; Kossman, P; Orfanos, C E

    1992-11-25

    In order to measure cell mediated cytotoxicity to adherent growing cell lines in vitro more rapidly and conveniently, a fluorometric microassay was developed and results were compared with those obtained by the 51Cr release assay. The fluorometric method is based on the hydrolysis of the fluorochrome 4-methylumbelliferyl heptanoate (MUH) by intracellular esterases of viable cells. Melanoma cell monolayers were incubated with lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells for 4 h at various effector: target (E:T) cell ratios (E:T = 16, 8, 4, 2:1). Thereafter surviving adherent melanoma cells were stained with MUH for 30 min and fluorescence was measured directly in a 96 well plate reader. For the calculation of LAK cell cytotoxicity fluorescence values were corrected for the number of nonspecifically detached tumor cells during the washes and the number of nonspecifically adherent LAK cells. Using identical target and effector cell preparations both assays showed a nearly proportional increase of percentage cytotoxicity with rising numbers of lymphocytes. Compared with the 51Cr release assay, however, higher cytotoxicity values were obtained with the fluorometric MUH microassay: 57% with MUH versus 26% with 51Cr and 39% versus 14% for cell lines StML-11 and SKMel-28, respectively (E:T ratio = 16:1). The higher cytotoxicity rates obtained with the fluorometric MUH microassay were not due to the additional 30 min staining with MUH or due to nonspecific hydrolysis of MUH by extracellular esterases released from damaged cells, as could be shown by a series of experiments. In conclusion, a simple and rapid fluorometric microassay has been developed showing reliable reproducibility and a higher sensitivity compared with the 51Cr release assay for the determination of cellular cytotoxicity to adherent growing cell lines, avoiding hazardous radioactive labels. PMID:1431156

  17. Macrophage Inflammatory Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ylostalo, Joni H.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent a widely distributed and functionally diverse population of innate myeloid cells involved in inflammatory response to pathogens, tissue homeostasis and tissue repair (Murray and Wynn, 2011). Macrophages can be broadly grouped into two subpopulations with opposing activites: M1 or pro-inflammatory macrophages that promote T-helper type 1 (Th1) cell immunity and tissue damage, and M2 or anti-inflammatory/alternatively activated macrophages implicated in Th2 response and resolution of inflammation. Here we describe a rapid assay we used previously to monitor changes in pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages in response to therapeutic paracrine factors produced by adult stem cells (Bartosh et al., 2010; Ylostalo et al., 2012; Bartosh et al., 2013). The assay can be adapted appropriately to test macrophage response to other agents as well that will be referred to herein as ‘test reagents’ or ‘test compounds’. In this protocol, the mouse macrophage cell line J774A.1 is expanded as an adherent monolayer on petri dishes allowing for the cells to be harvested easily without enzymes or cell scrapers that can damage the cells. The macropahges are then stimulated in suspension with LPS and seeded into 12-well cell culture plates containing the test reagents. After 16–18 h, the medium conditioned by the macrophages is harvested and the cytokine profile in the medium determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). We routinely measure levels of the pro-inflammtory cytokine TNF-alpha and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10).

  18. C. elegans chemotaxis assay.

    PubMed

    Margie, Olivia; Palmer, Chris; Chin-Sang, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Many organisms use chemotaxis to seek out food sources, avoid noxious substances, and find mates. Caenorhabditis elegans has impressive chemotaxis behavior. The premise behind testing the response of the worms to an odorant is to place them in an area and observe the movement evoked in response to an odorant. Even with the many available assays, optimizing worm starting location relative to both the control and test areas, while minimizing the interaction of worms with each other, while maintaining a significant sample size remains a work in progress (1-10). The method described here aims to address these issues by modifying the assay developed by Bargmann et al.(1). A Petri dish is divided into four quadrants, two opposite quadrants marked "Test" and two are designated "Control". Anesthetic is placed in all test and control sites. The worms are placed in the center of the plate with a circle marked around the origin to ensure that non-motile worms will be ignored. Utilizing a four-quadrant system rather than one 2 or two 1 eliminates bias in the movement of the worms, as they are equidistant from test and control samples, regardless of which side of the origin they began. This circumvents the problem of worms being forced to travel through a cluster of other worms to respond to an odorant, which can delay worms or force them to take a more circuitous route, yielding an incorrect interpretation of their intended path. This method also shows practical advantages by having a larger sample size and allowing the researcher to run the assay unattended and score the worms once the allotted time has expired. PMID:23644543

  19. Radon assay for SNO+

    SciTech Connect

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  20. Radon assay for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumleskie, Janet

    2015-12-01

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  1. Biosensors: Viruses for ultrasensitive assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donath, Edwin

    2009-04-01

    A three-dimensional assay based on genetically engineered viral nanoparticles and nickel nanohairs can detect much lower levels of protein markers associated with heart attacks than conventional assays.

  2. Long-term physiological effects of enhanced O/sub 2/ release by inositol hexaphosphate-loaded erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Teisseire, B.; Ropars, C.; Villereal, M.C.; Nicolau, C.

    1987-10-01

    A continuous lysing and resealing procedure with erythrocytes permitted incorporation in these cells of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP/sub 6/), a strong allosteric effector of Hb. This leads to significant rightward shifts of the HbO/sub 2/ dissociation curves with in vitro P/sub 50/, values increasing from 32.2 +/- 1.8 torr for control erythrocytes to 86 +/- 60 torr. The shape of the dissociation curve was still sigmoidal, although the Hill coefficient was decreased. The life span of InsP/sub 6/-loaded erythrocytes equaled that of control erythrocytes. Erythrocyte-survival studies were done using /sub 51/Cr labeling of cells. The long-term physiological effects of the InsP/sub 6/-loaded erythrocytes on piglets were increased O/sub 2/ release and reduced cardiac output. The reduced O/sub 2/ affinity of the InsP/sub 6/-loaded erythrocytes was still effective 20 days after transfusion in awake piglets. The electrolyte concentration appeared stable over the 5-day observation period except for a transient, but significant, hyperkalemia immediately after transfusion. The reductions in the O/sub 2/ affinity of Hb reported here are large compared with previously reported values. Introduction of InsP/sub 6/ into viable erythrocytes improves tissue oxygenation when, for any reason, normal blood flow is impaired.

  3. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced ...

  4. Tuberculosis Diagnosis: Assay Optimization, Validation, and Antigens for Specific Diagnosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interferon (IFN)-gamma release assays (i.e. Bovigam®, Prionics AG) are components of tuberculosis (TB) eradication programs in many countries. Because this test relies on functional leukocytes, environmental conditions before and during the in vitro culture period have the potential to influence the...

  5. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-06-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid.

  6. HIV-1 Fusion Assay

    PubMed Central

    Cavrois, Marielle; Neidleman, Jason; Greene, Warner C.

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 fusion assay measures all steps in the HIV-1 life cycle up to and including viral fusion. It relies on the incorporation of a β-lactamase Vpr (BlaM-Vpr) protein chimera into the virion and the subsequent transfer of this chimera into the target cell by fusion (Figure 1). The transfer is monitored by the enzymatic cleavage of CCF2, a fluorescent dye substrate of β-lactamase, loaded into the target cells. Cleavage of the β-lactam ring in CCF2 by β-lactamase changes the fluorescence emission spectrum of the dye from green (520 nm) to blue (447 nm). This change reflects virion fusion and can be detected by flow cytometry (Figure 2).

  7. Chemotaxis: Under Agarose Assay.

    PubMed

    Brazill, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum represents a superb model for examining chemotaxis. Under vegetative conditions, the amoebae are chemotactically responsive to pterins, such as folate. Under starved conditions, they lose their sensitivity to pterins, and become chemotactically responsive to cAMP. As an NIH model system, Dictyostelium offers a variety of advantages in studying chemotaxis, including its conservation of mammalian signaling pathways, its ease of growth, and its genetic tractability. In this chapter, we describe the use of the under agarose chemotaxis assay to identify proteins involved in controlling motility and directional sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum. Given the similarities between Dictyostelium and mammalian cells, this allows us to dissect the conserved pathways involved in eukaryotic chemotaxis. PMID:26498795

  8. Molecular inversion probe assay.

    PubMed

    Absalan, Farnaz; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2007-01-01

    We have described molecular inversion probe technologies for large-scale genetic analyses. This technique provides a comprehensive and powerful tool for the analysis of genetic variation and enables affordable, large-scale studies that will help uncover the genetic basis of complex disease and explain the individual variation in response to therapeutics. Major applications of the molecular inversion probes (MIP) technologies include targeted genotyping from focused regions to whole-genome studies, and allele quantification of genomic rearrangements. The MIP technology (used in the HapMap project) provides an efficient, scalable, and affordable way to score polymorphisms in case/control populations for genetic studies. The MIP technology provides the highest commercially available multiplexing levels and assay conversion rates for targeted genotyping. This enables more informative, genome-wide studies with either the functional (direct detection) approach or the indirect detection approach. PMID:18025701

  9. Chemical release module facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The chemical release module provides the capability to conduct: (1) thermite based metal vapor releases; (2) pressurized gas releases; (3) dispersed liquid releases; (4) shaped charge releases from ejected submodules; and (5) diagnostic measurements with pi supplied instruments. It also provides a basic R-F and electrical system for: (1) receiving and executing commands; (2) telemetering housekeeping data; (3) tracking; (4) monitoring housekeeping and control units; and (5) ultrasafe disarming and control monitoring.

  10. An assay for adjuvanticity

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, D. W.

    1968-01-01

    Adult mice injected with an adequate amount of a non-immunogenic antigen progress to a specific state of immunological paralysis, unless a substance with `extrinsic' adjuvanticity is injected before the induction of paralysis is completed. Consequently incipiently paralysed mice can be used to assay substances for adjuvanticity. Conventional adjuvants such as Freund's adjuvant and pertussis possess adjuvanticity; other substances with varying degrees of adjuvanticity are listed in the tables. It has been shown that the adjuvanticity effect of an injection of pertussis lasts for only a few days, although the effect of such an injection of pertussis on phagocytosis of carbon particles does not reach a maximum until 2 weeks after the injection. The dose-effectiveness of alum precipitated (highly phagocytosable) bovine γ-globulin was greatly increased by the intraperitoneal injection of pertussis. The evidence is considered to be incompatible with increased phagocytosis being either an essential factor in the role of pertussis as a conventional adjuvant, or in the adjuvanticity effect of pertussis. PMID:4179956

  11. Membrane Flotation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Dorothee A; Ott, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Many postitive-stranded RNA viruses, such as Hepatitis C virus (HCV), highjack cellular membranes, including the Golgi, ER, mitchondria, lipid droplets, and utilize them for replication of their RNA genome or assembly of new virions. By investigating how viral proteins associate with cellular membranes we will better understand the roles of cellular membranes in the viral life cycle. Our lab has focused specifically on the role of lipid droplets and lipid-rich membranes in the life cycle of HCV. To analyze the role of lipid-rich membranes in HCV RNA replication, we utilized a membrane flotation assay based on an 10–20–30% iodixanol density gradient developed by Yeaman et al. (2001). This gradient results in a linear increase in density over almost the entire length of the gradient, and membrane particles are separated in the gradient based on their buoyant characteristics. To preserve membranes in the lysate, cells are broken mechanically in a buffer lacking detergent. The cell lysate is loaded on the bottom of the gradient, overlaid with the gradient, and membranes float up as the iodixanol gradient self-generates. The lipid content of membranes and the concentration of associated proteins will determine the separation of different membranes within the gradient. After centrifugation, fractions can be sampled from the top of the gradient and analyzed using standard SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis for proteins of interest.

  12. Timed-release polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen T D; Truong, Nghia P; Gu, Wenyi; Jia, Zhongfan; Cooper, Matthew A; Monteiro, Michael J

    2013-02-11

    Triggered-release of encapsulated therapeutics from nanoparticles without remote or environmental triggers was demonstrated in this work. Disassembly of the polymer nanoparticles to unimers at precise times allowed the controlled release of oligo DNA. The polymers used in this study consisted of a hydrophilic block for stabilization and second thermoresponsive block for self-assembly and disassembly. At temperatures below the second block's LCST (i.e., below 37 °C for in vitro assays), the diblock copolymer was fully water-soluble, and when heated to 37 °C, the polymer self-assembled into a narrow size distribution of nanoparticles with an average diameter of approximately 25 nm. The thermoresponsive nature of the second block could be manipulated in situ by the self-catalyzed degradation of cationic 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate (DMAEA) units to negatively charged acrylic acid groups and when the amount of acid groups was sufficiently high to increase the LCST of the second block above 37 °C. The disassembly of the nanoparticles could be controlled from 10 to 70 h. The use of these nanoparticles as a combined therapy, in which one or more agents can be released in a predetermined way, has the potential to improve the personal point of care treatment of patients. PMID:23298322

  13. Delayed simultaneous release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, X. W.; Webb, J. B. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The disclosed appendage release mechanism is particularly adapted for use with spacecraft operating with despin mechanisms and releasable appendages. It includes a flexible loop and a number of appendage releasing devices which are attached to the flexible loop. The appendage releasing devices are made up of piston-cams and ball latches which hold the appendages as long as the flexible loop is maintained in a taut condition, but which release the appendages upon relaxation of the flexible loop. The flexible loop remains taut as long as the despin weights remain attached, but relaxes when the despin weights are released.

  14. Fluorescence imaging of glutamate release in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang; Yeung, Edward S.

    1999-12-01

    A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging is down to {mu}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time ({approx}30 s). The standard glutamate test shows a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude, from {mu}M to 0.1 mM range. The in vitro monitoring of glutamate release from cultured neuron cells demonstrated excellent spatial and temporal resolution. (c) 1999 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  15. TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY (TRI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) site is designed to provide information on toxic chemical releases including collected data, guidance documents, program planning, background, history, and, program contacts, among other things. The data included in this homepage have been submi...

  16. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  17. From Antenna to Assay

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Evan G.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Ligand-sensitized, luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable importance because their unique photophysical properties (microsecond to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts) make them well suited as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived emission of lanthanide(III) cations can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence to vastly enhance measurement sensitivity. One challenge in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive complexes with sufficient stability and aqueous solubility for practical applications. In this Account, we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technology. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms and using multi-chromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity; earlier examples utilized a single pendant chromophore (that is, a single “antenna”). Ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to ∼60% that are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM chromophore and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally, we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong

  18. Transporter assays and assay ontologies: useful tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Zdrazil, Barbara; Chichester, Christine; Zander Balderud, Linda; Engkvist, Ola; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-06-01

    Transport proteins represent an eminent class of drug targets and ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) associated genes. There exists a large number of distinct activity assays for transport proteins, depending on not only the measurement needed (e.g. transport activity, strength of ligand–protein interaction), but also due to heterogeneous assay setups used by different research groups. Efforts to systematically organize this (divergent) bioassay data have large potential impact in Public-Private partnership and conventional commercial drug discovery. In this short review, we highlight some of the frequently used high-throughput assays for transport proteins, and we discuss emerging assay ontologies and their application to this field. Focusing on human P-glycoprotein (Multidrug resistance protein 1; gene name: ABCB1, MDR1), we exemplify how annotation of bioassay data per target class could improve and add to existing ontologies, and we propose to include an additional layer of metadata supporting data fusion across different bioassays. PMID:25027375

  19. The assay of diphtheria toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gerwing, Julia; Long, D. A.; Mussett, Marjorie V.

    1957-01-01

    A precise assay of diphtheria toxin is described, based on the linear relationship between the diameter of the skin reaction to, and logarithm of the dose of, toxin. It eliminates the need for preliminary titrations, is economical, provides information about the slope of the log-dose response lines and, therefore, of the validity of the assay, and yields limits of error of potency from the internal evidence of the assay. A study has been made of the effects of avidity, combining power, toxicity and buffering on the assay of diphtheria toxins against the International Standards for both Diphtheria Antitoxin and Schick-Test Toxin. All the toxins assayed against the standard toxin, whatever their other properties might be, gave log-dose response lines of similar slope provided that they were diluted in buffered physiological saline. The assays were therefore valid. These experiments were repeated concurrently in non-immune and in actively immunized guinea-pigs, and comparable figures for potency obtained in both groups. The result was not significantly affected by the avidity or combining power of the toxin. However, non-avid toxins gave low values in Schick units when assayed, by the Römer & Sames technique, in terms of the International Standard for Diphtheria Antitoxin. The problem of the ultimate standard and the implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:13511133

  20. Transwell(®) invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John

    2011-01-01

    The need to identify inhibitors of cancer invasion has driven the development of quantitative in vitro invasion assays. The most common assays used are based on the original Boyden assay system. Today commercially available plastic inserts for multi-well plates, which possess a cell-permeable membrane, as typified by Transwell(®) Permeable Supports, permit accurate repeatable invasion assays. When placed in the well of a multi-well tissue culture plate these inserts create a two-chamber system separated by the cell-permeable membrane. To create an invasion assay the pores in the membrane are blocked with a gel composed of extracellular matrix that is meant to mimic the typical matrices that tumour cells encounter during the invasion process in vivo. By placing the cells on one side of the gel and a chemoattractant on the other side of the gel, invasion is determined by counting those cells that have traversed the cell-permeable membrane having invaded towards the higher concentration of chemoattractant. In this chapter, in addition to protocols for performing Transwell invasion assays, there is consideration of the limitations of current assay designs with regard to available matrices and the absence of tumour microenvironment cells. PMID:21748672

  1. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  2. ELECTROMAGNETIC RELEASE MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Michelson, C.

    1960-09-13

    An electromagnetic release mechanism is offered that may be used, for example, for supporting a safety rod for a nuclear reactor. The release mechanism is designed to have a large excess holding force and a rapid, uniform, and dependable release. The fast release is accomplished by providing the electromagnet with slotttd polts separated by an insulating potting resin, and by constructing the poles with a ferro-nickel alloy. The combination of these two features materially reduces the eddy current power density whenever the magnetic field changes during a release operation. In addition to these features, the design of the armature is such as to provide ready entrance of fluid into any void that might tend to form during release of the armature. This also improves the release time for the mechanism. The large holding force for the mechanism is accomplished by providing a small, selected, uniform air gap between the inner pole piece and the armature.

  3. A Chromogenic Assay Suitable for High-Throughput Determination of Limit Dextrinase Activity in Barley Malt Extracts.

    PubMed

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Marri, Lucia; Lok, Finn; Hindsgaul, Ole

    2015-12-23

    Twenty-four malt samples were assayed for limit dextrinase activity using a chromogenic assay developed recently in our group. The assay utilizes a small soluble chromogenic substrate which is hydrolyzed selectively by limit dextrinase in a coupled assay to release the chromophore 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol. The release of the chromophore, corresponding to the activity of limit dextrinase, can be followed by measuring the UV absorption at 405 nm. The 24 malt samples represented a wide variation of limit dextrinase activities, and these activities could be clearly differentiated by the assay. The results obtained were comparable with the results obtained from a commercially available assay, Limit-Dextrizyme from Megazyme International Ireland. Furthermore, the improved assay uses a soluble substrate. That makes it well suited for high-throughput screening as it can be handled in a 96-well plate format. PMID:26615836

  4. A laboratory-scale pretreatment and hydrolysis assay for determination of reactivity in cellulosic biomass feedstocks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid determination of the release of structural sugars from biomass feedstocks is an important enabling technology for the development of cellulosic biofuels. An assay that is used to determine sugar release for large numbers of samples must be robust, rapid, and easy to perform, and must use modest amounts of the samples to be tested. In this work we present a laboratory-scale combined pretreatment and saccharification assay that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. The assay uses a commercially available automated solvent extraction system for pretreatment followed by a small-scale enzymatic hydrolysis step. The assay allows multiple samples to be screened simultaneously, and uses only ~3 g of biomass per sample. If the composition of the biomass sample is known, the results of the assay can be expressed as reactivity (fraction of structural carbohydrate present in the biomass sample released as monomeric sugars). Results We first present pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis experiments on a set of representative biomass feedstock samples (corn stover, poplar, sorghum, switchgrass) in order to put the assay in context, and then show the results of the assay applied to approximately 150 different feedstock samples covering 5 different materials. From the compositional analysis data we identify a positive correlation between lignin and structural carbohydrates, and from the reactivity data we identify a negative correlation between both carbohydrate and lignin content and total reactivity. The negative correlation between lignin content and total reactivity suggests that lignin may interfere with sugar release, or that more mature samples (with higher structural sugars) may have more recalcitrant lignin. Conclusions The assay presented in this work provides a robust and straightforward method to measure the sugar release after pretreatment and saccharification that can be used as a biomass feedstock screening tool. We demonstrated

  5. Methods to assay Drosophila behavior.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Charles D; Becnel, Jaime; Pandey, Udai B

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, has been used to study molecular mechanisms of a wide range of human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and various neurological diseases(1). We have optimized simple and robust behavioral assays for determining larval locomotion, adult climbing ability (RING assay), and courtship behaviors of Drosophila. These behavioral assays are widely applicable for studying the role of genetic and environmental factors on fly behavior. Larval crawling ability can be reliably used for determining early stage changes in the crawling abilities of Drosophila larvae and also for examining effect of drugs or human disease genes (in transgenic flies) on their locomotion. The larval crawling assay becomes more applicable if expression or abolition of a gene causes lethality in pupal or adult stages, as these flies do not survive to adulthood where they otherwise could be assessed. This basic assay can also be used in conjunction with bright light or stress to examine additional behavioral responses in Drosophila larvae. Courtship behavior has been widely used to investigate genetic basis of sexual behavior, and can also be used to examine activity and coordination, as well as learning and memory. Drosophila courtship behavior involves the exchange of various sensory stimuli including visual, auditory, and chemosensory signals between males and females that lead to a complex series of well characterized motor behaviors culminating in successful copulation. Traditional adult climbing assays (negative geotaxis) are tedious, labor intensive, and time consuming, with significant variation between different trials(2-4). The rapid iterative negative geotaxis (RING) assay(5) has many advantages over more widely employed protocols, providing a reproducible, sensitive, and high throughput approach to quantify adult locomotor and negative geotaxis behaviors. In the RING assay, several genotypes or drug treatments can be tested simultaneously

  6. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  7. Solid waste transuranic storage and assay facility indoor air sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pingel, L.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-20

    The purpose of the study is to collect and analyze samples of the indoor air at the Transuranic Storage and Assay Facility (TRUSAF), Westinghouse Hanford. A modified US EPA TO-14 methodology, using gas chromatography/mass spectrography, may be used for the collection and analysis of the samples. The information obtained will be used to estimate the total release of volatile organic compounds from TRUSAF to determine the need for air emmission permits.

  8. Quantitative Microplate Assay for Real-Time Nuclease Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing the phenomenon of nucleases exposing oligonucleotide phosphate backbones to phosphatases we present a novel quantitative method for kinetics of nuclease catalysis. Inorganic phosphate released from nuclease products by phosphatases could be quantified in real-time by a fluorescent sensor of inorganic phosphate. Two different nucleases were employed, showing the versatility of this assay for multiple turnover label-free nuclease studies. PMID:27101307

  9. Microbiological assay using bioluminescent organism

    SciTech Connect

    Stiffey, A.V.

    1987-12-21

    This invention relates to testing processes for toxicity involving microorganisms and, more particularly, to testing processes for toxicity involving bioluminescent organisms. The present known method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity employs the mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia) as the assay organism. The shrimp are difficult to raise and handle as laboratory assay organisms. This method is labor-intensive, because it requires a assay time of about 96 hours. Summary of the Invention: A microbiological assay in which the assay organism is the dinoflagellate, Pyrocystis lunula. A sample of a substance to be assayed is added to known numbers of the bioluminescent dinoflagellate and the mixture is agitated to subject the organisms to a shear stress causing them to emit light. The amount of light emitted is measured and compared with the amount of light emitted by a known non-toxic control mixture to determine if there is diminution or non-diminution of light emitted by the sample under test which is an indication of the presence or absence of toxicity, respectively. Accordingly, an object of the present invention is the provision of an improved method of testing substances for toxicity. A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved method of testing oil-well drilling fluids for toxicity using bioluminescent dinoflagellate (Pyrocystis lunula).

  10. Strategies for Assaying Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Repnik, Urška; Hafner Česen, Maruša; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Late endosomal organelles have an acidic pH and contain hydrolytic enzymes to degrade cargo delivered either from the extracellular environment by endocytosis or from within the cell itself by autophagy. In the event of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), the contents of late endosomes and lysosomes can be released into the cytosol and then initiate apoptosis. Compounds that can trigger LMP are therefore candidates for the induction of apoptosis, in particular in anticancer therapy. Alternatively, drug-delivery systems, such as nanoparticles, can have side effects that can include LMP, which has toxic consequences for the cells. To determine when, to what extent, and with what consequences LMP occurs is therefore of paramount importance for the evaluation of new potentially LMP-inducing compounds. In this introduction, we provide an overview of some basic assays for assessing LMP, such as staining with lysosomotropic dyes and measurement of cysteine cathepsin activity, and discuss additional strategies for the detection of the release of endogenous lysosomal molecules or preloaded exogenous tracers into the cytosol. PMID:27250949

  11. Mechanism For Guided Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kull, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed mechanism retains protective shield until no longer needed, then releases shield and guides it away for safe ejection from vehicle (spacecraft, according to original concept). Intended for use with shield like one described in article "Crash-Resistant Shield" (NPO-17616). Mechanism for guided release separates shield from base and from supporting truss on command. Band holding shield on base released by explosive separator.

  12. Normal anti-Klebsiella lymphocytotoxicity in ankylosing spondylitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.D.; Fritzler, M.J.; Lewkonia, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    We compared in vitro lymphocytotoxicity (LCT) of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), obtained from patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and normal controls (NC). Assays were performed with antibacterial antisera prepared from AS- and NC-derived Klebsiella and coliforms Escherichia coli. LCT assessed by eosin staining was not significantly different in PBL of 12 AS patients and 28 controls when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. LCT assessed by /sup 51/Cr release was not significantly different for PBL of 20 age- and sex-matched pairs of AS patients and NC when reacted with 3 Klebsiella and 1 E coli antisera. Similarly, LCT-/sup 51/Cr of PBL of 15 matched AS and NC pairs was not significantly different for anti-K21, a serotype putatively implicated in Klebsiella-HLA-B27 antigenic cross-reactivity. Our results do not support the notion of molecular mimicry between Klebsiella and B27 in the pathogenesis of primary AS.

  13. Release the Body, Release the Mind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoner, Martha Goff

    1998-01-01

    A college English teacher describes the anxiety and resentment of students during in-class writing assignments and the successful classroom use of meditation and body movement. Movement seemed to relax the students, change their attitudes, and release their creative impulses to write. Implications related to the body-mind connection are pondered.…

  14. HIV-1 Capsid Stabilization Assay.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Thomas; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects in HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. This assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). By using our novel assay, one can measure the ability of different drugs to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine A, Bi2, and the peptide CAI. We also found that purified CPSF6 (1-321) protein stabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes (Fricke et al., J Virol 87:10587-10597, 2013). Here we describe in detail the use of this capsid stability assay. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 capsid stability in vitro. PMID:26714703

  15. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. PMID:24681053

  16. Large scientific releases

    SciTech Connect

    Pongratz, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics.

