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Sample records for 5300-year-old tyrolean iceman

  1. Nanostructure and mechanics of mummified type I collagen from the 5300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman.

    PubMed

    Janko, Marek; Zink, Albert; Gigler, Alexander M; Heckl, Wolfgang M; Stark, Robert W

    2010-08-01

    Skin protects the body from pathogens and degradation. Mummified skin in particular is extremely resistant to decomposition. External influences or the action of micro-organisms, however, can degrade the connective tissue and lay the subjacent tissue open. To determine the degree of tissue preservation in mummified human skin and, in particular, the reason for its durability, we investigated the structural integrity of its main protein, type I collagen. We extracted samples from the Neolithic glacier mummy known as 'the Iceman'. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed collagen fibrils that had characteristic banding patterns of 69 +/- 5 nm periodicity. Both the microstructure and the ultrastructure of dermal collagen bundles and fibrils were largely unaltered and extremely well preserved by the natural conservation process. Raman spectra of the ancient collagen indicated that there were no significant modifications in the molecular structure. However, AFM nanoindentation measurements showed slight changes in the mechanical behaviour of the fibrils. Young's modulus of single mummified fibrils was 4.1 +/- 1.1 GPa, whereas the elasticity of recent collagen averages 3.2 +/- 1.0 GPa. The excellent preservation of the collagen indicates that dehydration owing to freeze-drying of the collagen is the main process in mummification and that the influence of the degradation processes can be addressed, even after 5300 years.

  2. Deposits of different origin in the lungs of the 5,300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman.

    PubMed

    Pabst, M; Hofer, F

    1998-09-01

    Deposits in the lung of the Late Neolithic Tyrolean Iceman were studied with a combination of different methods of analytical electron microscopy. Numerous anthracotic areas with plentiful inhaled soot particles were found in the lung; these most probably derived from open fires in houses. Between the soot particles tiny mineral crystals (mainly muscovite) were identified, which may indicate that the Tyrolean Iceman lived in a muscoviterich area. Furthermore, illite, quartz, and a plagioclase (andesine), which are also minerals in the crystalline rocks of the Otztal Alps, were found. Additionally, organic material, which may represent inhaled threshing residues, was present in the anthracotic areas. As threshing residues and seeds in husk also were detected in the Iceman's belongings, some kind of rustic occupation seems probable. Outside of the anthracotic areas, vivianite and hydroxyapatite crystals were detected. Because of their separate location, and as vivianite is also described in the Iceman's skin, these minerals seem to have crystallized during his 5,300 years of storage in the high mountains. PMID:9740297

  3. Deposits of different origin in the lungs of the 5,300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman.

    PubMed

    Pabst, M; Hofer, F

    1998-09-01

    Deposits in the lung of the Late Neolithic Tyrolean Iceman were studied with a combination of different methods of analytical electron microscopy. Numerous anthracotic areas with plentiful inhaled soot particles were found in the lung; these most probably derived from open fires in houses. Between the soot particles tiny mineral crystals (mainly muscovite) were identified, which may indicate that the Tyrolean Iceman lived in a muscoviterich area. Furthermore, illite, quartz, and a plagioclase (andesine), which are also minerals in the crystalline rocks of the Otztal Alps, were found. Additionally, organic material, which may represent inhaled threshing residues, was present in the anthracotic areas. As threshing residues and seeds in husk also were detected in the Iceman's belongings, some kind of rustic occupation seems probable. Outside of the anthracotic areas, vivianite and hydroxyapatite crystals were detected. Because of their separate location, and as vivianite is also described in the Iceman's skin, these minerals seem to have crystallized during his 5,300 years of storage in the high mountains.

  4. The 5300-year-old Helicobacter pylori genome of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Turaev, Dmitrij; Herbig, Alexander; Hoopmann, Michael R; Hallows, Janice L; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Vigl, Eduard Egarter; Malfertheiner, Peter; Megraud, Francis; O'Sullivan, Niall; Cipollini, Giovanna; Coia, Valentina; Samadelli, Marco; Engstrand, Lars; Linz, Bodo; Moritz, Robert L; Grimm, Rudolf; Krause, Johannes; Nebel, Almut; Moodley, Yoshan; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori is one of the most prevalent human pathogens. It has dispersed globally with its human host, resulting in a distinct phylogeographic pattern that can be used to reconstruct both recent and ancient human migrations. The extant European population of H. pylori is known to be a hybrid between Asian and African bacteria, but there exist different hypotheses about when and where the hybridization took place, reflecting the complex demographic history of Europeans. Here, we present a 5300-year-old H. pylori genome from a European Copper Age glacier mummy. The "Iceman" H. pylori is a nearly pure representative of the bacterial population of Asian origin that existed in Europe before hybridization, suggesting that the African population arrived in Europe within the past few thousand years. PMID:26744403

  5. The 5300-year-old Helicobacter pylori genome of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Turaev, Dmitrij; Herbig, Alexander; Hoopmann, Michael R; Hallows, Janice L; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Vigl, Eduard Egarter; Malfertheiner, Peter; Megraud, Francis; O'Sullivan, Niall; Cipollini, Giovanna; Coia, Valentina; Samadelli, Marco; Engstrand, Lars; Linz, Bodo; Moritz, Robert L; Grimm, Rudolf; Krause, Johannes; Nebel, Almut; Moodley, Yoshan; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori is one of the most prevalent human pathogens. It has dispersed globally with its human host, resulting in a distinct phylogeographic pattern that can be used to reconstruct both recent and ancient human migrations. The extant European population of H. pylori is known to be a hybrid between Asian and African bacteria, but there exist different hypotheses about when and where the hybridization took place, reflecting the complex demographic history of Europeans. Here, we present a 5300-year-old H. pylori genome from a European Copper Age glacier mummy. The "Iceman" H. pylori is a nearly pure representative of the bacterial population of Asian origin that existed in Europe before hybridization, suggesting that the African population arrived in Europe within the past few thousand years.

  6. 3D image-guided surgery on the example of the 5,300-year-old Innsbruck Iceman.

    PubMed

    Thumfart, W F; Freysinger, W; Gunkel, A R; Truppe, M J

    1997-03-01

    Interventional Video Tomography (IVT) is regularly used for computer-assisted 3D navigation in ear-, nose, throat, and head & neck surgery in our clinic. We present the technology and its application to collect biopsies of a 5,300 year old, completely conserved male cadaver, the Iceman. IVT links intraoperative live video with medical imaging data sets, realizing real-time surgical guidance in the live video and/or in the medical images. The IVT data contain the video images and the spatial sensor information; this has a large potential for documentation, training, teaching, and telepresence. IVT allowed us to sample the Iceman's mucosa by the minimally invasive endoscopic approach of the maxillary sinus, the nasal cavity, and the larynx, minimizing tissue damage. Visual inspection of the sinuses and the mucosa revealed the typical mucosa of a fresh cadaver, albeit originating from the stone-age.

  7. Preservation of 5300 year old red blood cells in the Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Janko, Marek; Stark, Robert W.; Zink, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Changes in elasticity and structures of red blood cells (RBCs) are important indicators of disease, and this makes them interesting for medical studies. In forensics, blood analyses represent a crucial part of crime scene investigations. For these reasons, the recovery and analysis of blood cells from ancient tissues is of major interest. In this study, we show that RBCs were preserved in Iceman tissue samples for more than 5000 years. The morphological and molecular composition of the blood corpuscle is verified by atomic force microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The cell size and shape approximated those of healthy, dried, recent RBCs. Raman spectra of the ancient corpuscle revealed bands that are characteristic of haemoglobin. Additional vibrational modes typical for other proteinaceous fragments, possibly fibrin, suggested the formation of a blood clot. The band intensities, however, were approximately an order of magnitude weaker than those of recent RBCs. This fact points to a decrease in the RBC-specific metalloprotein haemoglobin and, thus, to a degradation of the cells. Together, the results show the preservation of RBCs in the 5000 year old mummy tissue and give the first insights into their degradation. PMID:22552923

  8. Preservation of 5300 year old red blood cells in the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Janko, Marek; Stark, Robert W; Zink, Albert

    2012-10-01

    Changes in elasticity and structures of red blood cells (RBCs) are important indicators of disease, and this makes them interesting for medical studies. In forensics, blood analyses represent a crucial part of crime scene investigations. For these reasons, the recovery and analysis of blood cells from ancient tissues is of major interest. In this study, we show that RBCs were preserved in Iceman tissue samples for more than 5000 years. The morphological and molecular composition of the blood corpuscle is verified by atomic force microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The cell size and shape approximated those of healthy, dried, recent RBCs. Raman spectra of the ancient corpuscle revealed bands that are characteristic of haemoglobin. Additional vibrational modes typical for other proteinaceous fragments, possibly fibrin, suggested the formation of a blood clot. The band intensities, however, were approximately an order of magnitude weaker than those of recent RBCs. This fact points to a decrease in the RBC-specific metalloprotein haemoglobin and, thus, to a degradation of the cells. Together, the results show the preservation of RBCs in the 5000 year old mummy tissue and give the first insights into their degradation.

  9. Nanostructure and mechanics of mummified type I collagen from the 5300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Janko, Marek; Zink, Albert; Gigler, Alexander M.; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Stark, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Skin protects the body from pathogens and degradation. Mummified skin in particular is extremely resistant to decomposition. External influences or the action of micro-organisms, however, can degrade the connective tissue and lay the subjacent tissue open. To determine the degree of tissue preservation in mummified human skin and, in particular, the reason for its durability, we investigated the structural integrity of its main protein, type I collagen. We extracted samples from the Neolithic glacier mummy known as ‘the Iceman’. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed collagen fibrils that had characteristic banding patterns of 69 ± 5 nm periodicity. Both the microstructure and the ultrastructure of dermal collagen bundles and fibrils were largely unaltered and extremely well preserved by the natural conservation process. Raman spectra of the ancient collagen indicated that there were no significant modifications in the molecular structure. However, AFM nanoindentation measurements showed slight changes in the mechanical behaviour of the fibrils. Young's modulus of single mummified fibrils was 4.1 ± 1.1 GPa, whereas the elasticity of recent collagen averages 3.2 ± 1.0 GPa. The excellent preservation of the collagen indicates that dehydration owing to freeze-drying of the collagen is the main process in mummification and that the influence of the degradation processes can be addressed, even after 5300 years. PMID:20356896

  10. New insights into the Tyrolean Iceman's origin and phenotype as inferred by whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Keller, Andreas; Graefen, Angela; Ball, Markus; Matzas, Mark; Boisguerin, Valesca; Maixner, Frank; Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Khairat, Rabab; Forster, Michael; Stade, Björn; Franke, Andre; Mayer, Jens; Spangler, Jessica; McLaughlin, Stephen; Shah, Minita; Lee, Clarence; Harkins, Timothy T; Sartori, Alexander; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Henn, Brenna; Sikora, Martin; Semino, Ornella; Chiaroni, Jacques; Rootsi, Siiri; Myres, Natalie M; Cabrera, Vicente M; Underhill, Peter A; Bustamante, Carlos D; Vigl, Eduard Egarter; Samadelli, Marco; Cipollini, Giovanna; Haas, Jan; Katus, Hugo; O'Connor, Brian D; Carlson, Marc R J; Meder, Benjamin; Blin, Nikolaus; Meese, Eckart; Pusch, Carsten M; Zink, Albert

    2012-02-28

    The Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper age individual, was discovered in 1991 on the Tisenjoch Pass in the Italian part of the Ötztal Alps. Here we report the complete genome sequence of the Iceman and show 100% concordance between the previously reported mitochondrial genome sequence and the consensus sequence generated from our genomic data. We present indications for recent common ancestry between the Iceman and present-day inhabitants of the Tyrrhenian Sea, that the Iceman probably had brown eyes, belonged to blood group O and was lactose intolerant. His genetic predisposition shows an increased risk for coronary heart disease and may have contributed to the development of previously reported vascular calcifications. Sequences corresponding to ~60% of the genome of Borrelia burgdorferi are indicative of the earliest human case of infection with the pathogen for Lyme borreliosis.

  11. New insights into the Tyrolean Iceman's origin and phenotype as inferred by whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Keller, Andreas; Graefen, Angela; Ball, Markus; Matzas, Mark; Boisguerin, Valesca; Maixner, Frank; Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Khairat, Rabab; Forster, Michael; Stade, Björn; Franke, Andre; Mayer, Jens; Spangler, Jessica; McLaughlin, Stephen; Shah, Minita; Lee, Clarence; Harkins, Timothy T; Sartori, Alexander; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Henn, Brenna; Sikora, Martin; Semino, Ornella; Chiaroni, Jacques; Rootsi, Siiri; Myres, Natalie M; Cabrera, Vicente M; Underhill, Peter A; Bustamante, Carlos D; Vigl, Eduard Egarter; Samadelli, Marco; Cipollini, Giovanna; Haas, Jan; Katus, Hugo; O'Connor, Brian D; Carlson, Marc R J; Meder, Benjamin; Blin, Nikolaus; Meese, Eckart; Pusch, Carsten M; Zink, Albert

    2012-01-01

    The Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper age individual, was discovered in 1991 on the Tisenjoch Pass in the Italian part of the Ötztal Alps. Here we report the complete genome sequence of the Iceman and show 100% concordance between the previously reported mitochondrial genome sequence and the consensus sequence generated from our genomic data. We present indications for recent common ancestry between the Iceman and present-day inhabitants of the Tyrrhenian Sea, that the Iceman probably had brown eyes, belonged to blood group O and was lactose intolerant. His genetic predisposition shows an increased risk for coronary heart disease and may have contributed to the development of previously reported vascular calcifications. Sequences corresponding to ~60% of the genome of Borrelia burgdorferi are indicative of the earliest human case of infection with the pathogen for Lyme borreliosis. PMID:22426219

  12. A whole mitochondria analysis of the Tyrolean Iceman's leather provides insights into the animal sources of Copper Age clothing.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Niall J; Teasdale, Matthew D; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Maixner, Frank; Pinhasi, Ron; Bradley, Daniel G; Zink, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The attire of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old natural mummy from the Ötzal Italian Alps, provides a surviving example of ancient manufacturing technologies. Research into his garments has however, been limited by ambiguity surrounding their source species. Here we present a targeted enrichment and sequencing of full mitochondrial genomes sampled from his clothes and quiver, which elucidates the species of production for nine fragments. Results indicate that the majority of the samples originate from domestic ungulate species (cattle, sheep and goat), whose recovered haplogroups are now at high frequency in today's domestic populations. Intriguingly, the hat and quiver samples were produced from wild species, brown bear and roe deer respectively. Combined, these results suggest that Copper Age populations made considered choices of clothing material from both the wild and domestic populations available to them. Moreover, these results show the potential for the recovery of complete mitochondrial genomes from degraded prehistoric artefacts. PMID:27537861

  13. A whole mitochondria analysis of the Tyrolean Iceman's leather provides insights into the animal sources of Copper Age clothing.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Niall J; Teasdale, Matthew D; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Maixner, Frank; Pinhasi, Ron; Bradley, Daniel G; Zink, Albert

    2016-08-18

    The attire of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old natural mummy from the Ötzal Italian Alps, provides a surviving example of ancient manufacturing technologies. Research into his garments has however, been limited by ambiguity surrounding their source species. Here we present a targeted enrichment and sequencing of full mitochondrial genomes sampled from his clothes and quiver, which elucidates the species of production for nine fragments. Results indicate that the majority of the samples originate from domestic ungulate species (cattle, sheep and goat), whose recovered haplogroups are now at high frequency in today's domestic populations. Intriguingly, the hat and quiver samples were produced from wild species, brown bear and roe deer respectively. Combined, these results suggest that Copper Age populations made considered choices of clothing material from both the wild and domestic populations available to them. Moreover, these results show the potential for the recovery of complete mitochondrial genomes from degraded prehistoric artefacts.

  14. Glycosylated proteins preserved over millennia: N-glycan analysis of Tyrolean Iceman, Scythian Princess and Warrior

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Kim, Bum Jin; Ro, Grace; Kim, Jae-Han; Bereuter, Thomas L.; Reiter, Christian; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Garrido, Daniel; Mills, David A.; Grimm, Rudolf; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-01-01

    An improved understanding of glycosylation will provide new insights into many biological processes. In the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological samples, a strict regime is typically followed to ensure sample integrity. However, the fate of glycans that have been exposed to environmental conditions over millennia has not yet been investigated. This is also true for understanding the evolution of the glycosylation machinery in humans as well as in any other biological systems. In this study, we examined the glycosylation of tissue samples derived from four mummies which have been naturally preserved: – the 5,300 year old “Iceman called Oetzi”, found in the Tyrolean Alps; the 2,400 year old “Scythian warrior” and “Scythian Princess”, found in the Altai Mountains; and a 4 year old apartment mummy, found in Vienna/Austria. The number of N-glycans that were identified varied both with the age and the preservation status of the mummies. More glycan structures were discovered in the contemporary sample, as expected, however it is significant that glycan still exists in the ancient tissue samples. This discovery clearly shows that glycans persist for thousands of years, and these samples provide a vital insight into ancient glycosylation, offering us a window into the distant past. PMID:24831691

  15. Glycosylated proteins preserved over millennia: N-glycan analysis of Tyrolean Iceman, Scythian Princess and Warrior.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Kim, Bum Jin; Ro, Grace; Kim, Jae-Han; Bereuter, Thomas L; Reiter, Christian; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Garrido, Daniel; Mills, David A; Grimm, Rudolf; Lebrilla, Carlito B; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-05-16

    An improved understanding of glycosylation will provide new insights into many biological processes. In the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological samples, a strict regime is typically followed to ensure sample integrity. However, the fate of glycans that have been exposed to environmental conditions over millennia has not yet been investigated. This is also true for understanding the evolution of the glycosylation machinery in humans as well as in any other biological systems. In this study, we examined the glycosylation of tissue samples derived from four mummies which have been naturally preserved: - the 5,300 year old "Iceman called Oetzi", found in the Tyrolean Alps; the 2,400 year old "Scythian warrior" and "Scythian Princess", found in the Altai Mountains; and a 4 year old apartment mummy, found in Vienna/Austria. The number of N-glycans that were identified varied both with the age and the preservation status of the mummies. More glycan structures were discovered in the contemporary sample, as expected, however it is significant that glycan still exists in the ancient tissue samples. This discovery clearly shows that glycans persist for thousands of years, and these samples provide a vital insight into ancient glycosylation, offering us a window into the distant past.

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Tyrolean Iceman.

    PubMed

    Ermini, Luca; Olivieri, Cristina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Bonnal, Raoul; Soares, Pedro; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Richards, Martin B; Rollo, Franco

    2008-11-11

    The Tyrolean Iceman was a witness to the Neolithic-Copper Age transition in Central Europe 5350-5100 years ago, and his mummified corpse was recovered from an Alpine glacier on the Austro-Italian border in 1991 [1]. Using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplification and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products, we have retrieved the first complete mitochondrial-genome sequence of a prehistoric European. We have then compared it with 115 related extant lineages from mitochondrial haplogroup K. We found that the Iceman belonged to a branch of mitochondrial haplogroup K1 that has not yet been identified in modern European populations. This is the oldest complete Homo sapiens mtDNA genome generated to date. The results point to the potential significance of complete-ancient-mtDNA studies in addressing questions concerning the genetic history of human populations that the phylogeography of modern lineages is unable to tackle.

  17. Population Genomic Analysis of Ancient and Modern Genomes Yields New Insights into the Genetic Ancestry of the Tyrolean Iceman and the Genetic Structure of Europe

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Martin; Carpenter, Meredith L.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Henn, Brenna M.; Underhill, Peter A.; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Zara, Ilenia; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Angius, Andrea; Jones, Chris; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Nekhrizov, Georgi; Dimitrova, Diana; Theodossiev, Nikola; Harkins, Timothy T.; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Zink, Albert; Abecasis, Goncalo; Sanna, Serena; Cucca, Francesco; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing of the 5,300-year-old mummy of the Tyrolean Iceman, found in 1991 on a glacier near the border of Italy and Austria, has yielded new insights into his origin and relationship to modern European populations. A key finding of that study was an apparent recent common ancestry with individuals from Sardinia, based largely on the Y chromosome haplogroup and common autosomal SNP variation. Here, we compiled and analyzed genomic datasets from both modern and ancient Europeans, including genome sequence data from over 400 Sardinians and two ancient Thracians from Bulgaria, to investigate this result in greater detail and determine its implications for the genetic structure of Neolithic Europe. Using whole-genome sequencing data, we confirm that the Iceman is, indeed, most closely related to Sardinians. Furthermore, we show that this relationship extends to other individuals from cultural contexts associated with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition, in contrast to individuals from a hunter-gatherer context. We hypothesize that this genetic affinity of ancient samples from different parts of Europe with Sardinians represents a common genetic component that was geographically widespread across Europe during the Neolithic, likely related to migrations and population expansions associated with the spread of agriculture. PMID:24809476

  18. Population genomic analysis of ancient and modern genomes yields new insights into the genetic ancestry of the Tyrolean Iceman and the genetic structure of Europe.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Martin; Carpenter, Meredith L; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Henn, Brenna M; Underhill, Peter A; Sánchez-Quinto, Federico; Zara, Ilenia; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Angius, Andrea; Jones, Chris; Mendoza-Revilla, Javier; Nekhrizov, Georgi; Dimitrova, Diana; Theodossiev, Nikola; Harkins, Timothy T; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Zink, Albert; Abecasis, Goncalo; Sanna, Serena; Cucca, Francesco; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2014-05-01

    Genome sequencing of the 5,300-year-old mummy of the Tyrolean Iceman, found in 1991 on a glacier near the border of Italy and Austria, has yielded new insights into his origin and relationship to modern European populations. A key finding of that study was an apparent recent common ancestry with individuals from Sardinia, based largely on the Y chromosome haplogroup and common autosomal SNP variation. Here, we compiled and analyzed genomic datasets from both modern and ancient Europeans, including genome sequence data from over 400 Sardinians and two ancient Thracians from Bulgaria, to investigate this result in greater detail and determine its implications for the genetic structure of Neolithic Europe. Using whole-genome sequencing data, we confirm that the Iceman is, indeed, most closely related to Sardinians. Furthermore, we show that this relationship extends to other individuals from cultural contexts associated with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic transition, in contrast to individuals from a hunter-gatherer context. We hypothesize that this genetic affinity of ancient samples from different parts of Europe with Sardinians represents a common genetic component that was geographically widespread across Europe during the Neolithic, likely related to migrations and population expansions associated with the spread of agriculture.

