Science.gov

Sample records for 532-nm laser light

  1. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-Hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium John W. Obringer Martin D. Johnson Laser and Optics...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Lightl2-hours...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial USAFA F05611-02-P-0471 Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser-Light and 1064nm, 170 ps Pulsed

  2. Miniaturized diode laser module emitting green light at 532 nm with a power of more than 900 mW for next-generation holographic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Julian; Blume, Gunnar; Jedrzejczyk, Daniel; Eppich, Bernd; Feise, David; Kreutzmann, Sabrina; Sahm, Alexander; Paschke, Katrin

    2016-02-01

    We present a micro-integrated laser module based on an amplified diode laser and second harmonic generation which is a promising candidate for a green light source in next-generation 3D holographic displays. The light emitted by the amplified laser has a wavelength of 1064 nm, reaches a power up to 8.2 W and has a long coherence length of >400 m. For second harmonic generation, we tested two geometries of periodically poled lithium niobate crystals in single pass: a bulk crystal and a planar waveguide crystal. With the planar waveguide crystal, we achieve an output power >900 mW and a coherence length >20 m at a wavelength of 532 nm.

  3. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed Laser Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    years or younger, either sex, with no mitigating ocular or retinal pathology such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa , etc. Donor: The...USAFA TR 2004-01 Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps Pulsed...TR 2004-01 This article, "Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 120 ps

  4. In vitro assessment of fiber sweeping speed during Q-switched 532-nm laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Woo Jin; Stinson, Douglas; Choi, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) is considered a minimally invasive procedure to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). During the PVP, the prostate gland is irradiated by the 532-nm laser and the fiber is swept and dragged along the urethra. In this study the speed of sweeping fiber during the PVP is being investigated. In vitro porcine kidney model was used (N=100) throughout the experiment. A Q-switched 532-nm laser, equipped with sidefiring 750-Um fiber, was employed and set to power levels of 120 and 180 W. The speed of fiber sweeping was the only variable in this study and varied at 0 (i.e. no sweeping), 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 sweep/s. Ablation rate, depth, and coagulation thickness were quantified. Based on the current settings, ablation rate decreased as sweeping speed increased and was maximized between 0 to 1.0 sweep/s for 120-W power level and between 0 to 0.5 sweep/s for 180-W power level. Ablation rate at 180 W was higher than that at 120 W, regardless of sweeping speed. Ablation depth at both 120 and 180 W was maximized at 0 sweep/s and decreased 35% at 0.5 sweep/s. The overall coagulation thickness was less than 1.5 mm and comparable from 0 to 1.5 sweep/s (0.8~0.9 mm) and increased at 2.0 sweep/s (~1.1 mm). This study demonstrated that tissue ablation performance was contingent upon sweeping speed and maximized at slow sweeping speed due to longer laser-tissue interaction time and larger area coverage by the 532-nm light.

  5. Improving the laser-induced damage threshold of 532-nm antireflection coating using plasma ion cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meiping; Xing, Huanbin; Chai, Yingjie; Yi, Kui; Sun, Jian; Wang, Jianguo; Shao, Jianda

    2017-01-01

    BK7 glass substrates were precleaned by different cleaning procedures before being loaded into a vacuum chamber, and then a series of plasma ion cleaning procedures were conducted at different bias voltages in the vacuum chamber, prior to the deposition of 532-nm antireflection (AR) coatings. The plasma ion cleaning process was implemented by the plasma ion bombardment from an advanced plasma source. The surface morphology of the plasma ion-cleaned substrate, as well as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the 532-nm AR coating was investigated. The results indicated that the LIDT of 532-nm AR coating can be greatly influenced by the plasma ion cleaning energy. The plasma ion cleaning with lower energy is an attractive method to improve the LIDT of the 532-nm AR coating, due to the removal of the adsorbed contaminations on the substrate surface, as well as the removal of part of the chemical impurities hidden in the surface layer.

  6. A 532 nm Chaotic Fiber Laser Transmitter for Underwater Lidar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-23

    cooling to deal with the heat. There are no direct solid-state blue-green transitions, but neodymium -doped YAG crystal lasers (Nd:YAG)) is commonly...dopants include neodymium , thulium, praseodymium, yt- terbium, and erbium, but the latter two are by far the most common. Erbium-doped fiber lasers

  7. Performance of multilayer optical coatings under long-term 532nm laser exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulios, D.; Konoplev, O.; Chiragh, F.; Vasilyev, A.; Stephen, M.; Strickler, K.

    2013-11-01

    The effects of long-term exposure to high intensity 532 nm radiation on various dielectric-coated optics are studied. To investigate potential photodarkening effects on optical surfaces, an accelerated life test platform was constructed where optics were exposed to 532 nm radiation from a short-pulse, high repetition rate fiber amplifier at total doses up to 1 trillion shots. The first run of trillion-shot tests were conducted on e-beam deposited and ion beam sputtering (IBS) coated high reflecting mirrors with onsurface intensities ranging from 1.0-1.4 GW/cm2. It was found that the e-beam coated mirrors failed catastrophically at less than 150 billion shots, while the IBS coated mirror was able to complete the trillionshot test with no measurable loss of reflectivity. Profiling the IBS mirror surface with a high-resolution white light interferometer post-irradiation revealed a ~10 nm high photocontamination deposit at the irradiation site that closely matched the intensity profile of the laser spot. Trillion-shot surface exposure tests were also conducted at multiple surface sites of an LBO frequency doubling crystal at ~1.5 GW/cm2 at multiple surface sites. The transmitted power and on-surface beam size were monitored throughout the tests, and periodic measurements of the beam quality and waist location of the transmitted light were also made using an M2 meter. No changes in transmitted power or M2 were observed in any of the tests, but 3D surface profiling revealed laser-induced contamination deposits at each site tested.

  8. Remote Raman spectra of benzene obtained from 217 meters using a single 532 nm laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng; Madey, John M J; Price, Frank M; Sharma, Shiv K; Lienert, Barry

    2007-06-01

    This report describes a mobile Raman lidar system that has been developed for spectral measurements of samples located remotely at ranges of hundreds of meters. The performance of this system has been quantitatively verified in a lidar calibration experiment using a hard target of standardized reflectance. A new record in detection range was achieved for remote Raman systems using 532 nm laser excitation. Specifically, Raman spectra of liquid benzene were measured with an integration time corresponding to a single 532 nm laser pulse at a distance of 217 meters. The single-shot Raman spectra at 217 meters demonstrated high signal-to-noise ratio and good resolution sufficient for the unambiguous identification of the samples of interest. The transmitter consists of a 20 Hz Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm and 1064 nm and a 178 mm telescope through the use of which allows the system to produce a focused beam at the target location. The receiver consists of a large custom telescope (609 mm aperture) and a Czerny-Turner monochromator equipped with two fast photomultiplier tubes.

  9. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector at 532 nm and demonstration in satellite laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Chen, Sijing; You, Lixing; Meng, Wengdong; Wu, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhongping; Tang, Kai; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Weijun; Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-02-22

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) at a wavelength of 532 nm were designed and fabricated aiming to satellite laser ranging (SLR) applications. The NbN SNSPDs were fabricated on one-dimensional photonic crystals with a sensitive-area diameter of 42 μm. The devices were coupled with multimode fiber (ϕ = 50 μm) and exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency of 75% at an extremely low dark count rate of <0.1 Hz. An SLR experiment using an SNSPD at a wavelength of 532 nm was successfully demonstrated. The results showed a depth ranging with a precision of ~8.0 mm for the target satellite LARES, which is ~3,000 km away from the ground ranging station at the Sheshan Observatory.

  10. Interaction between high power 532nm laser and prostatic tissue: in vitro evaluation for laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Peng, Yihlih Steven; Stinson, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has been developed for effective treatment of obstructive benign prostatic hyperplasia. To maximize tissue ablation for large prostate gland, identifying the optimal power level for PVP is still necessary. We investigated the effect of various power levels on in vitro bovine prostate ablation with a 532-nm laser system. A custom-made 532-nm laser was employed to provide various power levels, delivered through a newly designed 750-μm side-firing fiber. Tissue ablation efficiency was evaluated in terms of power (P; 120~200W), treatment speed of fiber (TS; 2~8 mm/s), and working distance between fiber and tissue surface (WD; 1~5 mm). Coagulation depth was also estimated macroscopically and histologically (H&E) at various Ps. Both 180 and 200W yielded comparable ablated volume (104.3+/-24.7 vs. 104.1+/-23.9 mm3 at TS=4 mm/s and WD=2 mm; p=0.99); thus, 180W was identified as the optimal power to maximize tissue ablation, by removing tissue up to 80% faster than 120W (41.7+/-9.9 vs. 23.2+/-3.4 mm3/s at TS=4 mm/s and WD=2 mm; p<0.005). Tissue ablation was maximized at TS=4 mm/s and ablated equally efficiently at up to 3 mm WD (104.5+/-16.7 mm3 for WD=1 mm vs. 93.4+/-7.4 mm3 for WD=3 mm at 180W; p=0.33). The mean thickness of coagulation zone for 180W was 20% thicker than that for 120W (1.31+/-0.17 vs. 1.09+/-0.16 mm; p<0.005). The current in vitro study demonstrated that 180W was the optimal power to maximize tissue ablation efficiency with enhanced coagulation characteristics.

  11. Interaction of pulse laser radiation of 532 nm with model coloration layers for medieval stone artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colson, J.; Nimmrichter, J.; Kautek, W.

    2014-05-01

    Multilayer polychrome coatings on medieval and Renaissance stone artefacts represent substantial challenges in laser cleaning. Therefore, polychromic models with classical pigments, minium Pb22+PbO, zinc white (ZnO), and lead white ((PbCO3)2·Pb(OH)2) in an acrylic binder, were irradiated with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm. The studied medieval pigments exhibit strongly varying incubation behaviours directly correlated to their band gap energies. Higher band gaps beyond the laser photon energy of 2.3 eV require more incubative generation of defects for resonant transitions. A matching of the modification thresholds after more than four laser pulses was observed. Laser cleaning with multiple pulsing should not exceed ca. 0.05 J/cm2 when these pigments coexist in close spatial proximity.

  12. Effects of Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser radiation on `clean' cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloisi, F.; Vicari, L.; Barone, A. C.; Martuscelli, E.; Gentile, G.; Polcaro, C.

    The use of pulsed laser radiation in order to remove small particles from a substrate has gained a growing interest in the last decade, finding applications in several fields ranging from the microcircuits industry to cultural heritage restoration and conservation. The application of such a technique requires the knowledge of the correct laser irradiation parameters to be used in order to obtain a desired result avoiding substrate damage. In this paper we have studied the effect of frequency-doubled (532 nm) Nd:YAG laser radiation on clean cotton samples. We have observed that `yellowing' is present even at low fluences. This suggests that less invasive laser assisted particle removal techniques, some of which have already been proposed by different authors, must be considered.

  13. Influence of consecutive picosecond pulses at 532 nm wavelength on laser ablation of human teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirdan, Balsam M.; Antonelli, Luca; Batani, Dimitri; Jafer, Rashida; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Tarazi, Saad al; Villa, Anna Maria; Vodopivec, Bruno; Volpe, Luca

    2014-07-01

    The interaction of 40 ps pulse duration laser emitting at 532 nm wavelength with human dental tissue (enamel, dentin, and dentin-enamel junction) has been investigated. The crater profile and the surface morphology have been studied by using a confocal auto-fluorescence microscope (working in reflection mode) and a scanning electron microscope. Crater profile and crater morphology were studied after applying consecutive laser pulses and it was found that the ablation depth increases with the number of consecutive pulses, leaving the crater diameter unchanged. We found that the thermal damage is reduced by using short duration laser pulses, which implies an increased retention of restorative material. We observe carbonization of the irradiated samples, which does not imply changes in the chemical composition. Finally, the use of 40 ps pulse duration laser may become a state of art in conservative dentistry.

  14. Pulsed 532 nm laser wirestripping: Removal of dye-doped polyurethane insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, J.; Snyder, C.

    1994-07-01

    Removal of rhodamine 6G doped polyurethane insulation coated onto 50 μm diameter wire is shown to proceed efficiently and cleanly by irradiation with 532 nm Q-switched pulses from a Nd:YAG laser. The stripping action produced by this method is similar in quality to excimer laser wirestripping. Several experimental parameters were explored including fluence, pulse duration, dye concentration, and the number of incident pulses. Acceptable stripping conditions were obtained for a 3 5 s exposure at 10 Hz, using a dye concentration of 10% by weight, and 12 n pulses at 650 mJ/cm2. Nearly 0.5 μm/pulse is removed at this fluence, which exceeds the threshold fluence of ≈600 mJ/cm2 by only 50 mJ/cm2. The measured 532 nm absorption coefficient of the 10% dye-doped polyurethane was ≈4×104 cm-1. Lower fluences and/or dye concentrations produced inadequate stripping, while shorter duration pulses caused unacceptable melting of the thin gold layer which covered the copper core of the wire. Pulse-by-pulse photographs of the stripping action clearly show melting of the dye/polymer insulation, and thermal “rollback” of the insulation near the stripped end. Regardless, excellent edge definition is obtained by this method.

  15. The 532-nm 180-W (GreenLight®) laser vaporization of the prostate for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms: how durable is the new side-fire fiber with integrated cooling system?

    PubMed

    Brunken, Claus; Munsch, Maximilian; Tauber, Stephan; Schmidt, Rainer; Seitz, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The 532-nm side-fire laser vaporization is established for the treatment of symptomatic benign prostate hyperplasia. Meanwhile, the third generation of this system is offered by American Medical Systems, Inc. The laser power increased from 80 and 120 to 180 W from the first to the third generation. Despite good functional results, with the 80- and 120-W systems, the removal of prostate tissue is limited because of fiber degradation. To overcome this problem, the fiber was designed newly with an integrated cooling system and a sensor for decreasing the laser energy in case of overheating. We evaluate whether the new fiber still suffers from degradation with consecutive drop of power transmission during the procedure. The power output of the cooled fiber was measured in vitro and during prostate vaporization in ten patients. Laser beam power was measured at baseline and after the application each of 50 kJ during laser vaporization. Power emission of the fiber remains constant at 20, 80, and 180 W of power settings over the whole 40-kJ lifespan. During the transurethral procedure, a median total energy of 276 kJ (standard deviation 153 kJ) was applied for vaporization. Median power output from the fiber at the end of the procedure was 97% from the baseline value. There were no fiber malfunctions observed. In contrast to former generations, the third-generation laser fiber is durable without significant power loss during prostate vaporization.

  16. Stimulated scattering effects in gold-nanorod-water samples pumped by 532 nm laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiulin; Wu, Haopeng; Liu, Juan; Li, Shujing; He, Xingdao

    2015-07-15

    Stimulated scattering in gold-nanorod-water samples has been investigated experimentally. The scattering centers are impurity particles rather than the atoms or molecules of conventional homogeneous scattering media. The pump source for exciting stimulated scattering is a pulsed and narrow linewidth second-harmonic Nd: YAG laser, with 532 nm wavelength, ~8 ns pulse duration, and 10 Hz repetition rate. Experimental results indicate that SMBS, SBS and STRS can be generated in gold-nanorod-water samples under appropriate pump and absorption conditions. The incident pump energy has to be larger than a certain threshold value before stimulated scattering can be detected. The absorption coefficient of samples at 532 nm wavelength depends on the one of characteristic absorption bands of gold nanorods located around 530 nm. A critical absorption coefficient can be determined for the transition from SBS to STRS. Also, the spectral-line-broadening effects of STRS have been observed, the line-shape presents a pseudo-Voigt profile due to the random thermal motion of molecules and strong particle collision.

  17. MoXy fiber with active cooling cap for bovine prostate vaporization with high power 200W 532 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Steven Y.; Kang, Hyun Wook; Pirzadeh, Homa; Stinson, Douglas

    2011-03-01

    A novel MoXyTM fiber delivery device with Active Cooling Cap (ACCTM) is designed to transmit up to 180W of 532 nm laser light to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Under such high power tissue ablation, effective cooling is key to maintaining fiber power transmission and ensuring the reliability of the fiber delivery device To handle high power and reduce fiber degradation, the MoXy fiber features a larger core size (750 micrometer) and an internal fluid channel to ensure better cooling of the fiber tip to prevent the cap from burning, detaching, or shattering during the BPH treatment. The internal cooling channel was created with a metal cap and tubing that surrounds the optical fiber. In this study MoXy fibers were used to investigate the effect of power levels of 120 and 200 W on in-vitro bovine prostate ablation using a 532 nm XPSTM laser system. For procedures requiring more than 100 kJ, the MoXy fiber at 200W removed tissue at twice the rate of the current HPS fiber at 120W. The fiber maintained a constant tissue vaporization rate during the entire tissue ablation process. The coagulation at 200W was about 20% thicker than at 120W. In conclusion, the new fibers at 200W doubled the tissue removal rate, maintained vaporization efficiency throughout delivery of 400kJ energy, and induced similar coagulation to the existing HPS fiber at 120W.

  18. Optimal irradiance for sintering of inkjet-printed Ag electrodes with a 532nm CW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Yoon Jae; Kang, Heuiseok; Kang, Kyungtae; Hwang, Jun Young; Moon, Seung Jae

    2013-09-01

    Industrial solar cell fabrication generally adopts printing process to deposit the front electrodes, which needs additional heat treatment after printing to enhance electrical conductivity. As a heating method, laser irradiation draws attention not only because of its special selectivity, but also because of its intense heating to achieve high electric conductivity which is essential to reduce ohmic loss of solar cells. In this study, variation of electric conductivity was examined with laser irradiation having various beam intensity. 532 nm continuous wave (CW) laser was irradiated on inkjet-printed silver lines on glass substrate and electrical resistance was measured in situ during the irradiation. The results demonstrate that electric conductivity varies nonlinearly with laser intensity, having minimum specific resistance of 4.1 x 10-8 Ωm at 529 W/cm2 irradiation. The results is interesting because the specific resistance achieved by the present laser irradiation was about 1.8 times lower than the best value obtainable by oven heating, even though it was still higher by 2.5 times than that of bulk silver. It is also demonstrated that the irradiation time, needed to finish sintering process, decreases with laser intensity. The numerical simulation of laser heating showed that the optimal heating temperature could be as high as 300 oC for laser sintering, while it was limited to 250 oC for oven sintering. The nonlinear response of sintering with heating intensity was discussed, based on the results of FESEM images and XRD analysis.

  19. 532 nm Low-Power Laser Irradiation Facilitates the Migration of GABAergic Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells in Mouse Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzaki, Yumi; Shin, Hyeryun; Kawai, Hideki D.; Yamanoha, Banri; Kogure, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Accumulating evidence has shown that low-power laser irradiation (LLI) affects cell proliferation and survival, but little is known about LLI effects on neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). Here we investigate whether transcranial 532 nm LLI affects NSPCs in adult murine neocortex and in neurospheres from embryonic mice. Study Design/Materials and Methods We applied 532 nm LLI (Nd:YVO4, CW, 60 mW) on neocortical surface via cranium in adult mice and on cultured cells from embryonic mouse brains in vitro to investigate the proliferation and migration of NSPCs and Akt expression using immunohistochemical assays and Western blotting techniques. Results In vivo experiments demonstrated that 532 nm LLI significantly facilitated the migration of GABAergic NSPCs that were induced to proliferate in layer 1 by mild ischemia. In vitro experiments using GABAergic NSPCs derived from embryonic day 14 ganglionic eminence demonstrated that 532 nm LLI for 60 min promoted the migration of GAD67-immunopositive NSPCs with a significant increase of Akt expression. Meanwhile, the LLI induced proliferation, but not migration, of NSPCs that give rise to excitatory neurons. Conclusion It is concluded that 532 nm LLI promoted the migration of GABAergic NSPCs into deeper layers of the neocortex in vivo by elevating Akt expression. PMID:25919297

  20. LD pumped high-repetition-rate high-power 532nm Nd:YAG/LBO solid state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Liu, Dongyu; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Hu, Haowei; Zhang, Guangju; Yao, Yifei

    2013-09-01

    Diode pumped solid state 532 nm green laser is widely required for many industrial, medical and scientific applications. Among most of these applications, high power quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) green laser output is demanded. This can be efficiently achieved through a diode-side-pumped acoustic-optic Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with an intracavity second harmonic generation (SHG). In our experiment, LBO crystal is used for the second harmonic generation of high-average-power lasers of near infrared (NIR) range, though its effective NLO coefficient deff is relatively small. It is because of its high damage threshold (greater than 2.5 GW/cm2), large acceptance angle, small walk-off angle, and the nonhygroscopic characteristic. In this paper, we reported a high-repetition-rate high-power diode-side-pumped AO Q-switched Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. A plane-plane cavity with two rods, two AO Q-switches and the type II critical phase-matched LBO at room temperature were employed. Under the LD pump power of 480 W, 95.86 W at 1064 nm wavelength was achieved when the repetition rate was 15 kHz, and the 532 nm average output power of 44.77 W was obtained, with a pulse width of 111.7 ns, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 46.7% from 1064 nm to 532 nm. The 532 nm average output power was 40.10 W at a repetition rate of 10 kHz with a pulse width of 78.65 ns. The output characteristics of the SHG varying with the pumping current and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the laser were also investigated. Further improvement of the SHG is under study.

  1. In vitro assessment of fiber sweeping angle during Q-switched 532-nm laser tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabhandharaks, Danop; Kang, Hyun Wook; Ko, Woo Jin; Stinson, Douglas; Choi, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP) has been widely used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). It is well regarded as a safe and minimally invasive procedure and an alternative to the gold standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Despite of its greatness, as well aware of, the operative procedure time during the PVP is still prolonged. Such attempts have been tried out in order to shorten the operative time and increase its efficacy. However, scientific study to investigate techniques used during the PVP is still lacking. The objective of this study is to investigate how sweeping angle might affect the PVP performance. Porcine kidneys acquired from a local grocery store were used (N=140). A Q-switched 532-nm GreenLight XPSTM (American Medical Systems, Inc., MN, USA), together with 750- μm core MoXyTM fiber, was set to have power levels of 120 W and 180 W. Treatment speed and sweeping speed were fixed at 2 mm/s and 0.5 sweep/s, respectively. Sweeping angles were varied from 0 (no sweeping motion) to 120 degree. Ablation rate, depth, and coagulation zone were measured and quantified. Tissue ablation rate was peaked at 15 and 30 degree for both 120- and 180-W power levels and dramatically decreased beyond 60 degree. At 180 W, ablation rate increased 20% at 30 degree compared to 0 degree. This study demonstrated that ablation rate could be maximized and was contingent upon sweeping angle.

  2. 532-nm laser sources based on intracavity frequency doubling of extended-cavity surface-emitting diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchegrov, Andrei V.; Umbrasas, Arvydas; Watson, Jason P.; Lee, Dicky; Amsden, Charles A.; Ha, Wonill; Carey, Glen P.; Doan, Vincent V.; Moran, Bryan; Lewis, Alan; Mooradian, Aram

    2004-07-01

    We introduce a novel type of cw green laser source, the Protera 532, based on the intracavity frequency doubling of an extended-cavity, surface-emitting diode laser. The distinguishing characteristics of this platform are high compactness and efficiency in a stable, single-longitudinal mode with beam quality M2 < 1.2. The laser design is based on the previously reported NECSEL architecture used for 488nm lasers, and includes several novel features to accommodate different types of nonlinear optical materials. The infrared laser die wavelength is increased from 976nm to 1064nm without compromising performance or reliability. The intracavity frequency doubling to 532nm has been demonstrated with both bulk and periodically poled nonlinear materials, with single-ended cw power outputs of greater than 30 mW.

  3. Anti-Fungal Laser Treatment of Paper: A Model Study with a Laser Wavelength of 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilch, E.; Pentzien, S.; Mädebach, H.; Kautek, W.

    Biodeterioration of organic cultural heritage materials is a common problem. Particularly the removal of discoloration caused by fungal pigments is yet an unsolved problem in paper conservation. In the present study, cellulose (cotton and linters) and 16th century paper (rag), were incubated with several fungi types, such as Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Alternaria, Chaetomium, Aspergillus, Trichophyton, and Penicillium on agar for three weeks. Then they were immersed in 70% Ethanol for removal of hyphae and mycelia and deactivation of the remaining conidia. These specimens were laser-treated in a computer-controlled laser cleaning system with a high pulse energy diode pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm and a pulse duration of 8 ns. Colour differences were determined spectrophotometrically. Best cleaning results were observed with fungi such as Penicillium and Alternaria. Dry laser cleaning generally turned out to be superb over wet bleaching approaches.

  4. KTP 532-nm laser treatment of leg telangiectases resistant to sclerotherapy: follow-up after one year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangoni, Ovidio

    2002-10-01

    Leg telangiectasias are venous, arterial and arteriovenous capillarya dilatations of the subpapillary dermal plexus, which is directly connected to the deep dermal plexus and indirectly through perforating to the subfascial saphenic and deep venous circulation. These angectasias are almost always indicators of varicose pathology. After accurage history taking and precise diagnosis they should be treated by sclerosis, but only after having verified possible saphenous ostial refluxes which must be eliminated first by surgical means. Laser photosclerosis is aimed at the small (red) residual, resistant and matting vessels. The 532nm lasers are irreplaceable because of the surface delicacy with which they vaporise selectively the telangiectatic and vascular malforming lesions of the face. The aim of this study was to verify the effectiveness of the 532nm on leg angectasiae resistant to sclerotherapy. We used a laser 532nm Combi Zeiss, Jena in 20 cases selected for residual, resistant relapsing and matting leg telangiectasias (0,1 -1mm) on a total of 64 angectatic areas. The areas were cooled down with ice cubes for at least two minutes. 15 - 40 J/sq cm fluences, 10 - 50 msec. pulse durations and 1,5 mm spots were applied. As soon as the vessel blanched, it was cooled down for two further minutes. Four patients had positive results after one session only, twelve patients asked for a second session after 20 days, four patients were retouched for a third time. Follow up examinations were performed after 7-30 days and one year. In all cases the treatment was reported as painless. The immediate erythema was followed by microcrusting in 52 areas, which disappeared in 15-20 days. The one-year follow-up evidenced partial relapses in six patients and complete replases in four on a total of 30 areas (48%). Two patients had hypo-chromic micro-scars in three areas; two patients had four residual dyspigmented areas. Our results suggest that the use of the 532nm laser is justified in

  5. Reconditioning of the trabeculo-descemet's membrane with the 532-nm Nd : YAG (SLT) laser after deep sclerectomy.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, K; Mariani, A; Ravinet, E

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect of modified goniopuncture with the 532-nm Nd : YAG selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) laser on eyes after deep sclerectomy with collagen implant (DSCI). This was an interventional cased series. The effects of modified goniopuncture on eyes with insufficient IOP-lowering after DSCI were observed. Goniopuncture was performed using a Q-switched, frequency-doubled 532-nm Nd : YAG laser (SLT-goniopuncture, SLT-G). Outcome measures were amount of IOP-lowering and rapidity of decrease after laser intervention. In all, 10 eyes of 10 patients with a mean age of 71.0±7.7 (SD) years were treated with SLT-G. The mean time of SLT-G after DSCI procedure was 7.1±10.9 months. SLT-G decreased IOP from an average of 16.1±3.4 mm Hg to 14.2±2.8 mm Hg (after 15 min), 13.6±3.9 mm Hg (at 1 day), 12.5±4.1 mm Hg (at 1 month), and 12.6±2.5 (at 6 months) (P<0.0125). There were no complications related to the intervention. Patients in this series achieved an average 22.5% of IOP reduction after SLT-G. The use of the SLT laser appears to be an effective and safe alternative to the traditional Nd : YAG laser for goniopuncture in eyes after DSCI, with potential advantages related to non-perforation of trabeculo-descemet's membrane (TDM).

  6. Changing the optical and electrical properties of a crown dielectric surface using a 532 nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khairuzzaman, Md

    The optical response of a dielectric surface to a given laser radiation can be modified when this surface receives a supplemental uniform energy from an external source such as from the uniform electric field set up by a capacitor voltage. A low capacitor voltage across the dielectric can shift the wavelength of the probe laser as perceived by the dielectric surface toward smaller values. This shift is due to an increase of the vibrational frequency of the electric dipoles located on the dielectric surface. The change in the polarization properties of the dielectric surface suggests the usage of this configuration as an optoelectronic switch driven by a relatively small capacitor voltage. Another goal of this work is to observe the coupling between two lasers through a simultaneous interaction on the surface of a crown dielectric material. We analyze the destructive interference pattern between a weak probe laser and a stronger coupling laser in an electromagnetic induced transparency (EIT)-type configuration. We compare our destructive interference pattern obtained with crown glass illuminated with a diode laser of 532 nm, with previous results where a flint dielectric material was illuminated with the same radiation in similar experimental conditions.

  7. Fractional 532-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser: One of the safest novel treatment modality to treat café-au-lait macules.

    PubMed

    Won, Kwang Hee; Lee, Ye Jin; Rhee, Do Young; Chang, Sung Eun

    2016-10-01

    Café-au-lait macules (CALMs) are benign epidermal basilar hyperpigmentations that can be found in an isolated form or in association with neurocutaneous syndromes. Frequency-doubled Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (532-nm QSNYL) does not penetrate deeply into the skin and is therefore suitable for epidermal pigmented lesion. Fractional photothermolysis (FP) targets only very small areas of the skin, without injuring adjacent areas of healthy, normal skin. Herein, we report a case of CALMs successfully treated with fractional 532-nm QSNYL. By applying FP to 532-nm QSNYL, we could treat CALMs safely with less downtime as compared to conventional laser treatments and expect more energy delivery for each microscopic hole, thereby allowing higher response rate.

  8. Stimulated scattering effects in gold-nanorod-water samples pumped by 532 nm laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiulin; Wu, Haopeng; Liu, Juan; Li, Shujing; He, Xingdao

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated scattering in gold-nanorod-water samples has been investigated experimentally. The scattering centers are impurity particles rather than the atoms or molecules of conventional homogeneous scattering media. The pump source for exciting stimulated scattering is a pulsed and narrow linewidth second-harmonic Nd: YAG laser, with 532 nm wavelength, ~8 ns pulse duration, and 10 Hz repetition rate. Experimental results indicate that SMBS, SBS and STRS can be generated in gold-nanorod-water samples under appropriate pump and absorption conditions. The incident pump energy has to be larger than a certain threshold value before stimulated scattering can be detected. The absorption coefficient of samples at 532 nm wavelength depends on the one of characteristic absorption bands of gold nanorods located around 530 nm. A critical absorption coefficient can be determined for the transition from SBS to STRS. Also, the spectral-line-broadening effects of STRS have been observed, the line-shape presents a pseudo-Voigt profile due to the random thermal motion of molecules and strong particle collision. PMID:26173804

  9. Stimulated scattering effects in gold-nanorod-water samples pumped by 532 nm laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jiulin; Wu, Haopeng; Liu, Juan; Li, Shujing; He, Xingdao

    2015-07-01

    Stimulated scattering in gold-nanorod-water samples has been investigated experimentally. The scattering centers are impurity particles rather than the atoms or molecules of conventional homogeneous scattering media. The pump source for exciting stimulated scattering is a pulsed and narrow linewidth second-harmonic Nd: YAG laser, with 532 nm wavelength, ~8 ns pulse duration, and 10 Hz repetition rate. Experimental results indicate that SMBS, SBS and STRS can be generated in gold-nanorod-water samples under appropriate pump and absorption conditions. The incident pump energy has to be larger than a certain threshold value before stimulated scattering can be detected. The absorption coefficient of samples at 532 nm wavelength depends on the one of characteristic absorption bands of gold nanorods located around 530 nm. A critical absorption coefficient can be determined for the transition from SBS to STRS. Also, the spectral-line-broadening effects of STRS have been observed, the line-shape presents a pseudo-Voigt profile due to the random thermal motion of molecules and strong particle collision.

  10. The study of stability on a laser-diode-pumped high-power high-repetition-rate intracavity frequency-doubled 532-nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shi-yong; Yao, Jian-Quan; Xu, De-gang; Zhou, Rui; Zhang, Bai-gang; Zhou, Jia-ning; Wang, Peng

    2005-01-01

    High power laser-diode-pumped 532nm laser sources (including continuous wave and high repetition rate operation) are directly used for precise processing of metals and plastics. Furthermore, high power green laser will be used in some fields such as ocean exploration, laser probe and underwater communication. Recently, we reported a 110W diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG intracavity frequency doubled high stability 532nm laser. In the experiment, we found that the average output power of second harmonic fluctuated acutely with the variety of pumping current. Moreover, the length of arms between the mirrors were very sensitive to this cavity. We consider that one of the reason is the focus length of thermal lens of Nd:YAG rod alter with the variational pumping current, which makes the cavity be unstable. We consider the KTP crystal as a thin lens for its short length. As thermal lensing effect of the Nd:YAG rod is quite severe, so we consider it as thermal lensing medium. By ray matrix methods, we have obtained the stable regions and beam waist radii distribution in the flat-concave cavity. In our experiment, we used a pump head consisting of 80 diode bars with pentagon pump model and employed flat-concave cavity structure in order to achieve high stability output and increase output power. The total cavity length is 505mm. By using an acousto-optic Q-switching with high diffraction loss and the KTP crystal which is type II phase matching, 110 W high stability 532nm laser is achieved. The experimental result is in good agreement with the calculation.

  11. Successful Treatment of Tattoo-Induced Pseudolymphoma with Sequential Ablative Fractional Resurfacing Followed by Q-Switched Nd: YAG 532 nm Laser.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lucinda Siyun; Lucinda, Tan Siyun; Oon, Hazel Hwee; Hazel, Oon Hwee Boon; Lee, Joyce Siong Siong; Joyce, Lee Siong See; Chua, Sze Hon; Hon, Chua Sze

    2013-10-01

    Decorative tattooing has been linked with a range of complications, with pseudolymphoma being unusual and challenging to manage. We report a case of tattoo-induced pseudolymphoma, who failed treatment with potent topical and intralesional steroids. She responded well to sequential treatment with ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) followed by Q-Switched (QS) Nd:YAG 532 nm laser. Interestingly, we managed to document the clearance of her tattoo pigments after laser treatments on histology and would like to highlight the use of special stains such as the Grocott's Methenamine Silver (GMS) stain as a useful method to assess the presence of tattoo pigment in cases where dense inflammatory infiltrates are present.

  12. Laser intervention on trabeculo-Descemet's membrane after resistant viscocanalostomy: Selective 532 nm gonioreconditioning or conventional 1064 nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser goniopuncture?

    PubMed Central

    Sabur, Huri; Baykara, Mehmet; Can, Basak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the results of conventional 1064 nm neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum garnet laser goniopuncture (Nd:YAG-GP) and selective 532 nm Nd:YAG laser (selective laser trabeculoplasty [SLT]) gonioreconditioning (GR) on trabeculo-Descemet's membrane in eyes resistant to viscocanalostomy surgery. Methods: Thirty-eight eyes of 35 patients who underwent laser procedure after successful viscocanalostomy surgery were included in the study. When postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) was above the individual target, the eyes were scheduled for laser procedure. Nineteen eyes underwent 532 nm SLT-GR (Group 1), and the remaining 19 eyes underwent conventional 1064 nm Nd:YAG-GP (Group 2). IOPs before and after laser (1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and last visit), follow-up periods, number of glaucoma medications, and complications were recorded for both groups. Results: Mean times from surgery to laser procedures were 17.3 ± 9.6 months in Group 1 and 13.0 ± 11.4 months in Group 2. Mean IOPs before laser procedures were 21.2 ± 1.7 mmHg in Group 1 and 22.8 ± 1.9 mmHg in Group 2 (P = 0.454). Postlaser IOP measurements of Group 1 were 12.1 ± 3.4 mmHg and 13.8 ± 1.7 mmHg in the 1st week and last visit, respectively; in Group 2, these measurements were 13.6 ± 3.7 mmHg and 14.9 ± 4.8 mmHg, respectively. There were statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) in IOP reduction at all visits in both groups; the results of the two groups were similar (P > 0.05). Mean follow-up was 16.6 ± 6.4 months after SLT-GR and 18.9 ± 11.2 months after Nd:YAG-GP. Conclusions: While conventional Nd:YAG-GP and SLT-GR, a novel procedure, are both effective choices in eyes resistant to viscocanalostomy, there are fewer complications with SLT-GR. SLT-GR can be an alternative to conventional Nd:YAG-GP. PMID:27688277

  13. Spectroscopic study of carbon plasma produced by the first (1064 nm) and second (532 nm) harmonics of Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hanif, M.; Salik, M.; Arif, F.

    2015-03-15

    In this research work, spectroscopic studies of carbon (C) plasma by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are presented. The plasma was produced by the first (1064 nm) and second (532 nm) harmonics of a Q-switched Nd:YAG (Quantel Brilliant) pulsed laser having a pulse duration of 5 ns and 10-Hz repetition rate, which is capable of delivering 400 mJ at 1064 nm and 200 mJ at 532 nm. The laser beam was focused on the target material (100% carbon) by placing it in air at atmospheric pressure. The experimentally observed line profiles of five neutral carbon (C I) lines at 247.85, 394.22, 396.14, 588.95, and 591.25 nm were used to extract the electron temperature T{sub e} by using the Boltzmann plot method and determine its value, 9880 and 9400 K, respectively, for the fundamental and second harmonics of the laser, whereas the electron density N{sub e} was determined from the Stark broadening profile of neutral carbon line at 247.85 nm. The values of N{sub e} at a distance of 0.05 mm from the target surface for the fundamental-harmonic laser with a pulse energy of 130 mJ and the second-harmonic laser with a pulse energy of 72 mJ are 4.68 × 10{sup 17} and 5.98 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, respectively. This extracted information on T{sub e} and N{sub e} is useful for the deposition of carbon thin films by using the pulsed laser deposition technique. Moreover, both plasma parameters (T{sub e} and N{sub e}) were also calculated by varying the distance from the target surface along the line of propagation of the plasma plume and also by varying the laser irradiance.

  14. [Optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue with theoretical model of optics about biological tissues at Ar+ laser and 532 nm laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation in vitro].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua-jiang; Xing, Da; Wu, Guo-yong; Jin, Ying; Gu, Huai-min

    2004-05-01

    A double-integrating-spheres system, basic principle of measuring technology of ray radiation, and optical model of biological tissues were used for the study. Optical properties of human normal small intestine tissue at 476.5, 488, 496.5, 514.5 and 532 nm laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation were studied. The results of measurement showed that the total attenuation coefficient and scattering coefficient of the tissue at these wavelengths of laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation increased with decreasing wavelengths. And obviously there was a distinction at 514.5 to 532 nm wavelength between lasers and their linearly polarized laser irradiation. Absorption coefficient of tissue at these wavelengths of laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation increased with decreasing wavelengths. Absorption coefficient of tissue at 514.5 to 532 nm wavelength of laser was obviously decreasing, which was independent of these wavelengths of laser or their linearly polarized laser irradiation. Mean cosine of scattering of tissue at these wavelengths of laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation also increased with decreasing wavelengths. But penetration depth of tissue at these wavelengths of laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation also increased with increasing of wavelengths. Refractive index of tissue between these wavelengths of laser was within 1.38 to 1.48. Absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, total attenuation coefficient, effective attenuation coefficients of tissue in Kubelka-Munk two-flux model at the same wavelength of laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation showed no prominent distinction (P>0.01). Absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, total attenuation coefficient, effective attenuation coefficients of tissue in Kubelka-Munk two-flux model at different wavelength of laser and their linearly polarized laser irradiation showed obvious distinction. Optical properties of tissue

  15. Direct Write Processing of Multi-micron Thickness Copper Nano-particle Paste on Flexible Substrates with 532 nm Laser Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Espiricueta, Dunia; Fearon, Eamonn; Edwardson, Stuart; Dearden, Geoffrey

    The Laser Assisted Direct Write (LA-DW) method has been implemented in the development of different markets and material processing, recently also used for creating Printed Circuit Boards (PCB) or electrical circuitry. The process consists in the deposition of metallic nano-particle (NP) inks, which are afterwards cured or sintered by laser irradiation, thus creating conductive pathways; advantages are speed, accuracy and the protection of the heat affected zone (HAZ). This research will study the behaviour of the heat dissipation relatively within the Nano-particle Copper paste after being irradiated with 1064 nm and 532 nm wavelengths, research will be developed on different widths and depths deposited onto flat surfaces such as flexible PET. Comparisons to be made between resistivity results obtained from different wavelengths.

  16. Investigation of N2O Production from 266 and 532 nm Laser Flash Photolysis of O3/N2/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estupinan, E. G.; Nicovich, J. M.; Li, J.; Cunnold, D. M.; Wine, P. H.

    2002-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been employed to measure the amount of N2O produced from laser flash photolysis of O3/N2/O2 mixtures at 266 and 532 nm. In the 532 nm photolysis experiments very little N2O is observed, thus allowing an upper limit yield of 7 x 10(exp -8) to be established for the process O3 + N2 yield N2O + O2, where O3 is nascent O3 that is newly formed via O(3P(sub J)) + O2 recombination (with vibrational excitation near the dissociation energy of O3). The measured upper limit yield is a factor of approx. 600 smaller than a previous literature value and is approximately a factor of 10 below the threshold for atmospheric importance. In the 266 nm photolysis experiments, significant N2O production is observed and the N2O quantum yield is found to increase linearly with pressure over the range 100 - 900 Torr in air bath gas. The source of N2O in the 266 nm photolysis experiments is believed to be the addition reaction O(1D(sub 2)) + N2 + M yields (k(sub sigma)) N2O + M, although reaction of (very short-lived) electronically excited O3 with N2 cannot be ruled out by the available data. Assuming that all observed N2O comes from the O(1D(sub 2)) + N2 + M reaction, the following expression describes the temperature dependence of k(sub sigma) (in its third-order low-pressure limit) that is consistent with the N2O yield data: k(sub sigma) = (2.8 +/- 0.1) x 10(exp -36)(T/300)(sup -(0-88+0.36)) cm(sup 6) molecule(sup -2)/s, where the uncertainties are 2(sigma) and represent precision only. The accuracy of the reported rate coefficients at the 95% confidence level is estimated to be 30 - 40% depending on the temperature. Model calculations suggest that gas phase processes initiated by ozone absorption of a UV photon represent about 1.4% of the currently estimated global source strength of atmospheric N2O. However, these processes could account for a significant fraction of the oxygen mass-independent enrichment observed in atmospheric N2O, and

  17. Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals: nonaqueous fluids development, optical finish, and laser damage performance at 1064 nm and 532 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Ehrmann, P R; Bickel, R C

    2009-11-05

    Over the past year we have been working on specialized MR fluids for polishing KDP crystals. KDP is an extremely difficult material to conventionally polish due to its water solubility, low hardness, and temperature sensitivity. Today, KDP crystals are finished using single-point diamond turning (SPDT) tools and nonaqueous lubricants/coolants. KDP optics fabricated using SPDT, however, are limited to surface corrections due to tool/method characteristics with surface quality driven by microroughness from machine pitch, speed, force, and diamond tool character. MRF polishing offers a means to circumvent many of these issues since it is deterministic which makes the technique practical for surface and transmitted wavefront correction, is low force, and is temperature independent. What is lacking is a usable nonaqueous MR fluid that is chemically and physically compatible with KDP which can be used for polishing and subsequently cleaned from the optical surface. In this study, we will present the fluid parameters important in the design and development of nonaqueous MR fluid formulations capable of polishing KDP and how these parameters affect MRF polishing. We will also discuss requirements peculiar to successful KDP polishing and how they affect optical figure/finish and laser damage performance at 1064 nm and 532 nm.

  18. Investigation of wavelength-dependent tissue ablation: visible (λ=532 nm) vs IR (λ=2.01 μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Peng, Yihlih Steven

    2010-02-01

    Laser prostatectomy with various lasers has been shown to be effective in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. However, the impact of laser parameters on tissue ablation is still in question. The aim of this study is to experimentally characterize laser-tissue interactions in terms of wavelength by comparing visible (λ= 532 nm) and infrared (λ= 2.01 μm) spectra. Porcine kidney tissue was used as it has thermal properties and glandular structure similar to human prostatic tissue. Q-switched 532 nm (GreenLightTM HPS) and continuous-wave (CW) 2.01 μm (custom-made Tm:YAG) lasers were employed to remove soft tissue under various settings (power, working distance, and treatment speed). For both laser systems, ablation rate increased with power and was maximized at 4 mm/s. The 532 nm laser generated approximately 30% (p<0.005) higher ablation efficiency than the IR laser. A comparable ablation depth was found between the two wavelengths, but the 532nm laser generated relatively wider (up to 30%; p<0.005) craters. Owing to constant heating due the CW mode, the IR laser induced 20% thicker coagulation depth than the 532 nm (0.94 vs. 0.8 mm at 100 W; p<0.005). Histology also confirmed coagulation depth in response to each wavelength. Due to light absorption in aqueous environment, the IR laser exhibited a dramatic decrease in power transmission and ablation volume with increasing working distance whereas the 532 nm laser maintained relatively constant features. In conclusion, the characteristics of tissue ablation were contingent upon the applied wavelengths due to optical properties and laser parameters.

  19. Nonlinear optical response of nanocomposites based on KDP single crystal with incorporated Al2O3*nH2O nanofibriles under CW and pulsed laser irradiation at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. S.; Uklein, A. V.; Multian, V. V.; Dantec, R. Le; Kostenyukova, E. I.; Bezkrovnaya, O. N.; Pritula, I. M.; Gayvoronsky, V. Ya.

    2016-11-01

    Optical properties and nonlinear optical response due to the CW and pulsed laser radiation self-action at 532 nm were studied in composites based on KDP single crystals with incorporated nanofibriles of nanostructured oxyhydroxide of aluminum (NOA). It was shown a high optical quality and structural homogeneity of nanocomposites KDP:NOA by the transmittance spectra, elastic optical scattering and XRD analysis. It was observed manifestation of the second harmonic generation efficiency enhancement in the KDP:NOA versus the nominally pure KDP (λ=1064 nm, τ=1 ns) that is correlated with efficient refractive index self-modulation Δn ∼10-4 (λ=532 nm, τ=30 ps). In the pyramidal and prismatic growth sectors of the nominally pure KDP crystal it was shown opposite signs of the photoinduced variations both of the refractive index and of the optical absorption/bleaching due to resonant excitation of the native defects at 532 nm. It should be considered for the wide-aperture laser frequency KDP family based convertors fabrication.

  20. Measurement of optical absorption coefficient of bio-tissue at 532nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuyun; Li, Zhengjia; Yao, Yucheng; He, Yanyan

    2007-05-01

    Laser technology has succeeded in medical application. High power 532nm laser has applied in prostate ablation and other clinic application. To understand optical property of bio-tissue at 532nm wavelength, a method of monitoring surface temperature was used to measure absorption coefficient of gall-stone, porcine liver and canine prostate. The absorption coefficient of gall-stone is about 62cm -1 at 532nm wavelength, and those of porcine liver and canine prostate are about 13cm -1 and 5.4cm -1, respectively. These results help to understand the optical property of bio-tissue and offer theoretic reference for optical dosimetry in clinic application.

  1. Measurements of Stokes parameters of materials at 1064-nm and 532-nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Songxin; Narayanan, Ram M.; Kalshoven, James E., Jr.

    2001-09-01

    Laser radar systems have found wide applications in the field of remote sensing. Reflectance as well as polarization features are used together for applications ranging from environmental monitoring to target classification. The Stokes parameters are ideal quantities for characterizing the above features because they provide useful information on both light intensity and polarization state. The University of Nebraska is currently refurbishing an airborne multi-wavelength laser radar system based on the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) developed Airborne Laser Polarimetric Sensor (ALPS). The system uses a Nd:YAG laser operating at wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, and contains four channels at each wavelength to measure the polarization states. This system was used to measure the Stokes parameters of backscattered laser light from different materials. These included canvas tarp, white paper, plywood, concrete, aluminum plate and anodized aluminum plate. The data provide an understanding of the polarized scattering properties of various materials, and are expected to be useful in developing target discrimination algorithms.

  2. Assessment of the CALIPSO Lidar 532 nm Attenuated Backscatter Calibration Using the NASA LaRC Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Raymond R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Obland, Michael D.; Harper, David B.; Cook, Anthony L.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Winker, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) spacecraft has provided global, high-resolution vertical profiles of aerosols and clouds since it became operational on 13 June 2006. On 14 June 2006, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed aboard the NASA Langley B-200 aircraft for the first of a series of 86 underflights of the CALIPSO satellite to provide validation measurements for the CALIOP data products. To better assess the range of conditions under which CALIOP data products are produced, these validation flights were conducted under both daytime and nighttime lighting conditions, in multiple seasons, and over a large range of latitudes and aerosol and cloud conditions. This paper presents a quantitative assessment of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration (through the 532 nm total attenuated backscatter) using an internally calibrated airborne HSRL underflight data and is the most extensive study of CALIOP 532 nm calibration. Results show that average HSRL and CALIOP 532 nm total attenuated backscatter agree on average within 2.7% +/- 2.1% (CALIOP lower) at night and within 2.9 % +/- 3.9% (CALIOP lower) during the day., demonstrating the accuracy of the CALIOP 532 nm calibration algorithms. Additionally, comparisons with HSRL show consistency of the CALIOP calibration before and after the laser switch in 2009 as well as improvements in the daytime version 3 calibration scheme compared with the version 2 calibration scheme. Potential systematic uncertainties in the methodology relevant to validating satellite lidar measurements with an airborne lidar system are discussed and found to be less than 3.7% for this validation effort with HSRL. Results from this study are also compared to those from prior assessments of CALIOP calibration and attenuated backscatter.

  3. Tunable Solid-Etalon Filter for the ICESat/GLAS 532 nm Channel Lidar Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Martino, Anthony J.; Lunt, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was launched into Earth orbit on board the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) on January 12, 2003. GLAS is a laser altimeter designed to measure ice-sheet topography and associated temporal changes, as well as cloud and atmospheric properties. Each (of the three identical) GLAS lasers is a diode pumped, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with energy levels of 75 mJ (1064 nm) and 35 mJ (532 nm). The infrared pulse is used for both surface altimetry and atmospheric measurements while the green pulse is used primarily for atmospheric measurements. The receiver uses a 1 meter diameter telescope. We report on the tunable solid-etalon filter used in the ICESat/GLAS 532 nm channel lidar receiver.

  4. Morphological alterations on Citrobacter freundii bacteria induced by erythrosine dye and laser light.

    PubMed

    Silva, Josmary R; Cardoso, Gleidson; Maciel, Rafael R G; de Souza, Nara C

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the laser irradiation (532 nm) on films prepared from Citrobacter freundii mixed with erythrosine dye was investigated by using atomic force microscopy. It was observed that morphological changes of bacterial surfaces after irradiations, which were attributed to cellular damage of the outer membranes, are a result of a photodynamic effect. The results suggested that the combination of erythrosine and laser light at 532 nm could be a candidate to a photodynamic therapy against C. freundii.

  5. Nonlinear optical effects related to saturable and reverse saturable absorption by subphthalocyanines at 532 nm.

    PubMed

    Dini, Danilo; Vagin, Sergej; Hanack, Michael; Amendola, Vincenzo; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2005-08-14

    It is found that both effects of saturable absorption and reverse saturable absorption are obtained with a solution of subphthalocyanine at 532 nm depending on the intensity of 9 ns laser pulses; saturable absorption occurs at lower intensity levels whereas the reverse effect prevails at higher levels; contrary to expectations, subphthalocyanines can behave as reverse saturable absorbers at 532 nm, despite the high linear absorption at this wavelength; data have been fitted with a five-level model which considers three consecutive electronic transitions with absorption cross-section values of 1.4 x 10(-16), 1.0 x 10(-16) and 40 x 10(-16) cm(2), respectively.

  6. Optical characterization, visual function, and pursuit tracking performance using a 532 nm reflecting holographic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, D. A.; Lund, D. J.; Esgandarian, G. E.; Levine, R. R.; Stuck, B. E.; Beatrice, E. S.

    1982-09-01

    A series of tests, involving the optical characterization, visual function, and pursuit tracking, were conducted to evaluate a newly developed laser ocular protective filter. The filter, a reflecting holograph, was designed to provide narrow hand protection against the doubled neodymium (532 nm) wavelength. Optical characterization of the material was determined by measuring broad band radiant transmission through the filter, photopic luminous transmission, optical density (OD) at 532 nm, variation of OD as a function of position, and the relationship between OD and the angle of incidence. Tests of visual function included the Snellen Acuity Chart, Arden Contrast Sensitivity Test, and Farnsworth Munsell 100 Hue Test. Pursuit tracking was evaluated using the BLASER tracking simulator which utilizes a terrain board model with moving targets and a viscous-damped tracking device. The optical characterization test results showed that at the 530 nm rejection band the holographic filter at the 50% transmission point had a band width of 30 nm and a 3.7 OD was achieved over much of the filter. The visual functions test indicated that the subjects had difficulty in color discrimination involving blue and green. No systematic differences were found on the contrast sensitivity test or Snellen Acuity Test.

  7. Seagrass Identification Using High-Resolution 532nm Bathymetric LiDAR and Hyperspectral Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Prasad, S.; Starek, M. J.; Fernandez Diaz, J. C.; Glennie, C. L.; Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Singhania, A.; Gibeaut, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Seagrass provides vital habitat for marine fisheries and is a key indicator species of coastal ecosystem vitality. Monitoring seagrass is therefore an important environmental initiative, but measuring details of seagrass distribution over large areas via remote sensing has proved challenging. Developments in airborne bathymetric light detection and ranging (LiDAR) provide great potential in this regard. Traditional bathymetric LiDAR systems have been limited in their ability to map within the shallow water zone (< 1 m) where seagrass is typically present due to limitations in receiver response and laser pulse length. Emergent short-pulse width bathymetric LiDAR sensors and waveform processing algorithms enable depth measurements in shallow water environments previously inaccessible. This 3D information of the benthic layer can be applied to detect seagrass and characterize its distribution. Researchers with the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM) at the University of Houston (UH) and the Coastal and Marine Geospatial Sciences Lab (CMGL) of the Harte Research Institute at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi conducted a coordinated airborne and boat-based survey of the Redfish Bay State Scientific Area as part of a collaborative study to investigate the capabilities of bathymetric LiDAR and hyperspectral imaging for seagrass mapping. Redfish Bay, located along the middle Texas coast of the Gulf of Mexico, is a state scientific area designated for the purpose of protecting and studying native seagrasses. Redfish Bay is part of the broader Coastal Bend Bays estuary system recognized by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a national estuary of significance. For this survey, UH acquired high-resolution discrete-return and full-waveform bathymetric data using their Optech Aquarius 532 nm green LiDAR. In a separate flight, UH collected 2 sets of hyperspectral imaging data (1.2-m pixel resolution and 72 bands, and 0.6m pixel resolution and 36

  8. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.; Geurtsen, G. P.; Rothschild, M.

    2013-02-07

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above {approx}50 MW/cm{sup 2}. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficients for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.

