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Sample records for 56-kda type-specific antigen

  1. Type-Specific Antigens in the Psittacosis-Lymphogranuloma Venereum Group of Organisms1

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C. E. Ovid; Berman, David T.

    1965-01-01

    Fraser, C. E. Ovid (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and David T. Berman. Type-specific antigens in the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum group of organisms. J. Bacteriol. 89:943–948. 1965.—Antigens of 14 strains of the psittacosis-lymphogranuloma venereum (PLV) group of organisms were prepared by treating purified particles with deoxycholate and trypsin. In complement-fixation tests of these antigens with the homologous and heterologous antisera, specific serotype differences were observed. Application of the method of specificity differences permitted placement of the 14 strains into 7 subgroups. The possible value of these techniques in immunology, epizootiology, and taxonomy of the PLV group is discussed. PMID:14276119

  2. Isolation and characterization of type III group B streptococcal mutants defective in biosynthesis of the type-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, M K; Mattingly, S J

    1983-01-01

    Four classes of mutants of type III group B streptococcus were isolated by serial subculture of the wild-type strain in the presence of type III-specific rabbit antiserum. Class I mutants no longer synthesized sialic acid but still elaborated the core antigen. Class II mutants maintained the ability to synthesize sialic acid but could not attach it to the core antigen. Class III mutants did not produce the core antigen but still synthesized intracellular sialic acid. Class IV mutants synthesized the complete antigen; however, only approximately 4% of the antigen synthesized was found associated with the cell wall peptidoglycan (in the wild-type strain greater than 85% of the antigen synthesized is covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan), whereas greater than 90% of the antigen was secreted into the growth medium. Production of other components (CAMP factor, group B antigen, beta-hemolysin, neuraminidase) by these mutants appeared similar to those of the wild-type strain. Mouse lethality studies of these strains indicated that all four classes have greater than 3 log10-higher 50% lethal dose values than that of the wild-type strain. To understand the basis for this variation, the invasive ability of the wild-type strain and the sialic acid-deficient mutant strain M-10 (class I) was examined. Mice received 10(5) CFU of each organism; they were then sacrificed at various times postinoculation, and viable group B streptococci from different organs were enumerated. Mice were able to clear M-10 more efficiently, with greater than 80% of M-10 cells being phagocytized by macrophages within 1 h, whereas the wild-type strain was able to evade phagocytic killing and disseminate to other tissues. These data, therefore, strongly indicate that the sialic acid moiety greatly enhances the virulence of the type III antigen. In addition, the level of cell-associated type-specific antigen appears to contribute significantly to the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID

  3. Type-specific capsular antigen is associated with virulence in late-onset group B Streptococcal type III disease.

    PubMed Central

    Klegerman, M E; Boyer, K M; Papierniak, C K; Levine, L; Gotoff, S P

    1984-01-01

    Strain differences have been postulated to explain the observation that group B Streptococcus type III (GBS III) late-onset disease occurs in only a fraction of colonized infants. To determine the distribution of type-specific polysaccharide antigen (Ag) in GBS III, Ag was measured by rocket immunoelectrophoresis in both supernatant fluids and EDTA extracts and by radial immunodiffusion in multiple HCl extracts of the pellet from cultures of 10 strains of GBS III. Capsular Ag was defined as the sum of Ag in EDTA extracts + Ag in multiple HCl extracts. Both Ag in EDTA extracts and Ag in supernatant fluids correlated with capsular Ag (r = 0.94). GBS III strains were obtained from the blood of 19 infants with late-onset sepsis, from the cerebrospinal fluid or blood of 22 infants with late-onset meningitis, and from mucosal surfaces of both 18 infants and 12 mothers of infants with low levels of type-specific antibody and asymptomatic colonization. Mean values of Ag in supernatant fluids in strains from infants with late-onset sepsis (1.50 +/- 0.08 micrograms/ml) and late-onset meningitis (1.67 +/- 0.09 micrograms/ml) were significantly greater than those in asymptomatic colonization strains (1.14 +/- 0.05 micrograms/ml; P less than 0.001). The number of organisms required for a 50% lethal dose in the chick embryo, determined in 29 strains, was inversely related to Ag in supernatant fluids (r = -0.60). The demonstration that the quantity of capsular Ag produced by GBS III strains is related to their virulence in chick embryos and to their invasiveness in susceptible infants supports the hypothesis that Ag is a virulence factor in humans. Images PMID:6423540

  4. Spike Protein VP8* of Human Rotavirus Recognizes Histo-Blood Group Antigens in a Type-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pengwei; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Wei, Chao; Wang, Leyi; Morrow, Ardythe

    2012-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs), an important cause of severe diarrhea in children, have been found to recognize sialic acid as receptors for host cell attachment. While a few animal RVs (of P[1], P[2], P[3], and P[7]) are sialidase sensitive, human RVs and the majority of animal RVs are sialidase insensitive. In this study, we demonstrated that the surface spike protein VP8* of the major P genotypes of human RVs interacts with the secretor histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Strains of the P[4] and P[8] genotypes shared reactivity with the common antigens of Lewis b (Leb) and H type 1, while strains of the P[6] genotype bound the H type 1 antigen only. The bindings between recombinant VP8* and human saliva, milk, or synthetic HBGA oligosaccharides were demonstrated, which was confirmed by blockade of the bindings by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to Leb and/or H type 1. In addition, specific binding activities were observed when triple-layered particles of a P[8] (Wa) RV were tested. Our results suggest that the spike protein VP8* of RVs is involved in the recognition of human HBGAs that may function as ligands or receptors for RV attachment to host cells. PMID:22345472

  5. Characterization of an antigenic site that contains a dominant, type-specific neutralization determinant on the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of dengue 2 virus

    SciTech Connect

    Gromowski, Gregory D.; Barrett, Alan D.T.

    2007-09-30

    The surface of the mature dengue virus (DENV) particle consists of 90 envelope (E) protein dimers that mediate both receptor binding and fusion. The E protein ectodomain can be divided into three structural domains designated ED1, ED2, and ED3, of which ED3 contains the critical and dominant virus-specific neutralization sites. In this study the ED3 epitopes recognized by seven, murine, IgG1 DENV-2 type-specific, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were determined using site-directed mutagenesis of a recombinant DENV-2 ED3 (rED3) protein. A total of 41 single amino acid substitutions were introduced into the rED3 at 30 different surface accessible residues. The affinity of each MAb with the mutant rED3s was assessed by indirect ELISA and the results indicate that all seven MAbs recognize overlapping epitopes with residues K305 and P384 critical for binding. These residues are conserved among DENV-2 strains and cluster together on the upper lateral face of ED3. A linear relationship was observed between relative occupancy of ED3 on the virion by MAb and neutralization of the majority of virus infectivity ({approx} 90%) for all seven MAbs. Depending on the MAb, it is predicted that between 10% and 50% relative occupancy of ED3 on the virion is necessary for virus neutralization and for all seven MAbs occupancy levels approaching saturation were required for 100% neutralization of virus infectivity. Overall, the conserved antigenic site recognized by all seven MAbs is likely to be a dominant DENV-2 type-specific, neutralization determinant.

  6. Characterization of antigenic property of Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina adults and larvae through immunodiagnostic electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot technique.

    PubMed

    el-Massry, A A

    1999-08-01

    Differential molecular studies were performed by sodium dodecyle sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis--SDS-PAGE--between somatic antigen of Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina, adults and larvae, recovered from dogs. SDS-PAGE of both adults somatic antigen showed two closely similar bands (90.00, 91.95 KDa and 69.25-70.56 KDa). Each parasite had characteristic bands clustered in different molecular weights. While for their larval antigen, T. canis showed a very different antigenic profile when analysed in comparison to T. leonina antigen except at one band (66.85-66.89 KDa). The Western blot analysis showed four prominent bands represented immunoreaction between the separated somatic antigen of T. canis adults and experimentally immunized rabbit with the corresponding parasite (125.37, 117.73, 90.00 and 69.25 KDa). While separated antigen of T. leonina adults immune reacted with the corresponding hyperimmune rabbit sera at 119.04, 91.95 and 70.56 KDa. The Western blot showed cross reactive immune bands between T. canis and T. leonina adults somatic antigen at two bands (90.00, 91.95 KDa and 69.25-70.56 KDa). The polypeptide bands reacted at 125.37 KDa and 117.73 KDa can be used as specific finger print for T. canis adults while that at 119.04 KDa was specific for T. leonina adult worm.

  7. Robust Type-specific Hemisynapses Induced by Artificial Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Joong; Jeon, Chang Su; Lee, Soo Youn; Hwang, Inseong; Chung, Taek Dong

    2016-01-01

    Type-specificity of synapses, excitatory and inhibitory, regulates information process in neural networks via chemical neurotransmitters. To lay a foundation of synapse-based neural interfaces, artificial dendrites are generated by covering abiotic substrata with ectodomains of type-specific synaptogenic proteins that are C-terminally tagged with biotinylated fluorescent proteins. The excitatory artificial synapses displaying engineered ectodomains of postsynaptic neuroligin-1 (NL1) induce the formation of excitatory presynapses with mixed culture of neurons in various developmental stages, while the inhibitory artificial dendrites displaying engineered NL2 and Slitrk3 induce inhibitory presynapses only with mature neurons. By contrast, if the artificial dendrites are applied to the axonal components of micropatterned neurons, correctly-matched synaptic specificity emerges regardless of the neuronal developmental stages. The hemisynapses retain their initially established type-specificity during neuronal development and maintain their synaptic strength provided live neurons, implying the possibility of durable synapse-based biointerfaces. PMID:27072994

  8. Prevalence of type-specific HPV infection in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Berois, Nora; Heard, Isabelle; Fort, Zoraida; Alonso, Rafael; Sica, Adela; Moerzinger, Patricia; Rodriguez, Guillermo; Sancho-Garnier, Hélène; Osinaga, Eduardo; Favre, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work was to describe the prevalence of type-specific Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women attending organized cervical cancer screening program in Uruguay. Nine hundred sixty-five liquid cervical cell samples obtained after collection of cervical smears for cytology were assessed for HPV DNA using the Papillocheck system (Greiner BioOne). The overall prevalence of High-Risk (HR) HPV infections was 20.8% and increased from 16.5% in women with normal cytology to 93.3% in HSIL. Prevalence of HPV 16 and/or 18 was 6.3% and HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype in normal cytology (3.6%). The five most prevalent genotypes were HPV 16, 31, 51, 56, and 39. The overall prevalence peaked below age 30. This study provides essential baseline information at national level on type-specific HPV prevalence in Uruguay before the introduction of HPV vaccination. It documents the current prevalence of each of the oncogenic genotypes in a population attending cervical cancer screening program, suggesting that at least 64.7% of high risk lesions are potentially preventable by available HPV vaccines, and possibly augmentable if cross-protection against non-vaccine HPV types 31, 33, and 45 is confirmed.

  9. Synapse-type-specific plasticity in local circuits

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Rylan S; Sjöström, P Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscientists spent decades debating whether synaptic plasticity was presynaptically or postsynaptically expressed. It was eventually concluded that plasticity depends on many factors, including cell type. More recently, it has become increasingly clear that plasticity is regulated at an even finer grained level; it is specific to the synapse type, a concept we denote synapse-type-specific plasticity (STSP). Here, we review recent developments in the field of STSP, discussing both long-term and short-term variants and with particular emphasis on neocortical function. As there are dozens of neocortical cell types, there is a multiplicity of forms of STSP, the vast majority of which have never been explored. We argue that to understand the brain and synaptic diseases, we have to grapple with STSP. PMID:26310110

  10. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  11. Detection of type-specific antibody to herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 in human sera by complement-fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Hartley, C H; Whitney, J E

    1976-01-01

    Type-specific antigens for herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 were prepared by rigorous absorption of cell extracts with heterotypic immune sera. Type-specificity was demonstrated by immunodiffusion and complement-fixation tests against immune sera prepared in rabbits. Specific type 1 complement-fixing reactivity was detected in eleven of fifteen sera from Roman Catholic nuns and in two convalescent sera from patients with recurrent herpes labialis; these sera had been previously shown to contain neutralising and complement-fixing antibody to herpes simplex virus. Three of the non-reacting sera contained low or absent levels of type-common complement-fixing reactivity and other contained no type-specific neutralising antibody. With the exception of three "acute" sera, specific type 2 complement-fixing reactivity was detected in every convalescent or interim serum obtained from patients with a virologically-proven history of type 2 herpes virus infection. It is suggested that complement-fixation testing using these absorbed type-specific antigens preparations may provide a convenient and rapid method for the identification of type-specific antibody in human sera.

  12. B-Cell and Monocyte Contribution to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Identified by Cell-Type-Specific Differential Expression Analysis in RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G.; Dominguez, Nicolas; Bean, Krista; Macwana, Susan R.; Roberts, Virginia; Glass, Edmund; James, Judith A.; Guthridge, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by complex interplay among immune cell types. SLE activity is experimentally assessed by several blood tests, including gene expression profiling of heterogeneous populations of cells in peripheral blood. To better understand the contribution of different cell types in SLE pathogenesis, we applied the two methods in cell-type-specific differential expression analysis, csSAM and DSection, to identify cell-type-specific gene expression differences in heterogeneous gene expression measures obtained using RNA-seq technology. We identified B-cell-, monocyte-, and neutrophil-specific gene expression differences. Immunoglobulin-coding gene expression was altered in B-cells, while a ribosomal signature was prominent in monocytes. On the contrary, genes differentially expressed in the heterogeneous mixture of cells did not show any functional enrichment. Our results identify antigen binding and structural constituents of ribosomes as functions altered by B-cell- and monocyte-specific gene expression differences, respectively. Finally, these results position both csSAM and DSection methods as viable techniques for cell-type-specific differential expression analysis, which may help uncover pathogenic, cell-type-specific processes in SLE. PMID:26512198

  13. CUTANEOUS REACTIONS IN RABBITS TO THE TYPE-SPECIFIC CAPSULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF PNEUMOCOCCUS

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Thomas; Tillett, William S.

    1931-01-01

    The injection of the type-specific capsular polysaccharides of Pneumococcus Types I, II and III into the skin of rabbits, actively or passively immunized to one of these types of Pneumococcus, elicits a type-specific cutaneous reaction. The form of reaction resembles that described by Arthus. The reaction is produced only when type-specific precipitins for the homologous polysaccharide are demonstrable in the blood of the rabbit. In 84 per cent of actively immunized rabbits, the serum of which contained type-specific precipitins, a reaction was elicited. A positive result was obtained in 100 per cent of rabbits passively immunized with antipneumococcus horse serum whereas, attempts passively to transfer reactivity from immune rabbit to normal rabbit were unsuccessful. The recipients, in the latter group, possessed no demonstrable circulating type-specific precipitins. The reaction produced by specific capsular carbohydrates is always associated with a well grounded type-specific immunity. A brief summary of the relation of hypersensitiveness and immunity to pneumococcus is given. PMID:19869942

  14. Monitoring Astrocytic Proteome Dynamics by Cell Type-Specific Protein Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anke; Stellmacher, Anne; Freitag, Christine E.; Landgraf, Peter; Dieterich, Daniela C.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the nervous system to undergo long-term plasticity is based on changes in cellular and synaptic proteomes. While many studies have explored dynamic alterations in neuronal proteomes during plasticity, there has been less attention paid to the astrocytic counterpart. Indeed, progress in identifying cell type-specific proteomes is limited owing to technical difficulties. Here, we present a cell type-specific metabolic tagging technique for a mammalian coculture model based on the bioorthogonal amino acid azidonorleucine and the mutated Mus musculus methionyl-tRNA synthetaseL274G enabling azidonorleucine introduction into de novo synthesized proteins. Azidonorleucine incorporation resulted in cell type-specific protein labeling and retained neuronal or astrocytic cell viability. Furthermore, we were able to label astrocytic de novo synthesized proteins and identified both Connexin-43 and 60S ribosomal protein L10a upregulated upon treatment with Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in astrocytes of a neuron-glia coculture. Taken together, we demonstrate the successful dissociation of astrocytic from neuronal proteomes by cell type-specific metabolic labeling offering new possibilities for the analyses of cell type-specific proteome dynamics. PMID:26690742

  15. Quantitative analysis of cell-type specific gene expression in the green alga Volvox carteri

    PubMed Central

    Nematollahi, Ghazaleh; Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Background The multicellular alga Volvox carteri possesses only two cell types: mortal, motile somatic cells and potentially immortal, immotile reproductive cells. It is therefore an attractive model system for studying how cell-autonomous cytodifferentiation is programmed within a genome. Moreover, there are ongoing genome projects both in Volvox carteri and in the closely related unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. However, gene sequencing is only the beginning. To identify cell-type specific expression and to determine relative expression rates, we evaluate the potential of real-time RT-PCR for quantifying gene transcript levels. Results Here we analyze a diversified pool of 39 target genes by real-time RT-PCR for each cell type. This gene pool contains previously known genes with unknown localization of cellular expression, 28 novel genes which are described in this study for the first time, and a few known, cell-type specific genes as a control. The respective gene products are, for instance, part of photosynthesis, cellular regulation, stress response, or transport processes. We provide expression data for all these genes. Conclusion The results show that quantitative real-time RT-PCR is a favorable approach to analyze cell-type specific gene expression in Volvox, which can be extended to a much larger number of genes or to developmental or metabolic mutants. Our expression data also provide a basis for a detailed analysis of individual, previously unknown, cell-type specifically expressed genes. PMID:17184518

  16. Type-specific PCR assays for Babesia bovis msa-1 genotypes in Asia: Revisiting the genetic diversity in Sri Lanka, Mongolia, and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Liyanagunawardena, Nilukshi; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Battsetseg, Badgar; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich; Inoue, Noboru; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    Babesia bovis is the most virulent Babesia organism, resulting in a high mortality rate in cattle. The genetic diversity of B. bovis merozoite surface antigens (MSAs), such as MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c, might be linked to altered immune profiles in the host animals. The present study aimed to develop type-specific PCR assays for Asian msa-1 genotypes, thereby re-analyzing the genetic diversity of msa-1 in Sri Lanka, Mongolia, and Vietnam. Specific primers were designed for nine Asian msa-1 genotypes, which had been detected based on the phylogeny constructed using msa-1 gene sequences retrieved from the GenBank database. Specificity of the type-specific PCR assays was confirmed using plasmids containing the inserts of msa-1 gene fragments that represent Asian genotypes. Furthermore, no amplicons were observed by these PCR assays when DNA samples of Babesia bigemina, Babesia ovata, Theileria annulata, Theileria orientalis, Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma theileri, Anaplasma marginale, and Anaplasma bovis, and non-infected bovine blood were analyzed. In total, 109 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from Sri Lanka (44 cattle), Mongolia (26 cattle), and Vietnam (23 cattle and 16 water buffaloes) were then screened by the type-specific PCR assays. The sequences derived from all of the PCR amplicons were phylogenetically analyzed. Out of 109 DNA samples, 23 (20 from cattle and 3 from water buffaloes) were positive for at least one genotype. In agreement with previous studies, five and four different genotypes were detected among the DNA samples from Sri Lanka and Vietnam, respectively. In contrast, four genotypes, including three novel genotypes, were detected from Mongolia. Five DNA samples were found to be co-infected with multiple genotypes. The sequences of the PCR amplicons clustered phylogenetically within the corresponding clades. These findings indicated that the type-specific PCR assays described herein are useful for the determination of genotypic

  17. Soil type-specific environmental quality standards for zinc in Dutch soil.

    PubMed

    Bos, Rudy; Huijbregts, Mark; Peijnenburg, Willie

    2005-07-01

    The heavy metal zinc is an element of natural origin. Adverse effects of chemicals on soil ecosystems depend on the soil type. Therefore, soil type-specific variation in natural background concentration and toxicity data should be taken into account in the derivation of environmental quality standards for zinc. In this paper, a methodology is presented, taking the specific features of natural occurrence and soil type into account by deriving soil type-specific background concentrations as well as soil type-specific maximum permissible additions (MPAs) for zinc in Dutch soil. The strategy used to perform a soil type-specific risk assessment for zinc consisted of 6 steps: identification of soil types, determination of characteristic background concentrations, selection of characteristic organisms, determination of no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs), and derivations of the MPA and the maximum permissible concentration (MPC). Differences in background concentrations between different Dutch soil types were up to a factor of 7.5, whereas the MPA between the soil types varied by up to a factor of 3. This resulted in MPCs for the 3 predominant soil types that vary from 44 mg/kg dry weight (dry wt) to 208 mg/kg dry wt. Although large differences in MPC were observed, the uncertainties in background concentrations hinder setting more accurate environmental quality standards for zinc. Additional measurements on remote background concentrations of zinc in Dutch soil are needed to reduce the uncertainties in the calculated MPCs. The risk assessment approach discussed here is widely applicable to naturally occurring and anthropogenic substances.

  18. Isolation of cell type-specific apoptotic bodies by fluorescence-activated cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Atkin-Smith, Georgia K.; Paone, Stephanie; Zanker, Damien J.; Duan, Mubing; Phan, Than K.; Chen, Weisan; Hulett, Mark D.; Poon, Ivan K. H.

    2017-01-01

    Apoptotic bodies (ApoBDs) are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles that can mediate intercellular communication in physiological and pathological settings. By combining recently developed analytical strategies with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), we have developed a method that enables the isolation of ApoBDs from cultured cells to 99% purity. In addition, this approach also enables the identification and isolation of cell type-specific ApoBDs from tissue, bodily fluid and blood-derived samples. PMID:28057919

  19. Single-Cell mRNA Profiling Reveals Cell-Type Specific Expression of Neurexin Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Fuccillo, Marc V.; Földy, Csaba; Gökce, Özgün; Rothwell, Patrick E.; Sun, Gordon L.; Malenka, Robert C.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurexins are considered central organizers of synapse architecture that are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Expression of neurexins in hundreds of alternatively spliced isoforms suggested that individual neurons might exhibit a cell type-specific neurexin expression pattern (a neurexin code). To test this hypothesis, we quantified the single-cell levels of neurexin isoforms and other trans-synaptic cell-adhesion molecules by microfluidics-based RT-PCR. We show that the neurexin repertoire displays pronounced cell-type specificity that is remarkably consistent within each type of neuron. Furthermore, we uncovered region-specific regulation of neurexin transcription and splice-site usage. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional profiles of neurexins can be altered in an experience-dependent fashion by exposure to a drug of abuse. Our data provide evidence of cell type-specific expression patterns of multiple neurexins at the single-cell level, and suggest that expression of synaptic cell-adhesion molecules overlaps with other key features of cellular identity and diversity. PMID:26182417

  20. Locus- and cell type-specific epigenetic switching during cellular differentiation in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Tao; Fasolino, Maria; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epigenomic reconfiguration, including changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications, is crucial for the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into somatic cells. However, the extent to which the epigenome is reconfigured and the interplay between components of the epigenome during cellular differentiation remain poorly defined. METHODS We systematically analyzed and compared DNA methylation, various histone modification, and transcriptome profiles in ESCs with those of two distinct types of somatic cells from human and mouse. RESULTS We found that global DNA methylation levels are lower in somatic cells compared to ESCs in both species. We also found that 80% of regions with histone modification occupancy differ between human ESCs and the two human somatic cell types. Approximately 70% of the reconfigurations in DNA methylation and histone modifications are locus- and cell type-specific. Intriguingly, the loss of DNA methylation is accompanied by the gain of different histone modifications in a locus- and cell type-specific manner. Further examination of transcriptional changes associated with epigenetic reconfiguration at promoter regions revealed an epigenetic switching for gene regulation—a transition from stable gene silencing mediated by DNA methylation in ESCs to flexible gene repression facilitated by repressive histone modifications in somatic cells. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that the epigenome is reconfigured in a locus- and cell type-specific manner and epigenetic switching is common during cellular differentiation in both human and mouse. PMID:28261266

  1. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Dorte E; Albers, Peter H; Prats, Clara; Baba, Otto; Birk, Jesper B; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a regulator of energy homeostasis during exercise. Studies suggest muscle fibre type-specific AMPK expression. However, fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets during exercise has not been demonstrated. We hypothesized that AMPK subunits are expressed in a fibre type-dependent manner and that fibre type-specific activation of AMPK and downstream targets is dependent on exercise intensity. Pools of type I and II fibres were prepared from biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle from healthy men before and after two exercise trials: (1) continuous cycling (CON) for 30 min at 69 ± 1% peak rate of O2 consumption () or (2) interval cycling (INT) for 30 min with 6 × 1.5 min high-intensity bouts peaking at 95 ± 2% . In type I vs. II fibres a higher β1 AMPK (+215%) and lower γ3 AMPK expression (−71%) was found. α1, α2, β2 and γ1 AMPK expression was similar between fibre types. In type I vs. II fibres phosphoregulation after CON was similar (AMPKThr172, ACCSer221, TBC1D1Ser231 and GS2+2a) or lower (TBC1D4Ser704). Following INT, phosphoregulation in type I vs. II fibres was lower (AMPKThr172, TBC1D1Ser231, TBC1D4Ser704 and ACCSer221) or higher (GS2+2a). Exercise-induced glycogen degradation in type I vs. II fibres was similar (CON) or lower (INT). In conclusion, a differentiated response to exercise of metabolic signalling/effector proteins in human type I and II fibres was evident during interval exercise. This could be important for exercise type-specific adaptations, i.e. insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial density, and highlights the potential for new discoveries when investigating fibre type-specific signalling. PMID:25640469