  17. Large scientific releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongratz, M. B.

    The motivation for active experiments in space is considered, taking into account the use of active techniques to obtain a better understanding of the natural space environment, the utilization of the advantages of space as a laboratory to study fundamental plasma physics, and the employment of active techniques to determine the magnitude, degree, and consequences of artificial modification of the space environment. It is pointed out that mass-injection experiments in space plasmas began about twenty years ago with the Project Firefly releases. Attention is given to mass-release techniques and diagnostics, operational aspects of mass release active experiments, the active observation of mass release experiments, active perturbation mass release experiments, simulating an artificial modification of the space environment, and active experiments to study fundamental plasma physics.

  18. A homogeneous biochemiluminescent assay for detection of influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Kwok Min; Li, Xiao Jing; Pan, Lu; Li, X. J.

    2015-05-01

    Current methods of rapid detection of influenza are based on detection of the nucleic acids or antigens of influenza viruses. Since influenza viruses constantly mutate leading to appearance of new strains or variants of viruses, these detection methods are susceptible to genetic changes in influenza viruses. Type A and B influenza viruses contain neuraminidase, an essential enzyme for virus replication which enables progeny influenza viruses leave the host cells to infect new cells. Here we describe an assay method, the homogeneous biochemiluminescent assay (HBA), for rapid detection of influenza by detecting viral neuraminidase activity. The assay mimics the light production process of a firefly: a viral neuraminidase specific substrate containing a luciferin moiety is cleaved in the presence of influenza virus to release luciferin, which becomes a substrate to firefly luciferase in a light production system. All reagents can be formulated in a single reaction mix so that the assay involves only one manual step, i.e., sample addition. Presence of Type A or B influenza virus in the sample leads to production of strong, stable and easily detectable light signal, which lasts for hours. Thus, this influenza virus assay is suitable for use in point-of-care settings.

  19. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  20. Evolving BioAssay Ontology (BAO): modularization, integration and applications.

    PubMed

    Abeyruwan, Saminda; Vempati, Uma D; Küçük-McGinty, Hande; Visser, Ubbo; Koleti, Amar; Mir, Ahsan; Sakurai, Kunie; Chung, Caty; Bittker, Joshua A; Clemons, Paul A; Brudz, Steve; Siripala, Anosha; Morales, Arturo J; Romacker, Martin; Twomey, David; Bureeva, Svetlana; Lemmon, Vance; Schürer, Stephan C

    2014-01-01

    The lack of established standards to describe and annotate biological assays and screening outcomes in the domain of drug and chemical probe discovery is a severe limitation to utilize public and proprietary drug screening data to their maximum potential. We have created the BioAssay Ontology (BAO) project (http://bioassayontology.org) to develop common reference metadata terms and definitions required for describing relevant information of low-and high-throughput drug and probe screening assays and results. The main objectives of BAO are to enable effective integration, aggregation, retrieval, and analyses of drug screening data. Since we first released BAO on the BioPortal in 2010 we have considerably expanded and enhanced BAO and we have applied the ontology in several internal and external collaborative projects, for example the BioAssay Research Database (BARD). We describe the evolution of BAO with a design that enables modeling complex assays including profile and panel assays such as those in the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS). One of the critical questions in evolving BAO is the following: how can we provide a way to efficiently reuse and share among various research projects specific parts of our ontologies without violating the integrity of the ontology and without creating redundancies. This paper provides a comprehensive answer to this question with a description of a methodology for ontology modularization using a layered architecture. Our modularization approach defines several distinct BAO components and separates internal from external modules and domain-level from structural components. This approach facilitates the generation/extraction of derived ontologies (or perspectives) that can suit particular use cases or software applications. We describe the evolution of BAO related to its formal structures, engineering approaches, and content to enable modeling of complex assays and integration with other ontologies and

  1. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Charych, D.; Reichart, A.

    2000-06-27

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  2. Three dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichart, Anke

    2000-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flu virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  3. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  4. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  5. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  6. Assays for B lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Bondada, Subbarao; Robertson, Darrell A

    2003-11-01

    This unit describes the antigenic stimulation of in vitro antibody production by B cells and the subsequent measurement of secreted antibodies. The first basic protocol is a generalized system for inducing in vitro antibody production and can accommodate various types of antigens under study. Secreted antibodies can then be measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or other soluble-antibody detection systems. Alternatively, the number of antibody-producing cells can be quantified by plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays presented in this unit: the Cunningham-Szenberg and the Jerne-Nordin techniques. Both methods employ specially prepared slide chambers, described here, in which the antibody-producing B cells are mixed with complement and indicator sheep red blood cells (SRBC), or with trinitrophenol-modified SRBC (TNP-SRBC), with subsequent lysis and counting of plaques. Because IgM antibodies fix complement efficiently, whereas IgG and IgA antibodies do not, unmodified PFC assays measure only IgM antibodies. The assay can be modified, however, to measure all classes of antibodies or to enumerate total immunoglobulin-secreting B cells, as described in alternate protocols. Yet another method of measuring the number of antibody-producing B cells (in a class-specific fashion) is to use the ELISPOT technique described in UNIT 7.14. The resting B cells used in these procedures are prepared as described in the final support protocols for Percoll gradient centrifugation. PMID:18432909

  7. Decreased NK killing in patients with multiple sclerosis: An analysis on the level of the single effector cell in peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid in relation to the activity of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Jean; Jondal, M.; Seeley, Janet; Ullberg, M.; Sidén, Å.

    1982-01-01

    Natural killer cell activity has earlier been shown to be depressed in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) (Benczur et al., 1980). In the present study, this defect was more clearly characterized in different stages of the disease. By using a single-cell cytotoxicity assay in agarose (Grimm & Bonavida, 1979), in combination with the conventional 51Cr-release, the number of target-binding cells (TBCs) and the fraction of active killer cells therein could be compared with the radioisotope release in the different patient groups. It was found that patients with active and chronic MS showed lower natural killer (NK) activity in the 51Cr-release assay as compared with age and sex-matched controls, in contrast to stable MS patients who were comparable with their control group. The single cell cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that acute MS patients had a decreased number of TBCs in peripheral blood and that they also had a decreased percentage of active NK cells in their TBC fractions. Patients with chronic MS were normal in the single-cell cytotoxicity assay. When cells present in CSF were analysed in acute and chronic MS, few cells were found with target binding capacity and only in two instances out of 13 could any cytotoxicity at all be detected. Patients with other neurological diseases (OND) were found to have detectable NK activity in CSF in six cases out of ten in the single-cell assay. OND patients as a group also had higher peripheral NK activity in the 51Cr-release assay as compared with the control group. When peripheral and CSF cells from MS patients and OND patients were treated with interferon, no increase in TBCs or fraction of killer cells in TBCs was found. In the 51Cr-release assay, comparable increases in cytotoxicity were found in all groups. One possible explanation for the stage-related NK suppression seen in the present investigation may be a decreased interferon production combined with immune-complex induced, macrophage-produced prostaglandins

  8. Characterisation of textile dust extracts: I. Histamine release in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J S; Duncan, P G

    1984-01-01

    Cotton, flax, hemp, and cotton bracts extracts did not release histamine from mouse, rat, guinea pig, horse, cow, and monkey lung. Neither rat peritoneal mast cells nor mouse mastocytoma cells released histamine when incubated with textile dust extracts. Compound 48/80 caused a considerable release of histamine from all these tissues and the extracts released histamine from pig and human lung tissues. Whereas dusts that cause bronchospasm in man released histamine--for instance, cotton--those that are inactive, such as pericarps, did not. Histamine release was not quantitatively related to the concentration of extract used. Cotton bracts extract released histamine from pig lung tissue whereas in the same preparations methyl piperonylate was inactive. The active releasing agent was highly water soluble but could not be steam distilled from, nor extracted by, ether from bracts extract. These physicochemical properties are not characteristic of methyl piperonylate. There was no correlation between the induction of histidine decarboxylase and the histamine releasing capacity of the extracts. We conclude that pig lung is a useful qualitative assay tissue for the further characterisation of the histamine releasing agent(s) in textile dust extracts. PMID:6197990

  9. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  10. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  11. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  12. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  13. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State...

  14. Qualitative and Quantitative Assays for Detection and Characterization of Protein Antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Farris, M Heath; Ford, Kara A; Doyle, Richard C

    2016-01-01

    Initial evaluations of large microbial libraries for potential producers of novel antimicrobial proteins require both qualitative and quantitative methods to screen for target enzymes prior to investing greater research effort and resources. The goal of this protocol is to demonstrate two complementary assays for conducting these initial evaluations. The microslide diffusion assay provides an initial or simple detection screen to enable the qualitative and rapid assessment of proteolytic activity against an array of both viable and heat-killed bacterial target substrates. As a counterpart, the increased sensitivity and reproducibility of the dye-release assay provides a quantitative platform for evaluating and comparing environmental influences affecting the hydrolytic activity of protein antimicrobials. The ability to label specific heat-killed cell culture substrates with Remazol brilliant blue R dye expands this capability to tailor the dye-release assay to characterize enzymatic activity of interest. PMID:27166738

  15. Mycoplasma-dependent activation of normal lymphocytes: induction of a lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity for allogeneic and syngeneic mouse target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, K E; Cole, B C; Ward, J R

    1977-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis, M. hominis, and M. arginini were tested for their ability to induce a cytotoxic response from normal CBA mouse lymphocytes against 51Cr-labeled allogeneic target cells. In most cases, the mycoplasmas alone were not toxic for the target cells. Furthermore, the mycoplasmas did not result in decreased lymphocyte viability but, in fact, contributed to enhanced lymphocyte survival. In the absence of normal CBA lymphocytes, mycoplasmas alone did not induce a significant amount of cell damage in either the allogeneic or the syngeneic target cells. Strains of M. arthritidis and M. hominis, when added to the lymphocyte-target cell mixtures, induced statistically significant increases in 51Cr release from both target cell types at each assay period after 6 h. The release of 51Cr was taken as a measure of cell death. M. arginini induced only low levels of cytotoxicity or none at all. Both arthritogenic and non-arthritogenic strains of M. arthritidis induced the cytotoxic response. The degree of cytotoxicity produced was directly related to the size of the initial inoculum. The presence or absence of serum in the culture medium did not contribute significantly to the cytotoxicity response. PMID:562853

  16. Rad-Release

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  17. Rad-Release

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

  18. Local Affinity Release.

    PubMed

    Delplace, Vianney; Obermeyer, Jaclyn; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-07-26

    The use of hydrogels for therapeutic delivery is a burgeoning area of investigation. These water-swollen polymer matrices are ideal platforms for localized drug delivery that can be further combined with specific ligands or nanotechnologies to advance the controlled release of small-molecule drugs and proteins. Due to the advantage of hydrophobic, electrostatic, or specific extracellular matrix interactions, affinity-based strategies can overcome burst release and challenges associated with encapsulation. Future studies will provide innovative binding tools, truly stimuli-responsive systems, and original combinations of emerging technologies to control the release of therapeutics spatially and temporally. Local drug delivery can be achieved by directly injecting a therapeutic to its site of action and is advantageous because off-target effects associated with systemic delivery can be minimized. For prolonged benefit, a vehicle that provides sustained drug release is required. Hydrogels are versatile platforms for localized drug release, owing to the large library of biocompatible building blocks from which they can be formed. Injectable hydrogel formulations that gel quickly in situ and provide sustained release of therapeutics are particularly advantageous to minimize invasiveness. The incorporation of polymers, ligands or nanoparticles that have an affinity for the therapeutic of interest improve control over the release of small-molecule drugs and proteins from hydrogels, enabling spatial and temporal control over the delivery. Such affinity-based strategies can overcome drug burst release and challenges associated with protein instability, allowing more effective therapeutic molecule delivery for a range of applications from therapeutic contact lenses to ischemic tissue regeneration. PMID:27403513

  19. Advanced release technologies program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdy, Bill

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the ARTS program was to develop lighter and less expensive spacecraft ordnance and release systems that answer to the requirements of a wide variety of spacecraft applications. These improvements were to be evaluated at the spacecraft system level, as it was determined that there were substantial system-level costs associated with the present ordnance and release subsystems. New, better devices were to be developed, then flight qualified, then integrated into a flight experiment in order to prove the reliability required for their subsequent use on high-reliability spacecraft. The secondary goal of the program was to quantify the system-level benefits of these new subsystems based upon the development program results. Three non-explosive release mechanisms and one laser-diode-based ordnance system were qualified under the program. The release devices being developed were required to release high preloads because it is easier to scale down a release mechanism than to scale it up. The laser initiator developed was required to be a direct replacement for NASA Standard Initiators, since these are the most common initiator in use presently. The program began in October, 1991, with completion of the flight experiment scheduled for February, 1994. This paper provides an overview of the ARTS program, discusses the benefits of using the ARTS components, introduces the new components, compares them with conventional systems and each other, and provides recommendations on how best to implement them.

  20. Important Norwegian crude assays updated

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A

    1990-03-12

    New assays on two important Norwegian North Sea crude oils, Statfjord and Gullfaks, are presented. Both are high-quality, low-sulfur crudes that will yield a full range of good-quality products. All assay data came from industry-standard test procedures. The Statfjord field is the largest in the North Sea. Production started in 1979. Statfjord is a typical North Sea crude, produced from three separate platforms and three separate loading buoys with interconnecting lines. Current production is about 700,000 b/d. Gullfaks is produced from a large field in Block 34/10 of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea production area. Gullfaks crude oil is more biodegraded than other crudes from the region. Biodegradation has removed most of the waxy normal paraffins, resulting in a heavier, more naphthenic and aromatic crude.

  1. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks. PMID:26608293

  2. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  3. Two offshore Australian crudes assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-05-09

    Two light, sweet crudes from offshore Australia have been assayed. Gippsland crude, also called Bass Strait, is produced off the coast of Victoria, in southeastern Australia. The 47 API, 0.09% sulfur crude was analyzed in mid-1993. Skua, a 42 API, 0.06 wt % sulfur crude, is produced in the Timor Sea. Data are given on the whole crude and fractions for both deposits. Both chemical and physical properties are listed.

  4. Olive oil phenolic compounds affect the release of aroma compounds.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Alessandro; Caporaso, Nicola; Villani, Veronica; Paduano, Antonello; Sacchi, Raffaele

    2015-08-15

    Twelve aroma compounds were monitored and quantified by dynamic headspace analysis after their addition in refined olive oil model systems with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) biophenols to simulate EVOO aroma. The influence of polyphenols on aroma release was studied under simulated mouth conditions by using human saliva, and SPME-GC/MS analysis. While few differences were observed in orthonasal assay (without saliva), interesting results were obtained for retronasal aroma. Biophenols caused generally the lowest headspace release of almost all volatile compounds. However, only ethyl esters and linalool concentrations were significantly lower in retronasal than orthonasal assay. Saliva also caused higher concentration of hexanal, probably due to hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) action on linoleyl hydroperoxides. Epicatechin was compared to EVOO phenolics and the behaviour was dramatically different, likely to be due to salivary protein-tannin binding interactions, which influenced aroma headspace release. These results were also confirmed using two extra virgin olive oils. PMID:25794752

  5. Glutamate release from platelets: exocytosis versus glutamate transporter reversal.

    PubMed

    Kasatkina, Ludmila A; Borisova, Tatiana A

    2013-11-01

    Platelets express neuronal and glial glutamate transporters EAAT 1-3 in the plasma membrane and vesicular glutamate transporters VGLUT 1,2 in the membrane of secretory granules. This study is focused on the assessment of non-exocytotic glutamate release, that is, the unstimulated release, heteroexchange and glutamate transporter reversal in platelets. Using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay, the absence of unstimulated release of endogenous glutamate from platelets was demonstrated, even after inhibition of glutamate transporters and cytoplasmic enzyme glutamine synthetase by dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate and methionine sulfoximine, respectively. Depolarization of the plasma membrane by exposure to elevated [K(+)] did not induce the release of glutamate from platelets that was shown using the glutamate dehydrogenase assay and radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate. Glutamate efflux by means of heteroexchange with transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporters dl-threo-β-hydroxyaspartate (dl-THA) was not observed. Furthermore, the protonophore cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon (FCCP) and inhibitor of V-type H(+)-ATPase bafilomycin A1 also failed to stimulate the release of glutamate from platelets. However, exocytotic release of glutamate from secretory granules in response to thrombin stimulation was not prevented by elevated [K(+)], dl-THA, FCCP and bafilomycin A1. In contrast to nerve terminals, platelets cannot release glutamate in a non-exocytotic manner. Heteroexchange, transporter-mediated and unstimulated release of glutamate are not inherent to platelets. Therefore, platelets may be used as a peripheral marker/model for the analysis of glutamate uptake by brain nerve terminals only (direct function of transporters), whereas the mechanisms of glutamate release are different in platelets and nerve terminals. Glutamate is released by platelets exclusively by means of exocytosis. Also, reverse function of vesicular glutamate transporters of platelets is

  6. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Omokoko, Tana A; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard (51)Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the (51)Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  7. Luciferase mRNA Transfection of Antigen Presenting Cells Permits Sensitive Nonradioactive Measurement of Cellular and Humoral Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Omokoko, Tana A.; Luxemburger, Uli; Bardissi, Shaheer; Simon, Petra; Utsch, Magdalena; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is rapidly evolving as an effective treatment option for many cancers. With the emerging fields of cancer vaccines and adoptive cell transfer therapies, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput in vitro cytotoxicity assays that efficiently analyze immune effector functions. The gold standard 51Cr-release assay is very accurate but has the major disadvantage of being radioactive. We reveal the development of a versatile and nonradioactive firefly luciferase in vitro transcribed (IVT) RNA-based assay. Demonstrating high efficiency, consistency, and excellent target cell viability, our optimized luciferase IVT RNA is used to transfect dividing and nondividing primary antigen presenting cells. Together with the long-lasting expression and minimal background, the direct measurement of intracellular luciferase activity of living cells allows for the monitoring of killing kinetics and displays paramount sensitivity. The ability to cotransfect the IVT RNA of the luciferase reporter and the antigen of interest into the antigen presenting cells and its simple read-out procedure render the assay high-throughput in nature. Results generated were comparable to the 51Cr release and further confirmed the assay's ability to measure antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The assay's combined simplicity, practicality, and efficiency tailor it for the analysis of antigen-specific cellular and humoral effector functions during the development of novel immunotherapies. PMID:27057556

  8. Determining drug release rates of hydrophobic compounds from nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Suzanne M; Bukari, Abdallah A; Dawoud, Mohammed; Bunjes, Heike; Rinaldi, Carlos; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-07-28

    Obtaining meaningful drug release profiles for drug formulations is essential prior to in vivo testing and for ensuring consistent quality. The release kinetics of hydrophobic drugs from nanocarriers (NCs) are not well understood because the standard protocols for maintaining sink conditions and sampling are not valid owing to mass transfer and solubility limitations. In this work, a new in vitroassay protocol based on 'lipid sinks' and magnetic separation produces release conditions that mimic the concentrations of lipid membranes and lipoproteins in vivo, facilitates separation, and thus allows determination of intrinsic release rates of drugs from NCs. The assay protocol is validated by (i) determining the magnetic separation efficiency, (ii) demonstrating that sink condition requirements are met, and (iii) accounting for drug by completing a mass balance. NCs of itraconazole and cyclosporine A (CsA) were prepared and the drug release profiles were determined. This release protocol has been used to compare the drug release from a polymer stabilized NC of CsA to a solid drug NP of CsA alone. These data have led to the finding that stabilizing block copolymer layers have a retarding effect on drug release from NCs, reducing the rate of CsA release fourfold compared with the nanoparticle without a polymer coating.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298440

  9. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    PubMed

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples. PMID:24123550

  10. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System for assaying HTO from detritiation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L.; Naruse, Y.

    1992-07-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) is being added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system is an upgrade to the TWT to provide accurate measurements of the liquid waste generated from this system. Within the TWT, hydrogen isotopes are removed from the effluent gas stream by the catalytic conversion to water and the subsequent removal of water by molecular sieve trapping prior to the release to the environment. Within the TWT and similar systems, molecular sieve regeneration is required to rejuvenate the beds. The major difference of the MSRS and other regeneration systems is the capability of direct assay of long-term storage waste containers. This is accomplished with loop-flow regeneration, water collection, and tritiated water assay by scintillation and calorimetric techniques. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the Tritium Waste Treatment system.

  11. Molecular Sieve Regeneration System for assaying HTO from detritiation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nasise, J.E.; Anderson, J.L. ); Naruse, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    A Molecular Sieve Regeneration System (MSRS) is being added to the existing Tritium Waste Treatment system (TWT) within the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system is an upgrade to the TWT to provide accurate measurements of the liquid waste generated from this system. Within the TWT, hydrogen isotopes are removed from the effluent gas stream by the catalytic conversion to water and the subsequent removal of water by molecular sieve trapping prior to the release to the environment. Within the TWT and similar systems, molecular sieve regeneration is required to rejuvenate the beds. The major difference of the MSRS and other regeneration systems is the capability of direct assay of long-term storage waste containers. This is accomplished with loop-flow regeneration, water collection, and tritiated water assay by scintillation and calorimetric techniques. This paper describes the MSRS in detail and how it is interfaced with the Tritium Waste Treatment system.

  12. Biotoxicity assays for fruiting body lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Künzler, Markus; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Butschi, Alex; Garbani, Mattia; Lüthy, Peter; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a specific class of fungal lectins, commonly referred to as fruiting body lectins, play a role as effector molecules in the defense of fungi against predators and parasites. Hallmarks of these fungal lectins are their specific expression in reproductive structures, fruiting bodies, and/or sclerotia and their synthesis on free ribosomes in the cytoplasm. Fruiting body lectins are released upon damage of the fungal cell and bind to specific carbohydrate structures of predators and parasites, which leads to deterrence, inhibition of growth, and development or even killing of these organisms. Here, we describe assays to assess the toxicity of such lectins and other cytoplasmic proteins toward three different model organisms: the insect Aedes aegypti, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii. All three assays are based on heterologous expression of the examined proteins in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli and feeding of these recombinant bacteria to omnivorous and bacterivorous organisms. PMID:20816208

  13. Altitude release mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Kulhanek, Frank C.

    1977-01-01

    An altitude release mechanism for releasing a radiosonde or other measuring instrument from a balloon carrying it up into the atmosphere includes a bottle partially filled with water, a tube sealed into the bottle having one end submerged in the water in the bottle and the free end extending above the top of the bottle and a strip of water-disintegrable paper held within the free end of the tube linking the balloon to the remainder of the package. As the balloon ascends, the lowered atmospheric air pressure causes the air in the bottle to expand, forcing the water in the bottle up the tubing to wet and disintegrate the paper, releasing the package from the balloon.

  14. Comparison of broad-scope assays of nucleotide sugar-dependent glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Bubner, Patricia; Czabany, Tibor; Luley-Goedl, Christiane; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are abundant in nature and diverse in their range of substrates. Application of GTs is, however, often complicated by their narrow substrate specificity. GTs with tailored specificities are highly demanded for targeted glycosylation reactions. Engineering of such GTs is, however, restricted by lack of practical and broad-scope assays currently available. Here we present an improvement of an inexpensive and simple assay that relies on the enzymatic detection of inorganic phosphate cleaved from nucleoside phosphate products released in GT reactions. This phosphatase-coupled assay (PCA) is compared with other GT assays: a pH shift assay and a commercially available immunoassay in Escherichia coli cell-free extract (CE). Furthermore, we probe PCA with three GTs with different specificities. Our results demonstrate that PCA is a versatile and apparently general GT assay with a detection limit as low as 1 mU. The detection limit of the pH shift assay is roughly 4 times higher. The immunoassay, by contrast, detected only nucleoside diphosphates (NDPs) but had the lowest detection limit. Compared with these assays, PCA showed superior robustness and, therefore, appears to be a suitable general screening assay for nucleotide sugar-dependent GTs. PMID:26297818

  15. Investigation on Photorespiration With a Sensitive 14C-Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zelitch, Israel

    1968-01-01

    A leaf disk assay for photorespiration has been developed based on the rate of release of recently fixed 14CO2 in light in a rapid stream of CO2-free air at 30° to 35°. In tobacco leaves (Havana Seed) photorespiration with this assay is 3 to 5 times greater than the 14CO2 output in the dark. In maize, photorespiration is only 2% of that in tobacco. The importance of open leaf stomata, rapid flow rates of CO2-free air, elevated temperatures, and oxygen in the atmosphere in order to obtain release into the air of a larger portion of the 14CO2 evolved within the tissue in the light was established in tobacco. Photorespiration, but not dark respiration, was inhibited by α-hydroxy-2-pyridinemethanesulfonic acid, an inhibitor of glycolate oxidase, and by 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (CMU), an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron transport, under conditions which did not affect the stomata. These experiments show that the substrates of photorespiration and dark respiration differ and also provide additional support for the role of glycolate as a major substrate of photorespiration. It was also shown that at 35° the quantity of 14CO2 released in the assay may represent only 33% of the gross 14CO2 evolved in the light, the remainder being recycled within the tissue. It was concluded that maize does not evolve appreciable quantities of CO2 in the light and that this largely accounts for the greater efficiency of net photosynthesis exhibited by maize. Hence low rates of photorespiration may be expected to be correlated with a high rate of CO2 uptake at the normal concentrations of CO2 found in air and at higher light intensities. PMID:16656976

  16. [Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene.].

    PubMed

    Kurz-Müller, K; Zenz, M

    1991-12-01

    Dextropropoxyphene is a mild opioid analgesic whose analgesic potency corresponds to that of acetylsalicylic acid and paracetamol. It has a similar analgesic effect to codeine but also a considerably lower addiction and dependence potential. Dextropropoxyphene is a therapeutic alternative to other weak opioids such as codeine or dihydrocodeine. In the case of absolute intolerance of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, their analgesic effect can be replaced by that of dextropropoxyphene. In case of relative intolerance, i.e. occurrence of non-tolerable side-effects, the dose of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents can be kept low by additional administration of dextropropoxyphene, which simultaneously enhances analgesia. Analgesics are prescribed according to a definite time schedule for the long-term treatment of chronic pain. The oral route of administration is preferred since it enables the patient to be independent of the nursing staff. Sustained-release drugs with a duration of action of at least 8 h are used in preference to other preparations. Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene provides analgesia for 8-12 h. Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene clearly differs from non-sustained-release dextropropoxyphene in its pharmacokinetics. Repeated administration of the sustained-release form at the therapeutically recommended intervals does not lead to cumulation, and the risk of accidental overdosage is extremely low. Intoxication can only occur after simultaneous ingestion of alcohol or other centrally depressant substances or in the presence of hepatic and/or renal failure. Sustained-release dextropropoxyphene is a sensible and undeniable alternative for the second stage in the analgesic ladder of chronic pain therapy. PMID:18415177

  17. Barium release system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A chemical system is described for releasing a good yield of free barium neutral atoms and barium ions in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium. The barium is released in the vapor phase so that it can be ionized by solar radiation and also be excited to emit resonance radiation in the visible range. The ionized luminous cloud of barium becomes a visible indication of magnetic and electrical characteristics in space and allows determination of these properties over relatively large areas at a given time.