  9. Efficient second-harmonic conversion of CW single-frequency Nd:YAG laser light by frequency locking to a monolithic ring frequency doubler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstenberger, D. C.; Tye, G. E.; Wallace, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Efficient second-harmonic conversion of the 1064-nm output of a diode-pumped CW single-frequency Nd:YAG laser to 532 nm was obtained by frequency locking the laser to a monolithic ring resonator constructed of magnesium-oxide-doped lithium niobate. The conversion efficiency from the fundamental to the second harmonic was 65 percent. Two hundred milliwatts of CW single-frequency 532-nm light were produced from 310 mW of power of 1064-nm light. This represents a conversion efficiency of 20 percent from the 1-W diode laser used to pump the Nd:YAG laser to single-frequency 532-nm output. No signs of degradation were observed for over 500 h of operation.

  10. Revised Calibration Strategy for the CALIOP 532 nm Channel. Part II; Daytime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Kathleen A.; Vaughan, Mark A.; Kuehn, Ralph; Hunt, William H.; Pee, Kam-Pui

    2008-01-01

    The CALIPSO lidar (CALIOP) makes backscatter measurements at 532 nm and 1064 nm and linear depolarization ratios at 532 nm. Accurate calibration of the backscatter measurements is essential in the retrieval of optical properties. An assessment of the nighttime 532 nm parallel channel calibration showed that the calibration strategy used for the initial release (Release 1) of the CALIOP lidar level 1B data was acceptable. In general, the nighttime calibration coefficients are relatively constant over the darkest segment of the orbit, but then change rapidly over a short period as the satellite enters sunlight. The daytime 532 nm parallel channel calibration scheme implemented in Release 1 derived the daytime calibration coefficients from the previous nighttime coefficients. A subsequent review of the daytime 532 nm parallel channel calibration revealed that the daytime calibration coefficients do not remain constant, but vary considerably over the course of the orbit, due to thermally-induced misalignment of the transmitter and receiver. A correction to the daytime calibration scheme is applied in Release 2 of the data. Results of both nighttime and daytime calibration performance are presented in this paper.

  11. Thermal and damage data from multiple microsecond pulse trains at 532nm in an in vitro retinal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Michael L.; Tijerina, Amanda J.; Hoffman, Aaron; Clark, Clifton D.; Noojin, Gary D.; Rickman, John M.; Castellanos, Cherry C.; Shingledecker, Aurora D.; Boukhris, Sarah J.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-03-01

    An artificially pigmented retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell model was used to study the damage rates for exposure to 1, 10, 100, and 1,000 230-μs laser pulses at 532 nm, at two different concentrations of melanosome particles (MPs) per cell. Multiple pulses were delivered at pulse repetition rates of 50 and 99 pulses per second. Standard fluorescence viability indicator dyes and the method of microthermography were used to assess damage and thermal responses, respectively. Although frame rate during microthermography was more than five times slower than the duration of laser pulses, thermal information was useful in refining the BTEC computational model for simulating high-resolution thermal responses by the pigmented cells. When we temporally sampled the thermal model output at a rate similar to our microthermography, the resulting thermal profiles for multiple pulses resembled the thermal experimental profiles. Complementary to the thermal simulations, our computer-generated thresholds were in good agreement with the in vitro data. Findings are examined within the context of common exposure limit definitions in the national and international laser safety standards.

  12. Enhanced light scattering in Si nanostructures produced by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sberna, P. M.; Scapellato, G. G.; Piluso, N.; Boninelli, S.; Miritello, M.; Crupi, I.; Bruno, E.; Privitera, V.; Simone, F.; Mirabella, S.

    2013-11-01

    An innovative method for Si nanostructures (NS) fabrication is proposed, through nanosecond laser irradiation (λ = 532 nm) of thin Si film (120 nm) on quartz. Varying the laser energy fluences (425-1130 mJ/cm2) distinct morphologies of Si NS appear, going from interconnected structures to isolated clusters. Film breaking occurs through a laser-induced dewetting process. Raman scattering is enhanced in all the obtained Si NS, with the largest enhancement in interconnected Si structures, pointing out an increased trapping of light due to multiple scattering. The reported method is fast, scalable and cheap, and can be applied for light management in photovoltaics.

  13. Resolved Sideband Spectroscopy and Cooling of Strontium in a 532-nm Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, James; Hill, Joshua; Killian, T. C.

    2016-05-01

    Resolved sideband cooling is a powerful and well established technique for driving ultracold atoms in optical lattices to the motional ground state of individual lattice sites. Here we present spectroscopy of the narrow 5s21S0 --> 5 s 5 p3P1 transition for neutral strontium-84 in a 532nm optical lattice. Resolved red- and blue-detuned sidebands are observed corresponding to changes in the motional state in the lattice sites. Driving the red sideband, we demonstrate cooling into the ground state, which increases the initial phase-space density before forced evaporative cooling. This is a promising technique for improving the production of strontium quantum degenerate gases. Research supported by the Robert A, Welch Foundation under Grant No. C-1844.

  14. Effect of visible laser light on ATP level of anaemic red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Suardi, Nursakinah; Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Mustafa, Mohd Zulkifli; Ali, Zalila

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present influence of visible laser light on ATP level and viability of anaemic red blood cell (RBC). The visible laser lights used in this work are 460nm and 532nm. The responses of ATP level in anaemic and normal RBC before and after laser irradiation at different exposure time (30, 40, 50 and 60s) were observed. Three aliquots were prepared from the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) blood sample. One served as a control (untreated) and another two were irradiated with 460nm and 560nm lasers. Packed RBC was prepared to study ATP level in the RBC using CellTiter-GloLuminescent cell Viability Assay kit. The assay generates a glow type signal produced by luciferase reaction, which is proportional to the amount of ATP present in RBCs. Paired t-test were done to analyse ATP level before and after laser irradiation. The results revealed laser irradiation improve level of ATP in anaemic RBC. Effect of laser light on anaemic RBCs were significant over different exposure time for both 460nm (p=0.000) and 532nm (p=0.003). The result of ATP level is further used as marker for RBC viability. The influence of ATP level and viability were studied. Optical densities obtained from the data were used to determine cell viability of the samples. Results showed that laser irradiation increased viability of anaemic RBC compared to normal RBC.

  15. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  16. Evaluation of CALIOP 532-nm Aerosol Optical Depth Over Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Winker, D.; Omar, A.; Vaughan, M.; Kar, J.; Trepte, C.; Hu, Y.; Schuster, G.

    2015-01-01

    With its height-resolved measurements and near global coverage, the CALIOP lidar onboard the CALIPSO satellite offers a new capability for aerosol retrievals in cloudy skies. Validation of these retrievals is difficult, however, as independent, collocated and co-temporal data sets are generally not available. In this paper, we evaluate CALIOP aerosol products above opaque water clouds by applying multiple retrieval techniques to CALIOP Level 1 profile data and comparing the results. This approach allows us to both characterize the accuracy of the CALIOP above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD) and develop an error budget that quantifies the relative contributions of different error sources. We focus on two spatial domains: the African dust transport pathway over the tropical North Atlantic and the African smoke transport pathway over the southeastern Atlantic. Six years of CALIOP observations (2007-2012) from the northern hemisphere summer and early fall are analyzed. The analysis is limited to cases where aerosol layers are located above opaque water clouds so that a constrained retrieval technique can be used to directly retrieve 532 nm aerosol optical depth and lidar ratio. For the moderately dense Sahara dust layers detected in the CALIOP data used in this study, the mean/median values of the lidar ratios derived from a constrained opaque water cloud (OWC) technique are 45.1/44.4 +/- 8.8 sr, which are somewhat larger than the value of 40 +/- 20 sr used in the CALIOP Level 2 (L2) data products. Comparisons of CALIOP L2 AOD with the OWC-retrieved AOD reveal that for nighttime conditions the L2 AOD in the dust region is underestimated on average by approx. 26% (0.183 vs. 0.247). Examination of the error sources indicates that errors in the L2 dust AOD are primarily due to using a lidar ratio that is somewhat too small. The mean/median lidar ratio retrieved for smoke is 70.8/70.4 +/- 16.2 sr, which is consistent with the modeled value of 70 +/- 28 sr used in the

  17. Biomodulation of light on cells in laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Yan; Duan, Rui; Cai, Xiongwei

    2002-04-01

    In laser surgery, it has been observed pulsed 532-nm laser can avoid postoperative purpura, but pulsed 585-nm, 595-nm or 600-nm lasers nonetheless cause purpura when they were used to treat port-wine stains; the XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) can safely and effectively clear psoriasis; both XeCl excimer laser and Ho:YAG laser were used in coronary interventions, but only former was approved by the FDA; open channels after ultraviolet (UV) laser treatment and closed channels with infrared (IR) lasers for transmyocardial laser revascularization; and so on. In this paper, the biological information model of low intensity laser (BIML) is extended to include UVA biomodulation and is used to understand these phenomena. Although the central intensity of the laser beam is so intense that it destroys the tissue, the edge intensity is so low that it can induce biomodulation. Our investigation showed that biomodulation of light on cells might play an important role in the long-term effects of laser surgery.

  18. Efficient green-light generation by frequency doubling of a picosecond all-fiber ytterbium-doped fiber amplifier in PPKTP waveguide inscribed by femtosecond laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chenghou; Huang, Zhangchao; Lou, Kai; Liu, Hongjun; Wang, Yishan; Li, Yongnan; Lu, Fuyun; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2010-11-22

    We have demonstrated an ultrashort, compact green light radiation by frequency doubling of an all-fiber ytterbium-doped fiber laser source in a PPKTP waveguide fabricated by femtosecond laser pulses. Using the fabricated PPKTP waveguide crystal containing a 10 mm single grating with a period of 9.0 μm, we generate 310 mW of picosecond radiation at 532 nm for a fundamental power of 1.6W, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 19.3%. The temperature tuning range of 8°C is achieved for a fixed fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, the FWHM of the wavelength tuning curve is 4.2 nm at room temperature. The generated ultrashort pulses at 532 nm are of great importance and have comprehensive applications in photobiology research and high-resolution spectroscopy.

  19. Direct laser light enhancement of susceptibility of bacteria to gentamicin antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznick, Yana; Banin, Ehud; Lipovsky, Anat; Lubart, Rachel; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-11-01

    ObjectivesTo test the effect of pulsed (Q-switched) and continuous wave (CW) laser light at wavelength of 532 nm on the viability of free-living stationary phase bacteria with and without gentamicin (an antibiotic) treatment. MethodsFree living stationary phase gram negative bacteria ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1) was immersed in Luria Broth (LB) solution and exposed to Q-switched and CW lasers with and without the addition of the antibiotic gentamicin. Cell viability was determined at different time points. ResultsLaser treatment alone did not reduce cell viability compared to untreated control and the gentamicin treatment alone only resulted in a 0.5 log reduction in the viable count for P. aeruginosa. The combined laser and gentamicin treatment, however, resulted in a synergistic effect and viability was reduced by 8 logs for P. aeruginosa PAO1. ConclusionsCombination of laser light with gentamicin shows an improved efficacy against P. aeruginosa.

  20. Effect of laser-radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in nanodiamond suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Vanyukov, V. V.; Mogileva, T. N.; Puzyr', A. P.; Bondar', V. S.; Svirko, Yu. P.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of laser radiation polarization on the nonlinear scattering of light in aqueous suspensions of detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) in a regime of optical power limiting (OPL) has been studied. It is established that the nonlinear transmission coefficient of DND suspension in the OPL regime in a field of nanosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm is independent of the polarization of incident radiation. The nonlinear scattering of light observed at an angle of 90° in the plane perpendicular to the plane of polarization of the incident radiation depends on the polarization angle in accordance with a trigonometric law. It is shown that the ratio of the signals of scattered radiation for the vertical and horizontal polarizations exhibits nonmonotonic dependence on the laser-beam power density. The results are explained by the Rayleigh-Mie scattering and a change in the size of scattering centers as a result of the effect of a laser upon the DND suspension.

  1. Red, blue, and green laser-light generation from the NYAB nonlinear crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaque Garcia, Daniel; Capmany, Juan; Sole, Jose G.

    1999-11-01

    Continuous wave red, green, and blue laser light are generated under IR-pumping crystals of Nd3+:YAl3(BO3)4 by a Ti:sapphire laser. The red (669-nm) and green (532-nm) radiations are obtained by self-frequency doubling of the fundamental laser lines at 1338 nm (4F3/2 yields 4I13/2 channel) and 1062 nm (4F3/2 yields 4I11/2 channel), respectively. Blue laser radiation (458 nm) is achieved by self-sum-frequency mixing of the main laser line at 1062 nm and the pumping radiation at 807 nm. The main spectroscopic and nonlinear properties of this crystal are included. In addition, a simple model devoted to optimizing the blue radiation is provided.

  2. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  3. Transcranial measurement of diffuse light reflectance from brain edema in rats: effect of change in the blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Okada, Yoshiaki; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-04-01

    We assumed that edema causes a decrease in the scattering coefficient of brain tissue and hence a decrease in the intensity of diffuse reflectance from the brain. On the basis of this assumption, we attempted to transcranially detect a formation of brain edema by measuring diffuse light reflectance. In rats, edema was induced by making a cold injury in the brain. The skull was irradiated with 633-nm and 532-nm laser light delivered through an optical fiber, and the diffuse light reflectance from the brain was collected with another optical fiber. We observed that reflectance intensities were significantly decreased around the cold injury both at 633 nm and 532 nm, suggesting that scattering coefficient of brain tissue was reduced due to a formation of edema in this area. In the injury, reflectance intensity was increased at 532 nm, indicating that cerebral blood volume was decreased in this region.

  4. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  5. Formation of temperature fields in doped anisotropic crystals under spatially inhomogeneous light beams passing through them

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, E. V.; Markelov, A. S.; Trushin, V. N. Chuprunov, E. V.

    2013-12-15

    The features of formation of thermal fields in potassium dihydrophosphate crystal doped with potassium permanganate under a 532-nm laser beam passing through it have been investigated. Data on the influence of birefringence on the temperature distribution in an anisotropic crystal whose surface is illuminated by a spatially modulated light beam are presented.

  6. Solid-state laser source of narrowband ultraviolet B light for skin disease care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Aleksandr A.; Chu, Hong

    2013-03-01

    We report about the development of all-solid-state laser source of narrowband UV-B light for medical applications. The device is based on a gain-switched Ti: Sapphire laser with volume Bragg grating, pumped at 532 nm and operating at 931.8 nm, followed by a third harmonic generator and a fiber optic beam homogenizer. The maximum available pulse energy exceeded 5 mJ at 310.6 nm, with a pulse repetition rates of 50 Hz. The output characteristics satisfy the medical requirements for psoriasis and vitiligo treatment. A new optical scheme for third harmonic generation enhancement at moderate levels of input intensities is proposed and investigated. As a result, 40% harmonic efficiency was obtained, when input pulse power was only 300 kW.

  7. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  8. Simultaneous Filtered and Unfiltered Light Scattering Measurements in Laser Generated Air Sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbach, Christopher; Miles, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Elastic laser light scattering may be used to measure the thermofluidic properties of gases and plasmas, including but not limited to density, temperature and velocity. Most of this information is contained within the spectra of the scattered radiation. This may be measured directly through dispersion or indirectly, by passing the light through an atomic or molecular vapor filter with known absorption features. In this work, filtered and unfiltered laser light scattering is used to diagnose air sparks generated by a 1064 nm Q-switched laser. The probe laser consists of a second Q-switched Nd:YAG laser frequency doubled to 532 nm. Simultaneous unfiltered and filtered images of the scattering are captured by a Princeton Instruments ICCD camera by using a 50 mm diameter concave re-imaging mirror. The filter consists of a well-characterized molecular Iodine cell. In the shock wave formed by the laser spark, spatially resolved measurements of density, temperature and radial velocity are extracted and compared with theory and models. Measurements in the spark core probe the ion feature of the electron Thomson scattering, from which ne and T can be extracted with the assumption Te =Ti . Partial funding was provided by General Electric Global Research Center: Niskayuna, New York. The first author is also supported by a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  9. Lighting with laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Chandrajit; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

    Contemporary white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are much more efficient than compact fluorescent lamps and hence are rapidly capturing the market for general illumination. LEDs are also replacing halogen lamps or even newer xenon based lamps in automotive headlamps. Because laser diodes are inherently much brighter and often more efficient than corresponding LEDs, there is great research interest in developing laser diode based illumination systems. Operating at higher current densities and with smaller form factors, laser diodes may outperform LEDs in the future. This article reviews the possibilities and challenges in the integration of visible laser diodes in future illumination systems.

  10. Vibration mode shapes visualization in industrial environment by real-time time-averaged phase-stepped electronic speckle pattern interferometry at 10.6 μm and shearography at 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Languy, Fabian; Vandenrijt, Jean-François; Thizy, Cédric; Rochet, Jonathan; Loffet, Christophe; Simon, Daniel; Georges, Marc P.

    2016-12-01

    We present our investigations on two interferometric methods suitable for industrial conditions dedicated to the visualization of vibration modes of aeronautic blades. First, we consider long-wave infrared (LWIR) electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). The use of long wavelength allows measuring larger amplitudes of vibrations compared with what can be achieved with visible light. Also longer wavelengths allow lower sensitivity to external perturbations. Second, shearography at 532 nm is used as an alternative to LWIR ESPI. Both methods are used in time-averaged mode with the use of phase-stepping. This allows transforming Bessel fringes, typical to time averaging, into phase values that provide higher contrast and improve the visualization of vibration mode shapes. Laboratory experimental results with both techniques allowed comparison of techniques, leading to selection of shearography. Finally a vibration test on electrodynamic shaker is performed in an industrial environment and mode shapes are obtained with good quality by shearography.

  11. ERL R&D: Laser and Laser Light Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehy, B.

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the photocathode gun in the ERL requires that a tightly controlled optical pulse train, consisting of temporally and spatially shaped pulses, be delivered at the photocathode in synchrony with the RF field in the gun cavity. The pulse train must also be dynamically variable, in order to tune or ramp up the current in the ERL. A laser was developed especially for this task by Lumera Laser GmbH, of Kaiserslautern Germany, under design supervision and review of the ERL project. Following the final design review, the laser was delivered in August 2009. Preliminary tests certifying its compliance with design specifications have been performed, with further tests planned following the final certification of the ERL laser room in January 2010. The development of the necessary spatial and temporal shaping techniques is an ongoing project: proof of principle experiments have been successfully carried out with a laser of similar pulse width, operating at 532 nm and 81.5 MHz. The next stage is to evaluate the application of these techniques and alternatives, using the operations laser. A transport line has been designed and the propagation of a shaped pulse through it to the photocathode simulated and tested experimentally. As the performance of the complete photocathode drive system is critical for ERL operation, an extensive set of diagnostics will be in place to monitor and maintain its performance. The block diagram in Fig. 1 breaks the optical system down into its basic components, which are discussed.

  12. Analysis of Laser Breakdown Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Experiments on laser breakdown for ns pulses of 532 nm or 1064 nm light in water and dozens of simple hydrocarbon liquids are analyzed and compared to widely-used models and other laser breakdown experiments reported in the literature. Particular attention is given to the curve for the probability of breakdown as a function of the laser fluence at the beam focus. Criticism is made of the na"ive forms of both ``avalanche'' breakdown and multi-photon breakdown. It appears that the process is complex and is intimately tied to the chemical group of the material. Difficulties with developing an accurate model of laser breakdown in liquids are outlined.

  13. High-quality ultraviolet beam generation in multimode photonic crystal fiber through nondegenerate four-wave mixing at 532 nm.

    PubMed

    Sévigny, Benoit; Cassez, Andy; Vanvincq, Olivier; Quiquempois, Yves; Bouwmans, Géraud

    2015-05-15

    All-fiber ultraviolet (UV) light sources are of great practical interest for a multitude of applications spanned across different sectors, from industrial processes such as nonthermal, high-resolution materials processing, to biomedical applications such as eye surgery, to name a few. However, production of UV light sources with high beam quality has been a problem to this day as the fiber designs required to reach UV wavelengths by four-wave mixing with widely available pumps (i.e., 532 nm) are challenging because of their small size and increased risk of material damage. In this Letter, a specific pumping scheme is presented that allows the conversion of two pump photons in different modes to UV light in the fundamental mode and the corresponding idler in a higher order mode. The process has also been shown to work experimentally, and UV light at 390.5 nm in the fundamental mode was successfully generated.

  14. Laser light scattering review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaetzel, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Since the development of laser light sources and fast digital electronics for signal processing, the classical discipline of light scattering on liquid systems experienced a strong revival plus an enormous expansion, mainly due to new dynamic light scattering techniques. While a large number of liquid systems can be investigated, ranging from pure liquids to multicomponent microemulsions, this review is largely restricted to applications on Brownian particles, typically in the submicron range. Static light scattering, the careful recording of the angular dependence of scattered light, is a valuable tool for the analysis of particle size and shape, or of their spatial ordering due to mutual interactions. Dynamic techniques, most notably photon correlation spectroscopy, give direct access to particle motion. This may be Brownian motion, which allows the determination of particle size, or some collective motion, e.g., electrophoresis, which yields particle mobility data. Suitable optical systems as well as the necessary data processing schemes are presented in some detail. Special attention is devoted to topics of current interest, like correlation over very large lag time ranges or multiple scattering.

  15. The ARGOS laser system: green light for ground layer adaptive optics at the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Walfried; Rabien, Sebastian; Gässler, Wolfgang; Esposito, Simone; Barl, Lothar; Borelli, Jose; Daysenroth, Matthias; Gemperlein, Hans; Kulas, Martin; Ziegleder, Julian

    2014-07-01

    We report on the development of the laser system of ARGOS, the multiple laser guide star adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The system uses a total of six high powered, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers frequency-doubled to a wavelength of 532 nm to generate a set of three guide stars above each of the LBT telescopes. The position of each of the LGS constellations on sky as well as the relative position of the individual laser guide stars within this constellation is controlled by a set of steerable mirrors and a fast tip-tilt mirror within the laser system. The entire opto-mechanical system is housed in two hermetically sealed and thermally controlled enclosures on the SX and DX side of the LBT telescope. The laser beams are propagated through two refractive launch telescopes which focus the beams at an altitude of 12 km, creating a constellation of laser guide stars around a 4 arcminute diameter circle by means of Rayleigh scattering. In addition to the GLAO Rayleigh beacon system, ARGOS has also been designed for a possible future upgrade with a hybrid sodium laser - Rayleigh beacon combination, enabling diffraction limited operation. The ARGOS laser system was successfully installed at the LBT in April 2013. Extensive functional tests have been carried out and have verified the operation of the systems according to specifications. The alignment of the laser system with respect to the launch telescope was carried out during two more runs in June and October 2013, followed by the first propagation of laser light on sky in November 2013.

  16. Design of LCPG-type polarization-independent shutter with diffractive efficiency and high contrast at wavelength 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavosh Tehrani, Masoud; Sajad Mousavi Fard, Sayed

    2017-02-01

    We have designed liquid crystal (LC) shutter of LCPG type with high diffractive efficiency and transmission rate of more than 99.747% for modulation of non-polar light with wavelength 532 nm and high contrast in this article. Compared to other similar cases, the advantages of this design include maximization of transmission percent of diffractive element (particularly first-order diffraction) and minimization of light leakage rate caused by zero-order, and other unwanted diffractive orders. The conditions have been prepared for using diffractive elements (gratings) with shorter periods and acquisition of diffraction orders with greater diffraction angles by benefitting from suitable compounds of LC in the given design. Similarly, required measures have been taken for the deletion of adverse effects caused by reflection from optic surfaces so that very appropriate status is prepared for the function of LCPG shutter.

  17. Continuous-wave 532 nm pumped MgO:PPLN optical parametric oscillator with external power regulation and spatial mode filtering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seung Kwan; Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Hee Su; Lee, Jae Yong; Choi, Sang-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    We report a continuous-wave (CW) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO(3) (MgO:PPLN) crystal. The 532 nm pump generates coherent radiation that is tunable from 800 to 920 nm for the signal and from 1250 to 1580 nm for the idler, respectively. The OPO output power exhibits a slowly varying instability that we attribute to a thermal effect induced by the pump. This instability is truncated by means of a low-pass servo that includes a single-mode fiber that filters the beam into a single spatial mode. The resulting output characteristics are promising for radiometric applications in the near infrared including most fiber-optic communication bands.

  18. Fiber-Coupled Planar Light-Wave Circuit for Seed Laser Control in High Spectral Resolution Lidar Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony; McNeil, Shirley; Switzer, Gregg; Battle, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Precise laser remote sensing of aerosol extinction and backscatter in the atmosphere requires a high-power, pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser that is wavelength- stabilized to a narrow absorption line such as found in iodine vapor. One method for precise wavelength control is to injection seed the Nd:YAG laser with a low-power CW laser that is stabilized by frequency converting a fraction of the beam to 532 nm, and to actively frequency-lock it to an iodine vapor absorption line. While the feasibility of this approach has been demonstrated using bulk optics in NASA Langley s Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) program, an ideal, lower cost solution is to develop an all-waveguide, frequency-locked seed laser in a compact, robust package that will withstand the temperature, shock, and vibration levels associated with airborne and space-based remote sensing platforms. A key technology leading to this miniaturization is the integration of an efficient waveguide frequency doubling element, and a low-voltage phase modulation element into a single, monolithic, planar light-wave circuit (PLC). The PLC concept advances NASA's future lidar systems due to its compact, efficient and reliable design, thus enabling use on small aircraft and satellites. The immediate application for this technology is targeted for NASA Langley's HSRL system for aerosol and cloud characterization. This Phase I effort proposes the development of a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide phase modulator for future integration into a PLC. For this innovation, the proposed device is the integration of a waveguide-based frequency doubler and phase modulator in a single, fiber pigtail device that will be capable of efficient second harmonic generation of 1,064-nm light and subsequent phase modulation of the 532 nm light at 250 MHz, providing a properly spectrally formatted beam for HSRL s seed laser locking system. Fabrication of the integrated PLC chip for NASA Langley, planned for

  19. Airborne Doppler lidar at 532nm based on a tunable dual-channel Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-mei; Xing, Ting-wen; Lin, Wi-mei

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore a high-precision, a wide range of a frequency discrimination technique, and to study the application of this technique in the optical air data system (MOADS). To overcome the traditional equipment's shortcomings of short velocity detecting range such as pilot static tubes and wind wane, this technique can provide precision aviation data for various aerocrafts , without influencing pneumatic shape and performance of aerocraft. A tunable dual channel Fabry-Perot interferometer is used as a frequency discriminator in an airborne wind lidar system. This new frequency discriminator has been proposed to overcome the exiting frequency discriminator shortcoming. By adjusting the cavity length of interferometer, the speed of aerocraft can be detected and cut into several dynamic range. By this way, the Doppler wind lidar system can detect atmospheric parameters at the meantime, such as speed of aerocraft and temperature of atmosphere around the aerocraft, by analyzing the information of Rayleigh backscattering light. There are three main contribution in this paper: the first is discussing the basic theory of MOADS, calculational method and mathematic model of relative wind velocity between aircraft and wind are put forward.; the second is the parameter optimization of the dual-channel Fabry-Perot interferometer and the structure design of the interferometer; the third is the simulation of the performance and the accuracy of this system. Theory analysis and simulation results show this method is reasonable and practical.

  20. Tri-wave laser therapy for spinal cord injury, neuropathic pain management, and restoration of motor function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chariff, Mark D.; Olszak, Peter

    2015-03-01

    A laser therapy device using three combined wavelengths 532nm, 808nm, and 1064nm has been demonstrated in clinical studies. Primarily, therapeutic lasers have used wavelengths in the ranges of 632nm through 1064nm, where the optical density (OD) < 5, to achieve pain relief and tissue regeneration. Conventional wisdom would argue against using wavelengths in the region of 532nm, due to poor penetration (OD ~ 8); however, the author's observations are to the contrary. The 532nm light is efficiently absorbed by chromophores such as oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and cytochrome c oxidase thereby providing energy to accelerate the healing process. The 808nm light is known to result in Nitric Oxide production thereby reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. All three laser wavelengths likely contribute to pain relief by inhibiting nerve conduction; however, the 1064nm has the deepest penetration. Through the use of this device on over 1000 patients with a variety of acute and chronic neuro-musculoskeletal disorders, the author observed that a majority of these individuals experienced rapid relief from their presenting conditions and most patients reported a tingling sensation upon irradiation. Patient testimonials and thermal images have been collected to document the results of the laser therapy. These studies demonstrate the ability of laser therapy to rapidly alleviate pain from both acute and chronic conditions.

  1. Lasers and Coherent Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svelto, Orazio; Longhi, Stefano; Della Valle, Giuseppe; Huber, Günter; Kück, Stefan; Pollnau, Markus; Hillmer, Hartmut; Kusserow, Thomas; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Rohlfing (deceased), Frank; Kaiser, Jeffrey; Malz, Ralf; Marowsky, Gerd; Mann, Klaus; Simon, Peter; Rhodes, Charles K.; Duarte, Frank J.; Borsutzky, Annette; L'Huillier, Johannes A.; Sigrist, Markus W.; Wächter, Helen; Saldin, Evgeny; Schneidmiller, Evgeny; Yurkov, Mikhail; Sauerbrey, Roland; Hein, Joachim; Gianella, Michele; Helmcke, Jürgen; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Riehle, Fritz; Steinberg, Steffen; Brand, Hans

    This chapter describes lasers and other sources of coherent light that operate in a wide wavelength range. First, the general principles for the generation of coherent continuous-wave and pulsed radiation are treated including the interaction of radiation with matter, the properties of optical resonators and their modes as well as such processes as Q-switching and mode-locking. The general introduction is followed by sections on numerous types of lasers, the emphasis being on today's most important sources of coherent light, in particular on solid-state lasers and several types of gas lasers. An important part of the chapter is devoted to the generation of coherent radiation coherent radiation by nonlinear processes with optical parametric oscillators, difference- and sum-frequency generation, and high-order harmonics. Radiation in the extended ultraviolet (EUV) and x-ray ranges can be generated by free electron lasers (FEL) and advanced x-ray sources. Ultrahigh light intensities up to 1021 W/cm2 open the door to studies of relativistic laser-matter interaction and laser particle acceleration. The chapter closes with a section on laser stabilization.

  2. Lasers and Coherent Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svelto, Orazio; Longhi, Stefano; Valle, Giuseppe; Kück, Stefan; Huber, Günter; Pollnau, Markus; Hillmer, Hartmut; Hansmann, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Brand, Hans; Kaiser, Jeffrey; Peterson, Alan; Malz, Ralf; Steinberg, Steffen; Marowsky, Gerd; Brinkmann, Uwe; Lo, Dennis; Borsutzky, Annette; Wächter, Helen; Sigrist, Markus; Saldin, Evgeny; Schneidmiller, Evgeny; Yurkov, Mikhail; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Hein, Joachim; Sauerbrey, Roland; Helmcke, Jürgen

    This chapter describes lasers and other sources of coherent light that operate in a wide wavelength range. First, the general principles for the generation of coherent continuous-wave and pulsed radiation are treated including the interaction of radiation with matter, the properties of optical resonators and their modes as well as such processes as Q-switching and mode-locking. The general introduction is followed by sections on numerous types of lasers, the emphasis being on today's most important sources of coherent light, in particular on solid-state lasers and several types of gas lasers. An important part of the chapter is devoted to the generation of coherent radiation by nonlinear processes with optical parametric oscillators, difference- and sum-frequency generation, and high-order harmonics. Radiation in the extended ultraviolet (EUV) and X-ray ranges can be generated by free electron lasers (FEL) and advanced X-ray sources. Ultrahigh light intensities up to 1021 W/cm2 open the door to studies of relativistic laser-matter interaction and laser particle acceleration. The chapter closes with a section on laser stabilization.

  3. Visible and near infrared resonance plasmonic enhanced nanosecond laser optoporation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    St-Louis Lalonde, Bastien; Boulais, Étienne; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques; Meunier, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a light driven, non-invasive cell membrane perforation technique based on the localized field amplification by a nanosecond pulsed laser near gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The optoporation phenomena is investigated with pulses generated by a Nd:YAG laser for two wavelengths that are either in the visible (532 nm) or near infrared (NIR) (1064 nm). Here, the main objective is to compare on and off localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR) to introduce foreign material through the cell membrane using nanosecond laser pulses. The membrane permeability of human melanoma cells (MW278) has been successfully increased as shown by the intake of a fluorescent dye upon irradiation. The viability of this laser driven perforation method is evaluated by propidium iodide exclusion as well as MTT assay. Our results show that up to 25% of the cells are perforated with 532 nm pulses at 50 mJ/cm2 and around 30% of the cells are perforated with 1064 nm pulses at 1 J/cm2. With 532 nm pulses, the viability 2 h after treatment is 64% but it increases to 88% 72 h later. On the other hand, the irradiation with 1064 nm pulses leads to an improved 2 h viability of 81% and reaches 98% after 72 h. Scanning electron microscopy images show that the 5 pulses delivered during treatment induce changes in the AuNPs size distribution when irradiated by a 532 nm beam, while this distribution is barely affected when 1064 nm is used. PMID:23577284

  4. Slow Light Semiconductor Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-02

    Painter, “Nonlinear response of silicon photonic crystal microresonators excited via an integrated waveguide and fiber taper,” Opt. Express, vol. 13, pp...exceeding 106 (figure 2g), which represent record high Q for 1D photonic crystal waveguide resonators on Si-on-insulator (SOI). In the hybrid lasers, the...1 million) of photonic crystal nanocavities. Optics Express 14:1996–2002. [14] Akahane Y, Asano T, Song BS, Noda S (2003) High-Q photonic nanocavity

  5. Broadly tunable high-power operation of an all-solid-state titanium-doped sapphire laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, T. R.; Gerstenberger, D. C.; Drobshoff, A.; Wallace, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Broadly tunable and high-power operation of a Ti-doped sapphire laser is obtained with a diode-laser-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser as the pump source. A maximum broadband (FWHM = 25 nm) output pulse energy of 720 microJ at 795 nm in a TEM00 mode is obtained for 1850 microJ of energy of 532-nm pump light. A minimum pulse duration of 7 nsec is obtained from a 40-mm-long cavity. With the use of an intracavity prism, the Ti:sapphire laser is tunable continuously over the 696-1000-nm spectral range (with three different mirror sets).

  6. Stimulated Raman microscopy without ultrafast lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Petrov, Georgi I.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2013-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is a powerful tool for chemically-sensitive non-invasive optical imaging. However, the short-pulse laser sources, which are currently being employed for this imaging technique, are still expensive and require substantial maintenance to provide temporal and spectral overlap. SRS imaging, which utilizes cw laser sources, has a major advantage over pulsed lasers, as it eliminates the possibility of cell damage due to exposure to high-intensity light radiation, while substantially reducing the cost and complexity of the set-up and keeping a sub-cellular spatial resolution. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate microscopic imaging of dimethyl sulfoxide using two independent, commonly used and inexpensive lasers: a diode-pumped, intracavity doubled 532 nm laser and a He-Ne laser operating at 633 nm. In our proof-of-principle experience, dimethyl sulfoxide acts as a contrast agent providing Raman scattering signal. The 532 nm and 633 nm lasers act as excitation and probe sources, respectively [1].

  7. Influence of laser radiation on the growth and development of seeds of agricultural plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkanich, Alexander; Zhevlakov, Alexander; Polyakov, Vadim; Kascheev, Sergey; Sidorov, Igor; Ruzankina, Julia; Yakovlev, Alexey; Mak, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    The experimental results presented in this study focused on the study of biological processes caused by exposure to the coating layers of the laser green light seed (λ = 532 nm) range for the larch, violet (λ = 405 nm) and red (λ = 640 nm) for spruce. Spend a series of experiments to study the dependence of crop seed quality (spruce and larch from the pine family) from exposure to laser radiation under different conditions. In all the analyzed groups studied seed germination and growth of seedlings exposed to laser exposure, compared with the control group. The results showed that the higher percentage of germination than seeds of the control group.

  8. Modulation of cardiomyocyte activity using pulsed laser irradiated gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gentemann, Lara; Kalies, Stefan; Coffee, Michelle; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Zweigerdt, Robert; Heinemann, Dag

    2016-01-01

    Can photothermal gold nanoparticle mediated laser manipulation be applied to induce cardiac contraction? Based on our previous work, we present a novel concept of cell stimulation. A 532 nm picosecond laser was employed to heat gold nanoparticles on cardiomyocytes. This leads to calcium oscillations in the HL-1 cardiomyocyte cell line. As calcium is connected to the contractility, we aimed to alter the contraction rate of native and stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. A contraction rate increase was particularly observed in calcium containing buffer with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Consequently, the study provides conceptual ideas for a light based, nanoparticle mediated stimulation system. PMID:28101410

  9. UV Laser Diagnostics of the 1-MA Z-pinch Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Altemara, S. D.; Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Haboub, A.

    2009-01-21

    The 532 nm laser diagnostic set at the Zebra generator shows the details of the ablation and stagnation phases in cylindrical, planar, and star-like wire arrays but it cannot show the structure of the stagnated z-pinch and the implosion in small diameter loads, 1-3 mm in diameter. The absorption increment and the refraction angle of the 532 nm laser, when passing through the plasma, are too great to obtain quality images. An ultraviolet probing beam at the wavelength of 266 nm was developed to study small-diameter loads and to investigate the structure of the 1-MA z-pinch. The UV radiation has a much smaller absorption increment and refraction angles in plasmas than the 532 nm light and allows for better imaging of the z-pinch plasmas. Estimates showed that UV probing would be able to probe the high-density z-pinch plasma in experiments on the Zebra generator, and the early results of UV probing on the Zebra generator have shown promise.

  10. Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope Measurement of Local Fundus Reflectance and Autofluorescence Changes Arising from Rhodopsin Bleaching and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Pugh, Edward N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We measured the bleaching and regeneration kinetics of rhodopsin in the living human eye with two-wavelength, wide-field scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), and investigated the effect of rhodopsin bleaching on autofluorescence intensity. Methods. The retina was imaged with an Optos P200C SLO by its reflectance of 532 and 633 nm light, and its autofluorescence excited by 532 nm light, before and after exposure to lights calibrated to bleach rhodopsin substantially. Bleaching was confined to circular retinal regions of 4.8° visual angle located approximately 16° superotemporal and superonasal to fixation. Images were captured as 12-bit tiff files and postprocessed to extract changes in reflectance and autofluorescence. Results. At the locus of bleaching transient increases in reflectance of the 532 nm, but not the 633 nm beam were observed readily and quantified. A transient increase in autofluorescence also occurred. The action spectrum, absolute sensitivity, and recovery of the 532 nm reflectance increase were consistent with previous measurements of human rhodopsin's spectral sensitivity, photosensitivity, and regeneration kinetics. The autofluorescence changes closely tracked the changes in rhodopsin density. Conclusions. The bleaching and regeneration kinetics of rhodopsin can be measured locally in the human retina with a widely available SLO. The increased autofluorescence excited by 532 nm light upon bleaching appears primarily due to transient elimination of rhodopsin's screening of autofluorescent fluorochromes in the RPE. The spatially localized measurement with a widely available SLO of rhodopsin, the most abundant protein in the retina, could be a valuable adjunct to retinal health assessment. PMID:23412087

  11. Bright diode laser light source.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Erkki; Hernberg, Rolf

    2006-05-20

    A simplified multiwavelength prototype of an axially symmetric diode laser device based on stacks made of single emitters has been made, and the performance of the device has been demonstrated experimentally. The results verify that kilowatt-level light power can be focused into a circular spot with a 1/e2 diameter of 360 microm, a focal length of 100 mm, and a numerical aperture of 0.24, thus producing an average power density in excess of 10 kW/mm2 and a brightness of 6x10(10) W m-2 sr-1. The experiments also predict that it will be possible to increase these values to more than 60 kW/mm2 and 3x10(11) W m-2 sr-1.

  12. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  13. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1993-01-01

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  14. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources.

  15. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    PubMed Central

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources. PMID:28112254

  16. Laser device for special light effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Jerzy K.; Niesterowicz, Andrzej

    1995-03-01

    A system for laser beam deflection and its particular application described in this paper can be treated as a technical aid for contemporary art and visual enhancement of electronic music equipment. The device for special art effects produced by `Optocyfronika' was ordered by disco-clubs. The equipment was designed to enhance light effects with images obtained by means of laser light. One of the results of this work is the device for drawing of simple images by means of the laser beam.

  17. Laser-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound heating in an in vivo small animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2016-11-01

    The enhanced heating effect during the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-optical-fluence laser illumination was investigated by using an in vivo murine animal model. The thighs of murine animals were synergistically irradiated by HIFU and pulsed nano-second laser light. The temperature increases in the target region were measured by a thermocouple under different HIFU pressures, which were 6.2, 7.9, and 9.8 MPa, in combination with 20 mJ/cm2 laser exposures at 532 nm wavelength. In comparison with conventional laser therapies, the laser fluence used here is at least one order of magnitude lower. The results showed that laser illumination could enhance temperature during HIFU applications. Additionally, cavitation activity was enhanced when laser and HIFU irradiation were concurrently used. Further, a theoretical simulation showed that the inertial cavitation threshold was indeed decreased when laser and HIFU irradiation were utilized concurrently.

  18. χ{sup (3)} measurements of axial ligand modified high valent tin(IV) porphyrins using degenarete four wave mixing at 532nm

    SciTech Connect

    Narendran, N. K. Siji Chandrasekharan, K.; Soman, Rahul; Arunkumar, Chellaiah; Sudheesh, P.

    2014-10-15

    Porphyrins and metalloporphyrins are unique class of molecules for Nonlinear Optical applications because of their unique structure of altering the central metal atom, large extended π-system, high thermal stability, tunable shape, symmetry and synthetic versatility Here, we report χ{sup (3)} Measurements of a simple phenyl porphyrins and its highvalent tin(IV) porphyrins with Bromination characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopic method. In this study, we employed the Degenerate Four Wave Mixing technique using forward Boxcar geometry with an Nd:YAG nano second pulsed laser as source and it was found that the tin(IV) porphyrin with Bromination exhibits good χ{sup (3)} value and figure of merit.

  19. Laser-induced alteration of contaminated papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, P.; Ligterink, F. J.; Pedersoli, J. L., Jr.; Scholten, H.; Schipper, D.; Havermans, J. B. G. A.; Aziz, H. A.; Quillet, V.; Kraan, M.; van Beek, B.; Corr, S.; Hua-Ströfer, H.-Y.; Stokmans, J.; Dalen, P. van; Kautek, W.

    Cleaning of paper objects represents one of the most complex cases of laser ablation, since low volumes of dispersed material phases are evaporated while a sensitive and fragile fibrous organic matrix has to be preserved. Conventional chemical and mechanical cleaning methods suffer from the common phenomenon that the foreign matter is diluted into the substrate rather than removed. The application of a laser beam allows highly localized and optically specific interaction. However, the occurrence of extreme temperatures and light intensities may cause irreversible alteration of the paper matrix. Further, incomplete removal and/or chemical conversion of contaminations may result in insufficient cleaning or affect the ageing behaviour. Laser treatments were performed by Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers at three wavelengths (355 nm, 532 nm, and 1064 nm). Papers contaminated with inks and adhesive-tape remnants served as model samples. Multispectral imaging and colorimetric results served to quantify and systematize the results.

  20. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  1. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (~480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting “fine-tuning” of excitation wavelength to particular probes. PMID:19072836

  2. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Telford, William G; Subach, Fedor V; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2009-05-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (approximately 480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting "fine-tuning" of excitation wavelength to particular probes.

  3. Notes: Laser Light Gets Everyone's Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Ellen

    1989-01-01

    Discusses laser demonstration for invoking interest in science, especially physics. Describes some examples, such as diffraction, scattering, expansion by diverging lens, internal reflection in a light pipe, and illumination through optical cable. Provides some practical hints for the demonstration. (YP)

  4. Electronic Rotator For Sheet Of Laser Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franke, John M.; Rhodes, David B.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1989-01-01

    Primary flow-visualization system in Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) at NASA Langley Research Center is sheet of laser light generated by 5-W argon-ion laser and two-axis mirror galvanometer scanner. Generates single and multiple sheets of light, which remain stationary or driven to sweep out volume. Sine/cosine potentiometer used to orient two galvanometer/mirror devices simultaneously and yields desired result at reasonable cost and incorporated into prototype in 1 day.

  5. Engineering Light: Quantum Cascade Lasers

    ScienceCinema

    Claire Gmachl

    2016-07-12

    Quantum cascade lasers are ideal for environmental sensing and medical diagnostic applications. Gmachl discusses how these lasers work, and their applications, including their use as chemical trace gas sensors. As examples of these applications, she briefly presents results from her field campaign at the Beijing Olympics, and ongoing campaigns in Texas, Maryland, and Ghana.

  6. Femtosecond laser processing and spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paivasaari, Kimmo; Silvennoinen, Martti; Kaakkunen, Jarno; Vahimaa, Pasi

    2014-03-01

    The use of the femtosecond laser enables generation of small spot sizes and ablation features. Ablation of the small features usually requires only a small amount of laser power to be delivered to the ablation spot. When using only a one beam for the ablation of the small features this process is bound to be time consuming. The spatial light modulator (SLM) together with the computer generated holograms (CGH) can be used for manipulating and shaping of the laser beam in various applications. In laser micromachining, when using laser with relatively high power, the original beam can be divided up to hundreds beams and still have the energy of the individual beam above the ablation threshold of the material. This parallel laser processing enables more efficient use of the laser power regardless of the machining task.

  7. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  8. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the DLP chip, the optomechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  9. Visible light plasmonic heating of Au-ZnO for the catalytic reduction of CO2

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Congjun; Ranasingha, Oshadha; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; ...

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO2 and H2 reactants to CH4 and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat Au–ZnO from 30 to ~600 °C and simultaneously tune the CH4 : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH4 : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperature-programmed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resultingmore » from the plasmonic heating of the Au-ZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO2 conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser illumination is 0.030%. The Au-ZnO catalysts are robust and remain active after repeated laser exposure and cycling. The light intensity required to initiate CO2 reduction is low ( ~2.5 x 105 W m-2) and achievable with solar concentrators. Our results illustrate the viability of plasmonic heating approaches for CO2 utilization and other practical thermal catalytic applications.« less

  10. On the cooperativeness of nanosecond-laser induced damage during frequency doubling of 1064 nm light in KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Frank; Duchateau, Guillaume; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-12-01

    Due to its high nonlinear coefficients, KTP (KTiOPO4) is one of the most important nonlinear optical materials for frequency doubling of Nd:YAG lasers. Former studies suggest a certain cooperativeness of the laser induced damage mechanism between the 1064 nm and the 532 nm wavelengths present during second harmonic generation. We report on experiments that allow confirming and quantifying the cooperativeness of the laser damage mechanism in this material and compare it to known data from KDP. A damage scenario based on the formation of color centers, which are also responsible for the gray tracking effect, will be presented.

  11. Three-year aging of prototype flight laser at 10 kHz and 1 ns pulses with external frequency doubler for ICESat-2 mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; Culpepper, Charles F.; Strickler, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a three-year operational-aging test of a specially designed prototype flight laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and externally frequency-doubled. Fibertek designed and built the q-switched, 1064nm laser and this laser was in a sealed container of dry air pressurized to 1.3 atm. The external frequency doubler was in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm separately. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, non-critically phase-matched crystal. After some 1064 nm light was diverted for diagnostics, 13.7W of fundamental power was available to pump the doubling crystal. Between 8.5W and 10W of 532nm power was generated, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The test consisted of two stages, the first at 0.3 J/cm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to expected operational conditions, and the second at 0.93 J/cm2 for the remainder of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated optical stress testing. We observed no degradation at the first stress-level and linear degradation at the second stress-level. The linear degradation was linked to doubler crystal output surface changes from laser-assisted contamination. We estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm using fluence as the stress parameter. This work was done for NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  12. Laser-photophoretic migration and fractionation of human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Monjushiro, Hideaki; Tanahashi, Yuko; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-13

    Laser photophoretic migration behavior of human blood cells in saline solution was investigated under the irradiation of Nd:YAG laser beam (532 nm) in the absence and the presence of the flow in a fused silica capillary. Red blood cells (RBC) were migrated faster than white blood cells (WBC) and blood pellets to the direction of propagation of laser light. The observed photophoretic velocity of RBC was about 11 times faster than those of others. This was understood from the larger photophoretic efficiency of RBC than that of WBC, which was simulated based on the Mie scattering theory. Furthermore, it was found that, during the photophoretic migration, RBCs spontaneously orientated parallel to the migration direction so as to reduce the drag force. Finally, it was demonstrated that RBC and WBC were separated in a micro-channel flow system by the laser photophoresis.

  13. Laser based enhancement of susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznick, Yana; Banin, Ehud; Lipovsky, Anat; Lubart, Rachel; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2012-03-01

    Our objective is to test the effect of pulsed (Q-switched) and continuous wave (CW) laser light at wavelength of 532nm on the viability of free-living stationary phase bacteria with and without gentamicin (an antibiotic) treatment. Free living stationary phase gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1) was immersed in Luria Broth (LB) solution and exposed to Q-switched and CW lasers with and without the addition of the antibiotic gentamicin. Cell viability was determined at different time points. Laser treatment alone did not reduce cell viability compared to untreated control and the gentamicin treatment alone only resulted in a 0.5 log reduction in the viable count for P. aeruginosa. The combined laser and gentamicin treatment, however, resulted in a synergistic effect and viability was reduced by 8 log's for P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  14. Imaging of droplets and vapor distributions in a diesel fuel spray by means of a laser absorption-scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Y; Yoshizaki, T; Nishida, K

    2000-11-20

    The droplets and vapor distributions in a fuel spray were imaged by a dual-wavelength laser absorption-scattering technique. 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene, which has physical properties similar to those of Diesel fuel, strongly absorbs the ultraviolet light near the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser but is nearly transparent to the visible light near the second harmonic (532 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. Therefore, droplets and vapor distributions in a Diesel spray can be visualized by an imaging system that uses a Nd:YAG laser as the incident light and 1,3-dimethylnaphthalene as the test fuel. For a quantitative application consideration, the absorption coefficients of dimethylnapthalene vapor at different temperatures and pressures were examined with an optical spectrometer. The findings of this study suggest that this imaging technique has great promise for simultaneously obtaining quantitative information of droplet density and vapor concentration in Diesel fuel spray.

  15. How Monochromatic Is Laser Light?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Stephen F.

    1979-01-01

    Presents two derivations of the fundamental laser linewidth that have been used successfully in introductory physics courses. The cause of the finite linewidth is identified with phase fluctuations in the electric field due to spontaneous emissions. A factor of 2 discrepancy between the energy and field analysis is explained. (Author/GA)

  16. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities.

  17. Self-structured surface patterns on molecular azo glass films induced by laser light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianjun; Ye, Gang; Wang, Xiaogong

    2010-05-04

    In this work, formation of photoinduced self-structured surface pattern and its correlation with chromophoric structures were studied by using a series of star-shaped azo compounds, which exist as stable molecular glass at room temperature. For the synthesis, a star-shaped precursor (Tr-AN) was prepared by a ring-open reaction between 1, 3, 5-triglycidyl isocyanurate and N-methylaniline. The star-shaped azo compounds were then synthesized through azo-coupling reactions between the precursor and diazonium salts of 4-nitroaniline, 2-methyl-4-nitroaniline, and 4-aminobenzonitrile, respectively. Through these steps, three azo compounds were obtained to bear different donor-acceptor type azo chromophores at the peripheral positions. The formation of the photoinduced self-structured patterns was investigated by irradiating solid thin films of the molecular azo glass with a uniform laser beam (532 nm, 200 mW/cm(2)) at normal incidence. For comparison, formation of surface-relief-gratings (SRGs) was also investigated by exposing the thin films to an interference pattern of the laser beams (532 nm, 80 mW/cm(2)). The results show that SRGs can be inscribed on the films of all three star-shaped azo compounds, but self-structured surface patterns is only observed on film of the azo compound containing 4-cyanoazobenzene moieties (Tr-AZ-CN) under the same irradiation condition. The electron-withdrawing groups, which control the absorption band position, show a significant influence on both the self-structured pattern formation and SRG inscription rate. Under proper experimental conditions, both self-structured surface pattern and SRG can simultaneously be observed on the Tr-AZ-CN films. The observations can lead to a deeper understanding of the photoinduced effects, especially their correlation with molecular structures.

  18. Visible light plasmonic heating of Au-ZnO for the catalytic reduction of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Congjun; Ranasingha, Oshadha; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Andio, Mark; Lewis, James P.; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO2 and H2 reactants to CH4 and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat Au–ZnO from 30 to ~600 °C and simultaneously tune the CH4 : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH4 : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperature-programmed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resulting from the plasmonic heating of the Au-ZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO2 conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser illumination is 0.030%. The Au-ZnO catalysts are robust and remain active after repeated laser exposure and cycling. The light intensity required to initiate CO2 reduction is low ( ~2.5 x 105 W m-2) and achievable with solar concentrators. Our results illustrate the viability of plasmonic heating approaches for CO2 utilization and other practical thermal catalytic applications.

  19. The global light system laser station prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Patrick R.

    2015-08-01

    We describe the design and fabrication of a prototype Global Light System (GLS) laser station for the JEM-EUSO project. The GLS will consist of a network of ground-based Ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and steered lasers to monitor and calibrate the cosmic ray detector planned for install on the International Space Station (ISS). The GLS units will generate optical signatures in the atmosphere that are comparable to tracks from cosmic ray extensive air showers (EASs). Unlike an EAS, the number, time, energy, location and direction (for lasers) of GLS events can be specified as JEM-EUSO passes 400 km overhead. Laser tracks from the GLS prototype will be recorded by prototype detectors in ground-to-ground tests. Distant tracks with low angular speed are of particular interest because these are the types of EAS tracks that will be measured by JEM-EUSO. To do these ground-to-ground tests, the prototype detectors will need to measure the laser through the atmosphere at low elevation viewing angles. The beam energy can be adjusted from 1 to 90 mJ to compensate for this additional atmospheric attenuation. The frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser produces 355 nm (7 ns pulse) light. This wavelength is near the center of the UV EAS fluorescence spectrum. The system is housed in a utility trailer that can be transported by a small truck for domestic campaigns or shipped in an industry standard 20 foot container for global deployment. In operation mode, the laser platform inside the trailer is isolated mechanically to maintain beam pointing accuracy. A retractable two stage steering head can point in any direction above the horizon. A slip ring eliminates cable wrap problems. The GLS prototype will be used to test the EUSO-TA detector and will also be used in preflight tests of the EUSO-balloon payload planned for a super pressure balloon mission.

  20. OH measurement by laser light absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perner, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since the first attempt to measure atmospheric hydroxyl radicals by optical absorption in 1975 (Perner et al., 1976) this method has been continuously developed further and its major obstacles and limitations are known today. The laser beam needs to be expanded in order to reduce the beam divergence. At the same time the energy density of the laser beam which produces OH via ozone photolysis is reduced to such an extent that the self-produced OH concentration ranges well below the atmospheric value. Atmospheric absorptions should be observed over a wide spectral range so that not only the OH radicals are properly identified by several rotational lines but their absorption can be corrected for interfering absorptions from other air constituents as SO2, CH2O, CS2, etc., which can be identified in a wide spectral range with more confidence. Air turbulence demands fast spectral scanning or probing on and off the absorption line. Energy requirements should be kept small in field operations. In the experiment frequency doubled dye laser pulses at 308 nm are produced. The picosecond light pulses are expected to show a smooth profile (light intensity against wavelength) which will be broadened to the required spectral width according to the uncertainty principle. The pump laser will be an optoacoustically modulated Nd:YAG laser.