  2. Cell-type specific gene expression profiles of leukocytes in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Chana; Diehn, Maximilian; Alizadeh, Ash A; Brown, Patrick O

    2006-01-01

    Background Blood is a complex tissue comprising numerous cell types with distinct functions and corresponding gene expression profiles. We attempted to define the cell type specific gene expression patterns for the major constituent cells of blood, including B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, lymphocytes and granulocytes. We did this by comparing the global gene expression profiles of purified B-cells, CD4+ T-cells, CD8+ T-cells, granulocytes, and lymphocytes using cDNA microarrays. Results Unsupervised clustering analysis showed that similar cell populations from different donors share common gene expression profiles. Supervised analyses identified gene expression signatures for B-cells (427 genes), T-cells (222 genes), CD8+ T-cells (23 genes), granulocytes (411 genes), and lymphocytes (67 genes). No statistically significant gene expression signature was identified for CD4+ cells. Genes encoding cell surface proteins were disproportionately represented among the genes that distinguished among the lymphocyte subpopulations. Lymphocytes were distinguishable from granulocytes based on their higher levels of expression of genes encoding ribosomal proteins, while granulocytes exhibited characteristic expression of various cell surface and inflammatory proteins. Conclusion The genes comprising the cell-type specific signatures encompassed many of the genes already known to be involved in cell-type specific processes, and provided clues that may prove useful in discovering the functions of many still unannotated genes. The most prominent feature of the cell type signature genes was the enrichment of genes encoding cell surface proteins, perhaps reflecting the importance of specialized systems for sensing the environment to the physiology of resting leukocytes. PMID:16704732

  3. L1 regularization facilitates detection of cell type-specific parameters in dynamical systems

    PubMed Central

    Steiert, Bernhard; Timmer, Jens; Kreutz, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: A major goal of drug development is to selectively target certain cell types. Cellular decisions influenced by drugs are often dependent on the dynamic processing of information. Selective responses can be achieved by differences between the involved cell types at levels of receptor, signaling, gene regulation or further downstream. Therefore, a systematic approach to detect and quantify cell type-specific parameters in dynamical systems becomes necessary. Results: Here, we demonstrate that a combination of nonlinear modeling with L1 regularization is capable of detecting cell type-specific parameters. To adapt the least-squares numerical optimization routine to L1 regularization, sub-gradient strategies as well as truncation of proposed optimization steps were implemented. Likelihood-ratio tests were used to determine the optimal regularization strength resulting in a sparse solution in terms of a minimal number of cell type-specific parameters that is in agreement with the data. By applying our implementation to a realistic dynamical benchmark model of the DREAM6 challenge we were able to recover parameter differences with an accuracy of 78%. Within the subset of detected differences, 91% were in agreement with their true value. Furthermore, we found that the results could be improved using the profile likelihood. In conclusion, the approach constitutes a general method to infer an overarching model with a minimum number of individual parameters for the particular models. Availability and Implementation: A MATLAB implementation is provided within the freely available, open-source modeling environment Data2Dynamics. Source code for all examples is provided online at http://www.data2dynamics.org/. Contact: bernhard.steiert@fdm.uni-freiburg.de PMID:27587694

  4. Proteome-determined type-specific proteins of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Valerie; Garcia-Sanchez, Alfredo; Smith, Stuart; Mclean, Kevin; Lainson, Alex; Nath, Mintu; Stevenson, Karen

    2012-07-06

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis) is a pathogen of ruminants, causing paratuberculosis (characterized by severe emaciation). The disease is endemic in many countries including the UK and places a severe economic burden on the global livestock industry. Two types of M. a. paratuberculosis can be classified by pulsed-field electrophoresis (I/III and II), which are phenotypically distinct and appear to have different host preferences. Proteomes of Type I and Type II M. a. paratuberculosis were analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis to determine if any significant differences existed between the subtypes. Seven different strains of Type I and 18 strains of Type II were analyzed and compared to detect type-specific differences. These 'type-specific' differences existed regardless of growth phase and were also exhibited in cells isolated directly from pathogenic lesions. Twenty-three spots predominated on the Type I profile, from which 17 proteins were identified. Twenty-one spots predominated on the Type II profile, from which 16 proteins were identified. None of the proteins identified as differentially represented on the profiles of Type I or Type II corresponded to open reading frames of the defining genomic regions as previously described for the Type I (sheep) and Type II (cattle). Sequence polymorphisms existing in Type I and II strains were identified in some open reading frames or regulatory regions of genes that correspond to proteins expressed in a type-specific fashion. The consequence of these is discussed in relation to protein expression and their impact on the type phenotype is discussed.

  5. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Nicholas L; Banks, Glen B; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K; Hockenbery, David M; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M

    2015-01-13

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I "red" slow twitch and type II "white" fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases.

  6. Transition to chaos in random networks with cell-type-specific connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Aljadeff, Johnatan; Stern, Merav; Sharpee, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    In neural circuits, statistical connectivity rules strongly depend on cell-type identity. We study dynamics of neural networks with cell-type specific connectivity by extending the dynamic mean field method, and find that these networks exhibit a phase transition between silent and chaotic activity. By analyzing the locus of this transition, we derive a new result in random matrix theory: the spectral radius of a random connectivity matrix with block-structured variances. We apply our results to show how a small group of hyper-excitable neurons within the network can significantly increase the network’s computational capacity by bringing it into the chaotic regime. PMID:25768781

  7. Selection of Human Antibody Fragments Which Bind Novel Breast Tumor Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    cell type specific scFv for tumor targeting and as tools for identifying novel tumor antigens ... tumor specific antigens ). Subsequently, the cells were washed extensively with PBS to remove unbound phage and then incubated at 37°C for 15 minutes... detection and isolation of a tumor cell surface antigen using antibody phage display. J. Immunol. Meth. 203: 11-24. 46. Watters, J.M., Telleman, P.,

  8. Integrating and mining the chromatin landscape of cell-type specificity using self-organizing maps

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Ali; Pepke, Shirley; Jansen, Camden; Marinov, Georgi K.; Ernst, Jason; Kellis, Manolis; Hardison, Ross C.; Myers, Richard M.; Wold, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    We tested whether self-organizing maps (SOMs) could be used to effectively integrate, visualize, and mine diverse genomics data types, including complex chromatin signatures. A fine-grained SOM was trained on 72 ChIP-seq histone modifications and DNase-seq data sets from six biologically diverse cell lines studied by The ENCODE Project Consortium. We mined the resulting SOM to identify chromatin signatures related to sequence-specific transcription factor occupancy, sequence motif enrichment, and biological functions. To highlight clusters enriched for specific functions such as transcriptional promoters or enhancers, we overlaid onto the map additional data sets not used during training, such as ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, CAGE, and information on cis-acting regulatory modules from the literature. We used the SOM to parse known transcriptional enhancers according to the cell-type-specific chromatin signature, and we further corroborated this pattern on the map by EP300 (also known as p300) occupancy. New candidate cell-type-specific enhancers were identified for multiple ENCODE cell types in this way, along with new candidates for ubiquitous enhancer activity. An interactive web interface was developed to allow users to visualize and custom-mine the ENCODE SOM. We conclude that large SOMs trained on chromatin data from multiple cell types provide a powerful way to identify complex relationships in genomic data at user-selected levels of granularity. PMID:24170599

  9. Ribosome Profiling Reveals a Cell-Type-Specific Translational Landscape in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Christian; Sims, Jennifer S.; Hornstein, Nicholas; Mela, Angeliki; Garcia, Franklin; Lei, Liang; Gass, David A.; Amendolara, Benjamin; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Glioma growth is driven by signaling that ultimately regulates protein synthesis. Gliomas are also complex at the cellular level and involve multiple cell types, including transformed and reactive cells in the brain tumor microenvironment. The distinct functions of the various cell types likely lead to different requirements and regulatory paradigms for protein synthesis. Proneural gliomas can arise from transformation of glial progenitors that are driven to proliferate via mitogenic signaling that affects translation. To investigate translational regulation in this system, we developed a RiboTag glioma mouse model that enables cell-type-specific, genome-wide ribosome profiling of tumor tissue. Infecting glial progenitors with Cre-recombinant retrovirus simultaneously activates expression of tagged ribosomes and delivers a tumor-initiating mutation. Remarkably, we find that although genes specific to transformed cells are highly translated, their translation efficiencies are low compared with normal brain. Ribosome positioning reveals sequence-dependent regulation of ribosomal activity in 5′-leaders upstream of annotated start codons, leading to differential translation in glioma compared with normal brain. Additionally, although transformed cells express a proneural signature, untransformed tumor-associated cells, including reactive astrocytes and microglia, express a mesenchymal signature. Finally, we observe the same phenomena in human disease by combining ribosome profiling of human proneural tumor and non-neoplastic brain tissue with computational deconvolution to assess cell-type-specific translational regulation. PMID:25122893

  10. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss.

    PubMed

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-09-02

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders.

  11. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09800.001 PMID:26329458

  12. Cell-type specific cis-regulatory networks: insights from Hox transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Polychronidou, Maria; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Hox proteins are a prominent class of transcription factors that specify cell and tissue identities in animal embryos. In sharp contrast to tissue-specifically expressed transcription factors, which coordinate regulatory pathways leading to the differentiation of a selected tissue, Hox proteins are active in many different cell types but are nonetheless able to differentially regulate gene expression in a context-dependent manner. This particular feature makes Hox proteins ideal candidates for elucidating the mechanisms employed by transcription factors to achieve tissue-specific functions in multi-cellular organisms. Here we discuss how the recent genome-wide identification and characterization of Hox cis-regulatory elements has provided insight concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying the high spatiotemporal specificity of Hox proteins. In particular, it was shown that Hox transcriptional outputs depend on the cell-type specific interplay of the different Hox proteins with co-regulatory factors as well as with epigenetic modifiers. Based on these observations it becomes clear that cell-type specific approaches are required for dissecting the tissue-specific Hox regulatory code. Identification and comparative analysis of Hox cis-regulatory elements driving target gene expression in different cell types in combination with analyses on how cofactors, epigenetic modifiers and protein-protein interactions mediate context-dependent Hox function will elucidate the mechanistic basis of tissue-specific gene regulation.

  13. Fibre type-specific change in FXYD1 phosphorylation during acute intense exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Martin; Murphy, Robyn M; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine fibre type-specific Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit expression and exercise-induced alterations in phospholemman (FXYD1) phosphorylation in humans. Segments of human skeletal muscle fibres were dissected and fibre typed, and protein expression was determined by Western blotting. The protein expression of the Na(+)-K(+) pump α2 isoform was lower in type I than in type II fibres (0.63 ± 0.04 a.u. vs. 1.00 ± 0.07 a.u., P < 0.001), while protein expression of the Na(+)-K(+) pump α1 and β1 isoforms was not different. Protein expression of the ATP-dependent potassium channel Kir6.2 was higher in type I compared with type II fibres. In both type I (P < 0.01) and type II fibres (P < 0.001) the AB_FXYD1 signal was lower after exercise compared with rest, indicating an increase in unspecific FXYD1 phosphorylation. The FXYD1 serine 68 phosphorylation was higher (P < 0.001) after exercise compared with rest in type II fibres (1.90 ± 0.25 vs. 1.00 ± 0.08) and not changed in type I fibres. Total FXYD1 was not expressed in a fibre type-specific manner. Expression of phosphofructokinase was lower (P < 0.001) in type I than in type II fibres, whereas citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase were more abundant (P < 0.001) in type I fibres. In conclusion, FXYD1 phosphorylation at serine 68 increased after an acute bout of intense exercise in human type II fibres, while AB_FXYD1 signal intensity was lower in both type I and type II fibres, indicating fibre type-specific differences in FXYD1 phosphorylation on serine 63, serine 68 and threonine 69. This, together with the observation of a higher abundance of the Na(+)-K(+) pump α2 isoform protein in type II fibres, is likely to have importance for the exercise-induced human Na(+)-K(+) pump activity in the different fibre types.

  14. Fibre type-specific change in FXYD1 phosphorylation during acute intense exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Thomassen, Martin; Murphy, Robyn M; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine fibre type-specific Na+–K+ pump subunit expression and exercise-induced alterations in phospholemman (FXYD1) phosphorylation in humans. Segments of human skeletal muscle fibres were dissected and fibre typed, and protein expression was determined by Western blotting. The protein expression of the Na+–K+ pump α2 isoform was lower in type I than in type II fibres (0.63 ± 0.04 a.u. vs. 1.00 ± 0.07 a.u., P < 0.001), while protein expression of the Na+–K+ pump α1 and β1 isoforms was not different. Protein expression of the ATP-dependent potassium channel Kir6.2 was higher in type I compared with type II fibres. In both type I (P < 0.01) and type II fibres (P < 0.001) the AB_FXYD1 signal was lower after exercise compared with rest, indicating an increase in unspecific FXYD1 phosphorylation. The FXYD1 serine 68 phosphorylation was higher (P < 0.001) after exercise compared with rest in type II fibres (1.90 ± 0.25 vs. 1.00 ± 0.08) and not changed in type I fibres. Total FXYD1 was not expressed in a fibre type-specific manner. Expression of phosphofructokinase was lower (P < 0.001) in type I than in type II fibres, whereas citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase were more abundant (P < 0.001) in type I fibres. In conclusion, FXYD1 phosphorylation at serine 68 increased after an acute bout of intense exercise in human type II fibres, while AB_FXYD1 signal intensity was lower in both type I and type II fibres, indicating fibre type-specific differences in FXYD1 phosphorylation on serine 63, serine 68 and threonine 69. This, together with the observation of a higher abundance of the Na+–K+ pump α2 isoform protein in type II fibres, is likely to have importance for the exercise-induced human Na+–K+ pump activity in the different fibre types. PMID:23359667

  15. The diagnosis of genital herpes – beyond culture: An evidence-based guide for the utilization of polymerase chain reaction and herpes simplex virus type-specific serology

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, S; Severini, A; Zahariadis, G; Petric, M; Romanowski, B

    2007-01-01

    Accurate identification of persons with genital herpes is necessary for optimal patient management and prevention of transmission. Because of inherent inaccuracies, clinical diagnosis of genital herpes should be confirmed by laboratory testing for the causative agents herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV type 2 (HSV-2). Further identification of the HSV type is valuable for counselling on the natural history of infection and risk of transmission. Laboratory methods include antigen detection, culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conventional and type-specific serology (TSS). PCR has, by far, the greater sensitivity and should be the test of choice for symptomatic cases. HSV-2 TSS is indicated for patients with genital lesions in whom antigen detection, culture or PCR fail to detect HSV, and for patients who are asymptomatic but have a history suggestive of genital herpes. HSV-2 TSS is further indicated for patients infected with HIV. HSV-2 TSS along with HSV-1 TSS may be considered, as appropriate, in evaluating infection and/or immune status in couples discordant for genital herpes, women who develop their first clinical episode of genital herpes during pregnancy, asymptomatic pregnant women whose partners have a history of genital herpes or HIV infection, and women contemplating pregnancy or considering sexual partnership with those with a history of genital herpes. The above should be performed in conjunction with counselling of infected persons and their sex partners. PMID:18923735

  16. Cell type-specific affinity purification of nuclei for chromatin profiling in whole animals.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Florian A; Henikoff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing cell differentiation during development in a complex organism requires the analysis of expression and chromatin profiles in individual cell types. Our laboratory has developed a simple and generally applicable strategy to purify specific cell types from whole organisms for simultaneous analysis of chromatin and expression. The method, termed INTACT for Isolation of Nuclei TAgged in specific Cell Types, depends on the expression of an affinity-tagged nuclear envelope protein in the cell type of interest. These nuclei can be affinity-purified from the total pool of nuclei and used as a source for RNA and chromatin. The method serves as a simple and scalable alternative to FACS sorting or laser capture microscopy to circumvent the need for expensive equipment and specialized skills. This chapter provides detailed protocols for the cell-type specific purification of nuclei from Caenorhabditis elegans.

  17. Type-specific proactive interference in patients with semantic and phonological STM deficits.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lara; Olson, Andrew; Humphreys, Glyn

    2014-01-01

    Prior neuropsychological evidence suggests that semantic and phonological components of short-term memory (STM) are functionally and neurologically distinct. The current paper examines proactive interference (PI) from semantic and phonological information in two STM-impaired patients, DS (semantic STM deficit) and AK (phonological STM deficit). In Experiment 1 probe recognition tasks with open and closed sets of stimuli were used. Phonological PI was assessed using nonword items, and semantic and phonological PI was assessed using words. In Experiment 2 phonological and semantic PI was elicited by an item recognition probe test with stimuli that bore phonological and semantic relations to the probes. The data suggested heightened phonological PI for the semantic STM patient, and exaggerated effects of semantic PI in the phonological STM case. The findings are consistent with an account of extremely rapid decay of activated type-specific representations in cases of severely impaired phonological and semantic STM.

  18. Cell type specific targeted intracellular delivery into muscle of a monoclonal antibody that binds myosin IIb.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, Richard H; Yang, Fusheng; Chan, Grace; Wakelin, Rika; Ferreri, Kevin; Zack, Debra J; Harrison, Brooke; Leinwand, Leslie A; Cole, Greg M

    2003-03-01

    Methods for cell type specific targeted intracellular delivery of proteins in vivo remain limited. A murine monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibody, mAb 3E10, was selectively transported into skeletal muscle cells in vivo. The antibody bound a 200 kDa protein only found in lysates of skeletal muscle by Western blotting. The 200 kDa protein was purified from muscle lysate by antibody affinity chromatography and identified as the skeletal muscle specific heavy chain of myosin IIb by electrospray mass spectrometry. Antibody binding specificity for myosin IIb was demonstrated in Western blots by binding myosin in skeletal muscle lysates from mice null for myosin IId but not in mice null for myosin IIb. Myosin IIb is implicated in the specific targeting of mAb 3E10 to skeletal muscle.

  19. Cell-Type-Specific Control of Brainstem Locomotor Circuits by Basal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Roseberry, Thomas K.; Lee, A. Moses; Lalive, Arnaud L.; Wilbrecht, Linda; Bonci, Antonello; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The basal ganglia (BG) are critical for adaptive motor control, but the circuit principles underlying their pathway-specific modulation of target regions are not well understood. Here, we dissect the mechanisms underlying BG direct- and indirect-pathway-mediated control of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR), a brainstem target of the BG that is critical for locomotion. We optogenetically dissect the locomotor function of the three neurochemically-distinct cell types within the MLR: glutamatergic, GABAergic, and cholinergic neurons. We find that the glutamatergic subpopulation encodes locomotor state and speed, is necessary and sufficient for locomotion, and is selectively innervated by BG. We further show activation and suppression, respectively, of MLR glutamatergic neurons by direct and indirect pathways, which is required for bidirectional control of locomotion by BG circuits. These findings provide a fundamental understanding of how the BG can initiate or suppress a motor program through cell-type-specific regulation of neurons linked to specific actions. PMID:26824660

  20. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-value< 0.001), which are closely related to K562. That is, cell type specific binding patterns are crucial for choosing the correct transcription factors for the model. Comparison of predictors obtained from binding sites in the GM12878 cell line with those from K562 shows that the amount of difference between binding patterns is directly related to the quality of the prediction. By identifying individual genes whose expression is predicted accurately by the binding sites, we are able to link transcription factors FOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation. PMID:22721266

  1. The female gametophyte: an emerging model for cell type-specific systems biology in plant development

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Marc W.; Schmidt, Anja; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Systems biology, a holistic approach describing a system emerging from the interactions of its molecular components, critically depends on accurate qualitative determination and quantitative measurements of these components. Development and improvement of large-scale profiling methods (“omics”) now facilitates comprehensive measurements of many relevant molecules. For multicellular organisms, such as animals, fungi, algae, and plants, the complexity of the system is augmented by the presence of specialized cell types and organs, and a complex interplay within and between them. Cell type-specific analyses are therefore crucial for the understanding of developmental processes and environmental responses. This review first gives an overview of current methods used for large-scale profiling of specific cell types exemplified by recent advances in plant biology. The focus then lies on suitable model systems to study plant development and cell type specification. We introduce the female gametophyte of flowering plants as an ideal model to study fundamental developmental processes. Moreover, the female reproductive lineage is of importance for the emergence of evolutionary novelties such as an unequal parental contribution to the tissue nurturing the embryo or the clonal production of seeds by asexual reproduction (apomixis). Understanding these processes is not only interesting from a developmental or evolutionary perspective, but bears great potential for further crop improvement and the simplification of breeding efforts. We finally highlight novel methods, which are already available or which will likely soon facilitate large-scale profiling of the specific cell types of the female gametophyte in both model and non-model species. We conclude that it may take only few years until an evolutionary systems biology approach toward female gametogenesis may decipher some of its biologically most interesting and economically most valuable processes. PMID:26579157

  2. Cell type specificity and host genetic polymorphisms influence antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Dambach, Kaitlyn M; Donofrio, Gina C; Tassaneetrithep, Boonrat; Marovich, Mary A

    2011-02-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is implicated in severe, usually secondary, dengue virus (DV) infections. Preexisting heterotypic antibodies, via their Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR) interactions, may increase disease severity through enhanced target cell infection. Greater numbers of infected target cells may contribute to higher viremia and excess cytokine levels often observed in severe disease. Monocytes, macrophages, and immature and mature dendritic cells (DC) are considered major cellular targets of DV. Apheresis of multiple donors allowed isolation of autologous primary myeloid target cell types for head-to-head comparison of infection rates, viral output, and cytokine production under direct infection (without antibody) or ADE conditions (with antibody). All studied cell types except immature DC supported ADE. All cells undergoing ADE secreted proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) at enhancement titers, but distinct cell-type-specific patterns were observed for other relevant proteins (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-α/β] and IL-10). Macrophages produced type I interferons (IFN-α/β) that were modulated by ADE. Mature DC mainly secreted IFN-β. Interestingly, only monocytes secreted IL-10, and only upon antibody-enhanced infection. While ADE infection rates were remarkably consistent in monocytes (10 to 15%) across donors, IL-10 protein levels varied according to previously described regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IL-10 promoter region. The homozygous GCC haplotype was associated with high-level IL-10 secretion, while the ACC and ATA haplotypes produced intermediate and low levels of IL-10, respectively. Our data suggest that ADE effects are cell type specific, are influenced by host genetics, and, depending on relative infection rates, may further contribute to the complexity of DV pathogenesis.

  3. In vitro generation and type-specific neutralization of a human papillomavirus type 16 virion pseudotype.

    PubMed Central

    Roden, R B; Greenstone, H L; Kirnbauer, R; Booy, F P; Jessie, J; Lowy, D R; Schiller, J T

    1996-01-01

    We report a system for generating infectious papillomaviruses in vitro that facilitates the analysis of papillomavirus assembly, infectivity, and serologic relatedness. Cultured hamster BPHE-1 cells harboring autonomously replicating bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) genomes were infected with recombinant Semliki Forest viruses that express the structural proteins of BPV1. When plated on C127 cells, extracts from cells expressing L1 and L2 together induced numerous transformed foci that could be specifically prevented by BPV neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating that BPV infection was responsible for the focal transformation. Extracts from BPHE-1 cells expressing L1 or L2 separately were not infectious. Although Semliki Forest virus-expressed L1 self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), viral DNA was detected in particles only when L2 was coexpressed with L1, indicating that genome encapsidation requires L2. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 and L2 together in BPHE-1 cells also yielded infectious virus. These pseudotyped virions were neutralized by antiserum to HPV16 VLPs derived from European (114/K) or African (Z-1194) HPV16 variants but not by antisera to BPV VLPs, to a poorly assembling mutant HPV16 L1 protein, or to VLPs of closely related genital HPV types. Extracts from BPHE-1 cells coexpressing BPV L1 and HPV16 L2 or HPV16 L1 and BPV L2 were not infectious. We conclude that (i) mouse C127 cells express the cell surface receptor for HPV16 and are able to uncoat HPV16 capsids; (ii) if a papillomavirus DNA packaging signal exists, then it is conserved between the BPV and HPV16 genomes; (iii) functional L1-L2 interaction exhibits type specificity; and (iv) protection by HPV virus-like particle vaccines is likely to be type specific. PMID:8709207

  4. Cell type-specific glycosylation of Orai1 modulates store-operated Ca2+ entry.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Kathrin; Kilch, Tatiana; Kappel, Sven; Alansary, Dalia; Schwär, Gertrud; Niemeyer, Barbara A; Peinelt, Christine

    2016-03-08

    N-glycosylation of cell surface proteins affects protein function, stability, and interaction with other proteins. Orai channels, which mediate store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), are composed of N-glycosylated subunits. Upon activation by Ca(2+) sensor proteins (stromal interaction molecules STIM1 or STIM2) in the endoplasmic reticulum, Orai Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane mediate Ca(2+) influx. Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins, and Siglecs are a family of sialic acid-binding lectins with immunoglobulin-like repeats. Using Western blot analysis and lectin-binding assays from various primary human cells and cancer cell lines, we found that glycosylation of Orai1 is cell type-specific. Ca(2+) imaging experiments and patch-clamp experiments revealed that mutation of the only glycosylation site of Orai1 (Orai1N223A) enhanced SOCE in Jurkat T cells. Knockdown of the sialyltransferase ST6GAL1 reduced α-2,6-linked sialic acids in the glycan structure of Orai1 and was associated with increased Ca(2+) entry in Jurkat T cells. In human mast cells, inhibition of sialyl sulfation altered the N-glycan of Orai1 (and other proteins) and increased SOCE. These data suggest that cell type-specific glycosylation influences the interaction of Orai1 with specific lectins, such as Siglecs, which then attenuates SOCE. In summary, the glycosylation state of Orai1 influences SOCE-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and, thus, may contribute to pathophysiological Ca(2+) signaling observed in immune disease and cancer.