  18. Benzene release. status report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworjanyn, L.O.; Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-11-04

    Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

  19. TnI-Ultra assay measurements in cancer patients: comparison with the conventional assay and clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Salvatici, Michela; Cardinale, Daniela; Botteri, Edoardo; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Mauro, Cristian; Cassatella, Maria C; Lentati, Paola; Bottari, Fabio; Zorzino, Laura; Passerini, Rita; Cipolla, Carlo M; Sandri, Maria T

    2014-08-01

    The serial monitoring of cardiac troponin represents an effective approach for the early identification, assessment, and monitoring of chemotherapy-induced cardiac injury. Over the last few years new generations of troponin assays, referred to as sensitive and high sensitivity assays, able to detect very low concentrations of troponin, have been progressively released on different platforms. Some studies have assessed the comparability of the cTnI measurements with the new assays versus the conventional ones, but none of these in the oncological population. We compared the cTnI results determined on Stratus CS and ADVIA Centaur CP System in 70 breast cancer patients, for a total of 327 samples collected during different cycles of treatment. Correlation (Spearman = 0.732) and agreement (91.4%) between the assays were good (244 concordant negatives and 55 concordant positives), with a frequency of 8.6% discordant results among the cTnI measurements. Despite the well-known lack in the harmonization and standardization of the currently commercially available cTnI methods, we found a good clinical concordance of cTnI determination on both systems. PMID:24693994

  20. An application of the RFQ Linac: Nuclear waste assay characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamkin, K.; Schultz, F.; Womble, P.; Humphrey, D.; Vourvopoulos, G.

    1997-02-01

    A collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Western Kentucky University examines the problem of characterization and assay of nuclear waste with high intrinsic neutron and gamma-ray fields. This waste is defined as Remote Handled-Transuranic waste (RH-TRU). A Radiofrequency Quadrupole Linac is used to produce pulses of neutrons, which impinge on the drum that contains the nuclear waste. The neutrons, after being thermalized in the matrix of the drum, are captured by the fissile material (239Pu or 235U), which releases fast neutrons upon fission. Experimental results will be presented to show the versatility of employing the RFQ with the Differential Die-away Technique.

  1. Predictive assays in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.M.L.

    1994-12-31

    There are reports of promising correlations between patient response to radiotherapy and laboratory measurements of tumor radiosensitivity, fibroblast radiosensitivity, tumor proliferation, and tumor oxygenation status. These all need to be substantiated in large clinical studies. The development of rapid, reliable assays, in particular for determining intrinsic radiosensitivity, would greatly facilitate this work. If the results illustrated in the figures in the chapter can be combined and shown to be feasible on a routine clinical basis, then radiobiologists would be able to provide radiotherapists with a useful aid for the individualization of patient treatment. 162 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Automated cytopathic effect (CPE) assays.

    PubMed

    McAleer, W J; Miller, W J; Hurni, W M; Machlowitz, R A; Hilleman, M R

    1983-07-01

    An automated CPE procedure has been developed that increases the precision and ease of performing titrations of measles, mumps and rubella viruses in vaccine materials. By this procedure, additions of cell suspensions and reagents and the dilution of samples are performed automatically by a modified Dynatiter instrument, using 96-well microtitre plates. Cell monolayers are stained with carbolfuchsin dye to eliminate the need for microscopic examination. Finally, the trays are read in an optical scanner and the end points calculated automatically by a programmable calculator. The increased accuracy and precision attained by performing greater numbers of replicate assays at reasonable cost will be of particular value to vaccine manufacturers. PMID:6885830

  3. Release the Prisoners Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hecke, Tanja

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the mathematical approach of the optimal strategy to win the "Release the prisoners" game and the integration of this analysis in a math class. Outline lesson plans at three different levels are given, where simulations are suggested as well as theoretical findings about the probability distribution function and its mean…

  4. Release of OLe peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OLe is a high oleic Spanish-type peanut that has excellent yield and enhanced Sclerotinia blight and pod rot resistance when compared to other high oleic Spanish cultivars. The purpose for releasing OLe is to provide peanut producers with a true Spanish peanut that is high oleic and has enhanced yi...

  5. Trabeculectomy with releasable sutures.

    PubMed Central

    Kolker, A E; Kass, M A; Rait, J L

    1993-01-01

    We attempted to reduce some of the postoperative complications of trabeculectomy by using releasable scleral flap sutures. This technique allows an initial tight closure of the scleral flap with the option to increase aqueous humor outflow in the early postoperative period. We reviewed our experience with trabeculectomy and releasable sutures in 146 eyes (134 patients) and compared these cases with a prior series of 128 eyes (124 patients) that underwent trabeculectomy with permanent scleral flap sutures. In the control group, 42 eyes (32.8%) had clinically detectable shallowing of the anterior chamber in the postoperative period. In contrast, shallow anterior chamber was noted in 21 eyes (14.4%) in the group with releasable sutures (P = .0003). Flat anterior chamber, defined as iridocorneal touch to the pupil margin, occurred in 11 control eyes (8.6%) but in only 2 eyes (1.4%) with releasable sutures (P = .0078). Surgical intervention to drain suprachoroidal fluid and re-form the anterior chamber was required in eight control eyes (6.2%) but in only one study eye (0.7%) (P = .014). At 1 year of follow-up, the two groups were similar in terms of mean intraocular pressure, the need for ocular hypotensive medications, and failure rate. PMID:8140688

  6. DSCOVR Public Release Statement

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-08-04

    ... Wednesday, July 20, 2016 The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) is a NOAA/NASA mission located near the ... Control Book .    NOAA will release data from the space weather instruments on July 27 th . The data, as well as space weather ...

  7. Literature: Released Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    This volume contains 1970-71 Literature assessment exercises (all in the public domain) which have been selected for release at this time by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Information furnished for each exercise includes: the literature objective it was designed to measure, the theme (section) in which it appears, relevant…

  8. Double swivel toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Guy L.; Schneider, William C.

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device is disclosed which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device comprises a fastener plate and fastener body each attachable to one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate and the fastener body are fastened by a dual swivel toggle member. The toggle member is supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. Its other end is received in a central opening in the fastener body, and has a universally mounted retainer ring member. The toggle member is restrained by three retractable latching pins symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle member and positionable in latching engagement with the retainer ring member on the toggle member. Each pin is retractable by a pyrotechnic charge, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face on the latch pins to effect retraction from the ring member. While retraction of all three pins releases the ring member, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the ring member and its dual pivotal movement ensures a release.

  9. Releasable Asbestos Field Sampler

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asbestos aerosolization (or releasability) is the potential for fibrous asbestos structures that are present in a material or on a solid surface to become airborne when the source is disturbed by human activities or natural forces. In turn, the magnitude of the airborne concentra...

  10. Indirect conductimetric assay of antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Sawai, J; Doi, R; Maekawa, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Kojima, H

    2002-11-01

    The applicability of indirect conductimetric assays for evaluation of antibacterial activity was examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) obtained by the indirect method was consistent with that by the direct conductimetric assay and the turbidity method. The indirect assay allows use of growth media, which cannot be used in the direct conductimetric assay, making it possible to evaluate the antibacterial activity of insoluble or slightly soluble materials with high turbidity, such as antibacterial ceramic powders. PMID:12407467

  11. The chemistry behind antioxidant capacity assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dejian; Ou, Boxin; Prior, Ronald L

    2005-03-23

    This review summarizes the multifaceted aspects of antioxidants and the basic kinetic models of inhibited autoxidation and analyzes the chemical principles of antioxidant capacity assays. Depending upon the reactions involved, these assays can roughly be classified into two types: assays based on hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions and assays based on electron transfer (ET). The majority of HAT-based assays apply a competitive reaction scheme, in which antioxidant and substrate compete for thermally generated peroxyl radicals through the decomposition of azo compounds. These assays include inhibition of induced low-density lipoprotein autoxidation, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), total radical trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), and crocin bleaching assays. ET-based assays measure the capacity of an antioxidant in the reduction of an oxidant, which changes color when reduced. The degree of color change is correlated with the sample's antioxidant concentrations. ET-based assays include the total phenols assay by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (FCR), Trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), "total antioxidant potential" assay using a Cu(II) complex as an oxidant, and DPPH. In addition, other assays intended to measure a sample's scavenging capacity of biologically relevant oxidants such as singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, peroxynitrite, and hydroxyl radical are also summarized. On the basis of this analysis, it is suggested that the total phenols assay by FCR be used to quantify an antioxidant's reducing capacity and the ORAC assay to quantify peroxyl radical scavenging capacity. To comprehensively study different aspects of antioxidants, validated and specific assays are needed in addition to these two commonly accepted assays. PMID:15769103

  12. Serum indices: managing assay interference.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher-John L; Carter, Andrew C

    2016-09-01

    Clinical laboratories frequently encounter samples showing significant haemolysis, icterus or lipaemia. Technical advances, utilizing spectrophotometric measurements on automated chemistry analysers, allow rapid and accurate identification of such samples. However, accurate quantification of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference is of limited value if laboratories do not set rational alert limits, based on sound interference testing experiments. Furthermore, in the context of increasing consolidation of laboratories and the formation of laboratory networks, there is an increasing requirement for harmonization of the handling of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia-affected samples across different analytical platforms. Harmonization may be best achieved by considering both the analytical aspects of index measurement and the possible variations in the effects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interferences on assays from different manufacturers. Initial verification studies, followed up with ongoing quality control testing, can help a laboratory ensure the accuracy of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia index results, as well as assist in managing any biases in index results from analysers from different manufacturers. Similarities, and variations, in the effect of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference in assays from different manufacturers can often be predicted from the mechanism of interference. Nevertheless, interference testing is required to confirm expected similarities or to quantify differences. It is important that laboratories are familiar with a number of interference testing protocols and the particular strengths and weaknesses of each. A rigorous approach to all aspects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference testing allows the analytical progress in index measurement to be translated into improved patient care. PMID:27147624

  13. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, Carl A.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Walker, William A.

    1993-01-01

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor.

  14. Rotor assembly and assay method

    DOEpatents

    Burtis, C.A.; Johnson, W.F.; Walker, W.A.

    1993-09-07

    A rotor assembly for carrying out an assay includes a rotor body which is rotatable about an axis of rotation, and has a central chamber and first, second, third, fourth, fifth, and sixth chambers which are in communication with and radiate from the central chamber. The rotor assembly further includes a shuttle which is movable through the central chamber and insertable into any of the chambers, the shuttle including a reaction cup carrying an immobilized antigen or an antibody for transport among the chambers. A method for carrying out an assay using the rotor assembly includes moving the reaction cup among the six chambers by passing the cup through the central chamber between centrifugation steps in order to perform the steps of: separating plasma from blood cells, binding plasma antibody or antigen, washing, drying, binding enzyme conjugate, reacting with enzyme substrate and optically comparing the resulting reaction product with unreacted enzyme substrate solution. The movement of the reaction cup can be provided by attaching a magnet to the reaction cup and supplying a moving magnetic field to the rotor. 34 figures.

  15. The validity of androgen assays

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Malcolm; Trinick, Tom R.; Wheeler, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Problems in the measurement of androgens and in interpreting results have been reviewed and classified as follows: Preanalytical factors The exact sampling conditions in relation to circadian and seasonal variations, diet, alcohol, physical activity and posture. Physiological and medical factors Androgen levels vary according to the patient's general health, stress, sexual activity and smoking habits. Analytical variables Sample preservation and storage variables are often unknown. The different androgen assays used have widely differing accuracy and precision and are subject to large inter-laboratory variation, which especially in women and children can render the results of routinely available direct immunoassays meaningless. Interpretation of results Laboratory reference ranges vary widely, largely independent of methodology, and fail to take into account the log-normal distribution of androgen values, causing errors in clinical diagnosis and treatment. Other unknowns are antagonists such as SHBG, estrogens, catecholamines, cortisol, and anti-androgens. As well as age, androgen receptor polymorphisms play a major role in regulating androgen levels and resistance to their action. Conclusions Though laboratory assays can support a diagnosis of androgen deficiency in men, they should not be used to exclude it. It is suggested that there needs to be greater reliance on the history and clinical features, together with careful evaluation of the symptomatology, and where necessary a therapeutic trial of androgen treatment given. PMID:17701661

  16. In vitro Tumorsphere Formation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara; Chen, Hexin; Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    A tumorsphere is a solid, spherical formation developed from the proliferation of one cancer stem/progenitor cell. These tumorspheres (Figure 1a) are easily distinguishable from single or aggregated cells (Figure 1b) as the cells appear to become fused together and individual cells cannot be identified. Cells are grown in serum-free, non-adherent conditions in order to enrich the cancer stem/progenitor cell population as only cancer stem/progenitor cells can survive and proliferate in this environment. This assay can be used to estimate the percentage of cancer stem/progenitor cells present in a population of tumor cells. The size, which can vary from less than 50 micrometers to 250 micrometers, and number of tumorspheres formed can be used to characterize the cancer stem/progenitor cell population within a population of in vitro cultured cancer cells and within in vivo tumors (Lo et al., 2012; Liu et al., 2009). While several cell lines can be used for tumorsphere formation assay (e.g. primary mammary tumor cells from Her2/neu-transgenic mice, MCF7, BT474 and HCC1954), some cell lines may not form typical tumorsphere structures and may be difficult to count or classify definitively as tumorspheres.

  17. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  18. Proteasome Assay in Cell Lysates

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of the proteolysis seen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. As such it plays an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including tumorigenesis, inflammation and cell death (Ciechanover, 2005; Kisselev and Goldberg, 2001). A number of recent studies have shown that proteasome activity is decreased in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke as well as during normal aging (Chung et al., 2001; Ciechanover and Brundin, 2003; Betarbet et al., 2005). This decrease in proteasome activity is thought to play a critical role in the accumulation of abnormal and oxidized proteins. Protein clearance by the UPS involves two sequential reactions. The first is the tagging of protein lysine residues with ubiquitin (Ub) and the second is the subsequent degradation of the tagged proteins by the proteasome. We herein describe an assay for the second of these two reactions (Valera et al., 2013). This assay uses fluorogenic substrates for each of the three activities of the proteasome: chymotrypsin-like activity, trypsin-like activity and caspase-like activity. Cleavage of the fluorophore from the substrate by the proteasome results in fluorescence that can be detected with a fluorescent plate reader.

  19. Assay of potentially contaminated propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.E.; Williams, H.E. III; Scott, W.S.

    1995-02-01

    One of the decontamination and decommissioning projects within DOD is demilitarization of an aging stockpile of munitions. A large portion of the stockpile contains depleted uranium (DU) as an armor piercing core and so these munitions must be assayed for the presence of uranium in other components. The assay method must be fast and preferably easy to implement. Presence of DU is indicated by its alpha decay. The alpha particles in turn produce ions in the ambient air. If a significant fraction of these ions can escape the quantity of propellant, the ions can be detected instead of the alpha particles. As a test of the feasibility of detecting alpha emissions from DU somewhere within a cartridge of propellant, the transmission of ions through layers of real propellant was measured. The propellant is in the form of graphite-coated cylindrical pellets. A 105nun cartridge was modified for use as a pellet chamber. A check source served as an ion source. The ion detector consisted of a grid held at 300V coupled to an ammeter. Results confirm that this is a promising technique for testing the propellant for the presence of DU quickly yet with sensitivity.

  20. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  1. Data transformation methods for multiplexed assays

    DOEpatents

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2013-07-23

    Methods to improve the performance of an array assay are described. A correlation between fluorescence intensity-related parameters and negative control values of the assay is determined. The parameters are then adjusted as a function of the correlation. As a result, sensitivity of the assay is improved without changes in its specificity.

  2. Direct Measurement of Lipase Inhibition by Orlistat Using a Dissolution Linked In Vitro Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel R; Liu, Dongzhou J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a bio-assay that would be able to directly test gastrointestinal and/or dissolution samples to determine lipase activity and inhibition by Orlistat. Methods Enzyme assays were performed with porcine pancreatic lipase and para-Nitrophenyl Palmitate (pNPP) in pH 8.0 reaction buffer at 37°C. Substrate hydrolysis was monitored by absorbance changes at 410 nm. The dissolution of two Orlistat formulations was tested with a USP II apparatus. Samples were HPLC analyzed to determine release profile in addition to being diluted and directly assayed for inhibitory effect. Results The lipase-pNPP system demonstrates linearity and Michalis-Menten kinetics with a Km=2.7 ± 0.2 μM and Kcat = 0.019 s−1. Orlistat showed highly potent and time dependent inhibition with 5 ng/ml effecting 50% activity after 5 minutes in the Lipase-pNPP system. Dissolution studies showed a correlation of the drug release profile to the inhibitory effect of dissolution samples in the assay. Conclusions The lipase-pNPP method can be used as an in vitro assay to monitor orlistat inhibition from drug release or dissolution samples. PMID:25419492

  3. Complete genome sequences for 35 biothreat assay-relevant bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shannon L; Daligault, Hajnalka E; Davenport, Karen W; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G; Ladner, Jason T; Broomall, Stacey M; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Bruce, David C; Gibbons, Henry S; Coyne, Susan R; Lo, Chien-Chi; Meincke, Linda; Munk, A Christine; Koroleva, Galina I; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Palacios, Gustavo F; Redden, Cassie L; Minogue, Timothy D; Chain, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) International released a list of Bacillus strains relevant to biothreat molecular detection assays. We present the complete and annotated genome assemblies for the 15 strains listed on the inclusivity panel, as well as the 20 strains listed on the exclusivity panel. PMID:25931591

  4. Complete Genome Sequences for 35 Biothreat Assay-Relevant Bacillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G.; Ladner, Jason T.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Bruce, David C.; Gibbons, Henry S.; Coyne, Susan R.; Lo, Chien-Chi; Meincke, Linda; Munk, A. Christine; Koroleva, Galina I.; Rosenzweig, C. Nicole; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Redden, Cassie L.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) International released a list of Bacillus strains relevant to biothreat molecular detection assays. We present the complete and annotated genome assemblies for the 15 strains listed on the inclusivity panel, as well as the 20 strains listed on the exclusivity panel. PMID:25931591

  5. Complete Genome Sequences for 35 Biothreat Assay-Relevant Bacillus Species

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James; Frey, Kenneth G.; Ladner, Jason T.; Broomall, Stacey M.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Bruce, David C.; Gibbons, Henry S.; et al

    2015-04-30

    In 2011, the Association of Analytical Communities (AOAC) International released a list of Bacillus strains relevant to biothreat molecular detection assays. Presented in this document are the complete and annotated genome assemblies for the 15 strains listed on the inclusivity panel, as well as the 20 strains listed on the exclusivity panel.

  6. The botulinum toxin LD50 potency assay - another chapter, another mystery.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Andy

    2012-09-01

    Observers of the potency assay used for botulinum toxin were greeted last year with the news that one company had an alternative, non-animal alternative in place. But all was not as it seemed from the press release, and over a year later, information is still lacking. PMID:23067303

  7. A Call for Nominations of Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays from Relevant Human Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council of the United States National Academies of Science has recently released a document outlining a long-range vision and strategy for transforming toxicity testing from largely whole animal-based testing to one based on in vitro assays. “Toxicity Testin...

  8. Novel diagnostic assays for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Rux, Ann H.; Hinds, Jillian L.; Dela Cruz, May; Yarovoi, Serge V.; Brown, Isola A. M.; Yang, Wei; Konkle, Barbara A.; Arepally, Gowthami M.; Watson, Stephen P.; Cines, Douglas B.; Sachais, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory testing for heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) has important shortcomings. Immunoassays fail to discriminate platelet-activating from nonpathogenic antibodies. Specific functional assays are impracticable due to the need for platelets and radioisotope. We describe 2 assays that may overcome these limitations. The KKO-inhibition test (KKO-I) measures the effect of plasma on binding of the HIT-like monoclonal antibody KKO to platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin. DT40-luciferase (DT40-luc) is a functional test comprised of a B-cell line expressing FcγRIIa coupled to a luciferase reporter. We compared these assays to polyspecific and immunoglobulin (Ig)G-specific PF4/heparin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in samples from 58 patients with suspected HIT and circulating anti-PF4/heparin antibodies. HIT was defined as a 4Ts score ≥ 4 and positive 14C-serotonin release assay. HIT-positive plasma demonstrated greater mean inhibition of KKO binding than HIT-negative plasma (78.9% vs 26.0%; P < .0001) and induced greater luciferase activity (3.14-fold basal vs 0.96-fold basal; P < .0001). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was greater for KKO-I (0.93) than for the polyspecific (0.82; P = .020) and IgG-specific ELISA (0.76; P = .0044) and for DT40-luc (0.89) than for the IgG-specific ELISA (P = .046). KKO-I and DT40-luc showed better discrimination than 2 commercially available immunoassays, are simple to perform, and hold promise for improving the specificity and feasibility of HIT laboratory testing. PMID:23446735

  9. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. PMID:26343557

  10. Comparison of Established and Emerging Biodosimetry Assays

    PubMed Central

    Rothkamm, K.; Beinke, C.; Romm, H.; Badie, C.; Balagurunathan, Y.; Barnard, S.; Bernard, N.; Boulay-Greene, H.; Brengues, M.; De Amicis, A.; De Sanctis, S.; Greither, R.; Herodin, F.; Jones, A.; Kabacik, S.; Knie, T.; Kulka, U.; Lista, F.; Martigne, P.; Missel, A.; Moquet, J.; Oestreicher, U.; Peinnequin, A.; Poyot, T.; Roessler, U.; Scherthan, H.; Terbrueggen, B.; Thierens, H.; Valente, M.; Vral, A.; Zenhausern, F.; Meineke, V.; Braselmann, H.; Abend, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid biodosimetry tools are required to assist with triage in the case of a large-scale radiation incident. Here, we aimed to determine the dose-assessment accuracy of the well-established dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN) in comparison to the emerging γ-H2AX foci and gene expression assays for triage mode biodosimetry and radiation injury assessment. Coded blood samples exposed to 10 X-ray doses (240 kVp, 1 Gy/min) of up to 6.4 Gy were sent to participants for dose estimation. Report times were documented for each laboratory and assay. The mean absolute difference (MAD) of estimated doses relative to the true doses was calculated. We also merged doses into binary dose categories of clinical relevance and examined accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the assays. Dose estimates were reported by the first laboratories within 0.3–0.4 days of receipt of samples for the γ-H2AX and gene expression assays compared to 2.4 and 4 days for the DCA and CBMN assays, respectively. Irrespective of the assay we found a 2.5–4-fold variation of interlaboratory accuracy per assay and lowest MAD values for the DCA assay (0.16 Gy) followed by CBMN (0.34 Gy), gene expression (0.34 Gy) and γ-H2AX (0.45 Gy) foci assay. Binary categories of dose estimates could be discriminated with equal efficiency for all assays, but at doses ≥1.5 Gy a 10% decrease in efficiency was observed for the foci assay, which was still comparable to the CBMN assay. In conclusion, the DCA has been confirmed as the gold standard biodosimetry method, but in situations where speed and throughput are more important than ultimate accuracy, the emerging rapid molecular assays have the potential to become useful triage tools. PMID:23862692

  11. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  12. Northwest Australia's Saladin crude assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1993-10-18

    High-quality Saladin crude oil from offshore Western Australia has been assayed. The 48.2[degree] API, 0.02 wt % sulfur crude's characteristics--determined in 1990--are presented here for the first time. The estimated 30--40 million bbl field, south of Barrow Island, is produced from two platforms in 58 ft of water in block TP 3. Production began in late 1989 from three platforms with three wells each and from two wells drilled directionally from Thevenard Island. The paper lists data on the following properties: API gravity, density, sulfur content, pour point, flash point, viscosity, salinity, heat of combustion, ash content, asphaltene content, wax content, and metal content for the whole crude and various fractions.

  13. Steroid Assays in Paediatric Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most steroid disorders of the adrenal cortex come to clinical attention in childhood and in order to investigate these problems, there are many challenges to the laboratory which need to be appreciated to a certain extent by clinicians. The analysis of sex steroids in biological fluids from neonates, over adrenarche and puberty present challenges of specificities and concentrations often in small sample sizes. Different reference ranges are also needed for interpretations. For around 40 years, quantitative assays for the steroids and their regulatory peptide hormones have been possible using immunoassay techniques. Problems are recognised and this review aims to summarise the benefits and failings of immunoassays and introduce where tandem mass spectrometry is anticipated to meet the clinical needs for steroid analysis in paediatric endocrine investigations. It is important to keep a dialogue between clinicians and the laboratory, especially when any laboratory result does not make sense in the clinical investigation. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:21274330

  14. Evaluating 6 ricin field detection assays.

    PubMed

    Slotved, Hans-Christian; Sparding, Nadja; Tanassi, Julia Tanas; Steenhard, Nina R; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2014-01-01

    This study presents data showing the performance of 6 commercial detection assays against ricin around concentrations specified as detection limits by the producers. A 2-fold dilution series of 20 ng/ml ricin was prepared and used for testing the lateral-flow kits: BADD, Pro Strips™, ENVI, RAID DX, Ricin BioThreat Alert, and IMASS™ device. Three of the 6 tested field assays (IMASS™ device, ENVI assay, and the BioThreat Alert assay) were able to detect ricin, although differences in the measured detection limits compared to the official detection limits and false-negative results were observed. We were not able to get the BADD, Pro Strips™, and RAID assays to function in our laboratory. We conclude that when purchasing a field responder assay, there is large variation in the specificity of the assays, and a number of in-house tests must be performed to ensure functionality. PMID:24978020

  15. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1983-02-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

  16. Releasable locking mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq (Inventor); Wingate, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    In the aerospace field spacecraft components are held together by separation systems until a specific time when they must be separated or deployed. Customarily a threaded joining bolt engages one of the components to be joined, and a threaded nut is placed on that bolt against the other component so they can be drawn together by a releasable locking assembly. The releasable locking assembly herein includes a plunger having one end coupled to one end of a plunger bolt. The other end is flanged to abut and compress a coil spring when the plunger is advanced toward the interface plane between the two components. When the plunger is so advanced toward the interface plane, the end of the plunger bolt can be connected to the joining bolt. Thus during retraction the joining bolt is drawn to one side of the interface plane by the force of the expanding spring.

  17. Releasable Locking Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq (Inventor); Wingate, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    In the aerospace field spacecraft components are held together by separation systems until a specific time when they must be separated or deployed. Customarily a threaded joining bolt engages one of the components to be joined, and a threaded nut is placed on that bolt against the other component so they can be drawn together by a releasable locking assembly. The releasable locking assembly herein includes a plunger having one end coupled to one end of a plunger bolt. The other end is flanged to abut and compress a coil spring when the plunger is advanced toward the interface plane between the two components. When the plunger is so advanced toward the interface plane, the end of the plunger bolt can be connected to the joining bolt. Thus during retraction the joining bolt is drawn to one side of the interface plane by the force of the expanding spring.