  1. Laser heating of metallic nanoparticles for photothermal ablation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Shan, Guangshuai; Yu, Junsheng; Yang, Wei; Ren, Zhaodi; Wang, Xiaohui; Xie, Xi; Chen, Hui-jiuan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-02-01

    In order to search for a suitable frequency and material with higher photothermal efficacy for hyperthermia application in cancer treatment, a comparative study on laser heating of Au/Ag nanoparticles and Ag nanowires has been conducted. It is found that gold nanoparticles are more photothermal efficient in comparison with silver nanoparticles and silver nanowires at 450nm and 532 nm. Gold nanoparticles are more heated by 532 nm laser than 450 nm laser. In contrast, silver nanoparticles show slightly less temperature rise at 532 nm than 450 nm laser. For silver nanowires, no significant photothermal effect has been observed. Size-dependent effect study indicates that the absorption efficiency of single gold nanoparticles of larger diameter is higher than that of smaller diameter, in the diameter range of 0-50nm. A mathematical model for describing the heating profile in the heating sample has been built. The mathematical model can be utilized to predict the optimal treatment size of tumor.

  2. Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-11-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions.

  3. [Laser and intense pulsed light management of couperose and rosacea].

    PubMed

    Dahan, S

    2011-09-01

    Management of couperosis and rosacea has been totally renewed by laser and vascular laser techniques, with efficacy targeted on the telangiectases and to a lesser extent on the erythrosis. Laser management of hypertrophic rosacea or rhinophyma depends on surgical treatment with decortication, continuous CO(2) ablative laser or Erbium, fractionated at high power, then vascular laser treatment for the telangiectases: lasers with pulsed dye, KTP, or pulsed lights for red laser telangiectases and long pulse Nd-Yag laser for blue telangiectases. For papulopustular rosacea, vascular laser treatment (pulsed dye and KTP) and intense pulsed light will be begun once the inflammation has been treated. The major indication for vascular lasers and intense pulsed light is found in erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, with high efficacy for the telangiectases. Diffuse erythrosis is difficult to treat, requiring a high number of laser and/or intense pulsed light sessions.

  4. KTP laser and neutral red phototherapy of human squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    VanderWerf, Q M; Castro, D J; Nguyen, R D; Paiva, M B; Chao, K H; Santillanes, M E; Saxton, R E

    1997-03-01

    Neutral red (NR) is a cationic, nontoxic vital dye employed as a histologic stain for proliferating cells; it has been used clinically for photodynamic treatment of herpes simplex virus lesions. NR is selectively taken up and concentrated by mitotic cells, an important characteristic for more effective antineoplastic agents. In the present study, UCLA-SO-P3 human squamous carcinoma cells displayed minimal toxicity when incubated with up to 50 microg/ml NR in the absence of light. However, cells incubated with greater than 0.5 microg/ml NR followed by exposure to KTP laser light at 532 nm exhibited nearly 100% tumor cell death. The degree of cell toxicity was proportional to NR dose and laser light fluence. This study demonstrates that NR is an excellent cancer cell photosensitizer in vitro, and, after adding additional in vivo preclinical testing, may prove to be a useful agent in photodynamic destruction of head and neck tumors.

  5. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Lassen, J.; Ruczkowski, J.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Bricault, P.

    2017-02-01

    The resonant ionization laser ion source is an element selective, efficient and versatile ion source to generate radioactive ion beams at on-line mass separator facilities. For some elements with complex atomic structures and incomplete spectroscopic data, laser spectroscopic investigations are required for ionization scheme development. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy using Ti:Sa lasers has been performed on antimony (Sb) at TRIUMF's off-line laser ion source test stand. Laser light of 230.217 nm (vacuum wavelength) as the first excitation step and light from a frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 laser (532 nm) as the nonresonant ionization step allowed to search for suitable second excitation steps by continuous wavelength scans from 720 nm to 920 nm across the wavelength tuning range of a grating-tuned Ti:Sa laser. Upon the identification of efficient SES, the third excitation steps for resonance ionization were investigated by laser scans across Rydberg states, the ionization potential and autoionizing states. One Rydberg state and six AI states were found to be well suitable for efficient resonance ionization.

  7. Determination Of The Elements In The Olive Oil Responsible For The Luminescence Spectra Using A Green Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawaz, Saiof; Mahmod, Al-gafary; Lamia, Al-mamouly

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we were able to record luminescence spectra of olive, sunflower, corn, gourd and laurel oils, chlorophyll and carotene by using an argon laser (488-514 nm) and second harmonic Nd-YAG laser (532 nm) along with a monochromator whose spectral range is 400-900 nm. Only when the luminescence light is vertical to laser light, two new peaks 540 nm and 673 nm have been detected with the latter one is more intense. In discussing our results, we succeeded in determining which materials in olive oil are responsible for producing the luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The experimental data has shown that the chlorophyll is the main part of the olive components which gives the olive oil luminescence spectral peak; 673 nm. The other luminescence spectral peak; 540 nm was common to all different kinds of oil in general.

  8. Trimodal detection of early childhood caries using laser light scanning and fluorescence spectroscopy: clinical prototype

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Amy S.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is currently a need for a safe and effective way to detect and diagnose early stages of childhood caries. A multimodal optical clinical prototype for diagnosing caries demineralization in vivo has been developed. The device can be used to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel by obtaining high-resolution and high-contrast surface images using a 405-nm laser as the illumination source, as well as obtaining autofluorescence and bacterial fluorescence images. When a suspicious region of demineralization is located, the device also performs dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405- and 532-nm laser excitation. An autofluorescence ratio of the two excitation lasers is computed and used to quantitatively diagnose enamel health. The device was tested on five patients in vivo as well as on 28 extracted teeth with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. The device was able to provide detailed images that highlighted the lesions identified by the clinicians. The autofluorescence spectroscopic ratios obtained from the extracted teeth successfully quantitatively discriminated between sound and demineralized enamel. PMID:23986369

  9. High power, picosecond green laser based on a frequency-doubled, all-fiber, narrow-bandwidth, linearly polarized, Yb-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wenyan; Isyanova, Yelena; Stegeman, Robert; Huang, Ye; Chieffo, Logan R.; Moulton, Peter F.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development of an all-fiber, 68-kW-peak-power, 16-ps-pulse-width, narrow-bandwidth, linearly polarized, 1064-nm fiber laser suitable for high-power, picosecond-pulse-width, green-light generation. Our 1064-nm fiber laser delivered an average power of up to 110 W at a repetition of 100- MHz in a narrow bandwidth, with minimal nonlinear distortion. We developed a high-power, picosecond green source at 532 nm through use of single-pass frequency-doubling of our 1064-nm fiber laser in lithium triborate (LBO). Using a 15-mm long LBO crystal, we have generated 30 W of average power in the second harmonic with 73-W of fundamental average power, for a conversion efficiency of 41%.

  10. Laser triggering of water switches in terrawatt-class pulse power accelerators.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Johnson, David Lee (Titan Pulse Sciences, San Leandro, CA); Wilkins, Frank (Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV); Van De Valde, David (EG&G Technical Services, Albuquerque, NM); Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich; Zameroski, Nathan D.; Starbird, Robert L.

    2005-12-01

    Focused Beams from high-power lasers have been used to command trigger gas switches in pulse power accelerators for more than two decades. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was aimed at determining whether high power lasers could also command trigger water switches on high-power accelerators. In initial work, we determined that focused light from three harmonics of a small pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm could be used to form breakdown arcs in water, with the lowest breakdown thresholds of 110 J/cm{sup 2} or 14 GW/cm{sup 2} at 532 nm in the green. In laboratory-scale laser triggering experiments with a 170-kV pulse-charged water switch with a 3-mm anode-cathode gap, we demonstrated that {approx}90 mJ of green laser energy could trigger the gap with a 1-{sigma} jitter of less than 2ns, a factor of 10 improvement over the jitter of the switch in its self breaking mode. In the laboratory-scale experiments we developed optical techniques utilizing polarization rotation of a probe laser beam to measure current in switch channels and electric field enhancements near streamer heads. In the final year of the project, we constructed a pulse-power facility to allow us to test laser triggering of water switches from 0.6- MV to 2.0 MV. Triggering experiments on this facility using an axicon lens for focusing the laser and a switch with a 740 kV self-break voltage produced consistent laser triggering with a {+-} 16-ns 1-{sigma} jitter, a significant improvement over the {+-} 24-ns jitter in the self-breaking mode.

  11. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography with a laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Ting; Oliver, David E.; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Most concurrent photoacoustic tomography systems are based on traditional ultrasound measurement regime, which requires the contact or acoustic coupling material between the biological tissue and the ultrasound transducer. This study investigates the feasibility of non-contact measurement of photacoustic signals generated inside biomedical tissues by observing the vibrations at the surface of the tissues with a commercial laser Doppler vibrometer. The vibrometer with 0- 2MHz measurement bandwidth and 5 MHz sampling frequency was integrated to a conventional rotational PAT data acquisition system. The data acquisition of the vibrometer was synchronized to the laser illumination from an Nd:YAG laser with output at 532nm. The laser energy was tuned to 17.5mJ per square centimeter. The PA signals were acquired at 120 angular locations uniformly distributed around the scanned objects. The frequency response of the measurement system was first calibrated. 2-inch-diamater cylindrical phantoms containing small rubber plates and biological tissues were afterwards imaged. The phantoms were made from 5% intralipid solution in 10% porcine gelatin to simulate the light scattering in biological tissue and to backscatter the measurement laser from the vibrometer. Time-domain backprojection method was used for the image reconstruction. Experiments with real-tissue phantoms show that with laser illumination of 17.5 mJ/cm2 at 532 nm, the non-contact photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with 15dB detection bandwidth of 2.5 MHz can resolve spherical optical inclusions with dimension of 500μm and multi-layered structure with optical contrast in strongly scattering medium. The experiment results prompt the potential implementation of the non-contact PAT to achieve "photoacoustic camera".

  12. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  13. Laser Ablated Carbon Nanodots for Light Emission.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Delfino; Camacho, Marco; Camacho, Miguel; Mayorga, Miguel; Weathers, Duncan; Salamo, Greg; Wang, Zhiming; Neogi, Arup

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of fluorescent carbon dots-like nanostructures (CNDs) obtained through the laser ablation of a carbon solid target in liquid environment is reported. The ablation process was induced in acetone with laser pulses of 1064, 532, and 355 nm under different irradiation times. Close-spherical amorphous CNDs with sizes between 5 and 20 nm, whose abundance strongly depends on the ablation parameters were investigated using electron microscopy and was confirmed using absorption and emission spectroscopies. The π- π* electronic transition at 3.76 eV dominates the absorption for all the CNDs species synthesized under different irradiation conditions. The light emission is most efficient due to excitation at 3.54 eV with the photoluminescence intensity centered at 3.23 eV. The light emission from the CNDs is most efficient due to ablation at 355 nm. The emission wavelength of the CNDs can be tuned from the near-UV to the green wavelength region by controlling the ablation time and modifying the ablation and excitation laser wavelength.

  14. The Post-Processing Effects due to Pulsed Laser Ablation of Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, A.; Sawczak, M.; Cieplnski, M.; Sliwinski, G.

    For contemporary samples the effect of pulsed laser ablation applied at wavelengths selected from the range UV — near IR of 266, 355, 532 and 1064 nm were investigated. All the samples were made by the same method and of the same material, i.e. mixture of pure cotton cellulose and wood-pulp. Results of the colorimetric measurements indicate the most effective surface cleaning at 532 nm for the artificially soiled samples. An artificial aging resulted in neglectable changes in lightness and yellowness of the laser cleaned laboratory soiled samples but influenced the changes in non soiled samples. Marked changes were noticed due to 266 nm, 355 nm and 1064 nm irradiation and were ascribed to the photochemical damage of the cellulose fibres and to enhanced absorption of the laser radiation by the soil particles.

  15. Effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser on microbial mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yansheng; Wang, Luyan; Zheng, Heng; Yin, Hongping; Chen, Xiangdong; Tan, Zheng; Wu, Wutong

    1999-09-01

    We are going to report the mutagenic effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on microbe. After irradiation with pulse laser, mutants of abscisic acid producing strains and erythromycin producing strains were obtained, one of which could produce 62.1% and 57% more products than control, respectively. In the study of mutagenization of Spirulina platensis caused by pulse laser, we selected a high photosynthetic strains, with improved productivity of protein and exocellular ploysaccharides of 12% and 246%, respectively. The experimental results indicate that frequency-doubling pulse laser (532 nm) is a potential new type of physical mutagenic factor.

  16. Green laser interferometric metrology system with sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shijie; Wei, Haoyun; Zhu, Minhao; Li, Yan

    2016-04-10

    This paper describes the design and realization of a heterodyne laser interferometer system that is applicable to metrology comparison. In this research, an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm served as the light source. Two spatially separated beams with different offset frequencies are generated by two acousto-optic modulators to prevent any source mixing and polarization leakage. The interferometry components are integrated to a monolithic prism to reduce the difficulty of the light path adjustment and to guarantee the measuring accuracy. The experimental results show there is a sub-nanometer periodic nonlinearity, which mainly results from the ghost reflection. Placed in a vacuum chamber, the interferometer is applicable for measuring comparison using a piezo nanopositioner and a precision translation stage. Finally, a commercial interferometer is calibrated with the interferometer system.

  17. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  18. Near Infrared (NIR) Imaging Techniques Using Lasers and Nonlinear Crystal Optical Parametric Oscillator/Amplifier (OPO/OPA) Imaging and Transferred Electron (TE) Photocathode Image Intensifiers

    SciTech Connect

    YATES,GEORGE J.; MCDONALD,THOMAS E. JR.; BLISS,DAVID E.; CAMERON,STEWART M.; GREIVES,KENNETH H.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.

    2000-12-20

    Laboratory experiments utilizing different near-infrared (NIR) sensitive imaging techniques for LADAR range gated imaging at eye-safe wavelengths are presented. An OPO/OPA configuration incorporating a nonlinear crystal for wavelength conversion of 1.56 micron probe or broadcast laser light to 807 nm light by utilizing a second pump laser at 532 nm for gating and gain, was evaluated for sensitivity, resolution, and general image quality. These data are presented with similar test results obtained from an image intensifier based upon a transferred electron (TE) photocathode with high quantum efficiency (QE) in the 1-2 micron range, with a P-20 phosphor output screen. Data presented include range-gated imaging performance in a cloud chamber with varying optical attenuation of laser reflectance images.

  19. Spectral and angular distribution of light scattered from the elytra of two carabid beetle species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Erbe, A.; Fabritius, H.; Raabe, D.

    2010-06-01

    Color in living organisms is primarily generated by two mechanisms: selective absorption by pigments and structural coloration, or a combination of both. In this study, we investigated the coloration of cuticle from the wings (elytra) of the two ground beetle species Carabus auronitens and Carabus auratus. The greenish iridescent color of both species is created by a multilayer structure consisting of periodically alternating layers with different thicknesses and composition which is located in the 1-2 µm thick outermost layer of the cuticle (epicuticle). Illuminated with white light, reflectance spectra in both linear polarisation show an angle-dependent characteristic peak in the blue/green region of the spectrum. Furthermore, the reflected light is polarised linearly. Scattering experiments with laser illumination at 532 nm show diffuse scattering over a larger angular range. The polarisation dependence of the scattered light is consistent with the interpretation of small inhomogeneities as scattering centres in the elytra.

  20. Generating A Strobed Laser Light Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Franke, John M.; Rhodes, David B.; Jones, Stephen B.

    1994-01-01

    An optoelectronic system generating synchronous, strobed sheet of laser light developed for use in making visible flow of air about model helicopter rotor. Used in wind-tunnel tests to determine actual locations of vortices for comparison with locations predicted by mathematical models to validate models. Each blade tip produces vortex. By establishing successive vortex locations, researcher determines trajectory of vortex pattern. Light-sheet strobe circuits provide selection of blade positions, strobe-pulse durations, and multiple pulses per revolution for rotors having two to nine blades. To make flow visible, vaporizing propylene glycol injected upstream of model. System also provides calibrated trigger delay of strobe pulses, adjustable strobe-pulse durations, selectable number of blades, and slip-sync mode to make flow visible as though in slow motion.

  1. Spectroscopy of {sup 127}I{sub 2} hyperfine structure near 532 mm using frequency - doubled diode - laser - pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Guellati, S.; Elandaloussi, H.; Fretel, E.

    1994-12-31

    Frequency - doubled diode - laser - pumped Nd : Yag laser can constitute an interesting optical standard around 532 nm. More than ten of {sup 127}I{sub 2} lines can be observed inside the laser spectral range. Two independent systems, stabilized on one {sup 127}I{sub 2} hyperfine component, are used to check the frequency long term stability for metrological purpose.

  2. Paper surface modification by lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekou, E.; Kotsifaki, D. G.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2010-10-01

    Lasers can provide a precious tool to conservation process due to their accuracy and the controlled energy they deliver, especially to fragile organic material such as paper. The current study concerns laser modification such as paper cleaning, initially of test papers artificially soiled and then of an original book of the early 20th Century. The test objects were A4 copier paper, newspaper, and paper Whatman No.1056. During the experiments, ink of a pen, pencil and ink from a stamp was mechanically employed on each paper surface. Laser cleaning was applied using a Q-switched Nd:YAG operating at 532 nm and CO2 laser at 10.6 μm for various fluences. The experimental results were presented by using optical microscopy. Eventually, laser cleaning of ink was performed to a book of 1934, by choosing the best conditions and parameters from cleaning the test samples, like Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm.

  3. Small bore ceramic laser tube inspection light table

    DOEpatents

    Updike, Earl O.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting small bore ceramic laser tubes, which includes a support base with one or more support rollers. A fluorescent light tube is inserted within the laser tube and the laser tube is supported by the support rollers so that a gap is maintained between the laser tube and the fluorescent tube to enable rotation of the laser tube. In operation, the ceramic tube is illuminated from the inside by the fluorescent tube to facilitate visual inspection. Centering the tube around the axial light of the fluorescent tube provides information about straightness and wall thickness of the laser tube itself.

  4. High-power pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Larry R.; Hays, A. D.; Kaz, Alex; Kasinski, Jeff; Burnham, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of both pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers are presented. The pulsed laser produced 1.0 mJ with pulsewidths of 90 psec at 20 Hz. The CW pumped laser produced 6 W output at 1.064 microns and 3 W output at 532 nm.

  5. State of the art of compact green lasers for mobile projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaian, Stepan; Khaydarov, John

    2012-11-01

    We report on progress in development of the low-cost, highly efficient miniature diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) green laser sources for pico-projectors and other consumer electronics applications with wavelength 532 nm. As Spectralus laser has monolithic microchip structure there are other green lasers with various discrete designs. We are reviewing both approaches in this paper.

  6. Temperature dependence of nanosecond laser pulse thresholds of melanosome and microsphere microcavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanosome microcavitation is the threshold-level retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) damage mechanism for nanosecond (ns) pulse exposures in the visible and near-infrared (NIR). Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes were determined as a function of temperature (20 to 85°C) using single ns laser pulses at 532 and 1064 nm. Melanosomes were irradiated using a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG (doubled for 532-nm irradiation). For comparison to melanosome data, a similar temperature (20 to 65°C) dependence study was also performed for 532 nm, ns pulse exposures of black polystyrene microbeads. Results indicated a decrease in the microcavitation average radiant exposure threshold with increasing sample temperature for both 532- and 1064-nm single pulse exposures of melanosomes and microbeads. Threshold data and extrapolated nucleation temperatures were used to estimate melanosome absorption coefficients in the visible and NIR, and microbead absorption coefficients in the visible, indicating that melanin is a better absorber of visible light than black polystyrene. The NIR melanosome absorption coefficients ranged from 3713 cm-1 at 800 nm to 222 cm-1 at 1319 nm. These data represent the first temperature-dependent melanosome microcavitation study in the NIR and provide additional information for understanding melanosome microcavitation threshold dependence on wavelength and ambient temperature.

  7. Two-mirrored galvanometer laser light sheet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, B. D.; Franke, J. M.; Jones, S. B.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1988-01-01

    Light sheets generated with either laser or noncoherent sources have found widespread application to flow visualization. Previous light sheet generating systems were usually dedicated to a specific viewing geometry. The technique with the most flexibility is the galvanometer mirror based laser light sheet system. A two-mirrored system was designed and developed to provide flexibility and adaptability to a wide range of applications. The design includes the capability to control the size and location of the laser light sheet in real time, to generate horizontal or vertical sheets, to sweep the sheet repeatedly through a volume, to generate multiple sheets with controllable separation and to rotate single or multiple laser light sheets. The system is capable of producing up to 12 sheets of laser light at an angular divergence of + or - 20 degrees. Maximum scan rate of any one line is 500 Hertz. This system has proven to be uniquely versatile and a patent has been applied for.

  8. Hyper-Rayleigh light scattering from an aqueous suspension of purple membrane.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P K; Rayfield, G W

    1994-07-01

    Here we report the first observation of hyper-Rayleigh light scattering from bacteriorhodopsin in the form of an aqueous suspension of unoriented purple membranes. A typical purple membrane suspension used in our experiments contains approximately 10(8) randomly oriented purple membranes. Each purple membrane contains approximately 10(5) bacteriorhodopsin molecules in a two-dimensional crystallinearray. Hyper-Rayleigh light scattering is observed when the purple membrane suspension is illuminated with light that has a wavelength of 1064 nm. We propose that the 532-nm scattered light from each of the bacteriorhodopsin molecules in a single purple membrane is coherent, and that the scattered light from different purple membranes is incoherent. This proposal is supported by the following experimental observations: (a) the 532-nm light intensity is proportional to the square of the incident power, (b) the intensity of the 532-nm signal is linearly proportional to the concentration of purple membrane in solution, (c) the scattered 532-nm light is incoherent, (d) the scattered 532-nm light intensity decreases if the size of the purple membranes is reduced while the bacteriorhodopsin concentration is kept constant, and (e) the 532-nm light is due to the retinal chromophore of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The ratio of horizontal polarized hyper-Rayleigh scattered light to vertically polarized hyper-Rayleigh scattered light gives the angle (23 ± 4°) of the retinal axis with respect to the plane of the purple membrane. The hyperpolarizability of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule is found to be 5 ± 0.4 × 10(-27) esu.

  9. Laser therapy of pigmented lesions: pro and contra.

    PubMed

    Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Lipozenčić, Jasna; Ceović, Romana; Stulhofer Buzina, Daška; Kostović, Krešimir

    2010-01-01

    Although frequently performed, laser removal of pigmented lesions still contains certain controversial issues. Epidermal pigmented lesions include solar lentigines, ephelides, café au lait macules and seborrheic keratoses. Dermal lesions include melanocytic nevi, blue nevi, drug induced hyperpigmentation and nevus of Ota and Ito. Some lesions exhibit both an epidermal and dermal component like Becker's nevus, postinflammatory hyperpigmentations, melasma and nevus spilus. Due to the wide absorption spectrum of melanin (500-1100 nm), several laser systems are effective in removal of pigmented lesions. These lasers include the pigmented lesion pulsed dye laser (510 nm), the Q-switched ruby laser (694 nm), the Q-switched alexandrite laser (755 nm) and the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm), which can be frequency-doubled to produce visible green light with a wavelength of 532 nm. The results of laser therapy are usually successful. However, there are still many controversies regarding the use of lasers in treating certain pigmented lesions. Actually, the essential question in removing pigmented lesions with lasers is whether the lesion has atypical features or has a malignant potential. Dermoscopy, used as a routine first-level diagnostic technique, is helpful in most cases. If there is any doubt whether the lesion is benign, then a biopsy for histologic evaluation is obligatory.

  10. A compact and high efficiency diode pumped green laser based on MgO doped PPLN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X. S.; Ji, B.; Jia, F. Q.; Cai, Z. P.; Xu, H. Y.; Xu, C. Q.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, an efficient intra-cavity second harmonic generation of green laser in a periodically poled MgO doped LiNbO3 (MgO:PPLN) bulk crystal using a compact Nd:YVO4 laser as a fundamental laser source is reported. Different length, different working temperature MgO:PPLN crystals are tested and investigated in the SHG experiments. The maximum output power at 532 nm is 6.2 W at the absorbed pump power at 808 nm of 14 W, the optical to optical conversion efficiencies from 808 to 532 nm and 1064 to 532 nm are 43 and 77%, respectively, the instability in 2 hours is less than 5%.

  11. Metallic surfaces decontamination by using laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier

    2013-07-01

    Metal surface cleaning appears to be one of the major priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. The research and the development of a new technology that is able to meet the actual requirements (i.e. waste volume minimization, liquid effluents and chemicals free process...) seems to be the main commitment. Currently, a wide panel of technologies already exists (e.g. blasting, disk sander, electro-decontamination...) but for some of them, the efficiency is limited (e.g, Dry Ice blasting) and for others, the wastes production (liquid and/or solid) remains an important issue. One answer could be the use of a LASER light process. Since a couple of years, the Clean- Up Business Unit of the AREVA group investigates this decontamination technology. Many tests have been already performed in inactive (i.e. on simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides) or active conditions (i.e. pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and metallic pieces covered with grease). The paper will describe the results obtained in term of decontamination efficiency during all our validation process. Metallographic characterizations (i.e. SEM, X-ray scattering) and radiological analysis will be provided. We will also focus our paper on the future deployment of the LASER technology and its commercial use at La Hague reprocessing facility in 2013. (authors)

  12. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  13. SATELLITE-MOUNTED LIGHT SOURCES AS PHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION STANDARDS FOR GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.

    2012-01-15

    A significant and growing portion of systematic error on a number of fundamental parameters in astrophysics and cosmology is due to uncertainties from absolute photometric and flux standards. A path toward achieving major reduction in such uncertainties may be provided by satellite-mounted light sources, resulting in improvement in the ability to precisely characterize atmospheric extinction, and thus helping to usher in the coming generation of precision results in astronomy. Using a campaign of observations of the 532 nm pulsed laser aboard the CALIPSO satellite, collected using a portable network of cameras and photodiodes, we obtain initial measurements of atmospheric extinction, which can apparently be greatly improved by further data of this type. For a future satellite-mounted precision light source, a high-altitude balloon platform under development (together with colleagues) can provide testing as well as observational data for calibration of atmospheric uncertainties.

  14. Light pollution generated by laser guide star at Canarian Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chueca, Sergio; Fuensalida, Jesus J.

    2004-11-01

    A new generation of instrument using a launching laser is been developed to correct the atmospheric image blurring and to establish optical communication with space. Then, light pollution generated by laser will be a serious operational problem in next years. This laser could affect astronomical works of adjacent telescopes when the laser lay across the field of view of the observing telescope, this is a kind of light pollution. This could be avoided with an adequate operational politic to detect possible interference between the laser and the astronomical telescopes. In this paper is analysed the mathematical probability of a cross-event happen.

  15. Twin-Mirrored-Galvanometer Laser-Light-Sheet Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1991-01-01

    Multiple, rotating laser-light sheets generated to illuminate flows in wind tunnels. Designed and developed to provide flexibility and adaptability to wide range of applications. Design includes capability to control size and location of laser-light sheet in real time, to generate horizontal or vertical sheets, to sweep sheet repeatedly through volume, to generate multiple sheets with controllable separation, and to rotate single or multiple laser-light sheets. Includes electronic equipment and laser mounted on adjustable-height platform. Twin-mirrored galvanometer unit supported by tripod to reduce vibration. Other possible applications include use in construction industry to align beams of building. Artistic or display applications also possible.

  16. NASA Laser Light Scattering Advanced Technology Development Workshop, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to explore the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware and to assess user requirements and needs for a laser light scattering instrument in a reduced gravity environment. The workshop addressed experimental needs and stressed hardware development.

  17. A Treatment of Amblyopia Using Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Yi-Ding; Liu, Bing-Chun

    2000-04-01

    We propose the treatment of amblyopia using yellow-green laser diodes. There are amblyopia children in excess of fifty million in the world. Because the causative agent of amblyopia hasn't been well understood,only roughly considered to be concerned with visual sense cell, optic nerve network and function of nerve center, no appropriate treatment is found up to date. The vision of person is determined by the center hollow region of retina, where there are three kinds of cone cell. The corresponding peak wavelength in absorption spectrum locates 447nm (blue light), 532nm (green light) and 565nm (yellow light), respectively. When stimulated by white light, excited degree of three kinds of cone cell are identical,or yellow-green light, to which person eye is most sensitive, will significantly takes effects. Therefore the yellow-green laser diode is suitable for treating amblyopia. The weak laser, namely laser power less than mW order of magnitude, shows curative by stimulating bion tissue. When stimulating light power density is less than 0.001W/cm, the compounding speed of nucleic acid DNA is significantly increased. The growth rate of cell, activity of enzyme, content of hemoglobin and the growth of blood vessel, are all increased. However, it's key to control the dose of light. When the dose transcend some value, a inhibition will occur. The little dose of weak laser treatment can be accumulated with a parabolic characteristics, that is the weak laser generate bion response stengthening gradually versus time. Then it will weaken gradually after the peak. When the treatment duration is longer than a certain time, a inhibition also takes place. A suggested theraphy is characterized by little dose and short treatment course. In a conclusion, the yellow-green laser diode should be used for the treatment of amblyopia. The little dose and short treatment couse are to be adopted. Key words:treatment amblyopia laser diode

  18. Airborne Polarimetric, Two-Color Laser Altimeter Measurements of Lake Ice Cover: A Pathfinder for NASA's ICESat-2 Spaceflight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David; Dabney, Philip; Valett, Susan; Yu, Anthony; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Kelly, April

    2011-01-01

    The ICESat-2 mission will continue NASA's spaceflight laser altimeter measurements of ice sheets, sea ice and vegetation using a new measurement approach: micropulse, single photon ranging at 532 nm. Differential penetration of green laser energy into snow, ice and water could introduce errors in sea ice freeboard determination used for estimation of ice thickness. Laser pulse scattering from these surface types, and resulting range biasing due to pulse broadening, is assessed using SIMPL airborne data acquired over icecovered Lake Erie. SIMPL acquires polarimetric lidar measurements at 1064 and 532 nm using the micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach.

  19. Mathematical model for light scanning system based on circular laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiquan; Yao, Shun; Lu, Fenggui; Tang, Xinhua; Zhang, Wei

    2005-11-01

    A novel light scanning system based on circular laser trajectory for welding robot is developed. With the help of image processing technique, intelligent laser welding could be realized. According to laser triangulation algorithm and Scheimpflug condition, mathematical model for circular laser vision is built. This scanning system projects circular laser onto welded seams and recovers the depth of the welded seams, escapes from shortcomings of less information, explains ambiguity and single tracking direction inherent in "spot" or "line" type laser trajectory. Three-dimensional (3D) model for welded seams could be recognized after depth recovery. The imaging error is investigated also.

  20. Visible light plasmonic heating of Au-ZnO for the catalytic reduction of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Congjun; Ranasingha, Oshadha; Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Andio, Mark; Lewis, James P.; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO2 and H2 reactants to CH4 and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat Au-ZnO from 30 to ~600 °C and simultaneously tune the CH4 : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH4 : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperature-programmed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resulting from the plasmonic heating of the Au-ZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO2 conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser illumination is 0.030%. The Au-ZnO catalysts are robust and remain active after repeated laser exposure and cycling. The light intensity required to initiate CO2 reduction is low (~2.5 × 105 W m-2) and achievable with solar concentrators. Our results illustrate the viability of plasmonic heating approaches for CO2 utilization and other practical thermal catalytic applications.Plasmonic excitation of Au nanoparticles attached to the surface of ZnO catalysts using low power 532 nm laser illumination leads to significant heating of the catalyst and the conversion of CO2 and H2 reactants to CH4 and CO products. Temperature-calibrated Raman spectra of ZnO phonons show that intensity-dependent plasmonic excitation can controllably heat Au-ZnO from 30 to ~600 °C and simultaneously tune the CH4 : CO product ratio. The laser induced heating and resulting CH4 : CO product distribution agrees well with predictions from thermodynamic models and temperature-programmed reaction experiments indicating that the reaction is a thermally driven process resulting from the plasmonic heating of the Au-ZnO. The apparent quantum yield for CO2 conversion under continuous wave (cw) 532 nm laser

  1. Red laser based on intra-cavity Nd:YAG/CH4 frequency doubled Raman lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanchao; Wang, Pengyuan; Liu, Jinbo; Liu, Wanfa; Guo, Jingwei

    2017-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a powerful tool for the extension of the spectral range of lasers. To obtain efficient Raman conversion in SRS, many researchers have studied different types of Raman laser configurations. Among these configurations, the intra-cavity type is particularly attractive. Intra-cavity SRS has the advantages of high intra-cavity laser intensity, low-SRS threshold, and high Raman conversion efficiency. In this paper, An Q-switched intra-cavity Nd: YAG/CH4 frequency-doubled Raman lasers is reported. A negative branch confocal resonator with M= 1.25 is used for the frequency-doubling of Nd: YAG laser. The consequent 532nm light is confined in intra- cavity SRS with travelling wave resonator, and the focal of one mirror of cavity is overlap with the center of the other mirror of the cavity. We found this design is especially efficient to reduce the threshold of SRS, and increase conversion efficiency. The threshold is measured to be 0.62 MW, and at the pump energy of 16.1 mJ, the conversion efficiency is 34%. With the smaller magnification M, the threshold could further decrease, and the conversion efficiency could be improved further. This is a successful try to extend the spectral range of a laser to the shorter wavelength by SRS, and this design may play an important role in the fulfillment of high power red lasers.

  2. Focusing light through biological tissue and tissue-mimicking phantoms up to 9.6 cm in thickness with digital optical phase conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuecheng; Liu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-08-01

    Optical phase conjugation (OPC)-based wavefront shaping techniques focus light through or within scattering media, which is critically important for deep-tissue optical imaging, manipulation, and therapy. However, to date, the sample thickness in OPC experiments has been limited to only a few millimeters. Here, by using a laser with a long coherence length and an optimized digital OPC system that can safely deliver more light power, we focused 532-nm light through tissue-mimicking phantoms up to 9.6 cm thick, as well as through ex vivo chicken breast tissue up to 2.5 cm thick. Our results demonstrate that OPC can be achieved even when photons have experienced on average 1000 scattering events. The demonstrated penetration of nearly 10 cm (˜100 transport mean free paths) has never been achieved before by any optical focusing technique, and it shows the promise of OPC for deep-tissue noninvasive optical imaging, manipulation, and therapy.

  3. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Transient Reorientation of a Doped Liquid Crystal System under a Short Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Xiang, Ying; Liu, Yi-Kun; Wang, Jian; Yang, Shun-Lin

    2009-08-01

    The transient optical nonlinearity of a nematic liquid crystal doped with azo-dye DR19 is examined. The optical reorientation threshold of a 25-μm-thick planar-aligned sample of 5CB using a 50 ns pulse duration 532 nm YAG laser pulse is observed to decrease from 800 mJ/mm2 to 0.6 mJ/mm2 after the addition of 1 vol% azo dopant, a reduction of three orders of magnitude. When using a laser pulse duration of 10 ns, no such effect is observed. Experimental results indicate that the azo dopant molecules undergo photoisomerization from trans-isomer to cis-isomer under exposure to light, and this conformation change reorients the 5CB molecules via intermolecular coupling between guest and host. This guest-host coupling also affects the azo photoisomerization process.

  4. ARGOS laser system mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deysenroth, M.; Honsberg, M.; Gemperlein, H.; Ziegleder, J.; Raab, W.; Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Gässler, W.; Borelli, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    ARGOS, a multi-star adaptive optics system is designed for the wide-field imager and multi-object spectrograph LUCI on the LBT (Large Binocular Telescope). Based on Rayleigh scattering the laser constellation images 3 artificial stars (at 532 nm) per each of the 2 eyes of the LBT, focused at a height of 12 km (Ground Layer Adaptive Optics). The stars are nominally positioned on a circle 2' in radius, but each star can be moved by up to 0.5' in any direction. For all of these needs are following main subsystems necessary: 1. A laser system with its 3 Lasers (Nd:YAG ~18W each) for delivering strong collimated light as for LGS indispensable. 2. The Launch system to project 3 beams per main mirror as a 40 cm telescope to the sky. 3. The Wave Front Sensor with a dichroic mirror. 4. The dichroic mirror unit to grab and interpret the data. 5. A Calibration Unit to adjust the system independently also during day time. 6. Racks + platforms for the WFS units. 7. Platforms and ladders for a secure access. This paper should mainly demonstrate how the ARGOS Laser System is configured and designed to support all other systems.

  5. Nonlinear Absorption Spectroscopy of Porphyrin J-aggregates in Aqueous Solution: Evidence for Control of Degree of Association by Light-Induced Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakawa, Masayuki; Nakata, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Masaya; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Tokunaga, Eiji

    2017-04-01

    Spectroscopic evidence was obtained for molecular aggregation states to be controlled by the irradiation of light, which is off-resonant below the peak absorption energies of both monomers and well-grown J-aggregates. In low (undersaturated)-concentration aqueous solutions of porphyrin molecules (tetraphenyl porphyrin tetrasulfonic acid; TPPS) where the monomer absorbance dominates, irradiation with a 532 nm laser induces a decrease in the monomer absorbance and an increase in the aggregate absorbance. The increase in the absorbance of J-aggregates occurs in a broad spectral range associated with the increase in the number of not only variously sized oligomer aggregates but also aggregates structurally different from well-grown stable J-aggregates. In high-concentration solutions where the J-aggregate absorbance dominates, a blue shift of the absorption peak of J-aggregates is induced at the same 532 nm irradiation, corresponding to a decrease in the aggregation number or in the association energy. By contrast, for spin-coated polymer films of monomers and J-aggregates where molecules are immobile, these features are not observed. It is remarkable that the gradient force potential is smaller by more than seven orders of magnitude than the kinetic energy of the thermal motion of the molecule at room temperature, but the absorption change in solution indicating the increase in the number of aggregates is as large as ΔA ˜ 10-3 in magnitude.

  6. Characteristics of light-induced electron transport from P3HT to ZnO-nanowire field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Minhyeok; Hoon Lee, Byoung; Park, Woojin; Kang, Jang-Won; Jeong, Sehee; Cho, Kyungjune; Hong, Woong-Ki; Hun Lee, Byoung; Lee, Kwanghee; Park, Seong-Ju; Lee, Takhee

    2013-11-01

    We fabricated ZnO-nanowire (NW) field-effect transistors (FETs) coated with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and characterized the electron-transfer characteristics from the P3HT to the ZnO NWs. Under irradiation by laser light with a wavelength of 532 nm, photo-induced electrons were created in the P3HT and then transported to the ZnO NWs, constituting a source-drain current in the initially enhancement-mode P3HT-coated ZnO-NW FETs. As the intensity of the light increased, the current increased, and its threshold voltage shifted to the negative gate-bias direction. We estimated the photo-induced electron density and the electron-transfer characteristics, which will be helpful for understanding organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronic devices.

  7. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  8. Changing correlation into anticorrelation by superposing thermal and laser light.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Li, Fu-Li; Xu, Zhuo

    2014-07-01

    Correlation can be changed into anticorrelation by superposing thermal and laser light with the same frequency and polarization. Two-photon interference theory is employed to interpret this phenomenon. An experimental scheme is designed to verify the theoretical predictions by employing pseudothermal light to simulate thermal light. The experimental results are consistent with the theoretical results.

  9. LIGHT SOURCE: TW Laser system for Thomson scattering X-ray light source at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Li-Xm; Du, Ying-Chao; Du, Qiang; Li, Ren-Kai; Hua, Jian-Fei; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2009-06-01

    A TW (Tera Watt) laser system based on Ti:sapphire mainly for the Tsinghua Thomson scattering X-ray light source (TTX) is being built. Both UV (ultraviolet) laser pulse for driving the photocathode radio-frequency (RF) gun and the IR (infrared) laser pulse as the electron-beam-scattered-light are provided by the system. Efforts have also been made in laser pulse shaping and laser beam transport to optimize the high-brightness electron beam production by the photocathode RF gun.

  10. Laser wavelength effect on nanosecond laser light reflection in ablation of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, O.; de la Cruz May, L.; Mejia, E. B.; Ruz Hernandez, J. A.; Flores Gil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Reflection of nanosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths (1.06 and 0.69 µm) in ablation of titanium in air is studied experimentally. The laser wavelength effect on reflection is essential at low laser fluence values. However, it becomes negligible for laser fluence values by about an order of magnitude higher than the plasma ignition threshold. We speculate that the disappearance of the wavelength effect is explained by counter-acting processes of the laser light absorption in plasma, which increases with laser wavelength, and absorption in the surface layer, which decreases with increasing laser wavelength.

  11. Modeling and experiments with a subsea laser radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjarnar, Morten L.; Klepsvik, John O.; Nilsen, Jan E.

    1991-12-01

    Subsea laser radar has a potential for accurate 3-D imaging in water. A prototype system has been developed at Seatex A/S in Norway as a prestudy for the design of an underwater laser radar scanning system. Parallel to the experimental studies, a numerical radiometric model has been developed as an aid in the system design. This model simulates a raster scanning laser radar system for in-water use. Thus this parametric model allows for analysis and predictions of the performance of such a sensor system. Experiments have been conducted to test a prototype laser radar system. The experimental system tested uses a Q-switched, frequency doubled, Nd:YAG solid state laser operating at a wavelength of 532 nm, which is close to optimal for use in water due to the small light attenuation around this wavelength in seawater. The laser has an energy output of 6 (mu) J per pulse 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the receiver aperture is approximately 17 cm2. The laser radar prototype was mounted onto an accurate pan and tilt unit in order to test the 3-D imaging capabilities. The ultimate goal of the development is to provide an optical 3-D imaging tool for distances comparable to high frequency sonars with a range capability of approximately 30 - 50 m. The results from these experiments are presented. The present implementation of the scanning laser radar model is described and some outputs from the simulation are shown.

  12. Study of laser-induced damage to GaAs/Ge solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Rongzhen; Ren, Guangsen; Wang, Yanbin; Zhang, Wenpan

    2015-10-01

    The laser-induced damage of GaAs/Ge single heterojunction solar cells is investigated. The solar cells were irradiated by a continuous wave laser at the wavelength of 532 nm. Results indicate that the GaAs/Ge solar cells would mostly be damaged when laser is focused on its grid lines. Theoretically, the continuous wave laser at the wavelength of 532 nm is absorbed at the surface of solar cells. The continual temperature rise decomposed the material GaAs and melted the material Ge. The melted metal Ge connected the solar cells grid lines and the rear electrode, the solar cell became completely invalid. The major damage of continuous wave mainly comes from both the thermal melting and the thermal stress effects. The huge temperature gradient on the surface of the solar cells generated the crack, and even rupture. Concentric iridescent ring appeared on the damaged surfaces when observed with an optical microscope(OM) of broad spectrum. The damaged surface film was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) and the Contour Meter. The component of the concentric iridescent is GeO2 film, when the light irradiated on the film and interfered, the concentric iridescent generated. The different ring indicated the thickness of oxide was different. When the film was corroded by HCl, the iridescent disappeared. The formation mechanism of the film and the cause of the concentric iridescent ring were analyzed. These experimental conclusions are tested and verified by scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  13. Polarization study of a supercontinuum light source for different wavelengths through a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Atilano, F. J.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Filoteo-Razo, J. D.; Hernández-Garcia, J. C.; Lauterio-Cruz, J. P.; Jáuregui-Vázquez, D.; Ibarra-Escamilla, B.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Pottiez, O.; Kuzin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we show the changes of polarization at different wavelengths in the end of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) by means bandpass filters in a supercontinuum light source. A linear and circular polarization was introduced in a piece of PCF, showing the changes of the polarization for each wavelength of each one of the filters from 450 to 700nm. We used a microchip laser as pumping source with wavelength of 532nm and short pulses of 650ps with repetition rate of 5kHz. We obtained a continuous spectrum in the visible spectral region, showing a comparison of the polarization state at the fiber input with respect to polarization state in the fiber output for different wavelengths by rotating the axes of the PCF.

  14. Visible light surface emitting semiconductor laser

    DOEpatents

    Olbright, Gregory R.; Jewell, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    A vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser is disclosed comprising a laser cavity sandwiched between two distributed Bragg reflectors. The laser cavity comprises a pair of spacer layers surrounding one or more active, optically emitting quantum-well layers having a bandgap in the visible which serve as the active optically emitting material of the device. The thickness of the laser cavity is m .lambda./2n.sub.eff where m is an integer, .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the laser radiation and n.sub.eff is the effective index of refraction of the cavity. Electrical pumping of the laser is achieved by heavily doping the bottom mirror and substrate to one conductivity-type and heavily doping regions of the upper mirror with the opposite conductivity type to form a diode structure and applying a suitable voltage to the diode structure. Specific embodiments of the invention for generating red, green, and blue radiation are described.

  15. Interferometer combines laser light source and digital counting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Measurement of small linear displacements in digital readouts with extreme accuracy and sensitivity is achieved by an interferometer. The instrument combines a digital electro-optical fringe-counting system and a laser light source.

  16. Laser-limiting materials for medical use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Kopylova, Tat'yana N.; Tereshchenko, Sergey A.; Reznichenko, Alexander V.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2004-03-01

    The important problem of modern laser medicine is the decrease of an exposure of biological tissues outside of an operational field and can be solved by optical radiation limiting. Organic dyes with reversibly darkening can be placed onto surfaces of irradiated tissues or can be introduced in solder for laser welding of vessels. The limiting properties of a set of nontoxic organic compounds were investigated. Nonlinear optical properties of dyes having reverse saturable absorption (pyran styryl derivatives, cyanine and porphyrine compounds) were studied under XeCl and YAG:Nd (II harmonics) lasers excitation. The effect of attenuation of a visible laser radiation is obtained for ethanol solutions of cyanines: radiation attenuation coefficient ( AC) = 25-35 at N/S = 100-250 MW/cm2. In water solutions of such compounds in UV spectrum range AC ~ 10. The spectral characteristics of compounds appeared expedient enough to operational use in laser limiters (broad passband in visible range of a spectrum). Under the data of Z-scanning (the scheme F/10) value AC ~ 70 was reached. The limiting of power laser radiation in visible (λ = 532 nm) and UV- (λ = 308 nm) spectral region and nanosecond pulse duration (7 -13 ns) across porphyrine solutions and their complexes with some metals (13 compounds) was investigated too. The comparative study of optical limiting dependence on intensity of laser radiation, solvent type and concentration of solutions was carried out for selecte wavelength. There was shown a possible use of pyran styryl derivatives DCM as limiters of visual laser radiation. To understand a mechanism of laser radiation limitation the light induced processes were experimentally and theoretically studied in organic molecules. The quantum-chemical investigation of one cyanine compound was carried out. There were noted the perspectives of laser radiation limiting by application of inverted schemes of traditional laser shutters. Usage of phenomena of light -induced

  17. Laser entertainment and light shows in education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaratnam, Andrew T.; Symons, Charles

    2002-05-01

    Laser shows and beam effects have been a source of entertainment since its first public performance May 9, 1969, at Mills College in Oakland, California. Since 1997, the Photonics Center, NgeeAnn Polytechnic, Singapore, has been using laser shows as a teaching tool. Students are able to exhibit their creative skills and learn at the same time how lasers are used in the entertainment industry. Students will acquire a number of skills including handling three- phase power supply, operation of cooling system, and laser alignment. Students also acquire an appreciation of the arts, learning about shapes and contours as they develop graphics for the shows. After holography, laser show animation provides a combination of the arts and technology. This paper aims to briefly describe how a krypton-argon laser, galvanometer scanners, a polychromatic acousto-optic modulator and related electronics are put together to develop a laser projector. The paper also describes how students are trained to make their own laser animation and beam effects with music, and at the same time have an appreciation of the operation of a Class IV laser and the handling of optical components.

  18. Research of time fiducial and imaging VISAR laser for Shenguang-III laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Wang, Zhenguo; Tian, Xiaocheng; Zhou, Dandan; Zhu, Na; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Mingzhong; Xu, Dangpeng; Dang, Zhao; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua; Zheng, Wanguo; Wang, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Time fiducial laser is an important tool for the precise measurement in high energy density physics experiments. The VISAR probe laser is also vital for shock wave diagnostics in ICF experiments. Here, time fiducial laser and VISAR light were generated from one source on SG-III laser facility. After generated from a 1064-nm DFB laser, the laser is modulated by an amplitude modulator driven by 10 GS/s arbitrary waveform generator. Using time division multiplexing technology, the ten-pulse time fiducial laser and the 20-ns VISAR pulse were split by a 1×2 multiplexer and then chosen by two acoustic optic modulators. Using the technique, cost of the system was reduced. The technologies adopted in the system also include pulse polarization stabilization, high precision fiber coupling and energy transmission. The time fiducial laser generated synchronized 12-beam 2ω and 4-beam 3ω laser, providing important reference marks for different detectors and making it convenient for the analysis of diagnostic data. After being amplified by fiber amplifiers and Nd:YAG rod amplifiers, the VISAR laser pulse was frequency-converted to 532-nm pulse by a thermally controlled LBO crystal with final output energy larger than 20 mJ. Finally, the green light was coupled into a 1-mm core diameter, multimode fused silica optical fiber and propagated to the imaging VISAR. The VISAR laser has been used in the VISAR diagnostic physics experiments. Shock wave loading and slowdown processes were measured. Function to measure velocity history of shock wave front movement in different kinds of materials was added to the SG-III laser facility.

  19. Laser- and light-based hair removal: an update.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David J

    2007-03-01

    A variety of laser technologies are now able to successfully remove unwanted hair. Successful removal is based on an understanding of laser physics and appropriate wavelengths, pulse durations and cooling of the skin. Although ruby lasers were among the first to be used, alexandrite, diode and neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers, as well as a variety of broad-spectrum intense pulsed light sources, are currently more commonly used for the treatment of unwanted hair. Darker skin types are more difficult to treat but can also be treated. Complications can occur after laser hair removal but can be reduced through an understanding of the fundamentals of laser removal. These complications include the obvious, such as scarring and pigmentary changes, and the not so obvious, such as reticulate erythema and uveitis. Laser hair removal is now widely accepted as a successful approach to remove unwanted hair in both men and women. The future will involve office-based laser and light source hair removal, as well as a variety of laser and light-based home devices.

  20. Control of light backscattering in blood during intravenous laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Popov, V. D.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1997-02-01

    One of the most important problems in modern laser medicine is the determination of system response on laser treatment. Reaction of living system is significant during many kinds of laser procedures like surgery, therapy and biostimulation. Our study was aimed to optimize laser exposure using feed-back fiber system for intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). This system consisted of helium-neon laser (633 nm, 5 mW) with coupled fiber unit, photodetector and PC interface. Photodetector signals produced due to light backscattering were storaged and processed during all blood irradiation procedure. Significant time-dependent variations were observed within 9-15 min after beginning of treatment procedure and were correlated with number of trials, stage and character of disease. The designed feed-back system allows us to register a human blood response on laser irradiation to achieve better cure effect.

  1. Hollow light guide and optical fiber for UV laser transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Uichi; Hashishin, Yuichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    1997-12-01

    The applications of ultraviolet lasers in medicine and surgery are expected to produce new therapies since UV laser is strongly absorbed by lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The suitable tools for the UV laser power delivery, however, have not been developed yet. In an effort to make efficient delivery of UV laser, we have proposed hollow light guide which consists of an aluminum-phosphor bronze reflector and a teflon E-type rail spacer. The delivery characteristics of the hollow light guide have been investigated using the ArF and KrF excimer lasers. In case of the KrF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy reached 77%/m and 110 mJ/pulse, respectively. In the ArF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy were obtained to be 56%/m and 40 mJ/pulse, respectively. It is known that 193 nm radiation by the ArF laser are absorbed by the air. Thus, the ArF laser beam delivery were examined in the helium gas. The transmittance and the delivery energy were obtained to be 72%/m and 50 mJ/pulse using helium-filled hollow light guide, which were greatly improved for comparison with the case of the air. We have also tried the quartz fiber with OH ion doped core. The effects of a lightly doped core with Cl and a clad with B-F on the laser transmittance have been investigated. In these result, the Cl was not good core dopant. The B and F were useful clad dopants for the excimer laser transmission.

  2. Hollow light guide and optical fiber for UV laser transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Uichi; Hashishin, Yuichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    1998-01-01

    The applications of ultraviolet lasers in medicine and surgery are expected to produce new therapies since UV laser is strongly absorbed by lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The suitable tools for the UV laser power delivery, however, have not been developed yet. In an effort to make efficient delivery of UV laser, we have proposed hollow light guide which consists of an aluminum-phosphor bronze reflector and a teflon E-type rail spacer. The delivery characteristics of the hollow light guide have been investigated using the ArF and KrF excimer lasers. In case of the KrF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy reached 77%/m and 110 mJ/pulse, respectively. In the ArF laser, the transmittance and delivery energy were obtained to be 56%/m and 40 mJ/pulse, respectively. It is known that 193 nm radiation by the ArF laser are absorbed by the air. Thus, the ArF laser beam delivery were examined in the helium gas. The transmittance and the delivery energy were obtained to be 72%/m and 50 mJ/pulse using helium-filled hollow light guide, which were greatly improved for comparison with the case of the air. We have also tried the quartz fiber with OH ion doped core. The effects of a lightly doped core with Cl and a clad with B-F on the laser transmittance have been investigated. In these result, the Cl was not good core dopant. The B and F were useful clad dopants for the excimer laser transmission.

  3. The interaction of laser radiation with explosively driven shock wave compressed Xe plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaporozhets, Yu B.; Mintsev, V. B.; Gryaznov, V. K.; Reinholz, H.; Röpke, G.; Fortov, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of the response of dense plasma to electromagnetic waves of moderate intensity can be used as a tool to investigate the validity of the physical models describing the behavior of matter under extreme conditions. Within this work the new experimental data on oblique incidence of polarized electromagnetic wave are presented. The study of polarized reflectivity properties of nonideal xenon plasma was accomplished using laser light at ν las = 2.83 × 1014 s-1 (λ las = 1064 nm) and ν las = 5.66 × 1014 s-1 (λ las = 532 nm). The measurements of polarized reflectivity coefficients of explosively driven dense plasmas have been carried out at incident angles up to θ = 78°. The plasma composition was calculated within a chemical picture. The integration of Maxwell equations to construct the spatial profile of the density of charge carriers of plasmas was based on an interpolation formula for DC conductivity.