  19. Body size, body proportions, and mobility in the Tyrolean "Iceman".

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B; Holt, Brigitte M; Sládek, Vladimir; Berner, Margit; Murphy, William A; zur Nedden, Dieter; Seidler, Horst; Recheis, Wolfgang

    2006-07-01

    Body mass and structural properties of the femoral and tibial midshafts of the "Iceman," a late Neolithic (5,200 BP) mummy found in the Tyrolean Alps, are determined from computed tomographic scans of his body, and compared with those of a sample of 139 males spanning the European early Upper Paleolithic through the Bronze Age. Two methods, based on femoral head breadth and estimated stature/bi-iliac (pelvic) breath, yield identical body-mass estimates of 61 kg for the Iceman. In combination with his estimated stature of 158 cm, this indicates a short but relatively wide or stocky body compared to our total sample. His femur is about average in strength compared to our late Neolithic (Eneolithic) males, but his tibia is well above average. His femur also shows adaptations for his relatively broad body (mediolateral strengthening), while his tibia shows adaptations for high mobility over rough terrain (anteroposterior strengthening). In many respects, his tibia more closely resembles those of European Mesolithic rather than Neolithic males, which may reflect a more mobile lifestyle than was characteristic of most Neolithic males, perhaps related to a pastoral subsistence strategy. There are indications that mobility in general declined between the European Mesolithic and late Neolithic, and that body size and shape may have become more variable throughout the continent following the Upper Paleolithic.

  20. Whole mitochondrial DNA sequencing in Alpine populations and the genetic history of the Neolithic Tyrolean Iceman.

    PubMed

    Coia, V; Cipollini, G; Anagnostou, P; Maixner, F; Battaggia, C; Brisighelli, F; Gómez-Carballa, A; Destro Bisol, G; Salas, A; Zink, A

    2016-01-01

    The Tyrolean Iceman is an extraordinarily well-preserved natural mummy that lived south of the Alpine ridge ~5,200 years before present (ybp), during the Copper Age. Despite studies that have investigated his genetic profile, the relation of the Iceman´s maternal lineage with present-day mitochondrial variation remains elusive. Studies of the Iceman have shown that his mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) belongs to a novel lineage of haplogroup K1 (K1f) not found in extant populations. We analyzed the complete mtDNA sequences of 42 haplogroup K bearing individuals from populations of the Eastern Italian Alps - putatively in genetic continuity with the Tyrolean Iceman-and compared his mitogenome with a large dataset of worldwide K1 sequences. Our results allow a re-definition of the K1 phylogeny, and indicate that the K1f haplogroup is absent or rare in present-day populations. We suggest that mtDNA Iceman´s lineage could have disappeared during demographic events starting in Europe from ~5,000 ybp. Based on the comparison of our results with published data, we propose a scenario that could explain the apparent contrast between the phylogeographic features of maternal and paternal lineages of the Tyrolean Iceman within the context of the demographic dynamics happening in Europe from 8,000 ybp. PMID:26764605

  1. Whole mitochondrial DNA sequencing in Alpine populations and the genetic history of the Neolithic Tyrolean Iceman.

    PubMed

    Coia, V; Cipollini, G; Anagnostou, P; Maixner, F; Battaggia, C; Brisighelli, F; Gómez-Carballa, A; Destro Bisol, G; Salas, A; Zink, A

    2016-01-14

    The Tyrolean Iceman is an extraordinarily well-preserved natural mummy that lived south of the Alpine ridge ~5,200 years before present (ybp), during the Copper Age. Despite studies that have investigated his genetic profile, the relation of the Iceman´s maternal lineage with present-day mitochondrial variation remains elusive. Studies of the Iceman have shown that his mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) belongs to a novel lineage of haplogroup K1 (K1f) not found in extant populations. We analyzed the complete mtDNA sequences of 42 haplogroup K bearing individuals from populations of the Eastern Italian Alps - putatively in genetic continuity with the Tyrolean Iceman-and compared his mitogenome with a large dataset of worldwide K1 sequences. Our results allow a re-definition of the K1 phylogeny, and indicate that the K1f haplogroup is absent or rare in present-day populations. We suggest that mtDNA Iceman´s lineage could have disappeared during demographic events starting in Europe from ~5,000 ybp. Based on the comparison of our results with published data, we propose a scenario that could explain the apparent contrast between the phylogeographic features of maternal and paternal lineages of the Tyrolean Iceman within the context of the demographic dynamics happening in Europe from 8,000 ybp.

  2. Whole mitochondrial DNA sequencing in Alpine populations and the genetic history of the Neolithic Tyrolean Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Coia, V.; Cipollini, G.; Anagnostou, P.; Maixner, F.; Battaggia, C.; Brisighelli, F.; Gómez-Carballa, A; Destro Bisol, G.; Salas, A.; Zink, A.

    2016-01-01

    The Tyrolean Iceman is an extraordinarily well-preserved natural mummy that lived south of the Alpine ridge ~5,200 years before present (ybp), during the Copper Age. Despite studies that have investigated his genetic profile, the relation of the Iceman´s maternal lineage with present-day mitochondrial variation remains elusive. Studies of the Iceman have shown that his mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) belongs to a novel lineage of haplogroup K1 (K1f) not found in extant populations. We analyzed the complete mtDNA sequences of 42 haplogroup K bearing individuals from populations of the Eastern Italian Alps – putatively in genetic continuity with the Tyrolean Iceman—and compared his mitogenome with a large dataset of worldwide K1 sequences. Our results allow a re-definition of the K1 phylogeny, and indicate that the K1f haplogroup is absent or rare in present-day populations. We suggest that mtDNA Iceman´s lineage could have disappeared during demographic events starting in Europe from ~5,000 ybp. Based on the comparison of our results with published data, we propose a scenario that could explain the apparent contrast between the phylogeographic features of maternal and paternal lineages of the Tyrolean Iceman within the context of the demographic dynamics happening in Europe from 8,000 ybp. PMID:26764605

  3. The omnivorous Tyrolean Iceman: colon contents (meat, cereals, pollen, moss and whipworm) and stable isotope analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, J H; Oeggl, K; Holden, T G; Handley, L L; O'Connell, T C; Preston, T

    2000-01-01

    The contents of the colon of the Tyrolean Iceman who lived ca. 5300 years ago include muscle fibres, cereal remains, a diversity of pollen, and most notably that of the hop hornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia) retaining cellular contents, as well as a moss leaf (Neckera complanata) and eggs of the parasitic whipworm (Trichuris trichiura). Based almost solely on stable isotope analyses and ignoring the work on the colon contents, two recently published papers on the Iceman's diet draw ill-founded conclusions about vegetarianism and even veganism. Neither the pollen nor the moss is likely to have been deliberately consumed as food by the Iceman. All the available evidence concerning the Iceman's broad-based diet is reviewed and the significance of the colon contents for matters other than assessment of food intake is outlined. PMID:11205345

  4. The omnivorous Tyrolean Iceman: colon contents (meat, cereals, pollen, moss and whipworm) and stable isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Dickson, J H; Oeggl, K; Holden, T G; Handley, L L; O'Connell, T C; Preston, T

    2000-12-29

    The contents of the colon of the Tyrolean Iceman who lived ca. 5300 years ago include muscle fibres, cereal remains, a diversity of pollen, and most notably that of the hop hornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia) retaining cellular contents, as well as a moss leaf (Neckera complanata) and eggs of the parasitic whipworm (Trichuris trichiura). Based almost solely on stable isotope analyses and ignoring the work on the colon contents, two recently published papers on the Iceman's diet draw ill-founded conclusions about vegetarianism and even veganism. Neither the pollen nor the moss is likely to have been deliberately consumed as food by the Iceman. All the available evidence concerning the Iceman's broad-based diet is reviewed and the significance of the colon contents for matters other than assessment of food intake is outlined.

  5. Sequence analysis of bacterial DNA in the colon and stomach of the Tyrolean Iceman.

    PubMed

    Cano, R J; Tiefenbrunner, F; Ubaldi, M; Del Cueto, C; Luciani, S; Cox, T; Orkand, P; Künzel, K H; Rollo, F

    2000-07-01

    The male human body found in an Alpine glacier on September 19, 1991 ("Tyrolean Iceman") has, for the first time in history, given scientists a chance to perform detailed anatomical, histological, and molecular investigations on the organs of a person from the Neolithic Age (5350-5100 B.P.). In the present study, tissue samples aseptically taken from the stomach and the colon of the mummy were utilized for DNA extraction, and the DNA was PCR-amplified, using primer pairs designed to bind to fragments of the 16s ribosomal RNA gene (16s rDNA) of a broad range of bacteria. The PCR products were cloned in plasmid vectors, and the recombinant clones (amplicons) were sequenced. The sequence data were finally used for scanning data libraries containing the corresponding sequences of present-day bacteria, to infer the putative ecophysiology of the ancient ones. The same procedure was repeated on some fragments of grass from the clothing found near the corpse. These fragments were taken as a control of the microbiological situation of the glacier. The results show that the flora of the Iceman's stomach is entirely composed of Burkholderia pickettii, an organism commonly found in aquatic habitats. The colon, on the other hand, contains several members of the fecal flora of humans, such as Clostridium perfringens, C. ghonii, C. sordellii, Eubacterium tenue, and Bacteroides sp. The Iceman's colon, however, was found to contain, rather unexpectedly, also some members of the genus Vibrio. The results are discussed in light of what is known about the preservation of microbial DNA at the Iceman's site and of previous parasitological studies performed on the Iceman himself and on human coprolites.

  6. Fatty acid composition and preservation of the Tyrolean Iceman and other mummies.

    PubMed

    Makristathis, Athanasios; Schwarzmeier, Josef; Mader, Robert M; Varmuza, Kurt; Simonitsch, Ingrid; Chavez, Jose Chavez; Platzer, Werner; Unterdorfer, Hans; Scheithauer, Richard; Derevianko, Anatoly; Seidler, Horst

    2002-12-01

    In anthropology, objective parameters to adequately describe storage conditions and the preservation of mummies have yet to be identified. Considering that fatty acids degrade to stable products, we analysed their profile in human mummies and in control samples by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Originating from different epochs and civilizations, samples of the Tyrolean Iceman, other glacier corpses, a freeze dried mummy, corpses from a permafrost region, a corpse mummified immersed in water, and a desert mummy were evaluated. Chemometric analysis based on the concentrations of 16 fatty acids revealed the degree of similarity between anthropologic and fresh corpse samples, which was mainly influenced by the content of palmitic acid, oleic acid, and 10-hydroxystearic acid. The presence of 10-hydroxystearic acid was associated with immersion in water, whereas dry mummification was accompanied by high contents of oleic acid. Samples of the Tyrolean Iceman clustered between fresh tissue and those of other glacier corpses indicating the good preservation of this mummy. Thus, environmental post-mortem conditions were associated with characteristic fatty acid patterns suggesting that chemometric analysis of fatty acid contents may add to our knowledge about post-mortem storage conditions and the preservation of human corpses.

  7. Positioning the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) Hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman into a Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Marota, Isolina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Ermini, Luca; Fusco, Letizia; Pietrelli, Alessandro; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco; Luciani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    In the last years several phylogeographic studies of both extant and extinct red deer populations have been conducted. Three distinct mitochondrial lineages (western, eastern and North-African/Sardinian) have been identified reflecting different glacial refugia and postglacial recolonisation processes. However, little is known about the genetics of the Alpine populations and no mitochondrial DNA sequences from Alpine archaeological specimens are available. Here we provide the first mitochondrial sequences of an Alpine Copper Age Cervus elaphus. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the remains of the clothes of the glacier mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi (5,350–5,100 years before present). A 2,297 base pairs long fragment was sequenced using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplifications and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer's haplotype with haplotypes of modern and ancient European red deer. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the haplotype of the Alpine Copper Age red deer falls within the western European mitochondrial lineage in contrast with the current populations from the Italian Alps belonging to the eastern lineage. We also discussed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer with the populations from Mesola Wood (northern Italy) and Sardinia. PMID:24988290

  8. Positioning the red deer (Cervus elaphus) hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman into a mitochondrial DNA phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Cristina; Marota, Isolina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Ermini, Luca; Fusco, Letizia; Pietrelli, Alessandro; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco; Luciani, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    In the last years several phylogeographic studies of both extant and extinct red deer populations have been conducted. Three distinct mitochondrial lineages (western, eastern and North-African/Sardinian) have been identified reflecting different glacial refugia and postglacial recolonisation processes. However, little is known about the genetics of the Alpine populations and no mitochondrial DNA sequences from Alpine archaeological specimens are available. Here we provide the first mitochondrial sequences of an Alpine Copper Age Cervus elaphus. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the remains of the clothes of the glacier mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi (5,350-5,100 years before present). A 2,297 base pairs long fragment was sequenced using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplifications and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer's haplotype with haplotypes of modern and ancient European red deer. The phylogenetic analyses showed that the haplotype of the Alpine Copper Age red deer falls within the western European mitochondrial lineage in contrast with the current populations from the Italian Alps belonging to the eastern lineage. We also discussed the phylogenetic relationships of the Alpine Copper Age red deer with the populations from Mesola Wood (northern Italy) and Sardinia.

  9. Analysis of bacterial DNA in skin and muscle of the Tyrolean iceman offers new insight into the mummification process.

    PubMed

    Rollo, F; Luciani, S; Canapa, A; Marota, I

    2000-02-01

    About 80 sequences (16s ribosomal RNA gene) of bacterial DNA in samples of skin and muscle taken directly from the Tyrolean iceman (3350-3100 years B.C.) or recovered during the 1992 archaeological expedition at the Alpine site were analyzed to obtain clues to the natural mummification process that allowed the corpse of the Neolithic shepherd/hunter to be preserved for more than 5,000 years. The investigation was made more complex by the fact that the surface of the mummy had been swabbed with phenol soon after the discovery (September 19, 1991). Our results show that no trace of microbial DNA is left on the actual surface of the body, while the untreated skin still bears the remains of large numbers of bacteria belonging to the genera Sphingomonas, Afipia, Curtobacterium, Microbacterium, Agromyces, and others. Compared to the untreated skin, the iceman's muscle is also very rich in bacterial DNA. However, this DNA comes, with few exceptions, from the species Clostridium algidicarnis. The sharp difference in the bacterial DNA composition of skin and muscle suggests that the remains of the original cadaveric microflora of the latter have not disappeared during the iceman's taphonomic history. On the other hand, the massive presence of C. algidicarnis, a cold-adapted sporigenous, the DNA of which was previously (Ubaldi et al. [1998] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 107:285-295) found in the soft tissue of a naturally desiccated Andean mummy, indicates that the hypothesis that the iceman's corpse underwent rapid dehydration by the effect of a warm wind (föhn) is no longer plausible. The results best fit with the hypothesis (Bereuter et al. [1997] Chem. Eur. J. 7:1032-1038) that the body was first covered by snow and ice, and then underwent thawing and, finally, desiccation.

  10. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with multidimensional scaling, binary hierarchical cluster tree and selected diagnostic masses improves species identification of Neolithic keratin sequences from furs of the Tyrolean Iceman Oetzi.

    PubMed

    Hollemeyer, Klaus; Altmeyer, Wolfgang; Heinzle, Elmar; Pitra, Christian

    2012-08-30

    The identification of fur origins from the 5300-year-old Tyrolean Iceman's accoutrement is not yet complete, although definite identification is essential for the socio-cultural context of his epoch. Neither have all potential samples been identified so far, nor there has a consensus been reached on the species identified using the classical methods. Archaeological hair often lacks analyzable hair scale patterns in microscopic analyses and polymer chain reaction (PCR)-based techniques are often inapplicable due to the lack of amplifiable ancient DNA. To overcome these drawbacks, a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) method was used exclusively based on hair keratins. Thirteen fur specimens from his accoutrement were analyzed after tryptic digest of native hair. Peptide mass fingerprints (pmfs) from ancient samples and from reference species mostly occurring in the Alpine surroundings at his lifetime were compared to each other using multidimensional scaling and binary hierarchical cluster tree analysis. Both statistical methods highly reflect spectral similarities among pmfs as close zoological relationships. While multidimensional scaling was useful to discriminate specimens on the zoological order level, binary hierarchical cluster tree reached the family or subfamily level. Additionally, the presence and/or absence of order, family and/or species-specific diagnostic masses in their pmfs allowed the identification of mammals mostly down to single species level. Red deer was found in his shoe vamp, goat in the leggings, cattle in his shoe sole and at his quiver's closing flap as well as sheep and chamois in his coat. Canid species, like grey wolf, domestic dog or European red fox, were discovered in his leggings for the first time, but could not be differentiated to species level. This is widening the spectrum of processed fur-bearing species to at least one member of the Canidae family. His fur cap was

  11. The Tyrolean Iceman and excavated human remains as sources of information about the past, the present, and the future.

    PubMed

    Sjøvold, T

    1998-01-01

    The 5,200-year-old mummy of the so-called "Iceman" found in the Tyrolean Alps in September 1991 has not only provided unique information about the European Stone Age, but has also supported disciplines of glaciology and paleoclimatology, contributed to medical history, age-at-death determination, and plastic surgery. The Iceman is the oldest known case of medical tattooing. Since the body is unique, new noninvasive methods had to be developed to investigate it. Stereolithographic skull models were produced to study the skull. Age determination was partly based on computer tomography. These methods may even be used for present or future medical or forensic practice. Furthermore, a collection of identified skulls from a charnel house in Austria, dating from about 1780 AD to 1990 AD, has been used for testing and developing osteological methods, though the inclusion of the skulls in the charnel house is formally classified a second burial. These skulls have been studied by permission from the local Catholic church. Careful respect for the ancestors is crucial in both these and other cases. In return, access to the remains of ancestors provides information which may shed light upon the past, the present, and even help survival in the future.

  12. A whole mitochondria analysis of the Tyrolean Iceman’s leather provides insights into the animal sources of Copper Age clothing

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, Niall J.; Teasdale, Matthew D.; Mattiangeli, Valeria; Maixner, Frank; Pinhasi, Ron; Bradley, Daniel G.; Zink, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The attire of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old natural mummy from the Ötzal Italian Alps, provides a surviving example of ancient manufacturing technologies. Research into his garments has however, been limited by ambiguity surrounding their source species. Here we present a targeted enrichment and sequencing of full mitochondrial genomes sampled from his clothes and quiver, which elucidates the species of production for nine fragments. Results indicate that the majority of the samples originate from domestic ungulate species (cattle, sheep and goat), whose recovered haplogroups are now at high frequency in today’s domestic populations. Intriguingly, the hat and quiver samples were produced from wild species, brown bear and roe deer respectively. Combined, these results suggest that Copper Age populations made considered choices of clothing material from both the wild and domestic populations available to them. Moreover, these results show the potential for the recovery of complete mitochondrial genomes from degraded prehistoric artefacts. PMID:27537861

  13. The iceman: discovery and imaging.

    PubMed

    Murphy, William A; Nedden Dz, Dieter zur; Gostner, Paul; Knapp, Rudolf; Recheis, Wolfgang; Seidler, Horst

    2003-03-01

    The anatomic features of a 5,300-year-old mummy, the iceman, were documented with conventional radiographic, portable computed radiographic, and conventional and spiral computed tomographic images obtained between September 1991 and June 2001. A team of scientists and radiologists from Austria, Italy, and the United States supervised the examinations and interpreted the images. The images demonstrated excellent preservation of the mineralized skeleton with profound dehydration of the soft tissues. The skeleton exhibited several types of trauma, including (a) healed rib fractures, (b) hairline skull fractures and a compression deformity of the thorax, probably acquired while encased in the glacier, and (c) damage acquired during the effort to recover the corpse. Skeletal variants were present, as was evidence of degenerative arthritis, frostbite, vascular calcification, and adaptation to cultural and geographic influences. In terms of anatomy and apparent health-related conditions, the iceman was very similar to modern humans. An arrowhead lodged between the rib cage and the left scapula was the probable cause of the iceman's death. Study of the images also provided insight regarding postmortem processes that led to the iceman's mummification.

  14. Investigation of the triacylglycerol composition of iceman's mummified tissue by high-temperature gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mayer, B X; Reiter, C; Bereuter, T L

    1997-04-25

    The pattern of intact triacylglycerols of a skin sample from the 5300-year-old Iceman mummy (nicknamed Otzi) was resolved on a diphenyl-dimethylpolysiloxane stationary phase by high-temperature gas chromatography. Adipocere from a 64-year-old glacier mummy as well as recent human subcutaneous fat served as a comparison in this study. Qualitatively, the results for mummy samples were similar with well-preserved saturated, but decomposed unsaturated, triacylglycerols, the latter being predominant in subcutaneous fat. Excellent preservation of triacylglycerols with odd carbon numbers and branched acyl chains was observed. The results presented here shed new light on the process of mummification.

  15. [3D computer-assisted ENT biopsies of the Iceman].

    PubMed

    Thumfart, W F; Freysinger, W; Gunkel, A R; Truppe, M J; Platzer, W

    1997-02-01

    The University of Innsbruck possesses a unique prehistoric, completely conserved 5300-year-old human cadaver. We report our experiences during which ENT specialists collected samples from various cavities inside the Iceman. Guidance of biopsy instruments was accomplished with computer-assisted navigation based on Interventional Video Tomography. This technology allows surgical guidance by interlinking currently available imaging modalities with live endoscopic video. The system operates without patient fixation and is practically free of external contact. Apart from sterility, special precautionary measures were necessary to avoid contamination with heavy metals or microorganisms. Visual inspection of the samples of mucosa from the nose, maxillary sinus and larynx revealed the typical patterns of a human cadaver without overt pathology.

  16. Metagenomic analysis reveals presence of Treponema denticola in a tissue biopsy of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Thomma, Anton; Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman's genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman's bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics-enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains. PMID:24941044

  17. Metagenomic analysis reveals presence of Treponema denticola in a tissue biopsy of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Thomma, Anton; Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman's genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman's bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics-enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains.

  18. Paleoproteomic study of the Iceman's brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Overath, Thorsten; Linke, Dennis; Janko, Marek; Guerriero, Gea; van den Berg, Bart H J; Stade, Bjoern; Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Jaremek, Marta; Kneissl, Benny; Meder, Benjamin; Franke, Andre; Egarter-Vigl, Eduard; Meese, Eckart; Schwarz, Andreas; Tholey, Andreas; Zink, Albert; Keller, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The Tyrolean Iceman, a Copper-age ice mummy, is one of the best-studied human individuals. While the genome of the Iceman has largely been decoded, tissue-specific proteomes have not yet been investigated. We studied the proteome of two distinct brain samples using gel-based and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies together with a multiple-databases and -search algorithms-driven data-analysis approach. Thereby, we identified a total of 502 different proteins. Of these, 41 proteins are known to be highly abundant in brain tissue and 9 are even specifically expressed in the brain. Furthermore, we found 10 proteins related to blood and coagulation. An enrichment analysis revealed a significant accumulation of proteins related to stress response and wound healing. Together with atomic force microscope scans, indicating clustered blood cells, our data reopens former discussions about a possible injury of the Iceman's head near the site where the tissue samples have been extracted.