  18. Use of the mitochondria toxicity assay for quantifying the viable cell density of microencapsulated jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Biss, K; Jérôme, V; Hilbrig, F; Freitag, R; Zambrano, K; Hübner, H; Buchholz, R; Mahou, R; Wandrey, C

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondria toxicity assay (MTT assay) is an established method for monitoring cell viability based on mitochondrial activity. Here the MTT assay is proposed for the in situ quantification of the living cell density of microencapsulated Jurkat cells. Three systems were used to encapsulate the cells, namely a membrane consisting of an interpenetrating polyelectrolyte network of sodium cellulose sulphate/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (NaCS/PDADMAC), a calcium alginate hydrogel covered with poly(L-lysine) (Ca-alg-PLL), and a novel calcium alginate-poly(ethylene glycol) hybrid material (Ca-alg-PEG). MTT results were correlated to data obtained by the trypan blue exclusion assay after release of the cells from the NaCS/PDADMAC and Ca-alg-PLL capsules, while a resazurin-based assay was used for comparison in case of the Ca-alg-PEG material. Analysis by MTT assay allows quick and reliable determination of viable cell densities of encapsulated cells independent of the capsule material. The assay is highly reproducible with inter-assay relative standard deviations below 10%. PMID:23636962

  19. A collaborative study of an alternative in vitro potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chul; Kim, Do-Keun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Yeonhee; Lim, Jong-Mi; Hong, JiYoung; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Park, Yong-Keun; Kim, Jaeok

    2016-09-01

    The use of inactivated Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccines has been ongoing in East Asia for 40 years. A mouse immunogenicity assay followed by a Plaque Reduction Neutralization (PRN) Test (PRNTest) is currently recommended for each lot release of the vaccine by many national authorities. We developed an alternative in vitro ELISA to determine the E antigen content of the Japanese encephalitis virus to observe the 3Rs strategy. A collaborative study for replacing the in vivo potency assay for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine with the in vitro ELISA assay was confirmed comparability between these two methods. The study demonstrated that an in vitro assay could perform faster and was more convenient than the established in vivo PRNTest. Moreover, this assay had better precision and reproducibility compared with the conventional in vivo assay. Additionally, the content of antigen determined using the in vitro ELISA correlated well with the potency of the in vivo assay. Furthermore, this method allowed discrimination between individual lots. Thus, we propose a progressive switch from the in vivo assay to the in vitro ELISA for JE vaccine quality control. PMID:27497622

  20. A rapid direct telomerase assay method using 96-well streptavidin plates.

    PubMed

    Francis, Rawle; Friedman, Simon H

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a high-throughput direct assay methodfor the assay of telomerase activity that improves on previous direct telomerase assays in two ways that allow larger numbers of samples to be conveniently processed: (i) 96-well streptavidin coated plates are used to bind and wash biotinylated primer extension products from the telomerase assay, as opposed to tubes containing streptavidin-coated magnetic beads; and (ii) storage phosphor-imagery is used instead of film autoradiography to detect telomerase products after being washed and released from the streptavidin-derivatized matrix. This method improves on previous direct assay methods using magnetic beads by allowing larger numbers of samples to be conveniently assayed. Also, the total activity of the radiolabeled nucleotides used in this procedure is significantly lower than that used in standard direct telomerase assays, lowering costs and exposure to radioactivity. We have validated the assay by repeating, in triplicate, the IC50 determination of rivanol, our previously identified telomerase inhibitor. PMID:12019789

  1. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  2. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Douglas W.; Golden, D. C.

    1992-10-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  3. EIA new releases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students.

  4. Cryogenic hydrogen release research.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFleur, Angela Christine

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this project was to devolop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. The necessary infrastructure has been specified and laboratory modifications are currently underway. Once complete, experiments from this platform will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  5. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  6. Slow-release fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Golden, D. C. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A synthetic apatite containing agronutrients and a method for making the apatite are disclosed. The apatite comprises crystalline calcium phosphate having agronutrients dispersed in the crystalline structure. The agronutrients can comprise potassium, magnesium, sulfur, iron, manganese, molybdenum, chlorine, boron, copper and zinc in amounts suited for plant growth. The apatite can optionally comprise a carbonate and/or silicon solubility control agent. The agronutrients are released slowly as the apatite dissolves.

  7. Contact: Releasing the news

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    The problem of mass behavior after man's future contacts with other intelligences in the universe is not only a challenge for social scientists and political leaders all over the world, but also a cultural time bomb as well. In fact, since the impact of CETI (Contact with Extraterrestrial Intelligence) on human civilization, with its different cultures, might cause a serious socio-anthropological shock, a common and predetermined worldwide strategy is necessary in releasing the news after the contact, in order to keep possible manifestations of fear, panic and hysteria under control. An analysis of past studies in this field and of parallel historical situations as analogs suggests a definite "authority crisis" in the public as a direct consequence of an unexpected release of the news, involving a devastating "chain reaction" process (from both the psychological and sociological viewpoints) of anomie and maybe the collapse of today's society. The only way to prevent all this is to prepare the world's public opinion concerning contact before releasing the news, and to develop a long-term strategy through the combined efforts of scientists, political leaders, intelligence agencies and the mass media, in order to create the cultural conditions in which a confrontation with ETI won't affect mankind in a traumatic way. Definite roles and tasks in this multi-level model are suggested.

  8. Preload release mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generoli, Robert M. (Inventor); Young, Harry J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a preload release mechanism comprising a preload spring assembly adapted to apply a preload to a first connector member which is mounted on a support structure and adapted for connection with a second connector member on an object. The assembly comprises telescoped bushings and a preload spring. A tubular shaft extends through the spring assembly and openings in the first connector member and support structure, on which it is clamped. A plunger rod in the shaft is provided with a tip end and a recess in the rod near the other end thereof. A retainer precludes passage of the rod through the shaft in one direction and an end cap closes the bore of the shaft at the other end and provides a shoulder which extends radially of the shaft. A plunger return spring biases the plunger rod against the plunger retainer with the plunger tip protruding from the shaft and a spring assembly return spring engages at its ends the shoulder of the end cap and one end of the spring assembly. Detents received in lateral openings in the tubular shaft are held captive by the plunger rod and one end of the spring assembly to lock the spring assembly on the tubular shaft and apply a preload to the first connector member. Upon completion of the connection, detents and spring assembly are released by plunger contact with the object to be connected, thereby releasing the preload while the connection is maintained.

  9. Multiplexed Dosing Assays by Digitally Definable Hydrogel Volumes.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Adele; Melander, Fredrik; Larsen, Esben Kjaer Unmack; Chernyy, Sergey; Andresen, Thomas L; Larsen, Niels B

    2016-01-21

    Stable and low-cost multiplexed drug sensitivity assays using small volumes of cells or tissue are in demand for personalized medicine, including patient-specific combination chemotherapy. Spatially defined projected light photopolymerization of hydrogels with embedded active compounds is introduced as a flexible and cost-efficient method for producing multiplexed dosing assays. The high spatial resolution of light projector technology defines multiple compound doses by the volume of individual compound-embedded hydrogel segments. Quantitative dosing of multiple proteins with a dynamic range of 1-2 orders of magnitude is demonstrated using fluorescently labeled albumins. The hydrogel matrix results from photopolymerization of low-cost poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylates (PEGDA), and tuning of the PEGDA composition enables fast complete dosing of all tested species. Dosing of hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds is demonstrated using two first-line chemotherapy regimens combining oxaliplatin, SN-38, 5-fluorouracil, and folinic acid, with each compound being dosed from a separate light-defined hydrogel segment. Cytotoxicity studies using a colorectal cancer cell line show equivalent effects of dissolved and released compounds. Further control of the dosing process is demonstrated by liposomal encapsulation of oxaliplatin, stable embedding of the liposomes in hydrogels for more than 3 months, and heat-triggered complete release of the loaded oxaliplatin. PMID:26619161

  10. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  11. Expert system for transuranic waste assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zoolalian, M.L.; Gibbs, A.; Kuhns, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Transuranic wastes are generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of routine production of nuclear materials. These wastes contain Pu-238 and Pu-239 and are placed into lined 55-gallon waste drums. The drums are placed on monitored storage pads pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. A passive-active neutron (PAN) assay system is used to determine the mass of the radioactive material within the waste drums. Assay results are used to classify the wastes as either low-level or transuranic (TRU). During assays, the PAN assay system communicates with an IBM-AT computer. A Fortran computer program, called NEUT, controls and performs all data analyses. Unassisted, the NEUT program cannot adequately interpret assay results. To eliminate this limitation, an expert system shell was used to write a new algorithm, called the Transuranic Expert System (TRUX), to drive the NEUT program and add decision making capabilities for analysis of the assay results. The TRUX knowledge base was formulated by consulting with human experts in the field of neutron assay, by direct experimentation on the PAN assay system, and by observing operations on a daily basis. TRUX, with its improved ability to interpret assay results, has eliminated the need for close supervision by a human expert, allowing skilled technicians to operate the PAN assay system. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen.

    PubMed

    Bradley, D C; Kaslow, H R

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus (1971, J. Biol. Chem. 246, 3885-3894) for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with [32P]ATP and glycerokinase, residual [32P]ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free [32P]phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays. PMID:2817333

  13. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.C.; Kaslow, H.R. )

    1989-07-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with (32P)ATP and glycerokinase, residual (32P)ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free (32P)phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of NK cell cytotoxicity against two target cell lines labelled with fluorescent lanthanide chelates.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, J; Blomberg, K

    1994-07-12

    We describe a cytotoxicity assay which permits the simultaneous measurement of natural killer cell activity against two different cell lines. The target cell lines are labelled either with a fluorescent europium chelate or with a fluorescent terbium chelate and cell death is quantified by measuring the chelate release. K-562, Molt4 and Daudi cell lines have been used as targets. The release of the two chelates from the target cells can be detected with the help of time resolved fluorometry. As the measurements are made after background fluorescence has decayed no additional steps are needed to correct for the background from the medium. The assay procedure used for measurement of cytotoxicity against two target cell lines is very similar to the widely used 51Cr release assay. PMID:8034979

  15. Pyrotechnic-actuated cable release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. W.

    1968-01-01

    Remote, unattended means has been designed and reduced to practice that retains and then releases an attached load by means of a restrained cable. The cable is released by an electrical impulse on signal.

  16. Immunoadjuvant activity of amphotericin B as displayed in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Bistoni, F; Vecchiarelli, A; Mazzolla, R; Puccetti, P; Marconi, P; Garaci, E

    1985-01-01

    Mice receiving a single intraperitoneal injection of amphotericin B showed increased resistance to subsequent challenge with either Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus. This enhancement of resistance was obvious in terms of both survival criteria and clearance of the intravenously injected organism from different organs. The protective effect of amphotericin B was conditioned by dose, time of drug administration, and size of yeast or bacterial inoculum and was reversed by cyclophosphamide. Effector cells from mice treated with amphotericin B displayed enhanced fungicidal activity in vitro as measured in a short-term 51Cr release assay. Macrophages from intact animals exposed in vitro to amphotericin B also acquired strong candidacidal reactivity. PMID:3890731

  17. Deficient natural killer cell function in preeclampsia

    SciTech Connect

    Alanen, A.; Lassila, O.

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer cell activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes was measured against K-562 target cells with a 4-hour /sup 51/Cr release assay in 15 primigravid women with preeclamptic symptoms. Nineteen primigravid women with an uncomplicated pregnancy and 18 nonpregnant women served as controls. The natural killer cell activity of preeclamptic women was observed to be significantly lower than that of both control groups. Natural killer cells in preeclamptic women responded normally to augmentation caused by interferon. These findings give further evidence for the participation of the maternal immune system in this pregnancy disorder.

  18. High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Hidenori; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Fujita, Osamu; Matsuda, Yasuyoshi; Miyata, Ryo; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Noda, Naohiro

    2009-02-20

    We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

  19. Controlled Release of Biologically Active Silver from Nanosilver Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Sonshine, David A.; Shervani, Saira; Hurt, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Major pathways in the antibacterial activity and eukaryotic toxicity of nano-silver involve the silver cation and its soluble complexes, which are well established thiol toxicants. Through these pathways, nano-silver behaves in analogy to a drug delivery system, in which the particle contains a concentrated inventory of an active species, the ion, which is transported to and released near biological target sites. Although the importance of silver ion in the biological response to nano-silver is widely recognized, the drug delivery paradigm has not been well developed for this system, and there is significant potential to improve nano-silver technologies through controlled release formulations. This article applies elements of the drug delivery paradigm to nano-silver dissolution and presents a systematic study of chemical concepts for controlled release. After presenting thermodynamic calculations of silver species partitioning in biological media, the rates of oxidative silver dissolution are measured for nanoparticles and macroscopic foils and used to derive unified area-based release kinetics. A variety of competing chemical approaches are demonstrated for controlling the ion release rate over four orders of magnitude. Release can be systematically slowed by thiol and citrate ligand binding, formation of sulfidic coatings, or the scavenging of peroxy-intermediates. Release can be accelerated by pre-oxidation or particle size reduction, while polymer coatings with complexation sites alter the release profile by storing and release inventories of surface-bound silver. Finally, the ability to tune biological activity is demonstrated through bacterial inhibition zone assay carried out on selected formulations of controlled release nano-silver. PMID:20968290

  20. Riola release report

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, E.C.

    1983-08-04

    Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables.

  1. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  2. Evaluation of microbial release probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Work undertaken to improve the estimation of the probability of release of microorganisms from unmanned Martian landing spacecraft is summarized. An analytical model is described for the development of numerical values for release parameters and release mechanisms applicable to flight missions are defined. Laboratory test data are used to evolve parameter values for use by flight projects in estimating numerical values for release probabilities. The analysis treats microbial burden located on spacecraft surfaces, between mated surfaces, and encapsulated within materials.

  3. Assay development status report for total cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-02-01

    A validated cyanide assay that is applicable to a variety of tank waste matrices is necessary to resolve certain waste tank safety issues and for purposes of overall waste characterization. The target for this effort is an assay with an applicable range of greater than 1,000 ppM (0.10 wt%) total cyanide and a confidence level greater than 80%. Figure 1 illustrates the operating regime of the proposed cyanide assay method. The Assay Development Status Report for Total Cyanide will summarize the past experience with cyanide analyses on-tank waste matrices and will rate the status of the analytical methods used to assay total cyanide (CN{sup {minus}} ion) in the tank waste matrices as acceptable or unacceptable. This paper will also briefly describe the current efforts for improving analytical resolution of the assays and the attempts at speciation.

  4. Matrix effects of TRU (transuranic) assays using the SWEPP PAN assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1990-08-01

    The Drum Assay System (DAS) at the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is a second-generation active-passive neutron assay system. It has been used to assay over 5000 208-liter drums of transuranic waste from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Data from these assays have been examined and compared with the assays performed at Rocky Flats, mainly utilize counting of {sup 239}Pu gamma rays. For the most part the passive assays are in very good agreement with the Rocky Flats assays. The active assays are strongly correlated with the results of the other two methods, but require matrix-dependent correction factors beyond those provided by the system itself. A set of matrix-dependent correction factors has been developed from the study of the assay results. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Rapid automation of a cell-based assay using a modular approach: case study of a flow-based Varicella Zoster Virus infectivity assay.

    PubMed

    Joelsson, Daniel; Gates, Irina V; Pacchione, Diana; Wang, Christopher J; Bennett, Philip S; Zhang, Yuhua; McMackin, Jennifer; Frey, Tina; Brodbeck, Kristin C; Baxter, Heather; Barmat, Scott L; Benetti, Luca; Bodmer, Jean-Luc

    2010-06-01

    Vaccine manufacturing requires constant analytical monitoring to ensure reliable quality and a consistent safety profile of the final product. Concentration and bioactivity of active components of the vaccine are key attributes routinely evaluated throughout the manufacturing cycle and for product release and dosage. In the case of live attenuated virus vaccines, bioactivity is traditionally measured in vitro by infection of susceptible cells with the vaccine followed by quantification of virus replication, cytopathology or expression of viral markers. These assays are typically multi-day procedures that require trained technicians and constant attention. Considering the need for high volumes of testing, automation and streamlining of these assays is highly desirable. In this study, the automation and streamlining of a complex infectivity assay for Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) containing test articles is presented. The automation procedure was completed using existing liquid handling infrastructure in a modular fashion, limiting custom-designed elements to a minimum to facilitate transposition. In addition, cellular senescence data provided an optimal population doubling range for long term, reliable assay operation at high throughput. The results presented in this study demonstrate a successful automation paradigm resulting in an eightfold increase in throughput while maintaining assay performance characteristics comparable to the original assay. PMID:20117140

  6. 233U Assay A Neutron NDA System

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.C.; Lucero, A.J.; Pierce, L.

    1998-11-17

    The assay of highly enriched {sup 233}U material presents some unique challenges. Techniques which apply to the assay of materials of Pu or enriched {sup 235}U do not convert easily over to the assay of {sup 233}U. A specialized neutron assay device is being fabricated to exploit the singles neutron signal, the weak correlated neutron signal, and an active correlated signal. These pieces of information when combined with {gamma} ray isotopics information should give a good overall determination of {sup 233}U material now stored in bldg. 3019 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  7. Nonradioactive GTP binding assay to monitor activation of g protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Frang, Heini; Mukkala, Veli-Matti; Syystö, Rita; Ollikka, Pia; Hurskainen, Pertti; Scheinin, Mika; Hemmilä, Ilkka

    2003-04-01

    GPCRs represent important targets for drug discovery because GPCRs participate in a wide range of cellular signaling pathways that play a role in a variety of pathological conditions. A large number of screening assays have been developed in HTS laboratories for the identification of hits or lead compounds acting on GPCRs. One type of assay that has found relatively widespread application, due to its at least in part generic nature, relies on the use of a radioactive GTP analogue, [(35)S]GTPgammaS. The G-protein alpha subunit is an essential part of the interaction between receptor and G proteins in transmembrane signaling, where the activated receptor catalyzes the release of GDP from Galpha, thereby enabling the subsequent binding of GTP or a GTP analogue. [(35)S]GTPgammaS allows the extent of this interaction to be followed quantitatively by determining the amount of radioactivity associated with cell membranes. However, with the increased desire to move assays to nonradioactive formats, there is a considerable need to develop a nonradioactive GTP binding assay to monitor ligand-induced changes in GPCR activity. The Eu-GTP binding assay described here is based on TRF that exploits the unique fluorescence properties of lanthanide chelates, and provides a powerful alternative to assays using radioisotopes. In this article, we have used the human alpha(2A)-AR as a model GPCR system to evaluate the usefulness of this Eu-GTP binding assay. PMID:15090192

  8. Standardization of the antibody-dependent respiratory burst assay with human neutrophils and Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn, David; Miura, Kazutoyo; Fay, Michael P.; Williams, Andrew R.; Murungi, Linda M.; Shi, Jianguo; Hodgson, Susanne H.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Osier, Faith H.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Diakite, Mahamadou; Pleass, Richard J.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of naturally-acquired and vaccine-induced immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria is of long-standing interest. However, the field has suffered from a paucity of in vitro assays that reproducibly measure the anti-parasitic activity induced by antibodies in conjunction with immune cells. Here we optimize the antibody-dependent respiratory burst (ADRB) assay, which assesses the ability of antibodies to activate the release of reactive oxygen species from human neutrophils in response to P. falciparum blood-stage parasites. We focus particularly on assay parameters affecting serum preparation and concentration, and importantly assess reproducibility. Our standardized protocol involves testing each serum sample in singlicate with three independent neutrophil donors, and indexing responses against a standard positive control of pooled hyper-immune Kenyan sera. The protocol can be used to quickly screen large cohorts of samples from individuals enrolled in immuno-epidemiological studies or clinical vaccine trials, and requires only 6 μL of serum per sample. Using a cohort of 86 samples, we show that malaria-exposed individuals induce higher ADRB activity than malaria-naïve individuals. The development of the ADRB assay complements the use of cell-independent assays in blood-stage malaria, such as the assay of growth inhibitory activity, and provides an important standardized cell-based assay in the field. PMID:26373337

  9. Particle-induced artifacts in the MTT and LDH viability assays.

    PubMed

    Holder, Amara L; Goth-Goldstein, Regine; Lucas, Donald; Koshland, Catherine P

    2012-09-17

    In vitro testing is a common first step in assessing combustion-generated and engineered nanoparticle-related health hazards. Commercially available viability assays are frequently used to compare the toxicity of different particle types and to generate dose-response data. Nanoparticles, well-known for having large surface areas and chemically active surfaces, may interfere with viability assays, producing a false assessment of toxicity and making it difficult to compare toxicity data. The objective of this study is to measure the extent of particle interference in two common viability assays, the MTT reduction and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assays. Diesel particles, activated carbon, flame soot, oxidized flame soot, and titanium dioxide particles are assessed for interactions with the MTT and LDH assay under cell-free conditions. Diesel particles, at concentrations as low as 0.05 μg/mL, reduce MTT. Other particle types reduce MTT only at a concentration of 50 μg/mL and higher. The activated carbon, soot, and oxidized soot particles bind LDH to varying extents, reducing the concentration measured in the LDH assay. The interfering effects of the particles explain in part the different toxicities measured in human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o). We conclude that valid particle toxicity assessments can only be assured after first performing controls to verify that the particles under investigation do not interfere with a specific assay at the expected concentrations. PMID:22799765

  10. Source of released carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.

    1979-01-01

    The potential for the release of carbon fibers from aircraft crashes/fires is addressed. Simulation of the conditions of aircraft crash fires in order to predict the quantities and forms of fibrous materials which might be released from civilian aircraft crashes/fires is considered. Figures are presented which describe some typical fiber release test activities together with some very preliminary results of those activities. The state of the art of carbon fiber release is summarized as well as some of the uncertainties concerning accidental fiber release.

  11. LT-HSC Methylcellulose Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kerenyi, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic differentiation is a highly complex process originating from an extraordinary population of cells called long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs). The unique feature of all stem cells, including HSCs, is their exceptional ability to divide asymmetrically giving rise to two different kinds of offspring. One daughter cell becomes an LT-HSC itself (self-renews) to maintain the LT-HSC pool, whereas the second daughter cell pursues a differentiation fate to ultimately give rise to terminally differentiated mature blood cells (Orkin and Zon, 2008). Quantification of phenotypic LT-HSCs can be performed by multi-color flow cytometry and the gold standard for assessment of LT-HSC self-renewal and function is competitive bone marrow transplantation (Miller et al., 2008). Although these methods are irreplaceable to determine LT-HSC abundance and functionality, they have their disadvantages and limitations. For example, competitive bone marrow transplantation is typically monitored as a function of peripheral blood donor contribution over 12–16 weeks. While reduced peripheral blood donor contribution by itself signifies impairment in the stem/progenitor cells compartment, it cannot unambiguously discriminate between reduced LT-HSC self-renewal, impaired LT-HSC differentiation or compromised progenitor cell differentiation. Here we describe an LT-HSCs methylcellulose colony-forming assay, as a fast complementary in vitro method to directly assess LT-HSC differentiation capacity. As described in Kerenyi et al. (2013), this technique acts as a powerful tool to differentiate between LT-HSC or progenitor cell differentiation defects.

  12. Use of interferon-gamma release assays to calculate the annual risk of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Díez, Nuria; Giner, Empar; Latorre, Irene; Lacoma, Alícia; Roig, Francisco-Javier; Mialdea, Irene; Díaz, Jessica; Serra-Vidal, Mar; Escribano, Amparo; Domínguez, Jose

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to assess the annual risk of tuberculosis infection by means of tuberculin skin testing (TST) in children, evaluating whether QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFN-G-IT) could improve the accuracy. On the basis of the positive TST results, the global annual incidence was estimated at 0.78%, with an increase in the prevalence from 0.64% to 1.68% in 2 years. However, QFN-G-IT was only positive in 6 of the 25 children with positive TST. The confirmation of the positive TST results by QFN-G-IT provided more accurate annual incidence estimation. PMID:25144799

  13. Strain Release Amination

    PubMed Central

    Gianatassio, Ryan; Lopchuk, Justin M.; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Malins, Lara R.; Prieto, Liher; Brandt, Thomas A.; Collins, Michael R.; Gallego, Gary M.; Sach, Neal W.; Spangler, Jillian E.; Zhu, Huichin; Zhu, Jinjiang; Baran, Phil S.

    2015-01-01

    To optimize drug candidates, modern medicinal chemists are increasingly turning to an unconventional structural motif: small, strained ring systems. However, the difficulty of introducing substituents such as bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes, azetidines, or cyclobutanes often outweighs the challenge of synthesizing the parent scaffold itself. Thus, there is an urgent need for general methods to rapidly and directly append such groups onto core scaffolds. Here we report a general strategy to harness the embedded potential energy of effectively spring-loaded C–C and C–N bonds with the most oft-encountered nucleophiles in pharmaceutical chemistry, amines. Strain release amination can diversify a range of substrates with a multitude of desirable bioisosteres at both the early and late-stages of a synthesis. The technique has also been applied to peptide labeling and bioconjugation. PMID:26816372

  14. QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE

    DOEpatents

    Dickson, J.J.

    1958-07-01

    A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

  15. Quick release engine cylinder

    DOEpatents

    Sunnarborg, Duane A.

    2000-01-01

    A quick release engine cylinder allows optical access to an essentially unaltered combustion chamber, is suitable for use with actual combustion processes, and is amenable to rapid and repeated disassembly and cleaning. A cylinder member, adapted to constrain a piston to a defined path through the cylinder member, sealingly engages a cylinder head to provide a production-like combustion chamber. A support member mounts with the cylinder member. The support-to-cylinder mounting allows two relationships therebetween. In the first mounting relationship, the support engages the cylinder member and restrains the cylinder against the head. In the second mounting relationship, the cylinder member can pass through the support member, moving away from the head and providing access to the piston-top and head.

  16. The Corneal Micropocket Assay: A Model of Angiogenesis in the Mouse Eye

    PubMed Central

    D'Amato, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The mouse corneal micropocket assay is a robust and quantitative in vivo assay for evaluating angiogenesis. By using standardized slow-release pellets containing specific growth factors that trigger blood vessel growth throughout the naturally avascular cornea, angiogenesis can be measured and quantified. In this assay the angiogenic response is generated over the course of several days, depending on the type and dose of growth factor used. The induction of neovascularization is commonly triggered by either basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). By combining these growth factors with sucralfate and hydron (poly-HEMA (poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate))) and casting the mixture into pellets, they can be surgically implanted in the mouse eye. These uniform pellets slowly-release the growth factors over five or six days (bFGF or VEGF respectively) enabling sufficient angiogenic response required for vessel area quantification using a slit lamp. This assay can be used for different applications, including the evaluation of angiogenic modulator drugs or treatments as well as comparison between different genetic backgrounds affecting angiogenesis. A skilled investigator after practicing this assay can implant a pellet in less than 5 min per eye. PMID:25177860

  17. Improvement of Microbial Assays of Vitamins

    PubMed Central

    Heed, Edward J.

    1972-01-01

    A method for the improvement of microbial assays of vitamins, which involves the addition of a surfactant to the incubated test, was developed. This surfactant tends to eliminate bacterial clumping, giving a uniform suspension of single cells, thereby making the turbidity readings less erratic and the actual assay standard curves more closely related to the desired theoretical curve. PMID:4627232

  18. Microtissue Culture Plaque Assay for Herpesvirus saimiri

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Emerson W.; Dunkel, Virginia C.