  4. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  5. Shaping laser accelerated ions for future applications - The LIGHT collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busold, S.; Almomani, A.; Bagnoud, V.; Barth, W.; Bedacht, S.; Blažević, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Brabetz, C.; Burris-Mog, T.; Cowan, T. E.; Deppert, O.; Droba, M.; Eickhoff, H.; Eisenbarth, U.; Harres, K.; Hoffmeister, G.; Hofmann, I.; Jaeckel, O.; Jaeger, R.; Joost, M.; Kraft, S.; Kroll, F.; Kaluza, M.; Kester, O.; Lecz, Z.; Merz, T.; Nürnberg, F.; Al-Omari, H.; Orzhekhovskaya, A.; Paulus, G.; Polz, J.; Ratzinger, U.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schmidt, P.; Schramm, U.; Schreiber, G.; Schumacher, D.; Stoehlker, T.; Tauschwitz, A.; Vinzenz, W.; Wagner, F.; Yaramyshev, S.; Zielbauer, B.

    2014-03-01

    The generation of intense ion beams from high-intensity laser-generated plasmas has been the focus of research for the last decade. In the LIGHT collaboration the expertise of heavy ion accelerator scientists and laser and plasma physicists has been combined to investigate the prospect of merging these ion beams with conventional accelerator technology and exploring the possibilities of future applications. We report about the goals and first results of the LIGHT collaboration to generate, handle and transport laser driven ion beams. This effort constitutes an important step in research for next generation accelerator technologies.

  6. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; ...

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  7. Properties of nuclei probed by laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugart, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    Viewing objects as small as atomic nuclei by visible light sounds quite unrealistic. However, nuclei usually appear as constituents of atoms whose excitations are indeed associated with the absorption and emission of light. Nuclei can thus interact with light via the atomic system as a whole.

  8. Laser warning receiver to identify the wavelength and angle of arrival of incident laser light

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair; Michael B.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-03-23

    A laser warning receiver is disclosed which has up to hundreds of individual optical channels each optically oriented to receive laser light from a different angle of arrival. Each optical channel has an optical wedge to define the angle of arrival, and a lens to focus the laser light onto a multi-wavelength photodetector for that channel. Each multi-wavelength photodetector has a number of semiconductor layers which are located in a multi-dielectric stack that concentrates the laser light into one of the semiconductor layers according to wavelength. An electrical signal from the multi-wavelength photodetector can be processed to determine both the angle of arrival and the wavelength of the laser light.

  9. An evaluation of the hypothesis that laser light is more conspicuous than incandescent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, T. S.; Mandler, M. B.

    1986-05-01

    It has been thought that laser aids to navigation might appear more conspicuous than aids employing conventional light sources. Two experiments rigorously tested the hypothesis that laser light is more conspicuous than incandescent light. Incandescent and Helium Neon laser sources were optically filtered and adjusted to present the same illuminance and color to distant observers. Thirty-seven observers viewed 60 random presentations (2 source types, 2 illuminance levels) from a distance of 1500 yards. Group correct source discrimination percentages were 52.6 and 55.2 for the low and high illuminance levels, respectively. The experiment was repeated indoors at higher illuminances with resultant group correct source discrimination percentages of 57, 67.5, and 66 for the low, medium, and high illuminances, respectively. It was concluded that at practical design illuminance levels, no significant conspicuity advantage would be gained by replacing existing navigational aids with laser aids-to-navigation. Calculations show that a significant conspicuity advantage is likely to be obtained if the mariner uses a narrow bandpass filter (3 to 10 nm) centered at the laser wavelength. The illuminance from the laser will be relatively unaffected, while the illuminances from all background lights will be dramatically diminished. An additional section compares the electrical efficiency of a standard Coast Guard FA-240 range light with a laser aid configured for the same application. For equal input power, the FA-240 is shown to produce 10 times the luminous intensity of the laser aid.

  10. NASA Now: Lasers and Light: STORRM

    NASA Video Gallery

    Byron Meadows, a laser systems engineer at NASA, describes his work on sensor testing for the Orion Relative Navigation Risk Mitigation, or STORRM, project. Learn why NASA wants to develop technolo...

  11. A twin-mirrored galvanometer laser light sheet generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1988-01-01

    A galvanometer mirror-based laser light sheet system has been developed for use in the Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel at NASA Langley. This system generates and positions single or multiple light sheets over aeronautical research models being tested in the low speed tunnel. This report describes a twin mirrored galvanometer laser light sheet generator and shows typical light sheet arrangements in use. With this system, illumination of smoke entrained in the flow over a delta wing model reveals the vortical flow produced by the separation of the flow at the leading edge of the model. The light sheet system has proven to be very adaptable and easy to use in sizing and positioning light sheets in wind tunnel applications.

  12. Gas-Filled Hollow Core Fiber Lasers Based on Population Inversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-05

    iodine (I2) and pumped at ~ 532 nm was studied. Toward improved fiber transmission measurements, novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns...transmission, we have demonstrated a novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns. Abstract (short): Hollow-core Optical Fiber Gas LASer...measurements, novel thulium /holmium fiber laser near 2 microns were created. H. Schlossberg Hollow-Core Optical Fiber Gas Lasers K. Corwin et al

  13. High-power visible-laser effect on a 37-segment Iris AO deformable mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Andrew; Gavel, Donald; Dillon, Daren

    2010-02-01

    We have tested an aluminum-coated Iris AO Micro-Electrical Mechanical System (MEMS) segmented Deformable Mirror (DM) for its behavior in the presence of high energy 532 nm laser light. The DM was subject to several tests in which the laser power and the duration of its incidence was varied. The DM experienced an irradiance of 94.5 W cm-2 at the maximum laser power of 2 W. A slight permanent reduction in the amount of bow in each segment was observed. This is most likely due to annealing. The mirror remained fully functional during and after the tests. Measurements of the mirror's temporal stability and position repeatability were performed before the laser test. We found a 1.28 nm rms variation in the bow of segments that is highly correlated over the 16 minute test. The mirror's ability to return to its initial position was within the 1.34 nm rms instrument noise. These results are encouraging for applications such as the laser uplink correction of the Visible Light Laser Guidestar Experiment (Villages) and future multi-Laser Guidestar systems (LGS).

  14. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  15. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOEpatents

    Hamil, Roy A.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  16. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy: Experimental study of lead emission intensity dependence on the wavelengths and sample matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piscitelli S, V.; Martínez L., M. A.; Fernández C., A. J.; González, J. J.; Mao, X. L.; Russo, R. E.

    2009-02-01

    Lead (Pb) emission intensity (atomic line 405.78 nm) dependence on the sample matrix (metal alloy) was studied by means of collinear double pulse (DP)-laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The measurement of the emission intensity produced by three different wavelength combinations (i.e. I:532 nm-II:1064 nm, I:532 nm-II:532 nm, and I:532 nm-II:355 nm) from three series of standard reference materials showed that the lead atomic line 405.78 nm emission intensity was dependent on the sample matrix for all the combination of wavelengths, however reduced dependency was found for the wavelength combination I:532 nm-II:355 nm. Two series of standard reference materials from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and one series from the British Chemical Standards (BCS) were used for these experiments. Calibration curves for lead ablated from NIST 626-630 ("Zn 95Al 4Cu 1") provided higher sensitivity (slope) than those calibration curves produced from NIST 1737-1741 ("Zn 99.5Al 0.5") and with the series BCS 551-556 ("Cu 87Sn 11"). Similar trends between lead emission intensity (calibration curve sensitivities) and reported variations in plasma temperatures caused by the differing ionization potentials of the major and minor elements in these samples were established.

  17. Stray-light suppression with high-collection efficiency in laser light-scattering experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deilamian, K.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Kelleher, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An optical system is described for collecting a large fraction of fluorescent light emitted isotropically from a cylindrical interaction region. While maintaining an overall detection efficiency of 9 percent, the system rejects, by more than 12 orders of magnitude, incident laser light along a single axis that intersects the interaction region. Such a system is useful for a wide variety of light-scattering experiments in which high-collection efficiency is desirable, but in which light from an incident laser beam must be rejected without resorting to spectral filters.

  18. The 'Magic Light': A Discussion on Laser Ethics.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Innovations in technology and science form novel fields that, although beneficial, introduce new bio-ethical issues. In their short history, lasers have greatly influenced our everyday lives, especially in medicine. This paper focuses particularly on medical and para-medical laser ethics and their origins, and presents the complex relationships within laser ethics through a three-dimensional matrix model. The term 'laser' and the myth of the 'magic light' can be identified as landmarks for laser related ethical issues. These ethical issues are divided into five major groups: (1) media, marketing, and advertising; (2) economic outcomes; (3) user training; (4) the user-patient/client relationship; and (5) other issues. In addition, issues arising from two of the most common applications of lasers, laser eye surgery and laser tattoo removal, are discussed. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the use of medical and para-medical lasers has so greatly influenced our lives that the scientific community must initiate an earnest discussion of medical laser ethics.

  19. Influence of laser light on bioimplants used in otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Siedek, Vanessa; Nehls, Kristina; Zur Nieden, Katrin; Leunig, Andreas; Sroka, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    In otorhinolaryngology, dermatology and reconstructive surgery biomaterials as implants and a variety of lasers are used. Laser light applied near to an implant could have the risk to damage these materials. Therefore, their resistance exposed to laser light is of interest. A diode laser emitting at 940 nm and a CO2 laser were used to investigate its effects to the biomaterials Bioverit®, Medpor® and Palacos®, and in addition, an excised implant containing Medpor® and nasal turbinate tissue, excised and fixed in formalin. The macro- and microscopic changes of the material, temperature development during laser energy application in dependency to distance of fibre and material, time of exposure and applied power were investigated. Interaction of diode laser light with Bioverit® (0 mm distance, 360 s, 10 W, 3,600 J) resulted in minimal microscopic effects in direct contact of with the fibre. Using Medpor® (1 mm, 10s, 10 W, 100 J) resulted in melting and perforation. In the case of Palacos® (0.6 mm, 10s, 10 W, 100 J), melting occurred creating a flat excavation. The effect to Medpor® in nasal turbinate (1-2 mm, 10s, 10 W, 100 J) showed tissue denaturation and carbonisation and creation of a hole. The interaction of the CO2 laser with Bioverit® (3 cm, 0.5, 1 and 5 s, 2, 10 or 20 W) induced melting and discolouring resulting finally in a perforating hole. Depending on the material, first damage starts 10 s after an impact of 100 J (threshold value). So interaction between laser energy and biomaterials occurs. This should be carefully considered during clinical laser treatments especially nearby implants.

  20. Developing and testing a pushbroom camera motion control system: using a lidar-based streak tube camera for studying the influence of water waves on underwater light structure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Ghir, Teddy; Naro-Norman, Scott; Huddleston, Lisa H.; Bassetti, Luce; Mitra, Kunal; Das, Champak; Trivedi, Ashish

    2004-02-01

    A pushbroom sensor motion control system was developed for use in conjunction with a pulsed laser fan beam, streak tube camera, and a high speed low light level camera . The LIDAR and camera control system was tested to study the influence of water waves upon active-passive remote sensing systems and associated models that require pushbroom sensor motion. A pulsed laser fan beam signal at 532 nm was recorded using a streak tube camera and a (high speed, low light level, high quantum efficiency) digital CCD camera. Tests were conducted in 3 different water tanks, including 2 tanks with water waves (the longest wave tank or channel is 60 m long). Capillary waves, ~1 cm wavelength) were generated using an acoustic wave source generator. Streak tube camera and CCD images were collected in conjunction with a 532 nm pico-second short pulse laser. Images collected demonstrate the pulse stretching around submerged water targets as well as the ability to discriminate water depth of submerged targets in shallow water types. In turbid water, the pulsed layer backscatter structure showed a nearly random return as a function of depth if the signal was attenuated before reaching the bottom of the water column. The data collected indicated the motion control testing system can accommodate a variety of cameras and instruments in the lab and in the outdoor water wave channel. Data from these camera systems are being used to help validate analytical and Monte Carlo models of the water surface structure, and the underwater light field structure (pulse stretching) as well as to validate other LIDAR applications used in bathymetric and hydrographic surveys of coastal waters and marine inlets for physical and biological (submerged vegetation) surveys.

  1. Design and Calibration of a Raman Spectrometer for use in a Laser Spectroscopy Instrument Intended to Analyze Martian Surface and Atmospheric Characteristics for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, John F.; Hornef, James

    2016-01-01

    This project's goal is the design of a Raman spectroscopy instrument to be utilized by NASA in an integrated spectroscopy strategy that will include Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Induced Florescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) for molecule and element identification on Mars Europa, and various asteroids. The instrument is to be down scaled from a dedicated rover mounted instrument into a compact unit with the same capabilities and accuracy as the larger instrument. The focus for this design is a spectrometer that utilizes Raman spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a calculated range of 218 nm wavelength spectrum with a resolution of 1.23 nm. To filter out the laser source wavelength of 532 nm the spectrometer design utilizes a 532 nm wavelength dichroic mirror and a 532 nm wavelength notch filter. The remaining scatter signal is concentrated by a 20 x microscopic objective through a 25-micron vertical slit into a 5mm diameter, 1cm focal length double concave focusing lens. The light is then diffracted by a 1600 Lines per Millimeter (L/mm) dual holographic transmission grating. This spectrum signal is captured by a 1-inch diameter double convex 3 cm focal length capture lens. An Intensified Charge Couple Device (ICCD) is placed within the initial focal cone of the capture lens and the Raman signal captured is to be analyzed through spectroscopy imaging software. This combination allows for accurate Raman spectroscopy to be achieved. The components for the spectrometer have been bench tested in a series of prototype developments based on theoretical calculations, alignment, and scaling strategies. The mounting platform is 2.5 cm wide by 8.8 cm long by 7 cm height. This platform has been tested and calibrated with various sources such as a neon light source and ruby crystal. This platform is intended to be enclosed in a ruggedized enclosure for mounting on a rover platform. The size and functionality of the Raman spectrometer allows for the rover to

  2. Light alloy upgrading by surface laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariaut, Francois; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Andreazza-Vignolle, Caroline; Sauvage, Thierry; Langlade, Cecile; Frainais, Michel

    2002-09-01

    The excimer laser nitriding and carburizing process reported is developed to enhance the mechanical and chemical properties of aluminum alloys. An excimer laser beam is focused onto the alloy surface in a cell containing 1 bar nitrogen or propylene gas. Vapor plasma expands from the surface then dissociates and ionizes ambient gas. Nitrogen or carbon atoms from plasma in contact with the surface penetrate in depth due to plasma recoil action onto the target surface heated by the plasma. It is thus necessary to work with a sufficient laser fluence to create the plasma, but this fluence must be limited to prevent laser-induced surface roughness. The nitrogen or carbon concentration profiles are determined from nuclear analysis. Crystalline quality is evidenced by X Ray Diffraction (XRD) technique. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) gives the in-depth microstructure. Fretting coefficient measurements exhibit a satisfying behavior for some experimental conditions. The polycrystalline nitride or carbide layer obtained is several micrometers thick and composed of pure A1N or Al4C3 (columnar microstructure) top layer standing on a diffusion layer.

  3. Femtosecond Kerr-lens mode-locked Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Akbari, Reza; Major, Arkady

    2016-06-27

    The generation of 170 fs pulses at 755 nm from a Kerr-lens mode-locked Alexandrite laser was demonstrated. The laser was pumped at 532 nm and produced 780 mW of average output power with 9.8% of optical-to-optical efficiency. To the best of our knowledge, these are the shortest pulses that have been produced from a mode-locked Alexandrite laser to date.

  4. Laser remote sensing of backscattered light from a target sample

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Williams, John D.

    2008-02-26

    A laser remote sensing apparatus comprises a laser to provide collimated excitation light at a wavelength; a sensing optic, comprising at least one optical element having a front receiving surface to focus the received excitation light onto a back surface comprising a target sample and wherein the target sample emits a return light signal that is recollimated by the front receiving surface; a telescope for collecting the recollimated return light signal from the sensing optic; and a detector for detecting and spectrally resolving the return light signal. The back surface further can comprise a substrate that absorbs the target sample from an environment. For example the substrate can be a SERS substrate comprising a roughened metal surface. The return light signal can be a surface-enhanced Raman signal or laser-induced fluorescence signal. For fluorescence applications, the return signal can be enhanced by about 10.sup.5, solely due to recollimation of the fluorescence return signal. For SERS applications, the return signal can be enhanced by 10.sup.9 or more, due both to recollimation and to structuring of the SERS substrate so that the incident laser and Raman scattered fields are in resonance with the surface plasmons of the SERS substrate.

  5. Laser and light therapy for facial warts: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Maranda, E L; Lim, V M; Nguyen, A H; Nouri, K

    2016-10-01

    Facial verruca plana, or flat warts, are benign skin papillomas caused by human papillomavirus infections. A large portion of cases are refractory to treatment and can cause psychosocial distress in patients. Laser and light modalities offer an alternative therapeutic approach that has not been extensively explored. We systematically reviewed PubMed for studies describing treatment of facial verruca plana using lasers, photodynamic therapy and infrared coagulation. Final inclusion and review of eighteen studies suggests laser and light therapies to have considerable potential in the treatment of this recalcitrant condition. In particular, yttrium aluminium garnet lasers, infrared coagulation and photodynamic therapies have been reported to demonstrate efficacy. Further studies with larger power are required to determine which method should be established as the alternative treatment of choice for recalcitrant facial verrucae.

  6. Laser and light therapy for onychomycosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ledon, Jennifer A; Savas, Jessica; Franca, Katlein; Chacon, Anna; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-03-01

    More than just a cosmetic concern, onychomycosis is a prevalent and extremely difficult condition to treat. In older and diabetic populations, severe onychomycosis may possibly serve as a nidus for infection, and other more serious complications may ensue. Many treatment modalities for the treatment of onychomycosis have been studied, including topical lacquers and ointments, oral antifungals, surgical and chemical nail avulsion, and lasers. Due to their minimally invasive nature and potential to restore clear nail growth with relatively few sessions, lasers have become a popular option in the treatment of onychomycosis for both physicians and patients. Laser or light systems that have been investigated for this indication include the carbon dioxide, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet, 870/930-nm combination, and femtosecond infrared 800-nm lasers, in addition to photodynamic and ultraviolet light therapy. This systematic review will discuss each of these modalities as well as their respective currently published, peer-reviewed literature.

  7. First light of the ESO Laser Guide Star Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccini Calia, D.; Allaert, E.; Alvarez, J. L.; Araujo Hauck, C.; Avila, G.; Bendek, E.; Buzzoni, B.; Comin, M.; Cullum, M.; Davies, R.; Dimmler, M.; Guidolin, I.; Hackenberg, W.; Hippler, S.; Kellner, S.; van Kesteren, A.; Koch, F.; Neumann, U.; Ott, T.; Popovic, D.; Pedichini, F.; Quattri, M.; Quentin, J.; Rabien, S.; Silber, A.; Tapia, M.

    2006-06-01

    Two teams of scientists and engineers at Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik and at the European Southern Observatory have joined forces to design, build and install the Laser Guide Star Facility for the VLT. The Laser Guide Star Facility has now been completed and installed on the VLT Yepun telescope at Cerro Paranal. In this paper we report on the first light and first results from the Commissioning of the LGSF.

  8. Laser and Light-Based Aesthetics in Men.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy B; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaufman, Joely; Keaney, Terrence

    2015-09-01

    Men represent an important evolving segment of the cosmetic market. With the growing acceptability of cosmetic procedures along with societal and workplace pressure to maintain youthfulness, men increasingly seek the advice of aesthetic practitioners. Despite this so-called "Menaissance," there is a paucity of published literature regarding laser and light treatments of male skin. Herein the differences in male cutaneous physiology are addressed, followed by a review of light-based treatment of conditions largely unique to male skin, pseudofolliculitis barbae, and rhinophyma. Next, the publications related to laser treatment of male skin specifically are examined. We conclude with a discussion of personal observations derived from clinical experience with laser and light-based treatments in men.

  9. Wavelength dependence on the elemental analysis of glass by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Cleon; Cahoon, Erica; Almirall, José R.

    2008-10-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is presented as a tool for the elemental analysis of glass in forensic applications. Two harmonics of the Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm and 532 nm were used as the irradiation source for the analysis of several glass standards and soda-lime glass samples of interest to forensic scientists. Both lasers were kept at a constant energy of 20 mJ and focused using a 150 mm focal length lens. A series of experiments were also conducted to determine the importance of wavelength on lens-to-sample distance (LTSD) at each wavelength. It was determined that the optimal LTSD was found at ~ 1-2 mm focused into the surface for both wavelengths yet the crater depth resulting from the irradiation at 266 nm was significantly deeper (112 µm) than that from the 532 nm laser (41 µm). In addition, the analytical performance of LIBS on 5 NIST glasses and 6 automobile glasses at both wavelengths is reported. Good correlation for the quantitative analysis results for the trace and minor elements Sr, Ba and Al are reported along with the calibration curves, in most cases R2 > 0.95, using absolute intensities at various emission lines. Although 266 nm resulted in more mass removal, the 532 nm produced greater emission intensities. A slightly higher plasma density was determined for irradiation by 532 nm using the Stark broadening technique in comparison to the 266 nm irradiation.

  10. The Laser Synthesis of Linear Polyynes: The Particle in a Box Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Bruce D.; Gordon, Christopher M.

    2008-01-01

    In this experiment, linear polyynes are synthesized and then the predictions of a one-dimensional, particle in a box are used to calculate the quantum mechanical box length for the polyynes. A solution of graphite in ethanol is irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) and the resulting solution is filtered and analyzed. Data from gas…

  11. Laser light: its nature and its action on the eye.

    PubMed Central

    Bessette, F M; Nguyen, L C

    1989-01-01

    Lasers produce a coherent, focused, monochromatic, high-energy form of light. Because laser surgery is more versatile and precise and is freer of complications than conventional surgery it has become widely accepted in ophthalmology over the past 10 years. Applications range from routine procedures in the fundus to recent, more delicate interventions in the cornea. The argon laser is the most widely used to treat extrafoveal chorioretinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy; it has also been used successfully to treat glaucoma by iridectomy or trabeculoplasty. The krypton red laser is the argon laser's counterpart in the treatment of subfoveal and pigment-epithelium-related diseases. Posterior capsulotomy is the most widespread and successful intervention with the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet crystal laser; this laser is also used to cut vitreous traction bands and is increasingly used in iridectomy. Although the use of the excimer laser in corneal surgery is still largely investigational it has been shown to produce precise cuts in corneal layers for the correction of myopia or astigmatism. The variable-wavelength dye laser, capable of reaching a specific level in the retina or choroid, has offered exciting new developments, and it promises to soon be part of the ophthalmologist's armamentarium in the treatment of eye disease. PMID:2684379

  12. Laser light propagation in adipose tissue and laser effects on adipose cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efraín; Rebolledo, Aldo; Gutierrez, Oscar; Criollo, William; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, José; Ramírez, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Recently Neira et al. have presented a new liposuction technique that demonstrated the movement of fat from inside to outside of the cell, using a low-level laser device during a liposuction procedure with Ultrawet solution. The clinical observations, allowed this new surgical development, started a set of physical, histological and pharmacological studies aimed to determine the mechanisms involved in the observed fat mobilization concomitant to external laser application in liposuction procedures. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, studies show that the cellular arrangement of normal adipose tissue changes when laser light from a diode laser: 10 mW, 635 nm is applied. Laser exposures longer than 6 minutes cause the total destruction of the adipocyte panicles. Detailed observation of the adipose cells show that by short irradiation times (less than four minutes) the cell membrane exhibits dark zones, that collapse by longer laser exposures. Optical measurements show that effective penetration length depends on the laser intensity. Moreover, the light scattering is enhanced by diffraction and subsequent interference effects, and the tumescent solution produces a clearing of the tissue optical medium. Finally, isolate adipose cell observation show that fat release from adipocytes is a concomitant effect between the tumescent solution (adrenaline) and laser light, revealing a synergism which conduces to the aperture, and maybe the disruption, of the cell membrane. All these studies were consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from inside the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides a strong modification of the cellular membranes.

  13. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  14. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  15. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    DOE PAGES

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons inmore » the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.« less

  16. An amplified femtosecond laser system for material micro-/nanostructuring with an integrated Raman microscope.

    PubMed

    Zalloum, Othman H Y; Parrish, Matthew; Terekhov, Alexander; Hofmeister, William

    2010-05-01

    In order to obtain new insights into laser-induced chemical material modifications, we introduce a novel combined approach of femtosecond pulsed laser-direct writing and in situ Raman microscopy within a single experimental apparatus. A newly developed scanning microscope, the first of its kind, provides a powerful tool for micro-/nanomachining and characterization of material properties and allows us to relate materials' functionality with composition. We address the issues of light delivery to the photomodification site and show the versatility of the system using tight focusing. Amplified femtosecond pulses are generated by a Ti:sapphire laser oscillator and a chirped-pulse regenerative amplifier, both pumped by a diode-pumped frequency doubled neodymium-doped yttrium orthovanadate (Nd:YVO(4)) laser operating at 532 nm. Results of Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy images of femtosecond laser micro-/nanomachining on the surface and in the bulk of single-crystal diamond obtained from first trials of this instrument are also presented. This effective combination could help to shed light on the influence of the local structure fluctuations on controllability of the laser processing and the role of the irradiation in the ablation processes ruling out possible imprecisions coming from the use of the two independent techniques.

  17. Designing Light Beam Transmittance Measuring Tool Using a Laser Pointer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuroso, H.; Kurniawan, W.; Marwoto, P.

    2016-08-01

    A simple instrument used for measuring light beam transmittance percentage made of window film has been developed. The instrument uses a laser pointer of 405 nm and 650 nm ±10% as a light source. Its accuracy approaches 80%. Transmittance data was found by comparing the light beam before and after passing the window film. The light intensity measuring unit was deleted by splitting the light source into two beams through a beam splitter. The light beam was changed into resistance by a NORP12 LDR sensor designed at a circuit of voltage divider rule of Khirchoff's laws. This conversion system will produce light beam intensity received by the sensor to become an equal voltage. This voltage will, then, be presented on the computer screen in the form of a real time graph via a 2.0 USB data transfer.

  18. Control of Laser High-Harmonic Generation with Counterpropagating Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, S. L.; Kohl, I.; Madsen, J. B.; Simmons, J.; Terry, N.; Titensor, J.; Wang, Q.; Peatross, J.

    2001-09-01

    Relatively weak counterpropagating light is shown to disrupt the emission of laser high-harmonic generation. Harmonic orders ranging from the teens to the low thirties produced by a 30-femtosecond pulse in a narrow argon jet are ``shut down'' with a contrast as high as 2 orders of magnitude by a chirped 1-picosecond counterpropagating laser pulse (60 times less intense). Alternatively, under poor phase-matching conditions, the counterpropagating light boosts harmonic production by similar contrast through quasiphase matching where out-of-phase emission is suppressed.

  19. Determination of wood grain direction from laser light scattering pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonaho, Simo-Pekka; Palviainen, Jari; Tolonen, Yrjö; Silvennoinen, Raimo

    2004-01-01

    Laser light scattering patterns from the grains of wood are investigated in detail to gain information about the characteristics of scattering patterns related to the direction of the grains. For this purpose, wood samples of Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris L.) and silver birch ( Betula pubescens) were investigated. The orientation and shape of the scattering pattern of laser light in wood was found to correlate well with the direction of grain angles in a three-dimensional domain. The proposed method was also experimentally verified.

  20. A multiple work mode YAG laser in derma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yu; Zhang, Guizhong; Ye, Zhisheng; Yu, Lin

    2006-06-01

    It has been very common that a pulse laser is used in derma surgery based on the theory of "Selective Photothermolysis". This method has also been accepted as the best way to treat the pigments by the medical textbook. A kind of double-pulsed laser which gets the name by two pulse output at one pumping process is developed for derma surgery lately, and this kind of laser has been proved more effective and safe than single-pulse laser. We also develop a multiple work mode YAG laser including two double-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, two single-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, and one free-running mode at 1064nm. Considering availability, security and reliability of the laser as a surgery machine, some important subsystems of the laser are optimized carefully, such as Q-switch driver, wavelength-switching system, power supply, and control system etc. At last we get a prototype laser which can run for longer than 30 minutes continuously, and output Max10 pulse per second (pps) with Max800mJ energy at 1064nm double Q-Switch mode, or Max400mJ at 532nm. Using double pulse mode of the laser we do some removal experiments of tattoos and other pigments, and obtain good effect.

  1. Simulation model of scattering properties and extinction of laser light applied to urban aerosols over the city of Cali, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Edith; Montilla, Elena; Jaramillo, Mauricio; Solarte, Efraín; Bastidas, Alvaro

    2005-10-01

    Aerosols are among the most spatially variable components of the atmosphere, and thus their study requires their monitoring over a broad geographic range. The backscattering of light from suspended solid and liquid particles in the atmosphere obeys Mie scattering theory. Light attenuation in the spectral region from 300 to 4000 nm due to Mie scattering exceeds that due to molecular (Rayleigh) scattering and ozone absorption combined. This occurs despite the fact that aerosol particle concentrations in the atmosphere are many orders of magnitude smaller than molecular concentrations. Starting from the characteristics of urban aerosols measured over the city of Cali (Colombia), 3° 30' N, 76° 30' W, with a PM10 particle selector, along with information on meteorological conditions typical of the region, we present the results of a study of light scattering properties generated using a model applied Mie scattering theory to size parameter between 0 and 50, with an increment of 0.01, and Matlab computer code, to simulate and predict measurements with a Lidar system operating at 532 nm.

  2. Analysis of dissolved C2H2 in transformer oils using laser Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Somekawa, Toshihiro; Kasaoka, Makoto; Kawachi, Fumio; Nagano, Yoshitomo; Fujita, Masayuki; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2013-04-01

    We have developed a laser Raman spectroscopy technique for assessing the working conditions of transformers by measuring dissolved C2H2 gas concentrations present in transformer oils. A frequency doubled Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) was used as a laser source, and Raman signals at ~1972 cm(-1) originating from C2H2 gas dissolved in oil were detected. The results show that laser Raman spectroscopy is a useful alternative method for detecting transformer faults.

  3. Plasmas as Light Sources for Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    RD-R159 460 PLASMS RS LIGHT SOURCES FOR LSERS(U) LBANA UNIV IN ./I HUNTSVILLE T A BARR ET AL. SEP 64 ANSMI/RH-CR-85-14 pAAHS-82-D-AS±6 N...and experimental results are presented, together with a * possible explanation of the optical radiation-tim history of the plasm . Potential...into a cold pl’sma device at Te - 1 eV and l018 / cc ions. Incidentally this experiment showed why there may be a need for a plasma light source

  4. Light sailboats: Laser driven autonomous microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Búzás, Anrdás; Kelemen, Lóránd; Mathesz, Anna; Oroszi, László; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Vicsek, Tamás; Ormos, Pál

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a system of light driven microscopic autonomous moving particles that move on a flat surface. The design is simple, yet effective: Micrometer sized objects with wedge shape are produced by photopolymerization, and they are covered with a reflective surface. When the area of motion is illuminated perpendicularly from above, the light is deflected to the side by the wedge shaped objects, in the direction determined by the position and orientation of the particles. The momentum change during reflection provides the driving force for an effectively autonomous motion. The system is an efficient tool to study self propelled microscopic robots.

  5. Evaluating the use of laser radiation in cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological Egyptian textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar; Harith, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cleaning of copper embroidery threads on archaeological textiles is still a complicated conservation process, as most textile conservators believe that the advantages of using traditional cleaning techniques are less than their disadvantages. In this study, the uses of laser cleaning method and two modified recipes of wet cleaning methods were evaluated for cleaning of the corroded archaeological Egyptian copper embroidery threads on an archaeological Egyptian textile fabric. Some corroded copper thread samples were cleaned using modified recipes of wet cleaning method; other corroded copper thread samples were cleaned with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation of wavelength 532 nm. All tested metal thread samples before and after cleaning were investigated using a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis unit. Also the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique was used for the elemental analysis of laser-cleaned samples to follow up the laser cleaning procedure. The results show that laser cleaning is the most effective method among all tested methods in the cleaning of corroded copper threads. It can be used safely in removing the corrosion products without any damage to both metal strips and fibrous core. The tested laser cleaning technique has solved the problems caused by other traditional cleaning techniques that are commonly used in the cleaning of metal threads on museum textiles.

  6. Quantum properties of light emitted by dipole nano-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghannam, Talal

    Recent technological advances allow entire optical systems to be lithographically implanted on small silicon chips. These systems include tiny semiconductor lasers that function as light sources for digital optical signals. Future advances will rely on even smaller components. At the theoretical limit of this process, the smallest lasers will have an active medium consisting of a single atom (natural or artificial). Several suggestions for how this can be accomplished have already been published, such as nano-lasers based on photonic crystals and nano wires. In particular, the "dipole nanolaser" consists of a single quantum dot functioning as the active medium. It is optically coupled to a metal nanoparticles that form a resonant cavity. Laser light is generated from the near-field optical signal. The proposed work is a theoretical exploration of the nature of the resulting laser light. The dynamics of the system will be studied and relevant time scales described. These will form the basis for a set of operator equations describing the quantum properties of the emitted light. The dynamics will be studied in both density matrix and quantum Langevin formulations, with attention directed to noise sources. The equations will be linearized and solved using standard techniques. The result of the study will be a set of predicted noise spectra describing the statistics of the emitted light. The goal will be to identify the major noise contributions and suggest methods for suppressing them. This will be done by studying the probability of getting squeezed light from the nanoparticle for the certain scheme of parameters.

  7. The efficiency of photovoltaic cells exposed to pulsed laser light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, R. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jenkins, P.

    1993-01-01

    Future space missions may use laser power beaming systems with a free electron laser (FEL) to transmit light to a photovoltaic array receiver. To investigate the efficiency of solar cells with pulsed laser light, several types of GaAs, Si, CuInSe2, and GaSb cells were tested with the simulated pulse format of the induction and radio frequency (RF) FEL. The induction pulse format was simulated with an 800-watt average power copper vapor laser and the RF format with a frequency-doubled mode-locked Nd:YAG laser. Averaged current vs bias voltage measurements for each cell were taken at various optical power levels and the efficiency measured at the maximum power point. Experimental results show that the conversion efficiency for the cells tested is highly dependent on cell minority carrier lifetime, the width and frequency of the pulses, load impedance, and the average incident power. Three main effects were found to decrease the efficiency of solar cells exposed to simulated FEL illumination: cell series resistance, LC 'ringing', and output inductance. Improvements in efficiency were achieved by modifying the frequency response of the cell to match the spectral energy content of the laser pulse with external passive components.

  8. Biomedical studies with the free-electron laser. Final report, 1 February 1986-31 January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Berns, M.W.

    1989-05-15

    An electrostatic Van de Graff FEL was used to study the effects of infrared radiation on the synthesis of DNA and RNA in living vertebrate cells in culture. The laser was operated at wavelengths of 165 and 200 microns at power densities of 0.1 - 30 KW/sq.cm. Cells were incubated in radioactive precursors to either DNA or RNA following exposure to the FEL and analyzed by light-microscope autoradiography. The results indicated that the 200 micron wavelength inhibited DNA but not RNA synthesis in a subpopulation of cells and the 165-micron wavelength inhibited RNA synthesis and not DNA synthesis. The statistical significance for the 200 micron wavelength studies was p = 0.05 and for the 165 micron wavelength studies p = 0.001 - 0.005. Partial Contents: Delayed Retinal Effects of Frequency Doubled YAG Laser (532 nm); Tumor Destruction in Photodynamic Therapy; Comparison of Continuous Wave Lasers for Endarterectomy of Experimental Atheromas; Mechanism of Tumor Destruction Following Photodynamic Therapy with Hematoporphyrin Derivative, Chlorin, and Phthalocyanine; Phycocyanin; Laser Activation, Cytotoxic Effects, and Uptake in Human Atherosclerotic Plague; Basic Laser Physics and Tissue Interaction; Biological Studies on the Free Electron Laser; Ablation of Bone and Methacrylate by a Prototype Mid-Infrared Erbium; YAG Laser; and Corneal Healing after Excimer Laser Surface Ablation.

  9. Near-infrared light photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tan; Wei, Qing; Song, Wei; Burke, Janice M.; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2012-01-01

    We achieved photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (PAOM) imaging of the retina with near-infrared (NIR) light illumination. A PAOM imaging system with dual-wavelength illumination at 1064 nm and 532 nm was built. We compared in vivo imaging results of both albino and pigmented rat eyes at the two wavelengths. The results show that the bulk optical absorption of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is only slightly higher than that of the retinal vessels at 532 nm while it becomes more than an order of magnitude higher than that of the retinal vessels at 1064 nm. These studies suggest that although visible light illumination is suitable for imaging both the retinal vessels and the RPE, NIR light illumination, being more comfortable to the eye, is better suited for RPE melanin related investigations and diagnoses. PMID:22574266

  10. Rate-equation approach to atomic-laser light statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chusseau, Laurent; Arnaud, Jacques; Philippe, Fabrice

    2002-11-01

    We consider three- and four-level atomic lasers that are either incoherently (unidirectionally) or coherently (bidirectionally) pumped, the single-mode cavity being resonant with the laser transition. The intracavity Fano factor and the photocurrent spectral density are evaluated on the basis of rate equations. According to that approach, fluctuations are caused by jumps in active and detecting atoms. The algebra is simple. Whenever a comparison is made, the expressions obtained coincide with the previous results. The conditions under which the output light exhibits sub-Poissonian statistics are considered in detail. Analytical results, based on linearization, are verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. An essentially exhaustive investigation of sub-Poissonian light generation by three- and four-level lasers has been performed. Only special forms were reported earlier.

  11. Towards Laser Cooling Trapped Ions with Telecom Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kristina; Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information has many potential applications in communication, atomic clocks, and the precision measurement of fundamental constants. Trapped ions are excellent candidates for applications in quantum information because of their isolation from external perturbations, and the precise control afforded by laser cooling and manipulation of the quantum state. For many applications in quantum communication, it would be advantageous to interface ions with telecom light. We present progress towards laser cooling and trapping of doubly-ionized lanthanum, which should require only infrared, telecom-compatible light. Additionally, we present progress on optimization of a second-harmonic generation cavity for laser cooling and trapping barium ions, for future sympathetic cooling experiments. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  12. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO₄ using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; ...

    2014-09-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO₄ by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygenmore » concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ¹⁶O₂⁺ ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO₄. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O₂ loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.« less

  13. Laser experiments in light cloudiness with the geostationary satellite ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkov, V.; Kuzkov, S.; Sodnik, Z.

    2016-08-01

    The geostationary satellite ARTEMIS was launched in July 2001. The satellite is equipped with a laser communication terminal, which was used for the world's first inter-satellite laser communication link between ARTEMIS and the low earth orbit satellite SPOT-4. Ground-to-space laser communication experiments were also conducted under various atmospheric conditions involving ESA's optical ground station. With a rapidly increasing volume of information transferred by geostationary satellites, there is a rising demand for high-speed data links between ground stations and satellites. For ground-to-space laser communications there are a number of important design parameters that need to be addressed, among them, the influence of atmospheric turbulence in different atmospheric conditions and link geometries. The Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine developed a precise computer tracking system for its 0.7 m AZT-2 telescope and a compact laser communication package LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication experiments with Satellites) for laser communication experiments with geostationary satellites. The specially developed software allows computerized tracking of the satellites using their orbital data. A number of laser experiments between MAO and ARTEMIS were conducted in partial cloudiness with some amount of laser light observed through clouds. Such conditions caused high break-up (splitting) of images from the laser beacon of ARTEMIS. One possible explanation is Raman scattering of photons on molecules of a water vapor in the atmosphere. Raman scattering causes a shift in a wavelength of the photons.In addition, a different value for the refraction index appears in the direction of the meridian for the wavelength-shifted photons. This is similar to the anomalous atmospheric refraction that appears at low angular altitudes above the horizon. We have also estimated the atmospheric attenuation and the influence of atmospheric turbulence on observed results

  14. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-09-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography.As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc.Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity.Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care.

  15. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, Claudio

    2011-03-02

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  16. Laser and light-based treatments of acne and acne scarring.

    PubMed

    Alexiades, Macrene

    The treatment of acne and acne scarring with lasers and light-based and energy-based technologies has become an integral component of our therapeutic arsenal. Lasers including infrared wavelengths and pulsed dye lasers; light devices including blue light, red light, and broadband light; and photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid and methylaminolevulinic acid have been shown to be effective in the treatment of acne vulgaris. The optimal outcomes are achieved with photodynamic therapy combined with medical therapy. Acne scarring has been best treated with lasers, including nonablative infrared lasers, fractional nonablative and ablative laser resurfacing, and most recently needle-based radiofrequency devices.

  17. Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    1998-11-01

    Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field*, Daisuke Okano, Kyushu Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, Japan. -----We have studied on guiding discharge path by weak ionized region between plasmas produced by a visible laser, that is, a YAG laser with wavelength 532nm, in an atmospheric air gap with DC non-uniform electric field using a rod-to-plate electrode. We succeeded in capturing the framing images in the temporal evolution on guiding discharge along the YAG laser light path. From the results of experiments, the region between two plasmas produced by a YAG laser can guide a discharge path, and the region between two plasmas on the laser light path is considered as well as a weak ionized one [1] produced by an excimer laser. [1]J.Sasaki, S.Kubodera, R.Ozaki and T.Uchiyama, J. Appl. Phys., 60 (1986) 3845. *This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)-no.10650295 of The Ministry of education, Science Sports and Culture in japan.

  18. Robotic visible-light laser adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-12-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The adaptive optics setup time, from the end of the telescope slew to the beginning of an observation, is a mere ~50-60 s, enabling over 200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems has finished 58 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 6,400 robotic observations executed thus far. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which doubles as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations and increase available sky coverage while also enabling deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources. Techniques applicable to larger telescope systems will also be tested: the infrared camera will be used to demonstrate advanced multiple region-of-interest tip-tilt guiding methods, and a visitor instrument port will be used for evaluation of other instrumentation, e.g. single-mode and photonic fibers to feed compact spectrographs.

  19. Laser pumped (4)He magnetometer with light shift suppression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zaisheng; Wang, He; Peng, Xiang; Wu, Teng; Guo, Hong

    2016-11-01

    We report a laser-pumped (4)He atomic magnetometer with light shift suppression through the atomic sensor itself. A linearly polarized light is used to optically align the (4)He metastable atoms and we monitor the magneto-optical double resonance (MODR) signals produced by the left- and right-circularly orthogonal components. It is shown that light shift leads to the atomic alignment to orientation conversion effect, and thus, the difference between the two MODR signals. One of these two MODR signals is locked at the Larmor frequency and is used to measure the ambient magnetic field, while the differential signal is, simultaneously, fed back to suppress the light shift. The scheme could be of the advantage to the design of compact magnetometers by reducing the systematic errors due to light shift.

  20. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  1. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near infrared excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on laser action in chromium-doped forsterite (Cr:Mg2SiO4) for 1064-nm excitation of the crystal's double-hump absorption band spanning the 850-1200-nm wavelength range. The cavity arrangement used for obtaining laser action in Cr:Mg2SiO2 was similar to that described by Petricevic et al. (1988). The fundamental and second harmonic emissions from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at a 10-Hz repetition rate were used for excitation of the NIR and visible bands, respectively. Pulsed laser action was readily observed for both the 1064-nm and 532-nm pumping at or above the respective thresholds. The laser parameters of the 532-nm and 1064-nm excitations were similar, indicating that the IR band is responsible for laser action for both excitations.

  2. Optical design of f-theta lens for dual wavelength selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lianhua; Cao, Hongzhong; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Xiping; Duan, Xuanming

    2016-10-01

    F-theta lens is an important unit for selective laser melting (SLM) manufacture. The dual wavelength f-theta lens has not been used in SLM manufacture. Here, we present the design of the f-theta lens which satisfies SLM manufacture with coaxial 532 nm and 1030 nm 1080 nm laser beams. It is composed of three pieces of spherical lenses. The focal spots for 532 nm laser and 1030 nm 1080 nm laser are smaller than 35 μm and 70 μm, respectively. The results meet the demands of high precision SLM. The chromatic aberration could cause separation between two laser focal spots in the scanning plane, so chromatic aberration correction is very important to our design. The lateral color of the designed f-theta lens is less than 11 μm within the scan area of 150 mm x 150 mm, which meet the application requirements of dual wavelength selective laser melting.

  3. Extreme light infrastructure: laser architecture and major challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambaret, J.-P.; Chekhlov, O.; Cheriaux, G.; Collier, J.; Dabu, R.; Dombi, P.; Dunne, A. M.; Ertel, K.; Georges, P.; Hebling, J.; Hein, J.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Hooker, C.; Karsch, S.; Korn, G.; Krausz, F.; Le Blanc, C.; Major, Zs.; Mathieu, F.; Metzger, T.; Mourou, G.; Nickles, P.; Osvay, K.; Rus, B.; Sandner, W.; Szabó, G.; Ursescu, D.; Varjú, K.

    2010-05-01

    Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI), the first research facility hosting an exawatt class laser will be built with a joint international effort and form an integrated infrastructure comprised at last three branches: Attosecond Science (in Szeged, Hungary) designed to make temporal investigation at the attosecond scale of electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, plasmas and solids. High Field Science will be mainly focused on producing ultra intense and ultra short sources of electons, protons and ions, coherent and high energetic X rays (in Prague, Czech Republic) as well as laserbased nuclear physics (in Magurele, Romania). The location of the fourth pillar devoted to Extreme Field Science, which will explore laser-matter interaction up to the non linear QED limit including the investigation of vacuum structure and pair creation, will be decided after 2012. The research activities will be based on an incremental development of the light sources starting from the current high intensity lasers (APOLLON, GEMINI, Vulcan and PFS) as prototypes to achieve unprecedented peak power performance, from tens of petawatt up to a fraction of exawatt (1018 W). This last step will depend on the laser technology development in the above three sites as well as in current high intensity laser facilities.

  4. Modes in light wave propagating in semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, Margarita A.

    1994-01-01

    The study of semiconductor laser based on an analogy of the Schrodinger equation and an equation describing light wave propagation in nonhomogeneous medium is developed. The active region of semiconductor laser is considered as optical waveguide confining the electromagnetic field in the cross-section (x,y) and allowing waveguide propagation along the laser resonator (z). The mode structure is investigated taking into account the transversal and what is the important part of the suggested consideration longitudinal nonhomogeneity of the optical waveguide. It is shown that the Gaussian modes in the case correspond to spatial squeezing and correlation. Spatially squeezed two-mode structure of nonhomogeneous optical waveguide is given explicitly. Distribution of light among the laser discrete modes is presented. Properties of the spatially squeezed two-mode field are described. The analog of Franck-Condon principle for finding the maxima of the distribution function and the analog of Ramsauer effect for control of spatial distribution of laser emission are discussed.

  5. Laser Cleaning of Metal Surface — Laboratory Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottner, P.; Wiedemann, G.; Haber, G.; Conrad, W.; Gervais, A.

    The interaction of various metal alloys with laser energy generated by a Nd:YAG medium (λ=1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm) has been examined systematically by the variation of laser parameters. With the help of model coupons, alteration/ablation thresholds of uncorroded/corroded surfaces of iron, pure copper and copper alloys were determined, leading to first recommendations for the cleaning of originals. Surface absorption measurements in the UV/VIS/IR wavelength regions completed the interaction studies.

  6. Laser induced tuning of cholesteric liquid crystal without alignment layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, M.-C.; Huang, T.-C.; Lee, C.-Y.; Hsiao, Vincent K. S.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate a laser induced tuning effect on non-chiral azobenzene-doped CLC (Azo-CLCs) without using orientated substrate. The reversible tuning range is 90 nm under alternative violet (405 nm) and green (532 nm) laser exposure corresponded to the response time of 3 and 15 s, respectively. The current demonstrations may find applications in photoactive micro- or nano-photonic devices where orientated substrate is difficult to be incorporated.

  7. Multimode laser beam analyzer instrument using electrically programmable optics.

    PubMed

    Marraccini, Philip J; Riza, Nabeel A

    2011-12-01

    Presented is a novel design of a multimode laser beam analyzer using a digital micromirror device (DMD) and an electronically controlled variable focus lens (ECVFL) that serve as the digital and analog agile optics, respectively. The proposed analyzer is a broadband laser characterization instrument that uses the agile optics to smartly direct light to the required point photodetectors to enable beam measurements of minimum beam waist size, minimum waist location, divergence, and the beam propagation parameter M(2). Experimental results successfully demonstrate these measurements for a 500 mW multimode test laser beam with a wavelength of 532 nm. The minimum beam waist, divergence, and M(2) experimental results for the test laser are found to be 257.61 μm, 2.103 mrad, 1.600 and 326.67 μm, 2.682 mrad, 2.587 for the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively. These measurements are compared to a traditional scan method and the results of the beam waist are found to be within error tolerance of the demonstrated instrument.

  8. Laser-induced nucleation of carbon dioxide bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Martin R.; Jamieson, William J.; Leckey, Claire A.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed experimental study of laser-induced nucleation (LIN) of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubbles is presented. Water and aqueous sucrose solutions supersaturated with CO2 were exposed to single nanosecond pulses (5 ns, 532 nm, 2.4-14.5 MW cm-2) and femtosecond pulses (110 fs, 800 nm, 0.028-11 GW cm-2) of laser light. No bubbles were observed with the femtosecond pulses, even at high peak power densities (11 GW cm-2). For the nanosecond pulses, the number of bubbles produced per pulse showed a quadratic dependence on laser power, with a distinct power threshold below which no bubbles were observed. The number of bubbles observed increases linearly with sucrose concentration. It was found that filtering of solutions reduces the number of bubbles significantly. Although the femtosecond pulses have higher peak power densities than the nanosecond pulses, they have lower energy densities per pulse. A simple model for LIN of CO2 is presented, based on heating of nanoparticles to produce vapor bubbles that must expand to reach a critical bubble radius to continue growth. The results suggest that non-photochemical laser-induced nucleation of crystals could also be caused by heating of nanoparticles.

  9. Sensitive detection of malachite green and crystal violet by nonlinear laser wave mixing and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Eric J; Tong, William G

    2016-05-01

    An ultrasensitive label-free antibody-free detection method for malachite green and crystal violet is presented using nonlinear laser wave-mixing spectroscopy and capillary zone electrophoresis. Wave-mixing spectroscopy provides a sensitive absorption-based detection method for trace analytes. This is accomplished by forming dynamic gratings within a sample cell, which diffracts light to create a coherent laser-like signal beam with high optical efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio. A cubic dependence on laser power and square dependence on analyte concentration make wave mixing sensitive enough to detect molecules in their native form without the use of fluorescent labels for signal enhancement. A 532 nm laser and a 635 nm laser were used for malachite green and crystal violet sample excitation. The use of two lasers of different wavelengths allows the method to simultaneously detect both analytes. Selectivity is obtained through the capillary zone electrophoresis separation, which results in characteristic migration times. Measurement in capillary zone electrophoresis resulted in a limit of detection of 6.9 × 10(-10)M (2.5 × 10(-19) mol) for crystal violet and 8.3 × 10(-11)M (3.0 × 10(-20) mol) for malachite green at S/N of 2.

  10. Status of ARGOS - The Laser Guide Star System for the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Walfried; Rabien, Sebastian; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Lloyd-Hart, Michael; Barl, Lothar; Beckmann, Udo; Bonaglia, Marco; Borelli, Jose; Brynnel, Joar; Buschkamp, Peter; Busoni, Lorenzo; Carbonaro, Luca; Christou, Julian; Connot, Claus; Davies, Richard; Deysenroth, Matthias; Durney, Olivier; Green, Richard; Gemperlein, Hans; Gasho, Victor; Haug, Marcus; Hubbard, Pete; Ihle, Sebastian; Kulas, Martin; Loose, Christina; Lehmitz, Michael; Noenickx, Jamison; Nussbaum, Edmund; Orban De Xivry, Gilles; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Peter, Diethard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Rademacher, Matt; Storm, Jesper; Schwab, Christian; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya; Ziegleder, Julian

    2013-12-01

    ARGOS is an innovative multiple laser guide star adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), designed to perform effective GLAO correction over a very wide field of view. The system is using high powered pulsed green (532 nm) lasers to generate a set of three guide stars above each of the LBT mirrors. The laser beams are launched through a 40 cm telescope and focused at an altitude of 12 km, creating laser beacons by means of Rayleigh scattering. The returning scattered light, primarily sensitive to the turbulences close to the ground, is detected by a gated wavefront sensor system. The derived ground layer correction signals are directly driving the adaptive secondary mirror of the LBT. ARGOS is especially designed for operation with the multiple object spectrograph Luci, which will benefit from both, the improved spatial resolution, as well as the strongly enhanced flux. In addition to the GLAO Rayleigh beacon system, ARGOS was also designed for a possible future upgrade with a hybrid sodium laser - Rayleigh beacon combination, enabling diffraction limited operation. The ARGOS laser system has undergone extensive tests during Summer 2012 and is scheduled for installation at the LBT in Spring 2013. The remaining sub-systems will be installed during the course of 2013. We report on the overall status of the ARGOS system and the results of the sub-system characterizations carried out so far.

  11. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Threshold for gas breakdown initiated by an interaction of laser light with aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1993-03-01

    A model constructed previously for plasma production through the laser heating, evaporation, and ionization of a microscopic surface defect is refined in an effort to determine the breakdown conditions in an aerosol. Simple analytic expressions are derived for the threshold laser intensity as a function of the wavelength of the laser light, the dimensions and material of the aerosol particles, the shape of the laser pulse, and the evaporated volume of the particle. The results are compared with experiments on the laser breakdown of air caused by beams from CO2 and Nd lasers in the presence of an aerosol consisting of carbon particles 0.1-25 μm in radius. The results are also compared with the predictions of the explosion model.

  12. Resonant self-focusing of laser light in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Clayton, C. E.; Chen, F. F.

    1982-03-01

    Difficulties regarding an employment of lasers in inertia-confinement fusion projects are related to possibilities of an occurrence of undesirable parametric instabilities such as stimulated Brillouin scattering. The use of multiline lasers has been proposed to overcome these difficulties. Attention is given to a sequence of events in which optical mixing first excites a plasma wave, which is driven to larger amplitude by stimulated Raman scattering in the forward direction. The ponderomotive force of the plasma wave creates then a density depression, causing a deflection of the laser beam by refraction. It is pointed out that such a mechanism could alter the focusing of beams onto a small target. The effect is similar to ponderomotive self-focusing of light by a plasma. Aspects of resonant self-focusing are considered.

  13. Anomalous absorption of laser light on ion acoustic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, Wojciech; Bychenkov, Valery Yu.

    2016-10-01

    Theory of laser light absorption due to ion acoustic turbulence (IAT) is discussed in high Z plasmas where ion acoustic waves are weakly damped. Our theory applies to the whole density range from underdense to critical density plasmas. It includes an absorption rate for the resonance anomalous absorption due to linear conversion of electromagnetic waves into electron plasma oscillations by the IAT near the critical density in addition to the absorption coefficient due to enhanced effective electron collisionality. IAT is driven by large electron heat flux through the return current instability. Stationary spectra of IAT are given by weak plasma turbulence theory and applied in description of the anomalous absorption in the inertial confinement fusion plasmas at the gold walls of a hohlraum. This absorption is anisotropic in nature due to IAT angular anisotropy and differs for p- and s-polarization of the laser radiation. Possible experiments which could identify the resonance anomalous absorption in a laser heated plasma are discussed.