  19. Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Presence of Treponema denticola in a Tissue Biopsy of the Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman’s genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman’s bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics- enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains. PMID:24941044

  20. The Iceman's last weeks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindler, Konrad

    1994-06-01

    The author presents the archaeological, botanical and anatomical of medical evidence relating to the events of the last few days of the Iceman's life. The unfinished arrows and the half-completed bow indicate that he had lost his weapons and was in the process of re-arming himself. The quiver and the two primed arrows show clear signs of damage that has been proved to originate from before entombment in the ice of Hauslabjoch. An intravital series of fractured ribs and atrophic changes to the humerus on the same side of the body are also indicative of a violent conflict. The presence of threshing and winnowing fragments proves that, shortly before his death, the Iceman spent some time in a human settlement in which the grain crop was threshed. The theory is therefore proposed that shortly before his death the Iceman suffered some personal catastrophe involving damage to his possessions and physical injury. He fled in the direction of the inner Ötz Valley, a region of high alpine pastures he may have been familiar with from summer transhumance. Just beyond the ridge of the main Alpine chain he was caught by a sudden fall in temperature and snowfall, which he did not survive.

  1. Fine characterization of the Iceman's mtDNA haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Franco; Ermini, Luca; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; Olivieri, Cristina; Luiselli, Donata

    2006-08-01

    Starting from specimens of the intestinal contents of the so-called Tyrolean Iceman or Otzi (5,350-5,100 years before present), it was possible by polymerase chain reaction to amplify fragments of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region that correspond to the sequence found in 1994 at the Munich and Oxford laboratories and which had been attributed to the original DNA of the mummy. The particularly favorable condition of the specimens, showing very low contamination levels, made it easier to extend the analyses to the coding region, which had not previously been considered. The mtDNA of the European population is currently divided into nine (H, T, U, V, W, X, I, J, and K) main groups (haplogroups). The K haplogroup, in particular, is composed of two (K1 and K2) subclusters. The results demonstrate that the Iceman's mtDNA belongs to the K1 subcluster, yet it does not fit any of the three known branches (a, b, and c) into which the K1 subcluster is presently divided. In addition, some other sites, reported to be linked to environmental adaptation or pathologies, were investigated.

  2. Characterization of Nucleotide Misincorporation Patterns in the Iceman's Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Bonnal, Raoul; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Background The degradation of DNA represents one of the main issues in the genetic analysis of archeological specimens. In the recent years, a particular kind of post-mortem DNA modification giving rise to nucleotide misincorporation (“miscoding lesions”) has been the object of extensive investigations. Methodology/Principal Findings To improve our knowledge regarding the nature and incidence of ancient DNA nucleotide misincorporations, we have utilized 6,859 (629,975 bp) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences obtained from the 5,350–5,100-years-old, freeze-desiccated human mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi. To generate the sequences, we have applied a mixed PCR/pyrosequencing procedure allowing one to obtain a particularly high sequence coverage. As a control, we have produced further 8,982 (805,155 bp) mtDNA sequences from a contemporary specimen using the same system and starting from the same template copy number of the ancient sample. From the analysis of the nucleotide misincorporation rate in ancient, modern, and putative contaminant sequences, we observed that the rate of misincorporation is significantly lower in modern and putative contaminant sequence datasets than in ancient sequences. In contrast, type 2 transitions represent the vast majority (85%) of the observed nucleotide misincorporations in ancient sequences. Conclusions/Significance This study provides a further contribution to the knowledge of nucleotide misincorporation patterns in DNA sequences obtained from freeze-preserved archeological specimens. In the Iceman system, ancient sequences can be clearly distinguished from contaminants on the basis of nucleotide misincorporation rates. This observation confirms a previous identification of the ancient mummy sequences made on a purely phylogenetical basis. The present investigation provides further indication that the majority of ancient DNA damage is reflected by type 2 (cytosine→thymine/guanine→adenine) transitions and

  3. Molecular phylogeny of the fungi of the Iceman's grass clothing.

    PubMed

    Rollo, F; Sassaroli, S; Ubaldi, M

    1995-08-01

    To investigate the origin of the fungal hyphae that cover the grass clothing (cloak, boots) found near the neolithic mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman, two radiocarbon-dated samples of grass were submitted to DNA extraction. The DNA was then PCR amplified using, respectively, primers specific for the region containing the internal transcribed spacers and the 5.8s rDNA (ITS), and primers specific for an approximately 600-bp long fragment of the nuclear small-subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA) repeat units of eukaryotes. The amplification products were cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis of 20 individual ITS clones and of ten SSU rDNA clones indicated that three types of fungal DNA can be extracted from the grass. Phylogenetic analyses, using 5.8s and SSU rDNA fungal reference sequences from EMBL and GenBank databases, suggest that the DNAs come, respectively, from a psychrophilic basidiomycetous yeast, phylogenetically close to Leucosporidium scottii, and from two ascomycetes, one of which is possibly related to the Eurotiales.

  4. Complement: the Iceman of immunology?

    PubMed

    Würzner, R

    1997-12-01

    Complement provides an important host defence system involved in a multitude of immune reactions, including opsonisation of micro-organisms, enhancement of inflammatory response, immunomodulation, clearance of immune complexes and cell lysis. The 6th European Meeting on Complement in Human Disease, 12-15 March 1997 in Innsbruck, Austria, the preservation site of the neolithic Iceman, addressed the functional role of complement and its regulators in human disease. The scientific presentations clearly demonstrated that complement is not a redundant fossil, evolving since the dawn of vertebrate existence on the earth, but remains continuously important for mankind.

  5. A major widespread climatic change around 5300 cal. yr BP at the time of the Alpine Iceman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magny, Michel; Haas, Jean Nicolas

    2004-07-01

    Palaeoenvironmental and archaeological data from Arbon Bleiche, Lake Constance (Switzerland) give evidence of a rapid rise in lake-level dated by tree-ring and radiocarbon to 5320 cal. yr BP. This rise event was the latest in a series of three successive episodes of higher lake-level between 5550 and 5300 cal. yr BP coinciding with glacier advance and tree-limit decline in the Alps. This west-central European climate change may have favoured the quick burial and the preservation of the Alpine Iceman recently found in the Tyrolean Alps. It has possible equivalents in many records from various regions in both hemispheres dating to 5600-5000 cal. yr BP and corresponds to global cooling and contrasting patterns of hydrological changes. This major mid-Holocene climate event marks the Hypsithermal/Neoglaciation transition possibly resulting from a combination of different factors including orbital forcing, changes in ocean circulation and variations in solar activity. Copyright

  6. Origin and migration of the Alpine Iceman.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolfgang; Fricke, Henry; Halliday, Alex N; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Wartho, Jo-Anne

    2003-10-31

    The Alpine Iceman provides a unique window into the Neolithic-Copper Age of Europe. We compared the radiogenic (strontium and lead) and stable (oxygen and carbon) isotope composition of the Iceman's teeth and bones, as well as 40Ar/39Ar mica ages from his intestine, to local geology and hydrology, and we inferred his habitat and range from childhood to adult life. The Iceman's origin can be restricted to a few valleys within approximately 60 kilometers south(east) of the discovery site. His migration during adulthood is indicated by contrasting isotopic compositions of enamel, bones, and intestinal content. This demonstrates that the Alpine valleys of central Europe were permanently inhabited during the terminal Neolithic.

  7. Ötzi, the prehistoric Iceman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Walter; Rom, Werner

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents a brief recollection of the discovery of the Iceman "Ötzi", an extraordinary archaeological find which opened up a window to prehistoric life some 5000 years ago. A selected number of investigations are also presented, with particular emphasis on the 14C dating method.

  8. The reconstruction of the last itinerary of “Ötzi”, the Neolithic Iceman, by pollen analyses from sequentially sampled gut extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeggl, Klaus; Kofler, Werner; Schmidl, Alexandra; Dickson, James H.; Egarter-Vigl, Eduard; Gaber, Othmar

    2007-04-01

    The investigations of the Tyrolean Iceman "Ötzi" and his artefacts, discovered at a remote location high in the Eastern Alps, have contributed greatly to the knowledge of the lifestyle of Neolithic humankind. However, the events immediately prior to the Iceman's death have remained unclear and even the recently discovered arrowhead in his back does not explain conclusively the cause of death satisfactorily. From the pollen and macrofossil content of his gut, we reconstruct his travels just before his demise. Sequential sampling of the food residues in the digestive tract of the 5200 year old glacier mummy has made possible the analyses of a series of meals and, from the pollen content, the deduction of the environments in which the last meals were eaten. During his last 33 or so hours, Ötzi crossed different habitats in the Ötztal mountains over considerable distances from high up near the timber line (at about 2500 m), to low down in the zone of warmth-loving trees (about 1200 m or less), and finally very high in the zone of perennial ice (above 3000 m). These final journeys lend new weight to the "disaster" theory of Ötzi's death, which suggests that, returning from the high alpine pastures to his native village, he came into a severe conflict with his kin such that he had to flee from the community back to the high ground familiar to him, where he died.

  9. Otzi, the iceman and his leather clothes.

    PubMed

    Püntener, Alois G; Moss, Serge

    2010-01-01

    Over 5000 years ago, a man climbed up to the icy heights of the glacier in South Tyrol, Italy and died. He was found by accident in 1991, with his clothes and equipment, mummified and frozen: an archaeological sensation and a unique snapshot of a Copper Age man. For several years highly specialised research teams have examined the mummy and all accompanying items. This paper describes how fur and leather clothes of the iceman could have been tanned. Details of the analytical tests undertaken on the 5000 year old leather samples and what they revealed are presented.

  10. The Time before History: Thinking Like an Archaeologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Michael M.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a series of lesson plans for a seventh-grade world studies class. The lessons use the discovery of a 5,300-year-old "iceman" in the Austrian Alps as a starting point for a series of simulated archaeological activities. Includes descriptions and drawings of the iceman's remains and artifacts. (MJP)

  11. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world. PMID:25667090

  12. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world.

  13. ``Isotope language'' of the Alpine Iceman investigated with AMS and MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Walter; Müller, Wolfgang

    2003-05-01

    This paper reviews the use of stable and radioactive isotopes to elucidate an extraordinary archaeological find, the Alpine Iceman "Ötzi". In 1991 the body of this man was accidentally discovered in an ice-filled depression at a high-altitude mountain pass (Tisenjoch, 3210 m) of the Ötztal Alps. This location at the Austrian-Italian border apparently formed an ancient transition across the Alps from South to North. 14C dating of the body with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) revealed that the Iceman had lived some 5200 years ago, within the time period from 3370 to 3100 years BC (Before Christ). A variety of other materials from the discovery site were also dated with 14C AMS suggesting a use of the mountain pass at other time periods, and varying climatic conditions. Ongoing investigations with thermal ionization (TIMS), inductively-coupled plasma (ICP-MS) and gas mass spectrometry include isotope ratios of 18O/ 16O ( δ18O), 87Sr/ 86Sr and 206Pb/ 204Pb, in order to reveal the Iceman's origin and migrational behavior. Analyzed samples include tooth enamel, bones and contents of his intestine, which all represent different ontogenetic (developmental) stages. The isotopic composition of the Iceman is compared to both soils from archaeological sites and local waters. Taken together, the results point towards an origin of the Iceman in the Southeast of the finding site, consistent with archaeological and paleobotanical data.

  14. Oral pathologies of the Neolithic Iceman, c.3,300 BC.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Roger; Spielman, Andrew I; Zink, Albert; Rühli, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The famous Iceman 'Ötzi' (South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology, Bolzano, Italy), a Neolithic human ice mummy, offers a unique opportunity to study evolutionary aspects of oral disease. The aim of this study was to assess, for the very first time, his oral cavity, which surprisingly had never been examined systematically. Based on several computed tomography (CT) scans from 1991 onwards and on macroscopic investigation, only a few findings, such as a central maxillary diastema, heavy abrasions, and missing wisdom teeth, were known. We re-evaluated the latest CT scans from 2005 and found various oral pathologies. In line with the increase of tooth decay in the Neolithic - because of diet change in this historic transition phase - several carious lesions were found, one of which penetrated into the dental pulp. In accordance with the Iceman's troubled life, as several injuries on his body and his violent death attest, mechanical trauma of one of his upper front teeth is evident. Finally, the poor periodontal condition of the Iceman's dentition (e.g. loss of alveolar bone), indicative of periodontitis, was assessed. These oral pathological findings in the Iceman's dentition provide a unique glimpse into the evolutionary history of oral conditions.

  15. The 'Iceman': molecular structure of 5200-year-old skin characterised by Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Williams, A C; Edwards, H G; Barry, B W

    1995-01-01

    The molecular state of about 5200-year-old skin from the so-called 'Iceman' (Similaun man or Otzi) has been characterised using Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, and has been compared with that of contemporary man. Contemporary skin was also freeze-dried (to mimic the conditions under which the ancient skin was preserved) and its molecular structure was compared with that of Iceman skin. The results showed that the proteinaceous moiety of the ancient skin had degraded considerably and, although olefinic bonds had probably oxidised, the lipoidal component was largely unaltered. Electron microscopical comparisons of Iceman and contemporary skin showed that the gross structure of Iceman skin had survived essentially intact for five millennia.

  16. The utility of ancient human DNA for improving allele age estimates, with implications for demographic models and tests of natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Aaron J.; Hawks, John; Keinan, Alon

    2015-01-01

    The age of polymorphic alleles in humans is often estimated from population genetic patterns in extant human populations, such as allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and rate of mutations. Ancient DNA can improve the accuracy of such estimates, as well as facilitate testing the validity of demographic models underlying many population genetic methods. Specifically, the presence of an allele in a genome derived from an ancient sample testifies that the allele is at least as old as that sample. In this study, we consider a common method for estimating allele age based on allele frequency as applied to variants from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project. We view these estimates in the context of the presence or absence of each allele in the genomes of the 5300 year old Tyrolean Iceman, Ötzi, and of the 50,000 year old Altai Neandertal. Our results illuminate the accuracy of these estimates and their sensitivity to demographic events that were not included in the model underlying age estimation. Specifically, allele presence in the Iceman genome provides a good fit of allele age estimates to the expectation based on the age of that specimen. The equivalent based on the Neandertal genome leads to a poorer fit. This is likely due in part to the older age of the Neandertal and the older time of the split between modern humans and Neandertals, but also due to gene flow from Neandertals to modern humans not being considered in the underlying demographic model. Thus, the incorporation of ancient DNA can improve allele age estimation, demographic modeling, and tests of natural selection. Our results also point to the importance of considering a more diverse set of ancient samples for understanding the geographic and temporal range of individual alleles. PMID:25467111

  17. The utility of ancient human DNA for improving allele age estimates, with implications for demographic models and tests of natural selection.

    PubMed

    Sams, Aaron J; Hawks, John; Keinan, Alon

    2015-02-01

    The age of polymorphic alleles in humans is often estimated from population genetic patterns in extant human populations, such as allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and rate of mutations. Ancient DNA can improve the accuracy of such estimates, as well as facilitate testing the validity of demographic models underlying many population genetic methods. Specifically, the presence of an allele in a genome derived from an ancient sample testifies that the allele is at least as old as that sample. In this study, we consider a common method for estimating allele age based on allele frequency as applied to variants from the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Exome Sequencing Project. We view these estimates in the context of the presence or absence of each allele in the genomes of the 5300 year old Tyrolean Iceman, Ötzi, and of the 50,000 year old Altai Neandertal. Our results illuminate the accuracy of these estimates and their sensitivity to demographic events that were not included in the model underlying age estimation. Specifically, allele presence in the Iceman genome provides a good fit of allele age estimates to the expectation based on the age of that specimen. The equivalent based on the Neandertal genome leads to a poorer fit. This is likely due in part to the older age of the Neandertal and the older time of the split between modern humans and Neandertals, but also due to gene flow from Neandertals to modern humans not being considered in the underlying demographic model. Thus, the incorporation of ancient DNA can improve allele age estimation, demographic modeling, and tests of natural selection. Our results also point to the importance of considering a more diverse set of ancient samples for understanding the geographic and temporal range of individual alleles.

  18. Isotopic Composition of the Neolithic Alpine Iceman's Tooth Enamel and Clues to his Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, W.; Muller, W.; Halliday, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    Five small enamel fragments from three teeth of the upper right jaw from the mummy of the Neolithic Alpine Iceman have been investigated for their isotopic composition in order to shed light on his geographic origins. Soils from approximately contemporaneous sites were sampled for comparison. Tooth enamel forms ontogenetically very early and is not re-mineralized during later lifetime (unlike with bone material). Therefore, unique insights into the Iceman's childhood can be acquired. Enamel also is the densest tissue of a human body and is thus less susceptible to post-mortem alteration. Both radiogenic (Sr, Pb, Nd) and stable isotopes (O, C) are investigated. Radiogenic isotopes allow reconstruction of the local geological background, because humans incorporate Sr, Pb and Nd from their local environment by eating local food. Stable isotopes provide information about altitude and/or position relative to the main Alpine watershed. High spatial-resolution laser-ablation ICPMS profiles reveal that most elements are distributed in a manner that is essentially similar to modern human teeth except of that La, Ce, Nd (LREE) show up to a 100-fold enrichment towards the outer enamel surface. These uptake-profiles may reflect interaction with melt water, consistent with data for the composition of samples of the Iceman's skin. Biogenic apatites (enamel, bone) have very low in-vivo LREE concentrations, but take up LREEs post-mortem from the burial environment. Ice core samples from the finding site show concentrations up to 400 ppt Ce. Such high uptake of the LREEs precludes the derivation of an in-vivo Nd isotopic signal, but both other radiogenic tracers, Sr and Pb, show pristine (in-vivo) concentrations of 87 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively. Strontium isotopic compositions were determined on fragments from the canine, the first and second premolar (1 - 9 mg) and two hip bone samples, utilizing three sequential leaching steps for each sample to detect possible alteration

  19. Deletion in the EVC2 gene causes chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Tyrolean Grey cattle.

    PubMed

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Benazzi, Cinzia; Bolcato, Marilena; Brunetti, Barbara; Muscatello, Luisa Vera; Dittmer, Keren; Piffer, Christian; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013 seven Italian Tyrolean Grey calves were born with abnormally short limbs. Detailed clinical and pathological examination revealed similarities to chondrodysplastic dwarfism. Pedigree analysis showed a common founder, assuming autosomal monogenic recessive transmission of the defective allele. A positional cloning approach combining genome wide association and homozygosity mapping identified a single 1.6 Mb genomic region on BTA 6 that was associated with the disease. Whole genome re-sequencing of an affected calf revealed a single candidate causal mutation in the Ellis van Creveld syndrome 2 (EVC2) gene. This gene is known to be associated with chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Japanese Brown cattle, and dwarfism, abnormal nails and teeth, and dysostosis in humans with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a 2 bp deletion in exon 19 (c.2993_2994ACdel) that led to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of bovine EVC2, and was concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier animals. This loss of function mutation confirms the important role of EVC2 in bone development. Genetic testing can now be used to eliminate this form of chondrodysplastic dwarfism from Tyrolean Grey cattle.

  20. Deletion in the EVC2 gene causes chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Tyrolean Grey cattle.

    PubMed

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Benazzi, Cinzia; Bolcato, Marilena; Brunetti, Barbara; Muscatello, Luisa Vera; Dittmer, Keren; Piffer, Christian; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013 seven Italian Tyrolean Grey calves were born with abnormally short limbs. Detailed clinical and pathological examination revealed similarities to chondrodysplastic dwarfism. Pedigree analysis showed a common founder, assuming autosomal monogenic recessive transmission of the defective allele. A positional cloning approach combining genome wide association and homozygosity mapping identified a single 1.6 Mb genomic region on BTA 6 that was associated with the disease. Whole genome re-sequencing of an affected calf revealed a single candidate causal mutation in the Ellis van Creveld syndrome 2 (EVC2) gene. This gene is known to be associated with chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Japanese Brown cattle, and dwarfism, abnormal nails and teeth, and dysostosis in humans with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a 2 bp deletion in exon 19 (c.2993_2994ACdel) that led to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of bovine EVC2, and was concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier animals. This loss of function mutation confirms the important role of EVC2 in bone development. Genetic testing can now be used to eliminate this form of chondrodysplastic dwarfism from Tyrolean Grey cattle. PMID:24733244

  1. Deletion in the EVC2 Gene Causes Chondrodysplastic Dwarfism in Tyrolean Grey Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Benazzi, Cinzia; Bolcato, Marilena; Brunetti, Barbara; Muscatello, Luisa Vera; Dittmer, Keren; Piffer, Christian; Gentile, Arcangelo; Drögemüller, Cord

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2013 seven Italian Tyrolean Grey calves were born with abnormally short limbs. Detailed clinical and pathological examination revealed similarities to chondrodysplastic dwarfism. Pedigree analysis showed a common founder, assuming autosomal monogenic recessive transmission of the defective allele. A positional cloning approach combining genome wide association and homozygosity mapping identified a single 1.6 Mb genomic region on BTA 6 that was associated with the disease. Whole genome re-sequencing of an affected calf revealed a single candidate causal mutation in the Ellis van Creveld syndrome 2 (EVC2) gene. This gene is known to be associated with chondrodysplastic dwarfism in Japanese Brown cattle, and dwarfism, abnormal nails and teeth, and dysostosis in humans with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a 2 bp deletion in exon 19 (c.2993_2994ACdel) that led to a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of bovine EVC2, and was concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier animals. This loss of function mutation confirms the important role of EVC2 in bone development. Genetic testing can now be used to eliminate this form of chondrodysplastic dwarfism from Tyrolean Grey cattle. PMID:24733244

  2. Species identification of Oetzi's clothing with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry based on peptide pattern similarities of hair digests.

    PubMed

    Hollemeyer, Klaus; Altmeyer, Wolfgang; Heinzle, Elmar; Pitra, Christian

    2008-09-01

    Identification of ancient biological samples from the 1991-discovered and more than 5300-year-old Tyrolean mummy, also called iceman or Oetzi, is very difficult. The species of origins of four animal-hair-bearing samples of the accoutrement of the mummy not yet diagnosed were identified by a special proteomics method. Ha 43/91/130 and Ha 6/91, two samples from his coat, and Ha 5/91, a sample from his leggings, were assigned to sheep. The upper leather of his moccasins, Ha 2/91, was made from cattle. Despite the enormous age of these samples with partial (bio)chemical alterations, reliable identification was possible using a recently developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric ((MALDI-TOF MS)-based analytical method. The method is exclusively based on the analysis of proteins and uses minute amounts of peptides directly derived from tryptic hair digests without any separation or enrichment steps. Unknown species are identified by comparison of their peptide ion patterns with known spectra stored in existing databases. Hereby, the correlation distance, a form of Euclidean distance, and deduced parameters are used to measure similarities. If more than one potential hit remains, specific diagnostic peptide ions are used to stepwise exclude incorrect matches. These ions are specific for orders, families, subfamilies/genera and/or even species. Peptide mass fingerprinting data combined with those from collision-induced dissociation spectra (combined MS & MS/MS) were used for interpretation with the MASCOT search engine and the NCBI database to find the potential parentage of hair proteins. For this technique, selected precursor ions were identified as specific diagnostic peptide ions.