    1973-01-01

    A microtissue culture method for the plaque assay of Herpesvirus saimiri has been developed. Virus titrations carried out in Microtest II tissue culture plates (Falcon) yielded reproducible results that agreed well with those obtained by employing macrocultures. The described method is quantitative, reproducible, economical, and suitable for routine assay of large numbers of virus samples. Images PMID:4201642

  19. A bioluminescent assay for measuring glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Valley, Michael P; Karassina, Natasha; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-07-15

    Identifying activators and inhibitors of glucose uptake is critical for both diabetes management and anticancer therapy. To facilitate such studies, easy-to-use nonradioactive assays are desired. Here we describe a bioluminescent glucose uptake assay for measuring glucose transport in cells. The assay is based on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and the enzymatic detection of the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate that accumulates. Uptake can be measured from a variety of cell types, it can be inhibited by known glucose transporter inhibitors, and the bioluminescent assay yields similar results when compared with the radioactive method. With HCT 116 cells, glucose uptake can be detected in as little as 5000 cells and remains linear up to 50,000 cells with signal-to-background values ranging from 5 to 45. The assay can be used to screen for glucose transporter inhibitors, or by multiplexing with viability readouts, changes in glucose uptake can be differentiated from overall effects on cell health. The assay also can provide a relevant end point for measuring insulin sensitivity. With adipocytes and myotubes, insulin-dependent increases in glucose uptake have been measured with 10- and 2-fold assay windows, respectively. Significant assay signals of 2-fold or more have also been measured with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and skeletal myoblasts. PMID:27130501

  20. Development of an upconverting chelate assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xudong; Haushalter, Jeanne P.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2005-04-01

    We report progress on performing a cell-based assay for the detection of EGFR on cell surfaces by using upconverting chelates. An upconversion microscope has been developed for performing assays and testing optical response. A431 cells are labeled with europium DOTA and imaged using this upconverting microscope.

  1. Fluorescence polarization assays in signal transduction discovery.

    PubMed

    Sportsman, J Richard; Daijo, Janet; Gaudet, Elizabeth A

    2003-05-01

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) has become widely employed for high throughput screening used in pharmaceutical drug discovery. Assays of important signal transduction targets are now adapted to FP. In this review we examine assays for cyclic adenosine monophosphate, phosphodiesterases, and protein kinases and phosphatases using FP competitive immunoassays and a direct enzymatic method called IMAP. PMID:12678698

  2. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  3. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  4. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  5. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  6. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification....

  7. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  8. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  9. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  10. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  11. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay....

  12. Micronucleus assay in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Claudia; Hayashi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic pollutants produce multiple consequences at organism, population, community and ecosystem level, affecting organ function, reproductive status, population size, species survival and thus biodiversity. Among these, carcinogenic and mutagenic compounds are the most dangerous as their effects may exert a damage beyond that of individual and may be active through several generations. The application of genotoxicity biomarkers in sentinel organisms allows for the assessment of mutagenic hazards and/or for the identification of the sources and fate of the contaminants. Micronucleus (MN) test as an index of accumulated genetic damage during the lifespan of the cells is one of the most suitable techniques to identify integrated response to the complex mixture of contaminants. MN assay is today widely applied in a large number of wild and transplanted aquatic species. The large majority of studies or programmes on the genotoxic effect of the polluted water environment have been carried out with the use of bivalves and fish. Haemocytes and gill cells are the target tissues most frequently considered for the MN determination in bivalves. The MN test was widely validated and was successfully applied in a large number of field studies using bivalves from the genera Mytilus. MN in fish can be visualised in different cell types: erythrocytes and gill, kidney, hepatic and fin cells. The use of peripheral erythrocytes is more widely used because it avoids the complex cell preparation and the killing of the animals. The MN test in fish erythrocytes was validated in laboratory with different species after exposure to a large number of genotoxic agents. The erythrocyte MN test in fish was also widely and frequently applied for genotoxicity assessment of freshwater and marine environment in situ using native or caged animals following different periods of exposure. Large interspecies differences in sensitivity for MN induction were observed. Further validation studies are

  13. Assays for Determination of Protein Concentration.

    PubMed

    Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical analysis of proteins relies on accurate quantification of protein concentration. Detailed in this appendix are some commonly used methods for protein analysis, e.g., Lowry, Bradford, bicinchoninic acid (BCA), UV spectroscopic, and 3-(4-carboxybenzoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (CBQCA) assays. The primary focus of this report is assay selection, emphasizing sample and buffer compatibility. The fundamentals of generating protein assay standard curves and of data processing are considered, as are high-throughput adaptations of the more commonly used protein assays. Also included is a rapid, inexpensive, and reliable BCA assay of total protein in SDS-PAGE sample buffer that is used for equal loading of SDS-PAGE gels. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248579

  14. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  15. Re-examining how complexin inhibits neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Trimbuch, Thorsten; Xu, Junjie; Flaherty, David; Tomchick, Diana R; Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Complexins play activating and inhibitory functions in neurotransmitter release. The complexin accessory helix inhibits release and was proposed to insert into SNARE complexes to prevent their full assembly. This model was supported by ‘superclamp’ and ‘poor-clamp’ mutations that enhanced or decreased the complexin-I inhibitory activity in cell–cell fusion assays, and by the crystal structure of a superclamp mutant bound to a synaptobrevin-truncated SNARE complex. NMR studies now show that the complexin-I accessory helix does not insert into synaptobrevin-truncated SNARE complexes in solution, and electrophysiological data reveal that superclamp mutants have slightly stimulatory or no effects on neurotransmitter release, whereas a poor-clamp mutant inhibits release. Importantly, increasing or decreasing the negative charge of the complexin-I accessory helix inhibits or stimulates release, respectively. These results suggest a new model whereby the complexin accessory helix inhibits release through electrostatic (and perhaps steric) repulsion enabled by its location between the vesicle and plasma membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02391.001 PMID:24842998

  16. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  17. Light-Triggered Release of Biomolecules from Diamond Nanowire Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Coffinier, Yannick; Li, Musen; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2016-06-28

    The controlled release of biomolecules from a substrate surface is a challenging task. Photocleavable linkers appear as attractive candidates for light-triggered delivery. We show here the possibility of creating photoactivable diamond nanowire interfaces, from which molecules can be photochemically released upon irradiation at 365 nm for several minutes. The approach is based on the covalent modification of boron-doped diamond nanowires (BDD NWs) with o-nitrobenzyl containing ligands, to which different biomolecules can be attached via amide bond formation. The photodecomposition reaction and the subsequent release of small proteins such as lysozyme or enzymes such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Using a colorimetric assay, we demonstrate that, while complete cleavage of HRP was achieved upon irradiation for 10 min at 1 W cm(-2), this exposure time resulted in a partial loss of enzymatic activity. PMID:27244476

  18. Sensitive microplate assay for the detection of proteolytic enzymes using radiolabeled gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, B.D.; Kwan-Lim, G.E.; Maizels, R.M.

    1988-07-01

    A sensitive, microplate assay is described for the detection of a wide range of proteolytic enzymes, using radio-iodine-labeled gelatin as substrate. The technique uses the Bolton-Hunter reagent to label the substrate, which is then coated onto the wells of polyvinyl chloride microtiter plates. By measuring the radioactivity released the assay is able to detect elastase, trypsin, and collagenase in concentrations of 1 ng/ml or less, while the microtiter format permits multiple sample handling and minimizes sample volumes required for analysis.

  19. Performance Evaluation of the Serum Thyroglobulin Assays With Immunochemiluminometric Assay and Immunoradiometric Assay for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Young; Chun, Sejong; Lee, Soo-Youn; Chung, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Measurement of postoperative serum thyroglobulin (Tg) is important for detecting persistent or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer. We evaluated the analytic performance of the DxI 800 assay (Beckman Coulter, USA) for serum Tg and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAbs) in comparison with that of the GAMMA-10 assay (Shinjin Medics Inc., Korea) for serum Tg and RIA-MAT 280 assay (Stratec, Germany) for TgAb. Methods We prospectively collected blood samples from 99 patients thyroidectomized for thyroid cancer. The functional sensitivity was investigated in standards and human serum. Precision and linearity were evaluated according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The correlation between the two assays was assessed in samples with different Tg ranges. Results The functional sensitivity of the DxI 800 assay for serum Tg was between 0.0313 and 0.0625 ng/mL. The total CV was 3.9–5.6% for serum Tg and 5.3–6.9% for serum TgAb. The coefficient of determination (R2) was 1.0 and 0.99 for serum Tg and TgAb, respectively. The cut-offs for serum TgAb were 4.0 IU/mL (DxI 800) and 60.0 IU/mL (RIA-MAT 280), and the overall agreement was 68.7%. The correlation between the two assays was excellent; the correlation coefficient was 0.99 and 0.88 for serum Tg and TgAb, respectively. Conclusions The DxI 800 is a sensitive assay for serum Tg and TgAb, and the results correlated well with those from the immunoradiometric assays (IRMA). This assay has several advantages over the IRMA and could be considered an alternative test for Tg measurement. PMID:27374705

  20. Spontaneous release of lipopolysaccharide by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cadieux, J E; Kuzio, J; Milazzo, F H; Kropinski, A M

    1983-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO grown in glucose mineral salts medium released lipopolysaccharide which was chemically and immunologically similar to the cellular lipopolysaccharide. In addition, it possessed identical phage E79-inactivating properties. Through neutralization of phage activity and hemolysis inhibition assays, the organism was found to liberate lipopolysaccharide at a constant rate during log-phase growth equivalent to 1.3 to 2.2 ng/10(8) cells over a growth temperature range of 25 to 42 degrees C. At 19 degrees C, a lipopolysaccharide was released which was deficient in phage-inactivating activity but retained its immunological properties. Chemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide extracted from cells grown at 19 degrees C showed a deficiency in the O-side-chain component fucosamine. Gel exclusion chromatography of the polysaccharide fraction derived from lipopolysaccharide isolated from cells grown at 19 degrees C exhibited a decreased content of side-chain polysaccharide as well as a difference in the hexosamine:hexose ratio. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis confirmed these results as well as establishing that an essentially normal distribution of side-chain repeating unit lengths were to be found in the 19 degrees C preparation. These results suggest a decrease in the frequency of capping R-form lipopolysaccharide at 19 degrees C. Images PMID:6409883

  1. Lipoprotein Release by Bacteria: Potential Factor in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Niesel, David W.; Peterson, Johnny W.; Klimpel, Gary R.

    1998-01-01

    Lipoprotein (LP) is a major component of the outer membrane of bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae. LP induces proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and lethal shock in LPS-responsive and -nonresponsive mice. In this study, the release of LP from growing bacteria was investigated by immuno-dot blot analysis. An immuno-dot blot assay that could detect LP at levels as low as 100 ng/ml was developed. By using this assay, significant levels of LP were detected in culture supernatants of growing Escherichia coli cells. During mid-logarithmic growth, approximately 1 to 1.5 μg of LP per ml was detected in culture supernatants from E. coli. In contrast, these culture supernatants contained 5 to 6 μg/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LP release was not unique to E. coli. Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica, and two pathogenic E. coli strains also released LP during in vitro growth. Treatment of bacteria with the antibiotic ceftazidime significantly enhanced LP release. Culture supernatants from 5-h cultures of E. coli were shown to induce in vitro production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by macrophages obtained from LPS-nonresponsive C3H/HeJ mice. In contrast, culture supernatants from an E. coli LP-deletion mutant were significantly less efficient at inducing IL-6 production in C3H/HeJ macrophages. These results suggest, for the first time, that LP is released from growing bacteria and that this released LP may play an important role in the induction of cytokine production and pathologic changes associated with gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:9784522

  2. Fluoride release from fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Godoy, F; Abarzua, I; De Goes, M F; Chan, D C

    1997-01-01

    This 30-day study, compared the amounts and patterns of fluoride release from 5 commercially available fluoride-containing pit and fissure sealants: FluroShield, Helioseal-F, Ultraseal XT, Baritone L3, and Teethmate-F; Delton without fluoride, was used as control. Disc-shaped samples of each sealant were immersed in distilled water and the fluoride release was measured periodically until day 30. All the fluoridated sealants tested released measurable fluoride throughout the test period in a similar pattern: the greatest amount of fluoride was released in the first 24 hours after mixing, fell sharply on the second day and decreased slowly for the last days. On day one, Baritone L3 released significantly more fluoride than all other materials. Teethmate-F released the highest amount of fluoride during all the other time intervals from day 2, until day 30. PMID:9643204

  3. Development of a solid-phase assay for measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, J.; Johnson, K.; Kaplan, J.

    1980-09-15

    A solid-phase, plate assay was developed for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity. In this assay procedure, radiolabeled substrates were dried onto the surface of microtiter wells. Following drying, the wells were washed two times with saline to remove the nonadherent substrate. When proteolytic enzymes were added to the wells, protein hydrolysis occurred, releasing radioactivity into the supernatant fluid. The amount of protein hydrolysis that occurred was reflected by the amount of radioactivity in the supernatant fluid. When /sup 125/I-hemoglobin was used as the substrate, it was as susceptible to hydrolysis by trypsin in the solid-phase assay as it was in solution in a standard assay procedure. Protease activity from a variety of sources (including from viable cells as well as from extracellular sources) were also able to hydrolyze the hemoglobin on the plate. /sup 125/I-Labeled serum albumen, fibrinogen, and rat pulmonary basement membrane were also susceptible to hydrolysis by trypsin in the solid phase. When (/sup 14/C)elastin was dried onto the plate, it behaved in a similar manner to elastin in solution. It was resistant to hydrolysis by nonspecific proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin but was highly susceptible to hydrolysis by elastase. The solid-phase plate assay has several features which recommended it for routine use. It is as sensitive as standard tube assays (and much more sensitive than routinely used colormetric assays). It is quick and convenient; there are no precipitation, centrifugation, or filtration steps. In addition, very small volumes of radioactive wastes are generated. Another advantage of the solid-phase plate assay is the resistance of the dried substrates to spontaneous breakdown and to microbial contamination. Finally, this assay is suitable for use with viable cells as well as for extracellular proteases.

  4. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  5. Botulinum neurotoxin dose-dependently inhibits release of neurosecretory vesicle-vargeted luciferase from neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Genz, Lara; Püchel, Gerhard P

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a bacterial toxin that inhibits neurotransmitter release from neurons and thereby causes a flaccid paralysis. It is used as drug to treat a number of serious ailments and, more frequently, for aesthetic medical interventions. Botulinum toxin for pharmacological applications is isolated from bacterial cultures. Due to partial denaturation of the protein, the specific activity of these preparations shows large variations.Because of its extreme potential toxicity, pharmacological preparations must be carefully tested for their activity. For the current gold standard, the mouse lethality assay, several hundred thousand mice are killed per year. Alternative methods have been developed that suffer from one or more of the following deficits: In vitro enzyme assays test only the activity of the catalytic subunit of the toxin. Enzymatic and cell based immunological assays are specific for just one of the different serotypes. The current study takes a completely different approach that overcomes these limitations: Neuronal cell lines were stably transfected with plasmids coding for luciferases of different species, which were N-terminally tagged with leader sequences that redirect the luciferase into neuro-secretory vesicles. From these vesicles, luciferases were released upon depolarization of the cells. The depolarization-dependent release was efficiently inhibited by of botulinum toxin in a concentration range (1 to 100 pM) that is used in pharmacological preparations. The new assay might thus be an alternative to the mouse lethality assay and the immunological assays already in use. PMID:26389683

  6. DNA Methyltransferase Activity Assays: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Wan Jun; Wee, Cayden Pang Pee; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases), a family of enzymes that catalyse the methylation of DNA, have a profound effect on gene regulation. A large body of evidence has indicated that DNA MTase is potentially a predictive biomarker closely associated with genetic disorders and genetic diseases like cancer. Given the attention bestowed onto DNA MTases in molecular biology and medicine, highly sensitive detection of DNA MTase activity is essential in determining gene regulation, epigenetic modification, clinical diagnosis and therapeutics. Conventional techniques such as isotope labelling are effective, but they often require laborious sample preparation, isotope labelling, sophisticated equipment and large amounts of DNA, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Simple, portable, highly sensitive and low-cost assays are urgently needed for DNA MTase activity screening. In most recent technological advances, many alternative DNA MTase activity assays such as fluorescent, electrochemical, colorimetric and chemiluminescent assays have been proposed. In addition, many of them are coupled with nanomaterials and/or enzymes to significantly enhance their sensitivity. Herein we review the progress in the development of DNA MTase activity assays with an emphasis on assay mechanism and performance with some discussion on challenges and perspectives. It is hoped that this article will provide a broad coverage of DNA MTase activity assays and their latest developments and open new perspectives toward the development of DNA MTase activity assays with much improved performance for uses in molecular biology and clinical practice. PMID:26909112

  7. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E.; Neira, Hector D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a “lateral e-flow assay” and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings. PMID:25608872

  8. Sustained-Release Corticosteroid Options

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Mariana; Yeh, Steven; Albini, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained-release corticosteroid treatment has shown to be a promising strategy for macular edema due to retinovascular disease (i.e., diabetes and retinal vein occlusion) and for the treatment of noninfectious posterior uveitis. Clinicians now have the option of three sustained-release corticosteroid implants: Ozurdex (Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA) which releases dexamethasone and two devices that release fluocinolone acetonide, Retisert (Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY), and Iluvien (Alimera Science, Alpharetta, GA). Each has different physical characteristics and duration effect and has been approved for different indications. Herein we provide a summary of the current clinical knowledge regarding these implants. PMID:25140246

  9. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    DOEpatents

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  10. Nondestructive assay confirmatory assessment experiments: mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lemming, J.F.

    1980-04-30

    The confirmatory assessment experiments demonstrate traceable nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of plutonium in mixed oxide powder using commercially available spontaneous-fission assay systems. The experiments illustrate two major concepts: the production of calibration materials using calorimetric assay, and the use of paired measurements for measurement assurance. Two batches of well-characterized mixed oxide powder were used to establish the random and systematic error components. The major components of an NDA measurement assurance technique to establish and maintain traceability are identified and their functions are demonstrated. 20 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Controlled Release Formulations of Auxinic Herbicides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Witold J.; Siłowiecki, Andrzej.; Romanowska, Iwona; Glazek, Mariola; Bajor, Justyna; Cieciwa, Katarzyna; Rychter, Piotr

    2013-04-01

    Controlled release formulations are applied extensively for the release of active ingredients such as plant protection agents and fertilizers in response to growing concern for ecological problems associated with increased use of plant protection chemicals required for intensive agricultural practices [1]. We synthesized oligomeric mixtures of (R,S)-3-hydroxy butyric acid chemically bonded with 2,4-D, Dicamba and MCPA herbicides (HBA) respectively, and determined their molecular structure and molecular weight dispersion by the size exclusion chromatography, proton magnetic resonance spectrometry and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry. Further we carried out bioassays of herbicidal effectiveness of the HBA herbicides vs. series of dicotyledonous weeds and crop injury tests [2, 3, 4]. Field bioassays were accomplished according to the EPPO standards [5]. Groups of representative weeds (the development stages in the BCCH scale: 10 - 30) were selected as targets. Statistical variabilities were assessed by the Fisher LSD test for plants treated with the studied herbicides in form of HBA oligomers, the reference herbicides in form of dimethyl ammonium salts (DMA), and untreated plants. No statistically significant differences in the crop injuries caused by the HBA vs. the DMA reference formulation were observed. The effectiveness of the HBA herbicides was lower through the initial period (ca. 2 weeks) relative to the DMA salts, but a significant increase in the effectiveness of the HBA systems followed during the remaining fraction of each assay. After 6 weeks all observed efficiencies approached 100%. The death of weeds treated with the HBA herbicides was delayed when compared with the DMA reference herbicides. The delayed uptake observed for the HBA oligomers relative to the DMA salts was due to controlled release phenomena. In case of the DMA salts the total amount of active ingredients was available at the target site. By contrast, the amount of an active

  12. Practical assay for nitrite and nitrosothiol as an alternative to the Griess assay or the 2,3-diaminonaphthalene assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanming; Zhang, Quanjuan; Qian, Xuhong; Yang, Youjun

    2015-01-20

    Nitrite is a heavily assayed substrate in the fields of food safety, water quality control, disease diagnosis, and forensic investigation and more recently in basic biological studies on nitric oxide physiology and pathology. The colorimetric Griess assay and the fluorimetric 2,3-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) assay are the current gold standards for nitrite quantification. They are not without limitations, yet have amazingly survived 156 and 44 years, respectively, due to the lack of a practical alternative. Both assays exhibit slow detection kinetics due to inactivation of nucleophiles under strongly acidic media, require an extensive incubation time for reaction to go completion, and hence offer a limited detection throughput. By converting an intermolecular reaction of the Griess assay intramolecularly, we designed a novel probe (NT555) for nitrite detection, which displays superior detection kinetics and sensitivity. NT555 was constructed following our "covalent-assembly" probe design principle. Upon detection, it affords a gigantic bathochromic shift of the absorption spectrum and a sensitive turn-on fluorescence signal from a zero background, both of which are typical of an "assembly" type probe. Overall, NT555 has addressed various difficulties associated with the Griess and the DAN assays and represents an attractive alternative for practical applications. PMID:25519711

  13. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. ); Hooper, K. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  14. Complement-dependence of platelet serotonin release test in polytransfused patients.

    PubMed

    Gandolfo, G M; Afeltra, A; Mannella, E; Costantini, G

    1977-10-01

    The research of platelet isoantibodies in patients with Cooley's anaemia was performed by simultaneous determination of the platelet-complement fixation test, platelet factor 3 availability assay and 14C-serotonin release test. In 93% of the examined patients we obtained positive results with the 5HT-release test, which appeared to be a complement-dependent reaction in most of the sera-containing isoantibodies, different from sera of patients affected by autoimmune thrombocytopenia. PMID:918563

  15. Statistical Evaluation of HTS Assays for Enzymatic Hydrolysis of β-Keto Esters

    PubMed Central

    Dold, S. -M.; Zimmermann, S.; Hamacher, K.; Schmitz, K.; Rudat, J.

    2016-01-01

    β-keto esters are used as precursors for the synthesis of β-amino acids, which are building blocks for some classes of pharmaceuticals. Here we describe the comparison of screening procedures for hydrolases to be used for the hydrolysis of β-keto esters, the first step in the preparation of β-amino acids. Two of the tested high throughput screening (HTS) assays depend on coupled enzymatic reactions which detect the alcohol released during ester hydrolysis by luminescence or absorption. The third assay detects the pH shift due to acid formation using an indicator dye. To choose the most efficient approach for screening, we assessed these assays with different statistical methods—namely, the classical Z’-factor, standardized mean difference (SSMD), the Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test, and t-statistics. This revealed that all three assays are suitable for HTS, the pH assay performing best. Based on our data we discuss the explanatory power of different statistical measures. Finally, we successfully employed the pH assay to identify a very fast hydrolase in an enzyme-substrate screening. PMID:26730596

  16. Statistical Evaluation of HTS Assays for Enzymatic Hydrolysis of β-Keto Esters.

    PubMed

    Buß, O; Jager, S; Dold, S-M; Zimmermann, S; Hamacher, K; Schmitz, K; Rudat, J

    2016-01-01

    β-keto esters are used as precursors for the synthesis of β-amino acids, which are building blocks for some classes of pharmaceuticals. Here we describe the comparison of screening procedures for hydrolases to be used for the hydrolysis of β-keto esters, the first step in the preparation of β-amino acids. Two of the tested high throughput screening (HTS) assays depend on coupled enzymatic reactions which detect the alcohol released during ester hydrolysis by luminescence or absorption. The third assay detects the pH shift due to acid formation using an indicator dye. To choose the most efficient approach for screening, we assessed these assays with different statistical methods-namely, the classical Z'-factor, standardized mean difference (SSMD), the Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test, and t-statistics. This revealed that all three assays are suitable for HTS, the pH assay performing best. Based on our data we discuss the explanatory power of different statistical measures. Finally, we successfully employed the pH assay to identify a very fast hydrolase in an enzyme-substrate screening. PMID:26730596

  17. Measurement of filter paper activities of cellulase with microplate-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yan; Cui, Yuxiao; Cheng, Qiyue; Zhang, Zaixiao; Lu, Jia Hui; Meng, Qingfan; Teng, Lirong; Ren, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    It is always a challenge to determine the total cellulase activity efficiently without reducing accuracy. The most common total cellulase activity assay is the filter paper assay (FPA) established by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). A new procedure to measure the FPA with microplate-based assay was studied in this work, which followed the main idea of IUPAC to dilute cellulase preparation to get fixed glucose release. FPAs of six cellulase preparations were determined with the microplate-based assay. It is shown that FPAs of cellulase Youtell, RCconc, R-10, Lerkam, Yishui and Sinopharm were 67.9, 46.0, 46.1, 27.4, 7.6 and 8.0 IU/ml respectively. There was no significant difference at the 95% confidence level between the FPA determined with IUPAC and the microplate-based assay. It could be concluded that the FPA could be determined by the microplate-based assay with the same accuracy and much more efficiency compared with that by IUPAC. PMID:26858572

  18. Bead-Based Assays for Biodetection: From Flow-Cytometry to Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Grate, Jay W.; Nash, Michael A.; Tyler, Abby J.

    2009-05-04

    ABSTRACT The potential for the use of biological agents by terrorists is a real threat. Two approaches for detection of biological species will be described: 1) The use of microbead arrays for multiplexed flow cytometry detection of cytokines and botulinum neurotoxin simulant, and 2) a microfluidic platform for capture and separation of different size superparamagnetic nanoparticles followed by on-chip fluorescence detection of the sandwich complex. The methods and automated fluidic systems used for trapping functionalized microbeads will be described. This approach allows sample, assay reagents, and wash solutions to be perfused over a micro-column of beads, resulting in faster and more sensitive assays. The automated fluidic approach resulted in up to five-fold improvements in assay sensitivity/speed as compared to identical assays performed in a typical manual batch mode. A second approach for implementing multiplexed bead-based assays without using flow cytometry detection is currently under development. The goal of the microfluidic-based approach is to achieve rapid (<20 minutes), multiplexed (> 3 bioagents) detection using a simple and low-cost, integrated microfluidic/optical detection platform. Using fiber-optic guided laser-induced fluorescence, assay detection limits were shown to be in the 100’s of picomolar range (10’s of micrograms per liter) for botulinum neurotoxin simulant without any optimization of the microfluidic device or optical detection approach. Video taping magnetic nanoparticle capture and release was used to improve understanding of the process and revealed interesting behavior.

  19. Measurement of filter paper activities of cellulase with microplate-based assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yan; Cui, Yuxiao; Cheng, Qiyue; Zhang, Zaixiao; Lu, Jia Hui; Meng, Qingfan; Teng, Lirong; Ren, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    It is always a challenge to determine the total cellulase activity efficiently without reducing accuracy. The most common total cellulase activity assay is the filter paper assay (FPA) established by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). A new procedure to measure the FPA with microplate-based assay was studied in this work, which followed the main idea of IUPAC to dilute cellulase preparation to get fixed glucose release. FPAs of six cellulase preparations were determined with the microplate-based assay. It is shown that FPAs of cellulase Youtell, RCconc, R-10, Lerkam, Yishui and Sinopharm were 67.9, 46.0, 46.1, 27.4, 7.6 and 8.0 IU/ml respectively. There was no significant difference at the 95% confidence level between the FPA determined with IUPAC and the microplate-based assay. It could be concluded that the FPA could be determined by the microplate-based assay with the same accuracy and much more efficiency compared with that by IUPAC. PMID:26858572

  20. Tests for oil/dispersant toxicity: In situ laboratory assays

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.A.; Coelho, G.M.; Aurand, D.V.

    1995-12-31

    As part of its readiness program in oil spill response, the Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU), Department of Transport, U.K. conducts annual field trials in the North Sea, approximately 30 nautical miles from the southeast coast of England. The trials take the form of controlled releases of crude oil or Medium Fuel/Gas Oil mix (MFO), with and without the application of Corexit 9527 dispersant. In 1994 and 1995 the authors conducted a series of in situ toxicity bioassays in association with these spills with included 48h LC50 tests for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae, a 48 h oyster (C. gigas) embryonic development test and two full life-cycle assays using the copepods Acartia tonsa and Tisbe battagliai. Tests were also conducted in the Chesapeake Bay laboratory using estuarine species including the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the inland silverside Menidia beryllina. Here, the authors report on the results of these assays, together with 1996 in situ toxicity data resulting from Norwegian field trials in the northern North Sea.