  14. Structure Optimization of 21,23-Core-Modified Porphyrins Absorbing Long-Wavelength Light as Potential Photosensitizers Against Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    recording singlet oxygen emission spectra. A diode -pumped solid-state laser (Millenia X, Spectra-Physics) at 532 nm was the excitation source. The sample...biological properties in vitro Youngjae You,a,* Scott L. Gibsonb and Michael R. Dettya aInstitute for Lasers , Photonics, and Biophotonics, Department...relative to the exciting laser beam. An additional long-pass filter (850LP) was used to attenuate the excitation laser and the fluorescence from the

  15. A fast ruthenium polypyridine cage complex photoreleases glutamate with visible or IR light in one and two photon regimes

    PubMed Central

    Salierno, Marcelo; Marceca, Ernesto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Yuste, Rafael; Etchenique, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new caged glutamate, based in a ruthenium bipyridyl core, that undergoes heterolytic cleavage after irradiation with visible light with wavelengths up to 532 nm, yielding free glutamate in less than 50 ns. Glutamate photorelease occurs also efficiently following two-photon (2P) excitation at 800 nm, and has a functional cross section of 0.14 GM. PMID:20060592

  16. LIGHT - from laser ion acceleration to future applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Light Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Creation of high intensity multi-MeV ion bunches by high power lasers became a reliable tool during the last 15 years. The laser plasma source provides for TV/m accelerating field gradients and initially sub-ps bunch lengths. However, the large envelope divergence and the continuous exponential energy spectrum are substential drawbacks for many possible applications. To face this problem, the LIGHT collaboration was founded (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport). The collaboration consists of several university groups and research centers, namely TU Darmstadt, JWGU Frankfurt, HI Jena, HZDR Dresden and GSI Darmstadt. The central goal is building a test beamline for merging laser ion acceleration with conventional accelerator infrastructure at the GSI facility. In the latest experiments, low divergent proton bunches with a central energy of up to 10 MeV and containing >109 particles could be provided at up to 2.2 m behind the plasma source, using a pulsed solenoid. In a next step, a radiofrequency cavity will be added to the beamline for phase rotation of these bunches, giving access to sub-ns bunch lengths and reaching highest intensities. An overview of the LIGHT objectives and the recent experimental results will be given. This work was supported by HIC4FAIR.

  17. Laser-activated remote phosphor light engine for projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Martin; Mehl, Oliver; Hartwig, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in blue emitting laser diodes enable attractive solutions in projection applications using phosphors for efficient light conversion with very high luminance levels. Various commercially available projectors incorporating this technology have entered the market in the past years. While luminous flux levels are still comparable to lamp-based systems, lifetime expectations of classical lamp systems are exceeded by far. OSRAM GmbH has been exploring this technology for several years and has introduced the PHASER® brand name (Phosphor + laser). State-of-the-art is a rotating phosphor wheel excited by blue laser diodes to deliver the necessary primary colors, either sequentially for single-imager projection engines, or simultaneously for 3-panel systems. The PHASER® technology enables flux and luminance scaling, which allows for smaller imagers and therefore cost-efficient projection solutions. The resulting overall efficiency and ANSI lumen specification at the projection screen of these systems is significantly determined by the target color gamut and the light transmission efficiency of the projection system. With increasing power and flux level demand, thermal issues, especially phosphor conversion related, dominate the opto-mechanical system design requirements. These flux levels are a great challenge for all components of an SSL-projection system (SSL:solid-state lighting). OSRAḾs PHASER® light engine platform is constantly expanded towards higher luminous flux levels as well as higher luminance levels for various applications. Recent experiments employ blue laser pump powers of multiple 100 Watts to excite various phosphors resulting in luminous flux levels of more than 40 klm.

  18. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is providing and coordinating the technology for placing a compact Laser Light Scattering (LLS) instrument in a microgravity environment. This will be accomplished by defining and assessing user requirements for microgravity experiments, coordinating needed technological developments, and filling technical gaps. This effort is striving to brassboard and evaluate a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument. The progress of the program is reported.

  19. Evaluation of a green laser pointer for flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Habbersett, Robert C; Naivar, Mark A; Woods, Travis A; Goddard, Gregory R; Graves, Steven W

    2007-10-01

    Flow cytometers typically incorporate expensive lasers with high-quality (TEM00) output beam structure and very stable output power, significantly increasing system cost and power requirements. Red diode lasers minimize power consumption and cost, but limit fluorophore selection. Low-cost DPSS laser pointer modules could possibly offer increased wavelength selection but presumed emission instability has limited their use. A $160 DPSS 532 nm laser pointer module was first evaluated for noise characteristics and then used as the excitation light source in a custom-built flow cytometer for the analysis of fluorescent calibration and alignment microspheres. Eight of ten modules tested were very quiet (RMS noise < or = 0.6% between 0 and 5 MHz). With a quiet laser pointer module as the light source in a slow-flow system, fluorescence measurements from alignment microspheres produced CVs of about 3.3%. Furthermore, the use of extended transit times and < or =1 mW of laser power produced both baseline resolution of all 8 peaks in a set of Rainbow microspheres, and a detection limit of <20 phycoerythrin molecules per particle. Data collected with the transit time reduced to 25 micros (in the same instrument but at 2.4 mW laser output) demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 75 phycoerythrin molecules and CVs of about 2.7%. The performance, cost, size, and power consumption of the tested laser pointer module suggests that it may be suitable for use in conventional flow cytometry, particularly if it were coupled with cytometers that support extended transit times.

  20. Fringe visibility of multimode laser light scattered through turbid water.

    PubMed

    Swanson, N L; Pham, C N; VanWinkle, D H

    1997-12-20

    Several years ago Swanson [Proc. SPIE 1750, 397 (1992)] performed a simple Michelson interferometric determination of the coherence length of a multimode argon-ion laser after the light passed through a tank of water. As colloidal particles were added to the water the observed coherence length (as measured by twice the distance the mirror moved for fringes to disappear) decreased. Subsequently, a series of careful experiments were performed with a single-mode laser to more accurately measure this change. In these experiments it was found that the 1.5-MHz width of the 514.5-nm line of a single-mode argon-ion laser broadened by as much as 1.3 +/- 0.2 MHz when small colloidal particles were added. At first glance such a broadening should not have resulted in any discernible change in the original Michelson experiment because the gain curve for the multimode laser is of the order of a few gigahertz. The zeros in the fringe visibility function depend on the spectral characteristics of the modes. Upon scattering, the spectral characteristics of the individual laser modes change from Voigt functions, containing both Lorentzian and Gaussian components, to primarily Gaussian. It is this change in the statistical properties of the modes, not the broadening, that accounts for the change in the fringe visibility for a multimode source.

  1. Singlet Molecular Oxygen Generation by Light-Activated DHN-Melanin of the Fungal Pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in Black Sigatoka Disease of Bananas

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J.; Prado, Fernanda M.; Oliveira, Marilene S.; Ortiz-Mendoza, David; Scalfo, Alexsandra C.; Pessoa, Adalberto; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.; White, James F.; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In pathogenic fungi, melanin contributes to virulence, allowing tissue invasion and inactivation of the plant defence system, but has never been implicated as a factor for host cell death, or as a light-activated phytotoxin. Our research shows that melanin synthesized by the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis acts as a virulence factor through the photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen O2 (1Δg). Using analytical tools, including elemental analysis, ultraviolet/infrared absorption spectrophometry and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, we characterized both pigment content in mycelia and secreted to the culture media as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin type compound. This is sole melanin-type in M. fijiensis. Isolated melanins irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm produced monomol light emission at 1270 nm, confirming generation of O2 (1Δg), a highly reactive oxygen specie (ROS) that causes cellular death by reacting with all cellular macromolecules. Intermediary polyketides accumulated in culture media by using tricyclazole and pyroquilon (two inhibitors of DHN-melanin synthesis) were identified by ESI-HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, irradiation at 532 nm of that mixture of compounds and whole melanized mycelium also generated O2 (1Δg). A pigmented-strain generated more O2 (1Δg) than a strain with low melanin content. Banana leaves of cultivar Cavendish, naturally infected with different stages of black Sigatoka disease, were collected from field. Direct staining of the naturally infected leaf tissues showed the presence of melanin that was positively correlated to the disease stage. We also found hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but we cannot distinguish the source. Our results suggest that O2 (1Δg) photogenerated by DHN-melanin may be involved in the destructive effects of Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana leaf tissues. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate contributions of melanin-mediated ROS to microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24646830

  2. Singlet molecular oxygen generation by light-activated DHN-melanin of the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis in black Sigatoka disease of bananas.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-García, Miguel J; Prado, Fernanda M; Oliveira, Marilene S; Ortiz-Mendoza, David; Scalfo, Alexsandra C; Pessoa, Adalberto; Medeiros, Marisa H G; White, James F; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In pathogenic fungi, melanin contributes to virulence, allowing tissue invasion and inactivation of the plant defence system, but has never been implicated as a factor for host cell death, or as a light-activated phytotoxin. Our research shows that melanin synthesized by the fungal banana pathogen Mycosphaerella fijiensis acts as a virulence factor through the photogeneration of singlet molecular oxygen O2 (1Δg). Using analytical tools, including elemental analysis, ultraviolet/infrared absorption spectrophometry and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, we characterized both pigment content in mycelia and secreted to the culture media as 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin type compound. This is sole melanin-type in M. fijiensis. Isolated melanins irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm produced monomol light emission at 1270 nm, confirming generation of O2 (1Δg), a highly reactive oxygen specie (ROS) that causes cellular death by reacting with all cellular macromolecules. Intermediary polyketides accumulated in culture media by using tricyclazole and pyroquilon (two inhibitors of DHN-melanin synthesis) were identified by ESI-HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, irradiation at 532 nm of that mixture of compounds and whole melanized mycelium also generated O2 (1Δg). A pigmented-strain generated more O2 (1Δg) than a strain with low melanin content. Banana leaves of cultivar Cavendish, naturally infected with different stages of black Sigatoka disease, were collected from field. Direct staining of the naturally infected leaf tissues showed the presence of melanin that was positively correlated to the disease stage. We also found hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but we cannot distinguish the source. Our results suggest that O2 (1Δg) photogenerated by DHN-melanin may be involved in the destructive effects of Mycosphaerella fijiensis on banana leaf tissues. Further studies are needed to fully evaluate contributions of melanin-mediated ROS to microbial pathogenesis.

  3. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  4. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  5. Comparison of lasers used in stapedotomy using specialized visualization techniques for mechanical and thermal effects in an inner ear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalski, Digna M. A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Grolman, Wilko

    2011-03-01

    The outcome of stapedotomy depends on several surgical steps. Using laser light, the ossicular chain can be handled and the oval window can be punctured with a non-touch method. Various lasers are being used or considered, however, it is not clear which settings and characteristics will contribute to optimal or adverse effects (vestibule damage and loss hearing frequencies). Using a unique high speed thermal imaging setup based on Schlieren techniques, the mechanical and thermal effects during laser stapedotomy were studied in an inner ear model consisting of human, fresh frozen stapes positioned on a liquid filled cavity in a gel cast. The cw KTP (532 nm), cw CO2 (10.6 μm), cw Thulium (2.0 μm), pulsed Er,Cr;YSGG (2.78 μm) coupled to special fiber delivery systems were applied at typical clinical settings for comparison. The imaging techniques provided a good insight in the extent of heat conduction beneath the footplate and (explosive) vapour formation on both sides. For the pulsed laser modes, explosive vapour expansion can to be controlled with optimized pulse energies while for continuous wave lasers the thermal effects can be controlled with the pulse length and repetition rate. The fluence at the tip of the delivery system and the distance to the footplate has a major impact on the ablation effect. The pulsed IR lasers with fiber delivery show to be promising for a controlled stapedotomy.

  6. Micromachining of polydimethylsiloxane induced by laser plasma EUV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, S.; Makimura, T.; Okazaki, K.; Nakamura, D.; Takahashi, A.; Okada, T.; Niino, H.; Murakami, K.

    2011-06-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is fundamental materials in the field of biotechnology. Because of its biocompatibility, microfabricated PDMS sheets are applied to micro-reactors and microchips for cell culture. Conventionally, the microstructures were fabricated by means of cast or imprint using molds, however it is difficult to fabricate the structures at high aspect ratios such as through-holes/vertical channels. The fabrication of the high-aspect structures would enable us to stack sheets to realize 3D fluidic circuits. In order to achieve the micromachining, direct photo-ablation by short wavelength light is promising. In the previous works, we investigated ablation of transparent materials such as silica glass and poly(methyl methacrylate) induced by irradiation with laser plasma EUV light. We achieved smooth and fine nanomachining. In this work, we applied our technique to PDMS micromachining. We condensed the EUV light onto PDMS surfaces at high power density up to 108 W/cm2 using a Au coated ellipsoidal mirror. We found that PDMS sheet was ablated at a rate up to 440 nm/shot. It should be emphasized that through hole with a diameter of 1 μm was fabricated in a PDMS sheet with a thickness of 4 μm. Thus we demonstrated the micromachining of PDMS sheets using laser plasma EUV light.

  7. Design and analysis of particles detecting system based on near forward light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiao-Jun; Li, Xiao; Yu, Jia-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel design based on near forward light scattering detection system to measure size and concentration distribution of particles in liquids is reported. According to theory of Mie scattering, the influence of relative refractive index, particles size and wavelength on the detection results are discussed. A green optical fiber laser with 532nm was used as the excited light source. As a key part in the detection system, the focusing system using a lens structure to confine light sensitive area with Gauss distribution less than 80 μm2. The lateral size of the sample cell is limited to 100μm. In order to measure the particles in non-overlapping state and improve the accuracy and repeatability, a novel structure in the sample cell was used and particle velocity through the sample cell was controlled by high precision stepper motor control system of micro circulation pump. Particle light scattering signal acquisition was completed by the poly lens combination system, according to the receiving angle relative to the measured particle, which can adjust the light scattering direction to obtain better particles light scattering signal. Photoelectric signal conversion, amplification and acquisition are all the devices with high precision. The measurement results showed that the measurement system was accurate and stable when the particles size in the range of 0.5-5μm.

  8. Laser-induced photoacoustic tomography for small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Pang, Yongjiang; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-06-01

    Photoacoustic tomography, also called opto-acoustic tomography when laser excitation is used, is a novel medical imaging modality that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound. Here, we present our study of laser-induced photoacoustic tomography of organs of small animals. Pulses of 6.5 ns in width from an Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm or 1064 nm are employed to generate the distribution of thermoelastic expansion in the sample. A wide-band ultrasonic transducer that is non-focused in the imaging plane scans around the sample to realize a full-view detection of the imaged cross-section. A modified back-projection algorithm is applied to reconstruct the distribution of optical absorption inside the biological sample. Using optical energy depositions that fall below safe levels, tissue structures in ex-vivo rat kidneys and in-situ mouse brains covered by the skin and skull are imaged successfully with the high intrinsic optical contrast and the high spatial resolution of ultrasound.

  9. Laser-induced jetting and controlled droplet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, Mihail Lucian; Andrei, Ionut Relu; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The article reports, in the general context of developing techniques to generate microjets, nanojets and even individual nanodroplets, a new method to obtain such formations by interaction of a single laser pulse at 532 nm with an individual/single mother droplet in pendant position in open air. The beam energy per pulse is varied between 0.25 and 1 mJ, the focus diameter is 90 μm, and the droplet's volumes are either 3 μl or 3.5 μl. Droplet's shape evolution and jet emission at impact with laser pulse was visualised with a high speed camera working at 10 kfps. Reproducible jets and/or separated microdroplets and nanodroplets are obtained which shows potential for applications in particular in jet printing. It is demonstrated that it becomes possible to play with the geometrical symmetry of both laser excitation and liquid in order to manage the number and the orientation of an induced microjet and consequently to actuate the orientation and the production of nanodroplets by light.

  10. Auditory nerve impulses induced by 980 nm laser.

    PubMed

    Guan, Tian; Zhu, Kai; Chen, Fei; He, Yonghong; Wang, Jian; Wu, Mocun; Nie, Guohui

    2015-08-01

    The discovery that a pulsed laser could trigger an auditory neural response inspired ongoing research on cochlear implants activated by optical stimulus rather than by electrical current. However, most studies to date have used visible light (532 nm) or long-wavelength near-infrared (>1840  nm ) and involved making a hole in the cochlea. This paper investigates the effect of optical parameters on the optically evoked compound action potentials (oCAPs) from the guinea pig cochlea, using a pulsed semiconductor near-infrared laser (980 nm) without making a hole in the cochlea. Synchronous trigger laser pulses were used to stimulate the cochlea, before and after deafening, upon varying the pulse duration (30–1000  μs ) and an amount of radiant energy (0–53.2  mJ/cm 2 ). oCAPs were successfully recorded after deafening. The amplitude of the oCAPs increased as the infrared radiant energy was increased at a fixed 50  μs pulse duration, and decreased with a longer pulse duration at a fixed 37.1  mJ/cm 2 radiant energy. The latency of the oCAPs shortened with increasing radiant energy at a fixed pulse duration. With a higher stimulation rate, the amplitude of the oCAPs’ amplitude decreased.

  11. Laser light scattering as a probe of fractal colloid aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, David A.; Lin, M. Y.

    1989-01-01

    The extensive use of laser light scattering is reviewed, both static and dynamic, in the study of colloid aggregation. Static light scattering enables the study of the fractal structure of the aggregates, while dynamic light scattering enables the study of aggregation kinetics. In addition, both techniques can be combined to demonstrate the universality of the aggregation process. Colloidal aggregates are now well understood and therefore represent an excellent experimental system to use in the study of the physical properties of fractal objects. However, the ultimate size of fractal aggregates is fundamentally limited by gravitational acceleration which will destroy the fractal structure as the size of the aggregates increases. This represents a great opportunity for spaceborne experimentation, where the reduced g will enable the growth of fractal structures of sufficient size for many interesting studies of their physical properties.

  12. Experimental studies of laser light scattering in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Sawyer; Grobe, Rainer; Su, Charles

    2006-05-01

    We inject an angularly collimated laser beam into a scattering medium of a non-dairy creamer-water solution and examine the distribution of the scattered light along the optical axis as a function of the source-detector spacing. The experimental and simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation on the optical axis suggest four regimes characterizing the transition from un-scattered to diffusive light. We compare the data with theoretical predictions based on a first-order scattering theory for regions close to the source, and with diffusion-like theories for larger source-detector spacings. We comment on the impact of the measurement on the light distribution and show that the regime of validity of these theories can depend on the experimental parameters such as the diameter and acceptance angle of the detection fiber.

  13. Transcutaneous laser treatment of leg veins.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Arne A; Pitassi, Luiza H U; Campos, Valeria; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; Dierickx, Christine C

    2014-03-01

    Leg telangiectasias and reticular veins are a common complaint affecting more than 80% of the population to some extent. To date, the gold standard remains sclerotherapy for most patients. However, there may be some specific situations, where sclerotherapy is contraindicated such as needle phobia, allergy to certain sclerosing agents, and the presence of vessels smaller than the diameter of a 30-gauge needle (including telangiectatic matting). In these cases, transcutaneous laser therapy is a valuable alternative. Currently, different laser modalities have been proposed for the management of leg veins. The aim of this article is to present an overview of the basic principles of transcutaneous laser therapy of leg veins and to review the existing literature on this subject, including the most recent developments. The 532-nm potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser, the 585-600-nm pulsed dye laser, the 755-nm alexandrite laser, various 800-983-nm diode lasers, and the 1,064-nm neodymium yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and various intense pulsed light sources have been investigated for this indication. The KTP and pulsed dye laser are an effective treatment option for small vessels (<1 mm). The side effect profile is usually favorable to that of longer wavelength modalities. For larger veins, the use of a longer wavelength is required. According to the scarce evidence available, the Nd:YAG laser produces better clinical results than the alexandrite and diode laser. Penetration depth is high, whereas absorption by melanin is low, making the Nd:YAG laser suitable for the treatment of larger and deeply located veins and for the treatment of patients with dark skin types. Clinical outcome of Nd:YAG laser therapy approximates that of sclerotherapy, although the latter is associated with less pain. New developments include (1) the use of a nonuniform pulse sequence or a dual-wavelength modality, inducing methemoglobin formation and enhancing the optical absorption

  14. Light assisted collisions in ultra cold Tm atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, Alexey; Cojocaru, Ivan; Pyatchenkov, Sergey; Snigirev, Stepan; Luchnokov, Ilia; Sukachev, Denis; Kalganova, Elena; Sorokin, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    Recently laser cooled rare earth elements attracted considerable attention due to the high orbital and magnetic moments. Such a systems allow low-field Feshabach resonances enabling tunable in wide range interactions. In particular, thulium atom has one hole in 4f shell therefore having orbital moment of 3 in the ground state, magnetic moment of 4 Bohr magnetons in ground state. While magnetic moment of the thulium atom is less than that of Erbium or Dysprosium simpler level structure, possibility to capture thulium atoms and the dipole trap at 532 nm make thulium atom an extremely attractive subject for quantum simulations. Nevertheless collisional properties of thulium atom are not yet explored in details, in particular light assisted collision of thulium atom were not yet investigated. In this contribution, we performed studies of light assisted collisions near in Magneto optical trap operating on narrow 530.7 nm transition. We found, that light assisted inelastic binary collisions losses rate is around β ~10-9cm3cm3s s . Possible mechanism of losses from the trap are discussed

  15. Quantum cascade lasers that emit more light than heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yanbo; Slivken, Steven; Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Darvish, Shaban R.; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2010-02-01

    For any semiconductor lasers, the wall plug efficiency, that is, the portion of the injected electrical energy that can be converted into output optical energy, is one of the most important figures of merit. A device with a higher wall plug efficiency has a lower power demand and prolonged device lifetime due to its reduced self-heating. Since its invention, the power performance of the quantum cascade laser has improved tremendously. However, although the internal quantum efficiency can be engineered to be greater than 80% at low temperatures, the wall plug efficiency of a quantum cascade laser has never been demonstrated above 50% at any temperature. The best wall plug efficiency reported to date is 36% at 120 K (ref. 9). Here, we overcome the limiting factors using a single-well injector design and demonstrate 53% wall plug efficiency at 40 K with an emitting wavelength of 5 µm. In other words, we demonstrate a quantum cascade laser that produces more light than heat.

  16. Novel remote phosphor design for laser-based white lighting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsung-Xian; Chou, Ching-Chia; Chang, Shuo-Chieh

    2016-09-01

    Recently, there is an interest in the laser-based white light source for illumination and display applications. The laser-based white lights inherently have much higher luminance than the corresponding LEDs. Moreover, laser diodes are often more efficient when operating at higher current densities and are with smaller form factors, which may outperform LEDs in the future. Based on this, in this paper, we combine the design of the light guide and reflective type remote phosphor structures in order to improve the overall performance of the laser-based white light source. In addition, these well-designed white light sources will provide the more flexible architecture for designing the subsequent lighting system. With the introduction of the innovative design for the laser-based illumination system, multiple applications incorporating laser and remote phosphor elements for improving lighting efficiency and quality were obtained.

  17. Analysis of natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments using laser induced breakdown and pulsed Raman spectroscopy, statistical analysis and light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osticioli, I.; Mendes, N. F. C.; Nevin, A.; Gil, Francisco P. S. C.; Becucci, M.; Castellucci, E.

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy were performed using a novel laboratory setup employing the same Nd:YAG laser emission at 532 nm for the analysis of five commercially available pigments collectively known as "ultramarine blue", a sodium silicate material of either mineral origin or an artificially produced glass. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy have provided information regarding the elemental and molecular composition of the samples; additionally, an analytical protocol for the differentiation between natural (lapis lazuli) and artificial ultramarine blue pigments is proposed. In particular LIBS analysis has allowed the discrimination between pigments on the basis of peaks ascribed to calcium. The presence of calcite in the natural blue pigments has been confirmed following Raman spectroscopy in specific areas of the samples, and micro-Raman and optical microscopy have further corroborated the presence of calcite inclusions in the samples of natural origin. Finally multivariate analysis of Laser induced breakdown spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) further enhanced the differentiation between natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments.

  18. Analysis of natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments using laser induced breakdown and pulsed Raman spectroscopy, statistical analysis and light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Osticioli, I; Mendes, N F C; Nevin, A; Gil, Francisco P S C; Becucci, M; Castellucci, E

    2009-08-01

    Pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman spectroscopy were performed using a novel laboratory setup employing the same Nd:YAG laser emission at 532 nm for the analysis of five commercially available pigments collectively known as "ultramarine blue", a sodium silicate material of either mineral origin or an artificially produced glass. LIBS and Raman spectroscopy have provided information regarding the elemental and molecular composition of the samples; additionally, an analytical protocol for the differentiation between natural (lapis lazuli) and artificial ultramarine blue pigments is proposed. In particular LIBS analysis has allowed the discrimination between pigments on the basis of peaks ascribed to calcium. The presence of calcite in the natural blue pigments has been confirmed following Raman spectroscopy in specific areas of the samples, and micro-Raman and optical microscopy have further corroborated the presence of calcite inclusions in the samples of natural origin. Finally multivariate analysis of Laser induced breakdown spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) further enhanced the differentiation between natural and artificial ultramarine blue pigments.

  19. Laser light scan analysis of the “anticonvulsant face”

    PubMed Central

    Orup, H. Ivan; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Holmes, Lewis B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The “anticonvulsant face”, comprised of a short nose, low nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, and wide mouth, was suggested in the 1970s to indicate teratogenesis caused by the anticonvulsant drugs phenytoin and phenobarbital. However, these were based on subjective clinical observations. In the present study we have applied objective and reliable quantitative measures to the operational definitions of craniofacial features in anticonvulant-exposed cases. We have adopted anthropometric analysis based on image analysis of laser light scans. Using morphometric methods, we established the positions of physical features and objectively determined the changes in the size and shape of affected soft tissues of the faces of children exposed to those anticonvulsant drugs during pregnancy. METHODS Thirteen individuals, exposed throughout pregnancy to phenytoin as either monotherapy or polytherapy, were identified in a previous analysis as having significant changes in their craniofacial features based on measurements of cephalometric radiographs, changes associated with “the anticonvulsant face”.. The soft tissues of their faces were imaged by 3D laser (structured light) scanning. RESULTS The notable changes in soft tissues identified by laser light scans were a wide philtrum (between the left and right cristae philtri), narrow mouth (between the left and right cheilions), short nasal bridge (between nasale and pronasale), short nose height (between the nasale and subnasale), and flat orbits (based on the orbital protrusion index). CONCLUSIONS This analysis of phenytoin-exposed individuals is the first anthropometric analysis of the craniofacial surface, designed to render the identification of abnormal features both objective and realiable. These analyses demonstrated that there were several significant changes in the soft tissue of the face, corroborating earlier studies of alterations of the craniofacial skeleton in the anticonvulsant face. Two of the

  20. Reflectives: Phosphors and lasers - shedding light on rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    The first powder electroluminescent phosphor was introduced in 1936. Today, phosphors, particularly those made of high-purity rare earths, have found their way into a variety of products: industrial, commercial, and consumer, alike. The fluorescent lamp industry which remains the leading market for the use of high-purity rare earths, lit the way for the future of rare earths in the optical, x-ray, and display screen applications. Light combined with rare earth materials is also a successful recipe for reflectivity needed in filtering applications such as optics, lasers, and conductors. This article discusses the applications and markets for phosphors and rare earths.

  1. Stability of a Light Sail Riding on a Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, Zachary; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    The stability of a light sail riding on a laser beam is analyzed both analytically and numerically. Conical sails on Gaussian beams, which have been studied in the past, are shown to be unstable without active control or additional mechanical modifications. A new architecture for a passively stable sail-and-beam configuration is proposed. The novel spherical shell design for the sail is capable of “beam riding” without the need for active feedback control. Full three-dimensional ray-tracing simulations are performed to verify our analytical results.

  2. Safety Guidelines for Laser Illumination on Exposed High Explosives and Metals in Contact with High Explosives with Calculational Results

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Roeske, F; Wilkins, P; Carpenter, K H

    2002-04-17

    Experimental tests have been undertaken to determine safe levels of laser exposure on bare high explosive (HE) samples and on common metals used in intimate contact with HE. Laser light is often focused on bare HE and upon metals in contact with HE during alignment procedures and experimental metrology experiments. This paper looks at effects caused by focusing laser beams at high energy densities directly onto the surface of various bare HE samples. Laser energy densities (fluence) exceeding 19 kilowatts/cm{sup 2} using a 5-milliwatt, 670 nm, cw laser diode were generated by focusing the laser down to a spot size diameter of 4 microns. Upon careful inspection, no laser damage was observed in any of the HE samples illuminated at this fluence level. Direct laser exposure of metals directly contacting HE surfaces was also tested. Laser energy densities (fluence) varying from 188 Watts/cm{sup 2} to 12.7 KW/cm{sup 2} were generated using an 11-Watt, 532 nm frequency-doubled Nd:YAG cw laser with focal spot size diameters as small as 100 microns. These measurements look at the temperature rise of the surface of the metal in contact with HE when laser energy is incident on the opposite side of the metal. The temperature rise was experimentally measured as a function of incident laser power, spot size, metal composition and metal thickness. Numerical simulations were also performed to solve the two-dimensional heat flow problem for this experimental geometry. In order to simplify the numerical simulation to allow representation of a large number of physical cases, the equations used in the simulation are expressed in terms of dimensionless variables. The normalized numerical solutions are then compared to the various experimental configurations utilized. Calculations and experiment agree well over the range measured. Safety guidelines for alignment laser illumination upon bare HE are outlined.

  3. Analysis of shade, temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration during dental bleaching: in vitro study with the KTP and diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Fornaini, C; Lagori, G; Merigo, E; Meleti, M; Manfredi, M; Guidotti, R; Serraj, A; Vescovi, P

    2013-01-01

    Many dental bleaching techniques are now available, several of them using a laser source. However, the literature on the exact role of coherent light in the biochemical reaction of the whitening process is very discordant. The aims of this in vitro study were: (1) to compare two different laser sources, a KTP laser with a wavelength of 532 nm and a diode laser with a wavelength of 808 nm, during dental bleaching, and (2) to investigate the relationships among changes in gel temperature, tooth shade and hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration during laser irradiation. Altogether, 116 bovine teeth were bleached using a 30% HP gel, some of them with gel only and others with gel plus one of the two lasers (532 or 808 nm) at two different powers (2 and 4 W). The KTP laser produced a significant shade variation with a minimal temperature increase. The diode laser led to a higher temperature increase with a greater reduction in HP concentration, but the change in shade was only statistically significant with a power of 4 W. At a power of 2 W, the KTP laser caused a greater change in shade than the diode laser. No significant correlations were found among temperature, HP concentration and shade variation. The KTP laser appears to provide better results with less dangerous thermal increases than the diode laser. This might call into question most of the literature affirming that the action of laser bleaching is by increasing the gel temperature and, consequently, the speed of the redox reaction. Further study is required to investigate the correlations between the parameters investigated and efficacy of the bleaching process.

  4. Characterization of laser ablation of carbon-doped glycerol at different laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Z. Y.; Zhang, S. Q.; Liang, T.; Tang, W. C.; Xiao, K.; Liang, W. F.; Gao, L.; Gao, H.; Xing, J.; Wu, X. W.; Zhang, Z. L.

    2016-12-01

    Laser ablation of carbon-doped glycerol at laser wavelengths of 1064 and 532 nm are characterized in laser plasma propulsion. The coupling coefficient, specific impulse and the plasma luminescence are measured. It is found that the coupling coefficient and the specific impulse are much related to the wavelength and the carbon content. A long wavelength and a high carbon content can enhance the coupling coefficient and specific impulse due to the prolonging coupling time of laser pulse with plasma. However, an optimal propulsion also relates with the un-ionized splashing liquids.

  5. Single-frequency, fully integrated, miniature DPSS laser based on monolithic resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, G.; Sotor, J.; Krzempek, K.; Soboń, G.; Abramski, K. M.

    2014-02-01

    We present a single frequency, stable, narrow linewidth, miniature laser sources operating at 532 nm (or 1064 nm) based on a monolithic resonators. Such resonators utilize birefringent filters formed by YVO4 beam displacer and KTP or YVO4 crystals to force single frequency operation at 532 nm or 1064 nm, respectively. In both configurations Nd:YVO4 gain crystal is used. The resonators dimensions are 1x1x10.5 mm3 and 1x1x8.5 mm3 for green and infrared configurations, respectively. Presented laser devices, with total dimensions of 40x52x120 mm3, are fully equipped with driving electronics, pump diode, optical and mechanical components. The highly integrated (36x15x65 mm3) low noise driving electronics with implemented digital PID controller was designed. It provides pump current and resonator temperature stability of ±30 μA@650 mA and ±0,003ºC, respectively. The laser parameters can be set and monitored via the USB interface by external application. The developed laser construction is universal. Hence, the other wavelengths can be obtained only by replacing the monolithic resonator. The optical output powers in single frequency regime was at the level of 42 mW@532 nm and 0.5 W@1064 nm with the long-term fluctuations of ±0.85 %. The linewidth and the passive frequency stability under the free running conditions were Δν < 100 kHz and 3ṡ10-9@1 s integration time, respectively. The total electrical power supply consumption of laser module was only 4 W. Presented compact, single frequency laser operating at 532 nm and 1064 nm may be used as an excellent source for laser vibrometry, interferometry or seed laser for fiber amplifiers.

  6. Elevation of plasma membrane permeability by laser irradiation of selectively bound nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yao, Cuiping; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin; Endl, Elmar; Zhang, Zhenxi; Gerdes, Johannes; Hüttmann, Gereon

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation of nanoabsorbers with pico- and nanosecond laser pulses could result in thermal effects with a spatial confinement of less than 50 nm. Therefore absorbing nanoparticles could be used to create controlled cellular effects. We describe a combination of laser irradiation with nanoparticles, which changes the plasma membrane permeability. We demonstrate that the system enables molecules to penetrate impermeable cell membranes. Laser light at 532 nm is used to irradiate conjugates of colloidal gold, which are delivered by antibodies to the plasma membrane of the Hodgkin's disease cell line L428 and/or the human large-cell anaplastic lymphoma cell line Karpas 299. After irradiation, membrane permeability is evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry using propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dextran. The fraction of transiently permeabilized and then resealed cells is affected by the laser parameter, the gold concentration, and the membrane protein of the different cell lines to which the nanoparticles are bound. Furthermore, a dependence on particle size is found for these interactions in the different cell lines. The results suggest that after optimization, this method could be used for gene transfection and gene therapy.

  7. Development of a broadband reflectivity diagnostic for laser driven shock compression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S. J.; Bolme, C. A.; Collins, G. W.; Jeanloz, R.

    2015-04-01

    A normal - incidence visible and near - infrared Shock Wave Optical Reflectivity Diagnostic (SWORD) was constructed to investigate changes in the optical properties of materials under dynamic laser compression . Documenting wavelength - and time - dependent changes in the optical properties of laser - shock compressed samples has been difficult, primarily due to the small sample sizes and short time scales involved , but we succeeded in doing so by broadening a series of time delayed 800 - nm pulses from an ultra fast Ti: sapphire laser to generate high - intensity broadband light at nanosecond time scales . This diagnostic was demonstrated over the wavelength range 450 to 1150 nm with up to 16 time displaced spectra during a single shock experiment. Simultaneous off - normal incidence velocity interferometry (VISAR) characterize d the sample under laser - compression , and also provide d a n independent reflectivity measurement at 532 nm wavelength . Lastly, the shock - driven semiconductor - to - metallic transition in germanium was documented by way of reflectivity measurements with 0.5 ns time resolution and a wavelength resolution of 10 nm .

  8. Method of laser activated nano-thermolysis for elimination of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Potapnev, Michail; Aleinikova, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2006-07-28

    We describe novel ex vivo method for elimination of tumor cells from cell suspension, Laser Activated Nanothermolysis and propose this method for purging of bone marrow and blood transplants. K562 and human lympholeukemia cells were eliminated in experiments by laser-induced micro-bubbles that emerge inside individual target cells around selectively formed clusters of light-absorbing gold nanoparticles. Pretreatment of tumor cells with specific monoclonal antibodies and Ig-conjugated 30-nm gold particles allowed the formation of clusters of 10-20 on the surface of cell membrane. Electron microscopy found the nanoparticulate clusters inside the cells. Total (100%) elimination of K562 cells targeted with specific antibodies was achieved with single laser pulses with optical fluence of 5J/cm(2) at the wavelength of 532 nm without damage to the same cells targeted without specific antibodies. Total elimination of human lymphoblasts from suspension of normal stem cells was achieved by a single laser pulse with the optical fluence of 1.7J/cm(2), while the damage level of normal cells was 16%.

  9. Large-area imager of hydrogen leaks in fuel cells using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hori, M; Hayano, R S; Fukuta, M; Koyama, T; Nobusue, H; Tanaka, J

    2009-10-01

    We constructed a simple device, which utilized laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to image H2 gas leaking from the surfaces of hydrogen fuel cells to ambient air. Nanosecond laser pulses of wavelength lambda=532 nm emitted from a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser were first compressed to a pulse length Deltat<1 ns using a stimulated Brillouin backscattering cell. Relay-imaging optics then focused this beam onto the H(2) leak and initiated the breakdown plasma. The Balmer-alpha (H-alpha) emission that emerged from this was collected with a 2-m-long macrolens assembly with a 90-mm-diameter image area, which covered a solid angle of approximately 1 x 10(-3)pi steradians seen from the plasma. The H-alpha light was isolated by two 100-mm-diameter interference filters with a 2 nm bandpass, and imaged by a thermoelectrically cooled charge-coupled device camera. By scanning the position of the laser focus, the spatial distribution of H2 gas over a 90-mm-diameter area was photographed with a spatial resolution of < or = 5 mm. Photoionization of the water vapor in the air caused a strong H-alpha background. By using pure N2 as a buffer gas, H2 leaks with rates of <1 cc/min were imaged. We also studied the possibilities of detecting He, Ne, or Xe gas leaks.

  10. Elimination of leukemic cells from human transplants by laser nano-thermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Potapnev, Michail; Aleinikova, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    We describe novel ex vivo method for elimination of tumor cells from bone marrow and blood, Laser Activated Nano-Thermolysis for Cell Elimination Technology (LANTCET) and propose this method for purging of transplants during treatment of leukemia. Human leukemic cells derived from real patients with different diagnoses (acute lymphoblastic leukemias) were selectively damaged by LANTCET in the experiments by laser-induced micro-bubbles that emerge inside individual specifically-targeted cells around the clusters of light-absorbing gold nanoparticles. Pretreatment of the transplants with diagnosis-specific primary monoclonal antibodies and gold nano-particles allowed the formation of nanoparticle clusters inside leukemic cells only. Electron microscopy found the nanoparticulate clusters inside the cells. Total (99.9%) elimination of leukemic cells targeted with specific antibodies and nanoparticles was achieved with single 10-ns laser pulses with optical fluence of 0.2 - 1.0 J/cm2 at the wavelength of 532 nm without significant damage to normal bone marrow cells in the same transplant. All cells were studied for the damage/viability with several control methods after their irradiation by laser pulses. Presented results have proved potential applicability of developed LANTCET technology for efficient and safe purging (cleaning of residual tumor cells) of human bone marrow and blood transplants. Design of extra-corporeal system was proposed that can process the transplant for one patient for less than an hour with parallel detection and counting residual leukemic cells.

  11. Synchronization of video recording and laser pulses including background light suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, Jr., James E. (Inventor); Tierney, Jr., Michael (Inventor); Dabney, Philip W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for and a method of triggering a pulsed light source, in particular a laser light source, for predictable capture of the source by video equipment. A frame synchronization signal is derived from the video signal of a camera to trigger the laser and position the resulting laser light pulse in the appropriate field of the video frame and during the opening of the electronic shutter, if such shutter is included in the camera. Positioning of the laser pulse in the proper video field allows, after recording, for the viewing of the laser light image with a video monitor using the pause mode on a standard cassette-type VCR. This invention also allows for fine positioning of the laser pulse to fall within the electronic shutter opening. For cameras with externally controllable electronic shutters, the invention provides for background light suppression by increasing shutter speed during the frame in which the laser light image is captured. This results in the laser light appearing in one frame in which the background scene is suppressed with the laser light being uneffected, while in all other frames, the shutter speed is slower, allowing for the normal recording of the background scene. This invention also allows for arbitrary (manual or external) triggering of the laser with full video synchronization and background light suppression.

  12. Deep ultraviolet light-emitting and laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Asif; Asif, Fatima; Muhtadi, Sakib

    2016-02-01

    Nearly all the air-water purification/polymer curing systems and bio-medical instruments require 250-300 nm wavelength ultraviolet light for which mercury lamps are primarily used. As a potential replacement for these hazardous mercury lamps, several global research teams are developing AlGaN based Deep Ultraviolet (DUV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) and DUV LED Lamps and Laser Diodes over Sapphire and AlN substrates. In this paper, we review the current research focus and the latest device results. In addition to the current results we also discuss a new quasipseudomorphic device design approach. This approach which is much easier to integrate in a commercial production setting was successfully used to demonstrate UVC devices on Sapphire substrates with performance levels equal to or better than the conventional relaxed device designs.

  13. Visible light laser voltage probing on thinned substrates

    DOEpatents

    Beutler, Joshua; Clement, John Joseph; Miller, Mary A.; Stevens, Jeffrey; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    2017-03-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing visible light in conjunction with a thinned structure to enable characterization of operation of one or more features included in an integrated circuit (IC). Short wavelength illumination (e.g., visible light) is applied to thinned samples (e.g., ultra-thinned samples) to achieve a spatial resolution for laser voltage probing (LVP) analysis to be performed on smaller technology node silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and bulk devices. Thinning of a semiconductor material included in the IC (e.g., backside material) can be controlled such that the thinned semiconductor material has sufficient thickness to enable operation of one or more features comprising the IC during LVP investigation.

  14. Laser and light-based treatment options for hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Hamzavi, Iltefat H; Griffith, James L; Riyaz, Farhaad; Hessam, Schapoor; Bechara, Falk G

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that commonly develops painful, deep dermal abscesses and chronic, draining sinus tracts. Classically, pharmacologic and surgical therapies have been effective for reducing lesion activity and inflammation, but provide only modest success in the prevention of future recurrences and disease progression. Adjunctive therapies, such as laser and light-based therapies, have become more commonly used in the management of HS. These therapies work to reduce the occurrence of painful HS flare-ups by decreasing the number of hair follicles, sebaceous glands, and bacteria in affected areas, and by ablatively debulking chronic lesions. The best results are seen when treatment is individualized, taking disease severity into consideration when selecting specific energy-based approaches. This article will discuss various light-based therapies and the evidence supporting their use in the management of HS.

  15. Laser-light delivery microtools based on laser technology: design, fabrication, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Voznesensky, Nikolay B.

    2001-06-01

    A set of new laser-light delivery microtools (LDM) based on laser technology is investigated and discussed. Wide application of LDM in different fields of science, medicine, biology, industry and information processing is considered. Fiber optical networks in medical diagnostics and technical, civil engineering and other technological areas are discussed. The general approach based on electromagnetic field equations-transformation for all range of dimensions (mini-, micro and nanodomain) is given. Laser-assisted technology for drawing-out and for microstructuring optical tools is investigated, high-speed movie has been applied to study the process and compared with theoretical description. Finally a number of fibers and micropipettes-based medical tools and SNOM-tips has been fabricated and tested. Applications of some tools for medical operations (thermocoagulation), protein rasters preparing, SNOM-microscopy investigation have been demonstrated.

  16. Influence of laser light on AMPK as a factor in the laser therapy of diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, A. M.

    2006-02-01

    The use of light and laser in the treatment of diabetes has been under research and some controversy. The following paper explores some of the mechanisms involved in glucose level regulation in connection to light. Several researchers have found that laser irradiation can activate ATP production, influence redox values within cells, and have other effects which can (in)directly activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The activation of AMPK plays an important, albeit not an exclusive, role in the induction of GLUT4 recruitment to the plasma membrane. In addition, there is some demonstration that AMPK may regulate glucose transport through GLUT1. Increased glucose uptake will result in an increase in glycolysis and ATP production.

  17. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Boundary instability of an erosion laser plasma expanding into a background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1993-12-01

    The stability of the contact region in the system consisting of an erosion plasma and a gas has been determined experimentally under conditions such that the length of the applied laser pulse is longer than the rise time of the instability, and the expansion of the erosion plume is accompanied by breakdown of the background gas. The evolution of perturbations of the plasma front following the introduction of initial perturbations with a fixed spatial period has been studied. It is possible to model the injection of plasma bunches into a low-pressure gas by studying the dynamics of the vaporization at moderate laser-light intensities, characteristic of technological applications.

  18. Stationary light pulses and narrowband light storage in a laser-cooled ensemble loaded into a hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatt, Frank; Simeonov, Lachezar S.; Halfmann, Thomas; Peters, Thorsten

    2016-10-01

    We report on an observation of stationary light pulses and narrowband light storage inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. Laser-cooled atoms were first loaded into the fiber core, providing strong light-matter coupling. Light pulses were then stored in a collective atomic excitation using a single control laser beam. By applying a second counterpropagating control beam, a light pulse could be brought to a standstill. Our work paves the way towards the creation of strongly correlated many-body systems with photons and applications in the field of quantum information processing.

  19. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SEMICONDUCTOR INJECTION LASERS SELCO-87: Pulsations of light emitted by laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, P.

    1988-11-01

    A system of three simple rate equations, derived from equations describing the excess heating near the front face of a resonator, is used as a model of the appearance of spontaneous (self-sustained) pulsations of light emitted by injection lasers. The rate equations are considered as an almost conservative system and the limit cycle is calculated for the system. The good agreement with numerical results favors our approximation, compared with other approximate calculations.

  20. Thin laser light sheet microscope for microbial oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Eran; Jaffe, Jules S.; Long, Richard A.; Azam, Farooq

    2002-01-01

    Despite a growing need, oceanographers are limited by existing technological constrains and are unable to observe aquatic microbes in their natural setting. In order to provide a simple and easy to implement solution for such studies, a new Thin Light Sheet Microscope (TLSM) has been developed. The TLSM utilizes a well-defined sheet of laser light, which has a narrow (23 micron) axial dimension over a 1 mm x 1 mm field of view. This light sheet is positioned precisely within the depth of field of the microscope’s objective lens. The technique thus utilizes conventional microscope optics but replaces the illumination system. The advantages of the TLSM are two-fold: First, it concentrates light only where excitation is needed, thus maximizing the efficiency of the illumination source. Secondly, the TLSM maximizes image sharpness while at the same time minimizing the level of background noise. Particles that are not located within the objective's depth of field are not illuminated and therefore do not contribute to an out-of-focus image. Images from a prototype system that used SYBR Green I fluorescence stain in order to localize single bacteria are reported. The bacteria were in a relatively large and undisturbed volume of 4ml, which contained natural seawater. The TLSM can be used for fresh water studies of bacteria with no modification. The microscope permits the observation of interactions at the microscale and has potential to yield insights into how microbes structure pelagic ecosystems.

  1. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.; Varoli, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50-75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  2. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  3. a Light-Weight Laser Scanner for Uav Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Torres, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP) as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  4. A Theoretical Light Scattering Model of Nanoparticle Laser Tweezers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Accomplishments this reporting period include: 1. derived, programmed, checked, and tested the Mie light scattering theory formulas for the radiation trapping force for both the on-axis and off-axis geometry of the trapping beam plus trapped spherical particle; 2. verified that the computed radiation trapping force for a freely propagating focused Gaussian laser beam incident on a spherical particle agrees with previous published calculations; 3. compared the small particle size and large particle size limits of the Mie calculation with the results of Rayleigh scattering theory and ray scattering theory, respectively and verified that the comparison is correct for Rayleigh scattering theory but found that ray theory omits an important light scattering effect included in the Mie theory treatment; 4. generalized the calculation of the radiation trapping force on a spherical particle in the on-axis geometry from a freely propagating focused Gaussian laser beam to the realistic situation of a Gaussian beam truncated and focused by a high numerical aperture oil-immersion microscope objective lens and aberrated by the interface between the microscope cover slip and the liquid-filled sample volume; and 5. compared the calculated radiation trapping force for this geometry with the results of previously published experiments and found that the agreement is better than when using previously developed theories.

  5. Thermal mechanisms of laser marking in transparent polymers with light-absorbing microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenska, K. S.; Zelensky, S. E.; Poperenko, L. V.; Kanev, K.; Mizeikis, V.; Gnatyuk, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of highly viscous polystyrene suspensions of light-absorbing microparticles with pulsed radiation of a Q-switched YAG:Nd3+ laser is investigated. Absorption of laser radiation by the suspended microparticles causes thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) of the polymer in the vicinity of the overheated particles. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) of light-absorbing microparticles under irradiation by a sequence of laser pulses is observed. The mechanism of laser marking includes formation of light-absorbing and scattering centers by accumulation of carbonaceous and gaseous products of pyrolysis.

  6. LIGHT SCATTERING: Observation of multiple scattering of laser radiation from a light-induced jet of microparticles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat'ev, Andrei V.

    2004-06-01

    Variation in the correlation function of light multiply scattered by a random medium was observed with increasing the incident beam power. The light-induced motion of microparticles in suspension, caused by a high-power laser radiation, serves as an additional factor in the decorrelation of the scattered light. The experimental data are in good agreement with the results of theoretical analysis.

  7. Polymers in lens design for laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasarova, Stefka N.; Sultanova, Nina G.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2015-01-01

    Successful application of optical materials in lens design is based on the knowledge of their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have obtained precise refractometric data of various optical polymers in the visible and near-infrared area. Different refractive index measuring techniques have been used. On base of the detailed study of refractive, dispersive, thermal and other important material characteristics of polymers, optical design of all-plastic systems for laser applications is proposed: a laser expander for 532 nm emission wavelength and a focusing microlens intended for reading/recording laser heads of DVD discs at 650 nm. Geometric and wave aberrations are computed and minimised.

  8. Comparative study of laser damage threshold energies in the artificial retina.

    PubMed

    Payne, D J; Hopkins, R A; Eilert, B G; Noojin, G D; Stolarski, D J; Thomas, R J; Cain, C P; Hengst, G T; Kennedy, P K; Jost, T R; Rockwell, B A

    1999-07-01

    Laser damage threshold energies produced from ultrashort (i.e., ⩽1 ns) laser pulses are investigated as a function of both pulse width and spot size for an artificial retina. A piece of film acts as the absorbing layer and is positioned at the focus of a variant on the Cain artificial eye [C. Cain, G. D. Noojin, D. X. Hammer, R. J. Thomas, and B. A. Rockwell, "Artificial eye for in vitro experiments of laser light interaction with aqueous media," J. Biomed. Opt.2, 88-94 (1997)]. Experiments were performed at the focal point and at two and ten Rayleigh ranges (RR) in front of the focus with the damage end point being the presence of a bubble imaged at the film plane. Pulse energy thresholds were determined for wavelengths of 1064, 580, and 532 nm with pulse durations ranging from the nanosecond (ns) to the femtosecond (fs) regime. For the at-focus data in the visible regime, the threshold dropped from 0.25 μJ for a 532 nm, 5 ns pulse to 0.11 μJ for a 580 nm, 100 fs pulse. The near-infrared (NIR) threshold changed from 5.5 μJ for a 5 ns pulse to 0.9 μJ for a 130 fs pulse at a distance two RR in front of the focus. The experiment was repeated using the same pulse widths and wavelengths, except the water path was removed to determine the impact of nonlinear self-focusing in water. A vertical microscope imaging system was employed in order to observe the threshold event. The NIR fluence threshold of 0.5 J/cm2 remained constant within an experimental uncertainty for all pulse widths, which corresponds to values in the literature [C. P. Lin and M. W. Kelly, "Ultrafast time-resolved imaging of stress transient and cavitation from short pulsed laser irradiated melanin particles," SPIE Laser-Tissue Interactions VI, Proc. SPIE2391, 294-299 (1995)]. The visible data also demonstrated a nearly constant fluence of 0.07 J/cm2. The disparity in thresholds between the two techniques arises from nonlinear optical phenomena related to propagation differences in the ocular

  9. Near infrared laser ocular bioeffects

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, D.J.; Beatrice, E.S.

    1989-05-01

    Thresholds for laser chorioretinal injury in the red end of the visible spectrum and the near-infrared (IR-A) spectral regions are presented. An unpredicted wavelength dependence of the injury threshold for single Q-switched pulses is demonstrated. Four lasers were used to determine thresholds at 40 wavelengths between 532 nm and 1064 nm: a ruby laser, a neodymium:YAG-pumped dye laser, an erbium:YLF laser and an alexandrite laser. Despite many careful and repeated efforts to determine a cause for the variation due to possible variations in the lasers or other aspects of the experimental technique and due to biological absorption properties of the eye, there is no complete or obvious explanation for the significant variations of threshold with small changes in wavelength. The implications of these findings for laser safety standards are presented.

  10. Laser-assisted biosynthesis for noble nanoparticles production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhtarev, Tatiana; Edwards, Vernessa; Kukhtareva, Nickolai; Moses, Sherita

    2014-08-01

    Extracellular Biosynthesis technique (EBS) for nanoparticles production has attracted a lot of attention as an environmentally friendly and an inexpensive methodology. Our recent research was focused on the rapid approach of the green synthesis method and the reduction of the homogeneous size distribution of nanoparticles using pulse laser application. Noble nanoparticles (NNPs) were produced using various ethanol and water plant extracts. The plants were chosen based on their biomedical applications. The plants we used were Magnolia grandiflora, Geranium, Aloe `tingtinkie', Aloe barbadensis (Aloe Vera), Eucalyptus angophoroides, Sansevieria trifasciata, Impatiens scapiflora. Water and ethanol extract, were used as reducing agents to produce the nanoparticles. The reaction process was monitored using a UV-Visible spectroscopy. NNPs were characterized by Fourier Transfer Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and the Dynamic Light Scattering technique (DLS). During the pulse laser Nd-YAG illumination (λ=1064nm, 532nm, PE= 450mJ, 200mJ, 10 min) the blue shift of the surface plasmon resonance absorption peak was observed from ~424nm to 403nm for silver NP; and from ~530nm to 520 nm for gold NPs. In addition, NNPs solution after Nd-YAG illumination was characterized by the narrowing of the surface plasmon absorption resonance band, which corresponds to monodispersed NNPS distribution. FTIR, TEM, DLS, Zeta potential results demonstrated that NNPs were surrounded by biological molecules, which naturally stabilized nanosolutions for months. Cytotoxicity investigation of biosynthesized NNPs is in progress.

  11. Light-induced Effects in Sillenite Crystals with Shallow and Deep Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, Tatiana; Kisteneva, Marina; Shandarov, Stanislav; Tolstik, Alexei

    This paper presents the light-induced effects in bismuth silicon and bismuth titanium oxide crystals associated both with the electron transitions into the conduction band and with the filling of shallow and deep traps, which determine the optical and electroconductive properties of these crystals. The dynamics of photoconductivity and light-induced absorption is analyzed under conditions of pulsed laser illumination at the wavelength of 532 nm. The possibility to describe the relaxation processes of a population for trapping levels with the use of two-exponential function is demonstrated. The photoconductivity dynamics is characterized by two relaxation times on the order of 100 ns and 10 μs, whereas for light-induced absorption the lifetimes about 10 μs and several days for short- and long-lived traps, respectively, have been obtained. Because of this, the relaxation transitions may be occurred both to the shallow trap centers with energy located close to the conduction band and to the deep-lying traps, which should be included into a diversified theoretical model adequately describing the light-induced phenomena in photorefractive sillenite-family crystals.