  3. Isolation and marriage patterns in four South Tyrolean villages (Italy) during the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Riegler, A; Marroni, F; Pattaro, C; Gueresi, P; Pramstaller, P P

    2008-09-01

    No information is currently available on the marriage patterns of German-speaking communities of the South Tyrol area. The aim of this study is to investigate the reproductive isolation of four South Tyrolean mountain villages during the 19th century. Data about 3953 marriages were drawn from existing pedigrees and completed with data from the parish registers of the studied villages to calculate the following indicators: age at marriage, endogamy, inbreeding from dispensations and from isonymy and repeated pairs of surnames among couples. The results show high levels of endogamy (78-87%) and an elevated age at marriage in all the studied villages. The percentages of consanguineous marriages (10-33%) vary considerably but result overall in relatively low inbreeding values (alpha 0.0015-0.0036; Ft 0.0098-0.0138). Levels of endogamy are consistent with the geographic characteristics of the area, while inbreeding values are lower than those observed in previous studies on Alpine communities. This is due to a low frequency of marriages between close relatives, probably related to the peculiar demographic and cultural characteristics of the studied populations that differentiate them from neighbouring Italian-speaking villages.

  4. Large interarcuate spaces in the cervical vertebral column of the tyrolean mountain sheep.

    PubMed

    Turkof, E; Jurasch, N; Grassberger, M; Schwendenwein, S; Habib, D; Knolle, E; Losert, U

    2003-02-01

    Large interarcual spaces have been described between the arcus vertebrae C5/C6 and C6/C7 in the cervical vertebral column of Nubian goats. This aperture enables direct access to spinal cord and rootlets without the need to perform a hemilaminectomy. The present study was performed in order to determine whether these large interarcual spaces can also be found in the vertebral column of the Tyrolean mountain sheep, as this small ruminant, which is anatomically very similar to the Nubian goat, is frequently used for experimental purposes at the Surgical University Clinic in Austria. The carcasses of 10 sheep (six females, four males; range of age: 2.5-6 years, range of weight: 52-89 kg) were dissected and the vertebral column was exposed. All 10 sheep showed elliptic openings between the fourth cervical and the first thoracal vertebrae. Three sheep had additional openings between the first and the second thoracal vertebrae. All openings were covered solitarily by the ligamentum flavum and under this ligamentum lay the spinal cord without any further osseous or ligamentous protection. These findings are not mentioned in the common textbooks of veterinary anatomy and deserve attention, as they can be a step forward towards non-traumatic experimental surgery on the spinal cord.

  5. Analyses of NOx and wet depositions at Mühleggerkböpfl, North Tyrolean Limestone Alps.

    PubMed

    Smidt, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The intensive investigation site 'Mühleggerkopfl' in the North Tyrolean Limestone Alps can be classified as a clean-air area site. The mean concentrations of NOx are far below the effect-related limit value of the WHO (30 microg NOx m(-3)). The gravitational depositions in the open field (bulk deposition) ranged from 10.8 to 14.7 kg N ha(-1) a(-1) (throughfall: 11.3 to 12.3 kg N ha(-1) a(-1)) in the measuring years 1998 to 2000. Compared to these data, depositions in other forested areas of the Austrian Alps amounted to up to 30 kg N ha(-1) a(-1). The gravitational depositions (bulk deposition) alone--without considering dry and occult deposition slightly exceeded the lower limit of Critical Loads for coniferous and deciduous forests (>10 kg N ha(-1) a(-1)), but were below the Critical Loads for calcareous forests (15-20 kg N ha(-1) a(-1)).

  6. Persistent organic pollutant accumulation in seasonal snow along an altitudinal gradient in the Tyrolean Alps.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Lourdes; Grimalt, Joan O; Fernández, Pilar; Lopez, Jordi F; Nickus, Ulrike; Thies, Hansjoerg

    2014-11-01

    The snow capacity for storage of a large number of pollutants such as polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDE), including BDE-209, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs; α- and γ-isomers), endosulfans (α- and β-isomers and the sulphate residue) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB), in a steep altitudinal gradient (1,101-2,500 m above sea level (asl); maximum planar distance 16 km) in a typical European mountain system, the Tyrolean Alps (Austria), was studied here for the first time. Snow samples representing the whole snowpack accumulated at the end of the cold season were collected in all cases. The snow specific surface area (SSA) of these samples, 140-260 cm(2) g(-1), was characteristic of aged snow with low retention capacity. PAHs were the pollutant group in highest concentrations (500-8,400 pg L(-1)). PCBs and PBDEs were found in concentrations of 460-900 and 8.5-290 pg L(-1), respectively. From the fourteen investigated BDE congeners, only BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100 and BDE-209 were found above the detection limit, which is consistent with the results found in the only previous study in the Tatra Mountains (Slovakia) which also involved a steep gradient (1,683-2,634 m asl; maximum planar distance 5 km; Arellano et al. 2011) and confirm the capacity of these low-volatile compounds for long-range transport from distant sources. HCB was found in a concentration range of 34-55 pg L(-1). Snow deposition fluxes of PCB-118, PCB-153, γ-HCH, α-endosulfan and BDE-47 showed statistically significant correlations with altitude, involving higher values at higher elevation. This trend may reflect cold trapping effects in view of the snow particle contents and SSA values. However, these gradients were only significant for this limited number of compounds within each pollutant group which may be explained by differences in physical-chemical properties of the compounds and the limited capacity of the aged snow for organic

  7. A high-resolution modelling approach on spatial wildfire distribution in the Tyrolean Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malowerschnig, Bodo; Sass, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    Global warming will cause increasing danger of wildfires in Austria, which can have long-lasting consequences on woodland ecosystems. The protective effect of forest can be severely diminished, leading to natural hazards like avalanches and rockfall. However, data on wildfire frequency and distribution have been sparse and incomplete for Austria. Long-lasting postfire degradation under adverse preconditions (steep slopes, limestone) was a common phenomenon in parts of the Tyrolean Alps several decades ago and should become relevant again under a changing fire frequency. The FIRIA project compiles historical wildfire data, information on fuel loads, fire weather indices (FWI) and vegetation recovery patterns. The governing climatic, topographic and socio-economic factors of forest fire distribution were assessed to trigger a distribution model of currently fire-prone areas in Tyrol. By collecting data from different sources like old newspapers archives and fire-fighter databases, we were able to build up a fire database of wildfire occurrences containing more than 1400 forest fires since the 15th century in Tyrol. For the period from 1993 to 2011, the database is widely complete and covers 482 fires. Using a non-parametrical statistical method it was possible to select the best suited fire weather index (FWI) for the prediction. The testing of 19 FWI's shows that it is necessary to use two discriminative indices to differentiate between summer and winter season. Together with compiled topographic, socio-economic, infrastructure and forest maps, the dataset was the base for a multifactorial analysis, performed by comparing the maximum entropy approach (Maxent) with an ensemble classifier (Random Forests). Both approaches have their background in the spatial habitat distribution and are easy to adapt to the requirements of a wildfire ignition model. The aim of this modelling approach was to determine areas which are particularly prone to wildfire. Due to the

  8. The iceman under pressure (Part I): A description of skull deformations due to 5100 years of glacial action.

    PubMed

    Prossinger, H; Seidler, H; Weaver, D S; Schäfer, K; Fieder, M; Weber, G W

    1999-12-01

    Due to its long deposition in the glacier, the 'Iceman' (an ice-mummy from the Hauslabjoch) has been deformed, notably its skull. We introduce various comparative methods that describe these deformations, assuming they can be ascribed--to a large extent--to glacial action. While pressure is a scalar, the deformations must be described via a 2-tensor strain field (which can be represented by a matrix function value at every point throughout the skull). In this paper, we present the assumed deformations in numerous graphical forms and, furthermore, the limitations in interpretation--including an estimate of statistical variability--that can be revealed by this analysis. These methods, although describing the results of glacial action and implying a 2-tensor strain field (which will be presented in a subsequent paper), do not permit a straightforward reconstruction of the original, underformed skull. These methods have wider applications to the general problem of deformation.

  9. Snow cover characteristics in a glacierized catchment in the Tyrolean Alps - Improved spatially distributed modelling by usage of Lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöber, Johannes; Schneider, K.; Helfricht, K.; Schattan, P.; Achleitner, S.; Schöberl, F.; Kirnbauer, R.

    2014-11-01

    In the present paper multi-temporal Lidar (Light detection and ranging) data and Landsat images are used to assess the spatial variability of snow at the end of the accumulation season (April-May) in a glacierized catchment (167 km2) in Tyrol, Austria. Snow cover characteristics in the Tyrolean Alps have been analysed using regular snow measurements and snow course data. Results are used for the conversion of basin-wide Lidar snow depth into snow water equivalent (SWE). When considering different possible error sources, uncertainties of the mean basin-wide SWE obtained from Lidar are between 12% and 16%. Available distributions of SWE and snow covered area (SCA) in the catchment are used for the calibration and validation of the fully distributed hydrological model SES. The study focuses especially on the simulation of snow accumulation and the corresponding variability of snow. Observed accumulation patterns are related to the topography (elevation, slope and curvature), and according parameter settings of the hydrological model are derived by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The majority of the model runs simulates SCA for various datasets with an accuracy of 85-95%. The paper demonstrates that using SWE data is superior to SCA for constraining model parameter ranges. Results at the watershed scale are in agreement with respect to the total water volume of the snow cover with deviations lower than 5% between SWE from Lidar or from the hydrological model.

  10. Soil warming increased whole-tree water use of Pinus cembra at the treeline in the Central Tyrolean Alps.

    PubMed

    Wieser, Gerhard; Grams, Thorsten E E; Matyssek, Rainer; Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This study quantified the effect of soil warming on sap flow density (Qs) of Pinus cembra L. at the treeline in the Central Tyrolean Alps. To enhance soil temperature we installed a transparent roof construction above the forest floor around six trees. Six other trees served as controls in the absence of any manipulation. Roofing enhanced growing season mean soil temperature by 1.6, 1.3 and 1.0 °C at 5, 10 and 20 cm soil depth, respectively, while soil water availability was not affected. Sap flow density (using Granier-type thermal dissipation probes) and environmental parameters were monitored throughout three growing seasons. During the first year of treatment, no warming effect was detected on Qs. However, soil warming caused Qs to increase significantly by 11 and 19% above levels in control trees during the second and third year, respectively. This effect appeared to result from warming-induced root production, a reduction in viscosity and perhaps an increase also in root hydraulic conductivity. Hardly affected were leaf-level net CO2 uptake rate and conductance for water vapour, so that water-use efficiency stayed unchanged as confirmed by needle δ(13)C analysis. We conclude that tree water loss will increase with soil warming, which may alter the water balance within the treeline ecotone of the Central Austrian Alps in a future warming environment.

  11. Did the Iceman Know Better? Screening of the Medicinal Properties of the Birch Polypore Medicinal Mushroom, Piptoporus betulinus (Higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Vunduk, Jovana; Klaus, Anita; Kozarski, Maja; Petrovic, Predrag; Zizak, Zeljko; Niksic, Miomir; Van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2015-01-01

    The birch polypore Piptoporus betulinus was among two mushrooms that were found in the Iceman's bag. Recent studies indicated that P. betulinus was probably used as a religious and medicinal item. In order to examine the medicinal potential of P. betulinus, hot water (HW), partially purified (PP), and alkali extract (HA) were prepared and tested for antioxidant, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity. All tested samples exhibited moderate cytotoxic activity, and HW appeared as the most effective (IC50 = 0.8 ± 0.1 mg/ml for HeLa cells). HA proved to be a good 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenger and exhibited the strongest ferric-reducing power (EC50 = 0.07 ± 0.3 mg/ml). The same extract (HA) also expressed the strongest ferric-reducing power (EC50 = 0.99 ± 0.1 mg/ml). Hot alkali extraction contributed significantly to ACE inhibitory activity (EC50 = 0.06 ± 0.00 mg/ml) and to antimicrobial activity, especially against highly resistant Enterococcus faecalis (minimum inhibitory concentration: 0.156 ± 0.000 mg/ml; and minimum bactericidal concentration: 1.25 ± 0.00 mg/ml).

  12. Personal networks: a tool for gaining insight into the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean (Austrian) migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Investigations into knowledge about food and medicinal plants in a certain geographic area or within a specific group are an important element of ethnobotanical research. This knowledge is context specific and dynamic due to changing ecological, social and economic circumstances. Migration processes affect food habits and the knowledge and use of medicinal plants as a result of adaptations that have to be made to new surroundings and changing environments. This study analyses and compares the different dynamics in the transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyrolean migrants in Australia, Brazil and Peru. Methods A social network approach was used to collect data on personal networks of knowledge about food and medicinal plants among Tyroleans who have migrated to Australia, Brazil and Peru and their descendants. A statistical analysis of the personal network maps and a qualitative analysis of the narratives were combined to provide insight into the process of transmitting knowledge about food and medicinal plants. Results 56 personal networks were identified in all (food: 30; medicinal plants: 26) across all the field sites studied here. In both sets of networks, the main source of knowledge is individual people (food: 71%; medicinal plants: 68%). The other sources mentioned are print and audiovisual media, organisations and institutions. Personal networks of food knowledge are larger than personal networks of medicinal plant knowledge in all areas of investigation. Relatives play a major role as transmitters of knowledge in both domains. Conclusions Human sources, especially relatives, play an important role in knowledge transmission in both domains. Reference was made to other sources as well, such as books, television, the internet, schools and restaurants. By taking a personal network approach, this study reveals the mode of transmission of knowledge about food and medicinal plants within a migrational context. PMID:24398225

  13. Transformation of traditional knowledge of medicinal plants: the case of Tyroleans (Austria) who migrated to Australia, Brazil and Peru

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In ethnobotanical research, the investigation into traditional knowledge of medicinal plants in the context of migration has been of increasing interest in recent decades since it is influenced and changed by new environmental and social conditions. It most likely undergoes transformation processes to match the different living circumstances in the new location. This study compares the traditional knowledge of medicinal plants held by Tyroleans – and their descendants – who emigrated to Australia, Brazil and Peru at different time scales. The study’s findings allow a discussion of the complexities and dynamics that influence this knowledge within the context of long-distance migration. Methods Information was obtained from 65 informants by free-listing, semi-structured interviews and non-participatory observation in Tyrol (Austria) and the migrants’ countries: Australia, Brazil and Peru. The collected data was analysed using different quantitative approaches, including statistical tests, and compared between the countries of investigation. Results All respondents in all four investigation areas claimed that they had knowledge and made use of medicinal plants to treat basic ailments in their day-to-day lives. Informants made 1,139 citations of medicinal plants in total in free lists, which correspond to 164 botanical taxa (genus or species level) in Tyrol, 87 in Australia, 84 in Brazil and 134 in Peru. Of all the botanical taxa listed, only five (1.1%) were listed in all four countries under investigation. Agreement among informants within free lists was highest in Tyrol (17%), followed by Peru (12.2%), Australia (11.9%) and Brazil (11.2%). The proportion of agreement differs significantly between informants in Australia and Tyrol (p = 0.001), Brazil and Tyrol (p = 0.001) and Peru and Tyrol (p = 0.001) and is similar between informants in the migrant countries, as indicated by statistical tests. We recorded 1,286 use citations

  14. Differences in urbanization degree and consequences on the diversity of conventional vs. rapidly mutating Y-STRs in five municipalities from a small region of the Tyrolean Alps in Austria.

    PubMed

    Niederstätter, Harald; Berger, Burkhard; Kayser, Manfred; Parson, Walther

    2016-09-01

    In this study we set out to test at a micro-geographic scale for the potential effects of differences in urbanization degree on Y-chromosomal diversity and the paternal lineage differentiation of "conventional" and rapidly-mutating (RM) Y-STR markers. To avoid systematic underrepresentation of common lineages, 551 male samples were collected under a sampling regime allowing for the inclusion of paternal relatives. All participants came from a small, topographically highly structured, yet culturally homogeneous settlement area in the Tyrolean Alps of Austria, a region that is characterized by a longstanding coexistence of communities differing considerably in size and connection. The study participants reported provenance in one of the three rural villages Alpbach, Brandenberg, and Wildschönau - all being separated by topographical barriers from each other - or in one of the two more urban-like and better connected municipalities Kitzbühel and St. Johann in Tirol. When compared with the sample pools from the two larger communities, the three small villages showed distinctly higher rates of self-reported patrilocality since the paternal grandfather (85-95% vs. ∼42%), and featured evidence for a considerably higher proportion of close and cryptic paternal relationships among the study participants. We observed marked differences in the Y-SNP haplogroup frequency spectra and statistically significant Y-STR-based FST distances among the municipality samples, suggesting population sub-structuring along municipality borders. While for the two larger settlements a widely used "core" set of 17 conventional Y-STRs (Yfiler) provided reasonably high lineage resolution (Ĥ: 0.99515±0.00256, 0.99739±0.00224), a markedly reduced haplotype diversity was seen in samples from the rural villages (Ĥ: 0.96126±0.00701-0.98515±0.00278). This difference largely diminished when instead using a set of 13 RM Y-STRs (Ĥ: 0.99180±0.00380-0.99922±0.00187, for all groups). Most

  15. Differences in urbanization degree and consequences on the diversity of conventional vs. rapidly mutating Y-STRs in five municipalities from a small region of the Tyrolean Alps in Austria.

    PubMed

    Niederstätter, Harald; Berger, Burkhard; Kayser, Manfred; Parson, Walther

    2016-09-01

    In this study we set out to test at a micro-geographic scale for the potential effects of differences in urbanization degree on Y-chromosomal diversity and the paternal lineage differentiation of "conventional" and rapidly-mutating (RM) Y-STR markers. To avoid systematic underrepresentation of common lineages, 551 male samples were collected under a sampling regime allowing for the inclusion of paternal relatives. All participants came from a small, topographically highly structured, yet culturally homogeneous settlement area in the Tyrolean Alps of Austria, a region that is characterized by a longstanding coexistence of communities differing considerably in size and connection. The study participants reported provenance in one of the three rural villages Alpbach, Brandenberg, and Wildschönau - all being separated by topographical barriers from each other - or in one of the two more urban-like and better connected municipalities Kitzbühel and St. Johann in Tirol. When compared with the sample pools from the two larger communities, the three small villages showed distinctly higher rates of self-reported patrilocality since the paternal grandfather (85-95% vs. ∼42%), and featured evidence for a considerably higher proportion of close and cryptic paternal relationships among the study participants. We observed marked differences in the Y-SNP haplogroup frequency spectra and statistically significant Y-STR-based FST distances among the municipality samples, suggesting population sub-structuring along municipality borders. While for the two larger settlements a widely used "core" set of 17 conventional Y-STRs (Yfiler) provided reasonably high lineage resolution (Ĥ: 0.99515±0.00256, 0.99739±0.00224), a markedly reduced haplotype diversity was seen in samples from the rural villages (Ĥ: 0.96126±0.00701-0.98515±0.00278). This difference largely diminished when instead using a set of 13 RM Y-STRs (Ĥ: 0.99180±0.00380-0.99922±0.00187, for all groups). Most

  16. Iceman Survived due to Cooling Device.

    PubMed

    Roser, M; Martens, F; Storm, C

    2011-01-01

    Although mild hypothermia treatment is part of the standard postresuscitation care today, no standard method for treatment of accidental severe hypothermia has been yet established. Different strategies including invasive and noninvasive methods have been described in the literature. We present the case of a 75-year-old man with accidental severe hypothermia (23°C) and demonstrate that using a surface cooling device with automatic controlled temperature feedback mechanism (ArcticSun2000 Medivance, Louisville, Colorado, USA) is an effective and safe method for controlled rewarming in this life-threatening setting.

  17. The Alpine ?Iceman? and Holocene Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Carlo; Orombelli, Giuseppe

    1996-07-01

    The finding of a prehistoric mummified corpse at the upper edge of the accumulation area of an alpine glacier, together with its unique set of artifacts, provided new information on glacier dimensions during the little-known phases of major glacier shrinkage that characterized the warmest parts of the Holocene. The sudden burial of the corpse in a permanent snow cover occurred 5300-5050 cal yr B.P., indicating a significant climatic change that induced glacier expansion at the beginning of Neoglaciation. New geomorphologic data and two AMS 14C ages from buried soils suggest that the present glacier size, following over 100 yr of shrinkage, is comparable to that immediately preceding Neoglaciation. Therefore, we can deduce that the current global climatic warming may have interrupted the environmental conditions prevailing in the Alps during Neoglacial time, restoring characteristics similar to those prevailing during the climatic optimumthat were never achieved during the second half of the Holocene.

  18. Really old-palaeoimmunology: immunohistochemical analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in historic and pre-historic material.

    PubMed

    Wick, G; Kalischnig, G; Maurer, H; Mayerl, C; Müller, P U

    2001-09-01

    In this review, we summarize data concerning the respective preservation and deterioration of antigenic determinants of various collagenous and non-collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in palaeontologic material of different ages. ECM proteins are the major quantitative constituents of mammalian organisms and were, therefore, selected as important representative proteins for these analyses. The specimens, studied by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical techniques, included the skin of 500-1500 year-old human mummies from Peru, skin and striated muscle from the 5300-year-old glacier mummy ("Iceman") from Tyrol, Austria, and a 50-million-year-old bat with preserved soft body parts from the fossil excavation site of Messel, Germany. In frozen sections of the former two sources, epitopes recognized by specific antibodies for triple-helical antigenic determinants of different types of collagen resistant against conventional proteases were preserved, while non-helical domains, as well as the non-collagenous ECM proteins, could no longer be demonstrated. The fossil bat, although showing evidence of fibrous, collagen-like structures in conventional histology, revealed no collagenous or non-collagenous ECM proteins by any technique. It later turned out that this was due to the replacement of the original soft parts in these fossils by lawns of bacteria. These studies introduced immunological techniques into palaeontology and opened new approaches for studying physiologically- and pathologically-altered structures in tissues of animals and humans of considerable historical age.

  19. [The man in the ice under special consideration of paleo-pathological evidence].

    PubMed

    Spindler, K

    2001-01-01

    Dealing with archaeological findings, the physical condition of the 5000-year-old Man in the Ice will be discussed. Several research projects with autoscopical, radiological, computertomographical and laparoscopical methods present an overview of the state of health of the Tyrolean Iceman. The vascular network at the lower brain shows a slight hardening of the arteries. On the right side of the thorax the sixth and seventh ribs are fractured without callus formation. On the left side serial rib fractures can be seen which had healed well. The twelfth ribs are absent on both sides. The Iceman was suffering from arthrosis of the right hip of medium severity. Osteolysis of the little toe is indicative of frostbite. Some ecto- and endoparasites were found (Pulex irritans, Trichuris trichiura). The Iceman has a number of skin markings on various places. The location of these tattoos matches the X-ray findings of discrete to medium arthrotic changes in the corresponding joints. It seems reasonable to assume that the markings were applied for a therapeutic reason. The combination of thickening of the arteries, arthrosis of the joints, the healed fractures and frostbite lesions illustrates the hard life to be endured by the Man in the Ice and by Late Stone Age man in general.