  5. Cell type-specific synaptic dynamics of synchronized bursting in the juvenile CA3 rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Aradi, Ildiko; Maccaferri, Gianmaria

    2004-10-27

    Spontaneous synchronous bursting of the CA3 hippocampus in vitro is a widely studied model of physiological and pathological network synchronization. The role of inhibitory conductances during network bursting is not understood in detail, despite the fact that several antiepileptic drugs target GABA(A) receptors. Here, we show that the first manifestation of a burst event is a cell type-specific flurry of GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory input to pyramidal cells, but not to stratum oriens horizontal interneurons. Moreover, GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic input is proportionally smaller in these interneurons compared with pyramidal cells. Computational models and dynamic-clamp studies using experimentally derived conductance waveforms indicate that both these factors modulate spike timing during synchronized activity. In particular, the different kinetics and the larger strength of GABAergic input to pyramidal cells defer action potential initiation and contribute to the observed delay of firing, so that the interneuronal activity leads the burst cycle. In contrast, excitatory inputs to both neuronal populations during a burst are kinetically similar, as required to maintain synchronicity. We also show that the natural pattern of activation of inhibitory and excitatory conductances during a synchronized burst cycle is different within the same neuronal population. In particular, GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents activate earlier and outlast the excitatory components driving the bursts. Thus, cell type-specific balance and timing of GABA(A) receptor-mediated input are critical to set the appropriate spike timing in pyramidal cells and interneurons and coordinate additional neurotransmitter release modulating burst strength and network frequency.

  6. Strand and Cell Type-specific Function of microRNA-126 in Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinbo; Anderson, Chastain; Hanus, Jakub; Zhao, Fangkun; Ma, Jing; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Wang, Shusheng

    2016-10-01

    microRNAs or miRs have been shown to be pivotal modulators of vascular development. The strand and cell type-specific function of miR-126 in angiogenesis, especially pathological angiogenesis, remains poorly defined. We characterized the retinal vascular phenotype of miR-126(-/-) mice, and tested the function of miR-126 strands (miR-126-3p and -5p) using in vitro angiogenesis models and a mouse model of neovascular age-related macular degeneration. We found that miR-126 is critical for retinal vascular development but has dual function in pathological angiogenesis. miR-126(-/-) mice showed defective postnatal retinal vascular development and remodeling, which is partially rescued by genetic knockout of its target gene Spred-1. Surprisingly, either silencing miR-126-3p by LNA-antimiR or overexpressing miR-126-3p by miRNA mimic repressed laser-induced choroidal neovascularization. To dissect the underlying mechanism, we found in endothelial cells, silencing of miR-126-3p repressed angiogenesis, while overexpression of miR-126-5p enhanced angiogenesis. However, in retinal pigment epithelial cells, miR-126-3p repressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) expression via a novel mechanism of regulating αB-Crystallin promoter activity and by directly targeting VEGF-A 3'-untranslated region. These findings provide first genetic evidence that miR-126 is required for the development of different retinal vascular layers, and also uncover a strand and cell type-specific function of miR-126 in ocular pathological angiogenesis.

  7. A versatile Multisite Gateway-compatible promoter and transgenic line collection for cell type-specific functional genomics in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Marquès-Bueno, Maria Mar; Morao, Ana K; Cayrel, Anne; Platre, Matthieu P; Barberon, Marie; Caillieux, Erwann; Colot, Vincent; Jaillais, Yvon; Roudier, François; Vert, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms are composed of many cell types that acquire their specific fate through a precisely controlled pattern of gene expression in time and space dictated in part by cell type-specific promoter activity. Understanding the contribution of highly specialized cell types in the development of a whole organism requires the ability to isolate or analyze different cell types separately. We have characterized and validated a large collection of root cell type-specific promoters and have generated cell type-specific marker lines. These benchmarked promoters can be readily used to evaluate cell type-specific complementation of mutant phenotypes, or to knockdown gene expression using targeted expression of artificial miRNA. We also generated vectors and characterized transgenic lines for cell type-specific induction of gene expression and cell type-specific isolation of nuclei for RNA and chromatin profiling. Vectors and seeds from transgenic Arabidopsis plants will be freely available, and will promote rapid progress in cell type-specific functional genomics. We demonstrate the power of this promoter set for analysis of complex biological processes by investigating the contribution of root cell types in the IRT1-dependent root iron uptake. Our findings revealed the complex spatial expression pattern of IRT1 in both root epidermis and phloem companion cells and the requirement for IRT1 to be expressed in both cell types for proper iron homeostasis.

  8. A versatile Multisite Gateway-compatible promoter and transgenic line collection for cell type-specific functional genomics in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Platre, Matthieu Pierre; Barberon, Marie; Caillieux, Erwann; Colot, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multicellular organisms are composed of many cell types that acquire their specific fate through a precisely controlled pattern of gene expression in time and space dictated in part by cell type-specific promoter activity. Understanding the contribution of highly specialized cell types in the development of a whole organism requires the ability to isolate or analyze different cell types separately. We have characterized and validated a large collection of root cell type-specific promoters and have generated cell type-specific marker lines. These benchmarked promoters can be readily used to evaluate cell type-specific complementation of mutant phenotypes, or to knockdown gene expression using targeted expression of artificial miRNA. We also generated vectors and characterized transgenic lines for cell type-specific induction of gene expression and cell type-specific isolation of nuclei for RNA and chromatin profiling. Vectors and seeds from transgenic Arabidopsis plants will be freely available, and will promote rapid progress in cell type-specific functional genomics. We demonstrate the power of this promoter set for analysis of complex biological processes by investigating the contribution of root cell types in the IRT1-dependent root iron uptake. Our findings revealed the complex spatial expression pattern of IRT1 in both root epidermis and phloem companion cells and the requirement for IRT1 to be expressed in both cell types for proper iron homeostasis. PMID:26662936

  9. Bacteria-type-specific biparental immune priming in the pipefish Syngnathus typhle.

    PubMed

    Beemelmanns, Anne; Roth, Olivia

    2016-09-01

    The transfer of acquired and specific immunity against previously encountered bacteria from mothers to offspring boosts the immune response of the next generation and supports the development of a successful pathogen defense. While most studies claim that the transfer of immunity is a maternal trait, in the sex-role-reversed pipefish Syngnathus typhle, fathers nurse the embryos over a placenta-like structure, which opens the door for additional paternal immune priming. We examined the potential and persistence of bacteria-type-specific parental immune priming in the pipefish S. typhle over maturation time using a fully reciprocal design with two different bacteria species (Vibrio spp. and Tenacibaculum maritimum). Our results suggest that S. typhle is able to specifically prime the next generation against prevalent local bacteria and to a limited extent even also against newly introduced bacteria species. Long-term protection was thereby maintained only against prevailing Vibrio bacteria. Maternal and paternal transgenerational immune priming can complement each other, as they affect different pathways of the offspring immune system and come with distinct degree of specificity. The differential regulation of DNA-methylation genes upon parental bacteria exposure in premature pipefish offspring indicates that epigenetic regulation processes are involved in transferring immune-related information across generations. The identified trade-offs between immune priming and reproduction determine TGIP as a costly trait, which might constrain the evolution of long-lasting TGIP, if parental and offspring generations do not share the same parasite assembly.

  10. Cell type-specific roles of Jak3 in IL-2-induced proliferative signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Hodaka . E-mail: hodaka@med.nyu.edu

    2007-03-16

    Binding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) to its specific receptor induces activation of two members of Jak family protein tyrosine kinases, Jak1 and Jak3. An IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)-reconstituted NIH 3T3 fibroblast cell line proliferates in response to IL-2 only when hematopoietic lineage-specific Jak3 is ectopically expressed. However, the mechanism of Jak3-dependent proliferation in the fibroblast cell line is not known. Here, I showed that Jak3 expression is dispensable for IL-2-induced activation of Jak1 and Stat proteins and expression of nuclear proto-oncogenes in the IL-2R-reconstituted fibroblast cell line. Jak3 expression markedly enhanced these IL-2-induced signaling events. In contrast, Jak3 expression was essential for induction of cyclin genes involved in the G1-S transition. These data suggest a critical role of Jak3 in IL-2 signaling in the fibroblast cell line and may provide further insight into the cell type-specific mechanism of cytokine signaling.

  11. eFORGE: A Tool for Identifying Cell Type-Specific Signal in Epigenomic Data.

    PubMed

    Breeze, Charles E; Paul, Dirk S; van Dongen, Jenny; Butcher, Lee M; Ambrose, John C; Barrett, James E; Lowe, Robert; Rakyan, Vardhman K; Iotchkova, Valentina; Frontini, Mattia; Downes, Kate; Ouwehand, Willem H; Laperle, Jonathan; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Bourque, Guillaume; Bergmann, Anke K; Siebert, Reiner; Vellenga, Edo; Saeed, Sadia; Matarese, Filomena; Martens, Joost H A; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Herrero, Javier; Birney, Ewan; Dunham, Ian; Beck, Stephan

    2016-11-15

    Epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) provide an alternative approach for studying human disease through consideration of non-genetic variants such as altered DNA methylation. To advance the complex interpretation of EWAS, we developed eFORGE (http://eforge.cs.ucl.ac.uk/), a new standalone and web-based tool for the analysis and interpretation of EWAS data. eFORGE determines the cell type-specific regulatory component of a set of EWAS-identified differentially methylated positions. This is achieved by detecting enrichment of overlap with DNase I hypersensitive sites across 454 samples (tissues, primary cell types, and cell lines) from the ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics, and BLUEPRINT projects. Application of eFORGE to 20 publicly available EWAS datasets identified disease-relevant cell types for several common diseases, a stem cell-like signature in cancer, and demonstrated the ability to detect cell-composition effects for EWAS performed on heterogeneous tissues. Our approach bridges the gap between large-scale epigenomics data and EWAS-derived target selection to yield insight into disease etiology.

  12. Cell type-specific translational repression of Cyclin B during meiosis in males.

    PubMed

    Baker, Catherine Craig; Gim, Byung Soo; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-10-01

    The unique cell cycle dynamics of meiosis are controlled by layers of regulation imposed on core mitotic cell cycle machinery components by the program of germ cell development. Although the mechanisms that regulate Cdk1/Cyclin B activity in meiosis in oocytes have been well studied, little is known about the trans-acting factors responsible for developmental control of these factors in male gametogenesis. During meiotic prophase in Drosophila males, transcript for the core cell cycle protein Cyclin B1 (CycB) is expressed in spermatocytes, but the protein does not accumulate in spermatocytes until just before the meiotic divisions. Here, we show that two interacting proteins, Rbp4 and Fest, expressed at the onset of spermatocyte differentiation under control of the developmental program of male gametogenesis, function to direct cell type- and stage-specific repression of translation of the core G2/M cell cycle component cycB during the specialized cell cycle of male meiosis. Binding of Fest to Rbp4 requires a 31-amino acid region within Rbp4. Rbp4 and Fest are required for translational repression of cycB in immature spermatocytes, with Rbp4 binding sequences in a cell type-specific shortened form of the cycB 3' UTR. Finally, we show that Fest is required for proper execution of meiosis I.

  13. A Cell Type-Specific Expression Signature Predicts Haploinsufficient Autism-Susceptibility Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaolin; Shen, Yufeng

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have identified many genes with rare de novo mutations in autism, but a limited number of these have been conclusively established as disease-susceptibility genes due to the lack of recurrence and confounding background mutations. Such extreme genetic heterogeneity severely limits recurrence-based statistical power even in studies with a large sample size. Here, we use cell-type specific expression profiles to differentiate mutations in autism patients from those in unaffected siblings. We report a gene expression signature in different neuronal cell types shared by genes with likely gene-disrupting (LGD) mutations in autism cases. This signature reflects haploinsufficiency of risk genes enriched in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators, with the strongest positive associations with specific types of neurons in different brain regions, including cortical neurons, cerebellar granule cells, and striatal medium spiny neurons. When used to prioritize genes with a single LGD mutation in cases, a D-score derived from the signature achieved a precision of 40% as compared with the 15% baseline with a minimal loss in sensitivity. An ensemble model combining D-score with mutation intolerance metrics from Exome Aggregation Consortium further improved the precision to 60%, resulting in 117 high-priority candidates. These prioritized lists can facilitate identification of additional autism-susceptibility genes.

  14. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Albers, Peter H; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper B; Kristensen, Dorte E; Vind, Birgitte F; Baba, Otto; Nøhr, Jane; Højlund, Kurt; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of different fiber types. Studies suggest that insulin-mediated glucose metabolism is different between muscle fiber types. We hypothesized that differences are due to fiber type-specific expression/regulation of insulin signaling elements and/or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese, and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared with type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4, hexokinase II, glycogen synthase (GS), and pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDH-E1α) and a lower protein content of Akt2, TBC1 domain family member 4 (TBC1D4), and TBC1D1. In type I fibers compared with type II fibers, the phosphorylation response to insulin was similar (TBC1D4, TBC1D1, and GS) or decreased (Akt and PDH-E1α). Phosphorylation responses to insulin adjusted for protein level were not different between fiber types. Independently of fiber type, insulin signaling was similar (TBC1D1, GS, and PDH-E1α) or decreased (Akt and TBC1D4) in muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with lean and obese subjects. We conclude that human type I muscle fibers compared with type II fibers have a higher glucose-handling capacity but a similar sensitivity for phosphoregulation by insulin.

  15. Cell-type-specific resonances shape the responses of striatal neurons to synaptic input

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Joseph A.; Song, Soomin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurons respond to synaptic inputs in cell-type-specific ways. Each neuron type may thus respond uniquely to shared patterns of synaptic input. We applied statistically identical barrages of artificial synaptic inputs to four striatal cell types to assess differences in their responses to a realistic input pattern. Each interneuron type fired in phase with a specific input-frequency component. The fast-spiking interneuron fired in relation to the gamma-band (and higher) frequencies, the low-threshold spike interneuron to the beta-band frequencies, and the cholinergic neurons to the delta-band frequencies. Low-threshold spiking and cholinergic interneurons showed input impedance resonances at frequencies matching their spiking resonances. Fast-spiking interneurons showed resonance of input impedance but at lower than gamma frequencies. The spiny projection neuron's frequency preference did not have a fixed frequency but instead tracked its own firing rate. Spiny cells showed no input impedance resonance. Striatal interneurons are each tuned to a specific frequency band corresponding to the major frequency components of local field potentials. Their influence in the circuit may fluctuate along with the contribution of that frequency band to the input. In contrast, spiny neurons may tune to any of the frequency bands by a change in firing rate. PMID:25411465

  16. Partitioning heritability of regulatory and cell-type-specific variants across 11 common diseases.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Kähler, Anna K; Hultman, Christina M; Purcell, Shaun M; McCarroll, Steven A; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F; Neale, Benjamin M; Wray, Naomi R; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L

    2014-11-06

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg(2)) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg(2) from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10(-17)) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg(2) from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10(-4)). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg(2) despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease.

  17. Cell Type Specific Analysis of Human Brain Transcriptome Data to Predict Alterations in Cellular Composition.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Nehorai, Arye; Dougherty, Joseph

    2013-07-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is composed of hundreds of distinct cell types, each expressing different subsets of genes from the genome. High throughput gene expression analysis of the CNS from patients and controls is a common method to screen for potentially pathological molecular mechanisms of psychiatric disease. One mechanism by which gene expression might be seen to vary across samples would be alterations in the cellular composition of the tissue. While the expressions of gene 'markers' for each cell type can provide certain information of cellularity, for many rare cell types markers are not well characterized. Moreover, if only small sets of markers are known, any substantial variation of a marker's expression pattern due to experiment conditions would result in poor sensitivity and specificity. Here, our proposed method combines prior information from mice cell-specific transcriptome profiling experiments with co-expression network analysis, to select large sets of potential cell type-specific gene markers in a systematic and unbiased manner. The method is efficient and robust, and identifies sufficient markers for further cellularity analysis. We then employ the markers to analytically detect changing cellular composition in human brain. Application of our method to temporal human brain microarray data successfully detects changes in cellularity over time that roughly correspond to known epochs of human brain development. Furthermore, application of our method to human brain samples with the neurodevelopmental disorder of autism supports the interpretation that the changes in astrocytes and neurons might contribute to the disorder.

  18. Partitioning Heritability of Regulatory and Cell-Type-Specific Variants across 11 Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexander; Lee, S. Hong; Trynka, Gosia; Finucane, Hilary; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Xu, Han; Zang, Chongzhi; Ripke, Stephan; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Stahl, Eli; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H.M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Brglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St. Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Ripke, Stephan; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L.; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steve; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Kähler, Anna K.; Hultman, Christina M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Daly, Mark; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory and coding variants are known to be enriched with associations identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of complex disease, but their contributions to trait heritability are currently unknown. We applied variance-component methods to imputed genotype data for 11 common diseases to partition the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2) across functional categories (while accounting for shared variance due to linkage disequilibrium). Extensive simulations showed that in contrast to current estimates from GWAS summary statistics, the variance-component approach partitions heritability accurately under a wide range of complex-disease architectures. Across the 11 diseases DNaseI hypersensitivity sites (DHSs) from 217 cell types spanned 16% of imputed SNPs (and 24% of genotyped SNPs) but explained an average of 79% (SE = 8%) of hg2 from imputed SNPs (5.1× enrichment; p = 3.7 × 10−17) and 38% (SE = 4%) of hg2 from genotyped SNPs (1.6× enrichment, p = 1.0 × 10−4). Further enrichment was observed at enhancer DHSs and cell-type-specific DHSs. In contrast, coding variants, which span 1% of the genome, explained <10% of hg2 despite having the highest enrichment. We replicated these findings but found no significant contribution from rare coding variants in independent schizophrenia cohorts genotyped on GWAS and exome chips. Our results highlight the value of analyzing components of heritability to unravel the functional architecture of common disease. PMID:25439723

  19. Cell Type-Specific Expression Analysis to Identify Putative Cellular Mechanisms for Neurogenetic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoxiao; Wells, Alan B.; O'Brien, David R.; Nehorai, Arye

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances have substantially increased the number of genes that are statistically associated with complex genetic disorders of the CNS such as autism and schizophrenia. It is now clear that there will likely be hundreds of distinct loci contributing to these disorders, underscoring a remarkable genetic heterogeneity. It is unclear whether this genetic heterogeneity indicates an equal heterogeneity of cellular mechanisms for these diseases. The commonality of symptoms across patients suggests there could be a functional convergence downstream of these loci upon a limited number of cell types or circuits that mediate the affected behaviors. One possible mechanism for this convergence would be the selective expression of at least a subset of these genes in the cell types that comprise these circuits. Using profiling data from mice and humans, we have developed and validated an approach, cell type-specific expression analysis, for identifying candidate cell populations likely to be disrupted across sets of patients with distinct genetic lesions. Using human genetics data and postmortem gene expression data, our approach can correctly identify the cell types for disorders of known cellular etiology, including narcolepsy and retinopathies. Applying this approach to autism, a disease where the cellular mechanism is unclear, indicates there may be multiple cellular routes to this disorder. Our approach may be useful for identifying common cellular mechanisms arising from distinct genetic lesions. PMID:24453331

  20. Size- and type-specific exposure assessment of an asbestos products factory in China.

    PubMed

    Courtice, Midori N; Berman, D Wayne; Yano, Eiji; Kohyama, Norihiko; Wang, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    This study describes fibre size and type-specific airborne asbestos exposures in an asbestos product factory. Forty-four membrane filter samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy to determine the size distribution of asbestos fibres, by workshop. Fibre frequencies of bivariate (length by width) categories were calculated and differences between workshops were tested by analysis of variance. Data were recorded for 13,435 chrysotile and 1075 tremolite fibres. The proportions between size metrics traditionally measured and potentially biologically important size metrics were found to vary in this study from proportions reported in other cohort studies. One, common size distribution was generated for each asbestos type over the entire factory because statistically significant differences in frequency between workshops were not detected. This study provides new information on asbestos fibre size and type distributions in an asbestos factory. The extent to which biologically relevant fibre size indices were captured or overlooked between studies can potentially reconcile currently unexplained differences in asbestos-related disease (ARD) risk between cohorts. The fibre distributions presented here, when combined with similar data from other sites, will contribute to the development of quantitative models for predicting risk and our understanding of the effects of fibre characteristics in the development of ARD.

  1. Molecular analysis of fiber type-specific expression of murine myostatin promoter.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Mônica Senna; Thomas, Mark; Forbes, Davanea; Watson, Trevor; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2004-10-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of muscle growth, and absence of the functional myostatin protein leads to the heavy muscle phenotype in both mouse and cattle. Although the role of myostatin in controlling muscle mass is established, little is known of the mechanisms regulating the expression of the myostatin gene. In this study, we have characterized the murine myostatin promoter in vivo. Various constructs of the murine myostatin promoter were injected into the quadriceps muscle of mice, and the reporter luciferase activity was analyzed. The results indicate that of the seven E-boxes present in the 2.5-kb fragment of the murine myostatin promoter, the E5 E-box plays an important role in the regulation of promoter activity in vivo. Furthermore, the in vitro studies demonstrated that MyoD preferentially binds and upregulates the murine myostatin promoter activity. We also analyzed the activity of the bovine and murine promoters in murine skeletal muscle and showed that, despite displaying comparable levels of activity in murine myoblast cultures, bovine myostatin promoter activity is much weaker than murine myostatin promoter in mice. Finally, we demonstrate that in vivo, the 2.5-kb region of the murine myostatin promoter is sufficient to drive the activity of the reporter gene in a fiber type-specific manner.

  2. Temperament type specific metabolite profiles of the prefrontal cortex and serum in cattle.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bodo; Hadlich, Frieder; Brandt, Bettina; Schauer, Nicolas; Graunke, Katharina L; Langbein, Jan; Repsilber, Dirk; Ponsuksili, Siriluk; Schwerin, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the number of studies investigating temperament in farm animals has increased greatly because temperament has been shown not only to affect handling but also reproduction, health and economically important production traits. However, molecular pathways underlying temperament and molecular pathways linking temperament to production traits, health and reproduction have yet to be studied in full detail. Here we report the results of metabolite profiling of the prefrontal cortex and serum of cattle with distinct temperament types that were performed to further explore their molecular divergence in the response to the slaughter procedure and to identify new targets for further research of cattle temperament. By performing an untargeted comprehensive metabolite profiling, 627 and 1097 metabolite features comprising 235 and 328 metabolites could be detected in the prefrontal cortex and serum, respectively. In total, 54 prefrontal cortex and 51 serum metabolite features were indicated to have a high relevance in the classification of temperament types by a sparse partial least square discriminant analysis. A clear discrimination between fearful/neophobic-alert, interested-stressed, subdued/uninterested-calm and outgoing/neophilic-alert temperament types could be observed based on the abundance of the identified relevant prefrontal cortex and serum metabolites. Metabolites with high relevance in the classification of temperament types revealed that the main differences between temperament types in the response to the slaughter procedure were related to the abundance of glycerophospholipids, fatty acyls and sterol lipids. Differences in the abundance of metabolites related to C21 steroid metabolism and oxidative stress indicated that the differences in the metabolite profiles of the four extreme temperament types could be the result of a temperament type specific regulation of molecular pathways that are known to be involved in the stress and fear response.