  12. Increased epidermal laser fluence through simultaneous ultrasonic microporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Chininis, Jeff A.; Schellenberg, Mason W.; Qian, Chenxi; Hunt, Heather K.

    2016-03-01

    Lasers have demonstrated widespread applicability in clinical dermatology as minimally invasive instruments that achieve photogenerated responses within tissue. However, before reaching its target, the incident light must first transmit through the surface layer of tissue, which is interspersed with chromophores (e.g. melanin) that preferentially absorb the light and may also generate negative tissue responses. These optical absorbers decrease the efficacy of the procedures. In order to ensure that the target receives a clinically relevant dose, most procedures simply increase the incident energy; however, this tends to exacerbate the negative complications of melanin absorption. Here, we present an alternative solution aimed at increasing epidermal energy uence while mitigating excess absorption by unintended targets. Our technique involves the combination of a waveguide-based contact transmission modality with simultaneous high-frequency ultrasonic pulsation, which alters the optical properties of the tissue through the agglomeration of dissolved gasses into micro-bubbles within the tissue. Doing so effectively creates optically transparent pathways for the light to transmit unobstructed through the tissue, resulting in an increase in forward scattering and a decrease in absorption. To demonstrate this, Q-switched nanosecond-pulsed laser light at 532nm was delivered into pig skin samples using custom glass waveguides clad in titanium and silver. Light transmission through the tissue was measured with a photodiode and integrating sphere for tissue with and without continuous ultrasonic pulsation at 510 kHz. The combination of these techniques has the potential to improve the efficiency of laser procedures while mitigating negative tissue effects caused by undesirable absorption.

  13. Spectrum of laser light scattered by nanoparticles in an ablation-induced cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Masato; Sasaki, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    The spectrum of the laser light scattered by nanoparticles in a cavitation bubble, which was induced by laser ablation of a titanium target in water, was measured using a triple-grating spectrograph. The scattered laser light observed at 100 \\upmu s after laser ablation had no wavelength-shifted component, suggesting that nanoparticles at this delay time were metallic. The wavelength-shifted component was observed in the spectrum at a delay time of 200 \\upmu s, suggesting the formation of oxidized nanoparticles. However, we observed no peaks in the spectrum of the scattered laser light in the present in situ laser-light scattering experiment. On the other hand, we observed clear peaks in the Raman spectrum of synthesized nanoparticles. The experimental results suggest slow crystallization of nanoparticles in liquid in liquid-phase laser ablation.

  14. Light pipe design method and stepper experimentation for interference effects reduction in laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyet, Jean-Michel; Lutz, Yves

    2016-07-01

    The use of light pipes is an efficient and low-cost technique to get a homogeneous illumination for laser-gated viewing systems. However, this technique suffers from drawbacks when used with coherent sources like solid-state lasers. Compacting light pipe-based laser illuminators involves working with small light pipe sections, and experiments show that interference fringes appear on the laser illumination profiles. The principle of light pipe homogenization has been reviewed using geometrical optics to understand the phenomenon better, and a pragmatic light pipe design method, based on laser-gated viewing system parameters, is proposed. Another original solution based on optical stepper is studied to reduce both interference fringes and speckle noise to increase the homogeneity of laser illumination profiles.

  15. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Recoil momentum at a solid surface during developed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, L. I.

    1993-12-01

    The recoil momentum from a laser light pulse in the intensity range 105-107 W/cm2 is experimentally investigated for dielectric and metallic targets as a function of the pressure of the surrounding medium and angle of illumination. An equation with empirical coefficients is obtained for the recoil momentum of illuminated targets. Effects of the screening properties of the erosion jet and the back pressure on the recoil momentum are analyzed as the external pressure is varied.

  16. The Measurement of the Speed of Light Using a Laser Pointer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Yip, Din-yan

    2000-01-01

    Presents a method for measuring the speed of light using a laser pointer with adjustable focus as the signal carrier, a signal generator to modulate the light beam, and a student oscilloscope to detect the phase shift. (Author/CCM)

  17. Metal-clad waveguide characterization for contact-based light transmission into tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chininis, Jeffrey; Whiteside, Paul; Hunt, Heather K.

    2016-02-01

    As contemporary laser dermatology procedures, like tattoo removal and skin resurfacing, become more popular, the complications of their operation are also becoming more prevalent. Frequent incidences of over-exposure, ocular injury, and excessive thermal damage represent mounting concerns for those seeking such procedures; moreover, each of these problems is a direct consequence of the standard, free-space method of laser transmission predominantly used in clinical settings. Therefore, an alternative method of light transmission is needed to minimize these problems. Here, we demonstrate and characterize an alternative method that uses planar waveguides to deliver light into sample tissue via direct contact. To do this, slab substrates made from glass were clad in layers of titanium and silver, constraining the light within the waveguide along the waveguide's length. By creating active areas on the waveguide surface, the propagating light could then optically tunnel into the tissue sample, when the waveguide was brought into contact with the tissue. SEM and EDS were used to characterize the metal film thickness and deposition rates onto the glass substrates. Laser light from a Q-switched Nd:YAG source operating at 532nm was coupled into the waveguide and transmitted into samples of pig skin. The amount of light transmitted was measured using photoacoustics techniques, in conjunction with a photodiode and integrating sphere. Transmitting light into tissue in this manner effectively resolves or circumvents the complications caused by free-space propagation methods as it reduces the operating distance to 0, which prevents hazardous back-reflections and allows for the ready incorporation of contact cooling technologies.

  18. Influence of the Sampling Rate and Noise Characteristics on Prediction of the Maximal Safe Laser Exposure in Human Skin Using Pulsed Photothermal Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, L.; Milanič, M.; Majaron, B.

    2013-09-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows for noninvasive determination of the laser-induced temperature depth profile in strongly scattering samples, including human skin. In a recent experimental study, we have demonstrated that such information can be used to derive rather accurate predictions of the maximal safe radiant exposure on an individual patient basis. This has important implications for efficacy and safety of several laser applications in dermatology and aesthetic surgery, which are often compromised by risk of adverse side effects (e.g., scarring, and dyspigmentation) resulting from nonselective absorption of strong laser light in epidermal melanin. In this study, the differences between the individual maximal safe radiant exposure values as predicted from PPTR temperature depth profiling performed using a commercial mid-IR thermal camera (as used to acquire the original patient data) and our customized PPTR setup are analyzed. To this end, the latter has been used to acquire 17 PPTR records from three healthy volunteers, using 1 ms laser irradiation at 532 nm and a signal sampling rate of 20 000 . The laser-induced temperature profiles are reconstructed first from the intact PPTR signals, and then by binning the data to imitate the lower sampling rate of the IR camera (1000 fps). Using either the initial temperature profile in a dedicated numerical model of heat transfer or protein denaturation dynamics, the predicted levels of epidermal thermal damage and the corresponding are compared. A similar analysis is performed also with regard to the differences between noise characteristics of the two PPTR setups.

  19. High-power picosecond 355 nm laser based on La₂CaB₁₀O₁₉ crystal.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Ling; Xu, Degang; Zhang, Guochun; Yu, Haijuan; Wang, Yuye; Shan, Faxian; Wang, Lirong; Yan, Chao; Wu, Yicheng; Lin, Xuechun; Yao, Jianquan

    2014-06-01

    Third harmonic generation experiments were performed on a type-I phase-matching La2CaB10O19 crystal cut at θ=49.4° and φ=0.0° with dimensions of 4.0  mm×4.0  mm×17.6  mm. A 1064 nm laser with a maximum average power of 35.2 W was employed as the fundamental light source, which has a pulse width of 10 picoseconds and a pulse repetition rate of 80 MHz. A type-I noncritical phase-matching LBO crystal was used to generate 532 nm lasers. By investigating a series of focusing lens combinations, a picosecond 355 nm laser of 5.3 W was obtained, which is the highest power of picosecond 355 nm laser based on a La2CaB10O19 crystal so far. The total conversion efficiency from 1064 to 355 nm was up to 15.1%.

  20. Paper un-printing: using lasers to remove toner-print in order to reuse office paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ayala, D. R.; Allwood, J. M.; Counsell, T. A. M.

    2011-12-01

    In this article, lasers in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared light spectra working with pulse widths in the nanosecond range are applied to a range of toner-paper combinations to determine their ability to remove toner. If the laser energy fluence can be chosen to stay below the ablation threshold of paper at the same time that it surpasses that of toner, paper could be cleaned and re-used instead of being recycled or disposed into a landfill. This could significantly reduce the environmental impact of paper production and use. Although there are a variety of paper conservation studies which have investigated the effects of laser radiation on blank and soiled paper, none has previously explored toner-print removal from paper by laser ablation. Colour analysis under the L ∗ a ∗ b ∗ colour space and SEM examination of the outcome indicate that it is possible to remove toner from paper without damaging and discolouring the substrate. Best results are obtained when employing visible radiation at a wavelength of 532 nm working with a pulse width of 4 ns and energy fluences under 1.6 J/cm2. This means that it is technically feasible to remove toner-print for paper re-use.

  1. Laser desorption studies using laser-induced fluorescence of large aromatic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. P.; Krancevic, B.; Huestis, D. L.; Oser, H.

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed laser desorption of non-volatile organic dye molecules paraterphenyl and tetra-t-butyl-p-quinquephenyl (QUI) was studied using gas phase ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence, following heating of a steel substrate by a pulsed 1.06- µm Nd:YAG laser. The fluorescence signal intensity is linear in concentration up to at least 30 monolayers and shows infrared power threshold behavior, as expected for evaporation, at ˜0.2 J/cm2. Similar signal levels were also observed in air, with 532-nm heating, and using other metallic or dark black surfaces.

  2. Large-angle Programmable Direct Laser Interference Patterning with Ultrafast Laser Using Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Fabian; Uyttendaele, Andreas; Stauch, Julian; Schechtel, Florian; Reg, Yvonne; Zimmermann, Maik

    Direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) facilitates the creation of periodic micro- and nanostructures for numerous applications such as anti-reflective moth-eye structures, security features (holograms) or for surface topology modification. For high quality applications the use of ultrafast laser sources is demanded. However, this puts high requirements on laser system technology as the short pulses imply very short spatial interaction lengths. Furthermore flexible adjustment of the patterns to be generated is preferable which is difficult with most opto-mechanical setups. We present an approach using a spatial light modulator (SLM) for the creation of flexibly programmable DLIP-patterns. With our optical setup we are able to overcome the limitations the SLM poses at the current state of the art, thus achieving 45°-90° interference angles of two-, three- and four-beam interference patterns. We show regular structure sizes of ≈1 μm inscribed on the surface of polished metallic substrates with a 12 picosecond laser source at a wavelength of 1064 nm.

  3. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1990-01-01

    A versatile laser light scattering (LLS) instrument is developed for use in microgravity to measure microscopic particles of 30 A to above 3 microns. Since it is an optical technique, LLS does not affect the sample being studied. A LLS instrument built from modules allows several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. The multiangle LLS instrument can be mounted in the rack in the Space Shuttle and on Space Station Freedom. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations. This offers simple means of flying a great number of experiments without the additional requirements of full-scale flight hardware experiments.

  4. Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C.

    2006-09-01

    In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO2-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351nm interaction beams at an intensity of ˜1015W /cm2. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO2. The 527nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

  5. Visualization of film cooling flows using laser sheet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivir, R. B.; Roqumore, W. M.; McCarthy, J. W.

    1987-06-01

    A cold flow characterization and simulation of the turbine film cooling flows has been undertaken to assist analytical modeling of these flows for the calculation of heat transfer. Laser-sheet lighting of the flow field, in which TiCl4 vapor added to the film-cooling flow reacts spontaneously with moist air in the channel flow to form TiO2, has been employed in the visualization. Illumination times of 10 nsec were used for the still photographs. The flows have been illuminated in planes parallel, perpendicular, and at 45 deg to the plane of film injection. The simulated turbine flows range through rho v ratios of 0.3 to 3.0. A film injection angle of 30 deg was used. Turbulence has been added to the free stream with a grid. The film flow interactions with two levels of free-stream turbulence approaching are examined.

  6. New picosecond laser emitting blue light for use in periodontology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Thomas; Nieswand, Elmar; Rechmann, Peter

    2001-04-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the impact of a new picosecond laser emitting blue light on tooth surfaces in order to remove calculus. The radiation may be comfortably transmitted via 25 micrometers diameter fiber optics. The resulting fluence at the tooth was found to be to low for ablation of calculus via nonlinear effects. Higher absorption of the 446 nm radiation by calculus compared to heathy tissues can provide preferential heating and evaporation of the calculus. The surface of thick calculus is irregular rough thus comprising a large interface to the surrounding cooling medium contra acting the preferential heating. In summary the study indicates the possibility flat layers of calculus by thermal effects. Carbonization in healthy tissues is the major problem concerning removal of subgingival calculus with thermal effects.

  7. Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Dustin T; Flippo, Kirk A; Gaillard, Sandrine A

    2009-01-01

    Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

  8. Time-resolved spectral investigations of laser light induced microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánai, L.; Hevesi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical and spectral properties of an optical breakdown microplasma created by pulses of different lasers on surfaces of insulators (KCI), metals (Cu) and semiconductors (V 2O 5), have been investigated. Experiments were carried out in air and vacuum using different wavelengths (λ = 0.694μm, type OGM-20,λ = 1.06μm with a home-made laser based on neodymium glass crystal, and λ = 10.6μm, similarly home-made) and pulse durations (Q-switched and free-running regimes). To follow the integral, dynamical and spectral characteristics of the luminous spot of microplasma we have used fast cameras (SFR-2M, IMACON-HADLAND), a high speed spectral camera (AGAT-2) and a spectrograph (STE-1). It has been shown that the microplasma consists of two parts: fast front (peak) with τ≈100 ns and slow front (tail) with τ≈1μs durations. The detonation front speed is of the order of ≈10 5 cm s -1 and follows the temporal dependence of to t0.4. It depends on the composition of the surrounding gas and its pressure and could be connected with quick evaporation of the material investigated (peak) and optical breakdown of the ambient gaseous atmosphere (tail). From the delay in appearance of different characteristic spectral lines of the target material and its gaseous surrounding we have shown that the evolution of the microplasma involves evaporation and ionization of the atoms of the parent material followed by optical breakdown due to the incident and absorbed laser light, together with microplasma expansion.

  9. High efficiency CW green-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, J. W.; Brown, D. C.

    2006-02-01

    High power, CW and pulsed alexandrite lasers were produced by pumping the laser rod with a high quality diode pumped 532 nm laser sources. This pumping architecture provides stable performance with output power > 1.4 W at 767nm in the free running mode and 0.78W at 1000 Hz. An output of 80 mW at 375.5 nm was achieved at 500 Hz. This approach holds promise for the production of a scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  10. Controllable fabrication of super-resolution nanocrater arrays by laser direct writing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongsheng; Guo, Chuanfei; Cao, Sihai; Miao, Junjie; Ren, Tianling; Liu, Qian

    2010-11-01

    A super-resolution fabrication technique for highly-ordered nanocrater arrays is reported based on laser direct writing method. Nanocraters with diameters up to 40 nm, which is much smaller than the diffraction limit of laser system, are fabricated on titanium films using a 532 nm laser. The diameters of the craters are tunable from 350 nm to 40 nm, with a rigorous linear relationship versus the writing laser powers and an approximate linear relationship versus pulse widths. Laser ablation and oxidation are involved in formation mechanism and Gaussian distribution of laser energy density is proposed to play a key role of super-resolution structures.

  11. Laser speckle tracking for monitoring and analysis of retinal photocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Eric; Bliedtner, Katharina; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    Laser coagulation of the retina is an established treatment for several retinal diseases. The absorbed laser energy and thus the induced thermal damage varies with the transmittance and scattering properties of the anterior eye media and with the pigmentation of the fundus. The temperature plays the most important role in the coagulation process. An established approach to measure a mean retinal temperature rise is optoacoustics, however it provides limited information on the coagulation. Phase sensitive OCT potentially offers a three dimensional temporally resolved temperature distribution but is very sensitive to slightest movements which are clinically hard to avoid. We develop an optical technique able to monitor and quantify thermally and coagulation induced tissue movements (expansions and contractions) and changes in the tissue structure by dynamic laser speckle analysis (LSA) offering a 2D map of the affected area. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm) is used for photocoagulation. Enucleated porcine eyes are used as targets. The spot is 100μm. A Helium Neon laser (HeNe) is used for illumination. The backscattered light of a HeNe is captured with a camera and the speckle pattern is analyzed. A Q-switched Nd:YLF laser is used for simultaneous temperature measurements with the optoacoustic approach. Radial tissue movements in the micrometer regime have been observed. The signals evaluation by optical flow algorithms and generalized differences tuned out to be able to distinguish between regions with and without immediate cell damage. Both approaches have shown a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity above 99% at their optimal threshold.

  12. Mechanical properties of composite resins light-cured using a blue DPSS laser.

    PubMed

    Baek, Du-Man; Park, Jeong-Kil; Son, Sung-Ae; Ko, Ching-Chang; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2013-02-01

    Lasers have many favorable features as a light source owing to their monochromaticity and coherence. This study examined the mechanical properties of composite resins that were light-cured using a diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser. Eight composite resins were light-cured using four different light sources (one quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH), two light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and one DPSS laser with a wavelength of 473 nm). The light intensity of the DPSS laser and remaining light-curing units were approximately 500 and 900 mW/cm(2), respectively. The microhardness, flexural properties, and compressive properties were evaluated using the Vickers hardness test, three-point bending test, and compression test, respectively. In most cases, the microhardness, flexural properties, and compressive properties of the specimens light-cured using the DPSS laser were similar to those obtained using the other light-curing units. Within the limits of the study, the microhardness, flexural modulus, and compressive strength were linearly correlated with the filler content (in weight percent). The flexural modulus and compressive modulus were also linearly correlated with the microhardness. Even with a much lower light intensity, the DPSS laser with a wavelength of 473 nm can polymerize composite resins and give comparable mechanical properties to those obtained using the other light-curing units.

  13. Design and implementation of control system for range-gated underwater laser imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wei-Long; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Han, Hong-Wei; Hua, Liang-Hong

    2011-11-01

    There is currently considerable in developing underwater target detection, the underwater imaging system can be divided into active imaging system and passive system. The main feature of the active imaging system is that they use light sources to illuminate the targets and collect the reflection from targets. The advantages of active imaging system over passive imaging systems are high contrast and without the affection of environment sources. In this article, a range-gated underwater laser imaging system is built, which consists of laser illumination system, photoelectric imaging system and control system. The laser illumination system includes a light-pumped solid state doubled ND-YAG laser(532nm) which laser power and frequency can be adjusted and an optics expanding system of variable ratio. The photoelectric imaging system includes a gated Intensified CCD(ICCD) cameras which ICCD scheduling, gate width, delay time and gain can be adjusted and a optics received system of variable ratio. In order to acquire effectual target image using range-gated underwater laser imaging system, appropriate control parameters that include laser power and frequency, ICCD scheduling, gate width, delay time and gain, optics expanding system ratio and optics received system ratio must be given accurately. A control system which used C8051F320 and C8051F040 (MCU) as the core is designed, the control system can effectively control seven parameters that given above. The construction of software and hardware of the control system is introduced. And target image of underwater distance 25 m and 40m is given, Experimental results showed that the control system has high control precision, safe and stable operation and good speed adjusting performance can be achieved. It can be satisfied to apply to underwater target detection.

  14. Design and implementation of control system for range-gated underwater laser imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wei-long; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Han, Hong-wei; Hua, Liang-hong

    2012-01-01

    There is currently considerable in developing underwater target detection, the underwater imaging system can be divided into active imaging system and passive system. The main feature of the active imaging system is that they use light sources to illuminate the targets and collect the reflection from targets. The advantages of active imaging system over passive imaging systems are high contrast and without the affection of environment sources. In this article, a range-gated underwater laser imaging system is built, which consists of laser illumination system, photoelectric imaging system and control system. The laser illumination system includes a light-pumped solid state doubled ND-YAG laser(532nm) which laser power and frequency can be adjusted and an optics expanding system of variable ratio. The photoelectric imaging system includes a gated Intensified CCD(ICCD) cameras which ICCD scheduling, gate width, delay time and gain can be adjusted and a optics received system of variable ratio. In order to acquire effectual target image using range-gated underwater laser imaging system, appropriate control parameters that include laser power and frequency, ICCD scheduling, gate width, delay time and gain, optics expanding system ratio and optics received system ratio must be given accurately. A control system which used C8051F320 and C8051F040 (MCU) as the core is designed, the control system can effectively control seven parameters that given above. The construction of software and hardware of the control system is introduced. And target image of underwater distance 25 m and 40m is given, Experimental results showed that the control system has high control precision, safe and stable operation and good speed adjusting performance can be achieved. It can be satisfied to apply to underwater target detection.

  15. Flow Visualization by Elastic Light Scattering in the Boundary Layer of a Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Hillard, Mervin E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate instantaneous flow visualization of the boundary layer region of a Mach 2.5 supersonic flow over a flat plate that is interacting with an impinging shock wave. Tests were performed in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) at NASA Langley Research Center. The technique is elastic light scattering using 10-nsec laser pulses at 532 nm. We emphasize that no seed material of any kind, including water (H2O), is purposely added to the flow. The scattered light comes from a residual impurity that normally exists in the flow medium after the air drying process. Thus, the technique described here differs from the traditional vapor-screen method, which is typically accomplished by the addition of extra H2O vapor to the airflow. The flow is visualized with a series of thin two-dimensional light sheets (oriented perpendicular to the streamwise direction) that are located at several positions downstream of the leading edge of the model. This geometry allows the direct observation of the unsteady flow structure in the spanwise dimension of the model and also allows the indirect observation of the boundary layer growth in the streamwise dimension.

  16. Measurements of near forward scattered laser light in a large ICF plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J.D., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    We describe an instrument which measures the angular spread and spectrum of near forward scattered laser light from a probe beam in a long scalelength laser-plasma. The instrument consists of a combination of time integrating and time resolving detectors which measure the scattered light amplitude over four orders of magnitude for a range of angles. These measurements allow us to study the beam spray resulting from various laser and plasma conditions and determine the density fluctuations associated with this beam spray.

  17. Comparative Study of Light Scattering from Hepatoma Cells and Hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaogang; Wang, Rongrong; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao; Guo, Xiaoen

    2012-11-01

    Primary liver cancer is one of the highest mortality malignant tumors in the world. China is a high occurrence area of primary liver cancer. Diagnosis of liver cancer, especially early diagnosis, is essential for improving patients' survival. Light scattering and measuring method is an emerging technology developed in recent decades, which has attracted a large number of biomedical researchers due to its advantages, such as fast, simple, high accuracy, good repeatability, and non-destructive. The hypothesis of this project is that there may be some different light scattering information between hepatoma cells and hepatocyte. Combined with the advantages of the dynamic light scattering method and the biological cytology, an experimental scheme to measure the light scattering information of cells was formulated. Hepatoma cells and hepatic cells were irradiated by a semiconductor laser (532 nm). And the Brookhaven BI-200SM wide-angle light scattering device and temperature control apparatus were adopted. The light scattering information of hepatoma cells and hepatic cells in vitro within the 15°C to 30°C temperature range was processed by a BI-9000AT digital autocorrelator. The following points were found: (a) the scattering intensities of human hepatic cells and hepatoma cells are nearly not affected by the temperature factor, and the former is always greater than the latter and (b) the relaxation time of hepatoma cells is longer than that of hepatic cells, and both the relaxation time are shortened with increasing temperature from 15°C to 25°C. It can be concluded that hepatoma cells could absorb more incident light than hepatic cells. The reason may be that there exists more protein and nucleic acid in cancerous cells than normal cells. Furthermore, based on the length relaxation time, a conclusion can be inferred that the Brownian movement of cancer cells is greater.

  18. [Application of lasers in treatment of larynx diseases].

    PubMed

    Wojdas, Andrzej; Kosek, Jarosław; Dzaman, Karolina; Szczygielski, Kornel; Ratajczak, Jan; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz

    2009-09-01

    In otolaryngology, CO2 laser is the first and most commonly applied device. Such lasers as Ny:YAG generating visible light having wavelength 532 nm referred to as KTP laser due to the Name of the crystal where infrared light is converted to visible light. Such wavelenght, having green colour, due to strong absorption in haemoglobin is applied in treatments on tissues having dense blood vessels. The object of the work is to analyze larynx microsurgery laser treatments performer between 1994-2008 in the Otolaryngology Department of the Military Medical Institute CSK MON in Warsaw. The examination covered 445 patients including 142 women (31.9%) and 303 men (68.1%) aged between 12 and 80 (the average age of 48.2 year olds) who Were qualified in 1994-2003 for endoscopic laser surgery of the larynx. The operations field was watched using OPMI-11 operating microscope (Zeiss, Germany) allowing 4-16 times blow-up. Larynx laser microsurgery was performer using white laser beam: CO2 Illumina 40 (Heraeus LaserSonics, Germany) and green laser beam using KTP AURA XP laser (AMS, USA). The total of 445 larynx laser microsurgeries were performer. In recent years our clinic has seen an increase in the number of operations using this technique. The largest group were patients with recognized precancerous conditions (33.0%) and larynx carcinoma (26.4%). The next group in terms of the number of patients were 114 patients (20.6%) with recognized juvenile papilloma. Complications were observed in 180 patients. Table III show the type of recognized complications. The most commonly observed was swelling of the mucous membrane (48.3%), the rarest type was subcutaneous emphysema (3.3%). It was concluded that larynx laser microsurgery is a safe method and a valuable tool in treatment of larynx diseases, especially precancerous conditions and early forms of larynx carcinoma; that complications following procedure are relatively rare, usually mild, not life-threatening, and most often

  19. High-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers for optical space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koechner, Walter; Burnham, Ralph; Kasinski, Jeff; Bournes, Pat; Dibiase, Don; Le, Khoa; Marshall, Larry; Hays, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance of a large diode-pumped multi-stage Nd:YAG laser system for space and airborne applications will be described. The laser operates at a repetition rate of 40 Hz and produces an output either at 1.064 micron or 532 nm with an average power in the Q-switched mode of 30 W at the fundamental and 20 W at the second harmonic wavelength. The output beam is diffraction limited (TEM 00 mode) and can optionally also be operated in a single longitudinal mode. The output energy ranges from 1.25 Joule/pulse in the free lasing mode, 0.75 Joule in a 17 nsec Q-switched pulse, to 0.5 Joules/pulse at 532 nm. The overall electrical efficiency for the Q-switched second harmonic output is 4.

  20. Laser testing of an Iris AO dielectric-coated segmented MEMS DM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Michael A.; He, Min; Norton, Andrew P.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2011-09-01

    Iris AO has been developing dielectric-coated segmented MEMS deformable mirrors (DM) for use in laser applications that range from 355-1540 nm. In order to mitigate deformation from residual stress in the thick dielectric coatings, a stress-compensation layer has been added to the underside if the DM segments. This paper describes fabrication results of DMs with high reflectance dielectric coatings for 532 nm, 1064 nm, and 1540 nm. Additionally, a DM with a 532 nm coating has been tested with a 2 W, 532 nm CW laser. Laser testing shows the DM can handle 300 W/cm2 with off-theshelf packaging. Projections show that with good heat sinking, the same DM can handle laser power densities of 2800 W/cm2. The coatings showed no signs of damage after exposure to a w0=25 μm beam with a power density of 205 kW/cm2 for 105 minutes at the center of a segment and at segment edges exposed to 180 kW/cm2 for 45 minutes.

  1. Influence of surface light scattering in hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses on laser beam transmittance.

    PubMed

    Shiraya, Tomoyasu; Kato, Satoshi; Minami, Keiichiro; Miyata, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to experimentally examine the changes in the transmittances of photocoagulation lasers when surface light scattering increases in AcrySof intraocular lenses (IOLs). SA60AT IOLs (Alcon) were acceleratingly aging for 0, 3, 5, and 10 years to simulate surface light scattering, and the surface light-scattering intensities of both IOL surfaces were measured using a Scheimpflug photographer. The powers of laser beams that passed from a laser photocoagulator through the aged IOLs were measured at 532, 577, and 647 nm. Changes in the laser power and transmittance with the years of aging and the intensities of surface light scattering were examined. Although the intensity of surface light scattering increased with the years of aging, the laser power did not change with the years of aging (P > 0.30, Kruskal-Wallis test). There were no significant changes in the laser transmittance with the years of aging or the laser wavelength (P > 0.30 and 0.57, respectively). The intensity of surface light scattering revealed no significant association with the laser transmittance at any wavelength (P > 0.37, liner regression). The increases in the surface light scattering of the AcrySof IOLs would not influence retinal photocoagulation treatments for up to 10 years after implantation.

  2. Laser radiation effects on Mycoplasma agalactiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Cerasela Z.; Grigoriu, Constantin; Dinescu, Maria; Pascale, Florentina; Popovici, Adrian; Gheorghescu, Lavinia; Cismileanu, Ana; Avram, Eugenia

    2002-08-01

    The biological effects of the laser radiation emitted by the Nd:YAG laser (second harmonic, wavelength 532 nm /fluence 32 mJ/cm2/pulse duration 6 ns) on the Mycoplasma agalactiae bacterium were studied. The radiation was found to intensify the multiplication of the bacteria irradiated in TRIS buffer (0.125 M), without however affecting the proteinic composition of the cell membrane. When the bacteria were irradiated in their growth medium (PPLO broth) being later cultivated on a solid medium (PPLO agar), the exclusive presence of the atypical colonies (granular and T-like ones) was noticed.

  3. Expendable Precision Laser Aimer for Shaped Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Ault, S; Kuklo, R

    2007-10-25

    Certain shaped-charge cutting operations require a precision aiming system that is operationally convenient, robust, and constructed to allow the aiming system to be left in place for last-minute alignment verification until it is expended when the charge is fired. This report describes an aiming system made from low cost doubled-Nd:YAG 532 nm laser modules of the type used in green laser pointers. Drawings and detailed procedures for constructing the aiming system are provided, as are the results of some minimal tests performed on a prototype device.

  4. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  5. The influence of a light pipe on the coherence properties in laser projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelandt, Stijn; Tervo, Jani; Meuret, Youri; Verschaffelt, Guy; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    Light pipes are key optical components used in projection systems to transport and homogenize light from the source towards the light valve. They can provide a uniform light distribution at their output as a result of multiple internal reflections. In laser projection systems, such light pipes are useful in combination with a laser-light module consisting of one or more single-mode lasers and a rotating diffuser. The partially coherent light emanating from the rotating diffuser is transported and homogenized towards the end of the light pipe. Consequently, propagation through the light pipe will also modify the coherence properties of the laser light. In this paper, a computationally efficient simulation model is presented to propagate partially coherent light through a homogenizing rectangular light pipe. The resulting coherence function clearly differs from that of free-space propagation over the same optical path length. The implications of these results on, for example, the appearance of speckle are discussed in further detail. The simulation results are experimentally verified using a reversing wavefront Michelson interferometer. The approach described in this paper can be extended further to investigate other types of light pipes, such as tapered light pipes or even more complex ones.

  6. Laser system refinements to reduce variability in infarct size in the rat photothrombotic stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Paterson, Phyllis G.; Bradley, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The rat photothrombotic stroke model can induce brain infarcts with reasonable biological variability. Nevertheless, we observed unexplained high inter-individual variability despite using a rigorous protocol. Of the three major determinants of infarct volume, photosensitive dye concentration and illumination period were strictly controlled, whereas undetected fluctuation in laser power output was suspected to account for the variability. New method The frequently utilized Diode Pumped Solid State (DPSS) lasers emitting 532 nm (green) light can exhibit fluctuations in output power due to temperature and input power alterations. The polarization properties of the Nd:YAG and Nd:YVO4 crystals commonly used in these lasers are another potential source of fluctuation, since one means of controlling output power uses a polarizer with a variable transmission axis. Thus, the properties of DPSS lasers and the relationship between power output and infarct size were explored. Results DPSS laser beam intensity showed considerable variation. Either a polarizer or a variable neutral density filter allowed adjustment of a polarized laser beam to the desired intensity. When the beam was unpolarized, the experimenter was restricted to using a variable neutral density filter. Comparison with existing method(s) Our refined approach includes continuous monitoring of DPSS laser intensity via beam sampling using a pellicle beamsplitter and photodiode sensor. This guarantees the desired beam intensity at the targeted brain area during stroke induction, with the intensity controlled either through a polarizer or variable neutral density filter. Conclusions Continuous monitoring and control of laser beam intensity is critical for ensuring consistent infarct size. PMID:25840363

  7. Direct laser interference patterning of polystyrene films doped with azo dyes, using 355 nm laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, M. F.; Suarez, S.; Soldera, F.; Mücklich, F.; Barbero, C. A.; Bellingeri, R.; Alustiza, F.; Acevedo, D.

    2014-05-01

    The generation of line-like periodic patterns by direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) of polystyrene films (PS) at a wavelength of 355 nm has been investigated. No structuration is achieved in plain PS due to the weak absorption of the polymer at 355 nm. On the other hand, patterning is achieved on films doped (PSd) with an azo dye (2-anisidine → 2-anisidine) which is incorporated in the polymer solution used for film preparation. Periodic micro-structures are generated. DLIP on PSd results in the swelling of the surface at low fluences, while at high laser intensities it causes the ablation of the regions at the interference maxima positions. The results contrast with the usual process of DLIP on PS (at shorter wavelengths, like 266 nm) where only ablation is detected. The results suggest that decomposition of the azo dye is the driving force of the patterning which therefore differ from the patterning obtained when plain PS is irradiated with laser light able to be absorbed by the aromatic ring in PS (e.g. 266 nm). The biocompatibility of these materials and adhesion of cells was tested, the data from in vitro assays shows that fibroblast cells are attached and proliferate extensively on the PSd films.

  8. Broadband optical absorption enhancement of N719 dye in ethanol by gold-silver alloy nanoparticles fabricated under laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azawi, Mohammed A.; Bidin, Noriah; Abbas, Khaldoon N.; Bououdina, Mohamed; Azzez, Shrook A.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (Au-Ag alloy NPs) by a two-step process with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser without any additives is presented. Mixtures of Au and Ag colloidal suspensions were separately obtained by 1064-nm laser ablation of metallic targets immersed in ethanol. Subsequently, the as-mixed colloidal suspensions were reirradiated by laser-induced heating at the second-harmonic generation (532 nm) for different irradiation periods of time. The absorption spectra and morphology of the colloidal alloys were studied as a function of exposure time to laser irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of monodispersed spherical nanoparticles with a homogeneous size distribution in all the synthesized samples. UV-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were also employed to characterize the changes in the light absorption and emission of N719 dye solution with different concentrations of Au-Ag colloidal alloys, respectively. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Au-Ag alloy NPs enhanced the absorption and fluorescence peak of the dye solution. The mixture of dye molecules with a higher concentration of alloy NPs exhibited an additional coupling of dipole moments with the LSPR, thereby contributing to the improvement of the optical properties of the mixture.

  9. Controlled laser delivery into biological tissue via thin-film optical tunneling and refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteside, Paul J. D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Curry, Randy; Viator, John A.

    2015-02-01

    Due to the often extreme energies employed, contemporary methods of laser delivery utilized in clinical dermatology allow for a dangerous amount of high-intensity laser light to reflect off a multitude of surfaces, including the patient's own skin. Such techniques consistently represent a clear and present threat to both patients and practitioners alike. The intention of this work was therefore to develop a technique that mitigates this problem by coupling the light directly into the tissue via physical contact with an optical waveguide. In this manner, planar waveguides cladded in silver with thin-film active areas were used to illuminate agar tissue phantoms with nanosecond-pulsed laser light at 532nm. The light then either refracted or optically tunneled through the active area, photoacoustically generating ultrasonic waves within the phantom, whose peak-to-peak intensity directly correlated to the internal reflection angle of the beam. Consequently, angular spectra for energy delivery were recorded for sub-wavelength silver and titanium films of variable thickness. Optimal energy delivery was achieved for internal reflection angles ranging from 43 to 50 degrees, depending on the active area and thin film geometries, with titanium films consistently delivering more energy across the entire angular spectrum due to their relatively high refractive index. The technique demonstrated herein therefore not only represents a viable method of energy delivery for biological tissue while minimizing the possibility for stray light, but also demonstrates the possibility for utilizing thin films of high refractive index metals to redirect light out of an optical waveguide.

  10. Dosimetry for lasers and light in dermatology: Monte Carlo simulations of 577 nm-pulsed laser penetration into cutaneous vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Keijzer, Marleen

    1991-06-01

    The role of skin optics in planning proper dosimetry for radiant energy delivered by lasers and conventional light sources is presented. The optical properties of the epidermis, dermis, and cutaneous blood are summarized. The ability of laser pulses at 577-nm wavelength to penetrate into and around a large blood vessel is studied using Monte Carlo simulations. The variation in laser penetration for variable beam diameters and variable vessel depths in presented. The distinction between TOTAL PULSE ENERGY versus PULSE ENERGY DENSITY is illustrated. The topic of this paper is especially pertinent to laser therapy for portwine stain lesions.

  11. 100-kHz-rate gas-phase thermometry using 100-ps pulses from a burst-mode laser.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sukesh; Hsu, Paul S; Jiang, Naibo; Slipchenko, Mikhail N; Gord, James R

    2015-11-01

    Temperature measurements based on gas-phase coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy are demonstrated in reacting flows at a rate of 100 kHz employing a burst-mode laser with a pulse duration of ∼100  ps. The recently developed picosecond-duration, high-energy burst-mode laser is used to pump an optical parametric generator/optical parametric amplifier that produces broadband light centered at ∼680  nm to provide the Stokes beams for excitation of the rovibrational Raman transitions of H(2). The 532-nm output of the picosecond burst-mode laser is then utilized as a pump beam for the CARS process that generates 100 single-shot spectra at a rate of 100 kHz during the 1-ms duration burst. Coherent spectroscopy-based temperature measurements at 100 kHz will significantly aid the understanding of transient and unsteady flow phenomena related to turbulent combustion, transonic and hypersonic flows, high-enthalpy flows, and the dynamics of energetic materials.

  12. Single shot thermometry using laser induced thermal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Pubo; Guan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Guohua; Ye, Jingfeng; Hu, Zhiyun

    2015-05-01

    With the concern of environmental protection and reducing the fossil fuel consumption, combustion processes need to be more efficient and less contaminable. Therefore, the ability to obtain important thermophysical parameters is crucial to combustion research and combustor design. Traditional surveying techniques were difficult to apply in a confined space, especially the physically intrusions of detectors can alter the combustion processes. Laser-based diagnostic techniques, like CARS, SVRS, PLIF and TDLAS, allow the in situ, non-intrusive, spatially and temporally resolved measurements of combustion parameters in hostile environments. We report here a new non-intrusive optical diagnostic technique, based on laser-induced thermal grating. Thermal gratings generated in NO2/N2 binary mixtures, arise from the nonlinear interaction between the medium and the light radiation from the interference of two pulsed, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers (532 nm). This leads to the formation of a dynamic grating through the resonant absorption and the subsequent collisional relaxation. By the temporally resolved detection of a continuous wave, frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 probe laser beam (671 nm) diffracted by LITG. The temporal behavior of the signal is a function of the local temperature and other properties of gas, various parameters of the target gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal. The accurate singleshot temperature measurements were carried out at different test conditions using a stainless steel pressurized cell, data averaged on 100 laser shots were compared with simultaneously recorded thermocouple data, and the results were consistent with each other. The LITG signal is shown to grow with increasing the gas pressure and is spatially coherent, which makes the LITG thermometry technique a promising candidate in high pressure environments.

  13. Toxicity of laser irradiated photoactive fluoride PrF3 nanoparticles toward bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudovkin, M. S.; Korableva, S. L.; Krasheninnicova, A. O.; Nizamutdinov, A. S.; Semashko, V. V.; Zelenihin, P. V.; Alakshin, E. M.; Nevzorova, T. A.

    2014-11-01

    The article is devoted to exploration of biological effects of crystalline PrF3 nanoparticles toward Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 bacteria under the laser irradiation. Obtained results show bactericidal activity of PrF3 nanoparticles and optimal parameters of laser irradiation (power of laser irradiation, wavelength, diameter of the laser spoil, and exposure time) have been found under which the effects of bactericidal activity become the most significant. Survival of bacterial cells under laser irradiation with wavelength 532 nm in colloidal solution of PrF3 nanoparticles was 39%, 34%, 20% for exposure times 5 minutes, 15 minutes and 30 minutes, correspondingly.

  14. [Solid-state multi-wavelength lasers equipment for retina treatment].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenlu; Zhou, Chuanqing; Ren, Qiushi

    2012-09-01

    Solid-state multi-wavelength laser equipment is the treatment device with selected wavelength Nd: YAG laser frequency technology, integrated red (659 nm), yellow (589 nm) and green (532 nm) of three solid-state lasers. The device is designed by the accurate controlled laser output system, precision optical and electronic control through the optical coupler into the optical fiber transmission system. It's combined with an eye slit lamp integration of high precision, good stability stability for all solid-state multi-wavelength lasers equipment.

  15. [Carbonization in endovasal laser obliteration by radial light guide with wavelength of 1470 and 970 nm].

    PubMed

    Shaidakov, E V; Ilyukhin, E A; Grigoryan, A G; Bulatov, V L; Rosukhovsky, D A; Shonov, O A

    2015-01-01

    The authors assessed the effect of carbonization and its influence on the parameters of endovasal laser obliteration (EVLO) depending on wavelength of laser radiation (970 and 1470 nm) using a light guide with radial emission. They also analysed the value of drop of radiation power of the light guide after performing EVLO and visually assessed the degree of damage of the glass tip of the radial fibre by means of ultra-close-up photography. The study comprised a total of 20 patients with varicose disease. A total of ten procedures of EVLO were performed in two modes: mode one - W-laser 1470 nm, mode two - H-laser 970 nm, using fibre with radial emission, an automatic retractor of the light guide. It was determined that the median of power loss after EVLO with W-laser amounted to 0.6 W, and that for H-laser - 3.15 W (p=0.002). Ultra-close-up photography showed pronounced damage of the glass tip of the radial light guide while using H-laser and no damages while using the W-laser. It was proved that using laser radiation with wavelength of 970 nm using the light guide with radial emission leads to pronounced carbonization on the surface of the glass tip of the light guide, its damage, a decrease in radiation power and risk of mechanical destruction of the flask. Using the laser with wavelength of 1470 nm with the use of radial light guide did not result in the development of such negative effects, which increases the service life of laser fibre and makes it possible to use it for obliteration of several segments in one patient.

  16. Secondary laser cooling and capturing of thulium atoms in traps

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Fedorov, S A; Vishnyakova, G A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, N N; Sorokin, V N

    2014-06-30

    Secondary laser cooling has been realised on the weak dipole transition 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sup o})6s{sup 2}, J = 7/2, F=4 → 4f{sup 12}({sup 3}H{sub 6}) 5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2}, J' = 9/2, F' = 5 with the wavelength of 530.7 nm and natural width of 350 kHz. The temperature of the atomic cloud in a magnetooptical trap (MOT) was 30 μK at the lifetime of 2 s and the number of atoms 10{sup 5}. Approximately 1% of atoms from the MOT have been reloaded to an optical dipole trap and to one-dimensional optical lattice at the wavelength of 532 nm. The atom lifetime in the optical lattice was 320 ms. We propose to employ thulium atoms captured in an optical lattice as an optical frequency reference. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  17. Rapid prototyping of reflectors for vehicle lighting using laser activated remote phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmayer, Roland; Kloppenburg, Gerolf; Wolf, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Bright white light sources are of significant importance for automotive front lighting systems. Today's upper class vehicles mainly use HID or LED as light source. As a further step in this development laser diode based systems offer high luminance, efficiency and allow the realization of new styling concepts and new dynamic lighting functions. These white laser diode systems can either be realized by mixing different spectral sources or by combining diodes with specific phosphors. Based on the approach of generating light using a laser and remote phosphor, lighting modules are manufactured. Four blue laser diodes (450 nm) are used to activate a phosphor coating and thus to achieve white light. A segmented paraboloid reflector generates the desired light distribution for an additional car headlamp. We use high speed milling and selective laser melting to build the reflector system for this lighting module. We compare the spectral reflection grade of these materials. Furthermore the generated modules are analyzed regarding their efficiency and light distribution. The use of Rapid Prototyping technologies allows an early validation of the chosen concept and is supposed to reduce cost and time in the product development process significantly. Therefor we discuss costs and times of the applied manufacturing technologies.

  18. Laser annealing of implanted silicon carbide and Raman characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zergioti, I.; Kontos, A. G.; Zekentes, K.; Boutopoulos, C.; Terzis, P.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2006-05-01

    Pulsed-laser-based methods have been applied for post-implant annealing of p-type Al doped 4H-SiC wafers in order to restore the crystal structure and to electrically activate the doping species. The annealing was performed with the second (532nm) and third (355nm) harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 4ns pulse duration. The epilayers were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy under surface and cross sectional backscattering. Changes in the phonon mode-intensity were related to the laser annealing induced recrystallization of the implanted material. The results were compared with changes in the infrared reflectivity across the Restsrahlen band.

  19. Beamed neutron emission driven by laser accelerated light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Green, A.; Ahmed, H.; Alejo, A.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Cerchez, M.; Clarke, R.; Doria, D.; Dorkings, S.; Fernandez, J.; Mirfayzi, S. R.; McKenna, P.; Naughton, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Peth, C.; Powell, H.; Ruiz, J. A.; Swain, J.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    Highly anisotropic, beam-like neutron emission with peak flux of the order of 109 n/sr was obtained from light nuclei reactions in a pitcher-catcher scenario, by employing MeV ions driven by a sub-petawatt laser. The spatial profile of the neutron beam, fully captured for the first time by employing a CR39 nuclear track detector, shows a FWHM divergence angle of ˜ 70^\\circ , with a peak flux nearly an order of magnitude higher than the isotropic component elsewhere. The observed beamed flux of neutrons is highly favourable for a wide range of applications, and indeed for further transport and moderation to thermal energies. A systematic study employing various combinations of pitcher-catcher materials indicates the dominant reactions being d(p, n+p)1H and d(d,n)3He. Albeit insufficient cross-section data are available for modelling, the observed anisotropy in the neutrons’ spatial and spectral profiles is most likely related to the directionality and high energy of the projectile ions.

  20. Comparison between blue lasers and light-emitting diodes for future solid-state lighting: Comparison between blue lasers and light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, Jonathan J.; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.; Sizov, Dmitry S.

    2013-08-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) is now the most efficient source of high color quality white light ever created. Nevertheless, the blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are the light engine of SSL still have significant performance limitations. Foremost among these is the decrease in efficiency at high input current densities widely known as “efficiency droop.” Efficiency droop limits input power densities, contrary to the desire to produce more photons per unit LED chip area and to make SSL more affordable. Pending a solution to efficiency droop, an alternative device could be a blue laser diode (LD). LDs, operated in stimulated emission, can have high efficiencies at much higher input power densities than LEDs can. In this article, LEDs and LDs for future SSL are explored by comparing: their current state-of-the-art input-power-density-dependent power-conversion efficiencies; potential improvements both in their peak power-conversion efficiencies and in the input power densities at which those efficiencies peak; and their economics for practical SSL.

  1. Safe Helium--Neon Lasers Advance Understanding of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, C. Harry

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data, Federal and State regulations, and user data are presented to assess the safety factors of low-power lasers. General safety precautions, basic laser theory, the place of the laser in the classroom, and some introductory exercises are also presented. (Author/TS)

  2. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Short, Robert W.; Craxton, Stephen; Letzring, Samuel A.; Soures, John

    1991-01-01

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

  3. Coherent Light Photo-modification, Mass Transport Effect, and Surface Relief Formation in AsxS100-x Nanolayers: Absorption Edge, XPS, and Raman Spectroscopy Combined with Profilometry Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, O.; Holomb, R.; Csik, A.; Takáts, V.; Veres, M.; Mitsa, V.

    2017-02-01

    As x S100- x ( x = 40, 45, 50) thin films top surface nanolayers affected by green (532 nm) diode laser illumination have been studied by high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, and surface profilometry. It is shown that the composition of obtained films depends not only on the composition of the source material but as well on the composition of the vapor during the evaporation process. Near-bandgap laser light decreases both As-As and S-S homopolar bonds in films, obtained from thermal evaporation of the As40S60 and As50S50 glasses. Although As45S55 composition demonstrates increasing of As-As bonds despite to the partial disappearance of S-S bonds, for explanation of this phenomenon Raman investigations has also been performed. It is shown that As4S3 structural units (s.u.) responsible for the observed effect. Laser light induced surface topology of the As45S55 film has been recorded by 2D profilometer.

  4. Soft x-ray radiation from laser-produced plasmas: characterization of radiation emission and its use in x-ray lithography.

    PubMed

    Kühne, M; Petzold, H C

    1988-09-15

    Laser pulses of 15 ns and 532 nm were focused onto steel targets to produce plasmas emitting intense soft x-ray radiation pulses. The plasma generation is described, and the x-ray emission is spectrally and spatially characterized. Using this plasma as an x-ray source, FBM120 resist was exposed through a gold patterned 2-microm silicon mask. Exposing the same resist to a primary standard source (electron storage ring BESSY) the plasma x-ray emission was evaluated resulting in conversion efficiencies (laser into x-ray radiation) of up to 3.4% for 1064 nm and up to 5.0% for 532-nm laser radiation pulses.

  5. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical visualization of the topography of a crater formed on a solid sample by a laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, Sergei V.; Ivanov, A. Yu; Lyalikov, A. M.

    1993-06-01

    A fringe projection method has been used to determine the shape of a crater formed by applying laser light to a metal plate. The crater topography should be taken into account in thermal, acoustic, and plasma-dynamics calculations.

  6. The potential of ill-nitride laser diodes for solid-state lighting [Advantages of III-Nitride Laser Diodes in Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, Jonathan; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    2014-09-01

    III-nitride laser diodes (LDs) are an interesting light source for solid-state lighting (SSL). Modelling of LDs is performed to reveal the potential advantages over traditionally used light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The first, and most notable, advantage is LDs have higher efficiency at higher currents when compared to LEDs. This is because Auger recombination that causes efficiency droop can no longer grow after laser threshold. Second, the same phosphor-converted methods used with LEDs can also be used with LDs to produce white light with similar color rendering and color temperature. Third, producing white light from direct emitters is equally challenging for both LEDs and LDs, with neither source having a direct advantage. Lastly, the LD emission is directional and can be more readily captured and focused, leading to the possibility of novel and more compact luminaires. These advantages make LDs a compelling source for future SSL.

  7. The potential of ill-nitride laser diodes for solid-state lighting [Advantages of III-Nitride Laser Diodes in Solid-State Lighting

    DOE PAGES

    Wierer, Jonathan; Tsao, Jeffrey Y.

    2014-09-01

    III-nitride laser diodes (LDs) are an interesting light source for solid-state lighting (SSL). Modelling of LDs is performed to reveal the potential advantages over traditionally used light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The first, and most notable, advantage is LDs have higher efficiency at higher currents when compared to LEDs. This is because Auger recombination that causes efficiency droop can no longer grow after laser threshold. Second, the same phosphor-converted methods used with LEDs can also be used with LDs to produce white light with similar color rendering and color temperature. Third, producing white light from direct emitters is equally challenging for bothmore » LEDs and LDs, with neither source having a direct advantage. Lastly, the LD emission is directional and can be more readily captured and focused, leading to the possibility of novel and more compact luminaires. These advantages make LDs a compelling source for future SSL.« less

  8. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Zain; Alster, Tina S

    2016-01-01

    The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. PMID:26893574

  9. Development of an underwater laser imaging system for micro-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunying; Lv, Shuai; Wang, Hailu; Li, Guijuan; Guo, Yuanyuan

    2015-10-01

    Bubbles in the sea are important to the research of geography, chemical engineering, biology etc. This paper presented an underwater laser imaging system for micro-bubbles, including the design, construction and performance. The system using a series 532-nm laser for lighting, and transform a piece-source. The piece-source illumination and image an area of bubbles by a high resolution CCD. It is impossible to achievement imaging the bubbles with diameters from 10µm to 500µm at the same time, we use three different focus apertures to adapt the requirements of resolution and receiver field of view. We can change the adaptive aperture for bubbles with different diameters. The imaging capability of the system is tested in the laboratory. The solid targets of specified size have been imaged in the sink, and obtained the clear images of the target with 500µm and 10µm for three magnifications. In order to verify the reliability of the system, experiments were carried out in the marine to obtain the bubble distribution in the offshore area. The results of bubbles distribution characteristics showed that the distribution is basically according with index law.

  10. Laser dosimetry for disabling anopheles stephensi mosquitoes in-flight (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Matthew D.; Norton, Bryan J.; Rutschman, Phil; Farrar, David J.; Marvit, Maclen; Makagon, Artyom

    2016-03-01

    The Photonic Fence is a system designed to detect mosquitoes and other pestilent flying insects in an active region and to apply lethal doses of laser light to them. Previously, we determined lethal fluence levels for a variety of lasers and pulse conditions on anesthetized Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. In this work, similar studies were performed while the bugs were freely flying within transparent cages. Dose-response curves were created for various beam diameter, pulse width, and power conditions at 455 nm, 532 nm, 1064nm, and 1540 nm wavelengths. Besides mortality outcomes, the flight behavior of the bugs and the performance of the tracking system were monitored for consistency and to ensure that they had no impact on the mortality outcomes. As in anesthetized experiments, the visible wavelengths required significantly less fluence than near infrared wavelengths to reliably disable bugs. For the visible wavelengths, lethal fluence values were generally equivalent to those found in anesthetized dosing, while near infrared wavelengths required approximately twice the fluence compared with anesthetized experiments. The performance of the optical tracking system remained highly stable throughout the experiments, and it was found not to influence mortality results for pulse widths up to 25 ms. In general, keeping energy constant while decreasing power and increasing pulse width reduced mortality levels. The results of this study further affirm the practicality of using optical approaches to protect people and crops from flying insects.