  20. The Iceman murder: one of a series of contract murders.

    PubMed

    Zugibe, F T; Costello, J T

    1993-11-01

    A body with a gunshot wound to the head was discovered in a wooded area in mid September 1983 wrapped with about 20 consecutive layers of plastic garbage bags and rope. Examination of the body revealed a bullet hole in the occipital-parietal region and a peculiar decomposition of the body. Following a forensic reconstruction of our autopsy findings, microscopic studies and other ancillary factors, we concluded that the body had been frozen for about 2 and one-quarter years prior to its being dumped along a mountain road here in Rockland County. The means by which we concluded that the victim had been frozen for about 2 and one-quarter years and other important aspects of this case are fully discussed.

  1. The Secrets of the Iceman. Technology Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    1993-01-01

    This learning activity asks students to use critical thinking skills to imagine life in the late stone age, including the tools and technology that would have existed. Presents the context, the challenge, objectives, resources, material and equipment needs, and evaluation methods. (SK)

  2. Studies on the preservation of the intestinal microbiota's DNA in human mummies from cold environments.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Franco; Ermini, Luca; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; Olivieri, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of ancient microorganism DNA represents one of the newest and most promising branches of molecular archaeology. In particular, microbial DNA associated with human remains can provide direct evidence of the occurrence and frequency of infectious diseases in historic times. Human mummies represent very interesting subjects for palaeomicrobiological investigations as they retain soft tissues. Recently reports on the identification of ancient bacterial pathogens in human mummies by DNA analysis are steadily becoming more numerous. However, despite this favourable trend, the analysis of ancient microbial DNA is still a contentious issue. As a model system, we studied the preservation of the intestinal microbiota's DNA in two naturally freeze-dried human mummies found on the Alps. This kind of mummy is an ideal subject for ancient DNA investigations. The first is a male body historically dated 1918 A.D. while the second is the famous Tyrolean Iceman (3.350-3.100 BC).

  3. Exploration of anthropological specimens by GC-MS and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Varmuza, Kurt; Makristathis, Athanasios; Schwarzmeier, Josef; Seidler, Horst; Mader, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Anthropological specimens combine a variety of unfavorable characteristics, rendering their evaluation an analytical challenge. Their remarkable status is primarily based on two characteristics: (i) these very rare samples of human origin are testimonies of human history and are, therefore, available only in minute amounts for analytical purposes, and (ii) the analysis of these samples is extremely limited by the decomposition of molecules, which are easily detected in living organisms, such as nucleic acids and proteins, but are subject to rapid post-mortem decay. In this article, we review the methods and results of archaeometry, emphasizing the role of MS combined with chemometrics. Focusing on experimental results for fatty acid profiles, specimens from mummies from different civilizations were compared. Considering in particular the Tyrolean Iceman, the application of chemometric methods to GC-MS data recovers essential information about the preservation and the storage conditions of mummies.

  4. Genomic diversity and admixture differs for Stone-Age Scandinavian foragers and farmers.

    PubMed

    Skoglund, Pontus; Malmström, Helena; Omrak, Ayça; Raghavan, Maanasa; Valdiosera, Cristina; Günther, Torsten; Hall, Per; Tambets, Kristiina; Parik, Jüri; Sjögren, Karl-Göran; Apel, Jan; Willerslev, Eske; Storå, Jan; Götherström, Anders; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2014-05-16

    Prehistoric population structure associated with the transition to an agricultural lifestyle in Europe remains a contentious idea. Population-genomic data from 11 Scandinavian Stone Age human remains suggest that hunter-gatherers had lower genetic diversity than that of farmers. Despite their close geographical proximity, the genetic differentiation between the two Stone Age groups was greater than that observed among extant European populations. Additionally, the Scandinavian Neolithic farmers exhibited a greater degree of hunter-gatherer-related admixture than that of the Tyrolean Iceman, who also originated from a farming context. In contrast, Scandinavian hunter-gatherers displayed no significant evidence of introgression from farmers. Our findings suggest that Stone Age foraging groups were historically in low numbers, likely owing to oscillating living conditions or restricted carrying capacity, and that they were partially incorporated into expanding farming groups.

  5. Convinced, ambivalent or annoyed: Tyrolean ski tourism stakeholders and their perceptions of climate change☆

    PubMed Central

    Trawöger, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Its focus on snow-dependent activities makes Alpine winter tourism especially sensitive to climate change. Stakeholder risk perceptions are a key factor in adaptation to climate change because they fundamentally drive or constrain stakeholder action. This paper examines climate change perceptions of winter tourism stakeholders in Tyrol (Austria). Using a qualitative approach, expert interviews were conducted. Four opinion categories reflecting different attitudes toward climate change issues were identified: convinced planners, annoyed deniers, ambivalent optimists, convinced wait-and-seers. Although the findings generally indicate a growing awareness of climate change, this awareness is mainly limited to perceiving the issue as a global phenomenon. Awareness of regional and branch-specific consequences of climate change that lead to a demand for action could not be identified. Current technical strategies, like snowmaking, are not primarily climate-induced. At present, coping with climate change is not a priority for risk management. The findings point out the importance of gaining and transferring knowledge of regional and branch-specific consequences of climate change in order to induce action at the destination level. PMID:27064520

  6. Short- and long-term impacts of wildfires on geomorphic processes in the Tyrolean Limestone Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sass, O.; Schimmer, C.; Haas, F.

    2009-04-01

    Slopes affected by forest fires are widespread in the northern parts of the Eastern Alps. On the prevailing limestone bedrock only thin soils have been developed which may be damaged or destroyed by fire; consequently, some of the observed historical fires resulted in severe degradation. We currently investigate a variety of affected slopes using an interdisciplinary approach (historical investigation, vegetation mapping, soil investigation, geomorphic measurements and modeling). Erosional processes have been measured directly by means of erosion pins, sediment traps and mapping/weighting of avalanche debris. The results clearly show that mass wasting processes have increased by 1-3 orders of magnitude even several decades after the fires. Smaller fire slopes are characterized mainly by small-scale relocation processes while on larger slopes, significant avalanche erosion and linear fluvial erosion taking place. Furthermore, higher magnitudes in surface runoff enhance the probability of debris flows. In addition to the mentioned measurements, fluvial erosion was modelled by a rulebased empirical model which has been developed for steep slopes in alpine catchments. The model was calibrated by measuring bedload output of channels on steep slopes using sediment traps. The analysis of the measured data showed, that the mean annual bedload discharge highly depends on the extent of the sediment contributing area, the steepness of slopes and the degree of vegetation cover. This model was used to derive the bedload output of the channels on the aforementioned slopes affected by the wildfires. The modelling result was validated with the measured bedload discharge data. This validation showed good agreement between modelled and measured bedload discharge. Due to the fact that the model uses the vegetation cover (covered or not covered) for deriving the sediment contributing area, changes (scenarios) in the bedload discharge after e.g. natural reforestation on the slopes can be estimated. The model runs show that sediment discharge markedly decreases with increasing vegetation coverage and vice versa. This result confirms the influence of wildfires on fluvial geomorphic activity. Howwever, the geomorphic significance of the fires can only be fully understood in the context of the long-term fire history. Historical investigations suggest that the fire frequency has significantly increased due to anthropogenic activity. However, natural lightning fires also occurred, and they probably had a very large extent in the past when no fire fighting was taking place. Thus, fire-induced soil erosion is possibly a part of the natural process equilibrium. On the long term, forest fires probably prevent the development of a climax woodland vegetation and support the typical krummholz (shrub) formations of the sub-alpine belt.

  7. ICEMAN - Microwave detection of ultra-high energy neutrinos in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, John P.; McKay, Douglas W.

    1990-01-01

    A muon from an ultra-high energy neutrino interaction produces an electromagnetic shower of considerable length. Coherent Cerenkov emission at microwave frequencies from the electric-charge imbalance developing in such a shower serves as an efficient signal of the event. The detection of upward-going UHE neutrinos is discussed in the Antarctic ice by detecting this microwave signal with comparatively cheap and simple antennas located on the ice surface. A pilot experiment to measure UHE neutrinos from point sources such as Cygnus X-3 is feasible.

  8. The Evaluation of Educational Goals, Instructional Procedures and Outcomes or The Iceman Cometh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Michael

    A model checklist conceptualizing the evaluation process is presented and discussed. It is quite general and is intended to apply to the evaluation of educational products, procedures and most outcomes. The Pathway Comparison Model consists of the following: (1) characterization--how generally or specifically to describe the "treatment"; (2)…

  9. Virtual reality and anthropology.

    PubMed

    Recheis, W; Weber, G W; Schäfer, K; Knapp, R; Seidler, H; zur Nedden, D

    1999-08-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991 advanced imaging and post processing techniques were successfully applied in anthropology. Specific techniques include spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions including stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be reproduced using stereolithography, before this method was successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions were established as a routine tool for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques opened totally new insights in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without damaging or even touching them. Many of the most precious specimens from the species Autralopithecus (1.8-3.5 Myears), Homo heidelbergensis (200-600 kyears) or Homo neanderthalensis (40-100 kyears) were scanned during the last 5 years. Often the fossils are filled with a stone matrix or other materials. During the postprocessing routines highly advanced algorithms were used to remove virtually these incrustations. Thus it was possible to visualize the morphological structures that lie beneath the matrix. Some specimen were partially destroyed, so the missing parts were reconstructed on computer screen in order to get estimations of the brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover the computerized form of the data allows new descriptions of morphologic structures by the means of 'geometric morphometrics'. Some of the results may change aspects and interpretations in human evolution. The introduction of new imaging and post processing techniques created a new field of research: Virtual Anthropology.

  10. New methods and techniques in anthropology.

    PubMed

    Recheis, W; Weber, G W; Schäfer, K; Prossinger, H; Knapp, R; Seidler, H; zur Nedden, D

    1999-12-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991, advanced imaging and post-processing techniques have been successfully applied to anthropological research. Among the specific techniques are spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions, which include stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be produced using stereolithography; subsequently, it has been successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end performance graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions have become established as routine tools for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques enabled dramatically new insights to be gained in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without even touching--let alone damaging--them. Among the most precious are specimens from the genus Australopithecus (1.8 Myr-3.5 Myr), as well as representatives of Homo heidelbergensis (200 kyr-600 kyr) and Homo neanderthalensis (40 kyr-100 kyr); such fossils have been CT-scanned during the last five years. The fossils often are filled with a stone matrix or other encrustations. During the post-processing routines, highly advanced algorithms were used to remove these encrustations virtually (the concrete fossils remain untouched). Thus it has been possible to visualize the morphological structures that are hidden by the matrix layer. Some specimens have been partially destroyed, but it has been possible for the missing parts were reconstructed on the computer screen in order to get estimations of brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover, the data in computerized form allows new descriptions of morphological structures using geometric morphometrics. Some of the results may change aspects and

  11. Ancient Admixture in Human History

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Nick; Moorjani, Priya; Luo, Yontao; Mallick, Swapan; Rohland, Nadin; Zhan, Yiping; Genschoreck, Teri; Webster, Teresa; Reich, David

    2012-01-01

    Population mixture is an important process in biology. We present a suite of methods for learning about population mixtures, implemented in a software package called ADMIXTOOLS, that support formal tests for whether mixture occurred and make it possible to infer proportions and dates of mixture. We also describe the development of a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array consisting of 629,433 sites with clearly documented ascertainment that was specifically designed for population genetic analyses and that we genotyped in 934 individuals from 53 diverse populations. To illustrate the methods, we give a number of examples that provide new insights about the history of human admixture. The most striking finding is a clear signal of admixture into northern Europe, with one ancestral population related to present-day Basques and Sardinians and the other related to present-day populations of northeast Asia and the Americas. This likely reflects a history of admixture between Neolithic migrants and the indigenous Mesolithic population of Europe, consistent with recent analyses of ancient bones from Sweden and the sequencing of the genome of the TyroleanIceman.” PMID:22960212

  12. Ötzi's last meals: DNA analysis of the intestinal content of the Neolithic glacier mummy from the Alps

    PubMed Central

    Rollo, Franco; Ubaldi, Massimo; Ermini, Luca; Marota, Isolina

    2002-01-01

    Samples of the intestinal content were collected from the ileum and colon of the Neolithic glacier mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman, or Ötzi. DNA was extracted from the samples and PCR amplified, using a variety of primer pairs designed to bind to different genes (mammal mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene, plant/fungal nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene, plant chloroplast ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit gene). This made it possible to distinguish between animal and plant food residues (macroremains) and pollen (microremains). According to the DNA reconstruction, the man's last meal was composed of red deer (Cervus elaphus) meat, and, possibly, cereals; this meal had been preceded by another one based on ibex (Capra ibex), different species of dicots, and cereals. The DNA spectrum corresponding to pollen residues in the colon, on the other hand, fits with the hypothesis that the last journey of the Neolithic hunter/warrior was made through a subalpine coniferous forest to the site at over 3,200 m above sea level, where his mummified body was to be discovered 5,000 years later. PMID:12244211

  13. Phylogenetic Position of a Copper Age Sheep (Ovis aries) Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Cristina; Ermini, Luca; Rizzi, Ermanno; Corti, Giorgio; Luciani, Stefania; Marota, Isolina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Rollo, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Background Sheep (Ovis aries) were domesticated in the Fertile Crescent region about 9,000-8,000 years ago. Currently, few mitochondrial (mt) DNA studies are available on archaeological sheep. In particular, no data on archaeological European sheep are available. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the first portion of mtDNA sequence of a Copper Age European sheep. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the clothes of the so-called Tyrolean Iceman or Ötzi (5,350 - 5,100 years before present). Mitochondrial DNA (a total of 2,429 base pairs, encompassing a portion of the control region, tRNAPhe, a portion of the 12S rRNA gene, and the whole cytochrome B gene) was sequenced using a mixed sequencing procedure based on PCR amplification and 454 sequencing of pooled amplification products. We have compared the sequence with the corresponding sequence of 334 extant lineages. Conclusions/Significance A phylogenetic network based on a new cladistic notation for the mitochondrial diversity of domestic sheep shows that the Ötzi's sheep falls within haplogroup B, thus demonstrating that sheep belonging to this haplogroup were already present in the Alps more than 5,000 years ago. On the other hand, the lineage of the Ötzi's sheep is defined by two transitions (16147, and 16440) which, assembled together, define a motif that has not yet been identified in modern sheep populations. PMID:22457789

  14. Otzi's last meals: DNA analysis of the intestinal content of the Neolithic glacier mummy from the Alps.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Franco; Ubaldi, Massimo; Ermini, Luca; Marota, Isolina

    2002-10-01

    Samples of the intestinal content were collected from the ileum and colon of the Neolithic glacier mummy popularly known as the Tyrolean Iceman, or Otzi. DNA was extracted from the samples and PCR amplified, using a variety of primer pairs designed to bind to different genes (mammal mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene, plant/fungal nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene, plant chloroplast ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit gene). This made it possible to distinguish between animal and plant food residues (macroremains) and pollen (microremains). According to the DNA reconstruction, the man's last meal was composed of red deer (Cervus elaphus) meat, and, possibly, cereals; this meal had been preceded by another one based on ibex (Capra ibex), different species of dicots, and cereals. The DNA spectrum corresponding to pollen residues in the colon, on the other hand, fits with the hypothesis that the last journey of the Neolithic hunter/warrior was made through a subalpine coniferous forest to the site at over 3,200 m above sea level, where his mummified body was to be discovered 5,000 years later.

  15. From Galapagos to the labs: Darwinian medicine and epilepsy today.

    PubMed

    Scorza, Fulvio A; Cysneiros, Roberta M; Terra, Vera C; Arida, Ricardo M; Scorza, Carla A; Cavalheiro, Esper A

    2009-11-01

    In 1991, a mummy frozen in ice was found by climbers in the Tyrolean Alps. Otzi the Iceman has since been studied in the light of evolutionary explanations for diseases. This year, which marks Charles Darwin's 200th birthday and the 150th anniversary of his publication On the Origin of Species, should re-ignite discussion of the importance of the correlation between nutritional diet and diseases. Epilepsy is one of the commonest diseases in the world. Individuals with epilepsy are at higher risk of death than the general population, and sudden unexpected death (SUDEP) is the most important direct epilepsy-related cause of death. A number of factors may influence the risk for SUDEP. Along these lines, several studies have demonstrated that polyunsaturated (omega-3) fatty acids may reduce the risk of cardiovascular mortality, and diminish neuronal excitability. Also, omega-3 fatty acids may decrease seizure frequency, contributing to the reduction of SUDEP risk. Reconstruction of the nutritional patterns of Stone Age humans and optimal human nutrition in the present may be relevant to the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as epilepsy and the catastrophic evolution into epilepsy refractoriness and SUDEP.

  16. Ancient admixture in human history.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Nick; Moorjani, Priya; Luo, Yontao; Mallick, Swapan; Rohland, Nadin; Zhan, Yiping; Genschoreck, Teri; Webster, Teresa; Reich, David

    2012-11-01

    Population mixture is an important process in biology. We present a suite of methods for learning about population mixtures, implemented in a software package called ADMIXTOOLS, that support formal tests for whether mixture occurred and make it possible to infer proportions and dates of mixture. We also describe the development of a new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array consisting of 629,433 sites with clearly documented ascertainment that was specifically designed for population genetic analyses and that we genotyped in 934 individuals from 53 diverse populations. To illustrate the methods, we give a number of examples that provide new insights about the history of human admixture. The most striking finding is a clear signal of admixture into northern Europe, with one ancestral population related to present-day Basques and Sardinians and the other related to present-day populations of northeast Asia and the Americas. This likely reflects a history of admixture between Neolithic migrants and the indigenous Mesolithic population of Europe, consistent with recent analyses of ancient bones from Sweden and the sequencing of the genome of the Tyrolean "Iceman."

  17. Molecular paleontology.

    PubMed

    Marota, I; Rollo, F

    2002-01-01

    Molecular paleontology, i.e., the recovery of DNA from ancient human, animal, and plant remains is an innovative research field that has received progressively more attention from the scientific community since the 1980s. In the last decade, the field was punctuated by claims which aroused great interest but eventually turned out to be fakes--the most famous being the sequence of dinosaur DNA later shown to be of human origin. At present, the discipline is characterized by some certainties and many doubts. We know, for example, that we have reasonable chances to recover authentic DNA from a mammoth carcass, while our chances are negligible (or nonexistent) in the case of a dynastic mummy from Egypt. On the other hand, though we are developing convincing models of DNA decay in bone, we are not yet able to predict whether a certain paleontological or archeological site will yield material amenable to DNA analysis. This article reviews some of the most important and promising investigations using molecular paleontology approaches, such as studies on the conservation of DNA in human bone, the quest for ancient DNA in permafrost-frozen fauna, the Tyrolean iceman, and the Neandertals.

  18. [An unrivalled physician? Family strategies for child care in the late 19th century South Tyrolean countryside].

    PubMed

    Unterkircher, Alois

    2012-01-01

    Who was responsible for the treatment of sick children in the countryside during the second half of the 19th century? This paper investigates the medical complaint accusing the rural population of only reluctantly bringing their sick offspring to academic physicians. The following analyses the role Franz v. Ottenthal (1818-1899), a 'representative' of a private rural medical practice, played in the specialised medical market attending to childhood diseases. An exemplary survey of Ottenthal's medical records for patients from the age of one to 14 years throughout the 1890s has shown that children contributed a relevant percentage of the whole of the physician's patient distribution. It may therefore be assumed that Ottenthal knew how to successfully merchandise his specific therapies. On the demand side, however, parents of sick children were not solely reliant upon this physician. Evidence from the medical records provides information as to when parents regarded medical self-help as no longer supporting the recovery of their children, the cures of lay healers failed, or cases when parents were not satisfied with the therapeutic treatments other physicians had to offer and therefore consulted Ottenthal. PMID:23320379

  19. Patterns of Population Differentiation and Natural Selection on the Celiac Disease Background Risk Network

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Aaron; Hawks, John

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common small intestinal inflammatory condition induced by wheat gluten and related proteins from rye and barley. Left untreated, the clinical presentation of CD can include failure to thrive, malnutrition, and distension in juveniles. The disease can additionally lead to vitamin deficiencies, anemia, and osteoporosis. Therefore, CD potentially negatively affected fitness in past populations utilizing wheat, barley, and rye. Previous analyses of CD risk variants have uncovered evidence for positive selection on some of these loci. These studies also suggest the possibility that risk for common autoimmune conditions such as CD may be the result of positive selection on immune related loci in the genome to fight infection. Under this evolutionary scenario, disease phenotypes may be a trade-off from positive selection on immunity. If this hypothesis is generally true, we can expect to find a signal of natural selection when we survey across the network of loci known to influence CD risk. This study examines the non-HLA autosomal network of gene loci associated with CD risk in Europe. We reject the null hypothesis of neutrality on this network of CD risk loci. Additionally, we can localize evidence of selection in time and space by adding information from the genome of the Tyrolean Iceman. While we can show significant differentiation between continental regions across the CD network, the pattern of evidence is not consistent with primarily recent (Holocene) selection across this network in Europe. Further localization of ancient selection on this network may illuminate the ecological pressures acting on the immune system during this critically interesting phase of our evolution. PMID:23936230

  20. Patterns of population differentiation and natural selection on the celiac disease background risk network.

    PubMed

    Sams, Aaron; Hawks, John

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common small intestinal inflammatory condition induced by wheat gluten and related proteins from rye and barley. Left untreated, the clinical presentation of CD can include failure to thrive, malnutrition, and distension in juveniles. The disease can additionally lead to vitamin deficiencies, anemia, and osteoporosis. Therefore, CD potentially negatively affected fitness in past populations utilizing wheat, barley, and rye. Previous analyses of CD risk variants have uncovered evidence for positive selection on some of these loci. These studies also suggest the possibility that risk for common autoimmune conditions such as CD may be the result of positive selection on immune related loci in the genome to fight infection. Under this evolutionary scenario, disease phenotypes may be a trade-off from positive selection on immunity. If this hypothesis is generally true, we can expect to find a signal of natural selection when we survey across the network of loci known to influence CD risk. This study examines the non-HLA autosomal network of gene loci associated with CD risk in Europe. We reject the null hypothesis of neutrality on this network of CD risk loci. Additionally, we can localize evidence of selection in time and space by adding information from the genome of the Tyrolean Iceman. While we can show significant differentiation between continental regions across the CD network, the pattern of evidence is not consistent with primarily recent (Holocene) selection across this network in Europe. Further localization of ancient selection on this network may illuminate the ecological pressures acting on the immune system during this critically interesting phase of our evolution.