  1. Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology to study biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Cook, Neil; Harris, Alison; Hopkins, Alison; Hughes, Kelvin

    2002-05-01

    Scintillation proximity assay (SPA) is a versatile homogeneous technique for radioactive assays which eliminates the need for separation steps. In SPA, scintillant is incorporated into small fluomicrospheres. These microspheres or "beads" are constructed in such a way as to bind specific molecules. If a radioactive molecule is bound to the bead, it is brought into close enough proximity that it can stimulate the scintillant contained within to emit light. Otherwise, the unbound radioactivity is too distant, the energy released is dissipated before reaching the bead, and these disintegrations are not detected. In this unit, the application of SPA technology to measuring protein-protein interactions, Src Homology 2 (SH2) and 3 (SH3) domain binding to specific peptide sequences, and receptor-ligand interactions are described. Three other protocols discuss the application of SPA technology to cell-adhesion-molecule interactions, protein-DNA interactions, and radioimmunoassays. In addition, protocols are given for preparation of SK-N-MC cells and cell membranes. PMID:18429228

  2. Implementation of a Portable HPGe for Field Contamination Assay.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Using MCNP to construct a detector model based initially on x-ray images of a portable high purity germanium (HPGe) detector followed by normalizing covering material values to also agree with check source responses, a validation of the model was attained. By calibrating the detector parameters using large count spectra, rigorous reproducibility is attained for high activity measurements but does not prevent deviations from normality in error distributions at the very low count events where spectral peaks are not always identifiable. The resulting model was created to allow operational assay of contamination over large areal distributions that could not otherwise be measured, such as the exhaust shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Results indicate that contamination levels of activity in the exhaust shaft can be assayed to within a factor of 2. Detection limits are evaluated to be well below the contamination levels, which would constitute a legal environmental release if unfiltered ventilation of the underground facility were used. PMID:27115224

  3. Fluorescence assays for F-pili and their application.

    PubMed

    Daehnel, Katrin; Harris, Robin; Maddera, Lucinda; Silverman, Philip

    2005-11-01

    Conjugative pili are extracellular filaments elaborated by Gram-negative bacteria expressing certain type IV secretion systems. They are required at the earliest stages of conjugal DNA transfer to establish specific and secure cell-cell contacts. Conjugative pili also serve as adsorption organelles for both RNA and DNA bacteriophages. Beyond these facts, the structure, formation and function of these filaments are poorly understood. This paper describes a rapid, quantitative assay for F-pili encoded by the F plasmid type IV secretion system. The assay is based on the specific lateral adsorption of icosahedral RNA bacteriophage R17 by F-pili. Bacteriophage particles conjugated with a fluorescent dye, Alexa 488, and bound to F-pili defined filaments visible by immunofluorescence microscopy. F-pili attached to F+ cells and free F-pili were both visible by this method. For quantification, cell-bound bacteriophage were separated from free bacteriophage particles by sedimentation and released by suspending cell pellets in 0.1 % SDS. Fluorescence in cell-free supernatant fractions was measured by fluorometry. The authors present a characterization of this assay and its application to F-pilus formation by cells carrying mutations in the gene for the F-pilus subunit F-pilin. Each mutation introduced a cysteine, which F-pilin normally lacks, at a different position in its primary structure. Cysteine residues in the N-terminal domain I abolished filament formation as measured by fluorescent R17 binding. This was confirmed by measurements of DNA donor activity and filamentous DNA bacteriophage infection. With one exception (G53C), cysteines elsewhere in the F-pilin primary structure did not abolish filament formation, although some mutations differentially affected F-pilus functions. PMID:16272377

  4. Precision estimates for tomographic nondestructive assay

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    One technique being applied to improve the accuracy of assays of waste in large containers is computerized tomography (CT). Research on the application of CT to improve both neutron and gamma-ray assays of waste is being carried out at LANL. For example, tomographic gamma scanning (TGS) is a single-photon emission CT technique that corrects for the attenuation of gamma rays emitted from the sample using attenuation images from transmission CT. By accounting for the distribution of emitting material and correcting for the attenuation of the emitted gamma rays, TGS is able to achieve highly accurate assays of radionuclides in medium-density wastes. It is important to develope methods to estimate the precision of such assays, and this paper explores this problem by examining the precision estimators for TGS.

  5. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S; Bustin, Stephen A

    2015-06-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein-protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  6. LIMITATIONS OF THE FLUORESCENT PROBE VIABILITY ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell viability commonly is determined flow cytometrically by the carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA)/propidium iodide (PI) assay. FDA is taken up by the viable cell and converted via cytoplasmic esterase-catalyzed hydrolysis to carboxyfluorescein (CF). F fluorescence intensity is...

  7. Variables Affecting Two Electron Transport System Assays

    PubMed Central

    Burton, G. Allen; Lanza, Guy R.

    1986-01-01

    Several methodological variables were critical in two commonly used electron transport activity assays. The dehydrogenase assay based on triphenyl formazan production exhibited a nonlinear relationship between formazan production (dehydrogenase activity) and sediment dilution, and linear formazan production occurred for 1 h in sediment slurries. Activity decreased with increased time of sediment storage at 4°C. Extraction efficiencies of formazan from sediment varied with alcohol type; methanol was unsatisfactory. Phosphate buffer (0.06 M) produced higher activity than did either U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reconstituted hard water or Tris buffer sediment diluents. Intracellular formazan crystals were dissolved within minutes when in contact with immersion oil. Greater crystal production (respiration) detected by a tetrazolium salt assay occurred at increased substrate concentrations. Test diluents containing macrophyte exudates produced greater activity than did phosphate buffer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water, or ultrapure water diluents. Both assays showed decreases in sediment or bacterial activity through time. PMID:16347067

  8. Scrape Loading/Dye Transfer Assay.

    PubMed

    Babica, Pavel; Sovadinová, Iva; Upham, Brad L

    2016-01-01

    The scrape loading/dye transfer (SL/DT) technique is a simple functional assay for the simultaneous assessment of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in a large population of cells. The equipment needs are minimal and are typically met in standard cell biology labs, and SL/DT is the simplest and quickest of all the assays that measure GJIC. This assay has also been adapted for in vivo studies. The SL/DT assay is also conducive to a high-throughput setup with automated fluorescence microscopy imaging and analysis to elucidate more samples in shorter time, and hence can serve a broad range of in vitro pharmacological and toxicological needs. PMID:27207291

  9. BIOMARKER ASSAYS IN NIPPLE APIRATE FLUID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    The noninvasive technique of nipple aspiration as a potential source of biomarkers of breast cancer risk was evaluated. The feasibility of performing mutagenesis assays, amplifying DNA and performing protein electrophoresis on nipple aspirate fluid was explored. ...

  10. Proximity assays for sensitive quantification of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Christina; Ruff, David; Kirvell, Sara; Johnson, Gemma; Dhillon, Harvinder S.; Bustin, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Proximity assays are immunohistochemical tools that utilise two or more DNA-tagged aptamers or antibodies binding in close proximity to the same protein or protein complex. Amplification by PCR or isothermal methods and hybridisation of a labelled probe to its DNA target generates a signal that enables sensitive and robust detection of proteins, protein modifications or protein–protein interactions. Assays can be carried out in homogeneous or solid phase formats and in situ assays can visualise single protein molecules or complexes with high spatial accuracy. These properties highlight the potential of proximity assays in research, diagnostic, pharmacological and many other applications that require sensitive, specific and accurate assessments of protein expression. PMID:27077033

  11. Developmental Toxicity Assays Using the Drosophila Model

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Matthew D.; Montgomery, Sara L.; Prince, Lisa; Vorojeikina, Daria

    2014-01-01

    The fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) has long been a premier model for developmental biologists and geneticists. The utility of Drosophila for toxicology studies has only recently gained broader recognition as a tool to elaborate molecular genetic mechanisms of toxic substances. In this article two practical applications of Drosophila for developmental toxicity assays are described. The first assay takes advantage of newly developed methods to render the fly embryo accessible to small molecules, toxicants and drugs. The second assay engages straightforward exposures to developing larvae and easy to score outcomes of adult development. With the extensive collections of flies that are publicly available and the ease with which to create transgenic flies, these two assays have a unique power for identifying and characterizing molecular mechanisms and cellular pathways specific to the mode of action of a number of toxicants and drugs. PMID:24789363

  12. CONTROL ASSAY DEVELOPMENT: METHODOLOGY AND LABORATORY VERIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes Control Assay Development (CAD), a data acquisition program designed to evaluate the potential applicability of various treatment processes for the control of solid, liquid, and gaseous emissions from coal conversion plants. The CAD program described could be...

  13. Electrochemical Assay of Gold-Plating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiodo, R.

    1982-01-01

    Gold content of plating solution is assayed by simple method that required only ordinary electrochemical laboratory equipment and materials. Technique involves electrodeposition of gold from solution onto electrode, the weight gain of which is measured. Suitable fast assay methods are economically and practically necessary in electronics and decorative-plating industries. If gold content in plating bath is too low, poor plating may result, with consequent economic loss to user.

  14. Rapid assays for environmental and biological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Szurdoki, F; Jaeger, L; Harris, A; Kido, H; Wengatz, I; Goodrow, M H; Székács, A; Wortberg, M; Zheng, J; Stoutamire, D W; Sanborn, J R; Gilman, S D; Jones, A D; Gee, S J; Choudary, P V; Hammock, B D

    1996-05-01

    Rapid, inexpensive, sensitive, and selective enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) now are utilized in environmental science. In this laboratory, many ELISAs have been developed for pesticides and other toxic substances and also for their metabolites. Compounds for which ELISAs have recently been devised include insecticides (organophosphates, carbaryl, pyrethroids, and fenoxycarb), herbicides (s-triazines, arylureas, triclopyr, and bromacil), fungicides (myclobutanil), TCDD, and metabolites of naphthalene and toluene. New rapid assays have been developed for mercury. PMID:8642182

  15. Automated optical sensing system for biochemical assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroszlan, Peter; Duveneck, Gert L.; Ehrat, Markus; Widmer, H. M.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new system called FOBIA that was developed and optimized with respect to automated operation of repetitive assay cycles with regenerable bioaffinity sensors. The reliability and precision of the new system is demonstrated by an application in a competitive assay for the detection of the triazine herbicide Atrazine. Using one sensor in more than 300 repetitive cycles, a signal precision better than 5% was achieved.

  16. Controlled Release Applications of Organometals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thayer, John S.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews two classes of controlled release organometals: (1) distributional, to distribute bioactive materials to control a certain target organism; and (2) protective, to protect surface or interior of some structure from attach by organisms. Specific examples are given including a discussion of controlled release for schistosomiasis. (SK)

  17. Protein immobilization techniques for microfluidic assays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohyun; Herr, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic systems have shown unequivocal performance improvements over conventional bench-top assays across a range of performance metrics. For example, specific advances have been made in reagent consumption, throughput, integration of multiple assay steps, assay automation, and multiplexing capability. For heterogeneous systems, controlled immobilization of reactants is essential for reliable, sensitive detection of analytes. In most cases, protein immobilization densities are maximized, while native activity and conformation are maintained. Immobilization methods and chemistries vary significantly depending on immobilization surface, protein properties, and specific assay goals. In this review, we present trade-offs considerations for common immobilization surface materials. We overview immobilization methods and chemistries, and discuss studies exemplar of key approaches—here with a specific emphasis on immunoassays and enzymatic reactors. Recent “smart immobilization” methods including the use of light, electrochemical, thermal, and chemical stimuli to attach and detach proteins on demand with precise spatial control are highlighted. Spatially encoded protein immobilization using DNA hybridization for multiplexed assays and reversible protein immobilization surfaces for repeatable assay are introduced as immobilization methods. We also describe multifunctional surface coatings that can perform tasks that were, until recently, relegated to multiple functional coatings. We consider the microfluidics literature from 1997 to present and close with a perspective on future approaches to protein immobilization. PMID:24003344

  18. Immunoperoxidase inhibition assay for rabies antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Batista, H B C R; Lima, F E S; Maletich, D; Silva, A C R; Vicentini, F K; Roehe, L R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M

    2011-06-01

    An immunoperoxidase inhibition assay (IIA) for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera is described. Diluted test sera are added to microplates with paraformaldehyde-fixed, CER cells infected with rabies virus. Antibodies in test sera compete with a rabies polyclonal rabbit antiserum which was added subsequently. Next, an anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase conjugate is added and the reaction developed by the addition of the substrate 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The performance of the assay was compared to that of the "simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest" (SFIMT), an established virus neutralization assay, by testing 422 human sera. The IIA displayed 97.6% sensitivity, 98% specificity and 97.6% accuracy (Kappa correlation coefficient=0.9). The IIA results can be read by standard light microscopy, where the clearly identifiable specific staining is visible in antibody-negative sera, in contrast to the absence of staining in antibody-positive samples. The assay does not require monoclonal antibodies or production of large amounts of virus; furthermore, protein purification steps or specialized equipment are not necessary for its performance. The IIA was shown to be suitable for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy comparable to that of a neutralization-based assay. This assay may be advantageous over other similar methods designed to detect rabies-specific binding antibodies, in that it can be easily introduced into laboratories, provided basic cell culture facilities are available. PMID:21458492

  19. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    PubMed

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed. PMID:26952168

  20. Toxic releases from power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-09-15

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results.

  1. Kepler Data Release 4 Notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Cleve, Jeffrey (Editor); Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Doug; Allen, Christopher L.; Batalha, Natalie; Bryson, Stephen T.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Cote, Miles T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Gilliland, Ron; Girouard, Forrest; Haas, Michael R.; Hall, Jennifer; Ibrahim, Khadeejah; Klaus, Todd; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Li, Jie; McCauliff, Sean D.; Middour, Christopher K.; Pletcher, David L.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter G.; Twicken, Joe; Uddin, Akm Kamal

    2010-01-01

    The Data Analysis Working Group have released long and short cadence materials, including FFIs and Dropped Targets for the Public. The Kepler Science Office considers Data Release 4 to provide "browse quality" data. These notes have been prepared to give Kepler users of the Multimission Archive at STScl (MAST) a summary of how the data were collected and prepared, and how well the data processing pipeline is functioning on flight data. They will be updated for each release of data to the public archive and placed on MAST along with other Kepler documentation, at http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler/documents.html. Data release 3 is meant to give users the opportunity to examine the data for possibly interesting science and to involve the users in improving the pipeline for future data releases. To perform the latter service, users are encouraged to notice and document artifacts, either in the raw or processed data, and report them to the Science Office.

  2. Nitrogen release during coal combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Mitchell, R.E.; Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments in entrained flow reactors at combustion temperatures are performed to resolve the rank dependence of nitrogen release on an elemental basis for a suite of 15 U.S. coals ranging from lignite to low-volatile bituminous. Data were obtained as a function of particle conversion, with overall mass loss up to 99% on a dry, ash-free basis. Nitrogen release rates are presented relative to both carbon loss and overall mass loss. During devolatilization, fractional nitrogen release from low-rank coals is much slower than fractional mass release and noticeably slower than fractional carbon release. As coal rank increases, fractional nitrogen release rate relative to that of carbon and mass increases, with fractional nitrogen release rates exceeding fractional mass and fractional carbon release rates during devolatilization for high-rank (low-volatile bituminous) coals. At the onset of combustion, nitrogen release rates increase significantly. For all coals investigated, cumulative fractional nitrogen loss rates relative to those of mass and carbon passes through a maximum during the earliest stages of oxidation. The mechanism for generating this maximum is postulated to involve nascent thermal rupture of nitrogen-containing compounds and possible preferential oxidation of nitrogen sites. During later stages of oxidation, the cumulative fractional loss of nitrogen approaches that of carbon for all coals. Changes in the relative release rates of nitrogen compared to those of both overall mass and carbon during all stages of combustion are attributed to a combination of the chemical structure of coals, temperature histories during combustion, and char chemistry.

  3. Miniaturizable homogenous time-resolved fluorescence assay for carboxypeptidase B activity.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Marc; Zuck, Paul; Kolodin, Garrett; Mao, Shi Shan; Peltier, Richard R; Bailey, Carolyn; Gardell, Stephen J; Strulovici, Berta; Inglese, James

    2003-06-01

    An epitope-unmasking, homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) assay has been developed for measuring carboxypeptidase B (CPB) activity in a miniaturized high-throughput screening format. The enzyme substrate (biotin-RYRGLMVGGVVR-OH) is cleaved by CPB at the C terminus, causing release of the C-terminal Arg residue. The product (biotin-RYRGLMVGGVV-OH) is recognized specifically by a monoclonal antibody (G2-10) which is labeled with Eu(3+)-cryptate ([Eu(3+)]G2-10 mAb), and the complex is detected by fluorescence resonance energy transfer using streptavidin labeled with allophycocyanin ([XL665]SA). The CPB HTRF assay is readily adapted from 96- to 1536-well format as a robust (Z(')>0.5) assay for high-throughput screening. PMID:12729605

  4. Development of a Rapid Insulin Assay by Homogenous Time-Resolved Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Farino, Zachary J; Morgenstern, Travis J; Vallaghe, Julie; Gregor, Nathalie; Donthamsetti, Prashant; Harris, Paul E; Pierre, Nicolas; Freyberg, Robin; Charrier-Savournin, Fabienne; Javitch, Jonathan A; Freyberg, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurement of insulin is critical for basic and clinical studies of insulin secretion. However, current methods are expensive and time-consuming. We developed an insulin assay based on homogenous time-resolved fluorescence that is significantly more rapid and cost-effective than current commonly used approaches. This assay was applied effectively to an insulin secreting cell line, INS-1E cells, as well as pancreatic islets, allowing us to validate the assay by elucidating mechanisms by which dopamine regulates insulin release. We found that dopamine functioned as a significant negative modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Further, we showed that bromocriptine, a known dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist and newly approved drug used for treatment of type II diabetes mellitus, also decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islets to levels comparable to those caused by dopamine treatment. PMID:26849707

  5. Development of a Rapid Insulin Assay by Homogenous Time-Resolved Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Vallaghe, Julie; Gregor, Nathalie; Donthamsetti, Prashant; Harris, Paul E.; Pierre, Nicolas; Freyberg, Robin; Charrier-Savournin, Fabienne; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Freyberg, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Direct measurement of insulin is critical for basic and clinical studies of insulin secretion. However, current methods are expensive and time-consuming. We developed an insulin assay based on homogenous time-resolved fluorescence that is significantly more rapid and cost-effective than current commonly used approaches. This assay was applied effectively to an insulin secreting cell line, INS-1E cells, as well as pancreatic islets, allowing us to validate the assay by elucidating mechanisms by which dopamine regulates insulin release. We found that dopamine functioned as a significant negative modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Further, we showed that bromocriptine, a known dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist and newly approved drug used for treatment of type II diabetes mellitus, also decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in islets to levels comparable to those caused by dopamine treatment. PMID:26849707

  6. Organic Phosphorus Characterisation in Agricultural Soils by Enzyme Addition Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosch, Klaus; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2013-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is a non-renewable resource and it is a building block of many molecules indispensable for life. Up to 80 per cent of total soil P can be in organic form. Hydrolysability and thereby availability to plants and microorganisms differ strongly among the multitude of chemical forms of soil organic P. A recent approach to characterise organic P classes is the addition of specific enzymes which hydrolyse organic P to inorganic orthophosphate, making it detectable by colorimetry. Based on the substrate specificity of the added enzymes, conclusions about the hydrolysed forms of organic P can then be made. The aim of this study was to determine the applicability of enzyme addition assays for the characterisation of organic P species in soil:water suspensions of soils with differing properties. To this end, ten different soil samples originating from four continents, with variable pH (in water) values (4.2-8.0), land management (grassland or cropped land) and P fertilization intensity were analysed. Three different enzymes were used (acid phosphatase, nuclease and phytase). Acid phosphatase alone or in combination with nuclease was applied to determine the content of P in simple monoesters (monoester-like P) and P in DNA (DNA-like P), while P hydrolysed from myo-inositol hexakisphosphate (Ins6P-like P) was calculated from P release after incubation with phytase minus P release by acid phosphatase. To reduce sorption of inorganic P on soil particles of the suspension, especially in highly weathered soils, soil specific EDTA additions were determined in extensive pre-tests. The results of these pre-tests showed that recoveries of at least 30 per cent could be achieved in all soils. Thus, detection of even small organic P pools, such as DNA-like P, was possible in all soils if a suitable EDTA concentration was chosen. The enzyme addition assays provided information about the hydrolysable quantities of the different classes of soil organic P compounds as affected

  7. Highly Efficient Thermoresponsive Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yassine, Omar; Zaher, Amir; Li, Er Qiang; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Perez, Jose E.; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho; Contreras, Maria F.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Khashab, Niveen M.; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient magnetic release from nanocomposite microparticles is shown, which are made of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel with embedded iron nanowires. A simple microfluidic technique was adopted to fabricate the microparticles with a high control of the nanowire concentration and in a relatively short time compared to chemical synthesis methods. The thermoresponsive microparticles were used for the remotely triggered release of Rhodamine (B). With a magnetic field of only 1 mT and 20 kHz a drug release of 6.5% and 70% was achieved in the continuous and pulsatile modes, respectively. Those release values are similar to the ones commonly obtained using superparamagnetic beads but accomplished with a magnetic field of five orders of magnitude lower power. The high efficiency is a result of the high remanent magnetization of the nanowires, which produce a large torque when exposed to a magnetic field. This causes the nanowires to vibrate, resulting in friction losses and heating. For comparison, microparticles with superparamagnetic beads were also fabricated and tested; while those worked at 73 mT and 600 kHz, no release was observed at the low field conditions. Cytotoxicity assays showed similar and high cell viability for microparticles with nanowires and beads. PMID:27335342

  8. Highly Efficient Thermoresponsive Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Applications.

    PubMed

    Yassine, Omar; Zaher, Amir; Li, Er Qiang; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Perez, Jose E; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho; Contreras, Maria F; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T; Khashab, Niveen M; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-01-01

    Highly efficient magnetic release from nanocomposite microparticles is shown, which are made of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel with embedded iron nanowires. A simple microfluidic technique was adopted to fabricate the microparticles with a high control of the nanowire concentration and in a relatively short time compared to chemical synthesis methods. The thermoresponsive microparticles were used for the remotely triggered release of Rhodamine (B). With a magnetic field of only 1 mT and 20 kHz a drug release of 6.5% and 70% was achieved in the continuous and pulsatile modes, respectively. Those release values are similar to the ones commonly obtained using superparamagnetic beads but accomplished with a magnetic field of five orders of magnitude lower power. The high efficiency is a result of the high remanent magnetization of the nanowires, which produce a large torque when exposed to a magnetic field. This causes the nanowires to vibrate, resulting in friction losses and heating. For comparison, microparticles with superparamagnetic beads were also fabricated and tested; while those worked at 73 mT and 600 kHz, no release was observed at the low field conditions. Cytotoxicity assays showed similar and high cell viability for microparticles with nanowires and beads. PMID:27335342

  9. Pulsatile Release of Parathyroid Hormone from an Implantable Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohua; Pettway, Glenda J.; McCauley, Laurie K.; Ma, Peter X.

    2007-01-01

    Intermittent (pulsatile) administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known to improve bone micro-architecture, mineral density and strength. Therefore, daily injection of PTH has been clinically used for the treatment of osteoporosis. However, this regimen of administration is not convenient and is not a favorable choice of patients. In this study, an implantable delivery system has been developed to achieve pulsatile release of PTH. A well-defined cylindrical device was first fabricated with a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), using a reverse solid free form fabrication technique. Three-component polyanhydrides composed of sebacic acid, 1,3-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy) propane and poly(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and used as isolation layers. The polyanhydride isolation layers and PTH-loaded alginate layers were then stacked alternately within the delivery device. The gap between the stacked PTH-releasing core and the device frame was filled with PLLA to seal. Multi-pulse PTH release was achieved using the implantable device. The lag time between two adjacent pulses were modulated by the composition and the film thickness of the polyanhydride. The released PTH was demonstrated to be biologically active using an in vitro assay. Timed sequential release of multiple drugs has also been demonstrated. The implantable device holds promise for both systemic and local therapies. PMID:17576005

  10. Radio-synthesized polyacrylamide hydrogels for proteins release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz, Caroline C.; Varca, Gustavo H. C.; Lopes, Patricia S.; Mathor, Monica B.; Lugão, Ademar B.

    2014-01-01

    The use of hydrogels for biomedical purposes has been extensively investigated. Pharmaceutical proteins correspond to highly active substances which may be applied for distinct purposes. This work concerns the development of radio-synthesized hydrogel for protein release, using papain and bovine serum albumin as model proteins. The polymer was solubilized (1% w/v) in water and lyophilized. The proteins were incorporated into the lyophilized polymer and the hydrogels were produced by simultaneous crosslinking and sterilization using γ-radiation under frozen conditions. The produced systems were characterized in terms of swelling degree, gel fraction, crosslinking density and evaluated according to protein release, bioactivity and cytotoxicity. The hydrogels developed presented different properties as a function of polymer concentration and the optimized results were found for the samples containing 4-5% (w/v) polyacrylamide. Protein release was controlled by the electrostatic affinity of acrylic moieties and proteins. This selection was based on the release of the proteins during the experiment period (up to 50 h), maintenance of enzyme activity and the nanostructure developed. The system was suitable for protein loading and release and according to the cytotoxic assay it was also adequate for biomedical purposes, however this method was not able to generate a matrix with controlled pore sizes.

  11. Kinetics of Stop Codon Recognition by Release Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Byron; Lee, Kristin; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of stop codons by class I release factors is a fundamental step in the termination phase of protein synthesis. Since premature termination is costly to the cell, release factors have to efficiently discriminate between stop and sense codons. In order to understand the mechanism of discrimination between stop and sense codons, we developed a new, pre-steady state kinetic assay to monitor the interaction of RF1 with the ribosome. Our results show that RF1 associates with similar association rate constants to ribosomes programmed with a stop or sense codons. However, dissociation of RF1 from sense codons is as much as three orders of magnitude faster than from stop codons. Interestingly, the affinity of RF1 for ribosomes programmed with different sense codons does not correlate with the defects in peptide release. Thus, discrimination against sense codons is achieved, both, by increasing the dissociation rates and by decreasing the rate of peptide release. These results suggest that sense codons inhibit conformational changes necessary for RF1 to stably bind to the ribosome and catalyze peptide release. PMID:19874047

  12. Quantification of intracellular payload release from polymersome nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Edoardo; Bailey, Joanne L.; Janeczek, Agnieszka A.; Stumpf, Patrick S.; Johnston, Alexander H.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Woo, Yin L.; Cheong, Ying C.; Evans, Nicholas D.; Newman, Tracey A.