  3. Evolution of sexes from an ancestral mating-type specification pathway.

    PubMed

    Geng, Sa; De Hoff, Peter; Umen, James G

    2014-07-01

    Male and female sexes have evolved repeatedly in eukaryotes but the origins of dimorphic sexes and their relationship to mating types in unicellular species are not understood. Volvocine algae include isogamous species such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with two equal-sized mating types, and oogamous multicellular species such as Volvox carteri with sperm-producing males and egg-producing females. Theoretical work predicts genetic linkage of a gamete cell-size regulatory gene(s) to an ancestral mating-type locus as a possible step in the evolution of dimorphic gametes, but this idea has not been tested. Here we show that, contrary to predictions, a single conserved mating locus (MT) gene in volvocine algae-MID, which encodes a RWP-RK domain transcription factor-evolved from its ancestral role in C. reinhardtii as a mating-type specifier, to become a determinant of sperm and egg development in V. carteri. Transgenic female V. carteri expressing male MID produced functional sperm packets during sexual development. Transgenic male V. carteri with RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdowns of VcMID produced functional eggs, or self-fertile hermaphrodites. Post-transcriptional controls were found to regulate cell-type-limited expression and nuclear localization of VcMid protein that restricted its activity to nuclei of developing male germ cells and sperm. Crosses with sex-reversed strains uncoupled sex determination from sex chromosome identity and revealed gender-specific roles for male and female mating locus genes in sexual development, gamete fitness and reproductive success. Our data show genetic continuity between the mating-type specification and sex determination pathways of volvocine algae, and reveal evidence for gender-specific adaptations in the male and female mating locus haplotypes of Volvox. These findings will enable a deeper understanding of how a master regulator of mating-type determination in an ancestral unicellular species was reprogrammed to

  4. Cell-type-specific roles for COX-2 in UVB-induced skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jing; Mikulec, Carol; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Magyar, Clara; Dumlao, Darren S; Dennis, Edward A; Fischer, Susan M; Herschman, Harvey

    2014-06-01

    In human tumors, and in mouse models, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels are frequently correlated with tumor development/burden. In addition to intrinsic tumor cell expression, COX-2 is often present in fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells of the tumor microenvironment, and in infiltrating immune cells. Intrinsic cancer cell COX-2 expression is postulated as only one of many sources for prostanoids required for tumor promotion/progression. Although both COX-2 inhibition and global Cox-2 gene deletion ameliorate ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced SKH-1 mouse skin tumorigenesis, neither manipulation can elucidate the cell type(s) in which COX-2 expression is required for tumorigenesis; both eliminate COX-2 activity in all cells. To address this question, we created Cox-2(flox/flox) mice, in which the Cox-2 gene can be eliminated in a cell-type-specific fashion by targeted Cre recombinase expression. Cox-2 deletion in skin epithelial cells of SKH-1 Cox-2(flox/flox);K14Cre(+) mice resulted, following UVB irradiation, in reduced skin hyperplasia and increased apoptosis. Targeted epithelial cell Cox-2 deletion also resulted in reduced tumor incidence, frequency, size and proliferation rate, altered tumor cell differentiation and reduced tumor vascularization. Moreover, Cox-2(flox/flox);K14Cre(+) papillomas did not progress to squamous cell carcinomas. In contrast, Cox-2 deletion in SKH-1 Cox-2(flox/flox); LysMCre(+) myeloid cells had no effect on UVB tumor induction. We conclude that (i) intrinsic epithelial COX-2 activity plays a major role in UVB-induced skin cancer, (ii) macrophage/myeloid COX-2 plays no role in UVB-induced skin cancer and (iii) either there may be another COX-2-dependent prostanoid source(s) that drives UVB skin tumor induction or there may exist a COX-2-independent pathway(s) to UVB-induced skin cancer.

  5. Temperament Type Specific Metabolite Profiles of the Prefrontal Cortex and Serum in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Bodo; Hadlich, Frieder; Brandt, Bettina; Schauer, Nicolas; Graunke, Katharina L.; Langbein, Jan; Repsilber, Dirk; Ponsuksili, Siriluk; Schwerin, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the number of studies investigating temperament in farm animals has increased greatly because temperament has been shown not only to affect handling but also reproduction, health and economically important production traits. However, molecular pathways underlying temperament and molecular pathways linking temperament to production traits, health and reproduction have yet to be studied in full detail. Here we report the results of metabolite profiling of the prefrontal cortex and serum of cattle with distinct temperament types that were performed to further explore their molecular divergence in the response to the slaughter procedure and to identify new targets for further research of cattle temperament. By performing an untargeted comprehensive metabolite profiling, 627 and 1097 metabolite features comprising 235 and 328 metabolites could be detected in the prefrontal cortex and serum, respectively. In total, 54 prefrontal cortex and 51 serum metabolite features were indicated to have a high relevance in the classification of temperament types by a sparse partial least square discriminant analysis. A clear discrimination between fearful/neophobic-alert, interested-stressed, subdued/uninterested-calm and outgoing/neophilic-alert temperament types could be observed based on the abundance of the identified relevant prefrontal cortex and serum metabolites. Metabolites with high relevance in the classification of temperament types revealed that the main differences between temperament types in the response to the slaughter procedure were related to the abundance of glycerophospholipids, fatty acyls and sterol lipids. Differences in the abundance of metabolites related to C21 steroid metabolism and oxidative stress indicated that the differences in the metabolite profiles of the four extreme temperament types could be the result of a temperament type specific regulation of molecular pathways that are known to be involved in the stress and fear response

  6. Collagen-type specificity of glycoprotein VI as a determinant of platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Jung, Stephanie M; Takemura, Yukitoshi; Imamura, Yasutada; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Adachi, Eijiro; Moroi, Masaaki

    2008-02-01

    Of the two physiologically important platelet collagen receptors, glycoprotein (GP) VI is the receptor responsible for platelet activation. However, its reactivities towards different types of vascular collagen have not been directly and quantitatively analysed with collagen preparations of defined composition, although the other major platelet collagen receptor integrin alpha(2)beta(1) was shown to react with collagen types I-VI and VIII under either static or flow conditions. We analysed the collagen type specificity of GPVI binding to identify the physiological contribution of the various vascular collagens and how platelet reactivity towards the various collagens may be affected by fibril size. We used two methods to analyse the binding of recombinant GPVI (GPVI-Fc(2)) to different types of bovine collagen: binding to collagen microparticles in suspension and binding to immobilized collagen. GPVI-Fc(2) bound to type I-III collagens that can form large fibrils, but not to type V that only forms small fibrils. The apparent GPVI binding to types IV and V could be ascribed to type I collagen that was a contaminant in each of these preparations. Kinetic analyses of the binding data showed that type III collagen fibrils have both a higher Kd and Bmax than types I and II. Flow adhesion studies demonstrated that type III collagen supports the formation of larger platelet aggregates than type I. Our present results suggest that the physiological importance of type III collagen is to induce thrombus formation. Furthermore, these studies indicate that GPVI mainly binds to collagen types that can form large collagen fibrils.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Type-Specific Capsular Polysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Streptococcus agalactiae Type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Shin; Miyake, Katsuhide; Koike, Yoichi; Watanabe, Masaki; Machida, Yuichi; Ohta, Michio; Iijima, Shinji

    1999-01-01

    The type-specific capsular polysaccharide (CP) of a group B streptococcus, Streptococcus agalactiae type Ia, is a high-molecular-weight polymer consisting of the pentasaccharide repeating unit 4)-[α-d-NeupNAc-(2→3)-β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-GlcpNAc-(1→3)]-β-d-Galp-(1→4)-β-d-Glcp-(1. Here, cloning, sequencing, and transcription of the type Ia-specific capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) genes and functional analysis of these gene products are described. A 26-kb DNA fragment containing 18 complete open reading frames (ORFs) was cloned. These ORFs were designated cpsIaA to cpsIaL, neu (neuraminic acid synthesis gene) A to D, orf1 and ung (uracil DNA glycosylase). The cps gene products of S. agalactiae type Ia were homologous to proteins involved in CP synthesis of S. agalactiae type III and S. pneumoniae serotype 14. Unlike the cps gene cluster of S. pneumoniae serotype 14, transcription of this operon may start from cpsIaA, cpsIaE, and orf1 because putative promoter sequences were found in front of these genes. Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension analyses supported this hypothesis. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were two transcriptional terminators in the 3′ end of this operon (downstream of orf1 and ung). The functions of CpsIaE, CpsIaG, CpsIaI, and CpsIaJ were examined by glycosyltransferase assay by using the gene products expressed in Escherichia coli JM109 harboring plasmids containing various S. agalactiae type Ia cps gene fragments. Enzyme assays suggested that the gene products of cpsIaE, cpsIaG, cpsIaI, and cpsIaJ are putative glucosyltransferase, β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, and β-1,4-galactosyltransferase, respectively. PMID:10464185

  8. World Health Organization Guidelines for Containment of Poliovirus Following Type-Specific Polio Eradication - Worldwide, 2015.

    PubMed

    Previsani, Nicoletta; Tangermann, Rudolph H; Tallis, Graham; Jafari, Hamid S

    2015-08-28

    In 1988, the World Health Assembly of the World Health Organization (WHO) resolved to eradicate polio worldwide. Among the three wild poliovirus (WPV) types (type 1, type 2, and type 3), WPV type 2 (WPV2) has been eliminated in the wild since 1999, and WPV type 3 (WPV3) has not been reported since 2012. In 2015, only Afghanistan and Pakistan have reported WPV transmission. On May 25, 2015, all WHO Member States endorsed World Health Assembly resolution 68.3 on full implementation of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 (the Endgame Plan), and with it, the third Global Action Plan to minimize poliovirus facility-associated risk (GAPIII). All WHO Member States have committed to implementing appropriate containment of WPV2 in essential laboratory and vaccine production facilities* by the end of 2015 and of type 2 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV2) within 3 months of global withdrawal of OPV2, which is planned for April 2016. This report summarizes critical steps for essential laboratory and vaccine production facilities that intend to retain materials confirmed to contain or potentially containing type-specific WPV, vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV), or OPV/Sabin viruses, and steps for nonessential facilities† that process specimens that contain or might contain polioviruses. National authorities will need to certify that the essential facilities they host meet the containment requirements described in GAPIII. After certification of WPV eradication, the use of all OPV will cease; final containment of all polioviruses after polio eradication and OPV cessation will minimize the risk for reintroduction of poliovirus into a polio-free world.

  9. The role of action potentials in determining neuron-type-specific responses to nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Estes, Stephen; Zhong, Lei Ray; Artinian, Liana; Tornieri, Karine; Rehder, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The electrical activity in developing and mature neurons determines the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which in turn is translated into biochemical activities through various signaling cascades. Electrical activity is under control of neuromodulators, which can alter neuronal responses to incoming signals and increase the fidelity of neuronal communication. Conversely, the effects of neuromodulators can depend on the ongoing electrical activity within target neurons; however, these activity-dependent effects of neuromodulators are less well understood. Here, we present evidence that the neuronal firing frequency and intrinsic properties of the action potential (AP) waveform set the [Ca(2+)]i in growth cones and determine how neurons respond to the neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO). We used two well-characterized neurons from the freshwater snail Helisoma trivolvis that show different growth cone morphological responses to NO: B5 neurons elongate filopodia, while those of B19 neurons do not. Combining whole-cell patch clamp recordings with simultaneous calcium imaging, we show that the duration of an AP contributes to neuron-specific differences in [Ca(2+)]i, with shorter APs in B19 neurons yielding lower growth cone [Ca(2+)]i. Through the partial inhibition of voltage-gated K(+) channels, we increased the B19 AP duration resulting in a significant increase in [Ca(2+)]i that was then sufficient to cause filopodial elongation following NO treatment. Our results demonstrate a neuron-type specific correlation between AP shape, [Ca(2+)]i, and growth cone motility, providing an explanation to how growth cone responses to guidance cues depend on intrinsic electrical properties and helping explain the diverse effects of NO across neuronal populations.

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae Transmission Is Blocked by Type-Specific Immunity in an Infant Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Tonia; Wang, Yang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidemiological studies on Streptococcus pneumoniae show that rates of carriage are highest in early childhood and that the major benefit of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is a reduction in the incidence of nasopharyngeal colonization through decreased transmission within a population. In this study, we sought to understand how anti-S. pneumoniae immunity affects nasal shedding of bacteria, the limiting step in experimental pneumococcal transmission. Using an infant mouse model, we examined the role of immunity (passed from mother to pup) on shedding and within-litter transmission of S. pneumoniae by pups infected at 4 days of life. Pups from both previously colonized immune and PCV-vaccinated mothers had higher levels of anti-S. pneumoniae IgG than pups from non-immune or non-vaccinated mothers and shed significantly fewer S. pneumoniae over the first 5 days of infection. By setting up cross-foster experiments, we demonstrated that maternal passage of antibody to pups either in utero or post-natally decreases S. pneumoniae shedding. Passive immunization experiments showed that type-specific antibody to capsular polysaccharide is sufficient to decrease shedding and that the agglutinating function of immunoglobulin is required for this effect. Finally, we established that anti-pneumococcal immunity and anti-PCV vaccination block host-to-host transmission of S. pneumoniae. Moreover, immunity in either the donor or recipient pups alone was sufficient to reduce rates of transmission, indicating that decreased shedding and protection from acquisition of colonization are both contributing factors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the reduced levels of S. pneumoniae transmission between hosts immune from prior exposure and among vaccinated children. PMID:28292980

  11. Cell-type-specific roles for COX-2 in UVB-induced skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herschman, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    In human tumors, and in mouse models, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels are frequently correlated with tumor development/burden. In addition to intrinsic tumor cell expression, COX-2 is often present in fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells of the tumor microenvironment, and in infiltrating immune cells. Intrinsic cancer cell COX-2 expression is postulated as only one of many sources for prostanoids required for tumor promotion/progression. Although both COX-2 inhibition and global Cox-2 gene deletion ameliorate ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced SKH-1 mouse skin tumorigenesis, neither manipulation can elucidate the cell type(s) in which COX-2 expression is required for tumorigenesis; both eliminate COX-2 activity in all cells. To address this question, we created Cox-2 flox/flox mice, in which the Cox-2 gene can be eliminated in a cell-type-specific fashion by targeted Cre recombinase expression. Cox-2 deletion in skin epithelial cells of SKH-1 Cox-2 flox/flox;K14Cre + mice resulted, following UVB irradiation, in reduced skin hyperplasia and increased apoptosis. Targeted epithelial cell Cox-2 deletion also resulted in reduced tumor incidence, frequency, size and proliferation rate, altered tumor cell differentiation and reduced tumor vascularization. Moreover, Cox-2 flox/flox;K14Cre + papillomas did not progress to squamous cell carcinomas. In contrast, Cox-2 deletion in SKH-1 Cox-2 flox/flox; LysMCre + myeloid cells had no effect on UVB tumor induction. We conclude that (i) intrinsic epithelial COX-2 activity plays a major role in UVB-induced skin cancer, (ii) macrophage/myeloid COX-2 plays no role in UVB-induced skin cancer and (iii) either there may be another COX-2-dependent prostanoid source(s) that drives UVB skin tumor induction or there may exist a COX-2-independent pathway(s) to UVB-induced skin cancer. PMID:24469308

  12. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Vrba, Lukas; Garbe, James C.; Stampfer, Martha R.; Futscher, Bernard W.

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  13. Cell-Type-Specific Effects of RNase L on Viral Induction of Beta Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Chakrabarti, Arindam; Jha, Babal Kant; Weiss, Susan R.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interferon (IFN)-inducible antiviral state is mediated in part by the 2′,5′-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase (OAS)/RNase L system. 2-5A, produced from ATP by OAS proteins in response to viral double-stranded RNA, binds to and activates RNase L. RNase L restricts viral infections by degrading viral and cellular RNA, inducing autophagy and apoptosis, and producing RNA degradation products that amplify production of type I interferons (IFNs) through RIG-I-like receptors. However, the effects of the OAS/RNase L pathway on IFN induction in different cell types that vary in basal levels of these proteins have not been previously reported. Here we report higher basal expression of both RNase L and OAS in mouse macrophages in comparison to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In MEFs, RNase L gene knockout decreased induction of IFN-β by encephalomyocarditis virus infection or poly(rI):poly(rC) (pIC) transfection. In contrast, in macrophages, RNase L deletion increased (rather than decreased) induction of IFN-β by virus or pIC. RNA damage from RNase L in virus-infected macrophages is likely responsible for reducing IFN-β production. Similarly, direct activation of RNase L by transfection with 2-5A induced IFN-β in MEFs but not in macrophages. Also, viral infection or pIC transfection caused RNase L-dependent apoptosis of macrophages but not of MEFs. Our results suggest that cell-type-specific differences in basal levels of OAS and RNase L are determinants of IFN-β induction that could affect tissue protection and survival during viral infections. PMID:24570368

  14. Neurophysiology of space travel: energetic solar particles cause cell type-specific plasticity of neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Dudok, Barna; Parihar, Vipan K; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Zöldi, Miklós; Kang, Young-Jin; Maroso, Mattia; Alexander, Allyson L; Nelson, Gregory A; Piomelli, Daniele; Katona, István; Limoli, Charles L; Soltesz, Ivan

    2016-11-30

    In the not too distant future, humankind will embark on one of its greatest adventures, the travel to distant planets. However, deep space travel is associated with an inevitable exposure to radiation fields. Space-relevant doses of protons elicit persistent disruptions in cognition and neuronal structure. However, whether space-relevant irradiation alters neurotransmission is unknown. Within the hippocampus, a brain region crucial for cognition, perisomatic inhibitory control of pyramidal cells (PCs) is supplied by two distinct cell types, the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells (CB1BCs) and parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons (PVINs). Mice subjected to low-dose proton irradiation were analyzed using electrophysiological, biochemical and imaging techniques months after exposure. In irradiated mice, GABA release from CB1BCs onto PCs was dramatically increased. This effect was abolished by CB1 blockade, indicating that irradiation decreased CB1-dependent tonic inhibition of GABA release. These alterations in GABA release were accompanied by decreased levels of the major CB1 ligand 2-arachidonoylglycerol. In contrast, GABA release from PVINs was unchanged, and the excitatory connectivity from PCs to the interneurons also underwent cell type-specific alterations. These results demonstrate that energetic charged particles at space-relevant low doses elicit surprisingly selective long-term plasticity of synaptic microcircuits in the hippocampus. The magnitude and persistent nature of these alterations in synaptic function are consistent with the observed perturbations in cognitive performance after irradiation, while the high specificity of these changes indicates that it may be possible to develop targeted therapeutic interventions to decrease the risk of adverse events during interplanetary travel.

  15. Linear Multi-Epitope (Glyco)peptides for Type-specific Serology of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infections.

    PubMed

    Risinger, Christian Walter; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud J; Olofsson, Sigvard; Bergstrom, Tomas; Blixt, Ola

    2017-02-26

    Detection of type-specific antibodies is an important and essential part of accurate diagnosis, even in silent carriers of HSV-1 (oral) and HSV-2 (genital) infections. Serologic assays that identify HSV-1 and HSV-2 type-specific antibodies have been commercially available for more than a decade but often face problems related to cross-reactivity and similar issues. Attempts to identify type specific peptide epitopes for use in serology for both HSV-1 and HSV-2 have been limited. We recently demonstrated epitope mapping of envelope glycoprotein G2 and identified a type-specific glycopeptide epitope that broadly recognized HSV-2 infected individuals. In the present work we have performed a comprehensive glycopeptide synthesis and microarray epitope mapping of 14 envelope proteins from HSV-1 and HSV-2, namely: gB, gC, gD, gE, gG, gH and gI, using sera from HSV-1 and HSV-2 infected individuals and control sera. Several unique type-specific peptide epitopes with a high cumulative sensitivity were identified and synthesized as one large linear multi-epitope sequence using microwave assisted solid-phase-(glyco)peptide synthesis. Microarray validation with clinically defined HSV and Varicella Zoster (VZV) sera confirmed excellent specificities and sensitivities.

  16. Cell-type specific requirements for thiol/disulfide exchange during HIV-1 entry and infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of disulfide bond remodeling in HIV-1 infection is well described, but the process still remains incompletely characterized. At present, the data have been predominantly obtained using established cell lines and/or CXCR4-tropic laboratory-adapted virus strains. There is also ambiguity about which disulfide isomerases/ reductases play a major role in HIV-1 entry, as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and/or thioredoxin (Trx) have emerged as the two enzymes most often implicated in this process. Results We have extended our previous findings and those of others by focusing on CCR5-using HIV-1 strains and their natural targets - primary human macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found that the nonspecific thiol/disulfide exchange inhibitor, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), significantly reduced HIV-1 entry and infection in cell lines, human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), and also phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Subsequent studies were performed using specific anti-PDI or Trx monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in HIV-1 envelope pseudotyped and wild type (wt) virus infection systems. Although human donor-to-donor variability was observed as expected, Trx appeared to play a greater role than PDI in HIV-1 infection of MDM. In contrast, PDI, but not Trx, was predominantly involved in HIV-1 entry and infection of the CD4+/CCR5+ T cell line, PM-1, and PHA-stimulated primary human T lymphocytes. Intriguingly, both PDI and Trx were present on the surface of MDM, PM-1 and PHA-stimulated CD4+ T cells. However, considerably lower levels of Trx were detected on freshly isolated CD4+ lymphocytes, compared to PHA-stimulated cells. Conclusions Our findings clearly demonstrate the role of thiol/disulfide exchange in HIV-1 entry in primary T lymphocytes and MDM. They also establish a cell-type specificity regarding the involvement of particular disulfide isomerases/reductases in this process and may provide an

  17. Accurate assessment of Congo basin forest carbon stocks requires forest type specific assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonen, Pieter C. J.; Van Ballaert, Siege; Verbist, Bruno; Boyemba, Faustin; Muys, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Due to a limited number of field-based studies estimations of carbon stocks in the Central Congo Basin remain highly uncertain. In particular, more information is needed about the variation in stocks between forest types and on the factors explaining these differences. This study presents results from biomass and soil carbon inventories in 46 0.25ha old-growth forest plots located in three study sites in Tshopo District, Democratic Republic of Congo. Four forest community types were identified using cluster and indicator species analysis based on the plots' large tree (>30cm DBH) species composition. Carbon stocks were calculated using newly established forest type specific tree height-diameter relationships to prevent errors related to the use of inappropriate regional relationships from literature. Using the Akaike criterion it became clear that for one site and a few forest types separate tree height-diameter relationships gave a robust and significant better fit, showing that there was a clear and significant interaction effect between sites and forest type. Mean above-ground carbon stocks were estimated at 165 ±44 Mg ha-1. Significant differences were found between forest types, but not between sites for a given forest type. Largest stocks were found in monodominant Gilbertiodendron dewevrei forests (187 ± 37 Mg C ha-1), which occurred in all sites. Smallest stocks (91 ± 14 Mg C ha-1) were found in the Margaritaria discoidea mixed forest type, which occurred only in one site, while two other mixed forest types showed intermediate stocks (148 ± 28 Mg C ha-1 and 160 ± 36 Mg C ha-1 respectively). The observed differences in aboveground stocks between forest types could be explained by forest structure related variables including number of large trees (DBH>70cm), average wood density and dominant height. When comparing the G. dewevrei monodominant type with mixed forest types within each study site, the former showed equal basal area and sometimes higher

  18. Cell-type-specific effects of RNase L on viral induction of beta interferon.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Chakrabarti, Arindam; Jha, Babal Kant; Weiss, Susan R; Silverman, Robert H

    2014-02-25

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible antiviral state is mediated in part by the 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A) synthetase (OAS)/RNase L system. 2-5A, produced from ATP by OAS proteins in response to viral double-stranded RNA, binds to and activates RNase L. RNase L restricts viral infections by degrading viral and cellular RNA, inducing autophagy and apoptosis, and producing RNA degradation products that amplify production of type I interferons (IFNs) through RIG-I-like receptors. However, the effects of the OAS/RNase L pathway on IFN induction in different cell types that vary in basal levels of these proteins have not been previously reported. Here we report higher basal expression of both RNase L and OAS in mouse macrophages in comparison to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In MEFs, RNase L gene knockout decreased induction of IFN-β by encephalomyocarditis virus infection or poly(rI):poly(rC) (pIC) transfection. In contrast, in macrophages, RNase L deletion increased (rather than decreased) induction of IFN-β by virus or pIC. RNA damage from RNase L in virus-infected macrophages is likely responsible for reducing IFN-β production. Similarly, direct activation of RNase L by transfection with 2-5A induced IFN-β in MEFs but not in macrophages. Also, viral infection or pIC transfection caused RNase L-dependent apoptosis of macrophages but not of MEFs. Our results suggest that cell-type-specific differences in basal levels of OAS and RNase L are determinants of IFN-β induction that could affect tissue protection and survival during viral infections. IMPORTANCE Type I interferons (IFNs) such as IFN-β are essential antiviral cytokines that are often required for animal survival following infections by highly pathogenic viruses. Therefore, host factors that regulate type I IFN production are critically important for animal and human health. Previously we reported that the OAS/RNase L pathway amplifies antiviral innate immunity by enhancing IFN-β production in mouse

  19. Neuron type-specific miRNA represses two broadly expressed genes to modulate an avoidance behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drexel, Tanja; Mahofsky, Katharina; Latham, Richard; Zimmer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Two broad gene classes are distinguished within multicellular organisms: cell type-specific genes, which confer particular cellular properties, and ubiquitous genes that support general cellular functions. However, certain so-called ubiquitous genes show functionally relevant cell type-specific repression. How such repression is achieved is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are repressors, many of which are expressed with high cell type specificity. Here we show that mir-791, expressed exclusively in the CO2-sensing neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, represses two otherwise broadly expressed genes. This repression is necessary for normal neuronal function and behavior of the animals toward CO2. miRNA-mediated repression of broadly transcribed genes is a previously unappreciated strategy for cellular specialization. PMID:27688400

  20. Cell Type-Specific Regulation of Immunological Synapse Dynamics by B7 Ligand Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Brzostek, Joanna; Gascoigne, Nicholas R. J.; Rybakin, Vasily

    2016-01-01

    B7 proteins CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) are expressed on most antigen-presenting cells and provide critical co-stimulatory or inhibitory input to T cells via their T-cell-expressed receptors: CD28 and CTLA-4. CD28 is expressed on effector T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), and CD28-dependent signals are required for optimum activation of effector T cell functions. CD28 ligation on effector T cells leads to formation of distinct molecular patterns and induction of cytoskeletal rearrangements at the immunological synapse (IS). CD28 plays a critical role in recruitment of protein kinase C (PKC)-θ to the effector T cell IS. CTLA-4 is constitutively expressed on the surface of Tregs, but it is expressed on effector T cells only after activation. As CTLA-4 binds to B7 proteins with significantly higher affinity than CD28, B7 ligand recognition by cells expressing both receptors leads to displacement of CD28 and PKC-θ from the IS. In Tregs, B7 ligand recognition leads to recruitment of CTLA-4 and PKC-η to the IS. CTLA-4 plays a role in regulation of T effector and Treg IS stability and cell motility. Due to their important roles in regulating T-cell-mediated responses, B7 receptors are emerging as important drug targets in oncology. In this review, we present an integrated summary of current knowledge about the role of B7 family receptor–ligand interactions in the regulation of spatial and temporal IS dynamics in effector and Tregs. PMID:26870040

  1. [Use of radial immunodiffusion for quantitative determination of antibody to ribonucleoprotein antigen of influenza virus].