  1. Multi-temporal analysis of aerial images for the investigation of spatial-temporal dynamics of shallow erosion - a case study from the Tyrolean Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, C.; Geitner, C.; Heinrich, K.; Rutzinger, M.

    2012-04-01

    Small and shallow eroded areas characterize the landscape of many pastures and meadows in the Alps. The extent of such erosion phenomena varies between 2 m2 and 200 m2. These patches tend to be only a few decimetres thick, with a maximum depth of 2 m. The processes involved are shallow landslides, superficial erosion by snow and livestock trampling. Key parameters that influence the emergence of shallow erosion are the geological, topographical and climatic circumstances in an area as well as its soils, vegetation and land use. The negative impact of this phenomenon includes not only the loss of soil but also the reduced attractiveness of the landscape, especially in tourist regions. One approach identifying and mapping geomorphological elements is remote sensing. The analysis of aerial images is a suitable method for identifying the multi-temporal dynamics of shallow eroded areas because of the good spatial and temporal resolution. For this purpose, we used a pixel-based approach to detect these areas semi-automatically in an orthophoto. In a first step, each aerial image was classified using dynamic thresholds derived from the histogram of the orthophoto. In a second step, the identified areas of erosion were filtered and visually in-terpreted. Based on this procedure, eroded areas with a minimum size of 5 m2 were detected in a test site located in the Inner Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). The altitude of the test site ranges between 1,980 m and 2,370 m, with a mean inclination of 36°, facing E to SE. Geologically, the slope is part of the "Hohe Tauern Window", characterized by "Bündner schists" deficient in lime and regolith. Until the 1960s, the slope was used as a hay meadow. Orthophotos from 2000, 2003, 2007 and 2010 were used for this investigation. Older aerial images were not suitable because of their lower resolution and poor ortho-rectification. However, they are useful for relating the results of the ten-year time-span to a larger temporal context. No significant increase of erosion could be observed for the investigated ten-year period. The majority of the eroded areas show no distinct trend but rather an irregular pattern of increase and decrease. The results fit well in a larger temporal context: in aerial images of the 1950s, the slope already shows several eroded patches, which did not change until the year 2000. The owners also confirm that erosion was even a problem before abandonment. In this case, the inclination of the terrain seems to exceed the influence of land-use activities. With the semi-automated detection of such eroded areas, a more objective and time-saving method was found. The results contribute to an improved understanding of the process and can initiate a long-term observation. In subsequent studies we will apply the approach to further test sites and adapt it for the detection of smaller eroded areas.

  2. [From South Tyrol to Württemberg: the "resettlement" of South Tyrolean psychiatric patients within the Germano-Italian Option Agreement of 1939].

    PubMed

    Fiebrandt, Maria; Rüdenburg, Bodo; Müller, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Object of this article is the procedure of the transport of South Tyrol patients to the South Wuerttemberg asylums Zwiefalten und Schussenried as well as to some extent to the former asylum of Weissenau near Ravensburg in 1940 and 1942. Attention is focused on the pioneering state pre-negotiations, the so-called option treaties between the German Reich and Fascist Italy as part of the general aspect of National Socialist bio-Politics.The treatment of these South Tyrol patients in the asylums themselves, as well as their fate will be put into the context of the resettlement actions at the margins of the "Third Reich", which started in 1939 and widely affected the European continent. By presenting the abuse of medical patients in the aim to solve the political problems having occurred after bio-political goals had been set into practice, this study offers new material to the history of National Socialist psychiatry, as well as to National Socialist Foreign Policy in the case of Italy.

  3. Genomes on ice.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, Julian

    2016-03-01

    This month's Genome Watch discusses the analysis of a Helicobacter pylori genome from the preserved Copper-Age mummy known as the Iceman and how ancient genomes shed light on the history of bacterial pathogens. PMID:26853114

  4. Genomes on ice.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, Julian

    2016-03-01

    This month's Genome Watch discusses the analysis of a Helicobacter pylori genome from the preserved Copper-Age mummy known as the Iceman and how ancient genomes shed light on the history of bacterial pathogens.

  5. Meditation, the freud family and poets.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Lawrence M

    2008-09-01

    The savoring of yellow Tyrolean laburnum blossoms became a summer vacation rite of the Freud family. It was reminiscent of their paterfamilias's infantile "Dandelion in the Green Meadow" dream-scape. We may ponder whether Freud's adolescent olfactory memories were similarly "re-rooted" in Freiberg as a 17 year-old where many hours were "passed by him in solitary walks through the lovely woods" he had found once more.

  6. Resolution of regional seismic models: Squeezing the Iceland anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Richard M.; Tromp, Jeroen

    2005-05-01

    We present a resolution study of the velocity structure beneath Iceland as constrained by teleseismic traveltime tomography using data from the HOTSPOT seismic network. This temporary PASSCAL network and the tomographic technique that was used to generate the ICEMAN velocity models are typical of regional seismic studies. Therefore, this study also provides a basis for understanding the resolution of other regional seismic experiments. A suite of tests is used to constrain the range of velocity models that satisfy the traveltime observations on Iceland. These include ray-theoretical squeezing experiments, which attempt to force velocity anomalies into specific geometries while still satisfying the data set, and finite-frequency experiments, which use the spectral-element method (SEM) to simulate full waveform propagation through various 3-D velocity models. The use of the SEM allows the verification of the ray-theoretical ICEMAN models without the assumption of ray theory. The tests show that the ICEMAN models represent an end-member of the range of velocity models that satisfy the data set. The 200-km-width Gaussian-shaped upwelling beneath Iceland, imaged in the ICEMAN models, is at the broadest end of the allowed model range; the peak -2 per cent compressional and -4 per cent shear wave perturbations are lower bounds on the amplitude of the velocity model. Such broadening and lowering of velocity anomalies is the product of data coverage, the ray-theory approximation and regularization of the inversion. Comparison of the traveltime delays produced by a 100-km-diameter conduit as measured at short (1 s) and long (~20 s) periods demonstrate that such a conduit cannot satisfy the observed traveltime delays. Thus the width of the upwelling conduit beneath Iceland must lie in the range of 100 to 200 km. Separate tests on the minimum depth extent of the anomaly show that significant low velocities are required to 350 km depth. Should the true conduit be at the

  7. Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy and the Ice Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Walter

    2003-10-01

    The main use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is for 14C dating, which is arguably the most important application of any radionuclide. AMS has revolutionized the field by measuring 14C through isotope ratios rather than the classical method of beta counting. This increased the sensitivity of 14C detection almost one million times, allowing one to reduce sample sizes from several grams required for beta counting to milligram amounts and below for AMS. In addition, measuring times are reduced from several days to about one hour or less. This then allows one to perform 14C measurements which were impossible with the beta counting technique. A good example is the famous Iceman Oetzi, a well-preserved 5200-year old body which emerged from a thawing icefield in the central European Alps in 1991. In this talk, a summary of the current understanding of this unique archaeological find will be presented, with particular emphasis on 14C measurements.

  8. Early adipocere formation: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mohan Kumar, T S; Monteiro, Francis N P; Bhagavath, Prashantha; Bakkannavar, Shankar M

    2009-11-01

    Adipocere has a long history of frightening and fascinating mankind, from so called "incorruptible saints" to the famous "iceman" and its formation on human remains has long been known and feared. Adipocere formation replaces the putrefactive changes, when the body lies buried in shallow, moist, clay, soiled grave or it is thrown into cess pools or submerged in water. As the progression of putrefaction is arrested, the facial features and wounds are preserved without much alteration, thereby aiding the identification and to certain extent, the cause of death. The time required for the formation of adipocere is a subject of controversy. Here we present a case of early adipocere formation within 3 days and the review of literature pertaining to it.

  9. UV-induced effects on growth, photosynthetic performance and sunscreen contents in different populations of the green alga Klebsormidium fluitans (Streptophyta) from alpine soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Kitzing, C; Pröschold, T; Karsten, U

    2014-02-01

    Members of the green algal genus Klebsormidium (Klebsormidiales, Streptophyta) are typical components of biological soil crust communities worldwide, which exert important ecological functions. Klebsormidium fluitans (F. Gay) Lokhorst was isolated from an aeroterrestrial biofilm as well as from four different biological soil crusts along an elevational gradient between 600 and 2350 m in the Tyrolean and South Tyrolean Alps (Austria, Italy), which are characterised by seasonally high solar radiation. Since the UVtolerance of Klebsormidium has not been studied in detail, an ecophysiological and biochemical study was applied. The effects of controlled artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR; <9 W m(-2) UV-A, <0.5 W m(-2) UV-B) on growth, photosynthetic performance and the capability to synthesise mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as potential sunscreen compounds were comparatively investigated to evaluate physiological plasticity and possible ecotypic differentiation within this Klebsormidium species. Already under control conditions, the isolates showed significantly different growth rates ranging from 0.42 to 0.74 μm day(-1). The UVR effects on growth were isolate specific, with only two strains affected by the UV treatments. Although all photosynthetic and respiratory data indicated strain-specific differences under control conditions, UV-A and UV-B treatment led only to rather minor effects. All physiological results clearly point to a high UV tolerance in the K. fluitans strains studied, which can be explained by their biochemical capability to synthesize and accumulate a putative MAA after exposure to UV-A and UV-B. Using HPLC, a UV-absorbing compound with an absorption maximum at 324 nm could be identified in all strains. The steady-state concentrations of this Klebsormidium MAA under control conditions ranged from 0.09 to 0.93 mg g(-1) dry weight (DW). While UV-A led to a slight stimulation of MAA accumulation, exposure to UV-B was accompanied by a strong but

  10. CT-Based Assessment of Relative Soft-Tissue Alteration in Different Types of Ancient Mummies.

    PubMed

    Sydler, Christina; Öhrström, Lena; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Woitek, Ulrich; Rühli, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Mummification leads to alteration of soft-tissue morphology. No research has focused specifically on differences in soft-tissue shrinkage depending on mummification type. This study evaluated whether soft-tissue alteration is dependent on type of mummification. A total of 17 human mummies have been investigated by computed tomography (CT). Samples included artificially embalmed ancient Egyptian mummies, naturally mummified South American corpses, ice mummies (including the Iceman, South Tyrol Museum of Archeology, Bolzano, Italy, ca. 3,300 BC), bog bodies and a desiccated mummy of possibly Asian provenance. The acquired data were compared to four contemporary bodies. The extent of soft-tissue shrinkage was evaluated using CT data. Shrinkage was defined as soft-tissue relative to area of bone (in number of voxels). Measurements were taken at 13 anatomically defined locations. Ice mummies show the highest degree of preservation. This finding is most likely explained due to frozen water within tissues. All other types of mummies show significantly (at P < 0.05) smaller relative area of preserved soft-tissue. Variation between different anatomical structures (e.g., upper lip vs. mid-femur) is significant, unlike variation within one compartment (e.g., proximal vs. distal humerus). Mummification type strongly affects the degree of soft-tissue alteration, surprisingly mostly independent of overall historical age. These results highlight the unique morphological impact of taphonomy on soft-tissue preservation and are of particular interest in tissue research as well as in forensics. PMID:25998649

  11. "Brienzi" - The blue Vivianite man of Switzerland: Time since death estimation of an adipocere body.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Lux, Bettina; Lösch, Sandra; Rösing, Friedrich W; Hürlimann, Joachim; Feer, Philipp; Dirnhofer, Richard; Königsdorfer, Urs; Zollinger, Ulrich

    2011-09-10

    In 1996, a cadaver in adipocere condition was discovered in a bay of the Brienzer See in Switzerland. The torso was named "Brienzi" following the "Iceman" Ötzi. Several outer parts of the body were incrusted; the incrustation was in blue color. Further investigations showed that the bluish covering of parts of the adipocere torso were a mineral known as Vivianite. Vivianite (Fe(3)(PO(4))(2-)(H(2)O)(8)) is an iron phosphate mineral with needle lengths between 100 and 150μm. It is normally associated in a context with organic archaeological and geological materials (some hundreds to millions of years old). Hitherto, it is only described in three cases of human remains. We were able to reconstruct the following facts about 'Brienzi': The man drowned in Lake Brienz or in one of its tributaries during the 1700s. The body was subsequently covered with sedimentation and thus buried under water. An earthquake produced an underwater landslide which eventually exposed the corpse.

  12. Device or ice: the effect of consistent cooling using a device compared with intermittent cooling using an ice bag after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bech, Michelle; Moorhen, Joanne; Cho, Mary; Lavergne, M Ruth; Stothers, Keith; Hoens, Alison M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : To determine the comparative effectiveness of consistent cooling using an icing device (DonJoy Iceman, DJO Canada, Mississauga, ON) versus intermittent cooling using an ice bag (usual care) for the first 48 hours after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Method : A sample of 78 patients (intervention group, n=37; control group, n=34) undergoing primary TKA were randomized to intervention (device) or control (ice) groups. The primary outcome was pain intensity, measured by numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). Secondary outcomes were passive range of motion (PROM), nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, hospital length of stay, and patient-reported compliance and satisfaction. Results : No significant differences in the primary outcome (pain intensity measured via NPRS) were observed between control and intervention groups. Patients in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied (8.4 vs. 6.0, p=0.002); used the device more consistently, day and night (85.7% vs. 29.6% and 87.6% vs. 30.8%, respectively, p<0.001); and were more likely to recommend this method of cooling (96.8% vs. 68.0%, p=0.004). Conclusion : The study found no additional benefit of consistent cryotherapy using the icing device over intermittent ice bags on postoperative pain, PROM, nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, or length of stay, despite significant differences in patient-reported compliance and satisfaction.

  13. Characteristics and potential climatic significance of ''miniature ice caps'' (crest- and cornice-type low-altitude ice archives)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeberli, Wilfried; Frauenfelder, Regula; Kääb, Andreas; Wagner, Stephan

    Long-term ice-core records of Alpine glaciers are usually taken from cold-firn areas at high altitudes, as on Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa. Perennial ice bodies at lower altitudes, however, also bear information about the past. Recent findings from the remains of such ice (the Oetztal iceman found in Austria; wooden bows at Lötschen Pass, Switzerland) clearly indicate the hitherto little-recognized fact that small, more-or-less static perennial ice bodies which are cold and frozen to the underlying bedrock may contain very old ice and, hence, important palaeoclimatic information about warm periods with minimum ice extent in the Alps. Since autumn 1998, investigations have been initiated on a crest-type location or ''miniature ice cap'' at Piz Murtél, Engadine, Swiss Alps. First results from shallow drilling, temperature data-logging, geodetic surveying, visual observation, finite-element modelling of simplified basic two-dimensional configurations and comparison to earlier measurements at similar sites provide promising perspectives concerning a little-studied phenomenon with considerable scientific-environmental research potential. Specific characteristics of the investigated site, and probably of many other comparable mountain sites, are: cold ice (about -4°C at 10 m depth), no basal sliding, small mass turnover, striking lack of a firn zone, accumulation mainly by superimposed ice, and direct access to old layers (centuries, millennia?) at the ice/bedrock interface.

  14. Variations in atmospheric sulphate recorded in stalagmites by synchrotron micro-XRF and XANES analyses [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisia, Silvia; Borsato, Andrea; Fairchild, Ian J.; Susini, Jean

    2005-07-01

    We report here the first speleothem time-series of the variability of sulphate, a species whose abundance in catchments is strongly influenced by atmospheric anthropogenic and volcanic sources. Annually-resolved archives of S, Mg, Si and P were generated by applying synchrotron radiation micro X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to two speleothems from different sites in northern Italy. X-ray absorption-edge spectrometry proves that the S is in the form of sulphate and XRF mapping demonstrates that S is within calcite and enriched zones are predominantly as layers. A post-1850 A.D. record from the Ernesto cave shows a substantial rise in sulphate, interpreted as reflecting the largely anthropogenically-forced variation of sulphate of the atmospheric boundary layer, moderated by some ecosystem storage. Analysis of the circa 5.2 to circa 5.0 ka interval of a speleothem from Savi cave, where ecosystem retention of S is likely to have been minimal, shows a spiky sulphate record, resembling that of ice cores. A series of sulphate peaks suggest that multiple volcanic sulphate aerosol emissions at that time. This probably enhanced summer temperature cooling thus favouring the preservation of the human mummy of Neolithic-Copper age, the "Iceman" on the watershed between Italy and Austria. Both examples illustrate the power of speleothems to record atmospheric sulphate variability.

  15. CT-Based Assessment of Relative Soft-Tissue Alteration in Different Types of Ancient Mummies.

    PubMed

    Sydler, Christina; Öhrström, Lena; Rosendahl, Wilfried; Woitek, Ulrich; Rühli, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Mummification leads to alteration of soft-tissue morphology. No research has focused specifically on differences in soft-tissue shrinkage depending on mummification type. This study evaluated whether soft-tissue alteration is dependent on type of mummification. A total of 17 human mummies have been investigated by computed tomography (CT). Samples included artificially embalmed ancient Egyptian mummies, naturally mummified South American corpses, ice mummies (including the Iceman, South Tyrol Museum of Archeology, Bolzano, Italy, ca. 3,300 BC), bog bodies and a desiccated mummy of possibly Asian provenance. The acquired data were compared to four contemporary bodies. The extent of soft-tissue shrinkage was evaluated using CT data. Shrinkage was defined as soft-tissue relative to area of bone (in number of voxels). Measurements were taken at 13 anatomically defined locations. Ice mummies show the highest degree of preservation. This finding is most likely explained due to frozen water within tissues. All other types of mummies show significantly (at P < 0.05) smaller relative area of preserved soft-tissue. Variation between different anatomical structures (e.g., upper lip vs. mid-femur) is significant, unlike variation within one compartment (e.g., proximal vs. distal humerus). Mummification type strongly affects the degree of soft-tissue alteration, surprisingly mostly independent of overall historical age. These results highlight the unique morphological impact of taphonomy on soft-tissue preservation and are of particular interest in tissue research as well as in forensics.

  16. Device or Ice: The Effect of Consistent Cooling Using a Device Compared with Intermittent Cooling Using an Ice Bag after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Moorhen, Joanne; Cho, Mary; Lavergne, M. Ruth; Stothers, Keith; Hoens, Alison M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the comparative effectiveness of consistent cooling using an icing device (DonJoy Iceman, DJO Canada, Mississauga, ON) versus intermittent cooling using an ice bag (usual care) for the first 48 hours after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Method: A sample of 78 patients (intervention group, n=37; control group, n=34) undergoing primary TKA were randomized to intervention (device) or control (ice) groups. The primary outcome was pain intensity, measured by numerical pain rating scale (NPRS). Secondary outcomes were passive range of motion (PROM), nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, hospital length of stay, and patient-reported compliance and satisfaction. Results: No significant differences in the primary outcome (pain intensity measured via NPRS) were observed between control and intervention groups. Patients in the intervention group were significantly more satisfied (8.4 vs. 6.0, p=0.002); used the device more consistently, day and night (85.7% vs. 29.6% and 87.6% vs. 30.8%, respectively, p<0.001); and were more likely to recommend this method of cooling (96.8% vs. 68.0%, p=0.004). Conclusion: The study found no additional benefit of consistent cryotherapy using the icing device over intermittent ice bags on postoperative pain, PROM, nausea or vomiting, opioid use, blood loss, lower limb function, or length of stay, despite significant differences in patient-reported compliance and satisfaction. PMID:25931653

  17. "Brienzi" - The blue Vivianite man of Switzerland: Time since death estimation of an adipocere body.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Lux, Bettina; Lösch, Sandra; Rösing, Friedrich W; Hürlimann, Joachim; Feer, Philipp; Dirnhofer, Richard; Königsdorfer, Urs; Zollinger, Ulrich

    2011-09-10

    In 1996, a cadaver in adipocere condition was discovered in a bay of the Brienzer See in Switzerland. The torso was named "Brienzi" following the "Iceman" Ötzi. Several outer parts of the body were incrusted; the incrustation was in blue color. Further investigations showed that the bluish covering of parts of the adipocere torso were a mineral known as Vivianite. Vivianite (Fe(3)(PO(4))(2-)(H(2)O)(8)) is an iron phosphate mineral with needle lengths between 100 and 150μm. It is normally associated in a context with organic archaeological and geological materials (some hundreds to millions of years old). Hitherto, it is only described in three cases of human remains. We were able to reconstruct the following facts about 'Brienzi': The man drowned in Lake Brienz or in one of its tributaries during the 1700s. The body was subsequently covered with sedimentation and thus buried under water. An earthquake produced an underwater landslide which eventually exposed the corpse. PMID:21571462

  18. Foetal Gender and Obstetric Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Schildberger, B.; Leitner, H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Data on specific characteristics based on the gender of the unborn baby and their significance for obstetrics are limited. The aim of this study is to analyse selected parameters of obstetric relevance in the phases pregnancy, birth and postpartum period in dependence on the gender of the foetus. Materials and Methods: The selected study method comprised a retrospective data acquisition and evaluation from the Austrian birth register of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology of Tyrolean State Hospitals. For the analysis all inpatient singleton deliveries in Austria during the period from 2008 to 2013 were taken into account (live and stillbirths n = 444 685). The gender of the baby was correlated with previously defined, obstetrically relevant parameters. Results: In proportions, significantly more premature births and sub partu medical interventions (vaginal and abdominal surgical deliveries. episiotomies) were observed for male foetuses (p < 0.001). The neonatal outcome (5-min Apgar score, umbilical pH value less than 7.1, transfer to a neonatal special unit) is significantly poorer for boys (p < 0.001). Discussion: In view of the vulnerability of male foetuses and infants, further research is needed in order to be able to react appropriately to the differing gender-specific requirements in obstetrics. PMID:27065487

  19. Hydrological modeling in alpine catchments: sensing the critical parameters towards an efficient model calibration.

    PubMed

    Achleitner, S; Rinderer, M; Kirnbauer, R

    2009-01-01

    For the Tyrolean part of the river Inn, a hybrid model for flood forecast has been set up and is currently in its test phase. The system is a hybrid system which comprises of a hydraulic 1D model for the river Inn, and the hydrological models HQsim (Rainfall-runoff-discharge model) and the snow and ice melt model SES for modeling the rainfall runoff form non-glaciated and glaciated tributary catchment respectively. Within this paper the focus is put on the hydrological modeling of the totally 49 connected non-glaciated catchments realized with the software HQsim. In the course of model calibration, the identification of the most sensitive parameters is important aiming at an efficient calibration procedure. The indicators used for explaining the parameter sensitivities were chosen specifically for the purpose of flood forecasting. Finally five model parameters could be identified as being sensitive for model calibration when aiming for a well calibrated model for flood conditions. In addition two parameters were identified which are sensitive in situations where the snow line plays an important role.