    2016-01-01

    Polymersome nanoparticles (PMs) are attractive candidates for spatio-temporal controlled delivery of therapeutic agents. Although many studies have addressed cellular uptake of solid nanoparticles, there is very little data available on intracellular release of molecules encapsulated in membranous carriers, such as polymersomes. Here, we addressed this by developing a quantitative assay based on the hydrophilic dye, fluorescein. Fluorescein was encapsulated stably in PMs of mean diameter 85 nm, with minimal leakage after sustained dialysis. No fluorescence was detectable from fluorescein PMs, indicating quenching. Following incubation of L929 cells with fluorescein PMs, there was a gradual increase in intracellular fluorescence, indicating PM disruption and cytosolic release of fluorescein. By combining absorbance measurements with flow cytometry, we quantified the real-time intracellular release of a fluorescein at a single-cell resolution. We found that 173 ± 38 polymersomes released their payload per cell, with significant heterogeneity in uptake, despite controlled synchronisation of cell cycle. This novel method for quantification of the release of compounds from nanoparticles provides fundamental information on cellular uptake of nanoparticle-encapsulated compounds. It also illustrates the stochastic nature of population distribution in homogeneous cell populations, a factor that must be taken into account in clinical use of this technology. PMID:27404770

  13. Highly Efficient Thermoresponsive Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassine, Omar; Zaher, Amir; Li, Er Qiang; Alfadhel, Ahmed; Perez, Jose E.; Kavaldzhiev, Mincho; Contreras, Maria F.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Khashab, Niveen M.; Kosel, Jurgen

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient magnetic release from nanocomposite microparticles is shown, which are made of Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel with embedded iron nanowires. A simple microfluidic technique was adopted to fabricate the microparticles with a high control of the nanowire concentration and in a relatively short time compared to chemical synthesis methods. The thermoresponsive microparticles were used for the remotely triggered release of Rhodamine (B). With a magnetic field of only 1 mT and 20 kHz a drug release of 6.5% and 70% was achieved in the continuous and pulsatile modes, respectively. Those release values are similar to the ones commonly obtained using superparamagnetic beads but accomplished with a magnetic field of five orders of magnitude lower power. The high efficiency is a result of the high remanent magnetization of the nanowires, which produce a large torque when exposed to a magnetic field. This causes the nanowires to vibrate, resulting in friction losses and heating. For comparison, microparticles with superparamagnetic beads were also fabricated and tested; while those worked at 73 mT and 600 kHz, no release was observed at the low field conditions. Cytotoxicity assays showed similar and high cell viability for microparticles with nanowires and beads.

  14. SENSITIVE ASSAY, BASED ON HYDROXY FATTY ACIDS FROM LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE LIPID A, FOR GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biochemical measures have provided insight into the biomass and community structure of sedimentary microbiota without the requirement of selection by growth or quantitative removal from the sediment grains. This study used the assay of the hydroxy fatty acids released from the li...

  15. Melamine and Cyanuric Acid do not interfere with Bradford and Ninhydrin assays for protein determination

    PubMed Central

    Field, Anjalie; Field, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2007 pet food contaminated with melamine and cyanuric acid caused kidney stones in thousands of animals. In the summer of 2008, a more serious outbreak of adulterated dairy food caused the deaths of six infants and sickened about 290,000 children in China. In all cases, melamine was likely added to inflate the apparent protein content of the foods. To determine if we could measure protein without interference from melamine and cyanuric acid we tested these compounds in the Bradford and Ninhydrin assays, two common dye-based assays for protein, as well as by ammonia release, the most common assay used in the food industry. Neither compound was detected in the Ninhydrin and Bradford assays at concentrations of >100 μg/ml. The ammonia assay detected melamine but was inconclusive with respect to cyanuric acid. To develop an accurate test for food that would not detect either chemical as a protein, assays were run on cat food and reconstituted milk powder. The Bradford assay readily measured the protein content of each food, and importantly, the addition of melamine or cyanuric acid to reconstituted milk did not affect the readings. The protein concentrations obtained for reconstituted milk powder were as expected, but those for the cat food were 10 to 30-fold lower, due to its low solubility. We conclude that dye-binding assays can be employed to detect protein in food without interference from melamine and cyanuric acid, thus reducing the incentive to use them as additives. PMID:20228949

  16. Engineered nanomaterial transformation under oxidative environmental conditions: Development of an in vitro biomimetic assay

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Kevin M.; Mangham, Andrew N.; Bierman, Matthew J.; Jin, Song; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2013-01-01

    Once released into the environment, engineered nanomaterials may be transformed by microbially mediated redox processes altering their toxicity and fate. Little information currently exists on engineered nanomaterial transformation under environmentally relevant conditions. Here, we report the development of an in vitro biomimetic assay for investigation of nanomaterial transformation under simulated oxidative environmental conditions. The assay is based on the extracellular hydroquinone-driven Fenton’s reaction used by lignolytic fungi. We demonstrate the utility of the assay using CdSecore/ZnSshell quantum dots (QDs) functionalized with poly(ethylene glycol). QD transformation was assessed by UV-Visible spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). QDs were readily degraded under simulated oxidative environmental conditions: the ZnS shell eroded and cadmium was released from the QD core. TEM, electron diffraction analysis and EDX of transformed QDs revealed formation of amorphous Se aggregates. The biomimetic hydroquinone-driven Fenton’s reaction degraded QDs to a larger extent than did H2O2 and classical Fenton’s reagent (H2O2 + Fe2+). This assay provides a new method to characterize transformations of nanoscale materials expected to occur under oxidative environmental conditions. PMID:19350941

  17. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  18. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Andrew R.; El Yamani, Naouale; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Brunborg, Gunnar; Azqueta, Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardizing the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of alkaline incubation, and electrophoresis conditions (time, temperature, and voltage gradient) are particularly important. Even when these are controlled, variation seems to be inevitable. It is helpful to include in experiments reference standards, i.e., cells with a known amount of specific damage to the DNA. They can be aliquots frozen from a single large batch of cells, either untreated (negative controls) or treated with, for example, H2O2 or X-rays to induce strand breaks (positive control for the basic assay), or photosensitiser plus light to oxidize guanine (positive control for Fpg- or OGG1-sensitive sites). Reference standards are especially valuable when performing a series of experiments over a long period—for example, analysing samples of white blood cells from a large human biomonitoring trial—to check that the assay is performing consistently, and to identify anomalous results necessitating a repeat experiment. The reference values of tail intensity can also be used to iron out small variations occurring from day to day. We present examples of the use of reference standards in human trials, both within one laboratory and between different laboratories, and describe procedures that can be used to control variation. PMID:25368630

  19. Surface Bacterial-Spore Assay Using Tb3+/DPA Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and a method for rapidly assaying solid surfaces for contamination by bacterial spores are undergoing development. The method would yield a total (nonviable plus viable) spore count of a surface within minutes and a viable-spore count in about one hour. In this method, spores would be collected from a surface by use of a transparent polymeric tape coated on one side with a polymeric adhesive that would be permeated with one or more reagent(s) for detection of spores by use of visible luminescence. The sticky side of the tape would be pressed against a surface to be assayed, then the tape with captured spores would be placed in a reader that illuminates the sample with ultraviolet light and counts the green luminescence spots under a microscope to quantify the number of bacterial spores per unit area. The visible luminescence spots seen through the microscope would be counted to determine the concentration of spores on the surface. This method is based on the chemical and physical principles of methods described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, including Live/Dead Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence (NPO-30444), Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 7a. To recapitulate: The basic idea is to exploit the observations that (1) dipicolinic acid (DPA) is present naturally only in bacterial spores; and (2) when bound to Tb3+ ions, DPA triggers intense green luminescence of the ions under ultraviolet excitation; (3) DPA can be released from the viable spores by using L-alanine to make them germinate; and (4) by autoclaving, microwaving, or sonicating the sample, one can cause all the spores (non-viable as well as viable) to release their DPA. One candidate material for use as the adhesive in the present method is polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). In one variant of the method for obtaining counts of all (viable and nonviable) spores the PDMS would be doped with TbCl3. After collection of a sample, the spores immobilized on the sticky tape surface

  20. Development of a robust reporter-based assay for the bioactivity determination of anti-VEGF therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Xu, Gang-Ling; Gao, Kai; Wilkinson, Jennifer; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Lei; Liu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chuan-Fei; Wang, Wen-Bo; Li, Meng; Chen, Wei; Fan, Frank; Cong, Mei; Wang, Jun-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    Development of anti-VEGF based biologic agents has been a focus in cancer treatment for the past decades, and several anti-VEGF pharmaceuticals have been already approved for treatment of various medical indications especially in cancer. The first anti-angiogenic agent approved by FDA was bevacizumab (BVZ, trade name Avastin, Genentech/Roche), a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody. Accurate determination of bioactivity is crucial for the safety and efficacy of therapeutic antibodies. The current method widely used in the lot release and stability test for clinical trial batches of BVZ is anti-proliferation assay using primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), which is tedious with high assay variations. We describe here the development and preliminary validation of a reporter gene assay (RGA) that is based on an HEK293 cell line stably expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), and a luciferase reporter under the control of nuclear factor activated T cell (NFAT) response elements. Our study shows this assay not only to be superior on precision, sensitivity and assay simplicity compared with HUVEC assay, but also applicable to other VEGF-targeted biotherapeutics. These results show for the first time that this new reporter assay, based on the VEGF-VEGFR-NFAT pathway, can be a viable supplement to the HUVEC assay and employed in potency determination of BVZ and other kinds of anti-VEGF antibody-based biotherapeutics. PMID:27042807

  1. Toxic chemical release inventory information.

    PubMed

    Bronson, R J

    1991-01-01

    As part of a U.S. government effort to inform the public about toxic or hazardous chemicals released into the environment, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are jointly producing the TRI (Toxic Chemical Release Inventory) databanks which consist of two separate files, TRI87 and TRI88. Both files reside on NLM's TOX-NET system. The files contain geographic information about reporting facilities and land, air, and water release data for approximately 300 listed chemicals. PMID:10111718

  2. Controlled release liquid dosage formulation

    DOEpatents

    Benton, Ben F.; Gardner, David L.

    1989-01-01

    A liquid dual coated dosage formulation sustained release pharmaceutic having substantial shelf life prior to ingestion is disclosed. A dual coating is applied over controlled release cores to form dosage forms and the coatings comprise fats melting at less than approximately 101.degree. F. overcoated with cellulose acetate phthalate or zein. The dual coated dosage forms are dispersed in a sugar based acidic liquid carrier such as high fructose corn syrup and display a shelf life of up to approximately at least 45 days while still retaining their release profiles following ingestion. Cellulose acetate phthalate coated dosage form cores can in addition be dispersed in aqueous liquids of pH <5.

  3. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  4. Comparability of in vitro tests for bioactive nanoparticles: a common assay to detect reactive oxygen species as an example.

    PubMed

    Roesslein, Matthias; Hirsch, Cordula; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Krug, Harald F; Wick, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the electron transport of mitochondrial aerobic respiration is the major source of ROS. However, contact between cells and nanoparticles (NPs) can also induce release of ROS, leading to an imbalance towards the pro-oxidative state. At low levels of ROS production, cells initiate a protective response to guarantee their survival, but an excess of ROS can damage cellular compounds such as membranes and various organelles, or directly cause genotoxicity. Thus an elevated level of ROS is an important indicator of cellular stress and an accurate recording of this parameter would be very informative. ROS can be measured by various assays, but all known assays measuring and quantifying ROS possess certain weaknesses. The problems and challenges of quantitatively detecting ROS in vitro using the 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) assay is discussed as an example. In addition, we debate the difficulties in finding a suitable and stable chemical reaction control for the DCF assay (or other ROS-detecting assays). As a conclusion, we believe that using 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (Sin-1) as a ROS inducer in the DCF assay is feasible only qualitatively. However, a quantitative measurement of the absolute amount of ROS produced and a quantitative comparison between experiments is (at the moment) impossible. PMID:24351819

  5. Evaluation of three gentamicin serum assay techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, G.R.; Gwizdala, C.; Wery, J.; Ferry, D.; Starnes, R.

    1982-01-01

    This investigation was designed to compare the enzyme-modified immunoassay (Syva--EMIT) with a radioimmunoassay (New England Nuclear--RIA) and the radiometric assay (Johnston--BACTEC) to determine the optimal assay for use in our aminoglycoside dosing service. The serum concentration determinations obtained via the three assay methods were analyzed by linear regression analysis. Significant positive correlations were noted between the three assay techniques (p less than 0.005) during both sample collection phases. The coefficients of determination for EMIT vs BACTEC and RIA vs BACTEC were 0.73 and 0.83 during phase 1, respectively, and 0.65 and 0.68 during phase 2, respectively. The slope of the regression lines also varied markedly during the two phases; 0.49 and 0.42 for EMIT and for RIA vs BACTEC, respectively, during phase 1 compound with 1.12 and 0.77, respectively, during phase 2. The differences noted in these relationships during phase 1 and 2 may be related to the alteration of the pH of the control sera utilized in the BACTEC assay. In contrast, RIA vs EMIT regression analysis indicated that existence of a highly significant relationship (p less than 0.0005 and r2 . 0.90). The EMIT technique was the easiest and most accurate for determination of serum gentamicin concentrations, whereas the BACTEC method was judged unacceptable for clinical use.

  6. Comet assay to sense neutron 'fingerprint'.

    PubMed

    Gajendiran, N; Tanaka, K; Kamada, N

    2000-09-18

    The suitability of comet assay to identify DNA damage induced by neutrons of varying energy was tested. For this purpose, monoenergetic neutrons from Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator (HIRRAC) were used to induce DNA damage in irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The level of damage was computed as tail moment for different doses (0.125-1 Gy) and compared with the effects resulting from irradiation with (60)Co gamma. The neutron-irradiated cells exhibited longer comet tails consisting of tiny pieces of broken DNA in contrast to the streaking tails generated by (60)Co gamma. The peak biological effectiveness occurred at 0.37 and 0.57 MeV; a further increase or decrease in neutron energy led to a reduced RBE value. The RBE values, as measured by the comet assay, were 6.3, 5.4, 4.7, 4.3, 2.6, and 1.7 for 0.37, 0.57, 0.79, 0.186, 1, and 2.3 MeV neutrons. The lower RBE value obtained by the comet assay when compared to that for other biological end points is discussed. This study reports the usefulness of the alkaline comet assay for identifying DNA damage induced by neutrons of the same radiation weighting factor. The comet assay is a potential tool for use in neutron therapy, as well as a method for the rapid screening of samples from individuals accidentally exposed to radiation. PMID:11024477

  7. An improved molecular assay for Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Grahn, R A; BonDurant, R H; van Hoosear, K A; Walker, R L; Lyons, L A

    2005-01-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus (T. foetus) is the causative agent of bovine trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted disease leading to abortion (from 1 to 8 months gestation), infertility, and occasional pyometra. The annual losses to the U.S. beef industry are estimated to be in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Currently, the "gold standard" diagnostic test for trichomonosis in most countries is the cultivation of live organisms from reproductive secretions. The cultured organisms can then be followed by PCR assays with primers that amplify T. foetus to the exclusion of all other trichomonad species. Thus, negative results present as null data, indistinguishable from failed PCR amplification during T. foetus specific amplification. Our newly developed assay improves previously developed PCR based techniques by using diagnostic size variants from within the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region that is between the 18S rRNA and 5.8S rRNA subunits. This new PCR assay amplifies trichomonad DNA from a variety of genera and positively identifies the causative agent in the bovine trichomonad infection. This approach eliminates false negatives found in some current assays as well as identifying the causative agent of trichomonad infection. Additionally, our assay incorporates a fluorescently labeled primer enabling high sensitivity and rapid assessment of the specific trichomonad species. Moreover, electrophoretic separation of amplified samples can be outsourced, thus eliminating the need for diagnostic laboratories to purchase expensive analysis equipment. PMID:15619373

  8. Triggered drug release from superhydrophobic meshes using high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yohe, Stefan T; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Porter, Tyrone M; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Application of high-intensity focused ultrasound to drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes affords triggered drug release by displacing an entrapped air layer. The air layer within the superhydrophobic meshes is characterized using direct visualization and B-mode imaging. Drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes are cytotoxic in an in vitro assay after ultrasound treatment. PMID:23592698

  9. Triggered Drug Release from Superhydrophobic Meshes using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yohe, Stefan T.; Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Porter, Tyrone M.; Colson, Yolonda L.

    2014-01-01

    Application of high-intensity focused ultrasound to drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes affords triggered drug release by displacing an entrapped air layer. The air layer within the superhydrophobic meshes is characterized using direct visualization and B-mode imaging. Drug-loaded superhydrophobic meshes are cytotoxic in an in vitro assay after ultrasound treatment. PMID:23592698

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum chaperone glucose regulated protein 170-Pokemon complexes elicit a robust antitumor immune response in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bangqing; Xian, Ronghua; Wu, Xianqu; Jing, Junjie; Chen, Kangning; Liu, Guojun; Zhou, Zhenhua

    2012-07-01

    Previous evidence suggested that the stress protein grp170 can function as a highly efficient molecular chaperone, binding to large protein substrates and acting as a potent vaccine against specific tumors when purified from the same tumor. In addition, Pokemon can be found in almost all malignant tumor cells and is regarded to be a promising candidate for the treatment of tumors. However, the potential of the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex has not been well described. In the present study, the natural chaperone complex between grp170 and the Pokemon was formed by heat shock, and its immunogenicity was detected by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays in vitro and by tumor bearing models in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex could elicit T cell responses as determined by ELISPOT and (51)Cr-release assays. In addition, immunized C57BL/6 mice were challenged with subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of Lewis cancer cells to induce primary tumors. Treatment of mice with the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex also significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the life span of tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicated that the grp170-Pokemon chaperone complex might represent a powerful approach to tumor immunotherapy and have significant potential for clinical application. PMID:22317751

  11. In vitro effect of immune serum and bovine granulocytes on juvenile Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed Central

    Duffus, W P; Franks, D

    1980-01-01

    Cattle, infected with Fasciola hepatica metacercariae, produce antibodies against the outer glycocalyx of freshly excysted juvenile F. hepatica. Using 51Cr-release and viability assays such antibodies in the presence or absence of bovine complement did not cause discernible damage to the parasite. The presence of excess antibody caused the build-up of large aggregates of antigen--antibody complexes over the parasite surface; these aggregates were eventually shed into the medium. Neutrophils and eosinophils were obtained by selective stimulation of the mammary gland of heifers, and attached in large numbers to flukes coated with either IgG1 or IgG2. Attachment was dependent on Fc receptors although the adherence of the eosinophils was more prolonged than that of the neutrophils. Using 51Cr-release and viability assays no damage occurred to the flukes using either eosinophils or neutrophils in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; adherent granulocytes were eventually shed. It is suggested that the rapid turnover and excretion of the outer glycocalyx of juvenile flukes prevents the intimate attachment of granulocytes to the helminth parasite, which is perhaps a prerequisite for cell-mediated damage to occur. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7438560

  12. An epidermal equivalent assay for identification and ranking potency of contact sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Susan; Corsini, Emanuela; Spiekstra, Sander W.; Galbiati, Valentina; Fuchs, Horst W.; DeGeorge, George; Troese, Matthew; Hayden, Patrick; Deng, Wei; Roggen, Erwin

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of combining the epidermal equivalent (EE) potency assay with the assay which assesses release of interleukin-18 (IL-18) to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizing chemicals, including chemicals of low water solubility or stability. A protocol was developed using different 3D-epidermal models including in house VUMC model, epiCS® (previously EST1000™), MatTek EpiDerm™ and SkinEthic™ RHE and also the impact of different vehicles (acetone:olive oil 4:1, 1% DMSO, ethanol, water) was investigated. Following topical exposure for 24 h to 17 contact allergens and 13 non-sensitizers a robust increase in IL-18 release was observed only after exposure to contact allergens. A putative prediction model is proposed from data obtained from two laboratories yielding 95% accuracy. Correlating the in vitro EE sensitizer potency data, which assesses the chemical concentration which results in 50% cytotoxicity (EE-EC{sub 50}) with human and animal data showed a superior correlation with human DSA{sub 05} (μg/cm{sup 2}) data (Spearman r = 0.8500; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0061) compared to LLNA data (Spearman r = 0.5968; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0542). DSA{sub 05} = induction dose per skin area that produces a positive response in 5% of the tested population Also a good correlation was observed for release of IL-18 (SI-2) into culture supernatants with human DSA{sub 05} data (Spearman r = 0.8333; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0154). This easily transferable human in vitro assay appears to be very promising, but additional testing of a larger chemical set with the different EE models is required to fully evaluate the utility of this assay and to establish a definitive prediction model. - Highlights: • A potential epidermal equivalent assay to label and classify sensitizers • Il-18 release distinguishes sensitizers from non sensitizers • IL-18 release can rank sensitizer potency

  13. Best practices for code release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, G. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    In this talk, I want to describe what I think are the best practices for releasing code and having it adopted by end users. Make sure your code is licensed, so users will know how the software can be used and modified, and place your code in a public repository that (and make sure that you follow institutional policies in doing this). Yet licensing and releasing code are not enough: the code must be organized and documented so users can understand what it does, what its limitations are, and how to build and use it. I will describe what I think are best practices in developing the content to support release, including tutorials, design documents, specifications of interfaces and so on. Much of what I have learned on based on ten years of experience in supporting releases of the Montage Image Mosaic Engine.

  14. Gliotransmission: Exocytotic release from astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, Vladimir; Zorec, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Gliotransmitters are chemicals released from glial cells fulfilling a following set of criteria: i) they are synthesized by and/or stored in glia; ii) their regulated release is triggered by physiological and/or pathological stimuli; iii) they activate rapid (milliseconds to seconds) responses in neighboring cells; and iv) they play a role in (patho)physiological processes. Astrocytes can release a variety of gliotransmitters into the extracellular space using several different mechanisms. In this review, we focus on exocytotic mechanism(s) underlying the release of three classes of gliotransmitters: (i) amino acids, such as, glutamate and D-serine; (ii) nucleotides, like adenosine 5'-triphosphate; and (iii) peptides, such as, atrial natriuretic peptide and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. It is becoming clear that astrocytes are endowed with elements that qualify them as cells communicating with neurons and other cells within the central nervous system by employing regulated exocytosis. PMID:19948188

  15. Tyrosine - Effects on catecholamine release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, Ian N.; During, Matthew J.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine administration elevates striatal levels of dopamine metabolites in animals given treatments that accelerate nigrostriatal firing, but not in untreated rats. We examined the possibility that the amino acid might actually enhance dopamine release in untreated animals, but that the technique of measuring striatal dopamine metabolism was too insensitive to demonstrate such an effect. Dopamine release was assessed directly, using brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid. Tyrosine administration (50-200 mg/kg IP) did indeed cause a dose related increase in extracellular fluid dopamine levels with minor elevations in levels of DOPAC and HVA, its major metabolites, which were not dose-related. The rise in dopamine was short-lived, suggesting that receptor-mediated feedback mechanisms responded to the increased dopamine release by diminishing neuronal firing or sensitivity to tyrosine. These observations indicate that measurement of changes in striatal DOPAC and HVA, if negative, need not rule out increases in nigrostriatal dopamine release.

  16. SELF-RELEASING GRAPPLING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, D.A. Sr.

    1963-11-01

    >A self-releasing grappling device that lifts by virtue of engagement between clamping jaws and the undercut lower side of a conical head of a lifting lug attached to the object to be lifted and employs a releasing sleeve on the lug to free the jaws from the lug is presented. When the jaws are to be released, they are dropped over the releasing sleeve, which is located well below lug head. When the jaws are lifted, they engage a conical surface on the sleeve and lift it up to the head of the lifting lug. In this position of the sleeve, the lower side of the lug head is covered by the sleeve and so cannot be engaged by the jaws, which move past before clearing the sleeve. (AEC)

  17. Oligomeric BAX induces mitochondrial permeability transition and complete cytochrome c release without oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tsyregma; Brustovetsky, Tatiana; Antonsson, Bruno; Brustovetsky, Nickolay

    2008-01-01

    Summary In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of cytochrome c release from isolated brain mitochondria induced by recombinant oligomeric BAX (BAXoligo). We found that BAXoligo caused a complete release of cytochrome c in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The release was similar to those induced by alamethicin, which causes maximal mitochondrial swelling and eliminates barrier properties of the OMM. BAXoligo also produced large amplitude mitochondrial swelling as judged by light scattering assay and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, BAXoligo resulted in a strong mitochondrial depolarization. ATP or a combination of cyclosporin A and ADP, inhibitors of the mPT, suppressed BAXoligo-induced mitochondrial swelling and depolarization as well as cytochrome c release but did not influence BAXoligo insertion into the OMM. Both BAXoligo- and alamethicin-induced cytochrome c releases were accompanied by inhibition of ROS generation, which was assessed by measuring mitochondrial H2O2 release with an Amplex Red assay. The mPT inhibitors antagonized suppression of ROS generation caused by BAXoligo but not by alamethicin. Thus, BAXoligo resulted in a complete cytochrome c release from isolated brain mitochondria in the mPT-dependent manner without involvement of oxidative stress by the mechanism requiring mitochondrial remodeling and permeabilization of the OMM. PMID:18771651

  18. Simultaneous quantification of drug release and erosion from hypromellose hydrophilic matrices.

    PubMed

    Ghori, Muhammad U; Ginting, Gidion; Smith, Alan M; Conway, Barbara R

    2014-04-25

    Hypromellose, HPMC, is frequently used to control drug release from matrix tablet formulations. Drug is released by a combination of diffusion through and erosion of, the matrix and is usually measured invitro by separate dissolution and swelling/erosion studies. The present study was designed to measure matrix erosion, polymer dissolution and drug release kinetics and their inter-relationship in a single experiment using a phenol-sulphuric acid assay to quantify dissolved HPMC alongside spectrophotometrical analysis of drug release. HPMC-based matrix tablets were manufactured containing two drugs at various drug:HPMC ratios. Drug release was determined and the degree of erosion was calculated by gravimetry. Results showed the matrix erosion rate and drug release were dependent on HPMC content and drug solubility, as expected. It was also apparent that the erosion rate was directly related to the drug release kinetics and comparative analysis of both matrix erosion techniques showed a high level of correlation. The findings show that a simple and inexpensive assay can be utilised not only to quantify HPMC but can also be used to calculate the degree of erosion of tablet matrices, negating the need for a separate study and providing a simplified practical approach that may be of use during product optimization. PMID:24560637

  19. Microplate Assay for Colletotrichum Spore Production

    PubMed Central

    Slade, S. J.; Harris, R. F.; Smith, C. S.; Andrews, J. H.; Nordheim, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    A simple microplate method was devised to assay spore production by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides by growing the fungus on 1 ml of solid media in the wells of tissue culture plates. Growth and sporulation on microplates were compared at days 4 and 8 with growth and sporulation in 100-ml liquid batch cultures that involved 11 common media. Spore production per unit volume of medium was the same for solid and liquid forms of the media. Qualitative assessment of mycelial growth measured on microplates agreed with that of growth measured in liquid cultures. The microplate assay indicated that V8 juice was the best medium and that an organic content of about 6 mg/ml was optimal for high sporulation and low mycelium production. The assay provides a convenient, rapid, and inexpensive means of screening media for the production of fungal conidia in large numbers, to be used, for example, in biological control programs. PMID:16347310

  20. Microbiological assay of ketoconazole in shampoo.

    PubMed

    Staub, Inara; Schapoval, Elfrides E S; Bergold, Ana M

    2005-03-23

    Ketoconazole, an anti-fungal agent, is often incorporated in several pharmaceutical forms and in shampoo formulation it is known to be effective against fungal infection on the scalp. This paper describes a method to quantify ketoconazole in shampoo by comparing the cylinder plate assay and the HPLC method. The test organism used for the agar diffusion assay was Candida albicans ATCC 10231. Three different concentrations of ketoconazole were used for the diffusion assay. A mean zone diameter was obtained for each concentration. A standard curve was obtained by plotting the three values derived from the zone diameters. A prospective validation of the method showed that the method was linear (r = 0.9982), precise (R.S.D. = 2.57%) and accurate. The results obtained by the two methods were statistically evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the results obtained indicate that there is no significant difference between these two methods. PMID:15725566

  1. Assays of Transendothelial Migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Luscinskas, F. William

    2009-01-01

    The inflammatory response is critical for our ability to heal wounds and fight off foreign microorganisms. Uncontrolled inflammation is also at the root of most pathology. Recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation plays a defining role in the inflammatory response, and migration of leukocytes across endothelium is arguably the point of no return of the inflammatory response. Assays to study the transmigration of leukocytes have and will continue to shed light on the regulation of this vital response. Assays of transendothelial migration in vitro allow the controlled observation of this phenomenon as well as experiments to study its regulation. In this chapter we describe in vitro assays of transendothelial migration that have been used successfully in the authors’ laboratories for decades and have proven to be reproducible, reliable, and predictive of the behavior of leukocytes and endothelial cells in models of inflammation in vivo. PMID:18772016

  2. Miniaturization of hydrolase assays in thermocyclers.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Severino A; Moraes, Caroline S; Costa, Samara G; de Souza, Wanderley; Azambuja, Patrícia; Garcia, Eloi S; Genta, Fernando A

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the protocols of reducing sugar measurements with dinitrosalicylic acid and bicinchoninic acid for thermocyclers and their use in enzymatic assays for hydrolases such as amylase and β-1,3-glucanase. The use of thermocyclers for these enzymatic assays resulted in a 10 times reduction in the amount of reagent and volume of the sample needed when compared with conventional microplate protocols. We standardized absorbance readings from the polymerase chain reaction plates, which allowed us to make direct readings of the techniques above, and a β-glycosidase assay was also established under the same conditions. Standardization of the enzymatic reaction in thermocyclers resulted in less time-consuming temperature calibrations and without loss of volume through leakage or evaporation from the microplate. Kinetic parameters were successfully obtained, and the use of the thermocycler allowed the measurement of enzymatic activities in biological samples from the field with a limited amount of protein. PMID:23123426

  3. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-29

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  4. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-05

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  5. Competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, J.L. Jr.; Ringstad, J.L.; Sigel, C.W. )

    1989-09-01

    A competitive protein binding assay for piritrexim (PTX, 1) that makes use of a commercially available radioassay kit for methotrexate has been developed. After it is selectively extracted from plasma, PTX competes with ({sup 125}I)methotrexate for binding to dihydrofolate reductase isolated from Lactobacillus casei. Free drug is separated from bound drug by adsorption to dextran-coated charcoal. Piritrexim is measurable over a range of 0.01 to 10.0 micrograms/mL in plasma with a coefficient of variation less than 15%. The limit of sensitivity of the assay is approximately 2 ng/mL. An excellent correlation between this assay and a previously published HPLC method was found.