    PubMed

    Vaciaev, A I; Isupov, F G

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of quantitative determination of antibody to the inner type-specific antigen of influenza A virus by means of radial immunodiffusion test by the method of Mancini was demonstrated. Development of a method for preparation of a concentrated antigen will make it possible to use the test in practical laboratories. By means of radial immunodiffusion test antibody in paired sera from convalescents, vaccinees as well as animals and birds may be determined.

  2. Cell-Type Specific Inactivation of Hippocampal CA1 Disrupts Location-Dependent Object Recognition in the Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haettig, Jakob; Sun, Yanjun; Wood, Marcelo A.; Xu, Xiangmin

    2013-01-01

    The allatostatin receptor (AlstR)/ligand inactivation system enables potent regulation of neuronal circuit activity. To examine how different cell types participate in memory formation, we have used this system through Cre-directed, cell-type specific expression in mouse hippocampal CA1 in vivo and examined functional effects of inactivation of…

  3. Comparison of MY09/11 consensus PCR and type-specific PCRs in the detection of oncogenic HPV types.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, C E; Boulet, G A V; Horvath, C A J; Benoy, I H; Vereecken, A J; Bogers, J J

    2007-01-01

    The causal relationship between persistent infection with high-risk HPV and cervical cancer has resulted in the development of HPV DNA detection systems. The widely used MY09/11 consensus PCR targets a 450bp conserved sequence in the HPV L1 gene, and can therefore amplify a broad spectrum of HPV types. However, limitations of these consensus primers are evident, particularly in regard to the variability in detection sensitivity among different HPV types. This study compared MY09/11 PCR with type-specific PCRs in the detection of oncogenic HPV types. The study population comprised 15, 774 patients. Consensus PCR failed to detect 522 (10.9%) HPV infections indicated by type-specific PCRs. A significant correlation between failure of consensus PCR and HPV type was found. HPV types 51, 68 and 45 were missed most frequently. The clinical relevance of the HPV infections missed by MY09/11 PCR was reflected in the fraction of cases with cytological abnormalities and in follow-up, showing 104 (25.4%) CIN2+ cases. The MY09/11 false negativity could be the result of poor sensitivity, mismatch of MY09/11 primers or disruption of L1 target by HPV integration or DNA degradation. Furthermore, MY09/11 PCR lacked specificity for oncogenic HPVs. Diagnostic accuracy of the PCR systems, in terms of sensitivity (MY09/11 PCR: 87.9%; type-specific PCRs: 98.3%) and specificity (MY09/11 PCR: 38.7%; type-specific PCRs: 76.14%), and predictive values for histologically confirmed CIN2+, suggest that type-specific PCRs could be used in a clinical setting as a reliable screening tool.

  4. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  5. African swine fever virus serotype-specific proteins are significant protective antigens for African swine fever

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    African swine fever (ASF) is an emerging disease threat for the swine industry worldwide. No ASF vaccine is available and progress is hindered by lack of knowledge concerning the extent of African swine fever virus (ASFV) strain diversity and the viral antigens conferring type specific protective im...

  6. Cell type-specific expression of JC virus early promoter is determined by positive and negative regulation.

    PubMed

    Tada, H; Lashgari, M; Rappaport, J; Khalili, K

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed control sequences of the human papovavirus JC virus (JCV) to define the cis-acting elements that regulate specific expression of the viral early region genes in glial cells. Nuclear run-on transcription, S1 analysis, and chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme activity in a transient transfection assay established that the cell type-specific expression of JCV early genes is determined at the transcriptional level. Using DNase footprinting analysis of nuclear proteins prepared from glial and nonglial cells, we located four regions within the JCV control sequences that specifically interacted with the proteins. In glial cells, all four domains contributed to the specific expression of a heterologous promoter, whereas in nonglial cells, two protein-binding regions showed no effect on basal transcriptional activity and the other two domains significantly downregulated transcription of the promoter. We conclude that cell type-specific transcription of the JCV early promoter is under both positive and negative regulation in eucaryotic cells.

  7. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily M.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  8. Different GATA factors dictate CCR3 transcription in allergic inflammatory cells in a cell type-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Kong, Su-Kang; Kim, Byung Soo; Uhm, Tae Gi; Lee, Wonyong; Lee, Gap Ryol; Park, Choon-Sik; Lee, Chul-Hoon; Chung, Il Yup

    2013-06-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 is expressed in prominent allergic inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, and Th2 cells. We previously identified a functional GATA element within exon 1 of the CCR3 gene that is responsible for GATA-1-mediated CCR3 transcription. Because allergic inflammatory cells exhibit distinct expression patterns of different GATA factors, we investigated whether different GATA factors dictate CCR3 transcription in a cell type-specific manner. GATA-2 was expressed in EoL-1 eosinophilic cells, GATA-1 and GATA-2 were expressed in HMC-1 mast cells, and GATA-3 was preferentially expressed in Jurkat cells. Unlike a wild-type CCR3 reporter, reporters lacking the functional GATA element were not active in any of the three cell types, implying the involvement of different GATA factors in CCR3 transcription. RNA interference assays showed that small interfering RNAs specific for different GATA factors reduced CCR3 reporter activity in a cell type-specific fashion. Consistent with these findings, chromatin immunoprecipitation and EMSA analyses demonstrated cell type-specific binding of GATA factors to the functional GATA site. More importantly, specific inhibition of the CCR3 reporter activity by different GATA small interfering RNAs was well preserved in respective cell types differentiated from cord blood; in particular, GATA-3 was entirely responsible for reporter activity in Th2 cells and replaced the role predominantly played by GATA-1 and GATA-2. These results highlight a mechanistic role of GATA factors in which cell type-specific expression is the primary determinant of transcription of the CCR3 gene in major allergic inflammatory cells.

  9. Hunger States Control the Directions of Synaptic Plasticity via Switching Cell Type-Specific Subunits of NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yong; Yang, Yunlei

    2015-09-23

    It remains largely unknown whether and how hunger states control activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). We here report that both LTP and LTD of excitatory synaptic strength within the appetite control circuits residing in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) behave in a manner of hunger states dependence and cell type specificity. For instance, we find that tetanic stimulation induces LTP at orexigenic agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons in ad libitum fed mice, whereas it induces LTD in food-deprived mice. In an opposite direction, the same induction protocol induces LTD at anorexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in fed mice but weak LTP in deprived mice. Mechanistically, we also find that food deprivation increases the expressions of NR2C/NR2D/NR3-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at AgRP neurons that contribute to the inductions of LTD, whereas it decreases their expressions at POMC neurons. Collectively, our data reveal that hunger states control the directions of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity by switching NMDA receptor subpopulations in a cell type-specific manner, providing insights into NMDAR-mediated interactions between energy states and associative memory. Significance statement: Based on the experiments performed in this study, we demonstrate that activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is also under the control of energy states by regulating NMDAR subpopulations in a cell type-specific manner. We thus propose a reversible memory configuration constructed from energy states-dependent cell type-specific bidirectional conversions of LTP and LTD. Together with the distinct functional roles played by NMDAR signaling in the control of food intake and energy states, these findings reveal a new reciprocal interaction between energy states and associative memory, one that might serve as a target for therapeutic treatments of the energy-related memory disorders or vice versa.

  10. Root Type-Specific Reprogramming of Maize Pericycle Transcriptomes by Local High Nitrate Results in Disparate Lateral Root Branching Patterns.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Baldauf, Jutta A; Lithio, Andrew; Marcon, Caroline; Nettleton, Dan; Li, Chunjian; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-03-01

    The adaptability of root system architecture to unevenly distributed mineral nutrients in soil is a key determinant of plant performance. The molecular mechanisms underlying nitrate dependent plasticity of lateral root branching across the different root types of maize are only poorly understood. In this study, detailed morphological and anatomical analyses together with cell type-specific transcriptome profiling experiments combining laser capture microdissection with RNA-seq were performed to unravel the molecular signatures of lateral root formation in primary, seminal, crown, and brace roots of maize (Zea mays) upon local high nitrate stimulation. The four maize root types displayed divergent branching patterns of lateral roots upon local high nitrate stimulation. In particular, brace roots displayed an exceptional architectural plasticity compared to other root types. Transcriptome profiling revealed root type-specific transcriptomic reprogramming of pericycle cells upon local high nitrate stimulation. The alteration of the transcriptomic landscape of brace root pericycle cells in response to local high nitrate stimulation was most significant. Root type-specific transcriptome diversity in response to local high nitrate highlighted differences in the functional adaptability and systemic shoot nitrogen starvation response during development. Integration of morphological, anatomical, and transcriptomic data resulted in a framework underscoring similarity and diversity among root types grown in heterogeneous nitrate environments.

  11. An Efficient Antipodal Cell Isolation Method for Screening of Cell Type-Specific Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Meng-xiang

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, the mature embryo sac consists of seven cells, namely two synergid cells and an egg cell at the micropylar end, one central cell, and three antipodal cells at the chalazal end. Excluding the antipodal cell, as a model for the study of cell fate determination and cell type specification, the roles of these embryo sac component cells in fertilization and seed formation have been widely investigated. At this time, little is known regarding the function of antipodal cells and their cell type-specific gene expression patterns. One reason for this is difficulties related to the observation and isolation of cells for detailed functional analyses. Here, we report a method for antipodal cell isolation and transcriptome analysis. We identified antipodal cell-specific marker line K44-1, and based on this marker line, established a procedure allowing us to isolate antipodal cells with both high quality and quantity. PCR validation of antipodal-specific genes from antipodal cell cDNA showed that the isolated cells are qualified and can be used for transcriptome analysis and screening of cell type-specific marker genes. The isolated cells could keep viable for a week in culture condition. This method can be used to efficiently isolate antipodal cells of high quality and will promote the functional investigation of antipodal cells in Arabidopsis thaliana. This increases our understanding of the molecular regulatory mechanism of antipodal cell specification. PMID:27875553

  12. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  13. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting to examine cell-type-specific gene expression in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M

    2015-05-28

    The brain is comprised of four primary cell types including neurons, astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Though they are not the most abundant cell type in the brain, neurons are the most widely studied of these cell types given their direct role in impacting behaviors. Other cell types in the brain also impact neuronal function and behavior via the signaling molecules they produce. Neuroscientists must understand the interactions between the cell types in the brain to better understand how these interactions impact neural function and disease. To date, the most common method of analyzing protein or gene expression utilizes the homogenization of whole tissue samples, usually with blood, and without regard for cell type. This approach is an informative approach for examining general changes in gene or protein expression that may influence neural function and behavior; however, this method of analysis does not lend itself to a greater understanding of cell-type-specific gene expression and the effect of cell-to-cell communication on neural function. Analysis of behavioral epigenetics has been an area of growing focus which examines how modifications of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) structure impact long-term gene expression and behavior; however, this information may only be relevant if analyzed in a cell-type-specific manner given the differential lineage and thus epigenetic markers that may be present on certain genes of individual neural cell types. The Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) technique described below provides a simple and effective way to isolate individual neural cells for the subsequent analysis of gene expression, protein expression, or epigenetic modifications of DNA. This technique can also be modified to isolate more specific neural cell types in the brain for subsequent cell-type-specific analysis.

  14. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Steven J.; Modi, Jill N.; Melick, Garrett A.; Abousaud, Marin I.; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Beedle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  15. Antigen injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Leprosy is caused by the organism Mycobacterium leprae . The leprosy test involves injection of an antigen just under ... if your body has a current or recent leprosy infection. The injection site is labeled and examined ...

  16. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salopiata, Florian; Depner, Sofia; Wäsch, Marvin; Böhm, Martin E.; Mücke, Oliver; Plass, Christoph; Lehmann, Wolf D.; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Klingmüller, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO). However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR) and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid) and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR). The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in erythroid

  17. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting for Analysis of Cell Type-Specific Responses to Salinity Stress in Arabidopsis and Rice

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, Aurelie; Bargmann, Bastiaan O.R.; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.; Tester, Mark; Baumann, Ute; Johnson, Alexander A.T.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) provides a rapid means of isolating large numbers of fluorescently tagged cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells. Collections of transgenic plants with cell type-specific expression of fluorescent marker genes such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) are ideally suited for FACS-assisted studies of individual cell types. Here we describe the use of Arabidopsis and rice enhancer trap lines with tissue-specific GFP expression patterns in the root to isolate specific cell types of root tissues using FACS. Additionally, protocols are provided to impose a ramped salinity stress for 48 h prior to cell sorting. PMID:22895766

  18. Axonal motility and its modulation by activity are branch-type specific in the intact adult cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Fukaya, Masahiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Linden, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary We performed two-photon in vivo imaging of cerebellar climbing fibers (CFs; the terminal arbor of olivocerebellar axons) in adult mice. CF ascending branches innervate Purkinje cells while CF transverse branches show a near complete failure to form conventional synapses. Time-lapse imaging over hours or days revealed that ascending branches were very stable. However, transverse branches were highly dynamic, exhibiting rapid elongation and retraction and varicosity turnover. Thus, different branches of the same axon, with different innervation patterns, display branch type-specific motility in the adult cerebellum. Furthermore, dynamic changes in transverse branch length were almost completely suppressed by pharmacological stimulation of olivary firing. PMID:17988631

  19. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis to Evaluate Cell Type Specific Expression of Targets Relevant for Immunotherapy of Hematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pont, M J; Honders, M W; Kremer, A N; van Kooten, C; Out, C; Hiemstra, P S; de Boer, H C; Jager, M J; Schmelzer, E; Vries, R G; Al Hinai, A S; Kroes, W G; Monajemi, R; Goeman, J J; Böhringer, S; Marijt, W A F; Falkenburg, J H F; Griffioen, M

    2016-01-01

    Cellular immunotherapy has proven to be effective in the treatment of hematological cancers by donor lymphocyte infusion after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and more recently by targeted therapy with chimeric antigen or T-cell receptor-engineered T cells. However, dependent on the tissue distribution of the antigens that are targeted, anti-tumor responses can be accompanied by undesired side effects. Therefore, detailed tissue distribution analysis is essential to estimate potential efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy of hematological malignancies. We performed microarray gene expression analysis of hematological malignancies of different origins, healthy hematopoietic cells and various non-hematopoietic cell types from organs that are often targeted in detrimental immune responses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation leading to graft-versus-host disease. Non-hematopoietic cells were also cultured in the presence of IFN-γ to analyze gene expression under inflammatory circumstances. Gene expression was investigated by Illumina HT12.0 microarrays and quality control analysis was performed to confirm the cell-type origin and exclude contamination of non-hematopoietic cell samples with peripheral blood cells. Microarray data were validated by quantitative RT-PCR showing strong correlations between both platforms. Detailed gene expression profiles were generated for various minor histocompatibility antigens and B-cell surface antigens to illustrate the value of the microarray dataset to estimate efficacy and toxicity of candidate targets for immunotherapy. In conclusion, our microarray database provides a relevant platform to analyze and select candidate antigens with hematopoietic (lineage)-restricted expression as potential targets for immunotherapy of hematological cancers.

  20. Highly efficient cell-type-specific gene inactivation reveals a key function for the Drosophila FUS homolog cabeza in neurons.

    PubMed

    Frickenhaus, Marie; Wagner, Marina; Mallik, Moushami; Catinozzi, Marica; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-03-16

    To expand the rich genetic toolkit of Drosophila melanogaster, we evaluated whether introducing FRT or LoxP sites in endogenous genes could allow for cell-type-specific gene inactivation in both dividing and postmitotic cells by GAL4-driven expression of FLP or Cre recombinase. For proof of principle, conditional alleles were generated for cabeza (caz), the Drosophila homolog of human FUS, a gene implicated in the neurodegenerative disorders amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Upon selective expression in neurons or muscle, both FLP and Cre mediated caz inactivation in all neurons or muscle cells, respectively. Neuron-selective caz inactivation resulted in failure of pharate adult flies to eclose from the pupal case, and adult escapers displayed motor performance defects and reduced life span. Due to Cre-toxicity, FLP/FRT is the preferred system for cell-type-specific gene inactivation, and this strategy outperforms RNAi-mediated knock-down. Furthermore, the GAL80 target system allowed for temporal control over gene inactivation, as induction of FLP expression from the adult stage onwards still inactivated caz in >99% of neurons. Remarkably, selective caz inactivation in adult neurons did not affect motor performance and life span, indicating that neuronal caz is required during development, but not for maintenance of adult neuronal function.

  1. CAST-ChIP maps cell-type-specific chromatin states in the Drosophila central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Tamás; Schwalie, Petra C; Handley, Ava; Margulies, Carla E; Flicek, Paul; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2013-10-17

    Chromatin organization and gene activity are responsive to developmental and environmental cues. Although many genes are transcribed throughout development and across cell types, much of gene regulation is highly cell-type specific. To readily track chromatin features at the resolution of cell types within complex tissues, we developed and validated chromatin affinity purification from specific cell types by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CAST-ChIP), a broadly applicable biochemical procedure. RNA polymerase II (Pol II) CAST-ChIP identifies ~1,500 neuronal and glia-specific genes in differentiated cells within the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, the histone H2A.Z is distributed similarly across cell types and throughout development, marking cell-type-invariant Pol II-bound regions. Our study identifies H2A.Z as an active chromatin signature that is refractory to changes across cell fates. Thus, CAST-ChIP powerfully identifies cell-type-specific as well as cell-type-invariant chromatin states, enabling the systematic dissection of chromatin structure and gene regulation within complex tissues such as the brain.

  2. Discovery of Cell-Type-Specific and Disease-Related Enzymatic Activity Changes via Global Evaluation of Peptide Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Onagi, Jun; Komatsu, Toru; Ichihashi, Yuki; Kuriki, Yugo; Kamiya, Mako; Terai, Takuya; Ueno, Tasuku; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Hata, Keisuke; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2017-03-08

    Cellular homeostasis is maintained by a complex network of reactions catalyzed by enormous numbers of enzymatic activities (the enzymome), which serve to determine the phenotypes of cells. Here, we focused on the enzymomics of proteases and peptidases because these enzymes are an important class of disease-related proteins. We describe a system that (A) simultaneously evaluates metabolic activities of peptides using a series of exogenous peptide substrates and (B) identifies the enzymes that metabolize the specified peptide substrate with high throughput. We confirmed that the developed system was able to discover cell-type-specific and disease-related exo- and endopeptidase activities and identify the responsible enzymes. For example, we found that the activity of the endopeptidase neurolysin is highly elevated in human colorectal tumor tissue samples. This simple but powerful enzymomics platform should be widely applicable to uncover cell-type-specific reactions and altered enzymatic functions with potential value as biomarkers or drug targets in various disease states and to investigate the mechanisms of the underlying pathologies.

  3. Muscle enzyme and fiber type-specific sarcomere protein increases in serum after inertial concentric-eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Carmona, G; Guerrero, M; Cussó, R; Padullés, J M; Moras, G; Lloret, M; Bedini, J L; Cadefau, J A

    2015-12-01

    Muscle damage induced by inertial exercise performed on a flywheel device was assessed through the serum evolution of muscle enzymes, interleukin 6, and fiber type-specific sarcomere proteins such as fast myosin (FM) and slow myosin (SM). We hypothesized that a model of muscle damage could be constructed by measuring the evolution of serum concentration of muscle proteins following inertial exercise, according to their molecular weight and the fiber compartment in which they are located. Moreover, by measuring FM and SM, the type of fibers that are affected could be assessed. Serum profiles were registered before and 24, 48, and 144 h after exercise in 10 healthy and recreationally active young men. Creatine kinase (CK) and CK-myocardial band isoenzyme increased in serum early (24 h) and returned to baseline values after 48 h. FM increased in serum late (48 h) and remained elevated 144 h post-exercise. The increase in serum muscle enzymes suggests increased membrane permeability of both fast and slow fibers, and the increase in FM reveals sarcomere disruption as well as increased membrane permeability of fast fibers. Consequently, FM could be adopted as a fiber type-specific biomarker of muscle damage.

  4. Mouse TU tagging: a chemical/genetic intersectional method for purifying cell type-specific nascent RNA.

    PubMed

    Gay, Leslie; Miller, Michael R; Ventura, P Britten; Devasthali, Vidusha; Vue, Zer; Thompson, Heather L; Temple, Sally; Zong, Hui; Cleary, Michael D; Stankunas, Kryn; Doe, Chris Q

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach for understanding development and disease. Current cell type-specific RNA purification methods have limitations, including cell dissociation trauma or inability to identify all RNA species. Here, we describe "mouse thiouracil (TU) tagging," a genetic and chemical intersectional method for covalent labeling and purification of cell type-specific RNA in vivo. Cre-induced expression of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) provides spatial specificity; injection of 4-thiouracil (4TU) provides temporal specificity. Only UPRT(+) cells exposed to 4TU produce thio-RNA, which is then purified for RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). This method can purify transcripts from spatially complex and rare (<5%) cells, such as Tie2:Cre(+) brain endothelia/microglia (76% validated by expression pattern), or temporally dynamic transcripts, such as those acutely induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Moreover, generating chimeric mice via UPRT(+) bone marrow transplants identifies immune versus niche spleen RNA. TU tagging provides a novel method for identifying actively transcribed genes in specific cells at specific times within intact mice.

  5. Cell type specificity and structural determinants of IRES activity from the 5' leaders of different HIV-1 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2013-07-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs are important regulators of gene expression, but their diverse molecular mechanisms remain partially understood. The HIV-1 gag transcript leader contains an IRES that may be a good model for understanding the function of many other IRESs. We investigated the possibility that this IRES' function is linked to both the structure of the RNA and its cellular environment. We find that in the context of a bicistronic reporter construct, HIV-1 gag IRES' activity is cell type-specific, with higher activity in T-cell culture systems that model the natural target cells for HIV-1 infection. This finding underscores how an IRES may be fine tuned to function in certain cells, perhaps owing to cell type-specific protein factors. Using RNA probing and mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the HIV-1 gag IRES does not use pre-folded RNA structure to drive function, a finding that gives insight into how conformationally dynamic IRESs operate. Furthermore, we find that a common exon drives IRES activity in a diverse set of alternatively spliced transcripts. We propose a mechanism in which a structurally plastic RNA element confers the ability to initiate translation internally, and activity from this common element is modulated by 3' nucleotides added by alternative splicing.

  6. Two amino acid residues confer type specificity to a neutralizing, conformationally dependent epitope on human papillomavirus type 11.