  20. Soil nitrogen gas emissions increase considerably in warmer forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzler, Barbara; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Jandl, Robert; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Climate change will likely modify ecosystem properties and processes and therefore impact nitrogen (N) dynamics of forest soils. To elucidate the effect of warming and drought conditions on the nitrogen gas emissions we measured N2O and NO fluxes from the soil warming experiment Achenkirch, a spruce-fir-beech forest soil in the North Tyrolean limestone Alps in Austria. The uppermost layer of the soil was warmed (4°C) by heating cables during the snow-free seasons. Roofs were installed during 25 days in July/August 2008 and 2009 to simulate drought conditions. Gas sampling was conducted biweekly with static chambers (N2O). Gas concentrations were detected by GC. Nitric oxide fluxes were measured by an automatic dynamic chamber system on an hourly basis. In our study the emissions of N2O were increased by up to 73 % at warmed plots, and we observed a temporary increase following first rain. However N2O emissions of the drought affected plots remained depressed for more than two months after roof removal. Nitric oxide fluxes were increased considerably during dry periods and under warmer conditions.

  1. Hydrological modeling in alpine catchments: sensing the critical parameters towards an efficient model calibration.

    PubMed

    Achleitner, S; Rinderer, M; Kirnbauer, R

    2009-01-01

    For the Tyrolean part of the river Inn, a hybrid model for flood forecast has been set up and is currently in its test phase. The system is a hybrid system which comprises of a hydraulic 1D model for the river Inn, and the hydrological models HQsim (Rainfall-runoff-discharge model) and the snow and ice melt model SES for modeling the rainfall runoff form non-glaciated and glaciated tributary catchment respectively. Within this paper the focus is put on the hydrological modeling of the totally 49 connected non-glaciated catchments realized with the software HQsim. In the course of model calibration, the identification of the most sensitive parameters is important aiming at an efficient calibration procedure. The indicators used for explaining the parameter sensitivities were chosen specifically for the purpose of flood forecasting. Finally five model parameters could be identified as being sensitive for model calibration when aiming for a well calibrated model for flood conditions. In addition two parameters were identified which are sensitive in situations where the snow line plays an important role. PMID:19759453

  2. Variation of bedload transport threshold in two Alpine mountain streams inferred from geophone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickenmann, Dieter; Weninger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Geophone measurements are a surrogate technique to monitor bedload transport in mountain streams. The two mountain streams Fischbach and the Ruetz in Western Austria are fed by glacial meltwater and feature regular bedload transport during the summer months. In spring 2008 the so-called Swiss plate geophone system was installed in the two streams. The sites are operated by the Tyrolean water power company (TIWAG), and discharge data are available as well. The geophone sensors record the motion of bedload particles transported over a steel plate mounted flush with the channel bed. Calibration measurements of the geophone system were performed by TIWAG, and they show an approximately linear relation between number of impulses and bedload mass transported over the sensors. For the period 2008 to 2013, the variation in bedload transport with shear stress was analyzed using an exponential form of the Meyer-Peter & Müller equation proposed by Chen (2002). If the dimensionless threshold shear stress at initiation of motion, i.e. the Shields number, is back-calculated from the measured bedload transport rates, the temporal variability in bedload transport efficiency can be reasonably well described by postulating a corresponding temporal variability in the Shields number. The geophone measurements were also used to qualitatively assess the grain size distribution of the transported particles. It is hypothesized that an increase in the Shields number is associated with a coarsening of the surface grain size distribution of the bed material upstream of the measuring site.

  3. Louis J. Battan 1923”1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, David

    Dr. Louis J. Battan died on October 29, 1986, after a short illness. Although he had been a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Arizon a since 1958 and director of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics there from 1973 to 1982 (and associate director from 1958 to 1973), his activities on the national and international scenes were so varied that he was known in different ways by the numerous communities with which he was involved. However, all who knew him shared his uncommonly good humor, took pride in his friendship, and respected his wisdom and good judgment. Lou is survived by his wife Jeanette, daughter Suzette, and son Paul.Battan was born in New York City on February 9, 1923. He was the second of four sons born to Annibale and Luisa Battan, immigrants to the United States from the village of Vigo in the Tyrolean Alps of Austria. He grew up in Brooklyn, N.Y., in a family environment that encouraged the highest moral standards and a devotion to hard work and self-reliance, qualities that remained with him throughout his life.

  4. Cost control in nursing homes by means of economies of scale and care profile optimization.

    PubMed

    Hoess, Victoria; Bachler, Adi; Ostermann, Herwig; Staudinger, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The call to enlarge or merge nursing homes in order to lower costs rests on the assumption that economies of scale exist within the cost structure of these homes. Economies of scale means that an increasing number of residents will reduce the costs per person needing care. However, the existence and the extent of economies of scale as such in nursing homes are the subject of controversy because studies of this issue performed in nursing homes up to now have yielded contradictory results. In this study, researchers demonstrated economies of scale in Tyrolean, Austria, nursing homes and showed that the composition of the nursing home residents in respect to their care needs influences the development of the average costs. Changing the size of the facility and/or influencing the average care level can have a considerable influence on the progression of average costs in nursing homes. Cost reductions can be achieved by increasing the size of the facility or by improved distribution of the care levels of the persons in need of care.

  5. Spotted fever group--Rickettsiae in the Tyrols: evidence by seroepidemiology and PCR.

    PubMed

    Sonnleitner, S T; Simeoni, J; Lang, S; Dobler, G; Speck, S; Zelger, R; Schennach, H; Lass-Flörl, C; Walder, G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the occurrence of Rickettsia in the inner-alpine valleys of the Eastern Alps and to determine the amount of seroreaction among the local human population. Ticks were investigated by PCR and the percentage of seropositives was determined among local blood donors by an in-house immunofluorescence assay. The local cut-off titre for screening of IgG was set at 1 : 128 with a well-characterised low-risk collective according to WHO-guidelines. Positive sera were confirmed by independent re-testing. Rickettsia is present in ticks north and south of the continental divide. Of 259 ticks investigated, 12.4% are positive for Rickettsia. Of over 1200 blood donors tested so far, 7.7% bear IgG at a titre of 1 : 128 or higher against R. helvetica. R. helvetica is present in the study area, causes immunoreaction among local residents and is associated with anamnestic erythema. Furthermore, screening with a second Spotted Fever Group Rickettsia indicates that significant parts of the Tyrolean population are exposed to a Rickettsia other than R. helvetica. PMID:22883690

  6. Investigations of nitrogen fluxes and pools on a limestone site in the Alps.

    PubMed

    Herman, Friedl; Smidt, Stefan; Englisch, Michael; Feichtinger, Franz; Gerzabek, Martin; Haberhauer, Georg; Jandl, Robert; Kalina, Michael; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    In the North Tyrolean Limestone Alps a site was investigated over a four-year period (1998-2001) in order to assess the nitrogen saturation status, the nitrogen budget (quantification of the net uptake of nitrogen by the canopy and of the nitrogen mineralization, nitrogen uptake from roots and N2O emission rates, proof of the origin of nitrate in the soil water with stable isotope analyses), and the effects of the actual nitrogen input on ground water quality. The main goals were to quantify the nitrogen input rate, the nitrogen pools in above-ground and below-ground compartments, nitrogen turnover processes in the soil as well as the output into the groundwater and into the atmosphere. The findings are based on continuous and discontinuous field measurements as well as on model results. While nitrogen input exceeded the Critical Loads of the WHO (1995), nitrogen deficiency and nutrient imbalances were verified by needle analyses. The atmospheric input of inorganic nitrogen was higher than the nitrogen output in 50 cm soil depth. A tracer experiment with 15N helped to prove that not more than half of the applied nitrate could be discharged. This allows the conclusion that nitrogen is stored in the system and that the site cannot yet be said to be saturated with nitrogen. The same result was also obtained by modelling. In addition, it was proved that the nitrogen discharge did not stem from deposition but from processes within the system.

  7. First insights into the metagenome of Egyptian mummies using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khairat, Rabab; Ball, Markus; Chang, Chun-Chi Hsieh; Bianucci, Raffaella; Nerlich, Andreas G; Trautmann, Martin; Ismail, Somaia; Shanab, Gamila M L; Karim, Amr M; Gad, Yehia Z; Pusch, Carsten M

    2013-08-01

    We applied, for the first time, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology on Egyptian mummies. Seven NGS datasets obtained from five randomly selected Third Intermediate to Graeco-Roman Egyptian mummies (806 BC-124AD) and two unearthed pre-contact Bolivian lowland skeletons were generated and characterised. The datasets were contrasted to three recently published NGS datasets obtained from cold-climate regions, i.e. the Saqqaq, the Denisova hominid and the Alpine Iceman. Analysis was done using one million reads of each newly generated or published dataset. Blastn and megablast results were analysed using MEGAN software. Distinct NGS results were replicated by specific and sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols in ancient DNA dedicated laboratories. Here, we provide unambiguous identification of authentic DNA in Egyptian mummies. The NGS datasets showed variable contents of endogenous DNA harboured in tissues. Three of five mummies displayed a human DNA proportion comparable to the human read count of the Saqqaq permafrost-preserved specimen. Furthermore, a metagenomic signature unique to mummies was displayed. By applying a "bacterial fingerprint", discrimination among mummies and other remains from warm areas outside Egypt was possible. Due to the absence of an adequate environment monitoring, a bacterial bloom was identified when analysing different biopsies from the same mummies taken after a lapse of time of 1.5 years. Plant kingdom representation in all mummy datasets was unique and could be partially associated with their use in embalming materials. Finally, NGS data showed the presence of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii DNA sequences, indicating malaria and toxoplasmosis in these mummies. We demonstrate that endogenous ancient DNA can be extracted from mummies and serve as a proper template for the NGS technique, thus, opening new pathways of investigation for future genome sequencing of ancient Egyptian individuals. PMID:23553074

  8. Insights from characterizing extinct human gut microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Tito, Raul Y; Knights, Dan; Metcalf, Jessica; Obregon-Tito, Alexandra J; Cleeland, Lauren; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Reinhard, Karl; Sobolik, Kristin; Belknap, Samuel; Foster, Morris; Spicer, Paul; Knight, Rob; Lewis, Cecil M

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the ancestral state of the human distal gut microbiome, we examine feces retrieved from archaeological contexts (coprolites). To accomplish this, we pyrosequenced the 16S rDNA V3 region from duplicate coprolite samples recovered from three archaeological sites, each representing a different depositional environment: Hinds Cave (~8000 years B.P.) in the southern United States, Caserones (1600 years B.P.) in northern Chile, and Rio Zape in northern Mexico (1400 years B.P.). Clustering algorithms grouped samples from the same site. Phyletic representation was more similar within sites than between them. A Bayesian approach to source-tracking was used to compare the coprolite data to published data from known sources that include, soil, compost, human gut from rural African children, human gut, oral and skin from US cosmopolitan adults and non-human primate gut. The data from the Hinds Cave samples largely represented unknown sources. The Caserones samples, retrieved directly from natural mummies, matched compost in high proportion. A substantial and robust proportion of Rio Zape data was predicted to match the gut microbiome found in traditional rural communities, with more minor matches to other sources. One of the Rio Zape samples had taxonomic representation consistent with a child. To provide an idealized scenario for sample preservation, we also applied source tracking to previously published data for Ötzi the Iceman and a soldier frozen for 93 years on a glacier. Overall these studies reveal that human microbiome data has been preserved in some coprolites, and these preserved human microbiomes match more closely to those from the rural communities than to those from cosmopolitan communities. These results suggest that the modern cosmopolitan lifestyle resulted in a dramatic change to the human gut microbiome.

  9. Insights from Characterizing Extinct Human Gut Microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Tito, Raul Y.; Knights, Dan; Metcalf, Jessica; Obregon-Tito, Alexandra J.; Cleeland, Lauren; Najar, Fares; Roe, Bruce; Reinhard, Karl; Sobolik, Kristin; Belknap, Samuel; Foster, Morris; Spicer, Paul; Knight, Rob; Lewis, Cecil M.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the ancestral state of the human distal gut microbiome, we examine feces retrieved from archaeological contexts (coprolites). To accomplish this, we pyrosequenced the 16S rDNA V3 region from duplicate coprolite samples recovered from three archaeological sites, each representing a different depositional environment: Hinds Cave (∼8000 years B.P.) in the southern United States, Caserones (1600 years B.P.) in northern Chile, and Rio Zape in northern Mexico (1400 years B.P.). Clustering algorithms grouped samples from the same site. Phyletic representation was more similar within sites than between them. A Bayesian approach to source-tracking was used to compare the coprolite data to published data from known sources that include, soil, compost, human gut from rural African children, human gut, oral and skin from US cosmopolitan adults and non-human primate gut. The data from the Hinds Cave samples largely represented unknown sources. The Caserones samples, retrieved directly from natural mummies, matched compost in high proportion. A substantial and robust proportion of Rio Zape data was predicted to match the gut microbiome found in traditional rural communities, with more minor matches to other sources. One of the Rio Zape samples had taxonomic representation consistent with a child. To provide an idealized scenario for sample preservation, we also applied source tracking to previously published data for Ötzi the Iceman and a soldier frozen for 93 years on a glacier. Overall these studies reveal that human microbiome data has been preserved in some coprolites, and these preserved human microbiomes match more closely to those from the rural communities than to those from cosmopolitan communities. These results suggest that the modern cosmopolitan lifestyle resulted in a dramatic change to the human gut microbiome. PMID:23251439

  10. The 3D velocity structure beneath Iceland: Identifying melt pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The integration of various seismic datasets, recorded by the broadband HOTSPOT network deployed across Iceland, provides one of the highest resolution studies of the crust and mantle structure associated with a plume-ridge system. The mantle P- and S-velocity models (ICEMAN), derived from teleseismic body-wave and surface wave analysis, show a vertical, cylindrical low velocity anomaly ˜200 km in diameter extending from ˜400 km, the maximum depth of resolution, up to ˜200 km above which low velocity material is present beneath all of Iceland. The maximum P- and S-velocity anomalies of -2% and -4% respectively are found beneath the northwestern edge of Vatnajokull. The crustal S-velocity model (ICECRTb) is constrained by local surface waves, refraction experiments and receiver functions, and shows significant variation in crustal thickness. The thinnest, ˜15 km, crust is found around coastal regions, the thickest crust is beneath northwestern Vatnajokull where it reaches a thickness of 45 km. Within this thick crustal root is a vertical low velocity anomaly connecting the core of the mantle anomaly to horizontal low velocity regions that extend along the western and eastern volcanic zones but not the northern volcanic zone. These crustal low velocity zones are interpreted as regions through which melt is fed from the mantle to shallow magma chambers beneath the rift zones, where crustal formation occurs. The pipework between the core of the mantle anomaly and the southern rift zones is responsible for ˜30 km thick crust. Its absence to the north results in relatively thin, ˜20 km thick, crust.

  11. First insights into the metagenome of Egyptian mummies using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khairat, Rabab; Ball, Markus; Chang, Chun-Chi Hsieh; Bianucci, Raffaella; Nerlich, Andreas G; Trautmann, Martin; Ismail, Somaia; Shanab, Gamila M L; Karim, Amr M; Gad, Yehia Z; Pusch, Carsten M

    2013-08-01

    We applied, for the first time, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology on Egyptian mummies. Seven NGS datasets obtained from five randomly selected Third Intermediate to Graeco-Roman Egyptian mummies (806 BC-124AD) and two unearthed pre-contact Bolivian lowland skeletons were generated and characterised. The datasets were contrasted to three recently published NGS datasets obtained from cold-climate regions, i.e. the Saqqaq, the Denisova hominid and the Alpine Iceman. Analysis was done using one million reads of each newly generated or published dataset. Blastn and megablast results were analysed using MEGAN software. Distinct NGS results were replicated by specific and sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols in ancient DNA dedicated laboratories. Here, we provide unambiguous identification of authentic DNA in Egyptian mummies. The NGS datasets showed variable contents of endogenous DNA harboured in tissues. Three of five mummies displayed a human DNA proportion comparable to the human read count of the Saqqaq permafrost-preserved specimen. Furthermore, a metagenomic signature unique to mummies was displayed. By applying a "bacterial fingerprint", discrimination among mummies and other remains from warm areas outside Egypt was possible. Due to the absence of an adequate environment monitoring, a bacterial bloom was identified when analysing different biopsies from the same mummies taken after a lapse of time of 1.5 years. Plant kingdom representation in all mummy datasets was unique and could be partially associated with their use in embalming materials. Finally, NGS data showed the presence of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii DNA sequences, indicating malaria and toxoplasmosis in these mummies. We demonstrate that endogenous ancient DNA can be extracted from mummies and serve as a proper template for the NGS technique, thus, opening new pathways of investigation for future genome sequencing of ancient Egyptian individuals.

  12. Demographic histories, isolation and social factors as determinants of the genetic structure of Alpine linguistic groups.

    PubMed

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B J; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of "local ethnicity" on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  13. Pasture names with Romance and Slavic roots facilitate dissection of Y chromosome variation in an exclusively German-speaking alpine region.

    PubMed

    Niederstätter, Harald; Rampl, Gerhard; Erhart, Daniel; Pitterl, Florian; Oberacher, Herbert; Neuhuber, Franz; Hausner, Isolde; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Berger, Burkhard; Parson, Walther

    2012-01-01

    The small alpine district of East Tyrol (Austria) has an exceptional demographic history. It was contemporaneously inhabited by members of the Romance, the Slavic and the Germanic language groups for centuries. Since the Late Middle Ages, however, the population of the principally agrarian-oriented area is solely Germanic speaking. Historic facts about East Tyrol's colonization are rare, but spatial density-distribution analysis based on the etymology of place-names has facilitated accurate spatial mapping of the various language groups' former settlement regions. To test for present-day Y chromosome population substructure, molecular genetic data were compared to the information attained by the linguistic analysis of pasture names. The linguistic data were used for subdividing East Tyrol into two regions of former Romance (A) and Slavic (B) settlement. Samples from 270 East Tyrolean men were genotyped for 17 Y-chromosomal microsatellites (Y-STRs) and 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs). Analysis of the probands' surnames revealed no evidence for spatial genetic structuring. Also, spatial autocorrelation analysis did not indicate significant correlation between genetic (Y-STR haplotypes) and geographic distance. Haplogroup R-M17 chromosomes, however, were absent in region A, but constituted one of the most frequent haplogroups in region B. The R-M343 (R1b) clade showed a marked and complementary frequency distribution pattern in these two regions. To further test East Tyrol's modern Y-chromosomal landscape for geographic patterning attributable to the early history of settlement in this alpine area, principal coordinates analysis was performed. The Y-STR haplotypes from region A clearly clustered with those of Romance reference populations and the samples from region B matched best with Germanic speaking reference populations. The combined use of onomastic and molecular genetic data revealed and mapped the marked structuring of the distribution of Y

  14. Demographic Histories, Isolation and Social Factors as Determinants of the Genetic Structure of Alpine Linguistic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Coia, Valentina; Capocasa, Marco; Anagnostou, Paolo; Pascali, Vincenzo; Scarnicci, Francesca; Boschi, Ilaria; Battaggia, Cinzia; Crivellaro, Federica; Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Brisighelli, Francesca; Busby, George B. J.; Capelli, Cristian; Maixner, Frank; Cipollini, Giovanna; Viazzo, Pier Paolo; Zink, Albert; Destro Bisol, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Great European mountain ranges have acted as barriers to gene flow for resident populations since prehistory and have offered a place for the settlement of small, and sometimes culturally diverse, communities. Therefore, the human groups that have settled in these areas are worth exploring as an important potential source of diversity in the genetic structure of European populations. In this study, we present new high resolution data concerning Y chromosomal variation in three distinct Alpine ethno-linguistic groups, Italian, Ladin and German. Combining unpublished and literature data on Y chromosome and mitochondrial variation, we were able to detect different genetic patterns. In fact, within and among population diversity values observed vary across linguistic groups, with German and Italian speakers at the two extremes, and seem to reflect their different demographic histories. Using simulations we inferred that the joint effect of continued genetic isolation and reduced founding group size may explain the apportionment of genetic diversity observed in all groups. Extending the analysis to other continental populations, we observed that the genetic differentiation of Ladins and German speakers from Europeans is comparable or even greater to that observed for well known outliers like Sardinian and Basques. Finally, we found that in south Tyroleans, the social practice of Geschlossener Hof, a hereditary norm which might have favored male dispersal, coincides with a significant intra-group diversity for mtDNA but not for Y chromosome, a genetic pattern which is opposite to those expected among patrilocal populations. Together with previous evidence regarding the possible effects of “local ethnicity” on the genetic structure of German speakers that have settled in the eastern Italian Alps, this finding suggests that taking socio-cultural factors into account together with geographical variables and linguistic diversity may help unveil some yet to be understood

  15. Pasture names with Romance and Slavic roots facilitate dissection of Y chromosome variation in an exclusively German-speaking alpine region.

    PubMed

    Niederstätter, Harald; Rampl, Gerhard; Erhart, Daniel; Pitterl, Florian; Oberacher, Herbert; Neuhuber, Franz; Hausner, Isolde; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Berger, Burkhard; Parson, Walther

    2012-01-01

    The small alpine district of East Tyrol (Austria) has an exceptional demographic history. It was contemporaneously inhabited by members of the Romance, the Slavic and the Germanic language groups for centuries. Since the Late Middle Ages, however, the population of the principally agrarian-oriented area is solely Germanic speaking. Historic facts about East Tyrol's colonization are rare, but spatial density-distribution analysis based on the etymology of place-names has facilitated accurate spatial mapping of the various language groups' former settlement regions. To test for present-day Y chromosome population substructure, molecular genetic data were compared to the information attained by the linguistic analysis of pasture names. The linguistic data were used for subdividing East Tyrol into two regions of former Romance (A) and Slavic (B) settlement. Samples from 270 East Tyrolean men were genotyped for 17 Y-chromosomal microsatellites (Y-STRs) and 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs). Analysis of the probands' surnames revealed no evidence for spatial genetic structuring. Also, spatial autocorrelation analysis did not indicate significant correlation between genetic (Y-STR haplotypes) and geographic distance. Haplogroup R-M17 chromosomes, however, were absent in region A, but constituted one of the most frequent haplogroups in region B. The R-M343 (R1b) clade showed a marked and complementary frequency distribution pattern in these two regions. To further test East Tyrol's modern Y-chromosomal landscape for geographic patterning attributable to the early history of settlement in this alpine area, principal coordinates analysis was performed. The Y-STR haplotypes from region A clearly clustered with those of Romance reference populations and the samples from region B matched best with Germanic speaking reference populations. The combined use of onomastic and molecular genetic data revealed and mapped the marked structuring of the distribution of Y

  16. Reprint of: high resolution mapping of Y haplogroup G in Tyrol (Austria).

    PubMed

    Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Erhart, Daniel; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Parson, Walther

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of Y-chromosomal haplogroup G2a (G-P15) in present-day paternal lineages in Tyrol (Austria) was analyzed by applying a high-density regional sampling scheme that also covered remote mountain areas. There is evidence from ancient genetic data for a high frequency of Y-chromosomal haplogroup G in prehistoric populations of Central Europe, whilst nowadays levels well below 10% are routinely observed. A population sample comprising ∼3700 specimens was analyzed for Y-chromosomal variation by genotyping Y-SNPs and Y-STRs. The set of binary markers included nine SNPs specific for sub-lineages of haplogroup G. The frequency of haplogroup G in 2379 unrelated men born in Tyrol amounted to 11.3%. Nearly all of these Y chromosomes belonged to haplogroup G2a. The main sub-haplogroup within G2a was defined by the SNP L497 (G2a3b1c) and reached a population frequency of 8.6%. Although this average level is higher than reported for other countries the geographical distribution of haplogroup G-L497 showed a differentiated pattern with a clustered distribution within some alpine valleys, where maxima above 40% were found. Both, the estimation of coalescent times and a principle coordinates analysis based on RST values derived from Y-STR haplotypes from different sub-regions of Tyrol revealed evidence for an old settlement history associated with Y chromosomes belonging to haplogroup G in the Tyrolean Alps.