  6. A High-Throughput Radiometric Kinase Assay.

    PubMed

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant kinase signaling has been implicated in a number of diseases. While kinases have become attractive drug targets, only a small fraction of human protein kinases have validated inhibitors. Screening of libraries of compounds against a kinase or kinases of interest is routinely performed during kinase inhibitor development to identify promising scaffolds for a particular target and to identify kinase targets for compounds of interest. Screening of more focused compound libraries may also be conducted in the later stages of inhibitor development to improve potency and optimize selectivity. The dot blot kinase assay is a robust, high-throughput kinase assay that can be used to screen a number of small-molecule compounds against one kinase of interest or several kinases. Here, a protocol for a dot blot kinase assay used for measuring insulin receptor kinase activity is presented. This protocol can be readily adapted for use with other protein kinases. PMID:26501904

  7. Flow cytometer measurement of binding assays

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1987-01-01

    A method of measuring the result of a binding assay that does not require separation of fluorescent smaller particles is disclosed. In a competitive binding assay the smaller fluorescent particles coated with antigen compete with antigen in the sample being analyzed for available binding sites on larger particles. In a sandwich assay, the smaller, fluorescent spheres coated with antibody attach themselves to molecules containing antigen that are attached to larger spheres coated with the same antibody. The separation of unattached, fluorescent smaller particles is made unnecessary by only counting the fluorescent events triggered by the laser of a flow cytometer when the event is caused by a particle with a light scatter measurement within a certain range corresponding to the presence of larger particles.

  8. Nanoparticles for Use in Enzyme Assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Pil; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have created new ways to enhance the performance of classical biosensors in analytical sciences. NPs with unprecedented physiochemical properties can serve both as excellent carriers of bioreceptors and as signal enhancers, leading to improved assay platforms with high sensitivity and selectivity. Because enzymes play central roles in many cellular functions, specific and precise assays of their functions are of great significance in medical science and biotechnology. Here we review recent advances in NP-based biosensors and their use in enzyme assays. With fast and specific responses to enzyme-mediated reactions, NPs transduce and amplify the initial responses into various types of signals, such as electrochemical, optical and magnetic ones. Translation of their potential should lead to functionalized NPs finding wide applications in diagnostics, drug development and biotechnology. PMID:26662229

  9. Robot speeds assays and enhances safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, P.F.; Powell, W.D.; Blankenship, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    At the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility, a robotics system utilizing a gantry robot and an automated inventory system operates five calorimeters and two gamma isotopic assay instruments. This system has significantly improved safeguards, because the opportunity for diversion has been greatly reduced. Not only is the accountability much more timely because throughput has doubled but the special nuclear material has been made physically more secure in several ways. First, items awaiting assay are kept in the inventory system, whose doors remain locked whenever the robot is unattended. An alarm sounds if the doors are unlocked without authorization. Second, light curtains surround the robot's work envelope and pressure-sensitive pads cover the floor to detect entry into the assay area. Third, the robot weighs each item whenever it is moved, and the result is compared with the weight that was measured when the item was first put into inventory. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  11. Harmonization of the intracellular cytokine staining assay.

    PubMed

    Welters, Marij J P; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Ramwadhdoebe, Tamara H; Letsch, Anne; Ottensmeier, Christian H; Britten, Cedrik M; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2012-07-01

    Active immunotherapy for cancer is an accepted treatment modality aiming to reinforce the T-cell response to cancer. T-cell reactivity is measured by various assays and used to guide the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. However, data obtained across different institutions may vary substantially making comparative conclusions difficult. The Cancer Immunotherapy Immunoguiding Program organizes proficiency panels to identify key parameters influencing the outcome of commonly used T-cell assays followed by harmonization. Our successes with IFNγ-ELISPOT and peptide HLA multimer analysis have led to the current study on intracellular cytokine staining (ICS). We report the results of three successive panels evaluating this assay. At the beginning, 3 out of 9 participants (33 %) were able to detect >6 out of 8 known virus-specific T-cell responses in peripheral blood of healthy individuals. This increased to 50 % of the laboratories in the second phase. The reported percentages of cytokine-producing T cells by the different laboratories were highly variable with coefficients of variation well over 60 %. Variability could partially be explained by protocol-related differences in background cytokine production leading to sub-optimal signal-to-noise ratios. The large number of protocol variables prohibited identification of prime guidelines to harmonize the assays. In addition, the gating strategy used to identify reactive T cells had a major impact on assay outcome. Subsequent harmonization of the gating strategy considerably reduced the variability within the group of participants. In conclusion, we propose that first basic guidelines should be applied for gating in ICS experiments before harmonizing assay protocol variables. PMID:22714399

  12. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  13. Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal - Instructions for Uploading Data to the Assay Portal

    Cancer.gov

    This document provides instructions for configuring and uploading data files to the CPTAC Assay Portal. It is divided into sections, with an overview checklist provided at the end. If help is needed at any stage of the process, please use the support page: https://assays.cancer.gov/support/

  14. Method validation and clinical utility of chromogenic factor VIII assay compared to one-stage assay.

    PubMed

    Gouws, Wilmare; Botha, Elsabie; Visser, Adele

    2014-01-01

    The chromogenic FVIII assay is currently considered the gold standard for quantitation of factor VIII levels in both haemophilia A patients and as part of screening for thrombophilia. A method validation and evaluation of clinical utility within a routine diagnostic laboratory was undertaken by comparing the currently used one-stage assay to a commercially available chromogenic assay (Siemens, Johannesburg, South Africa). In total, 60 samples were included in this study to encompass the whole diagnostic range of the assay. Both low and high values showed very good correlation on linear regression analysis with correlation coeffients of 0.949 and 0.888 respectively. However, the lower detection limit of the Siemens Chromogenic assay was 1.5 IU/dL rendering it impossible to utilize in the setting of classifying a haemophilia A patient in terms of disease severity. Although the Siemens FVIII chromogenic assay shows excellent correlation to the currently used one-stage assay, the relatively high detection limit restrict implementation as a stand-alone assay in a routine diagnostic laboratory. PMID:23504571

  15. Operant assays for assessing pain in preclinical rodent models: highlights from an orofacial assay.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Niall P; Mills, Richard H; Caudle, Robert M; Neubert, John K

    2014-01-01

    Despite an immense investment of resources, pain remains at epidemic proportions. Given this, there has been an increased effort toward appraising the process by which new painkillers are developed, focusing specifically on why so few analgesics make it from the benchside to the bedside. The use of behavioral assays and animal modeling for the preclinical stages of analgesic development is being reexamined to determine whether they are truly relevant, meaningful, and predictive. Consequently, there is a strengthening consensus that the traditional reflex-based assays upon which several decades of preclinical pain research has been based are inadequate. Thus, investigators have recently turned to the development of new preclinical assays with improved face, content, and predictive validity. In this regard, operant pain assays show considerable promise, as they are more sensitive, present better validity, and, importantly, better encompass the psychological and affective dimensions of pain that trouble human pain sufferers. Here, we briefly compare and contrast reflex assays with operant assays, and we introduce a particular operant orofacial pain assay used in a variety of experiments to emphasize how operant pain assays can be applied to preclinical studies of pain. PMID:25103871

  16. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay in low volume.

    PubMed

    Bainor, Anthony; Chang, Lyra; McQuade, Thomas J; Webb, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E

    2011-03-15

    The BCA assay is a colorimetric method for estimating protein concentration. In 96-well plates, the relationship between protein content and absorbance is nearly linear over a wide range; however, performance is reduced in lower volume. To overcome this limitation, we performed the BCA assays in opaque, white 384-well plates. These plates emit fluorescence between 450-600 nm when excited at 430 nm; thus, their fluorescence is quenched by the BCA chromophore (λ(max) 562 nm). This arrangement allowed accurate determination of protein content using only 2 μL of sample. Moreover, soluble flourescein could replace the white plates, creating a homogenous format. PMID:21078286

  17. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, Katherine C; Bourne, Mark M; Crooks, William J; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R; Miko, David K; Salazar, William R; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I; Vigil, Georgiana M

    2012-07-13

    Waste will be removed from confinement vessels remaining from 1970s-era experiments. Los Alamos has 9+ spherical confinement vessels remaining from experiments. Each vessel contains {approx} 500 lbs of radioactive debris such as actinide metals and oxides, metals, powdered silica, graphite, and wires and hardware. In order to dispose of the vessels, debris and contamination must be removed. Neutron assay system was designed to assay vessels before and after cleanout. System requirements are: (1) Modular and moveable; (2) Capable of detecting {approx}100g {sup 239}Pu equivalent in a 2-inch thick steel sphere with 6 foot diameter; and (3) Capable of safeguards-quality assays. Initial design parameters arethe use of 4-atm {sup 3}He tubes with length of 6 feet, and {sup 3}He tubes embedded in polyethelene for moderation. This paper describes the calibration of the Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) and quantification of its uncertainties. Assay uncertainty depends on five factors: (1) Statistical uncertainty in the assay measurement; (2) Statistical uncertainty in the background measurement; (3) Statistical uncertainty in the isotopics determination - This should be much smaller than the other uncertainties; (4) Systematic uncertainty due to position bias; and (5) Systematic uncertainty due to fluctuations in cosmic ray spallation. This one can be virtually eliminated by performing the background measurement with an empty vessel - but that may not be possible. We used modeling and experiments to quantify the systematic uncertainties. The calibration assumes a uniform distribution of material, but reality will be different. MCNPX modeling was used to quantify the positional bias. The model was benchmarked to build confidence in its results. Material at top of vessel is 44% greater than amount assayed, according to singles. Material near 19-tube detector is 38% less than amount assayed, according to singles. Cosmic ray spallation contributes significantly to the

  18. Assaying the kinetics of protein denaturation catalyzed by AAA+ unfolding machines and proteases.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-04-28

    ATP-dependent molecular machines of the AAA+ superfamily unfold or remodel proteins in all cells. For example, AAA+ ClpX and ClpA hexamers collaborate with the self-compartmentalized ClpP peptidase to unfold and degrade specific proteins in bacteria and some eukaryotic organelles. Although degradation assays are straightforward, robust methods to assay the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding in the absence of proteolysis have been lacking. Here, we describe a FRET-based assay in which enzymatic unfolding converts a mixture of donor-labeled and acceptor-labeled homodimers into heterodimers. In this assay, ClpX is a more efficient protein-unfolding machine than ClpA both kinetically and in terms of ATP consumed. However, ClpP enhances the mechanical activities of ClpA substantially, and ClpAP degrades the dimeric substrate faster than ClpXP. When ClpXP or ClpAP engage the dimeric subunit, one subunit is actively unfolded and degraded, whereas the other subunit is passively unfolded by loss of its partner and released. This assay should be broadly applicable for studying the mechanisms of AAA+ proteases and remodeling chaperones. PMID:25870262

  19. Membrane translocation assay based on proteolytic cleavage: Application to diphtheria toxin T domain

    PubMed Central

    Rodnin, Mykola V.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2014-01-01

    The function of diphtheria toxin translocation (T) domain is to transfer the catalytic domain across the endosomal membrane upon acidification. The goal of this study was to develop and apply an in vitro functional assay for T domain activity, suitable for investigation of structure-function relationships of translocation across lipid bilayers of various compositions. Traditionally, T domain activity in vitro is estimated by measuring either conductance in planar lipid bilayers or the release of fluorescent markers from lipid vesicles. While an in vivo cell death assay is the most relevant to physiological function, it cannot be applied to studying the effects of pH or membrane lipid composition on translocation. Here we suggest an assay based on cleavage of the N-terminal part of T domain upon translocation into protease-loaded vesicles. A series of control experiment was used to confirm that cleavage occurs inside the vesicle and not as the result of vesicle disruption. Translocation of the N-terminus of the T domain is shown to require the presence of a critical fraction of anionic lipids, which is consistent with our previous biophysical measurements of insertion. Application of the proposed assay to a series of T domain mutants correlated well with the results of cytotoxicity assay. PMID:25291602

  20. A rapid assay for 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 24-hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos-Trinidad, M.; Brown, A.J.; DeLuca, H.F. )

    1990-10-01

    A rapid method for the measurement of the 24-hydroxylated metabolites of 25-hydroxy(26,27-3H)vitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxy(26,27-3H)vitamin D3 has been developed. This measurement has, in turn, made possible a rapid assay for the 24-hydroxylases of the vitamin D system. The assay involves the use of 26,27-3H-labeled 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 as the substrate and treatment of the enzyme reaction mixture with sodium periodate, which specifically cleaves the 24-hydroxylated products between carbons 24 and 25, releasing tritiated acetone. The acetone is measured after its separation from the labeled substrate by using a reversed-phase cartridge. The results obtained with this assay were validated by comparison with the results obtained with a well-established high-performance liquid chromatography assay. The activity of the enzyme determined by both methods was equal. This assay has been successfully used for the rapid screening of column fractions during purification of the enzyme and in the screening for monoclonal antibodies to the 24-hydroxylase.

  1. Ultrasensitive assay for measuring the intact (1-39) ACTH molecule: an asset in depression research.

    PubMed

    Maes, M; Meltzer, H; Blockx, P; Cosyns, P; Calabrese, J

    1994-01-01

    This study investigates the utility for depression research of an assay for intact (1-39) adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) versus that of a previously employed (i.e., 1-17, 1-24 sequences) ACTH assay. ACTH plasma levels were measured using two different ACTH assays (labeled as intact versus nonintact) in 10 minor and 27 major depressed subjects undergoing the combined dexamethasone suppression (DST) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) test. Intact--but not nonintact--ACTH values were significantly correlated with the severity of illness. Major depressed subjects exhibited significantly higher post-DST+CRH intact ACTH values than minor depressives, whereas nonintact ACTH values were not significantly different between these groups. Post-DST+CRH intact ACTH values were significantly more closely related to post-DST+CRH cortisol than nonintact ACTH values. It is concluded that the assay of the intact ACTH molecule is an asset in depression research and should replace the previous less specific and sensitive ACTH assays. PMID:8047242

  2. High-throughput radiometric CYP2C19 inhibition assay using tritiated (S)-mephenytoin.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Annalise; Cellucci, Antonella; Chaudhary, Ashok; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Laufer, Ralph

    2007-10-01

    A rapid and sensitive radiometric assay for assessing the potential of drugs to inhibit cytochrome P450 (P450) 2C19 in human liver microsomes is described. The new assay, which does not require high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation or mass spectrometric detection, is based on the release of tritium as tritiated water that occurs upon CYP2C19-mediated 4'-hydroxylation of (S)-mephenytoin labeled with tritium in the 4' position. Because this reaction is subject to an NIH shift, tritium was also introduced into the 3'- and 5'-positions of the tracer to enhance formation of a tritiated water product. Tritiated water was separated from the substrate using 96-well solid-phase extraction plates. The reaction is NADPH-dependent and sensitive to CYP2C19 inhibitors. IC(50) values for 15 diverse drugs differed less than 2.5-fold from those determined by quantification of the unlabeled 4'-hydroxy-(S)-mephenytoin product, using HPLC coupled to mass spectrometric detection. All of the steps of the new assay, namely incubation, product separation, and radioactivity counting, are performed in a 96-well format and can be automated. This assay represents a non-HPLC, high-throughput version of the classic (S)-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation assay, which is the most widely used method to assess the potential for CYP2C19 inhibition of new chemical entities. PMID:17600081

  3. Added release time in diffusion/dissolution coupled release.

    PubMed

    Nuxoll, Eric

    2015-10-15

    While increasingly sophisticated models have been developed to more accurately predict dispersed solute release from complex systems, distillation of their results into quantitative trends has been difficult. Here, the numerically calculated release profiles of coupled diffusion/dissolution systems are quantified by their cumulative release time (CRT) and compared against corresponding diffusion-controlled limits. The increase in CRT due to a finite dissolution rate was found to vary inversely with the second Damköhler number across several orders of magnitude, and also vary linearly with the amount of solid drug loaded in the system. The analytical nature of the relationship provides new physical insights into the system and appears to be indifferent to the form of the secondary rate-limiting step. This work provides a simple analytical expression with which one can not only predict the mean release time for a given set of parameter values, but understand precisely how each parameter value will affect it. The simplicity of the correlation and the lack of apparent limits to its validity also suggest the existence of an analytical pathway for its derivation, which may yield additional insights into the effect of secondary rate processes on controlled release. PMID:26276252

  4. Complex enzyme hydrolysis releases antioxidative phenolics from rice bran.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Ruifen; Wei, Zhencheng; Deng, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Juan; Zhang, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, phenolic profiles and antioxidant activity of rice bran were analyzed following successive treatment by gelatinization, liquefaction and complex enzyme hydrolysis. Compared with gelatinization alone, liquefaction slightly increased the total amount of phenolics and antioxidant activity as measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays. Complex enzyme hydrolysis significantly increased the total phenolics, flavonoids, FRAP and ORAC by 46.24%, 79.13%, 159.14% and 41.98%, respectively, compared to gelatinization alone. Furthermore, ten individual phenolics present in free or soluble conjugate forms were also analyzed following enzymatic processing. Ferulic acid experienced the largest release, followed by protocatechuic acid and then quercetin. Interestingly, a major proportion of phenolics existed as soluble conjugates, rather than free form. Overall, complex enzyme hydrolysis releases phenolics, thus increasing the antioxidant activity of rice bran extract. This study provides useful information for processing rice bran into functional beverage rich in phenolics. PMID:27507440

  5. Optical control of insulin release using a photoswitchable sulfonylurea

    PubMed Central

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Schönberger, Matthias; Cork, Simon C.; Frank, James A.; Marchetti, Piero; Bugliani, Marco; Shapiro, A. M. James; Trapp, Stefan; Rutter, Guy A.; Hodson, David J.; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Sulfonylureas are widely prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Through their actions on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, sulfonylureas boost insulin release from the pancreatic beta cell mass to restore glucose homeostasis. A limitation of these compounds is the elevated risk of developing hypoglycemia and cardiovascular disease, both potentially fatal complications. Here, we describe the design and development of a photoswitchable sulfonylurea, JB253, which reversibly and repeatedly blocks KATP channel activity following exposure to violet-blue light. Using in situ imaging and hormone assays, we further show that JB253 bestows light sensitivity upon rodent and human pancreatic beta cell function. Thus, JB253 enables the optical control of insulin release and may offer a valuable research tool for the interrogation of KATP channel function in health and T2DM. PMID:25311795

  6. Bradykinin Release Avoids High Molecular Weight Kininogen Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fabio D.; Souza, Daianne S. P.; Araujo, Mariana S.; Souza, Sinval E. G.; Sampaio, Misako U.; Nader, Helena B.; Tersariol, Ivarne L. S.; Motta, Guacyara

    2015-01-01

    Human H-kininogen (120 kDa) plays a role in many pathophysiological processes and interacts with the cell surface through protein receptors and proteoglycans, which mediate H-kininogen endocytosis. In the present work we demonstrate that H-kininogen containing bradykinin domain is internalized and different endogenous kininogenases are present in CHO-K1 cells. We used CHO-K1 (wild type) and CHO-745 (mutant deficient in proteoglycans biosynthesis) cell lines. H-kininogen endocytosis was studied using confocal microscopy, and its hydrolysis by cell lysate fraction was determined by immunoblotting. Bradykinin release was also measured by radioimmunoassay. H-kininogen interaction with the cell surface of CHO-745 cells resulted in bradykinin release by serine proteases. In CHO-K1 cells, which produce heparan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, internalization of H-kininogen through its bradykinin domain can occur on lipid raft domains/caveolae. Nevertheless bradykinin-free H-kininogen was not internalized by CHO-K1 cells. The H-kininogen present in acidic endosomal vesicles in CHO-K1 was approximately 10-fold higher than the levels in CHO-745. CHO-K1 lysate fractions were assayed at pH 5.5 and intact H-kininogen was totally hydrolyzed into a 62 kDa fragment. By contrast, at an assay pH 7.4, the remained fragments were 115 kDa, 83 kDa, 62 kDa and 48 kDa in size. The antipain-Sepharose chromatography separated endogenous kininogenases from CHO-K1 lysate fraction. No difference was detected in the assays at pH 5.5 or 7.4, but the proteins in the fraction bound to the resin released bradykinin from H-kininogen. However, the proteins in the unbound fraction cleaved intact H-kininogen at other sites but did not release bradykinin. H-kininogen can interact with extravascular cells, and is internalized dependent on its bradykinin domain and cell surface proteoglycans. After internalization, H-kininogen is proteolytically processed by intracellular kininogenases. The present

  7. Oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction. Possible role in airway disease

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, W.J.; Martin, W.J. 2d.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of reactive species of oxygen on the airway are not well known. This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the structure and function of the airway epithelium. Tracheal rings were prepared from 200 g male rats. Damage to the airway epithelium was assayed by monitoring the ciliary beat frequency, the release of 51Cr, and histology. H2O2 at concentrations of 1.0 mM and above caused a very rapid decrease in ciliary beat frequency. After ten minutes' exposure to 1.0 mM, the ciliary beat frequency was 72 +/- 20 percent of control. Release of 51Cr was a less sensitive measure with significant release occurring after four hours of exposure to ciliotoxic concentrations of H2O2. Histologic changes were not evident within the experimental time period. All toxic effects of H2O2 were completely blocked by catalase. This study shows that H2O2 causes a rapid decline in ciliary activity and suggests that oxidant-mediated ciliary dysfunction could play a role in the pathogenesis of airway disease. The ciliary beat frequency provides a sensitive, physiologically relevant parameter for the in vitro study of these diseases.

  8. Nondestructive assay of boxed radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gilles, W.P.; Roberts, R.J.; Jasen, W.G.

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the problems related to the nondestructive assay (NDA) of boxed radioactive waste at the Hanford Site and how Westinghouse Hanford company (WHC) is solving the problems. The waste form and radionuclide content are described. The characteristics of the combined neutron and gamma-based measurement system are described.

  9. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors. PMID:26551162

  10. A Rapid and Quantitative Recombinase Activity Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present here a comparison between the recombinase systems FLP-FRT and Cre-loxP. A transient excision based dual luciferase expression assay is used for its rapid and repeatable nature. The detection system was designed within an intron to remove the remaining recombinase recognition site and no...

  11. Three-dimensional colorimetric assay assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Reichert, Anke

    2001-01-01

    A direct assay is described using novel three-dimensional polymeric assemblies which change from a blue to red color when exposed to an analyte, in one case a flue virus. The assemblies are typically in the form of liposomes which can be maintained in a suspension, and show great intensity in their color changes. Their method of production is also described.

  12. Assay for Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-hour experiment designed to introduce students to chemistry of the angiotensis-converting enzyme, illustrate design of a quenched fluorescence substrate, and examine considerations necessary in designing a clinical assay. Includes background information on the biochemistry of hypertension, reagents/materials needed, procedures…

  13. Advanced analysis techniques for uranium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W. H.; Ensslin, Norbert; Carrillo, L. A.; Beard, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium has a negligible passive neutron emission rate making its assay practicable only with an active interrogation method. The active interrogation uses external neutron sources to induce fission events in the uranium in order to determine the mass. This technique requires careful calibration with standards that are representative of the items to be assayed. The samples to be measured are not always well represented by the available standards which often leads to large biases. A technique of active multiplicity counting is being developed to reduce some of these assay difficulties. Active multiplicity counting uses the measured doubles and triples count rates to determine the neutron multiplication (f4) and the product of the source-sample coupling ( C ) and the 235U mass (m). Since the 35U mass always appears in the multiplicity equations as the product of Cm, the coupling needs to be determined before the mass can be known. A relationship has been developed that relates the coupling to the neutron multiplication. The relationship is based on both an analytical derivation and also on empirical observations. To determine a scaling constant present in this relationship, known standards must be used. Evaluation of experimental data revealed an improvement over the traditional calibration curve analysis method of fitting the doubles count rate to the 235Um ass. Active multiplicity assay appears to relax the requirement that the calibration standards and unknown items have the same chemical form and geometry.

  14. INTERLABORATORY COMPARISON OF CHOLINESTERASE ASSAY MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Twelve wildlife toxicology laboratories participated in an interlaboratory survey of cholinesterase (ChE) assays to determine comparability of absolute ChE values and estimates of ChE inhibition from organophosphorus insecticide-dosed birds and to examine the type and consistency...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...

  17. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7425...

  19. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7490...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7250...