    PubMed Central

    Ludmerer, S W; Benincasa, D; Mark, G E

    1996-01-01

    Characterization of virus binding by neutralizing antibodies is important both in understanding early events in viral infectivity and in development of vaccines. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11) have been described, but mapping the binding site has been difficult because of the conformational nature of key type-specific neutralization epitopes on the L1 coat protein. We have determined those residues of the L1 protein of HPV11 which confer type specificity to the binding of HPV11-neutralizing MAbs. Binding of three HPV11-specific neutralizing MAbs could be redirected to HPV6 L1 virus-like particles in which as few as two substitutions of corresponding amino acid residues from HPV11 L1 have been made, thus demonstrating the importance of these residues to MAb binding through the transfer of a conformationally dependent epitope. In addition, a fourth neutralizing MAb could be distinguished from the other neutralizing MAbs in terms of the amino acid residues which affect binding, suggesting the possibility that it neutralizes HPV11 through a different mechanism. PMID:8676509

  7. Association Between Type-specific HPV Infections and hTERT DNA Methylation in Patients with Invasive Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    MOLANO, MÓNICA; MORENO-ACOSTA, PABLO; MORALES, NICOLÁS; BURGOS, MARCELA; BUITRAGO, LINA; GAMBOA, OSCAR; ALVAREZ, RAYNER; M. GARLAND, SUZANNE; N. TABRIZI, SEPEHR; D.M. STEENBERGEN, RENSKE; CARLOS MEJÍA, JUAN

    2016-01-01

    Background: There exists limited information on the role of hTERT methylation, and its association with type-specific HPV infections in cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: Eighty-seven frozen samples were analyzed for type-specific HPV infection using a GP5+/GP6+ PCR-RLB assay (RLB). hTERT DNA methylation analysis was performed using a newly developed PCR-RLB-hTERT. Results: Ninety-three percent of samples were HPV-positive and fifteen different types were detected. hTERT methylation analysis of region 1 revealed no methylation in 78.8% of the samples and partial methylation in 21.2%. In region two, 68.2% showed no methylation and 31.8% showed a pattern of partial methylation. An association between the alpha 9 and alpha 7 species with a pattern of no methylation of hTERT in the region 1 was established (p=0.02 and p=0.03, respectively). Conclusion: Differences in patterns of methylation of the hTERT core promoter [region 1 (nt -208 to -1) and region 2 (nt +1 to +104) relative to first ATG] are related to the HPV species present. PMID:27807071

  8. Fiber type specific expression of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-18 in human skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Pedersen, Bente K

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is now recognized as an endocrine organ with the capacity to produce signal peptides in response to muscle contractions. Here we demonstrate that resting healthy human muscles express cytokines in a fiber type specific manner. Human muscle biopsies from seven healthy young males were obtained from m. triceps, m. quadriceps vastus lateralis and m. soleus. Type I fibers contributed (mean +/- SE) 24.0 +/- 2.5% in triceps of total fibers, 51.3 +/- 2.4% in vastus and 84.9 +/- 22% in soleus. As expected, differences in the fiber type composition were accompanied by marked differences between the three muscles with regard to MHC I and MHC IIa mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-18 were solely expressed by type II fibers, whereas the expression of IL-6 was more prominent in type I compared to type II fibers. The fiber type specificity was found in triceps, vastus and soleus indicating that the level of daily muscle activity did not influence basal cytokine expression. The specificity of cytokine expression in different muscle fiber types in healthy young males suggests that cytokines may play specific regulatory roles in normal physiology.

  9. MultiSite Gateway-Compatible Cell Type-Specific Gene-Inducible System for Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Siligato, Riccardo; Wang, Xin; Yadav, Shri Ram; Lehesranta, Satu; Ma, Guojie; Ursache, Robertas; Sevilem, Iris; Zhang, Jing; Gorte, Maartje; Prasad, Kalika; Heidstra, Renze

    2016-01-01

    A powerful method to study gene function is expression or overexpression in an inducible, cell type-specific system followed by observation of consequent phenotypic changes and visualization of linked reporters in the target tissue. Multiple inducible gene overexpression systems have been developed for plants, but very few of these combine plant selection markers, control of expression domains, access to multiple promoters and protein fusion reporters, chemical induction, and high-throughput cloning capabilities. Here, we introduce a MultiSite Gateway-compatible inducible system for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants that provides the capability to generate such constructs in a single cloning step. The system is based on the tightly controlled, estrogen-inducible XVE system. We demonstrate that the transformants generated with this system exhibit the expected cell type-specific expression, similar to what is observed with constitutively expressed native promoters. With this new system, cloning of inducible constructs is no longer limited to a few special cases but can be used as a standard approach when gene function is studied. In addition, we present a set of entry clones consisting of histochemical and fluorescent reporter variants designed for gene and promoter expression studies. PMID:26644504

  10. Prevalence of type-specific HPV infection by age and grade of cervical cytology: data from the ARTISTIC trial.

    PubMed

    Sargent, A; Bailey, A; Almonte, M; Turner, A; Thomson, C; Peto, J; Desai, M; Mather, J; Moss, S; Roberts, C; Kitchener, H C

    2008-05-20

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection causes cervical cancer and premalignant dysplasia. Type-specific HPV prevalence data provide a basis for assessing the impact of HPV vaccination programmes on cervical cytology. We report high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) type-specific prevalence data in relation to cervical cytology for 24,510 women (age range: 20-64; mean age 40.2 years) recruited into the ARTISTIC trial, which is being conducted within the routine NHS Cervical Screening Programme in Greater Manchester. The most common HR-HPV types were HPV16, 18, 31, 51 and 52, which accounted for 60% of all HR-HPV types detected. There was a marked decline in the prevalence of HR-HPV infection with age, but the proportion due to each HPV type did not vary greatly with age. Multiple infections were common below the age of 30 years but less so between age 30 and 64 years. Catch-up vaccination of this sexually active cohort would be expected to reduce the number of women with moderate or worse cytology by 45%, but the number with borderline or mild cytology would fall by only 7%, giving an overall reduction of 12% in the number of women with abnormal cytology and 27% in the number with any HR-HPV infection. In the absence of broader cross-protection, the large majority of low-grade and many high-grade abnormalities may still occur in sexually active vaccinated women.

  11. Getting down to specifics: profiling gene expression and protein-DNA interactions in a cell type-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Colin D.; Southall, Tony D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of multicellular organisms are comprised of an extraordinary range of cell types, with different properties and gene expression profiles. Understanding what makes each cell type unique, and how their individual characteristics are attributed, are key questions for both developmental and neurobiologists alike. The brain is an excellent example of the cellular diversity expressed in the majority of eukaryotes. The mouse brain comprises of approximately 75 million neurons varying in morphology, electrophysiology, and preferences for synaptic partners. A powerful process in beginning to pick apart the mechanisms that specify individual characteristics of the cell, as well as their fate, is to profile gene expression patterns, chromatin states, and transcriptional networks in a cell type-specific manner, i.e. only profiling the cells of interest in a particular tissue. Depending on the organism, the questions being investigated, and the material available, certain cell type-specific profiling methods are more suitable than others. This chapter reviews the approaches presently available for selecting and isolating specific cell types and evaluates their key features. PMID:26410031

  12. A water framework directive (WFD) compliant determination of eologically acceptable flows in alpine rivers - a river type specific approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Paul; Zitek, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Currently the EU-Water Framework Directive (WFD) represents the driving force behind the assessment for rehabilitation and conservation of aquatic resources throughout Europe. Hydropower production, often considered as "green energy", in the past has put significant pressures on river systems like fragmentation by weirs, impoundment, hydropeaking and water abstraction. Due to the limited availability of data for determining ecologically acceptable flow for rivers at water abstraction sites, a special monitoring program was conducted in the federal state of Salzburg in Austria from 2006 to 2009. Water abstraction sites at 19 hydropower plants, mostly within the trout region of the River Salzach catchment, were assessed in detail with regard to the effect of water abstraction on fish and macrozoobenthos. Based on a detailed assessment of the specific local hydro-morphological and biological situations, the validity of natural low flow criteria (Absolute Minimum Flow - AMF, the lowest daily average flow ever measured and Mean Annual Daily Low Flow - MADLF) as starting points for the determination of an ecologically acceptable flow was tested. It was assessed, if a good ecological status in accordance with the EU-WFD can be maintained at natural AMF. Additionally it was tested, if important habitat parameters describing connectivity, river type specific flow variability and river type specific habitats are maintained at this discharge. Habitat modelling was applied in some situations. Hydraulic results showed that at AMF the highest flow velocity classes were lost in most situations. When AMF was significantly undercut, flow velocities between 0,0 - 0,4 m/s became dominant, describing the loss of the river type specific flow character, leading to a loss of river type specific flow variability and habitats and increased sedimentation of fines. Furthermore limits for parameters describing connectivity for fish like maximum depth at the pessimum profile and minimum flow

  13. Transcriptional analysis of Volvox photoreceptors suggests the existence of different cell-type specific light-signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash; Hallmann, Armin

    2015-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms, e.g., plants including green algae, use a sophisticated light-sensing system, composed of primary photoreceptors and additional downstream signaling components, to monitor changes in the ambient light environment towards adjust their growth and development. Although a variety of cellular processes, e.g., initiation of cleavage division and final cellular differentiation, have been shown to be light-regulated in the green alga Volvox carteri, little is known about the underlying light perception and signaling pathways. This multicellular alga possesses at least 12 photoreceptors, i.e., one phototropin (VcPhot), four cryptochromes (VcCRYa, VcCRYp, VcCRYd1, and VcCRYd2), and seven members of rhodopsin-like photoreceptors (VR1, VChR1, VChR2, VcHKR1, VcHKR2, VcHKR3, and VcHKR4), which display distinct light-dependent chemical processes based on their protein architectures and associated chromophores. Gene expression analyses could show that the transcript levels of some of the photoreceptor genes (e.g., VChR1 and VcHKR1) accumulate during division cleavages, while others (e.g., VcCRYa, VcCRYp, and VcPhot) accumulate during final cellular differentiation. However, the pattern of transcript accumulation changes when the alga switches to the sexual development. Eight photoreceptor genes, e.g., VcPhot, VcCRYp, and VcHKR1, are highly expressed in the somatic cells, while only the animal-type rhodopsin VR1 was found to be highly expressed in the reproductive cells/embryos during both asexual and sexual life cycles. Moreover, accumulation of VChR1 and VcCRYa transcripts is more sensitive to light and changes in response to more than one light quality. Obviously, different regulatory mechanisms underlying gene expression control transcript accumulation of photoreceptors not only during development, but also in a cell-type specific way and in response to various external signals such as light quality. The transcriptional patterns described in this study

  14. Discovery of Potential Diagnostic and Vaccine Antigens in Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 by Proteome-Wide Antibody Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chun, Sookhee; Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; Pablo, Jozelyn; Liang, Li; Dasgupta, Gargi; Molina, Douglas M.; Jasinskas, Algis; Nakajima-Sasaki, Rie; Felgner, Jiin; Hermanson, Gary; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Felgner, Philip L.

    2012-01-01

    Routine serodiagnosis of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections is currently performed using recombinant glycoprotein G (gG) antigens from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. This is a single-antigen test and has only one diagnostic application. Relatively little is known about HSV antigenicity at the proteome-wide level, and the full potential of mining the antibody repertoire to identify antigens with other useful diagnostic properties and candidate vaccine antigens is yet to be realized. To this end we produced HSV-1 and -2 proteome microarrays in Escherichia coli and probed them against a panel of sera from patients serotyped using commercial gG-1 and gG-2 (gGs for HSV-1 and -2, respectively) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We identified many reactive antigens in both HSV-1 and -2, some of which were type specific (i.e., recognized by HSV-1- or HSV-2-positive donors only) and others of which were nonspecific or cross-reactive (i.e., recognized by both HSV-1- and HSV-2-positive donors). Both membrane and nonmembrane virion proteins were antigenic, although type-specific antigens were enriched for membrane proteins, despite being expressed in E. coli. PMID:22318154

  15. Cell-type-specific and hypoxia-inducible expression of the human erythropoietin gene in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Semenza, G.L.; Nejfelt, M.K.; Gearhart, J.D.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Koury, S.T. )

    1991-10-01

    Synthesis of erythropoietin, the primary humoral regulator or erythropoiesis, in liver and kidney is inducible by anemia or hypoxia. Analysis of human erythropoietin gene expression in transgenic mice revealed that sequences located 6-14 kilobases 5{prime} to the gene direct expression to the kidney, whereas sequences within the immediate 3{prime}-flanking region control hepatocyte-specific expression. Human erythropoietin transcription initiation sites were differentially utilized in liver and kidney. Inducible transgene expression was precisely targeted to peritubular interstitial cells in the renal cortex that synthesize endogenous mouse erythropoietin. These studies demonstrate that multiple erythropoietin gene regulatory elements control cello-type-specific expression and inducibility by a fundamental physiologic stimulus, hypoxia.

  16. Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States Differentially Prime Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor-Initiating Cells for Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Nassar, Dany; Beck, Benjamin; Boumahdi, Soufiane; Wang, Li; Brisebarre, Audrey; Dubois, Christine; Nkusi, Erwin; Lenglez, Sandrine; Checinska, Agnieszka; Vercauteren Drubbel, Alizée; Devos, Michael; Declercq, Wim; Yi, Rui; Blanpain, Cédric

    2017-02-02

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancer cells has been associated with metastasis, stemness, and resistance to therapy. Some tumors undergo EMT while others do not, which may reflect intrinsic properties of their cell of origin. However, this possibility is largely unexplored. By targeting the same oncogenic mutations to discrete skin compartments, we show that cell-type-specific chromatin and transcriptional states differentially prime tumors to EMT. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) derived from interfollicular epidermis (IFE) are generally well differentiated, while hair follicle (HF) stem cell-derived SCCs frequently exhibit EMT, efficiently form secondary tumors, and possess increased metastatic potential. Transcriptional and epigenomic profiling revealed that IFE and HF tumor-initiating cells possess distinct chromatin landscapes and gene regulatory networks associated with tumorigenesis and EMT that correlate with accessibility of key epithelial and EMT transcription factor binding sites. These findings highlight the importance of chromatin states and transcriptional priming in dictating tumor phenotypes and EMT.

  17. Human Papilloma Virus prevalence and type-specific relative contribution in invasive cervical cancer specimens from Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer represents an important global public health problem. It is the 2nd most common cancer among women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is now well-established as a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) development. Only a few studies on HPV prevalence and type-specific distribution in ICC have been conducted in Italy. Aim To describe the prevalence of HPV and the HPV type-specific distribution in ICC cases identified in Rome, Italy. Methods 140 paraffin embedded tissue blocks of primary ICC diagnosed between 2001 and 2006 were identified at the Regina Elena Cancer Institute in Rome (Italy). HPV was detected through amplification of HPV DNA using SPF-10 HPV broad-spectrum primers followed by DEIA and then genotyping by LiPA25 (version 1). Results 134 cases were considered suitable for HPV DNA detection after histological evaluation; and overall, 90.3% (121/134) HPV prevalence was detected. 111 cases had a single HPV type, 4 cases had an uncharacterized type (HPVX) and 6 cases had multiple HPV infections. The five most common single HPV types among positive cases were: HPV16 (71/121; 58.7%), HPV18 (12/121; 9.9%), HPV31, HPV45 and HPV58 (5/121; 4.1% each). 2 (1.5%) of the single infections and 2 (1.5%) of the multiple infections contained low risk types. Statistically significant differences in the relative contribution of HPV18 were found when comparing squamous cell carcinomas with adenocarcinomas. Conclusions HPV16 and HPV18 accounted for almost 70% of all the HPV positive ICC cases. The study provides baseline information for further evaluation on the impact of recently introduced HPV vaccines in Italy. PMID:20525370

  18. Mechanisms of epigenetic and cell-type specific regulation of Hey target genes in ES cells and cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Weber, David; Heisig, Julia; Kneitz, Susanne; Wolf, Elmar; Eilers, Martin; Gessler, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Hey bHLH transcription factors are critical effectors of Notch signaling. During mammalian heart development they are expressed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and in the developing endocardium. Hey knockout mice suffer from lethal cardiac defects, such as ventricular septum defects, valve defects and cardiomyopathy. Despite this functional relevance, little is known about the regulation of downstream targets in relevant cell types. The objective of this study was to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms by which Hey proteins affect gene expression in a cell type specific manner. We used an in vitro cardiomyocyte differentiation system with inducible Hey1 or Hey2 expression to study target gene regulation in cardiomyocytes (CM) generated from murine embryonic stem cells (ESC). The effects of Hey1 and Hey2 are largely redundant, but cell type specific. The number of regulated genes is comparable between ESC and CM, but the total number of binding sites is much higher, especially in ESC, targeting mainly genes involved in transcriptional regulation and developmental processes. Repression by Hey proteins generally correlates with the extent of Hey-binding to target promoters, Hdac recruitment and lower histone acetylation. Functionally, treatment with the Hdac inhibitor TSA abolished Hey target gene regulation. However, in CM the repressive effect of Hey-binding is lost for a subset of genes. These also lack Hey-dependent histone deacetylation in CM and are enriched for binding sites of cardiac specific activators like Srf, Nkx2-5, and Gata4. Ectopic Nkx2-5 overexpression in ESC blocks Hey-mediated repression of these genes. Thus, Hey proteins mechanistically repress target genes via Hdac recruitment and histone deacetylation. In CM Hey-repression is counteracted by cardiac activators, which recruit histone acetylases and prevent Hey mediated deacetylation and subsequent repression for a subset of genes.

  19. Homeostasis or channelopathy? Acquired cell type-specific ion channel changes in temporal lobe epilepsy and their antiepileptic potential

    PubMed Central

    Wolfart, Jakob; Laker, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Neurons continuously adapt the expression and functionality of their ion channels. For example, exposed to chronic excitotoxicity, neurons homeostatically downscale their intrinsic excitability. In contrast, the “acquired channelopathy” hypothesis suggests that proepileptic channel characteristics develop during epilepsy. We review cell type-specific channel alterations under different epileptic conditions and discuss the potential of channels that undergo homeostatic adaptations, as targets for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Most of the relevant studies have been performed on temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), a widespread AED-refractory, focal epilepsy. The TLE patients, who undergo epilepsy surgery, frequently display hippocampal sclerosis (HS), which is associated with degeneration of cornu ammonis subfield 1 pyramidal cells (CA1 PCs). Although the resected human tissue offers insights, controlled data largely stem from animal models simulating different aspects of TLE and other epilepsies. Most of the cell type-specific information is available for CA1 PCs and dentate gyrus granule cells (DG GCs). Between these two cell types, a dichotomy can be observed: while DG GCs acquire properties decreasing the intrinsic excitability (in TLE models and patients with HS), CA1 PCs develop channel characteristics increasing intrinsic excitability (in TLE models without HS only). However, thorough examination of data on these and other cell types reveals the coexistence of protective and permissive intrinsic plasticity within neurons. These mechanisms appear differentially regulated, depending on the cell type and seizure condition. Interestingly, the same channel molecules that are upregulated in DG GCs during HS-related TLE, appear as promising targets for future AEDs and gene therapies. Hence, GCs provide an example of homeostatic ion channel adaptation which can serve as a primer when designing novel anti-epileptic strategies. PMID:26124723

  20. Cell type-specific functions of period genes revealed by novel adipocyte and hepatocyte circadian clock models.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Xu, Haiyan; Khan, Sanjoy K; Shen, Yang; Gitis, Paula J; Welsh, David K; Hogenesch, John B; Liu, Andrew C

    2014-04-01

    In animals, circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior result from coherent rhythmic interactions between clocks in the brain and those throughout the body. Despite the many tissue specific clocks, most understanding of the molecular core clock mechanism comes from studies of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus and a few other cell types. Here we report establishment and genetic characterization of three cell-autonomous mouse clock models: 3T3 fibroblasts, 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and MMH-D3 hepatocytes. Each model is genetically tractable and has an integrated luciferase reporter that allows for longitudinal luminescence recording of rhythmic clock gene expression using an inexpensive off-the-shelf microplate reader. To test these cellular models, we generated a library of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against a panel of known clock genes and evaluated their impact on circadian rhythms. Knockdown of Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, and Cry2 each resulted in similar phenotypes in all three models, consistent with previous studies. However, we observed cell type-specific knockdown phenotypes for the Period and Rev-Erb families of clock genes. In particular, Per1 and Per2, which have strong behavioral effects in knockout mice, appear to play different roles in regulating period length and amplitude in these peripheral systems. Per3, which has relatively modest behavioral effects in knockout mice, substantially affects period length in the three cellular models and in dissociated SCN neurons. In summary, this study establishes new cell-autonomous clock models that are of particular relevance to metabolism and suitable for screening for clock modifiers, and reveals previously under-appreciated cell type-specific functions of clock genes.

  1. Age-associated and cell-type-specific neurofibrillary pathology in transgenic mice expressing the human midsized neurofilament subunit.

    PubMed

    Vickers, J C; Morrison, J H; Friedrich, V L; Elder, G A; Perl, D P; Katz, R N; Lazzarini, R A

    1994-09-01

    Alterations in neurofilaments are a common occurrence in neurons of the human nervous system during aging and diseases associated with aging. Such pathologic changes may be attributed to species-specific properties of human neurofilaments as well as cell-type-specific regulation of this element of the cytoskeleton. The development of transgenic animals containing human neurofilament subunits offers an opportunity to study the effects of aging and other experimental conditions on the human-specific form of these proteins in a rodent model. The present study shows that mice from the transgenic line NF(M)27, which express the human midsized neurofilament subunit at low levels (2-25% of the endogenous NF-M), develop neurofilamentous accumulations in specific subgroups of neurons that are age dependent, affecting 78% of transgenic mice over 12 months of age. Similar accumulations do not occur in age-matched, wild-type littermates or in 3-month-old transgenic mice. In 12-month-old transgenic mice, somatic neurofilament accumulations resembling neurofibrillary tangles were present predominantly in layers III and V of the neocortex, as well as in select subpopulations of subcortical neurons. Intraperikaryal, spherical neurofilamentous accumulations were particularly abundant in cell bodies in layer II of the neocortex, and neurofilament-containing distentions of Purkinje cell proximal axons occurred in the cerebellum. These pathological accumulations contained mouse as well as human NF subunits, but could be distinguished by their content of phosphorylation-dependent NF epitopes. These cytoskeletal alterations closely resemble the cell-type-specific alterations in neurofilaments that occur during normal human aging and in diseases associated with aging, indicating that these transgenic animals may serve as models of some aspects of the pathologic features of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Transcriptome signature of resistance exercise adaptations: mixed muscle and fiber type specific profiles in young and old adults

    PubMed Central

    Raue, Ulrika; Trappe, Todd A.; Estrem, Shawn T.; Qian, Hui-Rong; Helvering, Leah M.; Smith, Rosamund C.

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of acute resistance exercise (RE), progressive resistance training (PRT), and age on the human skeletal muscle Transcriptome. Two cohorts of young and old adults [study A: 24 yr, 84 yr (n = 28); study B: 25 yr, 78 yr (n = 36)] were studied. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained pre- and 4 h post-RE in conjunction with the 1st and 36th (last) training session as part of a 12-wk PRT program in study A, whereas biopsies were obtained in the basal untrained state in study B. Additionally, the muscle fiber type specific (MHC I and MHC IIa) Transcriptome response to RE was examined in a subset of young and old women from study A. Transcriptome profiling was performed using HG U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays. The main findings were 1) there were 661 genes affected by RE during the 1st and 36th training bout that correlated with gains in muscle size and strength with PRT (termed the Transcriptome signature of resistance exercise adaptations); 2) the RE gene response was most pronounced in fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers and provided additional insight into the skeletal muscle biology affected by RE; 3) skeletal muscle of young adults is more responsive to RE at the gene level compared with old adults and age also affected basal level skeletal muscle gene expression. These skeletal muscle Transcriptome findings provide further insight into the molecular basis of sarcopenia and the impact of resistance exercise at the mixed muscle and fiber type specific level. PMID:22302958

  3. Diagnostic Antigens of Leishmania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-31

    braziliensis (MHOM/BR/75/M2903), L. chagasi (MJOM/BR/82/BA-2,C 1), L. donovani (MHOMiEt/67iHU3), Leishmania guyanensis (MIHOMJBR/75/M4147), L. infantum (IPT-1...comparative test to a variety of other recombinant Leishmania antigens including L. chagasi hsp70, L. braziliensis hsp83/90, L. braziliensis eIF4A, L...34 4. AD CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-92-C-2082 EC•£ 2 j 994 ’i, L TITLE: DIAGNOSTIC ANTIGENS OF LEISHMANIA L PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven G. Reed, Ph.D

  4. Hetero-organic thymus antigens.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnezditskaya, E V

    1985-01-01

    The use of sera containing antibodies to tissue-specific antigens of highly specialized organs (skeletal muscles, heart, skin, excretory glands) enabled us to detect, by immunofluorescence, cells capable of synthesizing analogous antigens (i.e. hetero-organic thymus antigens) in human and animal thymus. Detection of hetero-organic antigens in the thymus is the basis for the hypothesis that natural immunological tolerance to tissue self antigens is formed within the thymus in the course of T-lymphocyte maturation, with thymus antigens taking part in the process.

  5. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  6. Human liver nucleolar antigens.

    PubMed

    Busch, R K; Busch, H

    1981-10-01

    In an extension of previous studies on the antigens in rat liver nucleoli (R. K. Busch, R. C. Reddy, D. H. Henning, and H. Busch, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 160, 185 (1979); R. K. Busch and H. Busch, Tumori 63, 347 (1977); F. M. Davis, R. K. Busch, L. C. Yeoman, and H. Busch, Cancer Res. 38, 1906 (1978), rabbit antibodies were elicited to human liver nucleoli isolated by the sucrose--Mg2+ method (10). Fluorescent nucleoli were found in liver cryostat sections treated with rabbit anti-human liver nucleolar antibodies followed by fluorescein-conjugated goat anti-rabbit antibodies. In HeLa cells, fluorescence was distributed throughout the nucleus and in a nuclear network but was not localized to the nucleolus. In placental cryostat sections, an overall nuclear fluorescence was observed with some localization to nucleoli. Immunodiffusion analysis revealed two immunoprecipitin bands which appeared to be liver specific. Other immunoprecipitin bands were common to liver, placenta, and HeLa nuclear extracts. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed two liver-specific antigens, one migrating to the cathode and the other to the anode Other rockets exhibited identity to antigens of other nuclear extracts. These results demonstrate the presence of human liver nucleolar-specific antigens which were not found in the HeLa and placental cells.