  17. High resolution mapping of Y haplogroup G in Tyrol (Austria).

    PubMed

    Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Erhart, Daniel; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Parson, Walther

    2013-09-01

    The distribution of Y-chromosomal haplogroup G2a (G-P15) in present-day paternal lineages in Tyrol (Austria) was analyzed by applying a high-density regional sampling scheme that also covered remote mountain areas. There is evidence from ancient genetic data for a high frequency of Y-chromosomal haplogroup G in prehistoric populations of Central Europe, whilst nowadays levels well below 10% are routinely observed. A population sample comprising ∼3700 specimens was analyzed for Y-chromosomal variation by genotyping Y-SNPs and Y-STRs. The set of binary markers included nine SNPs specific for sub-lineages of haplogroup G. The frequency of haplogroup G in 2379 unrelated men born in Tyrol amounted to 11.3%. Nearly all of these Y chromosomes belonged to haplogroup G2a. The main sub-haplogroup within G2a was defined by the SNP L497 (G2a3b1c) and reached a population frequency of 8.6%. Although this average level is higher than reported for other countries the geographical distribution of haplogroup G-L497 showed a differentiated pattern with a clustered distribution within some alpine valleys, where maxima above 40% were found. Both, the estimation of coalescent times and a principle coordinates analysis based on RST values derived from Y-STR haplotypes from different sub-regions of Tyrol revealed evidence for an old settlement history associated with Y chromosomes belonging to haplogroup G in the Tyrolean Alps.

  18. Pasture Names with Romance and Slavic Roots Facilitate Dissection of Y Chromosome Variation in an Exclusively German-Speaking Alpine Region

    PubMed Central

    Niederstätter, Harald; Rampl, Gerhard; Erhart, Daniel; Pitterl, Florian; Oberacher, Herbert; Neuhuber, Franz; Hausner, Isolde; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Berger, Burkhard; Parson, Walther

    2012-01-01

    The small alpine district of East Tyrol (Austria) has an exceptional demographic history. It was contemporaneously inhabited by members of the Romance, the Slavic and the Germanic language groups for centuries. Since the Late Middle Ages, however, the population of the principally agrarian-oriented area is solely Germanic speaking. Historic facts about East Tyrol's colonization are rare, but spatial density-distribution analysis based on the etymology of place-names has facilitated accurate spatial mapping of the various language groups' former settlement regions. To test for present-day Y chromosome population substructure, molecular genetic data were compared to the information attained by the linguistic analysis of pasture names. The linguistic data were used for subdividing East Tyrol into two regions of former Romance (A) and Slavic (B) settlement. Samples from 270 East Tyrolean men were genotyped for 17 Y-chromosomal microsatellites (Y-STRs) and 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs). Analysis of the probands' surnames revealed no evidence for spatial genetic structuring. Also, spatial autocorrelation analysis did not indicate significant correlation between genetic (Y-STR haplotypes) and geographic distance. Haplogroup R-M17 chromosomes, however, were absent in region A, but constituted one of the most frequent haplogroups in region B. The R-M343 (R1b) clade showed a marked and complementary frequency distribution pattern in these two regions. To further test East Tyrol's modern Y-chromosomal landscape for geographic patterning attributable to the early history of settlement in this alpine area, principal coordinates analysis was performed. The Y-STR haplotypes from region A clearly clustered with those of Romance reference populations and the samples from region B matched best with Germanic speaking reference populations. The combined use of onomastic and molecular genetic data revealed and mapped the marked structuring of the distribution of Y

  19. Reducing Wound Tension with Undermining or Imbrication—Do They Work?

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Naveen M.; Brown, Benjamin J.; Davison, Steven P.; Mauskar, Neil; Mino, Matthew; Jordan, Marion H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: For the noncolonized wound, achieving tension-free, primary wound closure is ideal. Some surgeons advocate imbrication of deeper tissues rather than undermining, posing that imbrication preserves more dermal perfusion while still reducing tension at the wound edge. We sought to determine which technique most reliably reduced wound tension while preserving dermal wound perfusion. Methods: A total of 5 standardized, symmetrical pairs of full thickness wounds were created on Duroc swine. Wound tension was measured with a Tyrolean tensiometer before and after either method of closure, whereas a speckle contrast imager was used to assess dermal edge perfusion. Skin tension and dermal perfusion were evaluated for statistical significance via paired t tests and a multivariate analysis of variance. Results: There was a significant reduction in wound tension with undermining and imbrication relative to the raw wound tension (5 and 5.9 vs 7.1 N; P < 0.05) yet no significant difference between methods of closure (P > 0.05). There was a significant reduction in dermal perfusion between unwounded skin and the imbricated wound (222 perfusion units [PU] vs 48 PU; P < 0.05) and between the unwounded skin and the undermined wound (205 vs 63 PU; P < 0.05). Conclusions: We found no significant difference in wound tension between wound undermining or imbrication and a significant decrease in dermal perfusion after imbrication and undermining although the relative decrease in perfusion was greater with imbrication. Wound undermining reduces skin tension with greater relative dermal perfusion to the skin and should be selected over wound imbrication in standard primary wound closure. PMID:27536478

  20. Polygonum viviparum mycobionts on an alpine primary successional glacier forefront.

    PubMed

    Mühlmann, Oliver; Bacher, Margit; Peintner, Ursula

    2008-02-01

    Polygonum viviparum is one of the first ectomycorrhizal (EM) plant species colonising primary successional sites at the Rotmoos glacier forefront (Tyrolean Alps, Austria). On a site with soil development of about 150 years (2,400 m above sea level), mycobionts of P. viviparum were identified by morphotyping and fungal ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid internal transcribed spacer sequencing. For studying seasonal dynamics and spatial heterogeneity, ectomycorrhizae were sampled on five plots during all seasons. P. viviparum root tips were always EM. In total, 18 mycobiont taxa of the following genera were identified: Cenococcum (1), Cortinarius (2), Helvella (1), Inocybe (3), Russula (1), Sebacina (2), Thelephora (2) and Tomentella (6). All were non-specific EM partners of EM plants. As early as 2 weeks after spring snow melt, EM were well developed, vital and showed high mycobiont diversity. The relative abundance of senescent root tips was lowest in spring and increased throughout the year, with a maximum in winter (frozen soil). Thus, mycobiont growth and physiological activity obviously start when soil is still under snow cover: We speculate that water availability is one important initiation factor for mycorrhizal development under snow cover, when temperatures still range around the freezing point. Irrespectively of the season, most abundant mycobionts at this primary successional site belonged to the genera Tomentella, Sebacina and Cenococcum, also in frozen soil. Spatial heterogeneity was high when considering species composition and diversity indices. Overall mycobionts species richness was restricted at this site, probably because of the limited availability of fungal partners. We regard the presence/absence of fungal partner and limiting abiotic impacts of the environment as key factors for the symbiotic status of P. viviparum.

  1. Mutations in FKBP14 Cause a Variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome with Progressive Kyphoscoliosis, Myopathy, and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Matthias; Giunta, Cecilia; Krabichler, Birgit; Rüschendorf, Franz; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Colombi, Marina; Bittner, Reginald E.; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Muntoni, Francesco; Cirak, Sebahattin; Schreiber, Gudrun; Zou, Yaqun; Hu, Ying; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Carlier, Robert Yves; Amberger, Albert; Deutschmann, Andrea; Straub, Volker; Rohrbach, Marianne; Steinmann, Beat; Rostásy, Kevin; Karall, Daniela; Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Zschocke, Johannes; Fauth, Christine

    2012-01-01

    We report on an autosomal-recessive variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) characterized by severe muscle hypotonia at birth, progressive scoliosis, joint hypermobility, hyperelastic skin, myopathy, sensorineural hearing impairment, and normal pyridinoline excretion in urine. Clinically, the disorder shares many features with the kyphoscoliotic type of EDS (EDS VIA) and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Linkage analysis in a large Tyrolean kindred identified a homozygous frameshift mutation in FKBP14 in two affected individuals. Based on the cardinal clinical characteristics of the disorder, four additional individuals originating from different European countries were identified who carried either homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in FKBP14. FKBP14 belongs to the family of FK506-binding peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases). ER-resident FKBPs have been suggested to act as folding catalysts by accelerating cis-trans isomerization of peptidyl-prolyl bonds and to act occasionally also as chaperones. We demonstrate that FKBP14 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and that deficiency of FKBP14 leads to enlarged ER cisterns in dermal fibroblasts in vivo. Furthermore, indirect immunofluorescence of FKBP14-deficient fibroblasts indicated an altered assembly of the extracellular matrix in vitro. These findings suggest that a disturbance of protein folding in the ER affecting one or more components of the extracellular matrix might cause the generalized connective tissue involvement in this disorder. FKBP14 mutation analysis should be considered in all individuals with apparent kyphoscoliotic type of EDS and normal urinary pyridinoline excretion, in particular in conjunction with sensorineural hearing impairment. PMID:22265013

  2. Assessing Mantle Models with the Spectral-Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Komatitsch, D.; Ritsema, J.; Allen, R.

    2001-12-01

    We have developed and implemented a spectral-element method (SEM) to simulate seismic wave propagation throughout the entire globe. Our SEM incorporates the effects of fluid-solid boundaries, attenuation, anisotropy, the oceans, rotation, self-gravitation and 3-D mantle and crustal heterogeneity. The method is implemented on a massively parallel PC cluster computer using message-passing software (MPI). The effects of crustal thickness, anisotropy, and attenuation on surface waves are quite dramatic. Self-gravitation and, in particular, the presence of a water layer slow the Rayleigh wave down. For spherically symmetric Earth models the SEM is in excellent agreement with normal-mode synthetics at periods greater than 20~seconds. We use the SEM to assess the quality of mantle model S20RTS, developed by Ritsema and colleagues, and Iceland model ICEMAN, developed by Allen and colleagues. The effects of 3-D heterogeneity can be spectacular. For example, along oceanic paths from Fiji-Tonga to Western North America or Japan the Rayleigh wave arrives more than a minute earlier than in PREM, and the Love wave exhibits very little dispersion, unlike in PREM. These effects are largely due to the fact that the oceanic crust is much thinner than in PREM. For a set of well-recorded earthquakes we use the SEM to determine how well model S20RTS fits the travel-time data. Because the SEM synthetics are essentially exact at periods greater than 20~seconds, this facilitates a difficult test for a 3-D model. For Iceland we are investigating whether or not a narrow plume can explain the differential travel-time data used to constrain the model. The width of the plume is so small that standard ray theory may be inadequate for waves with periods greater than 20~seconds. Due to finite-frequency effects, a ray that `misses' the plume can still be significantly affected by its presence. The question is whether a thin plume, which is preferred in geodynamic models, can explain the data as

  3. Stalagmites from Spannagel cave (Austria) and holocene climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollweiler, N.; Mangini, A.; Spötl, C.; Scholz, D.; Mühlinghaus, C.

    2009-04-01

    The Spannagel cave is located around 2,500 m asl at the end of the Tux Valley in Tyrol (Austria) close to the Hintertux glacier. While the area above the cave is ice free at present, it was covered by ice during past glacials as well as during colder periods of Interglacials. Presently, the temperature inside the cave is between 1.8° and 2.0° C. We used the d18O time-series of three stalagmites which grew in small distance from each other. This speleothem record is not influenced by effects of kinetic isotope fractionation due to the low temperatures in the cave. The stalagmites were precisely dated with the U/Th-method. The combined record (COMNISPA, Vollweiler et al. 2006) shows substantial variability within the last 9 kyr with features like the Holocene Climatic Optimum between 7.5 and 6.5 kyr, the Mediaeval Warm Period between 1.2 and 0.7 kyr and the Roman Warm Period between 2.25 and 1.7 kyr. In contrast, periods of lower temperatures are visible between 7.9 and 7.5, 5.9 and 5.1, 3.5 and 3 kyr, and during the LIA between 600 and 150 yr. The period between 5.9 and 5.1 kyr has equivalence in many records from various regions in both hemispheres corresponding to global cooling. It also includes the time of the Alpine Iceman at 5.3 kyr. The timing of the climatic variations revealed by COMNISPA agrees approximately with that shown by other Alpine archives. Joerin et al. (2006) dated wood and peat samples which were released by melting Swiss Alpine glaciers located between Engadin and Valais. Both the d18O maxima and minima recorded in COMNISPA clearly have counterparts in the glacier recession record. Comparisons of COMNISPA with other archives have shown that our stalagmite curve does not only record local climate but also the history of European climate. The extremely high correlation to the Hematite Stained Grain record of Bond et al. (2001) suggests that COMNISPA is a good archive for climate in the North Atlantic region (Mangini et al. 2007). In addition

  4. Frequent Extreme Cold Exposure and Brown Fat and Cold-Induced Thermogenesis: A Study in a Monozygotic Twin

    PubMed Central

    Vosselman, Maarten J.; Vijgen, Guy H. E. J.; Kingma, Boris R. M.; Brans, Boudewijn; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mild cold acclimation is known to increase brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity and cold-induced thermogenesis (CIT) in humans. We here tested the effect of a lifestyle with frequent exposure to extreme cold on BAT and CIT in a Dutch man known as ‘the Iceman’, who has multiple world records in withstanding extreme cold challenges. Furthermore, his monozygotic twin brother who has a ‘normal’ sedentary lifestyle without extreme cold exposures was measured. Methods The Iceman (subject A) and his brother (subject B) were studied during mild cold (13°C) and thermoneutral conditions (31°C). Measurements included BAT activity and respiratory muscle activity by [18F]FDG-PET/CT imaging and energy expenditure through indirect calorimetry. In addition, body temperatures, cardiovascular parameters, skin perfusion, and thermal sensation and comfort were measured. Finally, we determined polymorphisms for uncoupling protein-1 and β3-adrenergic receptor. Results Subjects had comparable BAT activity (A: 1144 SUVtotal and B: 1325 SUVtotal), within the range previously observed in young adult men. They were genotyped with the polymorphism for uncoupling protein-1 (G/G). CIT was relatively high (A: 40.1% and B: 41.9%), but unlike during our previous cold exposure tests in young adult men, here both subjects practiced a g-Tummo like breathing technique, which involves vigorous respiratory muscle activity. This was confirmed by high [18F]FDG-uptake in respiratory muscle. Conclusion No significant differences were found between the two subjects, indicating that a lifestyle with frequent exposures to extreme cold does not seem to affect BAT activity and CIT. In both subjects, BAT was not higher compared to earlier observations, whereas CIT was very high, suggesting that g-Tummo like breathing during cold exposure may cause additional heat production by vigorous isometric respiratory muscle contraction. The results must be interpreted with caution given the low

  5. Assessing soil hydraulic characteristics using HYPROP and BEST: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitinger, Georg; Obojes, Nikolaus; Lassabatère, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of ecohydrological characteristics with high spatial resolution is a prerequisite for large-scale hydrological modelling. Data on soil hydraulic characteristics are of major importance, but measurements are often seen as time consuming and costly. In order to accurately model grassland productivity and in particular evapotranspiration, soil sampling and infiltration experiments at 25 grassland sites ranging from 900m to 2300m a.s.l. were conducted in the long term socio-ecological research (LTSER) site Stubai Valley, Tyrolean Alps, Austria, covering 265 km². Here we present a comparison of two methods to determine important hydrological properties of soils: (1) the evaporation method HYPROP (Hydraulic Property Analyzer; UMS Munich, 2010), and (2) the BEST-model (Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer Parameters; Lassabatère et al. (2006)), each determining the soil hydraulic characteristics and in particular the water retention curve. For the most abundant soil types we compared the pf-curves calculated from HYPROP data suing the Van Genuchten equation to the ones resulting from the comparatively time efficient BEST approach to find out if the latter is a suitable method to determine pf curves of alpine grassland soils. Except for the soil type Rendzina, the comparison of HYPROP and BEST showed slightly variations in the pF curves and resulting hydraulic characteristics. At the starting point BEST curves presented a slower dehydration, HYPROP a fast and continuous water loss. HYPROP analyses showed the highest variability in the measured values of Rendzina. Regarding BEST, the Alluvial Soils showed the highest variability. To assess equivalence between HYPROP and BEST we deduced several hydraulic characteristics from the pF curves, e.g. saturated water content, field capacity, permanent wilting point, pore size distribution, and minimum water retention. The comparison of HYPROP and BEST revealed that the results of soil water characteristics may depend on

  6. A high altitude paleoclimate record from an ice core retrieved at the northern margin of the Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielli, P.; Barbante, C.; Carturan, L.; Davis, M. E.; Dalla Fontana, G.; Dreossi, G.; Dinale, R.; Draga, G.; Gabrieli, J.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Mair, V.; Mikhalenko, V.; Oeggl, K.; Schotterer, U.; Seppi, R.; Spolaor, A.; Stenni, B.; Thompson, L. G.; Tonidandel, D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric temperatures in the Alps are increasing at twice the global rate and this change may be amplified at the highest elevations. There is a scarcity of paleo-climate information from high altitudes to place this current rapid climate change in a paleo-perspective. The 'Ortles Project' is an international scientific effort gathering institutes from six nations with the primary goal of obtaining a high altitude paleo-climate record in the Mediterranean area. In 2011 four ice cores were extracted from Alto dell'Ortles (3859 m, South Tyrol, Italy) the highest glacier in the eastern Alps. This site is located ~30 km away from where the famous ~5.2 kyr old Tyrolean Ice Man was discovered emerging from an ablating ice field (Hauslabjoch, 3210 m) in 1991. The good state of conservation of this mummy suggested that the current warming trend is unprecedented in South Tyrol during the late Holocene and that unique prehistoric ice was still present in this region. During the ice core drilling operations we found that the glacier Alto dell'Ortles shows a very unusual thermic behavior as it is transitioning from a cold to a temperate state. In fact, below a 30 meter thick temperate firn portion, we observed cold ice layers sitting on a frozen bedrock (-2.8 C). These represent remnants of the colder climate before ~1980 AD, when an instrumental record indicates a ~2 C lower temperature in this area during the period 1864-1980 AD. By analyzing one of the Ortles cores for stable isotopes, dust and major ions, we found an annually preserved climatic signal embedded in the deep cold ice of this glacier. Alto dell'Ortles is therefore the first low-accumulation (850 mm w.e. per year) alpine drilling site where both winter and summer layers can be identified. Preliminary annual layer counting and two absolute time markers suggest that the time period covered by the Ortles ice cores spans from several centuries to a few millennia. In particular, a Larix (larch) leaf discovered at

  7. UAV-based Natural Hazard Management in High-Alpine Terrain - Case Studies from Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotier, Bernadette; Adams, Marc; Lechner, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have become a standard tool for geodata collection, as they allow conducting on-demand mapping missions in a flexible, cost-effective manner at an unprecedented level of detail. Easy-to-use, high-performance image matching software make it possible to process the collected aerial images to orthophotos and 3D-terrain models. Such up-to-date geodata have proven to be an important asset in natural hazard management: Processes like debris flows, avalanches, landslides, fluvial erosion and rock-fall can be detected and quantified; damages can be documented and evaluated. In the Alps, these processes mostly originate in remote areas, which are difficult and hazardous to access, thus presenting a challenging task for RPAS data collection. In particular, the problems include finding suitable landing and piloting-places, dealing with bad or no GPS-signals and the installation of ground control points (GCP) for georeferencing. At the BFW, RPAS have been used since 2012 to aid natural hazard management of various processes, of which three case studies are presented below. The first case study deals with the results from an attempt to employ UAV-based multi-spectral remote sensing to monitor the state of natural hazard protection forests. Images in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) band were collected using modified low-cost cameras, combined with different optical filters. Several UAV-flights were performed in the 72 ha large study site in 2014, which lies in the Wattental, Tyrol (Austria) between 1700 and 2050 m a.s.l., where the main tree species are stone pine and mountain pine. The matched aerial images were analysed using different UAV-specific vitality indices, evaluating both single- and dual-camera UAV-missions. To calculate the mass balance of a debris flow in the Tyrolean Halltal (Austria), an RPAS flight was conducted in autumn 2012. The extreme alpine environment was challenging for both the mission and the evaluation of the aerial

  8. Estimation of the amount of telomere molecules in different human age groups and the telomere increasing effect of acupuncture and shiatsu on St.36, using synthesized basic units of the human telomere molecules as reference control substances for the bi-digital O-ring test resonance phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Omura, Y; Shimotsura, Y; Ooki, M; Noguchi, T

    1998-01-01

    who had exceptionally high telomere levels often had excellent physical conditions or mental acumen). The amounts of measured TTAGGG and CCCTAA molecules before and after acupuncture on St. 36 in adenocarcinomas and small cell carcinoma coexisting in the lung of a 54-yr.-old Asian male were: telomere in adenocarcinoma decreased from 950 ng to 750 ng and telomere in small cell carcinoma decreased from 770 ng to 600 ng. When the cancer treatment is effective, the amount of telomere is reduced towards the value of the normal internal organ. We found that acupuncture on St.36 on apparently normal subjects increased the telomere levels up to a maximum of more than 2 times their telomere levels prior to the treatment, depending on the method of treatment, but frequently increases were between 60% to 100%. Strong Shiatsu performed on St. 36 produced a somewhat lesser effect than acupuncture. We also determined the amounts of TTAGGG and CCCTAA molecules non-invasively in 3 mummified Egyptian sisters from the 8th Century BC on exhibit at the Museo Egizio in Turin, Italy in order to estimate their approximate ages (at the time of death). The amounts of body telomere were 500 ng, 550 ng, and 750 ng. For the prehistoric Iceman (about 3350 B.C. to 3310 B.C) discovered in 1991 in the Italian Otzal Alps at about 3,200 meters altitude, estimated body telomere was about 400 ng and telomere in brain and heart was 1600 ng, similar to that of a contemporary human being. Although these studies are preliminary, the findings may have potential applications not only in anti-aging, cancer treatments, and pathophysiology of brain and heart, but also for the estimation of the difference in the ages of cadavers studied in archeology and forensic medicine.