  11. MABEL photon-counting laser altimetry data in Alaska for ICESat-2 simulations and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunt, Kelly M.; Neumann, Thomas A.; Amundson, Jason M.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey L.; Moussavi, Mahsa S.; Walsh, Kaitlin M.; Cook, William B.; Markus, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) is scheduled to launch in late 2017 and will carry the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS), which is a photon-counting laser altimeter and represents a new approach to satellite determination of surface elevation. Given the new technology of ATLAS, an airborne instrument, the Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar (MABEL), was developed to provide data needed for satellite-algorithm development and ICESat-2 error analysis. MABEL was deployed out of Fairbanks, Alaska, in July 2014 to provide a test dataset for algorithm development in summer conditions with water-saturated snow and ice surfaces. Here we compare MABEL lidar data to in situ observations in Southeast Alaska to assess instrument performance in summer conditions and in the presence of glacier surface melt ponds and a wet snowpack. Results indicate the following: (1) based on MABEL and in situ data comparisons, the ATLAS 90 m beam-spacing strategy will provide a valid assessment of across-track slope that is consistent with shallow slopes (< 1°) of an ice-sheet interior over 50 to 150 m length scales; (2) the dense along-track sampling strategy of photon counting systems can provide crevasse detail; and (3) MABEL 532 nm wavelength light may sample both the surface and subsurface of shallow (approximately 2 m deep) supraglacial melt ponds. The data associated with crevasses and melt ponds indicate the potential ICESat-2 will have for the study of mountain and other small glaciers.

  12. How many principles does it take to change a light bulb…into a laser?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Howard M.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum optics did not, and could not, flourish without the laser. The present paper is not about the principles of laser construction, still less a history of how the laser was invented. Rather, it addresses the question: what are the fundamental features that distinguish laser light from thermal light? The obvious answer, ‘laser light is coherent’, is, I argue, so vague that it must be put aside at the start, albeit to revisit later. A more specific, quantum theoretic, version, ‘laser light is in a coherent state’, is simply wrong in this context: both laser light and thermal light can equally well be described by coherent states, with amplitudes that vary stochastically in space. Instead, my answer to the titular question is that four principles are needed: high directionality, monochromaticity, high brightness, and stable intensity. Combining the first three of these principles suffices to show, in a quantitative way—involving, indeed, very large dimensionless quantities (up to ∼ {10}51)—that a laser must be constructed very differently from a light bulb. This quantitative analysis is quite simple, and is easily relatable to ‘coherence’, yet is not to be found in any textbooks on quantum optics to my knowledge. The fourth principle is the most subtle and, perhaps surprisingly, is the only one related to coherent states in the quantum optics sense: it implies that the description in terms of coherent states is the only simple description of a laser beam. Interestingly, this leads to the (not, as it turns out, entirely new) prediction that narrowly filtered laser beams are indistinguishable from similarly filtered thermal beams. I hope that other educators find this material useful; it may contain surprises even for researchers who have been in the field longer than I have.

  13. Light extraction efficiency improvement by multiple laser stealth dicing in InGaN-based blue light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyun; Xie, Haizhong; Zheng, Haiyang; Wei, Tongbo; Yang, Hua; Li, Jing; Yi, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiangyang; Wang, Guohong; Li, Jinmin

    2012-03-12

    We report a multiple laser stealth dicing (multi-LSD) method to improve the light extraction efficiency (LEE) of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using a picosecond (Ps) laser. Compared with conventional LEDs scribed by a nanosecond (Ns) laser and single stealth-diced LEDs, the light output power (LOP) of the LEDs using multi-LSD method can be improved by 26.5% and 11.2%, respectively. The enhanced LOP is due to the increased side emission from the large-area roughened sidewalls of the sapphire substrates fabricated in the multi-LSD process. Numerical simulation results show that the multi-LSD process has little thermal damages to the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) of the LEDs.

  14. Processing of Diamond for Integrated Optic Devices Using Q-Switched Nd:YAG Laser at Different Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, S. K.; Pillai, V. P. Mahadevan; Nayar, V. U.

    In the present investigation, a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser is used to study the various aspects of diamond processing for fabricating integrated optic and UV optoelectronic devices. Diamond is a better choice of substrate compared to silicon and gallium arsenide for the fabrication of waveguides to perform operations such as modulation, switching, multiplexing, and filtering, particularly in the ultraviolet spectrum. The experimental setup of the present investigation consists of two Q-Switched Nd:YAG lasers capable of operating at wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm. The diamond cutting is performed using these two wavelengths by making the "V"-shaped groove with various opening angle. The variation of material loss of diamond during cutting is noted for the two wavelengths. The cut surface morphology and elemental and structural analysis of graphite formed during processing in both cases are compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser Raman spectroscopy. Both the Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser systems (at 1064 nm and 532 nm) show very good performance in terms of peak-to-peak output stability, minimal spot diameter, smaller divergence angle, higher peak power in Q-switched mode, and good fundamental TEM00 mode quality for processing natural diamond stones. Less material loss and minimal micro cracks are achieved with wavelength 532 nm whereas a better diamond cut surface is achieved with processing at 1064 nm with minimum roughness.

  15. Laser-induced periodic structures for light extraction efficiency enhancement of GaN-based light emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiun-Ting; Lai, Wei-Chih; Kao, Yu-Jui; Yang, Ya-Yu; Sheu, Jinn-Kong

    2012-02-27

    The laser-induced periodic surface structure technique was used to form simultaneously dual-scale rough structures (DSRS) with spiral-shaped nanoscale structure inside semi-spherical microscale holes on p-GaN surface to improve the light-extraction efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The light output power of DSRS-LEDs was 30% higher than that of conventional LEDs at an injection current of 20 mA. The enhancement in the light output power could be attributed to the increase in the probability of photons to escape from the increased surface area of textured p-GaN surface.

  16. Measurement of the group velocity of light in sea water at the ANTARES site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigi, A.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; McMillan, J. E.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-04-01

    The group velocity of light has been measured at eight different wavelengths between 385 nm and 532 nm in the Mediterranean Sea at a depth of about 2.2 km with the ANTARES optical beacon systems. A parametrisation of the dependence of the refractive index on wavelength based on the salinity, pressure and temperature of the sea water at the ANTARES site is in good agreement with these measurements.

  17. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, WB

    2012-01-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460–700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser. PMID:22432542

  18. Containing intense laser light in circular cavity with magnetic trap door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. H.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Xu, H.; Ma, Y. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ge, Z. Y.; Shao, F. Q.

    2017-03-01

    It is shown by particle-in-cell simulation that intense circularly polarized (CP) laser light can be contained in the cavity of a solid-density circular Al-plasma shell for hundreds of light-wave periods before it is dissipated by laser-plasma interaction. A right-hand CP laser pulse can propagate with almost no reflection and attenuation into the cavity through a highly magnetized overdense H-plasma slab filling the entrance hole. The entrapped laser light is then multiply reflected at the inner surfaces of the slab and shell plasmas, slowly losing energy to the latter. Compared to that of the incident laser, the frequency is only slightly broadened and the wave vector slightly modified by the appearance of weak nearly isotropic and homogeneous fluctuations.

  19. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, W B

    2012-05-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460-700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser.

  20. A review of melasma treatment focusing on laser and light devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Janet Y; Geddes, Elizabeth Rc; Robinson, Deanne M; Friedman, Paul M

    2016-12-01

    Melasma is a pigmentary disorder of unclear etiology with numerous treatment options and high recurrence rates. Laser and light therapies may be utilized cautiously as second- or third-line options for recalcitrant melasma, but low-energy settings are preferred due to the risk of postinflammatory hyperpigmentation and melasma stimulation. Commonly used lasers include the low-fluence 1064-nm Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser, nonablative fractionated lasers, and intense pulsed light. Strict sun protection, concomitant use of bleaching agents, and maintenance treatments are necessary. A variety of other treatments that may also help to improve results are now being more widely adopted, including oral tranexamic acid, pulsed dye laser, antioxidants, and laser-assisted drug delivery.

  1. Utilization of light scattering in transmission laser welding of medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bülow, Jon Fold; Bager, Kim; Thirstrup, Carsten

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports on optimization of material parameters in transmission laser welding of polymers including light absorption, light scattering and the thermal properties of the polymers. A criterion for making an optimized transmission laser weld between a transparent polymer part and an absorbing and scattering polymer part is formulated as a required thickness of the melt-zone in the transparent part with a corresponding minimum-line-energy-for-welding ( MLEW). Experimental data of MLEW are presented for a medical device application involving joining polyethylene-octene parts for various concentrations of near-infrared absorber and titanium dioxide light scattering particles. Numerical and analytical models yield good agreement to the experimental data and enable optimization of the transmission laser welding process. By utilization of light scattering, the laser line-energy required for joining two polymer parts can be reduced by a factor up to three, enabling a corresponding reduction of the cycle time in the manufacturing process.

  2. Interaction of a He-Ne laser light with the moist surface zone of porous material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozniakowski, Kazimierz; Wojtatowicz, Tomasz W.; Drobnik, Antoni; Jeske, I.

    1995-03-01

    The light scattered from the `rough' surface of a porous body illuminated by a narrow laser beam is carrying the information on geometrical micro structure of this surface. It is possible that the water vapor and water droplets in pores will cause changes in scattered light too. The aim of this paper is to present the results of the experimental investigations of the intensity of a helium-neon laser light reflected by a porous and moist gypsum slurry surface. Experiments show that the scattered light intensity increases with the decrease of the moisture content in porous material.

  3. Blue or red: which intravascular laser light has more effects in diabetic patients?

    PubMed

    KazemiKhoo, N; Ansari, F

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB), with 405 and 632.8 nm on serum blood sugar (BS) level, were comparatively studied. Twenty-four diabetic type 2 patients received 14 sessions of ILIB with blue and red lights. BS was measured before and after therapy. Serum BS decreased highly significant after ILIB with both red and blue lights (p < 0.0001), but we did not find significant difference between red and blue lights. The ILIB effect would be of benefit in the clinical treatment of diabetic type 2 patients, irrespective of lasers (blue or red lights) that are used.

  4. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture. PMID:27659906

  5. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  6. Over 0.5 MW green laser from sub-nanosecond giant pulsed microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihe; Taira, Takunori

    2016-03-01

    A sub-nanosecond green laser with laser head sized 35 × 35 × 35 mm3 was developed from a giant pulsed microchip laser for laser processing on organic superconducting transistor with a flexible substrate. A composite monolithic Y3Al5O12 (YAG) /Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG crystal was designed for generating giant pulsed 1064 nm laser. A fibercoupled 30 W laser diode centered at 808 nm was used with pump pulse duration of 245 μs. The 532 nm green laser was obtained from a LiB3O5 (LBO) crystal with output energy of 150 μJ and pulse duration of 268 ps. The sub-nanosecond green laser is interesting for 2-D ablation patterns.

  7. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  8. Numerical Optimization of Sequential Cryogen Spray Cooling and Laser Irradiation for Improved Therapy of Port Wine Stain

    PubMed Central

    Milanič, Matija; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J Stuart; Majaron, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective Despite application of cryogen spray (CS) precooling, customary treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks with a single laser pulse does not result in complete lesion blanching for a majority of patients. One obvious reason is nonselective absorption by epidermal melanin, which limits the maximal safe radiant exposure. Another possible reason for treatment failure is screening of laser light within large PWS vessels, which prevents uniform heating of the entire vessel lumen. Our aim is to identify the parameters of sequential CS cooling and laser irradiation that will allow optimal photocoagulation of various PWS blood vessels with minimal risk of epidermal thermal damage. Study Design and Methods Light and heat transport in laser treatment of PWS are simulated using a custom 3D Monte Carlo model and 2D finite element method, respectively. Protein denaturation in blood and skin are calculated using the Arrhenius kinetic model with tissue-specific coefficients. Simulated PWS vessels with diameters of 30–150 μm are located at depths of 200–600 μm, and shading by nearby vessels is accounted for according to PWS histology data from the literature. For moderately pigmented and dark skin phototypes, PWS blood vessel coagulation and epidermal thermal damage are assessed for various parameters of sequential CS cooling and 532-nm laser irradiation, i.e. the number of pulses in a sequence (1–5), repetition rate (7–30 Hz), and radiant exposure. Results Simulations of PWS treatment in darker skin phototypes indicate specific cooling/irradiation sequences that provide significantly higher efficacy and safety as compared to the customary single-pulse approach across a wide range of PWS blood vessel diameters and depths. The optimal sequences involve three to five laser pulses at repetition rates of 10–15 Hz. Conclusions Application of the identified cooling/irradiation sequences may offer improved therapeutic outcome for patients with

  9. Laser Light Scattering with Multiple Scattering Suppression Used to Measure Particle Sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Tin, Padetha; Lock, James A.; Cannell, David S.; Smart, Anthony E.; Taylor, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light scattering is the technique of choice for noninvasively sizing particles in a fluid. The members of the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) project in laser light scattering at the NASA Lewis Research Center have invented, tested, and recently enhanced a simple and elegant way to extend the concentration range of this standard laboratory particle-sizing technique by several orders of magnitude. With this technique, particles from 3 nm to 3 mm can be measured in a solution. Recently, laser light scattering evolved to successfully size particles in both clear solutions and concentrated milky-white solutions. The enhanced technique uses the property of light that causes it to form tall interference patterns at right angles to the scattering plane (perpendicular to the laser beam) when it is scattered from a narrow laser beam. Such multiple-scattered light forms a broad fuzzy halo around the focused beam, which, in turn, forms short interference patterns. By placing two fiber optics on top of each other and perpendicular to the laser beam (see the drawing), and then cross-correlating the signals they produce, only the tall interference patterns formed by singly scattered light are detected. To restate this, unless the two fiber optics see the same interference pattern, the scattered light is not incorporated into the signal. With this technique, only singly scattered light is seen (multiple-scattered light is rejected) because only singly scattered light has an interference pattern tall enough to span both of the fiber-optic pickups. This technique is simple to use, easy to align, and works at any angle. Placing a vertical slit in front of the signal collection fibers enhanced this approach. The slit serves as an optical mask, and it significantly shortens the time needed to collect good data by selectively masking out much of the unwanted light before cross-correlation is applied.

  10. Dependence of multiply charged ions on the polarization state in nanosecond laser-benzene cluster interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiguo; Zhao, Wuduo; Hua, Lei; Hou, Keyong; Li, Haiyang

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigated the dependence of multiply charged ions on the laser polarization state when benzene cluster was irradiated with 532 and 1064 nm nanosecond laser. A circle, square and flower distribution for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed with 532 nm laser respectively, while flower petals for C2+, C3+ and C4+ were observed at 1064 nm as the laser polarization varied. A theoretical calculation was performed to interpret the polarization state and wavelength dependence of the multiply charged ions. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental observation with considering the contribution from the cluster disintegration.

  11. Tooth bleaching using three laser systems, halogen-light unit, and chemical action agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinkova, Helena; Housova, Devana; Sulc, Jan; Nemec, Michal; Koranda, Petr; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-09-01

    μThe study describes the preclinical experience with laser-activated bleaching agent for discolored teeth. Extracted human upper central incisors were selected, and in the bleaching experiment 35% hydrogen peroxide was used. Three various laser systems and halogen-light unit for activation of the bleaching agent were applied. They were Alexandrite laser (wavelength 750 nm and 375 nm - SHG), Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1.064 m), and Er:YAG laser (wavelength 2.94 μm). The halogen-light unit was used in a standard regime. The enamel surface was analyzed in the scanning electron microscope. The method of chemical oxidation results in a 2-3 shade change in one treatment. The halogen-light units produced the same effect with shorter time of bleaching process (from 630 s to 300 s). The Alexandrite laser (750 nm) and bleaching agent helped to reach the desired color shade after a shorter time (400 s). Alexandrite laser (375 nm) and Nd:YAG laser had no effect on the longevity of the process of bleaching. Overheating of the chemical bleaching agent was visible after Er:YAG laser activation (195 s). Slight surface modification after bleaching process was detected in SEM.

  12. Fractional CO2 Laser Versus Intense Pulsed Light in Treating Striae Distensae

    PubMed Central

    El Taieb, Moustafa Adam; Ibrahim, Ahmed Khair

    2016-01-01

    Context: Striae distensae are linear atrophic dermal scars covered with flat atrophic epidermis. They may cause disfigurement, especially in females. Many factors may cause striae distensae such as steroids, obesity, and pregnancy. Although there is no standard treatment for striae; many topical applications, peeling, and light and laser systems have been tried. Aims: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of fractional CO2 laser with intense pulse light in treating striae distensae. Subjects and Methods: Forty patients with striae distensae were recruited. Twenty of them were treated by fractional CO2 laser and 20 were treated with intense pulse light. Length and width of the largest striae were measured pre- and post-treatment. Patient satisfaction was also evaluated and graded. Patients were photographed after each treatment session and photos were examined by a blinded physician who had no knowledge about the cases. Results: Both groups showed significant improvement after treatments (P < 0.05). Patients treated with fractional CO2 laser showed significant improvement after the fifth session compared with those treated with ten sessions of intense pulsed light (P < 0.05) in all parameters except in the length of striae (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The current study has provided supportive evidence to the effectiveness of both fractional CO2 laser and intense pulse light as treatments for striae distensae. Fractional CO2 laser was found to be more effective in the treatment of striae distensae compared with intense pulse light. PMID:27057017

  13. Resonance Absorption of Laser Light by Warm and Cold Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    34 Ponderomotive Force................38 Hot Electron Energy ................40 Validity bf Assumptions..............41 V. Conclusions...Indicated by Arrows) for the Warm and Cold Plasma Models ..... ................ 31 7 Cold Plasma: Fraction of Laser Energy Resonantly Absorbed as a...Function of Incident Angle .. ............ 35 8 Warm Plasma: Fraction of Laser Energy Resonantly Absorbed as a Function of Incident Angle (T = 637 ev and

  14. Surface and pulpal temperature comparison of tooth whitening using lasers and curing lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel M.; Pelino, Jose; Rodrigues, Rively; Zwhalen, Brian J.; Nguyen, Max H.; Wu, Emily

    2000-03-01

    Chemical action of bleaching agents applied to tooth surface is accelerated by increase in temperature. This in vitro study measured the temperature rises on the surface and in the pulp of teeth during whitening using a diode laser, a plasma arc curing (PAC) light and conventional curing lights. Extracted, non-carious single-rooted teeth were exposed to PAC light and laser at times ranging from 10 to 60 seconds and energy ranges of 2 W, 4 W, and 6 W, and to low-intensity curing lights from 1 to 4 minutes. Maximum temperature rises were analyzed for both pulpal and surface temperature. Diode laser exposures at 2 W for all times and at 4 watts for 10 seconds and PAC light exposures at 10 seconds all produced acceptably safe pulpal rises equivalent to conventional light-curing exposures. Exposures at these settings also attained surface temperature rises that were significantly higher than those using conventional light-curing. The diode laser demonstrated bleaching results equivalent to the PAC light, and both were achieved in significantly less times than conventional light- curing.

  15. Effects of Laser Energy and Wavelength on the Analysis of LiFePO4 Using Laser Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Rich; Janssen, Yuri; Kalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying S.

    2015-01-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative accuracy of atom probe tomography (APT) examinations of LiFePO4 (LFP) are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted APT of LFP has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of UV laser the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at. %) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ increased the observed oxygen concentration to near its correct stoichiometry and was well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of 16O2+ ions. This observation supports the premise that lower laser energies lead to a higher probability of oxygen molecule ionization. Conversely, at higher laser energies the resultant lower effective electric field reduces the probability of oxygen molecule ionization. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (~50% deficiency) and correct ratios of the remaining elements, including the oxygen concentration. The loss of Li is explained by selective dc evaporation of lithium between laser pulses and relatively negligible oxygen loss as neutrals during green-laser pulsing. Lastly, plotting of multihit events on a Saxey plot for the straight-flight path data (green laser only) revealed a surprising dynamic recombination process for some molecular ions mid-flight.

  16. Fluence rate variability among light delivery devices for esophageal photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, Jarod C.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2007-02-01

    Esophageal photodynamic therapy (PDT) is performed using a photosensitizing agent activated by light delivered via a cylindrically symmetric delivery device containing a diffusing optical fiber. In PDT treatment of dysplastic Barrett's esophagus, considerable variability in results is observed due to the non-uniform delivery of treatment light caused by source geometry and by luminal collapse. We compare the fluence rate at the tissue surface resulting from illumination with bare fiber, a centering balloon catheter (X-Cell, Cooke, Inc), and a fixed diameter transparent dilating catheter (Optical Dilator, Inscope, Ethicon ES). Measurements were made in a solid esophagus-simulating phantom illuminated by 2.5 and 5 cm diffusing fibers with and without each delivery device. The diffuser was coupled to a 630 nm dye laser pumped by a 532 nm KTP laser (LaserScope, Inc.) The total power emitted by the diffuser was 1W. The fluence rate as a function of position along the cavity was measured by a calibrated photodiode connected to an optical fiber with a 0.5 mm isotropic scattering tip, which was moved by a computer-controlled positioner. The mean fluence rate measured when the phantom was illuminated using either the centering balloon or the rigid dilator was approximately 50% less than that measured with a bare fiber. The decrease in fluence rate is due to attenuation of the primary light beam and to reduction in scattering from laterally adjacent points in the phantom. The importance of each of these effects as a function of tissue optical properties was confirmed using Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    SciTech Connect

    Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2007-02-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and

  18. Nano-Ablation of Inorganic Materials Using Laser Plasma Soft X-rays at around 10 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Miyamoto, Hisao; Uchida, Satoshi; Fujimori, Takashige; Niino, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Kouichi

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated the direct nanomachining of inorganic materials using laser plasma soft X-rays (LPSXs). LPSXs were generated by the irradiation of Ta targets with Q-switched 532 nm Nd:YAG laser light at an energy density of ˜104 J/cm2. Under this condition, Ta plasma emits soft X-rays at around 10 nm. The LPSXs were focused on the surfaces of inorganic materials, using an ellipsoidal mirror that we desined so as to focus LPSXs at around 10 nm efficiently. We found that synthetic quartz glass, fused silica, Pyrex, LiF, CaF2, Al2O3, and LiNbO3 can be machined. Typically, silica glass is ablated at 47 nm/shot, and it has a surface roughness less than 10 nm after 10 shots. To demonstrate lateral resolution, we fabricated a WSi contact mask with 200-nm-pitch line-and-space patterns on quartz glass. After soft X-ray irradiation, trench structures with a width of 70 nm were clearly observed.

  19. Growth of GaAs “nano ice cream cones” by dual wavelength pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamp, C. T.; Jesser, W. A.; Shivaram, B. S.

    2007-05-01

    Harmonic generation crystals inherently offer the possibility of using multiple wavelengths of light in a single laser pulse. In the present experiment, the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) wavelengths from an Nd:YAG laser are focused together on GaAs and GaSb targets for ablation. Incident energy densities up to about 45 J/cm 2 at 10 Hz with substrate temperatures between 25 and 600 °C for durations of about 60 s have been used in an ambient gas pressure of about 10 -6 Torr. The ablated material was collected on electron-transparent amorphous carbon films for TEM analysis. Apart from a high density of isolated nanocrystals, the most common morphology observed consists of a crystalline GaAs cone-like structure in contact with a sphere of liquid Ga, resembling an "ice cream cone", typically 50-100 nm in length. For all of the heterostuctures of this type, the liquid/solid/vacuum triple junction is found to correspond to the widest point on the cone. These heterostructures likely form by preferential evaporation of As from molten GaAs drops ablated from the target. The resulting morphology minimizes the interfacial and surface energies of the liquid Ga and solid GaAs.

  20. Pre-Conditioning with Low-Level Laser (Light) Therapy: Light Before the Storm

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Tanupriya; Gupta, Gaurav K.; Rai, Vikrant; Carroll, James D.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-conditioning by ischemia, hyperthermia, hypothermia, hyperbaric oxygen (and numerous other modalities) is a rapidly growing area of investigation that is used in pathological conditions where tissue damage may be expected. The damage caused by surgery, heart attack, or stroke can be mitigated by pre-treating the local or distant tissue with low levels of a stress-inducing stimulus, that can induce a protective response against subsequent major damage. Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been used for nearly 50 years to enhance tissue healing and to relieve pain, inflammation and swelling. The photons are absorbed in cytochrome(c) oxidase (unit four in the mitochondrial respiratory chain), and this enzyme activation increases electron transport, respiration, oxygen consumption and ATP production. A complex signaling cascade is initiated leading to activation of transcription factors and up- and down-regulation of numerous genes. Recently it has become apparent that LLLT can also be effective if delivered to normal cells or tissue before the actual insult or trauma, in a pre-conditioning mode. Muscles are protected, nerves feel less pain, and LLLT can protect against a subsequent heart attack. These examples point the way to wider use of LLLT as a pre-conditioning modality to prevent pain and increase healing after surgical/medical procedures and possibly to increase athletic performance. PMID:25552961

  1. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    SciTech Connect

    Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2004-09-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a recently acquired 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). The HPFL represents a potentially disruptive technology that, when compared to its competitors, is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. To determine how this promising laser compares with other lasers used in past experimental work, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on completion and perforation applications, although the results and techniques apply to well construction and other rock cutting applications. Variables investigated include laser power, beam intensity, external purging of cut materials, sample orientation, beam duration, beam shape, and beam frequency. The investigation also studied the thermal effects on the two sample rock types and their methods of destruction: spallation for sandstone, and thermal dissociation for limestone. Optimal operating conditions were identified for each rock type and condition. As a result of this experimental work, the HPFL has demonstrated a better capability of cutting and drilling limestone and sandstone when compared with other military and industrial lasers previously tested. Consideration should be given to the HPFL as the leading candidate for near term remote high power laser applications for well construction and completion.

  2. Research on range-gated laser active imaging seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Mu; Wang, PengHui; Tan, DongJie

    2013-09-01

    Compared with other imaging methods such as millimeter wave imaging, infrared imaging and visible light imaging, laser imaging provides both a 2-D array of reflected intensity data as well as 2-D array of range data, which is the most important data for use in autonomous target acquisition .In terms of application, it can be widely used in military fields such as radar, guidance and fuse. In this paper, we present a laser active imaging seeker system based on range-gated laser transmitter and sensor technology .The seeker system presented here consist of two important part, one is laser image system, which uses a negative lens to diverge the light from a pulse laser to flood illuminate a target, return light is collected by a camera lens, each laser pulse triggers the camera delay and shutter. The other is stabilization gimbals, which is designed to be a rotatable structure both in azimuth and elevation angles. The laser image system consists of transmitter and receiver. The transmitter is based on diode pumped solid-state lasers that are passively Q-switched at 532nm wavelength. A visible wavelength was chosen because the receiver uses a Gen III image intensifier tube with a spectral sensitivity limited to wavelengths less than 900nm.The receiver is image intensifier tube's micro channel plate coupled into high sensitivity charge coupled device camera. The image has been taken at range over one kilometer and can be taken at much longer range in better weather. Image frame frequency can be changed according to requirement of guidance with modifiable range gate, The instantaneous field of views of the system was found to be 2×2 deg. Since completion of system integration, the seeker system has gone through a series of tests both in the lab and in the outdoor field. Two different kinds of buildings have been chosen as target, which is located at range from 200m up to 1000m.To simulate dynamic process of range change between missile and target, the seeker system has

  3. Suppressed speckle contrast of blue light emission out of white lamp with phosphors excited by blue laser diodes for high-brightness lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Junichi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Takeda, Yuji; Ueno, Misaki; Kawasaki, Yoji; Matsuba, Yoshiaki; Heike, Atsushi

    2012-11-01

    The speckle contrast of blue light emission out of high-brightness white lamps using phosphors excited by InGaN/GaN blue laser diodes is evaluated as a measure of coherence. As a result, speckle contrast of as low as 1.7%, the same level as a blue light emitting diode, is obtained. This implies that the original blue laser light can be converted into incoherent light through lamp structures without any dynamic mechanisms. This unique speckle-free performance is considered to be realized by multiple scattering inside the lamp structure, the multi-longitudinal mode operation of the blue laser diodes, and the use of multiple laser diodes. Such almost-incoherent white lamps can be applied for general lighting without any nuisance of speckle noise and should be categorized as lamps rather than lasers in terms of laser safety regulation.

  4. Generation of high-power laser light with Gigahertz splitting.

    PubMed

    Unks, B E; Proite, N A; Yavuz, D D

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate the generation of two high-power laser beams whose frequencies are separated by the ground state hyperfine transition frequency in (87)Rb. The system uses a single master diode laser appropriately shifted by high frequency acousto-optic modulators and amplified by semiconductor tapered amplifiers. This produces two 1 W laser beams with a frequency spacing of 6.834 GHz and a relative frequency stability of 1 Hz. We discuss possible applications of this apparatus, including electromagnetically induced transparency-like effects and ultrafast qubit rotations.

  5. Design and implementation of omni-directional light source and receiving system used in underwater wireless optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Jionghui; Yao, Wenming; Chen, Nannan

    2013-08-01

    Underwater wireless optical communication is a communication mode which uses light as an information carrier and water as transmission medium. As a result of the inherent characteristics of the light waves, underwater wireless optical communication has the advantages of high transmission rate, good security, and strong anti-interference ability. It is suitable for high-speed, short-range communication between underwater mobile vehicles. Underwater optical wireless communication system designed in this paper is composed of the omni-directional communication light source and the receiving system. In the omni-directional communication light source, the laser beams with small divergence angle of 532nm wavelength produced by modulated laser are expanded through a combination refraction-reflection solid and then obtain more than 2π space divergence angle. The paper use TRACEPRO simulation tool to help design a combination solid composed of the lens, conical reflector and parabolic reflector, and test in the air and underwater, the result shows that the effect is fine. Unlike in the air, light attenuation is heavy in the water and a large range of variations in light intensity at different distances appear during underwater optical communication. In order to overcome this problem, the paper use a small photomultiplier as the detection device, design the receiving system using the automatic gain control technique. Underwater wireless optical communication system designed in this paper has the characteristics of small size, low power dissipation and the omni-directional communication function, it is suitable for application in the UUV, AUV, Swimmer Delivery Vehicle (SDV) and other underwater mobile platform, it realizes point-to-point communications and point-to-multipoint communications.

  6. Fundamentals of laser light interaction with human tissue, especially in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Haina, D; Landthaler, M

    1988-06-01

    The absorption of single photons in the molecules of biological tissue can induce various reactions. For the most medical laser applications the transformation from radiation energy into heat is relevant. The laser beam is used for coagulation or vaporization of tissue. The changes in tissue, which are created by light of different wavelengths depends on the thermal and optical properties (absorption and scatting) of tissue but also on the parameters of irradiation. As an example measurements from human skin are discussed. In the cardiovascular system laser light must have a clearly defined effect. Atherosclerotic plaques of different consistence have to be vaporized without damage of the vessel walls. From different reasons the usual medical CW-lasers, Argon-laser, CO2-laser and Nd:YAG-laser, are not optimal for direct ablation of arterial occlusions. In order to mimize reocclusion the walls of the channels have to be completely smooth and free of coagulation necrosis. This can be obtained by short laser pulses. Selection of a light wavelength, which is stronger absorbed in atherosclerotic plaques than in vessel walls and additional selective staining are two ways to reduce the risk of damaging the vessel walls.

  7. Thermally induced light-scattering effects as responsible for the degradation of cholesteric liquid crystal lasers.

    PubMed

    Etxebarria, J; Ortega, J; Folcia, C L; Sanz-Enguita, G; Aramburu, I

    2015-04-01

    We have studied the degradation process of the laser emission in a cholesteric liquid crystal laser. We have found that there exists a negative correlation between the laser efficiency and the amount of light scattered by the liquid-crystal sample in the illuminated area. The growth of scattering is attributed to the appearance of small imperfections generated in the sample as a result of certain thermal processes that involve the dye molecules. The scattering implies an increase of the coefficient of distributed losses, which is the main response of the rise of the laser threshold.

  8. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    DOEpatents

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  9. Analysis of lasers as a solution to efficiency droop in solid-state lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, W. W.; Crawford, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    This letter analyzes the proposal to mitigate the efficiency droop in solid-state light emitters by replacing InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with lasers. The argument in favor of this approach is that carrier-population clamping after the onset of lasing limits carrier loss to that at threshold, while stimulated emission continues to grow with injection current. A fully quantized (carriers and light) theory that is applicable to LEDs and lasers (above and below threshold) is used to obtain a quantitative evaluation. The results confirm the potential advantage of higher laser output power and efficiency above lasing threshold, while also indicating disadvantages including low efficiency prior to lasing onset, sensitivity of lasing threshold to temperature, and the effects of catastrophic laser failure. A solution to some of these concerns is suggested that takes advantage of recent developments in nanolasers.

  10. Analysis of lasers as a solution to efficiency droop in solid-state lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.

    2015-10-06

    This letter analyzes the proposal to mitigate the efficiency droop in solid-state light emitters by replacing InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with lasers. The argument in favor of this approach is that carrier-population clamping after the onset of lasing limits carrier loss to that at threshold, while stimulated emission continues to grow with injection current. A fully quantized (carriers and light) theory that is applicable to LEDs and lasers (above and below threshold) is used to obtain a quantitative evaluation. The results confirm the potential advantage of higher laser output power and efficiency above lasing threshold, while also indicating disadvantages including low efficiency prior to lasing onset, sensitivity of lasing threshold to temperature, and the effects of catastrophic laser failure. As a result, a solution to some of these concerns is suggested that takes advantage of recent developments in nanolasers.

  11. Analysis of lasers as a solution to efficiency droop in solid-state lighting

    DOE PAGES

    Chow, Weng W.; Crawford, Mary H.

    2015-10-06

    This letter analyzes the proposal to mitigate the efficiency droop in solid-state light emitters by replacing InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with lasers. The argument in favor of this approach is that carrier-population clamping after the onset of lasing limits carrier loss to that at threshold, while stimulated emission continues to grow with injection current. A fully quantized (carriers and light) theory that is applicable to LEDs and lasers (above and below threshold) is used to obtain a quantitative evaluation. The results confirm the potential advantage of higher laser output power and efficiency above lasing threshold, while also indicating disadvantages includingmore » low efficiency prior to lasing onset, sensitivity of lasing threshold to temperature, and the effects of catastrophic laser failure. As a result, a solution to some of these concerns is suggested that takes advantage of recent developments in nanolasers.« less

  12. Electrically switchable organo–inorganic hybrid for a white-light laser source

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jui-Chieh; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chia-Rong; Lee, Wei

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a spectrally discrete white-light laser device based on a photonic bandgap hybrid, which is composed of a soft photonic crystal; i.e., a layer of dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC), sandwiched between two imperfect but identical, inorganic multilayer photonic crystals. With a sole optical pump, a mono-, bi-, or tri-chromatic laser can be obtained and, through the soft photonic crystal regulated by an applied voltage, the hybrid possesses electrical tunability in laser wavelength. The three emitted spectral peaks originate from two bandedges of the CLC reflection band as well as one of the photonic defect modes in dual-mode lasing. Thanks to the optically bistable nature of CLC, such a white-light laser device can operate in quite an energy-saving fashion. This technique has potential to fulfill the present mainstream in the coherent white-light source. PMID:27324219

  13. Electrically switchable organo–inorganic hybrid for a white-light laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jui-Chieh; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chia-Rong; Lee, Wei

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a spectrally discrete white-light laser device based on a photonic bandgap hybrid, which is composed of a soft photonic crystal; i.e., a layer of dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC), sandwiched between two imperfect but identical, inorganic multilayer photonic crystals. With a sole optical pump, a mono-, bi-, or tri-chromatic laser can be obtained and, through the soft photonic crystal regulated by an applied voltage, the hybrid possesses electrical tunability in laser wavelength. The three emitted spectral peaks originate from two bandedges of the CLC reflection band as well as one of the photonic defect modes in dual-mode lasing. Thanks to the optically bistable nature of CLC, such a white-light laser device can operate in quite an energy-saving fashion. This technique has potential to fulfill the present mainstream in the coherent white-light source.

  14. Laser driven light sails: An examination of the possibilities for interstellar probes and other missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rather, J. D. G.; Zeiders, G. W.; Vogelsang, K. R.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical discussion of high energy laser propelled light sails is presented. Selection of sail materials, interstellar drag forces, beam pointing, flight velocity, probe mass, and radiation shielding are among the factors discussed. Interstellar probe missions and colonization of the solar system via the light sail are considered.

  15. Polymer laser fabricated by a simple micromolding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Justin R.; Turnbull, Graham A.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.

    2003-06-01

    We report polymer distributed feedback lasers fabricated using solvent-assisted microcontact molding. The poly[2-methoxy-5-(3,7-dimethyloctyloxy) paraphenylenevinylene] film is patterned by placing it in conformal contact with an elastomeric mould inked with a suitable solvent. When the resulting microstructured film is pumped with the 532 nm pulsed output of a microchip laser, we observe lasing above a threshold pump energy of 225 nJ. Above threshold the emission narrows to a linewidth of less than 0.6 nm at a wavelength of 638 nm. This micromolding technique may find application to a wide range of wavelength-scale microstructured organic photonic devices.

  16. Laser cooling of CdS nanobelts: thickness matters.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-08-12

    We report on the thickness dependent laser cooling in CdS nanobelts pumped by a 532 nm green laser. The lowest achievable cooling temperature is found to strongly depend on thickness. No net cooling can be achieved in nanobelts with a thickness below 65 nm due to nearly zero absorption and larger surface nonradiative recombination. While for nanobelts thicker than ~120 nm, the reabsorption effect leads to the reduction of the cooling temperature. Based on the thickness dependent photoconductivity gain, mean emission energy and external quantum efficiency, the modeling of the normalized temperature change suggests a good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  18. Colloid formation and laser-induced bleaching in fluorite

    SciTech Connect

    LeBret, Joel B.; Cramer, Loren P.; Norton, M. Grant; Dickinson, J. T.

    2004-11-08

    Colloid formation and subsequent laser-induced bleaching in fluorite has been studied by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. At high incident electron-beam (e-beam) energies, Ca colloids with diameter {approx}10 nm form a simple cubic superlattice with lattice parameter a{approx}18 nm. The colloids themselves are topotactic with the fluorite matrix forming low-energy interfaces close to a {sigma}=21 special grain boundary in cubic materials. Laser irradiation using {lambda}=532 nm has been shown to effectively bleach the e-beam-irradiated samples returning the fluorite to its monocrystalline state. The bleached samples appear more resistant to further colloid formation.

  19. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the ICESat Mission: Initial Science Measurement Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Sirota, M.; McGarry, J.; Palm, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System is the space lidar on the NASA ICESat mision. Its design combines an altimeter with 5 cm precision with a laser pointing angle determination system and a dual wavelength cloud and aerosol lidar. GLAS measures the range to the Earth's surface with 1064 nm laser pulses. Each laser pulse produces a precision pointing measurement from the stellar reference system (SRS) and an echo pulse waveform, which permits range determination and waveform spreading analysis. The single shot ranging accuracy is < 10 cm for ice surfaces with slopes < 2 degrees. GLAS also measures atmospheric backscatter profiles at both 1064 and 532 nm. The 1064 nm measurements use an analog Si APD detector and measure the height and profile the backscatter signal from thicker clouds. The measurements at 532 nm use photon counting detectors, and will measure the vertical height distributions of optically thin clouds and aerosol layers Before launch, the measurement performance of GLAS was evaluated using a lidar test instrument called the Bench Check Equipment (BCE). The BCE was developed in parallel with GLAS and served as an inverse altimeter, inverse lidar and a stellar source simulator. It was used to simulate the range of expected optical inputs to the GLAS receiver by illuminating its telescope with simulated background light as well as laser echoes with known powers, energy levels, widths and delay times. The BCE also allowed monitoring of the transmitted laser energy, the angle measurements of the SRS, the co-alignment of the transmitted laser beam to the receiver line of sight, and performance of the flight science algorithms. Performance was evaluated during the GLAS development, before and after environmental tests, and after delivery to the spacecraft. The ICESat observatory was launched into a 94 degree inclination, 590 km altitude circular polar orbit on January 12, 2003. Beginning in early February, GLAS was powered on tested in stages. Its 1064 nm

  20. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the ICESat Mission: Initial Science Measurement Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Sun, Xiaoli; Riris, Haris; Sirota, Marcos; McGarry, J.; Palm, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System is the space lidar on the NASA ICESat mission. Its design combines an altimeter with 5 cm precision with a laser pointing angle determination system and a dual wavelength cloud and aerosol lidar. GLAS measures the range to the Earth s surface with 1064 nm laser pulses. Each laser pulse produces a precision pointing measurement from the stellar reference system (SRS) and an echo pulse waveform, which permits range determination and waveform spreading analysis. The single shot ranging accuracy is < 10 cm for ice surfaces with slopes < 2 degrees. GLAS also measures atmospheric backscatter profiles at both 1064 and 532 nm. The 1064 nm measurements use an analog Si APD detector and measure the height and profile the backscatter signal from thicker clouds. The measurements at 532 nm use photon counting detectors, and will measure the vertical height distributions of optically thin clouds and aerosol layers Before launch, the measurement performance of GLAS was evaluated using a lidar test instrument called the Bench Check Equipment (BCE). The BCE was developed in parallel with GLAS and served as an inverse altimeter, inverse lidar and a stellar source simulator. It was used to simulate the range of expected optical inputs to the GLAS receiver by illuminating its telescope with simulated background light as well as laser echoes with known powers, energy levels, widths and delay times. The BCE also allowed monitoring of the transmitted laser energy, the angle measurements of the SRS, the co-alignment of the transmitted laser beam to the receiver line of sight, and performance of the flight science algorithms. Performance was evaluated during the GLAS development, before and after environmental tests, and after delivery to the spacecraft. The ICESat observatory was launched into a 94 degree inclination, 590 km altitude circular polar orbit on January 12,2003. Beginning in early February, GLAS was powered on tested in stages. Its 1064 nm

  1. New exclusion limits on scalar and pseudoscalar axionlike particles from light shining through a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballou, R.; Deferne, G.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Flekova, L.; Hosek, J.; Kunc, S.; Macuchova, K.; Meissner, K. A.; Pugnat, P.; Schott, M.; Siemko, A.; Slunecka, M.; Sulc, M.; Weinsheimer, C.; Zicha, J.; Osqar Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Physics beyond the Standard Model predicts the possible existence of new particles that can be searched at the low-energy frontier in the sub-eV range. The OSQAR photon regeneration experiment looks for "light shining through a wall" from the quantum oscillation of optical photons into "weakly interacting sub-eV particles," such as axion or axionlike particles (ALPs) in a 9 T transverse magnetic field over a length of 2 ×14.3 m . In 2014, this experiment was run with an outstanding sensitivity, using an 18.5 W continuous wave laser emitting in the green at the single wavelength of 532 nm. No regenerated photons have been detected after the wall, pushing the limits for the existence of axions and ALPs down to an unprecedented level for such type of laboratory experiment. The diphoton couplings of possible pseudoscalar and scalar ALPs can be constrained in the nearly massless limit to be less than 3.5 ×10-8 GeV-1 and 3.2 ×10-8 GeV-1 , respectively, at 95% confidence level.

  2. Once the Light Touch to the Brain: Cytotoxic Effects of Low-Dose Gamma-Ray, Laser Light, and Visible Light on Rat Neuronal Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murteza; Colak, Abdullah; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Taspinar, Numan; Sagsoz, Mustafa Erdem; Kadioglu, Hakan Hadi; Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Seven, Sabriye

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the effects of gamma-ray, laser light, and visible light, which neurons are commonly exposed to during treatment of various cranial diseases, on the viability of neurons. Materials and Methods: Neuronal cell culture was prepared from the frontal cortex of 9 newborn rats. Cultured cells were irradiated with gamma-ray for 1–10 min by 152Eu, 241Am, and 132Ba isotopes, visible light for 1–160 min, and laser light for 0.2–2 seconds. The MTT tetrazolium reduction assay was used to assess the number of viable cells in the neuronal cell cultures. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to determine Na, K, and Ca levels in cellular fluid obtained from neuronal cell culture plaques. Results: Under low-dose radiation with 152Eu, 241Am, and 132Ba isotopes, cell viability insignificantly decreased with time (p>0.05). On the other hand, exposure to visible light produced statistically significant decrease in cell viability at both short- (1–10 min) and long-term (20–160 min). Cell viability did not change with 2 seconds of laser exposure. Na, K, and Ca levels significantly decreased with gamma-ray and visible light. The level of oxidative stress markers significantly changed with gamma-ray. Conclusion: In conclusion, while low dose gamma-ray has slight to moderate apoptotic effect in neuronal cell cultures by oxidative stress, long-term visible light induces remarkable apoptosis and cell death. Laser light has no significant effect on neurons. Further genetic studies are needed to clarify the chronic effect of visible light on neuronal development and functions. PMID:27551168

  3. Laser-induced periodic surface structures: Fingerprints of light localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolski, J. Z. P.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Obona, J. V.; Ocelik, V.; Huis in't Veld, A. J.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2012-02-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to study the inhomogeneous absorption of linearly polarized laser radiation below a rough surface. The results are first analyzed in the frequency domain and compared to the efficacy factor theory of Sipe and coworkers. Both approaches show that the absorbed energy shows a periodic nature, not only in the direction orthogonal to the laser polarization, but also in the direction parallel to it. It is shown that the periodicity is not always close to the laser wavelength for the perpendicular direction. In the parallel direction, the periodicity is about λ/Re(ñ), with ñ being the complex refractive index of the medium. The space-domain FDTD results show a periodicity in the inhomogeneous energy absorption similar to the periodicity of the low- and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures depending on the material's excitation.

  4. Increased laser-accelerated proton energies via direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons in microcone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, S. A.; Kluge, T.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Flippo, K. A.; Offermann, D. T.; Gall, B.; Lockard, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Geissel, M.; Schollmeier, M.

    2011-05-15

    We present experimental results showing a laser-accelerated proton beam maximum energy cutoff of 67.5 MeV, with more than 5 x 10{sup 6} protons per MeV at that energy, using flat-top hollow microcone targets. This result was obtained with a modest laser energy of {approx}80 J, on the high-contrast Trident laser at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 2D particle-in-cell simulations, we attribute the source of these enhanced proton energies to direct laser-light-pressure acceleration of electrons along the inner cone wall surface, where the laser light wave accelerates electrons just outside the surface critical density, in a potential well created by a shift of the electrostatic field maximum with respect to that of the magnetic field maximum. Simulations show that for an increasing acceleration length, the continuous loading of electrons into the accelerating phase of the laser field yields an increase in high-energy electrons.

  5. Cracks growth behaviors of commercial pure titanium under nanosecond laser irradiation for formation of nanostructure-covered microstructures (with sub-5-μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. F.; Wang, W. J.; Mei, X. S.; Zheng, B. X.; Yan, Z. X.

    2016-11-01

    This study reported on the formation of sub-5-μm microstructures covered on titanium by cracks growth under 10-ns laser radiation at the wavelength of 532 nm and its induced light modification for production of nanostructures. The electric field intensity and laser power density absorbed by commercial pure titanium were computed to investigate the self-trapping introduced by cracks and the effect of surface morphology on laser propagation characteristics. It is found that nanostructures can form at the surface with the curvature radius below 20 μm. Meanwhile, variable laser fluences were applied to explore the evolution of cracks on commercial pure titanium with or without melt as spot overlap number increased. Experimental study was first performed at the peak laser fluence of 1.063 J/cm2 to investigate the microstructures induced only by cracks growth. The results demonstrated that angular microstructures with size between 1.68 μm and 4.74 μm was obtained and no nanostructure covered. Then, at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, there were some nanostructures covered on the melt-induced curved microstructured surface. However, surface molten material submerged in the most of cracks at the spot overlap number of 744, where the old cracks disappeared. The results indicated that there was too much molten material and melting time at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, which was not suitable for obtainment of perfect micro-nano structures. On this basis, peak laser fluence was reduced down to 1.595 J/cm2 and the sharp sub-5 μm microstructures with nanostructures covered was obtained at spot overlap number of 3720.

  6. Laser cleaning of 19th century Congo rattan mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, N.; Oujja, M.; Roemich, H.; Castillejo, M.

    2011-09-01

    There is a growing interest by art conservators for laser cleaning of organic materials, such as wooden artworks, paper and textiles, since traditional cleaning with solvents can be a source of further decay and mechanical cleaning may be too abrasive for sensitive fibers. In this work we present a successful laser cleaning approach for 19th century rattan mats from the Brooklyn Museum collection of African Art, now part of the study collection at the Conservation Center in New York. Tests were carried out using the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonic (532 nm) wavelength of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser to measure threshold values both for surface damage and color changes for different types of rattan samples. The irradiated substrates were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and by UV-vis spectroscopy in order to determine the efficiency of laser cleaning and to assess possible deterioration effects that may have occurred as a result of laser irradiation. The study showed that by using the laser emission at 532 nm, a wavelength for which photon energy is below the bond dissociation level of the main cellulosic compounds and the water absorption is negligible, it is possible to select a range of laser fluences to remove the black dust layer without damaging the rattan material.

  7. Focused laser lithographic system with sub-wavelength resolution based on vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic material.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Chen; Yao, Yuan; Hu, Neibin; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei; Yang, Guoguang

    2014-12-01

    A focused laser lithographic system combines with vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic layer to write patterns with linewidth below wavelength. A photochromic layer is formed by coating the mixture of metanil yellow and aqueous PVA solution on the photoresist layer. In our system, the center of a lithographic laser with a 405 nm wavelength coincides with the center of vortex laser with a 532 nm wavelength. When a photochromic layer is illuminated by both lasers simultaneously, the absorbance for the lithographic laser decreases at the hollow region of the vortex laser but increases at its annular region, so that a transparent aperture for the lithographic laser is created and its size could be tuned by changing the power of vortex laser; therefore, the linewidth of written patterns is variable. Experimentally, using a 20× lens (NA = 0.4), this system condenses the linewidth of written patterns from 6614 to 350 nm.

  8. Pulsed-laser micropatterned quantum-dot array for white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Huang-Yu; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kao, Tsung Sheng; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Han, Hau-Vei; Li, Jie-Ru; Lee, Po-Tsung; Chen, Huang-Ming; Hong, Ming-Hui; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a novel photoluminescent quantum dots device with laser-processed microscale patterns has been demonstrated to be used as a white light emitting source. The pulsed laser ablation technique was employed to directly fabricate microscale square holes with nano-ripple structures onto the sapphire substrate of a flip-chip blue light-emitting diode, confining sprayed quantum dots into well-defined areas and eliminating the coffee ring effect. The electroluminescence characterizations showed that the white light emission from the developed photoluminescent quantum-dot light-emitting diode exhibits stable emission at different driving currents. With a flexibility of controlling the quantum dots proportions in the patterned square holes, our developed white-light emitting source not only can be employed in the display applications with color triangle enlarged by 47% compared with the NTSC standard, but also provide the great potential in future lighting industry with the correlated color temperature continuously changed in a wide range.

  9. Pulsed-laser micropatterned quantum-dot array for white light source.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Huang-Yu; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kao, Tsung Sheng; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Han, Hau-Vei; Li, Jie-Ru; Lee, Po-Tsung; Chen, Huang-Ming; Hong, Ming-Hui; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-23

    In this study, a novel photoluminescent quantum dots device with laser-processed microscale patterns has been demonstrated to be used as a white light emitting source. The pulsed laser ablation technique was employed to directly fabricate microscale square holes with nano-ripple structures onto the sapphire substrate of a flip-chip blue light-emitting diode, confining sprayed quantum dots into well-defined areas and eliminating the coffee ring effect. The electroluminescence characterizations showed that the white light emission from the developed photoluminescent quantum-dot light-emitting diode exhibits stable emission at different driving currents. With a flexibility of controlling the quantum dots proportions in the patterned square holes, our developed white-light emitting source not only can be employed in the display applications with color triangle enlarged by 47% compared with the NTSC standard, but also provide the great potential in future lighting industry with the correlated color temperature continuously changed in a wide range.

  10. Towards a three-dimensional network of direct laser written waveguides on a chip for quantum optical experiments (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landowski, Alexander; Schmidt, Michael; Renner, Michael; von Freymann, Georg; Widera, Artur

    2016-09-01

    Waveguide networks are essential to gain control over photons on a chip-scale level, for applications in, e.g., optical communication, light routing, and even quantum simulation. Quantum simulators on a chip use highly controllable pairs of single photons to shed light onto the role of entanglement in interacting many-body systems. We build three-dimensional waveguide networks on a chip using a commercial system for direct laser writing in a low fluorescent photoresist on a silica substrate and air cladding. Due to our capability to fabricate three-dimensional structures, we use special coupling structures, that enable addressing all input and output ports of our waveguide network through the substrate via one microscope objective simultaneously. Since the photoresist shows low fluorescence for excitation at 532 nm, we will be able to integrate single quantum emitters, such as color centers in diamond, into the waveguide, acting as integrated single quantum system. Here we present our current arc shaped coupling structure, discuss the limits of the single mode-operation of the waveguides and show first beamsplitting devices. We analyze the contributions to the damping in our network, including the bend loss for bend radii smaller than 10 µm.

  11. Verifiable CPD paper: introduction, history of lasers and laser light production.

    PubMed

    Parker, S

    2007-01-13

    The word laser conjures in the mind's eye many aspects of what might be described as 'modern' life. The words 'powerful', 'precise' and 'innovative' complement our conception of the world in terms of technology, whereas patients often associate the words 'magical' and 'lightening quick' with the use of lasers in medical practice. The purpose of this series of articles is to explore the history and development of lasers, the integration of lasers into clinical dentistry and the safeguards as to their regulated use.

  12. Simultaneous self-starting additive pulse mode-locking and second harmonic generation of an Nd:YAG laser using self-organised germanosilicate optical fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, J. P.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1991-08-01

    The simultaneous operation of self-starting additive pulse mode-locking and optical fiber second harmonic generation of an Nd:YAG laser resulting in picosecond radiation at 1.06 mm and 532 nm was demonstrated. The IR pulses were measured to be 5 ps in duration, and the green pulses are expected to be approximately 3.5 ps due to the nonlinear interaction. Effects of self-modulation and cross-phase modulation on the conversion efficiency are discussed.

  13. Fungicidal response of a novel natural photosensitizer (Beta vulgaris) on Candida albicans with low-power laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Subhangi; Roy, Sukhdev; Srivastava, J. N.

    2013-05-01

    We report the efficacy of an aqueous extract of Beta vulgaris as a novel, natural photosensitizer for use in photodynamic therapy against Candidiasis disease. This study evaluates the effect of different laser wavelengths (He-Ne: 633 nm, Nd-YAG: 532 nm), power (17, 27 mW) and duration of exposure (5, 10, 15 min) in combination with the Beta vulgaris natural photosensitizer on the viability of Candida albicans causing Candidiasis disease. Although inhibition was observed in all cases, a maximum of 51.91% inhibition takes place with the combination of Beta vulgaris exposed to 532 nm at 27 mW for 15 min by the Agar well diffusion method. The study is important in optimizing different parameters and designing a low-power, compact, non-invasive and portable device for treatment.

  14. Magnetooptical Faraday and Light-Scattering Diagnostics of Laser Plasma in Leopard Laser Facility at UNR/NTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Yates, K.; Ivanov, V. V.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Yasin, E.; Wiewior, P.; Astanovitsky, A.; Chaly, O.; Kindel, J.

    2009-11-01

    Laser plasma of the solid target on Leopard Laser Facility at University of Nevada Reno was investigated using polarimetry, interferometry and laser-scattering diagnostics. 50 TW Nd:glass Leopard laser operates on 1056 nm wavelength, 10 J energy and 1ns/400 fs pulse width. Power flux on a target surface varied from 10^14 to 10^19W/cm^2 with 20 μm focus spot from off-axis parabola. The diagnostic of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser plasma was carried out using three-channel polarinterferometer with Faraday, shadow and interferogram channels. Ultrafast two-frame shadowgrams/interferograms with two probing beams with orthogonal polarizations were used for investigation of fast moving plasma phenomena (jets, ionization front propagation). Continuous 1W green DPSS-laser with external modulation was used for light scattering experiments for investigation of the late-time micro-particles generation in laser plasma with expected large charge number of the grain Z ˜ 100-1000.