  7. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells.

  8. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  9. Dual-Specificity Anti-sigma Factor Reinforces Control of Cell-Type Specific Gene Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R.; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  10. Type-specific neutralization of the human immunodeficiency virus with antibodies to env-encoded synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Palker, T J; Clark, M E; Langlois, A J; Matthews, T J; Weinhold, K J; Randall, R R; Bolognesi, D P; Haynes, B F

    1988-01-01

    A synthetic peptide (SP-10-IIIB) with an amino acid sequence [Cys-Thr-Arg-Pro-Asn-Asn-Asn-Thr-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Arg-Ile-Gln-Arg-Gly-Pro -Pro-Gly-(Tyr); amino acids 303-321] from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) HTLV-IIIB envelope glycoprotein gp120 was coupled to tetanus toxoid and used to raise goat antibodies to HIV gp120. Goat anti-SP-10-IIIB serum bound to the surface of HTLV-IIIB-infected CEM T cells but not to the surface of HTLV-IIIRF-infected or uninfected CEM T cells. Anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies also selectively bound to gp120 from lysates of HTLV-IIIB cells in immunoblot assays. Twenty-one percent of sera (28 of 175) from patients seropositive for HIV contained antibodies that reacted with SP-10-IIIB in RIA. Human anti-SP-10-IIIB antibodies affinity purified from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patient serum bound to HTLV-IIIB-infected cells and immunoprecipitated gp120. Goat antibodies to SP-10-IIIB neutralized HTLV-IIIB (80% neutralization titer of 1/600), inhibited HTLV-IIIB-induced syncytium formation, but did not neutralize HIV isolates HTLV-IIIRF or HTLV-IIIMN or inhibit syncytium formation with these isolates. Also, goat antiserum to an homologous synthetic peptide [SP-10-IIIRF(A), (Cys)-Arg-Lys-Ser-Ile-Thr-Lys-Gly-Pro-Gly-Arg-Val-Ile-Tyr] from gp120 of HIV isolate HTLV-IIIRF inhibited syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIRF, but did not inhibit syncytium formation by HTLV-IIIB or by HTLV-IIIMN. Thus, the amino acid sequences of SP-10-IIIB and SP-10-IIIRF(A) define homologous regions of gp120 that are important in type-specific virus neutralization. The identification of these type-specific neutralizing epitopes should facilitate the design of a polyvalent, synthetic vaccine for AIDS. Images PMID:2450351

  11. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  12. Cell-type-specific recruitment of amygdala interneurons to hippocampal theta rhythm and noxious stimuli in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Busti, Daniela; Magill, Peter J; Ferraguti, Francesco; Capogna, Marco

    2012-06-21

    Neuronal synchrony in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) is critical for emotional behavior. Coordinated theta-frequency oscillations between the BLA and the hippocampus and precisely timed integration of salient sensory stimuli in the BLA are involved in fear conditioning. We characterized GABAergic interneuron types of the BLA and determined their contribution to shaping these network activities. Using in vivo recordings in rats combined with the anatomical identification of neurons, we found that the firing of BLA interneurons associated with network activities was cell type specific. The firing of calbindin-positive interneurons targeting dendrites was precisely theta-modulated, but other cell types were heterogeneously modulated, including parvalbumin-positive basket cells. Salient sensory stimuli selectively triggered axo-axonic cells firing and inhibited firing of a disctinct projecting interneuron type. Thus, GABA is released onto BLA principal neurons in a time-, domain-, and sensory-specific manner. These specific synaptic actions likely cooperate to promote amygdalo-hippocampal synchrony involved in emotional memory formation.

  13. Cell type-specific regulation of von Willebrand factor expression by the E4BP4 transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Hough, Christine; Cuthbert, Carla D; Notley, Colleen; Brown, Christine; Hegadorn, Carol; Berber, Ergul; Lillicrap, David

    2005-02-15

    Mechanisms of tissue-restricted patterns of von Willebrand factor (VWF) expression involve activators and repressors that limit expression to endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. The relative transcriptional activity of the proximal VWF promoter was assessed in VWF-producing and -nonproducing cells, and promoter activity was highest in endothelial cells followed by megakaryocytes. Only basal VWF promoter activity was seen in nonendothelial cells. Here we identify a negative response element located at nucleotides (nts) +96/+105 and demonstrate, using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis, that in vivo this sequence interacts with the E4BP4 transcriptional repressor. Differences in size and relative abundance of nuclear E4BP4 were observed. In HepG2 cells, low levels of larger forms of E4BP4 are present that directly interact with the negative response element. In VWF-expressing cells, high levels of smaller forms predominate with no evidence of direct DNA binding. However, in endothelial cells, mutation of the VWF E4BP4 binding motif not only restores but also further elevates VWF promoter activity, suggesting that E4BP4 may be part of a coordinated binding complex. These observations implicate this binding motif in repressing both activated and basal levels of VWF transcription by different cell type-specific mechanisms, and support the hypothesis that E4BP4 sequesters negative regulators of transcription, thereby enhancing activated gene expression.

  14. Mapping cell type-specific transcriptional enhancers using high affinity, lineage-specific Ep300 bioChIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Zhang, Lina; Akerberg, Brynn N; Ma, Qing; Li, Kai; He, Aibin; Lin, Zhiqiang; Stevens, Sean M; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate cell type-specific transcriptional programs requires developing a lexicon of their genomic regulatory elements. We developed a lineage-selective method to map transcriptional enhancers, regulatory genomic regions that activate transcription, in mice. Since most tissue-specific enhancers are bound by the transcriptional co-activator Ep300, we used Cre-directed, lineage-specific Ep300 biotinylation and pulldown on immobilized streptavidin followed by next generation sequencing of co-precipitated DNA to identify lineage-specific enhancers. By driving this system with lineage-specific Cre transgenes, we mapped enhancers active in embryonic endothelial cells/blood or skeletal muscle. Analysis of these enhancers identified new transcription factor heterodimer motifs that likely regulate transcription in these lineages. Furthermore, we identified candidate enhancers that regulate adult heart- or lung- specific endothelial cell specialization. Our strategy for tissue-specific protein biotinylation opens new avenues for studying lineage-specific protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22039.001 PMID:28121289

  15. Modelling epigenetic regulation of gene expression in 12 human cell types reveals combinatorial patterns of cell-type-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiming; Qu, Wubin; Min, Bo; Liu, Zheyan; Chen, Changsheng; Zhang, Chenggang

    2014-06-01

    The maintenance of the diverse cell types in a multicellular organism is one of the fundamental mysteries of biology. Modelling the dynamic regulatory relationships between the histone modifications and the gene expression across the diverse cell types is essential for the authors to understand the mechanisms of the epigenetic regulation. Here, the authors thoroughly assessed the histone modification enrichment profiles at the promoters and constructed quantitative models between the histone modification abundances and the gene expression in 12 human cell types. The author's results showed that the histone modifications at the promoters exhibited remarkably cell-type-dependent variability in the cell-type-specific (CTS) genes. They demonstrated that the variable profiles of the modifications are highly predictive for the dynamic changes of the gene expression across all the cell types. Their findings revealed the close relationship between the combinatorial patterns of the histone modifications and the CTS gene expression. They anticipate that the findings and the methods they used in this study could provide useful information for the future studies of the regulatory roles of the histone modifications in the CTS genes.

  16. Dissecting cell-type-specific roles of androgen receptor in prostate homeostasis and regeneration through lineage tracing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Yueli; Cai, Tao; Horton, Corrigan; Stefanson, Joshua; Wang, Zhu A.

    2017-01-01

    Androgen signals through androgen receptor (AR) to influence prostate development and cancer. How stromal and epithelial AR regulate prostate homeostasis remains unclear. Using genetic lineage tracing, we systematically investigated the role of cell-autonomous AR in different prostate epithelial cell types. Here we show that AR is dispensable for basal cell maintenance, but is cell-autonomously required for the luminal differentiation of rare basal stem cells. In contrast, AR deletion in luminal cells alters cell morphology and induces transient over-proliferation, without affecting androgen-mediated luminal cell survival or regeneration. However, AR is selectively required for the maintenance of daughter cells produced by castration-resistant Nkx3.1-expressing luminal stem cells (CARNs). Notably, Pten loss can override AR-loss effects in both basal and luminal compartments to initiate tumours. Our data reveal distinct cell-type-specific roles of epithelial AR in orchestrating prostate homeostasis, and question the notion that epithelial AR serves as a tumour suppressor in early cancer initiation. PMID:28112153

  17. Comprehensive analysis of ultrasonic vocalizations in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome reveals limited, call type specific deficits.

    PubMed

    Roy, Snigdha; Watkins, Nick; Heck, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a well-recognized form of inherited mental retardation, caused by a mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (Fmr1) gene. The gene is located on the long arm of the X chromosome and encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Absence of FMRP in fragile X patients as well as in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice results, among other changes, in abnormal dendritic spine formation and altered synaptic plasticity in the neocortex and hippocampus. Clinical features of FXS include cognitive impairment, anxiety, abnormal social interaction, mental retardation, motor coordination and speech articulation deficits. Mouse pups generate ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) when isolated from their mothers. Whether those social ultrasonic vocalizations are deficient in mouse models of FXS is unknown. Here we compared isolation-induced USVs generated by pups of Fmr1-KO mice with those of their wild type (WT) littermates. Though the total number of calls was not significantly different between genotypes, a detailed analysis of 10 different categories of calls revealed that loss of Fmr1 expression in mice causes limited and call-type specific deficits in ultrasonic vocalization: the carrier frequency of flat calls was higher, the percentage of downward calls was lower and that the frequency range of complex calls was wider in Fmr1-KO mice compared to their WT littermates.

  18. Gamma-Retrovirus Integration Marks Cell Type-Specific Cancer Genes: A Novel Profiling Tool in Cancer Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Kathryn L.; Terry, Anne; Naseer, Asif; de Ridder, Jeroen; Wang, Weiwei; Carpenter, Eric; Mason, Andrew; Wong, Gane K-S.; Kilbey, Anna; Neil, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses have been foundational in cancer research since early studies identified proto-oncogenes as targets for insertional mutagenesis. Integration of murine gamma-retroviruses into the host genome favours promoters and enhancers and entails interaction of viral integrase with host BET/bromodomain factors. We report that this integration pattern is conserved in feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), a gamma-retrovirus that infects many human cell types. Analysis of FeLV insertion sites in the MCF-7 mammary carcinoma cell line revealed strong bias towards active chromatin marks with no evidence of significant post-integration growth selection. The most prominent FeLV integration targets had little overlap with the most abundantly expressed transcripts, but were strongly enriched for annotated cancer genes. A meta-analysis based on several gamma-retrovirus integration profiling (GRIP) studies in human cells (CD34+, K562, HepG2) revealed a similar cancer gene bias but also remarkable cell-type specificity, with prominent exceptions including a universal integration hotspot at the long non-coding RNA MALAT1. Comparison of GRIP targets with databases of super-enhancers from the same cell lines showed that these have only limited overlap and that GRIP provides unique insights into the upstream drivers of cell growth. These observations elucidate the oncogenic potency of the gamma-retroviruses and support the wider application of GRIP to identify the genes and growth regulatory circuits that drive distinct cancer types. PMID:27097319

  19. Dissecting cell-type-specific roles of androgen receptor in prostate homeostasis and regeneration through lineage tracing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qing; Liu, Yueli; Cai, Tao; Horton, Corrigan; Stefanson, Joshua; Wang, Zhu A

    2017-01-23

    Androgen signals through androgen receptor (AR) to influence prostate development and cancer. How stromal and epithelial AR regulate prostate homeostasis remains unclear. Using genetic lineage tracing, we systematically investigated the role of cell-autonomous AR in different prostate epithelial cell types. Here we show that AR is dispensable for basal cell maintenance, but is cell-autonomously required for the luminal differentiation of rare basal stem cells. In contrast, AR deletion in luminal cells alters cell morphology and induces transient over-proliferation, without affecting androgen-mediated luminal cell survival or regeneration. However, AR is selectively required for the maintenance of daughter cells produced by castration-resistant Nkx3.1-expressing luminal stem cells (CARNs). Notably, Pten loss can override AR-loss effects in both basal and luminal compartments to initiate tumours. Our data reveal distinct cell-type-specific roles of epithelial AR in orchestrating prostate homeostasis, and question the notion that epithelial AR serves as a tumour suppressor in early cancer initiation.

  20. Developmentally Programmed 3′ CpG Island Methylation Confers Tissue- and Cell-Type-Specific Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Da-Hai; Ware, Carol; Waterland, Robert A.; Zhang, Jiexin; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Gadkari, Manasi; Kunde-Ramamoorthy, Govindarajan; Nosavanh, Lagina M.

    2013-01-01

    During development, a small but significant number of CpG islands (CGIs) become methylated. The timing of developmentally programmed CGI methylation and associated mechanisms of transcriptional regulation during cellular differentiation, however, remain poorly characterized. Here, we used genome-wide DNA methylation microarrays to identify epigenetic changes during human embryonic stem cell (hESC) differentiation. We discovered a group of CGIs associated with developmental genes that gain methylation after hESCs differentiate. Conversely, erasure of methylation was observed at the identified CGIs during subsequent reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), further supporting a functional role for the CGI methylation. Both global gene expression profiling and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) validation indicated opposing effects of CGI methylation in transcriptional regulation during differentiation, with promoter CGI methylation repressing and 3′ CGI methylation activating transcription. By studying diverse human tissues and mouse models, we further confirmed that developmentally programmed 3′ CGI methylation confers tissue- and cell-type-specific gene activation in vivo. Importantly, luciferase reporter assays provided evidence that 3′ CGI methylation regulates transcriptional activation via a CTCF-dependent enhancer-blocking mechanism. These findings expand the classic view of mammalian CGI methylation as a mechanism for transcriptional silencing and indicate a functional role for 3′ CGI methylation in developmental gene regulation. PMID:23459939

  1. Balancing intestinal and systemic inflammation through cell type-specific expression of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor repressor

    PubMed Central

    Brandstätter, Olga; Schanz, Oliver; Vorac, Julia; König, Jessica; Mori, Tetsushi; Maruyama, Toru; Korkowski, Markus; Haarmann-Stemmann, Thomas; von Smolinski, Dorthe; Schultze, Joachim L.; Abel, Josef; Esser, Charlotte; Takeyama, Haruko; Weighardt, Heike; Förster, Irmgard

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of polyaromatic chemicals the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) exerts an important role in immune regulation besides its requirement for xenobiotic metabolism. Transcriptional activation of AhR target genes is counterregulated by the AhR repressor (AhRR) but the exact function of the AhRR in vivo is currently unknown. We here show that the AhRR is predominantly expressed in immune cells of the skin and intestine, different from other AhR target genes. Whereas AhRR antagonizes the anti-inflammatory function of the AhR in the context of systemic endotoxin shock, AhR and AhRR act in concert to dampen intestinal inflammation. Specifically, AhRR contributes to the maintenance of colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes and prevents excessive IL-1β production and Th17/Tc17 differentiation. In contrast, the AhRR enhances IFN-γ-production by effector T cells in the inflamed gut. Our findings highlight the physiologic importance of cell-type specific balancing of AhR/AhRR expression in response to microbial, nutritional and other environmental stimuli. PMID:27184933

  2. Cell-type-specific modulation of targets and distractors by dopamine D1 receptors in primate prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Simon N.; Stalter, Maximilian; Nieder, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is crucial for maintaining relevant information in working memory and resisting interference. PFC neurons are strongly regulated by dopamine, but it is unknown whether dopamine receptors are involved in protecting target memories from distracting stimuli. We investigated the prefrontal circuit dynamics and dopaminergic modulation of targets and distractors in monkeys trained to ignore interfering stimuli in a delayed-match-to-numerosity task. We found that dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) modulate the recovery of task-relevant information following a distracting stimulus. The direction of modulation is cell-type-specific: in putative pyramidal neurons, D1R inhibition enhances and D1R stimulation attenuates coding of the target stimulus after the interference, while the opposite pattern is observed in putative interneurons. Our results suggest that dopaminergic neuromodulation of PFC circuits regulates mental representations of behaviourally relevant stimuli that compete with task-irrelevant input and could play a central role for cognitive functioning in health and disease. PMID:27807366

  3. Post-ischaemic long-term synaptic potentiation in the striatum: a putative mechanism for cell type-specific vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Calabresi, Paolo; Saulle, Emilia; Centonze, Diego; Pisani, Antonio; Marfia, Girolama A; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2002-04-01

    In the present in vitro study of rat brain, we report that transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (in vitro ischaemia) induced a post-ischaemic long-term synaptic potentiation (i-LTP) at corticostriatal synapses. We compared the physiological and pharmacological characteristics of this pathological form of synaptic plasticity with those of LTP induced by tetanic stimulation of corticostriatal fibres (t-LTP), which is thought to represent a cellular substrate of learning and memory. Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors was required for the induction of both forms of synaptic plasticity. The intraneuronal injection of the calcium chelator BAPTA [bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetate] and inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway blocked both forms of synaptic plasticity. However, while t-LTP showed input specificity, i-LTP occurred also at synaptic pathways inactive during the ischaemic period. In addition, scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, prevented the induction of t-LTP but not of i-LTP, indicating that endogenous acetylcholine is required for physiological but not for pathological synaptic potentiation. Finally, we found that striatal cholinergic interneurones, which are resistant to in vivo ischaemia, do not express i-LTP while they express t-LTP. We suggest that i-LTP represents a pathological form of synaptic plasticity that may account for the cell type-specific vulnerability observed in striatal spiny neurones following ischaemia and energy deprivation.

  4. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Are emm Type-Specific in Highly Prevalent Group A Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Chan, Yuen-Chi; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are the bacterial adaptive immune system against foreign nucleic acids. Given the variable nature of CRISPR, it could be a good marker for molecular epidemiology. Group A streptococcus is one of the major human pathogens. It has two CRISPR loci, including CRISPR01 and CRISPR02. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CRISPR-associated gene cassettes (cas) and CRISPR arrays in highly prevalent emm types. The cas cassette and CRISPR array in two CRISPR loci were analyzed in a total of 332 strains, including emm1, emm3, emm4, emm12, and emm28 strains. The CRISPR type was defined by the spacer content of each CRISPR array. All strains had at least one cas cassette or CRISPR array. More than 90% of the spacers were found in one emm type, specifically. Comparing the consistency between emm and CRISPR types by Simpson's index of diversity and the adjusted Wallace coefficient, CRISPR01 type was concordant to emm type, and CRISPR02 showed unidirectional congruence to emm type, suggesting that at least for the majority of isolates causing infection in high income countries, the emm type can be inferred from CRISPR analysis, which can further discriminate isolates sharing the same emm type.

  5. Identification of sequence elements that confer cell-type-specific control of MF alpha 1 expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, K; Nakayama, A; Hishinuma, F

    1987-01-01

    The MF alpha 1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a major structural gene for mating pheromone alpha factor, is an alpha-specific gene whose expression is regulated by the mating-type locus. To study the role of sequences upstream of MF alpha 1 in its expression and regulation, we generated two sets of promoter deletions: upstream deletions and internal deletions. By analyzing these deletions, we have identified a TATA box and two closely related, tandemly arranged upstream activation sites as necessary elements for MF alpha 1 expression. Two upstream activation sites were located ca. 300 and 250 base pairs upstream of the MF alpha 1 transcription start points, which were also determined in this study. Each site contained a homologous 22-base-pair sequence, and both sites were required for maximum transcription level. The distance between the upstream activation sites and the transcription start points could be altered without causing loss of transcription efficiency, and the sites were active in either orientation with respect to the coding region. These elements conferred cell type-specific expression on a heterologous promoter. Analysis with host mating-type locus mutants indicates that these sequences are the sites through which the MAT alpha 1 product exerts its action to activate the MF alpha 1 gene. Homologous sequences with these elements were found in other alpha-specific genes, MF alpha 2 and STE3, and may mediate activation of this set of genes by MAT alpha 1. Images PMID:2959859

  6. LC-MS-based serum metabolic profiling for genitourinary cancer classification and cancer type-specific biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Huang, Zhenzhen; Gao, Yao; Chen, Yongjing; Hang, Wei; Xing, Jinchun; Yan, Xiaomei

    2012-08-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) and kidney cancer (KC) are the first two commonly occurring genitourinary cancers in China. In this study, a comprehensive LC-MS-based method, which utilizes both reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) separations, has been carried out in conjunction with multivariate data analysis to discriminate the global serum profiles of BC, KC, and noncancer controls. An independent test set consisting of different patients has been used to objectively evaluate the predictive ability of the analysis platform. Excellent sensitivity and specificity have been achieved in detection of KC and BC. The results suggest that serum metabolic profiling could be used for different types of genitourinary cancer diagnosis. Furthermore, cancer type-specific biomarkers were found through a critical selection criterion. As a result, eicosatrienol, azaprostanoic acid, docosatrienol, retinol, and 14'-apo-beta-carotenal  were found as specific biomarkers for BC; and PE(P-16:0e/0:0), glycerophosphorylcholine, ganglioside GM3 (d18:1/22:1), C17 sphinganine, and SM(d18:0/16:1(9Z)) were found as specific biomarkers for KC. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used for the preliminary evaluation of the biomarkers. These biomarkers have great potential to be used in the clinical diagnosis after further rigorous assessment.

  7. Cell type specificity and mechanism of control of a gene may be reverted in different strains of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Giorda, R

    2000-06-21

    Twelve genes which are expressed exclusively in pre-spore cells of Dictyostelium strain AX3 are expressed exclusively in pre-stalk cells of strain AX2. One gene has the opposite behavior: it is expressed in pre-stalk cells in AX3 and in pre-spore cells in AX2. The change in cell type specificity involves a change in the mechanism of control of gene expression. When they are expressed in pre-stalk cells, genes are controlled at the level of transcription, whilst in pre-spore cells, they are controlled at the level of mRNA stability. Genes expressed in pre-stalk cells in strain AX2, fused with an AX2 pre-spore specific promoter, become regulated at the level of mRNA stability. These findings indicate that at least a group of pre-stalk mRNAs possess the cis-destabilizing element typical of pre-spore mRNAs, though they are not destabilized in disaggregated cells. This is due to the fact that ribosomal protein S6, phosphorylation of which is responsible for controlling the stability of pre-spore mRNAs, is not dephosphorylated in disaggregated pre-stalk cells. These cells lack an S6 phosphatase activity which has been purified from disaggregated pre-spore cells.

  8. Implementing the LIM code: the structural basis for cell type-specific assembly of LIM-homeodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhati, Mugdha; Lee, Christopher; Nancarrow, Amy L.; Lee, Mihwa; Craig, Vanessa J.; Bach, Ingolf; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.; Matthews, Jacqueline M.

    2008-09-03

    LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) transcription factors form a combinatorial 'LIM code' that contributes to the specification of cell types. In the ventral spinal cord, the binary LIM homeobox protein 3 (Lhx3)/LIM domain-binding protein 1 (Ldb1) complex specifies the formation of V2 interneurons. The additional expression of islet-1 (Isl1) in adjacent cells instead specifies the formation of motor neurons through assembly of a ternary complex in which Isl1 contacts both Lhx3 and Ldb1, displacing Lhx3 as the binding partner of Ldb1. However, little is known about how this molecular switch occurs. Here, we have identified the 30-residue Lhx3-binding domain on Isl1 (Isl1{sub LBD}). Although the LIM interaction domain of Ldb1 (Ldb1{sub LID}) and Isl1{sub LBD} share low levels of sequence homology, X-ray and NMR structures reveal that they bind Lhx3 in an identical manner, that is, Isl1{sub LBD} mimics Ldb1{sub LID}. These data provide a structural basis for the formation of cell type-specific protein-protein interactions in which unstructured linear motifs with diverse sequences compete to bind protein partners. The resulting alternate protein complexes can target different genes to regulate key biological events.