  15. CO2 laser-fabricated cladding light strippers for high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Keiron; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Daniel, Jae; Swain, Robert; Mies, Eric; Rees, Simon; Andrew Clarkson, W; Haub, John

    2016-04-10

    We present and characterize a simple CO2 laser processing technique for the fabrication of compact all-glass optical fiber cladding light strippers. We investigate the cladding light loss as a function of radiation angle of incidence and demonstrate devices in a 400 μm diameter fiber with cladding losses of greater than 20 dB for a 7 cm device length. The core losses are also measured giving a loss of <0.008±0.006  dB/cm. Finally we demonstrate the successful cladding light stripping of a 300 W laser diode with minimal heating of the fiber coating and packaging adhesives.

  16. Indication of Local Laser Pump Depletion via Transmitted Self-Guided Laser Light

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Lu, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.

    2009-01-22

    In recent experiments it has been shown that an ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulse can be self-guided over tens of Rayleigh lengths in an underdense plasma where {tau}(FWHM of the laser pulse) is on the order of the plasma wavelength ({lambda}{sub p}). Using an imaging spectrograph, the frequency of the transmitted laser pulse was spatially and spectrally resolved at the exit of 3, 5, and 8 mm long plasmas. The mechanism of laser pump depletion was studied by observing the amount that the transmitted laser pulse's spectrum was red shifted in wavelength through the interaction with the self-guiding plasma wave.

  17. Laser and Light Treatments for Striae Distensae: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Aldahan, Adam S; Shah, Vidhi V; Mlacker, Stephanie; Samarkandy, Sahal; Alsaidan, Mohammed; Nouri, Keyvan

    2016-06-01

    Striae distensae (SD) are common dermatologic lesions that often arise as a result of rapid weight change, certain endocrine conditions, or prolonged exposure to steroids. SD initially present as raised edematous plaques (striae rubra), after which they become white and atrophic (striae alba) owing to local breakdown and reorganization of collagen and elastin. There currently exists no reliable treatment option, though numerous topical applications have been attempted. Lasers and light represent emerging noninvasive therapies that have demonstrated some success targeting vascular chromophores in striae rubra and stimulating collagen and elastin production in striae alba. An extensive literature review was performed to gather all available articles studying laser and light treatments for SD. Lasers and light can significantly improve the appearance of both striae rubra and striae alba. Generally, striae rubra are more responsive to therapy and can be treated successfully with a variety of lasers without major adverse effects. Fractional lasers exhibit the strongest results for striae alba repigmentation and collagen induction, and several other lasers produce temporary repigmentation. Lasers in combination with other modalities such as topical agents and additional energy devices have also demonstrated promising preliminary results; however, large comparative studies are necessary to validate these outcomes.

  18. A novel mobile dual-wavelength laser altimetry system for improved site-specific Nitrogen fertilizer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eitel, J.; Magney, T. S.; Vierling, L. A.; Brown, T. T.; Huggins, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing fertilizer inputs while maintaining yield would increase farmer's profits and similarly lessen the adverse environmental effects of production agriculture. The development of technologies that allow precise, site-specific application of Nitrogen (N) fertilizer has thus been an important research goal over the past decades. Remote sensing of foliar crop properties and function with tractor-mountable optical sensors has thought to be useful to optimize N fertilizer applications. However, on-the-go sensing of foliar crop properties and function has proven difficult, particularly during early crop growth stages when fertilizer decisions are often made. This difficulty arises from the fact that the spectral signal measured by on-the-go sensors is dominated by soil reflectance during early crop growth stages. Here, we present the basic principles behind a novel, dual-wavelength, tractor mountable laser altimetry system that measures the laser return intensity of the reflected green and red laser light. The green (532 nm) and the red (660 nm) wavelength combination allows calculation of a modified Photochemical Reflectance Index (mPRI) that have shown to be sensitive to both crop function and foliar chemistry. The small field of view of the laser points (diameter: 4 mm) combined with its high sampling rate (1000 points sec-1) allows vegetation returns to be isolated from ground returns by using simple thresholds. First tests relating foliar N of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with laser derived mPRI are promising (r2 = 0.72). Further research is needed to test the relationship between laser derived spectral indices and crop function.

  19. Two-photon photoemission from metals induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtel, J. H.; Smith, W. L.; Bloembergen, N.

    1977-01-01

    We have measured the two-photon photoemission current density from tungsten, tantalum, and molybdenum when irradiated by 532-nm wavelength radiation. This wavelength was produced by the second-harmonic radiation of single picosecond laser pulses from a mode-locked neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. The results are interpreted in terms of both a simple temperature-independent two-photon photoemission effect and a generalization of the Fowler-DuBridge theory of photoemission. The laser polarization dependence of the emitted current is also reported.

  20. High precision laser induced etching of multilayered MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P. J.; Thu, T. V.; Takahashi, H.; Abderrahmane, A.; Takamura, T.; Sandhu, A.

    2014-02-20

    We demonstrate a method for reducing the thickness of multilayered MoS{sub 2} to few and single layers by irradiation with a 532 nm wavelength laser spot. The morphology and optical properites of the etched MoS{sub 2} were were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy before and after laser etching. Our laser etching method is a simple and highly effective tool for the fabrication of single, and few layered MoS{sub 2} for atomic scale optical and electronic device applications.

  1. Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autrique, D.; Gornushkin, I.; Alexiades, V.; Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A.; Rethfeld, B.

    2013-10-01

    A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm2. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

  2. Plasmon Lasers: Coherent Light Source at Molecular Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    rates due to cavity damping. From [20]. where, pnth γ1β γgβΓ, with solutions of the form, γs 1 2 p pnth 1 2 p pnth 1 4p ...ers, Company Profiles, Industry Trends, Market study by http://www.freedoniagroup.com (2011), date of last visit: 18 February 2012. www.lpr...Photonics Rev., 1–21 (2012) /DOI 10.1002/lpor.201100040 LASER&PHOTONICS REVIEWS Abstract Plasmon lasers are a new class of coherent optical frequency

  3. 20,000 Photons Under the Snow: Subsurface Scattering of Visible Laser Light and the Implications for Laser Altimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, A.; Kurtz, N. T.; Shappirio, M.; Neumann, T.; Cook, W. B.; Markus, T.

    2014-12-01

    Existing visible light laser altimeters such as ATM (Airborne Topographical Mapper) with NASA's Operation IceBridge and NASA's MABEL (Multiple Altimeter Beam Experimental Lidar; a simulator for NASA's ICESat-2 mission) are providing scientists with a view of Earth's ice sheets, glaciers, and sea ice with unprecedented detail. Measuring how these surfaces evolve in the face of a rapidly changing climate requires the utmost attention to detail in the design and calibration of these instruments, as well as understanding the changing optical properties of these surfaces. As single photon counting lidars, MABEL and NASA's ATLAS (Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System) on the upcoming ICESat-2 mission provide fundamentally different information compared with waveform lidars such as ATM, or GLAS (Geoscience Laser Altimeter System) on NASA's previous ICESat-1 mission. By recording the travel times of individual photons, more detailed information about the surface, and potentially the subsurface, are available and must be considered in elevation retrievals from the observed photon cloud. Here, we investigate possible sources of uncertainty associated with monochromatic visible light scattering in subsurface snow, which may affect the precision and accuracy of elevation estimates. We also explore the capacity to estimate snow grain size in near surface snow using experimental visible light laser data obtained in laboratory experiments.

  4. Vacuum-Compatible Wideband White Light and Laser Combiner Source System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azizi, Alineza; Ryan, Daniel J.; Tang, Hong; Demers, Richard T.; Kadogawa, Hiroshi; An, Xin; Sun, George Y.

    2010-01-01

    For the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Spectrum Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) testbed, wideband white light is used to simulate starlight. The white light source mount requires extremely stable pointing accuracy (<3.2 microradians). To meet this and other needs, the laser light from a single-mode fiber was combined, through a beam splitter window with special coating from broadband wavelengths, with light from multimode fiber. Both lights were coupled to a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). In many optical systems, simulating a point star with broadband spectrum with stability of microradians for white light interferometry is a challenge. In this case, the cameras use the white light interference to balance two optical paths, and to maintain close tracking. In order to coarse align the optical paths, a laser light is sent into the system to allow tracking of fringes because a narrow band laser has a great range of interference. The design requirements forced the innovators to use a new type of optical fiber, and to take a large amount of care in aligning the input sources. The testbed required better than 1% throughput, or enough output power on the lowest spectrum to be detectable by the CCD camera (6 nW at camera). The system needed to be vacuum-compatible and to have the capability for combining a visible laser light at any time for calibration purposes. The red laser is a commercially produced 635-nm laser 5-mW diode, and the white light source is a commercially produced tungsten halogen lamp that gives a broad spectrum of about 525 to 800 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM), with about 1.4 mW of power at 630 nm. A custom-made beam splitter window with special coating for broadband wavelengths is used with the white light input via a 50-mm multi-mode fiber. The large mode area PCF is an LMA-8 made by Crystal Fibre (core diameter of 8.5 mm, mode field diameter of 6 mm, and numerical aperture at 625 nm of 0.083). Any science interferometer that needs a

  5. Design, assembly, and testing of a high-resolution relay lens used for holography with operation at both doubled and tripled Nd:YAG laser wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Danny S; Pazuchanics, Peter D; Malone, Robert M; Cox, Brian C; Frogget, Brent C; Kaufman, Morris I; Capelle, Gene A

    2009-01-01

    The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 1p/mm resolution at a 355-nm wavelength (ultraviolet) has been completed. By adding a doublet to this lens system, operation at a 532-nm wavelength (green) with > 1100 1p/mm resolution is achieved. This lens is used with high-power laser light to record holograms of fast-moving ejecta particles from a shocked metal surface located inside a test package. Part of the lens and the entire test package are under vacuum with a 1-cm air gap separation. Holograms have been recorded with both doubled and tripled Nd:YAG laser light. The UV operation is very sensitive to the package window's tilt. If this window is tilted by more than 0.1 degrees, the green operation performs with better resolution than that of the UV operation. The setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording can be done with either UV light or green light. A resolution plate can be temporarily placed inside the test package so that a television microscope located beyond the hologram position can archive images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires., interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens are presented. Resolution variation across the 12-mm field of view and throughout the 5-mm depth of field is discussed for both wavelengths.

  6. Design, Assembly, and Testing of a High-Resolution Relay Lens Used for Holography with Operation at Both Doubled and Tripled Nd:YAG Laser Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M; Cox, Brian C; Frogget, Brent C; Grover, Mike; Kaufman, Morris I; Pazuchanics, Peter; Sorenson, Danny S; Stevens, Gerald D; Tibbits, Aric; Turley, William D

    2009-08-21

    The design and assembly of a nine-element lens that achieves >2000 lp/mm resolution at a 355-nm wavelength (ultraviolet) has been completed. By adding a doublet to this lens system, operation at a 532-nm wavelength (green) with >1100 lp/mm resolution is achieved. This lens is used with high-power laser light to record holograms of fast-moving ejecta particles from a shocked metal surface located inside a test package. Part of the lens and the entire test package are under vacuum with a 1-cm air gap separation. Holograms have been recorded with both doubled and tripled Nd:YAG laser light. The UV operation is very sensitive to the package window’s tilt. If this window is tilted by more than 0.1 degrees, the green operation performs with better resolution than that of the UV operation. The setup and alignment are performed with green light, but the dynamic recording can be done with either UV light or green light. A resolution plate can be temporarily placed inside the test package so that a television microscope located beyond the hologram position can archive images of resolution patterns that prove that the calibration wires, interference filter, holographic plate, and relay lenses are in their correct positions. Part of this lens is under vacuum, at the point where the laser illumination passes through a focus. Alignment and tolerancing of this high-resolution lens are presented. Resolution variation across the 12-mm field of view and throughout the 5-mm depth of field is discussed for both wavelengths.

  7. Efficient plant growth using automatic position-feedback laser light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinoki, Yoshiaki; Kato, Yuya; Ogawa, Kosuke; Nakao, Akira; Okai, Zenshiro; Katsuyama, Toshio

    2013-05-01

    The plant growth based on the scanning laser beam is newly developed. Three semiconductor lasers with three primary colors, i.e., blue, green and red are used. Here, the laser scanned position is restricted only to the plant leaves, where the light illumination is needed. The feedback system based on the perspective projection is developed. The system consists of the automatic position correction from the camera image. The automatic image extraction of the leaf parts is also introduced. The electric power needed for this system is as small as 6.25% compared with the traditional white fluorescent lamp. Furthermore, experimental results show that the red-color laser light is particularly efficient for the growth of the radish sprouts.

  8. Note: Laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Abhijit; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2014-04-15

    In this work we describe laser beam scanning using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator. Commercially available ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulators are capable of displaying 85 colored images in 1 s using a time dithering technique. Each colored image, in fact, comprises 24 single bit (black and white) images displayed sequentially. We have used each single bit image to write a binary phase hologram. For a collimated laser beam incident on the hologram, one of the diffracted beams can be made to travel along a user defined direction. We have constructed a beam scanner employing the above arrangement and demonstrated its use to scan a single laser beam in a laser scanning optical sectioning microscope setup.

  9. Texturing of polypropylene (PP) with nanosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, A.; Soto, R.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Quintero, F.; Lusquiños, F.; Pou, J.

    2016-06-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a biocompatible and biostable polymer, showing good mechanical properties that has been recently introduced in the biomedical field for bone repairing applications; however, its poor surface properties due to its low surface energy limit their use in biomedical applications. In this work, we have studied the topographical modification of polypropylene (PP) laser textured with Nd:YVO4 nanosecond lasers emitting at λ = 1064 nm, 532 nm, and 355 nm. First, optical response of this material under these laser wavelengths was determined. The application of an absorbing coating was also studied. The influence of the laser processing parameters on the surface modification of PP was investigated by means of statistically designed experiments. Processing maps to tailor the roughness, and wettability, the main parameters affecting cell adhesion characteristics of implants, were also determined. Microhardness measurements were performed to discern the impact of laser treatment on the final mechanical properties of PP.

  10. Two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy from laser light scattered off a hard target.

    PubMed

    Powers, P E; Taatjes, C A; Kulp, T J

    1996-08-20

    One can apply two-tone frequency modulation spectroscopy techniques to the detection of gas-phase species by using laser light scattered from hard targets. High sensitivities are demonstrated, with a minimum detectable absorption of 10(-4) possible with a simple apparatus. The effects of laser speckle on the FM signal are described, and we show that the detection signal-to-noise ratio can be improved by collecting an increased number of speckle cells.

  11. Optical measurement of temperature in biological cells under infrared laser light exposure (λ=800 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rod P.

    2015-07-01

    Interest in the interaction between laser light and biological samples has gained momentum in recent years, particularly in neurobiology, where there is significant potential to stimulate neurons with infrared laser light. Despite recent reports showing the application of infrared light for neurostimulation, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. The two main hypotheses are based on thermal or electrostatic mechanisms. Here, a novel optical method is presented to make temperature measurements in human neural cells under infrared laser excitation (λ=800nm) using the dye Rhodamine B (RhB). The measurement of temperature is based on the property of RhB, a fluorescent dye whose fluorescence intensity decreases linearly with increases in temperature. We present and detail the setup and measurement procedure that has temporal resolution of few milliseconds, based around a fluorescent live-cell imaging microscope used for cellular microfluorimetry experiments.

  12. Frequency chirped light at large detuning with an injection-locked diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, K.; Disla, M.; Dellatto, J.; Limani, A.; Kaufman, B.; Wright, M. J.

    2015-04-15

    We have developed a laser system to generate frequency-chirped light at rapid modulation speeds (∼100 MHz) with a large frequency offset. Light from an external cavity diode laser with its frequency locked to an atomic resonance is passed through a lithium niobate electro-optical phase modulator. The phase modulator is driven by a ∼6 GHz signal whose frequency is itself modulated with a RF MHz signal (<200 MHz). A second injection locked diode laser is used to filter out all of the light except the frequency-chirped ±1 order by more than 30 dB. Using this system, it is possible to generate a 1 GHz frequency chirp in 5 ns.

  13. A review on laser and light-based therapies for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Mlacker, Stephanie; Aldahan, Adam Souhail; Simmons, Brian James; Shah, Vidhi; McNamara, Colin Andrew; Samarkandy, Sahal; Nouri, Keyvan

    2017-04-01

    Alopecia areata is a form of non-scarring alopecia that results from a hyperactive immune response of T cells against hair follicles. Many patients with visible hair loss experience psychological and emotional distress, as a result of their cosmetic disfigurement, and frequently seek treatment. However, existing treatment methods, such as corticosteroids, topical irritants, sensitizing agents, immunosuppressants, and psoralen plus ultraviolet light A, may result in various adverse effects and often lack efficacy. Laser and light treatments offer a safe and effective alternative. This review aims to provide clinicians with a comprehensive summary of laser and light-based modalities used for the treatment of alopecia areata. Currently, the excimer laser is the most widely studied device and has shown positive results thus far. However, the development of future randomized controlled clinical trials will help determine the appropriate treatment protocols necessary, in order to achieve superior clinical outcomes.

  14. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, S.; Letzring, S.A.; Soures, J.

    1991-09-10

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies (''colors'') cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers. 8 figures.

  15. Effect of laser cavity parameters on saturation of light – current characteristics of high-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Veselov, D A; Pikhtin, N A; Lyutetskiy, A V; Nikolaev, D N; Slipchenko, S O; Sokolova, Z N; Shamakhov, V V; Shashkin, I S; Kapitonov, V A; Tarasov, I S

    2015-07-31

    We report an experimental study of power characteristics of semiconductor lasers based on MOVPE-grown asymmetric separate-confinement heterostructures with a broadened waveguide as functions of cavity length, stripe contact width and mirror reflectivities. It is shown that at high current pump levels, the variation of the cavity parameters of a semiconductor laser (width, length and mirror reflectivities) influences the light – current (L – I) characteristic saturation and maximum optical power by affecting such laser characteristics, as the current density and the optical output loss. A model is elaborated and an optical power of semiconductor lasers is calculated by taking into account the dependence of the internal optical loss on pump current density and concentration distribution of charge carriers and photons along the cavity axis of the cavity. It is found that only introduction of the dependence of the internal optical loss on pump current density to the calculation model provides a good agreement between experimental and calculated L – I characteristics for all scenarios of variations in the laser cavity parameters. (lasers)

  16. Viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with red laser, infrared laser, and red light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Bagnato, Vanderley Salvador; Machado, Maria A. A. M.

    2011-07-01

    Phototherapy is noninvasive, painless and has no known side effect. However, for its incorporation into clinical practice, more well-designed studies are necessary to define optimal parameters for its application. The viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with either a red laser, an infrared laser, or a red light-emitting diode (LED) was analyzed. Irradiation parameters were: red laser (660 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), infrared laser (780 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), and red LED (637 +/- 15 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2). All applications were punctual and performed with a spot with 0.4 mm2 of diameter for 4 or 8 s. The Kruskal-Wallis test and analysis of variance of the general linear model (p <= 0.05) were used for statistical analysis. After 72 h, phototherapy with low-intensity laser and LED showed no toxicity at the cellular level. It even stimulated methylthiazol tetrazolium assay (MTT) conversion and neutral red uptake of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress, especially in the group irradiated with infrared laser (p = 0.004 for MTT conversion and p < 0.001 for neutral red uptake). Considering the parameters and protocol of phototherapy used, it can be concluded that phototherapy stimulated the viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional deficit resembling those found in traumatized tissue in which cell viability is reduced.

  17. Formation of titanium carbide layer by laser alloying with a light-transmitting resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takuto; Hagino, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    The weight reduction of mechanical components is becoming increasingly important, especially in the transportation industry, as fuel efficiency continues to improve. Titanium and titanium alloys are recognized for their outstanding potential as lightweight materials with high specific strength. Yet they also have poor tribological properties that preclude their use for sliding parts. Improved tribological properties of titanium would expand the application of titanium into different fields. Laser alloying is an effective process for improving surface properties such as wear resistance. The process has numerous advantages over conventional surface modification techniques. Many researchers have reported the usefulness of laser alloying as a technique to improve the wear resistance of titanium. The process has an important flaw, however, as defects such as cracks or voids tend to appear in the laser-alloyed zone. Our group performed a novel laser-alloying process using a light-transmitting resin as a source for the carbon element. We laser alloyed a surface layer of pure titanium pre-coated with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and investigated the microstructure and wear properties. A laser-alloyed zone was formed by a reaction between the molten titanium and thermal decomposition products of PMMA at the interface between the substrate and PMMA. The cracks could be eliminated from the laser-alloyed zone by optimizing the laser alloying conditions. The surface of the laser-alloyed zone was covered with a titanium carbide layer and exhibited a superior sliding property and wear resistance against WC-Co.

  18. In vivo studies of low level laser (light) therapy for traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weijun; Wu, Qiuhe; Huang, Ying-Ying; Ando, Takahiro; Huang, Liyi; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Low-level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) is attracting growing interest to treat both stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The fact that near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain allows non-invasive treatment to be carried out with a low likelihood of treatment-related adverse events. It is proposed that red and NIR light is absorbed by chromophores in the mitochondria of cells leading to changes in gene transcription and upregulation of proteins involved in cell survival, antioxidant production, collagen synthesis, reduction of chronic inflammation and cell migration and proliferation. We developed a mouse model of controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI and examined the effect of 0, 1, 3, and 14 daily 810-nm CW laser treatments in the CCI model as measured by neurological severity score and wire grip and motion test. 1 laser Tx gave a significant improvement while 3 laser Tx was even better. Surprisingly 14 laser Tx was no better than no treatment. Histological studies at necropsy suggested that the neurodegeneration was reduced at 14 days and that the cortical lesion was repaired by BrdU+ve neural progenitor (stem) cells at 28 days. Transcranial laser therapy is a promising treatment for acute (and chronic TBI) and the lack of side-effects and paucity of alternative treatments encourages early clinical trials.

  19. Light Trapping for Thin Silicon Solar Cells by Femtosecond Laser Texturing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B. G.; Lin, Y. T.; Sher, M. J.; Mazur, E.; Branz, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    Femtosecond laser texturing is used to create nano- to micron-scale surface roughness that strongly enhances light-trapping in thin crystalline silicon solar cells. Light trapping is crucial for thin solar cells where a single light-pass through the absorber is insufficient to capture the weakly absorbed red and near-infrared photons, especially with an indirect-gap semiconductor absorber layer such as crystalline Si which is less than 20 um thick. We achieve enhancement of the optical absorption from light-trapping that approaches the Yablonovitch limit.

  20. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Generation of squeezed (sub-Poissonian) light by a multimode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovskii, A. V.

    2007-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental results of investigations into the quantum noise of multimode laser radiation are considered. The feasibility of generating light with a photon-number-squeezed (sub-Poissonian) photon distribution by a multimode laser with a homogeneously broadened line is analyzed. The conditions of noisy and noiseless (regular) pumping are considered. Photon-number fluctuations of the net laser radiation summed over all generated modes are calculated in the approximation of equidistant equal modes, as are photon-number fluctuations in an individual mode inside and outside the resonator. Output-radiation noise spectra and photon-number fluctuations are calculated for solid-state (neodymium glass, Nd:YAG) and semiconductor lasers. Theoretical results are compared with a number of experimental data obtained for semiconductor lasers in recent years.

  1. Pulsed, controlled, frequency-chirped laser light at GHz detunings for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, B.; Paltoo, T.; Grogan, T.; Pena, T.; John, J. P. St.; Wright, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a means to control rapidly frequency-chirped laser light at large detuning, by controlling the input modulation frequency of a ˜7 GHz signal into an electro-optical phase modulator in an injection-locked laser system. We show that we can extend the capabilities of the system to effectively pulse the laser on timescales less than 3 ns by turning the injection lock on/off and create arbitrary frequency-chirp shapes on the laser on the tens of nanosecond time scales. We have been able to use this pulsed frequency-chirped laser to control the excitation of a thermal Rb gas via rapid adiabatic passage.

  2. Emission properties of tin droplets laser-produced-plasma light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang; Zhu, Haihong; Wu, Tao

    2014-04-01

    Laser produced plasma (LPP) light sources for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography currently has been extensively studied. Most of the studies are based on CO2 laser induced plasma from mass limited tin targets. In this work, a droplet dispenser that produces uniform droplets size of about 150μm was established. A pulsed TEA-CO2 laser and a Nd: YAG laser irradiated the droplets producing plasma respectively to get EUV emission. An X-ray Spectrometer and EUV photodiodes were used to collect the spectra and EUV radiation. The different EUV spectral composition and angular distribution of EUV emission from plasmas induced by the CO2 and Nd: YAG laser were studied.

  3. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mthunzi, Patience

    2015-12-01

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  4. Noninvasive micromanipulation of live HIV-1 infected cells via laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Mthunzi, Patience

    2015-12-31

    Live mammalian cells from various tissues of origin can be aseptically and noninvasively micromanipulated via lasers of different regimes. Laser-driven techniques are therefore paving a path toward the advancement of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV-1) investigations. Studies aimed at the interaction of laser light, nanomaterials, and biological materials can also lead to an understanding of a wealth of disease conditions and result in photonics-based therapies and diagnostic tools. Thus, in our research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs into HIV-1 permissive cells and preliminary results of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in HIV-1 infected cells.

  5. Development of laser light source with high stability for Brillouin optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Hu, Jiacheng; Liu, Zeguo; Wang, Chanyuan

    2016-10-01

    Temperature and strain measurement accuracy of Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensor are easily influenced by the performance of laser light source. A wavelength/power DFB semiconductor laser light source with high-stability used for Brillouin Fiber Sensing is designed. The laser light source works with constant-current drive circuit and temperature control circuit, which precisely controls drive current and operating temperature of the DFB semiconductor laser and makes the wavelength and optical power under control. The results show that: (1) the optical wavelength increases about 0.1nm and the power reduces about 0.05dBm when the temperature increased by 1°C . (2) The maximum drift of wavelength is 0.012nm and the maximum drift of optical power is 0.05dBm (0.0014mW) at 25 °C within one hour. The laser light source can completely meet the demand for Brillouin distributed optical fiber sensing.

  6. Pump light distribution in a laser rod pumped exfocally in a rotational ellipsoid.

    PubMed

    Mahlein, H F; Zeidler, G

    1971-04-01

    In a rotational ellipsoidal exfocal pumping system the linear lamp is arranged between vertex and nearest focus, and the laser rod is aligned between the second focus and the other vertex along the major axis of a rotational ellipsoidal mirror. For this optical pumping system, a calculation of the pump light distribution in the laser rod was performed on a computer by use of a ray tracing procedure. The calculations take account of reflection losses, multiple reflections, and shadowing at the end faces of the laser rod and the lamp. A series of diagrams presents the results of the computer calculations, which are also compared with experimental results.

  7. Analytical approach of laser beam propagation in the hollow polygonal light pipe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangzhi; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Changhong

    2013-08-10

    An analytical method of researching the light distribution properties on the output end of a hollow n-sided polygonal light pipe and a light source with a Gaussian distribution is developed. The mirror transformation matrices and a special algorithm of removing void virtual images are created to acquire the location and direction vector of each effective virtual image on the entrance plane. The analytical method is demonstrated by Monte Carlo ray tracing. At the same time, four typical cases are discussed. The analytical results indicate that the uniformity of light distribution varies with the structural and optical parameters of the hollow n-sided polygonal light pipe and light source with a Gaussian distribution. The analytical approach will be useful to design and choose the hollow n-sided polygonal light pipe, especially for high-power laser beam homogenization techniques.

  8. Light wave interference during laser drilling of polymer coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pargellis, A. N.; Au, D. T. W.; Kestenbaum, A.

    1988-12-01

    A CO2 laser has been used to drill holes in a 150-μm-thick, UV-curable, modified acrylate, polymer coating a copper substrate. A typical hole is 100-150 μm in diameter. The holes in this study were each made with a single laser pulse of 10.6-μm wavelength, duration 100 or 200 μs, and 4-20 mJ energy. Two superimposed sets of periodic ripples have been observed on the hole walls. The shorter wavelength varies from 4.0 μm at the top of the hole to 5.3 μm at the bottom of the hole. The longer wavelength appears to be 13.2 μm and is attenuated as the wave propagates towards the copper substrate. The experimental data are compared with values calculated using a model that considers the interference of a standing wave inside the hole with radiation propagating through the dielectric surrounding the hole. The amplitude (trough-to-peak distance) of the waves in the hole wall is about half the wavelength of the standing waves. The long-wavelength waves (13.2 μm) yield ripples in the wall of 6.5-μm amplitude. These ripples give 13.0 μm (0.5 mils) as an ultimate lower limit for laser drilling holes using the 10.6-μm wavelengths obtained with a CO2 laser. Chemical etching of the polymer causes all of the holes to have thin rims surrounding the top of the hole. This is due to accelerated etching of the less cured polymer material inside the hole. A chemical etching process etches away some of the ripple pattern, particularly near the top of the hole.

  9. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  10. Vectorial analytical description of the polarized light of a high-power laser diode.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Wang, Jiajie; Han, Yiping; Wu, Zhensen

    2013-03-10

    A mathematical model to describe the far-field of a high-power laser diode (LD) beam is presented. The laser beam propagation is studied by the vector Rayleigh-Sommerfeld far-field diffraction integral formula The far-field distribution of the LD beam is studied in detail; the light polarized parallel and perpendicular to the junction plane are all considered. This model is employed to predict the light intensity of high-power LDs. The computed intensity distributions are in a good agreement with the corresponding measurements. This model can be easily used to analyze the propagation properties of the high-power LD beam.

  11. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-11-14

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications.

  12. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2013-11-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications.

  13. Extreme field limits in the interaction of laser light with ultrarelativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Hayashi, Y.; Kando, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Koga, J.; Kondo, K.; Kotaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A.; Bulanov, S. S.; Zhidkov, A.; Chen, P.; Neely, D.; Kato, Y.; Narozhny, N. B.; Korn, G.

    2012-07-11

    The critical electric field of quantum electrodynamics is so strong that it produces electron-positron pairs from vacuum, converting the energy of light into matter. This field has become feasible through the construction of extremely high power lasers or/and with the sophisticated use of nonlinear processes in relativistic plasmas. A feasibility of the experiments on the collision of laser light and high intensity electromagnetic pulses, generated by relativistic flying mirrors, with relativistic electrons for the studying of extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves is discussed.

  14. 3-D aluminum nanostructure with microhole array synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light extinction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article presents 3-D aluminum micro-nanostructures for enhanced light absorption. Periodic microhole arrays were created by firing a train of femtosecond laser pulses at megahertz pulse frequency onto the surface of an aluminum target at ambient conditions. The laser trains ablated the target surface and created microholes leading to the generation of deposited nanostructures inside and around the microholes. These micro-nanostructures showed enhanced light absorption, which is attributed to surface plasmonics induced by the generation of both nano- and microstructures. These micro-nanostructures may be promising for solar cell applications. PMID:24225364

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring micro structures, anisotropy and birefringence in polymers using laser scattered light

    DOEpatents

    Grek, Boris; Bartolick, Joseph; Kennedy, Alan D.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring microstructures, anistropy and birefringence in polymers using laser scattered light includes a laser which provides a beam that can be conditioned and is directed at a fiber or film which causes the beam to scatter. Backscatter light is received and processed with detectors and beam splitters to obtain data. The data is directed to a computer where it is processed to obtain information about the fiber or film, such as the birefringence and diameter. This information provides a basis for modifications to the production process to enhance the process.

  16. Light and laser treatment modalities for disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aird, Gregory A; Sitenga, Jenna L; Nguyen, Austin Huy; Vaudreuil, Adam; Huerter, Christopher J

    2017-02-27

    Treatment of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is poorly standardized. The present review seeks to comprehensively discuss the potential for laser and light modalities in the treatment of DSAP. A systematic review of light and laser treatment modalities was conducted to include 26 cases of patients with DSAP. Systematic review resulted in 14 articles to be included. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) overall was the least successful treatment modality, with clinical improvement seen in a minority of patients (MAL-PDT: N = 9 patients, 33.3% showed improvement; ALA-PDT: N = 3 patients, 0% improvement; hypericin-PDT: N = 2 patients, 0% improvement) after numerous post-procedural side effects of hyperpigmentation, inflammation, erythema, and discomfort. Overall, in the available reports, PDT demonstrates poor outcomes with greater incidence of side effects. The response rates of DSAP lesions treated with lasers were as follows: (Q-switched ruby lasers: N = 2, 100%; CO2 laser: N = 1, 100%; PDT and CO2 combination therapy: N = 2, 0-50%; erbium and neodymium YAG lasers: N = 2, 100%; fractional 1927-nm thulium fiber lasers: N = 2, 100%; Grenz rays: N = 1, 100%; and fractional photothermolysis: N = 2, 100%). The side effects of laser therapy were minimal and included mild erythema, slight hyperpigmentation, and moderate edema. Laser therapy is a promising treatment option for DSAP with an excellent side effect profile. However, higher power studies are required to determine optimal guidelines for laser treatment of DSAP.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA High-power EUV (13.5 nm) light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, Vladimir M.; Borisova, Galina N.; Vinokhodov, Aleksandr Yu; Zakharov, S. V.; Ivanov, Aleksandr S.; Kiryukhin, Yurii B.; Mishchenko, Valentin A.; Prokof'ev, Aleksandr V.; Khristoforov, Oleg B.

    2010-10-01

    Characteristics of a discharge-produced plasma (DPP) light source in the spectral band 13.5±0.135 nm, developed for Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) lithography, are presented. EUV light is generated by DPP in tin vapour formed between rotating disk electrodes. The discharge is ignited by a focused laser beam. The EUV power 1000 W/(2π sr) in the spectral band 13.5±0.135 nm was achieved with input power about of ~63 kW to the plasma at a pulse repetition rate ~7 kHz . The results of numerical simulation are compared with the experimental data.

  18. Theory of laser acceleration of light-ion beams from interaction of ultrahigh-intensity lasers with layered targets.

    PubMed

    Albright, B J; Yin, L; Hegelich, B M; Bowers, Kevin J; Kwan, T J T; Fernández, J C

    2006-09-15

    Experiments at the LANL Trident facility demonstrated the production of monoenergetic ion beams from the interaction of an ultraintense laser with a target comprising a heavy ion substrate and thin layer of light ions. An analytic model is obtained that predicts how the mean energy and quality of monoenergetic ion beams and the energy of substrate ions vary with substrate material and light-ion layer composition and thickness. Dimensionless parameters controlling the dynamics are derived and the model is validated with particle-in-cell simulations and experimental data.

  19. Diode-Pumped, Q-Switched, Frequency-Doubling Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Lesh, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental Q-switched, diode-pumped, intracavity-frequency-doubling laser generates pulses of radiation at wavelength of 532 nm from excitation at 810 nm. Principal innovative feature distinguishing laser from others of its type: pulsed operation of laser at pulse-repetition frequencies higher than reported previously. Folded resonator keeps most of second-harmonic radiation away from Q-switcher, laser crystal, and laser diodes. Folding mirror highly reflective at fundamental laser wavelength and highly transmissive at second-harmonic laser wavelength. By virtue of difference of about 0.6 percent between reflectivities in two polarizations at fundamental wavelength, folding mirror favors polarized oscillation at fundamental wavelength. This characteristic desirable for doubling of frequency in some intracavity crystals.

  20. Responses of polymers to laser plasma EUV light beyond ablation threshold and micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Torii, Shuichi; Okazaki, Kota; Nakamura, Daisuke; Takahashi, Akihiko; Niino, Hiroyuki; Okada, Tatsuo; Murakami, Kouichi

    2011-06-01

    We have investigated responses of PDMS, PMMA and acrylic block copolymers (BCP) to EUV light from laserproduced plasma beyond ablation thresholds and micromachining. We generated wide band EUV light around 100 eV by irradiation of Ta targets with Nd:YAG laser light. In addition, narrow band EUV light at 11 and 13 nm were generated by irradiation of solid Xe and Sn targets, respectively, with pulsed CO2 laser light. The generated EUV light was condensed onto samples, using an ellipsoidal mirror. The EUV light was incident through windows of contact masks on the samples. We found that through-holes with a diameter of 1 μm can be fabricated in PDMS sheets with thicknesses of 10 μm. PDMS sheets are ablated if they are irradiated with EUV light beyond a threshold power density, while PDMS surfaces were modified by irradiation with the narrow band EUV light at lower power densities. Effective ablation of PMMA sheets can be applied to a LIGA-like process for fabricating micro-structures of metals using the practical apparatus. Furthermore, BCP sheets were ablated to have micro-structures. Thus, we have developed a practical technique for microma chining of PMMA, PDMS and BCP sheets in a micrometer scale.

  1. Remote Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Raman Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants and Toxic Industrial Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rivera, William; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2010-09-01

    This study describes the design, assembly, testing and comparison of two Remote Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) systems intended for standoff detection of hazardous chemical liquids. Raman spectra of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants (CWAS) and Toxic Industrial Compounds (TIC) were measured in the laboratory at a 6.6 m source-target distance using continuous wave (CW) laser detection. Standoff distances for pulsed measurements were 35 m for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection and 60, 90 and 140 m for cyclohexane detection. The prototype systems consisted of a Raman spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector (for CW measurements) and an I-CCD camera with time-gated electronics (for pulsed laser measurements), a reflecting telescope, a fiber optic assembly, a single-line CW laser source (514.5, 488.0, 351.1 and 363.8 nm) and a frequency-doubled single frequency Nd:YAG 532 nm laser (5 ns pulses at 10 Hz). The telescope was coupled to the spectrograph using an optical fiber, and filters were used to reject laser radiation and Rayleigh scattering. Two quartz convex lenses were used to collimate the light from the telescope from which the telescope-focusing eyepiece was removed, and direct it to the fiber optic assembly. To test the standoff sensing system, the Raman Telescope was used in the detection of liquid TIC: benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane and carbon disulfide. Other compounds studied were CWAS: dimethylmethyl phosphonate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-(butylamino)-ethanethiol. Relative Raman scattering cross sections of liquid CWAS were measured using single-line sources at 532.0, 488.0, 363.8 and 351.1 nm. Samples were placed in glass and quartz vials at the standoff distances from the telescope for the Remote Raman measurements. The mass of DMMP present in water solutions was also quantified as part of the system performance tests.

  2. Trends in Retinal Damage Thresholds from 100-Millisecond Near-Infrared Laser Radiation Exposures: A Study at 1,110, 1,130, 1,150, and 1,319 nm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    HeNe laser was expanded and attenuated for use as a pointer to allow for careful placement of retinal lesions. A Spectra Physics 532-nm Millennia laser ...recorded on a DVD . The NIR camera helped to confirm that the laser beam was not clipped by the subject’s iris when delivering the NIR laser radiation. The...NEAR-INFRARED LASER ADIATION: A STUDY AT 1110, 1130, 1150, 1139 NM 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER F41624-02-D-7003 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  3. Phase-sensitive correlation optical time-domain reflectometer using quantum phase noise of laser light.

    PubMed

    Arias, A; Shlyagin, M G; Miridonov, S V; Manuel, Rodolfo Martinez

    2015-11-16

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a simple approach to realize a phase-sensitive correlation optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) suitable for detection and localization of dynamic perturbations along a single-mode optical fiber. It is based on the quantum phase fluctuations of a coherent light emitted by a telecom DFB diode laser. Truly random probe signals are generated by an interferometer with the optical path difference exceeding the coherence length of the laser light. Speckle-like OTDR traces were obtained by calculating cross-correlation functions between the probe light and the light intensity signals returned back from the sensing fiber. Perturbations are detected and localized by monitoring time variations of correlation amplitude along the fiber length. Results of proof-of-concept experimental testing are presented using an array of ultra-low-reflectivity fiber Bragg gratings as weak reflectors.

  4. 100W class green 10ps 280µJ laser with M2<1.4 using Z-slab amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chard, Simon P.; Ramirez-Corral, Cristtel Y.; Bass, Michael; Chen, Ying; Kwon, Young K.

    2016-03-01

    A high-power green picosecond laser based on the `Z-slab' Nd:YAG amplifier is presented. The edge-pumped zigzag amplifier was designed to achieve high energy scaling with good beam quality. In a master oscillator power amplifier system 120 W average power was produced at 1064 nm, which was frequency doubled to 84 W at 532 nm. The maximum pulse energy was 400 μJ at 1064 nm and 280 μJ at 532 nm. The repetition rate was variable from 250 to 1000 kHz with M2 < 1.4. In burst mode with 1-10 pulses, over one millijoule total burst energy was demonstrated at 1064 nm.

  5. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Lademann, Jürgen; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2013-10-01

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo.

  6. Visible-Light Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography for Monitoring Laser-Induced Choroidal Neovascularization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ronil S.; Soetikno, Brian T.; Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Skondra, Dimitra; Zhang, Hao F.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to determine the earliest time-point at which evidence of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) could be detected with visible-light optical coherence tomography angiography (vis-OCTA) in a mouse model of laser-induced CNV. Methods Visible light-OCTA was used to study laser-induced CNV at different time-points after laser injury to monitor CNV development and measure CNV lesion size. Measurements obtained from vis-OCTA angiograms were compared with histopathologic measurements from isolectin-stained choroidal flatmounts. Results Choroidal neovascularization area measurements between the vis-OCTA system and isolectin-stained choroidal flatmounts were significantly different in area for days 2 to 4 postlaser injury, and were not significantly different in area for days 5, 7, and 14. Choroidal neovascularization area measurements taken from the stained flatmounts were larger than their vis-OCTA counterparts for all time-points. Both modalities showed a similar trend of CNV size increasing from the day of laser injury until a peak of day 7 postlaser injury and subsequently decreasing by day 14. Conclusions The earliest vis-OCTA can detect the presence of aberrant vessels in a mouse laser-induced CNV model is 5 days after laser injury. Visible light-OCTA was able to visualize the maximum of the CNV network 7 days postlaser injury, in accordance with choroidal flatmount immunostaining. Visible light-OCTA is a reliable tool in both detecting the presence of CNV development, as well as accurately determining the size of the lesion in a mouse laser-induced CNV model. PMID:27409510

  7. The Comparison of the Efficacy of Blue Light-Emitting Diode Light and 980-nm Low-Level Laser Light on Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dereci, Ömür; Sindel, Alper; Serap Toru, Havva; Yüce, Esra; Ay, Sinan; Tozoğlu, Sinan

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to histologically compare effects of blue light-emitting diode (LED) light (400-490 nm) and Ga-Al-As low-level diode laser light (980 nm) on bone regeneration of calvarial critical-sized defects in rats. Thirty Wistar Albino rats were included in the study. The experimental groups were as follows: blue LED light (400-490 nm) group (LED); 980-nm low-level laser light group (LL); and no-treatment, control group (CL). A critical-sized defect of 8 mm was formed on calvaria of rats. Each animal was sacrificed 21 days after defect formation. Calvarias of all rats were dissected and fixated for histological examination. Histomorphometric measurements of total horizontal length of the newly produced bone tissue, total vertical length of the newly produced bone tissue, and diameter of the newly produced longest bone trabecula were performed with a computer program in micrometers. There was a statistically significant increase in the total horizontal length and total vertical length in LL and LED groups compared to that in the CL group (P < 0.05), while there was no statistical difference between LED and LL groups (P > 0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed in the longest bone trabecula and LL groups compared to that in CL (P < 0.05), but not between LED-CL and LED-LL groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, blue LED light significantly enhances bone regeneration in critical-sized defects when compared with CL group, but does not have a statistically significant effect on bone regeneration when compared with 980-nm low-level laser light.

  8. Dynamic Laser-Light Scattering Study on Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miike, Hidetoshi; Hideshima, Masao; Hashimoto, Hajime; Ebina, Yoshio

    1984-08-01

    The motility changes in growing bacteria in a culture medium were observed with a dynamic light-scattering technique used to analyse the frequency spectrum of the scattered light intensity. Two typical enterobacteriaceae, E. coil and P. morganii, were examined, and the change in the velocity distribution of the bacteria with time was analysed using the observed spectrum. The distribution pattern was found to change from a Gaussian-type to a Saclay-type with time, and the mean speed of the bacteria had a maximum value at around the turning point of the growth curve.

  9. Parametric optimization of Nd-YVO4 laser for straight scribing on silver nanowire based conductive thin films by Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Lee, Wen-Fu

    2014-04-01

    This study presents parameter optimization of laser scribing on silver nanowire based conductive thin films and a high-precision Nd-YVO4 (wavelength, 532 nm) laser is used to perform scribing experiments to replace the traditional wet etching process. The laser beam is directly focused on conductive thin films and vaporizes the silver nanowire which is coated on the thin film; consequently it is a non-polluting processes. The main objective of this study is to perform laser scribing experiments to cut off the silver nanowire on the thin film without damaging the flexible PET (Polyethylene terephthalate) substrate.

  10. Five parameters you must understand to master control of your laser/light-based devices.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Jordan P; Hoopman, John E; Kenkel, Jeffrey M

    2013-09-01

    In this article, the authors review basic fundamental principles of light characteristics and their interaction with the target tissue. It is imperative for the practitioner to understand these concepts to deliver appropriate, efficacious, and safe phototherapeutic treatment for their patients. Once a diagnosis is made and a laser is chosen as a treatment tool, a basic knowledge and understanding of the physics and properties of light/tissue interaction is essential to allow practitioners to provide their patients with optimal results.

  11. DARPA Soldier Self Care: Rapid Healing of Laser Eye Injuries with Light Emitting Diode Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    hr light/dark schedule in a temperature- and humidity-controlled environment. Animals were handled in accordance with the Guide for the Care and Use...target tissue . LED treatments will be repeated at 24, 48, 72 and 96 h following creation of macular laser wounds. Functional testing (mERG and VEP...percent recovery statistics were graphically presented. Histopathologic analysis. Retinal tissue was prepared for light and electron microscopic

  12. Mandel'shtam-Brillouin scattering of laser light as a remote sensing tool.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, A.

    1972-01-01

    The mathematical relations regarding the intensity of scattered light are derived. The nature of density inhomogeneities in air is discussed together with scattering due to moving isothermal pressure fluctuations, the spectral distribution of scattering from static isobaric density fluctuations, and applications of Mandel'shtam-Brillouin (M-B) scattering to atmospheric sensing. It is concluded that M-B scattering of laser light from the atmosphere has an outstanding potential for remote atmospheric sensing.

  13. Efficient second harmonic generation of a diode-laser-pumped CW Nd:YAG laser using monolithic MgO:LiNbO3 external resonant cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, William J.; Nabors, C. D.; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    56-percent efficient external-cavity-resonant second-harmonic generation of a diode-laser pumped, CW single-axial-mode Nd:YAG laser is reported. A theory of external doubling with a resonant fundamental is presented and compared to experimental results for three monolithic cavities of nonlinear MgO:LiNbO3. The best conversion efficiency was obtained with a 12.5-mm-long monolithic ring cavity doubler, which produced 29.7 mW of CW, single-axial model 532-nm radiation from an input of 52.5 mW.

  14. Lasers and lights for the treatment of striae distensae.

    PubMed

    Savas, J A; Ledon, J A; Franca, K; Nouri, K

    2014-09-01

    Striae distensae (SD) or "stretch marks" are a common and well-recognized dermatologic entity affecting patients of all ages, genders, and ethnicities. The treatment of SD has long been plagued by disappointing outcomes and remains a frustrating entity for both physicians and patients. While striae may become less conspicuous over time, they rarely resolve without intervention. Inspired by the success of lasers for the treatment of scars and rhytides, these devices have been applied to the treatment of SD in the hopes of achieving similar efficacy.

  15. Glue-free assembly of glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics using laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binetruy, C.; Clement, S.; Deleglise, M.; Franz, C.; Knapp, W.; Oumarou, M.; Renard, J.; Roesner, A.

    2011-05-01

    The use of laser light for bonding of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic composites (CFTPC) offers new possibilities to overcome the constraints of conventional joining technologies. Laser bonding is environmentally friendly as no chemical additive or glue is necessary. Accuracy and flexibility of the laser process as well as the quality of the weld seams provide benefits which are already used in many industrial applications. Laser transmission welding has already been introduced in manufacturing of short fiber thermoplastic composites. The laser replaces hot air in tapelaying systems for pre-preg carbon fiber placement. The paper provides an overview concerning the technical basics of the joining process and outline some material inherent characteristics to be considered when using continuous glass fiber reinforced composites The technical feasibility and the mechanical characterization of laser bonded CFTPC are demonstrated. The influence of the different layer configurations on the laser interaction with the material is investigated and the dependency on the mechanical strength of the weld seem is analyzed. The results show that the laser provides an alternative joining technique and offers new perspectives to assemble structural components emerging in automotive or aeronautical manufacturing. It overcomes the environmental and technical difficulties related to existing gluing processes.

  16. Laser surface texturization for high power cladding light stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisset, Michael; Lebrun, Léo.; Faucon, Marc; Kling, Rainer; Boullet, Johan; Aguergaray, Claude

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated herein a new type of cladding light strippers suitable for high power systems. By precisely micro-machining the surface of the fiber we create CLS with efficiencies as high as 97 % for large NA, multi-mode, cladding light (NA = 0.3), and 70 % for single-mode, low NA, light. The NA of the cladding light is reduced from 0.3 down to 0.08. The CLS exhibit a 1°C/stripped-Watt temperature elevation making them very suitable for high power applications. This fabrication method is simple and reliable. We have tested different texturization geometries on several different fibers: 20/400 from Nufern, KAGOME, and LMA 10 and LMA 15 fibers (results not shown herein) and we observed good efficiencies and temperature elevation behavior for all of them. Finally, large scale production of CLS with this method is possible since the time necessary to prepare on CLS is very small, in the order of few seconds.

  17. A custom CMOS imager for multi-beam laser scanning microscopy and an improvement of scanning speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2013-02-01

    Multi-beam laser scanning confocal microscopy with a 256 × 256-pixel custom CMOS imager performing focal-plane pinhole effect, in which any rotating disk is not required, is demonstrated. A specimen is illuminated by 32 × 32 diffraction limited light spots whose wavelength and pitch are 532nm and 8.4 μm, respectively. The spot array is generated by a microlens array, which is scanned by two-dimensional piezo actuator according to the scanning of the image sensor. The frame rate of the prototype is 0.17 Hz, which is limited by the actuator. The confocal effect has been confirmed by comparing the axial resolution in the confocal imaging mode with that of the normal imaging mode. The axial resolution in the confocal mode measured by the full width at half maximum (FWHM) for a planar mirror was 8.9 μm, which is showed that the confocality has been achieved with the proposed CMOS image sensor. The focal-plane pinhole effect in the confocal microscopy with the proposed CMOS imager has been demonstrated at low frame rate. An improvement of the scanning speed and a CMOS imager with photo-sensitivity modulation pixels suitable for high-speed scanning are also discussed.

  18. An integrated laser Raman optical sensor for fast detection of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Luanje, Appolinaire T; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2011-04-01

    An integrated fiber optic Raman sensor was designed for real-time, nonintrusive detection of liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) in liquid oxygen (LO(2)) at high pressures and high flow rates. This was intended to monitor the quality of LO(2) in oxidizer feed lines during the ground testing of rocket engines. Various issues related to optical diagnosis of cryogenic fluids (LN(2)/LO(2)) in supercritical environment of rocket engine test facility, such as fluorescence from impurity in optical window of feed line, signal-noise ratio, and fast data acquisition time, etc., are well addressed. The integrated sensor employed a frequency doubled 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser as an excitation light source. The other optical components included were InPhotonics Raman probes, spectrometers, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The spectrometer was used to collect the Raman spectrum of LN(2) and LO(2). The PMT detection unit was integrated with home-built LABVIEW software for fast monitoring of concentration ratios LN(2) and LO(2). Prior to designing an integrated sensor system, its optical components were also tested with gaseous nitrogen (GN(2)) and oxygen (GO(2)).

  19. Space Debris Laser Ranging at Graz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Georg; Koidl, Franz; Kucharski, Daniel; Ploner, Martin; Riede, Wolfgang; Voelker, Uwe; Buske, Ivo; Friedrich, Fabian; Baur, Oliver; Krauss, Sandro; Wirnsberger, Harald

    2013-08-01

    The Graz Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) station usually measures distances to retro-reflector equipped satellites with an accuracy of few millimetres, using short laser pulses with 10 ps pulse width, a low energy of 400 μJ, and a repetition rate of 2 kHz. To test laser ranging possibilities to space debris, we installed two stronger lasers (a diode-pumped 25 mJ / 1 kHz / 10 ns / 532 nm laser, exchanged later to a flash lamp pumped 150 mJ / 100 Hz / 3 ns / 532 nm laser) - both on loan from DLR / German Aerospace Centre Stuttgart -, and built lownoise single-photon detection units. With this configuration, we successfully tracked ≈ 100 passes of almost 50 different space debris targets, in distances between 600 km and up to more than 2500 km, with radar cross sections from > 15 m2 down to < 0.3 m2 , and measured their distances with an average accuracy of 0.7 m (10 ns laser) resp. ≈ 0.5 m (3 ns laser) RMS. The resulting data will be used to calculate improved orbits of the tracked debris objects, and to compare them with radar-based TLE (two-line element) orbits. As demonstration experiment, here we provide findings for ENVISAT normal point analysis. As a next step, we plan to additionally taking pointing information into account. Potentially, the joint analysis of both ranges and orientation angles further improves space debris orbit accuracy. Orbit determination and prediction was done with the GEODYN software package. In addition, we successfully tested a 'bi-static' mode: Graz fired laser pulses to ENVISAT; while Graz detected photons reflected from the retro-reflector, the Swiss SLR station Zimmerwald detected the photons diffusely reflected from the satellite body.

  20. A study on anti-light disturbance in laser position detecting to welding seam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan-sheng; Guo, Chang-rong; Liu, Ming-you

    2006-02-01

    Laser position detecting to weld seam is based on the principle of structured light measuring. The intense arc, combusting gas and spatters influence the acquisition of weld seam image in the process of welding. Therefore, the problem of anti-light disturbance is studied in four aspects. First, the forming factors of the light disturbance such as the arc and the melting cell radiation and so on is studied from the viewpoint of the distribution of spectrum energy. Matching the narrow-band filter with the wavelength of laser can obstruct the ultraviolet and infrared radiation. Secondly, the influence brought by the reflection on the surface of steel plate is studied and a neutral filter is used to absorb the light disturbance and then the signal-to-noise ratio of an image is improved. Thirdly, there are still some stripes of spatters on image after compound filtering. For calculating the position of weld seam, the technology of digital image processing is also adopted. And finally, obstructing the light disturbance by a mechanical part is also an important measure. A baffle installed between the welding torch and the laser sensor can effectively obstruct some of the spatters. After taking the above four aspects measures, the light disturbance is better eliminated and a clear image is acquired. It can be used to track the weld seam by crawling arc welding robot.