  9. Cell Type-Specific Transcriptome of Brassicaceae Stigmatic Papilla Cells From a Combination of Laser Microdissection and RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Masaaki; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakazono, Satomi; Masuko-Suzuki, Hiromi; Maeda, Shunsuke; Sewaki, Misato; Sone, Mikako; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Nakazono, Mikio; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji; Shimizu, Kentaro K.; Yano, Kentaro; Lim, Yong Pyo; Suzuki, Go; Suwabe, Keita; Watanabe, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Pollination is an early and critical step in plant reproduction, leading to successful fertilization. It consists of many sequential processes, including adhesion of pollen grains onto the surface of stigmatic papilla cells, foot formation to strengthen pollen–stigma interaction, pollen hydration and germination, and pollen tube elongation and penetration. We have focused on an examination of the expressed genes in papilla cells, to increase understanding of the molecular systems of pollination. From three representative species of Brassicaceae (Arabidopsis thaliana, A. halleri and Brassica rapa), stigmatic papilla cells were isolated precisely by laser microdissection, and cell type-specific gene expression in papilla cells was determined by RNA sequencing. As a result, 17,240, 19,260 and 21,026 unigenes were defined in papilla cells of A. thaliana, A. halleri and B. rapa, respectively, and, among these, 12,311 genes were common to all three species. Among the17,240 genes predicted in A. thaliana, one-third were papilla specific while approximately half of the genes were detected in all tissues examined. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that genes related to a wide range of reproduction and development functions are expressed in papilla cells, particularly metabolism, transcription and membrane-mediated information exchange. These results reflect the conserved features of general cellular function and also the specific reproductive role of papilla cells, highlighting a complex cellular system regulated by a diverse range of molecules in these cells. This study provides fundamental biological knowledge to dissect the molecular mechanisms of pollination in papilla cells and will shed light on our understanding of plant reproduction mechanisms. PMID:24058146

  10. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tourlakis, Marina E.; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L.; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S.; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Durie, Peter R.; Rommens, Johanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15Ink4b and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  11. Adolescent maturation of inhibitory inputs onto cingulate cortex neurons is cell-type specific and TrkB dependent

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Angela; Piekarski, David J.; Caporale, Natalia; Munoz-Cuevas, Francisco Javier; Wilbrecht, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The maturation of inhibitory circuits during adolescence may be tied to the onset of mental health disorders such as schizophrenia. Neurotrophin signaling likely plays a critical role in supporting inhibitory circuit development and is also implicated in psychiatric disease. Within the neocortex, subcircuits may mature at different times and show differential sensitivity to neurotrophin signaling. We measured miniature inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs and mEPSCs) in Layer 5 cell-types in the mouse anterior cingulate (Cg) across the periadolescent period. We differentiated cell-types mainly by Thy1 YFP transgene expression and also retrobead injection labeling in the contralateral Cg and ipsilateral pons. We found that YFP− neurons and commissural projecting neurons had lower frequency of mIPSCs than neighboring YFP+ neurons or pons projecting neurons in juvenile mice (P21–25). YFP− neurons and to a lesser extent commissural projecting neurons also showed a significant increase in mIPSC amplitude during the periadolescent period (P21–25 vs. P40–50), which was not seen in YFP+ neurons or pons projecting neurons. Systemic disruption of tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) signaling during P23–50 in TrkBF616A mice blocked developmental changes in mIPSC amplitude, without affecting miniature excitatory post synaptic currents (mEPSCs). Our data suggest that the maturation of inhibitory inputs onto Layer 5 pyramidal neurons is cell-type specific. These data may inform our understanding of adolescent brain development across species and aid in identifying candidate subcircuits that may show greater vulnerability in mental illness. PMID:25762898

  12. In Vivo Senescence in the Sbds-Deficient Murine Pancreas: Cell-Type Specific Consequences of Translation Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Tourlakis, Marina E; Zhang, Siyi; Ball, Heather L; Gandhi, Rikesh; Liu, Hongrui; Zhong, Jian; Yuan, Julie S; Guidos, Cynthia J; Durie, Peter R; Rommens, Johanna M

    2015-06-01

    Genetic models of ribosome dysfunction show selective organ failure, highlighting a gap in our understanding of cell-type specific responses to translation insufficiency. Translation defects underlie a growing list of inherited and acquired cancer-predisposition syndromes referred to as ribosomopathies. We sought to identify molecular mechanisms underlying organ failure in a recessive ribosomopathy, with particular emphasis on the pancreas, an organ with a high and reiterative requirement for protein synthesis. Biallelic loss of function mutations in SBDS are associated with the ribosomopathy Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, which is typified by pancreatic dysfunction, bone marrow failure, skeletal abnormalities and neurological phenotypes. Targeted disruption of Sbds in the murine pancreas resulted in p53 stabilization early in the postnatal period, specifically in acinar cells. Decreased Myc expression was observed and atrophy of the adult SDS pancreas could be explained by the senescence of acinar cells, characterized by induction of Tgfβ, p15(Ink4b) and components of the senescence-associated secretory program. This is the first report of senescence, a tumour suppression mechanism, in association with SDS or in response to a ribosomopathy. Genetic ablation of p53 largely resolved digestive enzyme synthesis and acinar compartment hypoplasia, but resulted in decreased cell size, a hallmark of decreased translation capacity. Moreover, p53 ablation resulted in expression of acinar dedifferentiation markers and extensive apoptosis. Our findings indicate a protective role for p53 and senescence in response to Sbds ablation in the pancreas. In contrast to the pancreas, the Tgfβ molecular signature was not detected in fetal bone marrow, liver or brain of mouse models with constitutive Sbds ablation. Nevertheless, as observed with the adult pancreas phenotype, disease phenotypes of embryonic tissues, including marked neuronal cell death due to apoptosis, were determined to

  13. Cell-type-specific miR-431 dysregulation in a motor neuron model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Wertz, Mary H; Winden, Kellen; Neveu, Pierre; Ng, Shi-Yan; Ercan, Ebru; Sahin, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive pediatric neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of spinal motor neurons. It is caused by mutation in the survival of motor neuron 1, SMN1, gene and leads to loss of function of the full-length SMN protein. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs that are involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Prior studies have implicated miRNAs in the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease. We hypothesized that motor neuron-specific miRNA expression changes are involved in their selective vulnerability in SMA. Therefore, we sought to determine the effect of SMN loss on miRNAs and their target mRNAs in spinal motor neurons. We used microarray and RNAseq to profile both miRNA and mRNA expression in primary spinal motor neuron cultures after acute SMN knockdown. By integrating the miRNA:mRNA profiles, a number of dysregulated miRNAs were identified with enrichment in differentially expressed putative mRNA targets. miR-431 expression was highly increased, and a number of its putative mRNA targets were significantly downregulated in motor neurons after SMN loss. Further, we found that miR-431 regulates motor neuron neurite length by targeting several molecules previously identified to play a role in motor neuron axon outgrowth, including chondrolectin. Together, our findings indicate that cell-type-specific dysregulation of miR-431 plays a role in the SMA motor neuron phenotype.

  14. Cell-Type Specific Channelopathies in the Prefrontal Cortex of the fmr1-/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalmbach, Brian E; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene resulting in the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. FXS patients display several behavioral phenotypes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction. Voltage-gated ion channels, some of which are regulated by FMRP, heavily influence PFC neuron function. Although there is evidence for brain region-specific alterations to the function a single type of ion channel in FXS, it is unclear whether subtypes of principal neurons within a brain region are affected uniformly. We tested for alterations to ion channels critical in regulating neural excitability in two subtypes of prefrontal L5 pyramidal neurons. Using somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we provide evidence that the functional expression of h-channels (Ih) is down-regulated, whereas A-type K(+) channel function is up-regulated in pyramidal tract-projecting (PT) neurons in the fmr1-/y mouse PFC. This is the opposite pattern of results from published findings from hippocampus where Ih is up-regulated and A-type K(+) channel function is down-regulated. Additionally, we find that somatic Kv1-mediated current is down-regulated, resulting in increased excitability of fmr1-/y PT neurons. Importantly, these h- and K(+) channel differences do not extend to neighboring intratelencephalic-projecting neurons. Thus, the absence of FMRP has divergent effects on the function of individual types of ion channels not only between brain regions, but also variable effects across cell types within the same brain region. Given the importance of ion channels in regulating neural circuits, these results suggest cell-type-specific phenotypes for the disease.

  15. The Modulatory Effects of the Polymorphisms in GLA 5'-Untranslated Region Upon Gene Expression Are Cell-Type Specific.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Susana; Reguenga, Carlos; Oliveira, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal α-galactosidase A (αGal) is the enzyme deficient in Fabry disease (FD). The 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of the αGal gene (GLA) shows a remarkable degree of variation with three common single nucleotide polymorphisms at nucleotide positions c.-30G>A, c.-12G>A and c.-10C>T. We have recently identified in young Portuguese stroke patients a fourth polymorphism, at c.-44C>T, co-segregating in cis with the c.-12A allele. In vivo, the c.-30A allele is associated with higher enzyme activity in plasma, whereas c.-10T is associated with moderately decreased enzyme activity in leucocytes. Limited data suggest that c.-44T might be associated with increased plasma αGal activity. We have used a luciferase reporter system to experimentally assess the relative modulatory effects on gene expression of the different GLA 5'UTR polymorphisms, as compared to the wild-type sequence, in four different human cell lines. Group-wise, the relative luciferase expression patterns of the various GLA variant isoforms differed significantly in all four cell lines, as evaluated by non-parametric statistics, and were cell-type specific. Some of the post hoc pairwise statistical comparisons were also significant, but the observed effects of the GLA 5'UTR polymorphisms upon the luciferase transcriptional activity in vitro did not consistently replicate the in vivo observations.These data suggest that the GLA 5'UTR polymorphisms are possible modulators of the αGal expression. Further studies are needed to elucidate the biological and clinical implications of these observations, particularly to clarify the effect of these polymorphisms in individuals carrying GLA variants associated with high residual enzyme activity, with no or mild FD clinical phenotypes.

  16. Layer- and cell-type-specific subthreshold and suprathreshold effects of long-term monocular deprivation in rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Medini, Paolo

    2011-11-23

    Connectivity and dendritic properties are determinants of plasticity that are layer and cell-type specific in the neocortex. However, the impact of experience-dependent plasticity at the level of synaptic inputs and spike outputs remains unclear along vertical cortical microcircuits. Here I compared subthreshold and suprathreshold sensitivity to prolonged monocular deprivation (MD) in rat binocular visual cortex in layer 4 and layer 2/3 pyramids (4Ps and 2/3Ps) and in thick-tufted and nontufted layer 5 pyramids (5TPs and 5NPs), which innervate different extracortical targets. In normal rats, 5TPs and 2/3Ps are the most binocular in terms of synaptic inputs, and 5NPs are the least. Spike responses of all 5TPs were highly binocular, whereas those of 2/3Ps were dominated by either the contralateral or ipsilateral eye. MD dramatically shifted the ocular preference of 2/3Ps and 4Ps, mostly by depressing deprived-eye inputs. Plasticity was profoundly different in layer 5. The subthreshold ocular preference shift was sevenfold smaller in 5TPs because of smaller depression of deprived inputs combined with a generalized loss of responsiveness, and was undetectable in 5NPs. Despite their modest ocular dominance change, spike responses of 5TPs consistently lost their typically high binocularity during MD. The comparison of MD effects on 2/3Ps and 5TPs, the main affected output cells of vertical microcircuits, indicated that subthreshold plasticity is not uniquely determined by the initial degree of input binocularity. The data raise the question of whether 5TPs are driven solely by 2/3Ps during MD. The different suprathreshold plasticity of the two cell populations could underlie distinct functional deficits in amblyopia.

  17. Cell Type-Specific Replication of Simian Virus 40 Conferred by Hormone Response Elements in the Late Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Michael L.; Mertz, Janet E.

    2002-01-01

    The late genes of SV40 are not expressed at significant levels until after the onset of viral DNA replication. We previously identified two hormone response elements (HREs) in the late promoter that contribute to this delay. Mutants defective in these HREs overexpress late RNA at early, but not late, times after transfection of CV-1PD cells. Overexpression of nuclear receptors (NRs) that recognize these HREs leads to repression of the late promoter in a sequence-specific and titratable manner, resulting in a delay in late gene expression. These observations led to a model in which the late promoter is repressed at early times after infection by NRs, with this repression being relieved by titration of these repressors through simian virus 40 (SV40) genome replication to high copy number. Here, we tested this model in the context of the viral life cycle. SV40 genomes containing mutations in either or both HREs that significantly reduce NR binding without altering the coding of any proteins were constructed. Competition for replication between mutant and wild-type viruses in low-multiplicity coinfections indicated that the +1 HRE offered a significant selective advantage to the virus within a few cycles of infection in African green monkey kidney cell lines CV-1, CV-1P, TC-7, MA-134, and Vero but not in CV-1PD′ cells. Interestingly, the +55 HRE offered a selective disadvantage in MA-134 cells but had no effect in CV-1, CV-1P, TC-7, Vero, and CV-1PD′ cells. Thus, we conclude that these HREs are biologically important to the virus, but in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:12050389

  18. Immuno-Navigator, a batch-corrected coexpression database, reveals cell type-specific gene networks in the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Dinh, Viet H.; Mikami, Norihisa; Kitagawa, Yohko; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput gene expression data are one of the primary resources for exploring complex intracellular dynamics in modern biology. The integration of large amounts of public data may allow us to examine general dynamical relationships between regulators and target genes. However, obstacles for such analyses are study-specific biases or batch effects in the original data. Here we present Immuno-Navigator, a batch-corrected gene expression and coexpression database for 24 cell types of the mouse immune system. We systematically removed batch effects from the underlying gene expression data and showed that this removal considerably improved the consistency between inferred correlations and prior knowledge. The data revealed widespread cell type-specific correlation of expression. Integrated analysis tools allow users to use this correlation of expression for the generation of hypotheses about biological networks and candidate regulators in specific cell types. We show several applications of Immuno-Navigator as examples. In one application we successfully predicted known regulators of importance in naturally occurring Treg cells from their expression correlation with a set of Treg-specific genes. For one high-scoring gene, integrin β8 (Itgb8), we confirmed an association between Itgb8 expression in forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)-positive T cells and Treg-specific epigenetic remodeling. Our results also suggest that the regulation of Treg-specific genes within Treg cells is relatively independent of Foxp3 expression, supporting recent results pointing to a Foxp3-independent component in the development of Treg cells. PMID:27078110

  19. Cell-type-specific expression of STAT transcription factors in tissue samples from patients with lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Staab, Julia; Barth, Peter J; Meyer, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Expression of cytokine-regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins was histochemically assessed in patients diagnosed as having Hashimoto's disease or focal lymphocytic thyroiditis (n = 10). All surgical specimens showed histological features of lymphocytic thyroiditis, including a diffuse infiltration with mononuclear cells and an incomplete loss of thyroid follicles, resulting in the destruction of glandular tissue architecture. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated differential expression patterns of the various members of the STAT transcription factors examined, indicating that each member of this conserved protein family has its distinct functions in the development of the disease. Using an antibody that specifically recognized the phosphorylated tyrosine residue in position 701, we detected activated STAT1 dimers in numerous germinal macrophages and infiltrating lymphocytes as well as in oncocytes. In contrast, STAT3 expression was restricted to epithelial cells and showed a clear colocalization with the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. Moreover, expression of phospho-STAT3 was associated with low levels of stromal fibrosis, suggesting that STAT3 serves as a protective factor in the remodeling of the inflamed thyroid gland. Phospho-STAT5 immunoreactivity was detected in numerous infiltrating cells of hematopoietic origin and, additionally, in hyperplastic follicular epithelia. This tissue distribution demonstrated that activated STAT5 molecules participate in both lymphocytopoiesis and possibly also in the buildup of regenerating thyroid follicles. Taken together, the cell-type-specific expression patterns of STAT proteins in human lymphocytic thyroiditis reflect their distinct and partially antagonistic roles in orchestrating the balance between degenerating and regenerating processes within a changing cytokine environment.

  20. Bonafide, type-specific human papillomavirus persistence among HIV-positive pregnant women: predictive value for cytological abnormalities, a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Meyrelles, Angela RI; Siqueira, Juliana D; dos Santos, Pâmela P; Hofer, Cristina B; Luiz, Ronir R; Seuánez, Héctor N; Almeida, Gutemberg; Soares, Marcelo A; Soares, Esmeralda A; Machado, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence, associated risk factors, and predictors of cytological alteration outcomes in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnant women over an 18-month period. HPV was typed through L1 gene sequencing in cervical smears collected during gestation and at 12 months after delivery. Outcomes were defined as nonpersistence (clearance of the HPV in the 2nd sample), re-infection (detection of different types of HPV in the 2 samples), and type-specific HPV persistence (the same HPV type found in both samples). An unfavourable cytological outcome was considered when the second exam showed progression to squamous intraepithelial lesion or high squamous intraepithelial lesion. Ninety patients were studied. HPV DNA persistence occurred in 50% of the cases composed of type-specific persistence (30%) or re-infection (20%). A low CD4+T-cell count at entry was a risk factor for type-specific, re-infection, or HPV DNA persistence. The odds ratio (OR) was almost three times higher in the type-specific group when compared with the re-infection group (OR = 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 0.43-22.79). Our findings show that bonafide (type-specific) HPV persistence is a stronger predictor for the development of cytological abnormalities, highlighting the need for HPV typing as opposed to HPV DNA testing in the clinical setting. PMID:26872340

  1. Fiber Type-Specific Satellite Cell Content in Cyclists Following Heavy Training with Carbohydrate and Carbohydrate-Protein Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Alec I.; D'Lugos, Andrew C.; Saunders, Michael J.; Gworek, Keith D.; Luden, Nicholas D.

    2016-01-01

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the fiber type-specific satellite cell and myonuclear responses of endurance-trained cyclists to a block of intensified training, when supplementing with carbohydrate (CHO) vs. carbohydrate-protein (PRO). In a crossover design, endurance-trained cyclists (n = 8) performed two consecutive training periods, once supplementing with CHO (de facto “control” condition) and the other with PRO. Each training period consisted of 10 days of intensified cycle training (ICT–120% increase in average training duration) followed by 10 days of recovery (RVT–reduced volume training; 33% volume reduction vs. normal training). Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and after ICT and again following RVT. Immunofluorescent microscopy was used to quantify SCs (Pax7+), myonuclei (DAPI+), and myosin heavy chain I (MyHC I). Data are expressed as percent change ± 90% confidence limits. The 10-day block of ICTCHO increased MyHC I SC content (35 ± 28%) and myonuclear density (16 ± 6%), which remained elevated following RVTCHO (SC = 69 ± 50% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 17 ± 15% vs. PRE). MyHC II SC and myonuclei were not different following ICTCHO, but were higher following RVTCHO (SC = +33 ± 31% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 15 ± 14% vs. PRE), indicating a delayed response compared to MyHC I fibers. The MyHC I SC pool increased following ICTPRO (37 ± 37%), but without a concomitant increase in myonuclei. There were no changes in MyHC II SC or myonuclei following ICTPRO. Collectively, these trained endurance cyclists possessed a relatively large pool of SCs that facilitated rapid (MyHC I) and delayed (MyHC II) satellite cell proliferation and myonuclear accretion under carbohydrate conditions. The current findings strengthen the growing body of evidence demonstrating alterations in satellite cell number in the absence of hypertrophy. Satellite cell pool expansion is typically viewed as an advantageous response to

  2. Exercise in the fasted state facilitates fibre type-specific intramyocellular lipid breakdown and stimulates glycogen resynthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    De Bock, K; Richter, EA; Russell, AP; Eijnde, BO; Derave, W; Ramaekers, M; Koninckx, E; Léger, B; Verhaeghe, J; Hespel, P

    2005-01-01

    The effects were compared of exercise in the fasted state and exercise with a high rate of carbohydrate intake on intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) and glycogen content of human muscle. Using a randomized crossover study design, nine young healthy volunteers participated in two experimental sessions with an interval of 3 weeks. In each session subjects performed 2 h of constant-load bicycle exercise (∼ 75% ), followed by 4 h of controlled recovery. On one occasion they exercised after an overnight fast (F), and on the other (CHO) they received carbohydrates before (∼ 150 g) and during (1 g (kg bw)−1 h−1) exercise. In both conditions, subjects ingested 5 g carbohydrates per kg body weight during recovery. Fibre type-specific relative IMTG content was determined by Oil red O staining in needle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis before, immediately after and 4 h after exercise. During F but not during CHO, the exercise bout decreased IMTG content in type I fibres from 18 ± 2% to 6 ± 2% (P = 0.007) area lipid staining. Conversely, during recovery, IMTG in type I fibres decreased from 15 ± 2% to 10 ± 2% in CHO, but did not change in F. Neither exercise nor recovery changed IMTG in type IIa fibres in any experimental condition. Exercise-induced net glycogen breakdown was similar in F and CHO. However, compared with CHO (11.0 ± 7.8 mmol kg−1 h−1), mean rate of postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis was 3-fold greater in F (32.9 ± 2.7 mmol kg−1 h−1, P = 0.01). Furthermore, oral glucose loading during recovery increased plasma insulin markedly more in F (+46.80 μU ml−1) than in CHO (+14.63 μU ml−1, P = 0.02). We conclude that IMTG breakdown during prolonged submaximal exercise in the fasted state takes place predominantly in type I fibres and that this breakdown is prevented in the CHO-fed state. Furthermore, facilitated glucose-induced insulin secretion may contribute to enhanced muscle glycogen resynthesis following exercise in the fasted

  3. Fiber Type-Specific Satellite Cell Content in Cyclists Following Heavy Training with Carbohydrate and Carbohydrate-Protein Supplementation.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Alec I; D'Lugos, Andrew C; Saunders, Michael J; Gworek, Keith D; Luden, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The central purpose of this study was to evaluate the fiber type-specific satellite cell and myonuclear responses of endurance-trained cyclists to a block of intensified training, when supplementing with carbohydrate (CHO) vs. carbohydrate-protein (PRO). In a crossover design, endurance-trained cyclists (n = 8) performed two consecutive training periods, once supplementing with CHO (de facto "control" condition) and the other with PRO. Each training period consisted of 10 days of intensified cycle training (ICT-120% increase in average training duration) followed by 10 days of recovery (RVT-reduced volume training; 33% volume reduction vs. normal training). Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis before and after ICT and again following RVT. Immunofluorescent microscopy was used to quantify SCs (Pax7+), myonuclei (DAPI+), and myosin heavy chain I (MyHC I). Data are expressed as percent change ± 90% confidence limits. The 10-day block of ICTCHO increased MyHC I SC content (35 ± 28%) and myonuclear density (16 ± 6%), which remained elevated following RVTCHO (SC = 69 ± 50% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 17 ± 15% vs. PRE). MyHC II SC and myonuclei were not different following ICTCHO, but were higher following RVTCHO (SC = +33 ± 31% vs. PRE; Nuclei = 15 ± 14% vs. PRE), indicating a delayed response compared to MyHC I fibers. The MyHC I SC pool increased following ICTPRO (37 ± 37%), but without a concomitant increase in myonuclei. There were no changes in MyHC II SC or myonuclei following ICTPRO. Collectively, these trained endurance cyclists possessed a relatively large pool of SCs that facilitated rapid (MyHC I) and delayed (MyHC II) satellite cell proliferation and myonuclear accretion under carbohydrate conditions. The current findings strengthen the growing body of evidence demonstrating alterations in satellite cell number in the absence of hypertrophy. Satellite cell pool expansion is typically viewed as an advantageous response to exercise

  4. Cell-Type-Specific Modulation of Sensory Responses in Olfactory Bulb Circuits by Serotonergic Projections from the Raphe Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Brunert, Daniela; Tsuno, Yusuke; Rothermel, Markus; Shipley, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic neurons in the brainstem raphe nuclei densely innervate the olfactory bulb (OB), where they can modulate the initial representation and processing of olfactory information. Serotonergic modulation of sensory responses among defined OB cell types is poorly characterized in vivo. Here, we used cell-type-specific expression of optical reporters to visualize how raphe stimulation alters sensory responses in two classes of GABAergic neurons of the mouse OB glomerular layer, periglomerular (PG) and short axon (SA) cells, as well as mitral/tufted (MT) cells carrying OB output to piriform cortex. In PG and SA cells, brief (1–4 s) raphe stimulation elicited a large increase in the magnitude of responses linked to inhalation of ambient air, as well as modest increases in the magnitude of odorant-evoked responses. Near-identical effects were observed when the optical reporter of glutamatergic transmission iGluSnFR was expressed in PG and SA cells, suggesting enhanced excitatory input to these neurons. In contrast, in MT cells imaged from the dorsal OB, raphe stimulation elicited a strong increase in resting GCaMP fluorescence with only a slight enhancement of inhalation-linked responses to odorant. Finally, optogenetically stimulating raphe serotonergic afferents in the OB had heterogeneous effects on presumptive MT cells recorded extracellularly, with an overall modest increase in resting and odorant-evoked responses during serotonergic afferent stimulation. These results suggest that serotonergic afferents from raphe dynamically modulate olfactory processing through distinct effects on multiple OB targets, and may alter the degree to which OB output is shaped by inhibition during behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Modulation of the circuits that process sensory information can profoundly impact how information about the external world is represented and perceived. This study investigates how the serotonergic system modulates the initial processing of olfactory

  5. ON Bipolar Cells in Macaque Retina: Type-Specific Synaptic Connectivity with Special Reference to OFF Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Yoshihiko; Omi, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    To date, 12 macaque bipolar cell types have been described. This list includes all morphology types first outlined by Polyak (1941) using the Golgi method in the primate retina and subsequently identified by other researchers using electron microscopy (EM) combined with the Golgi method, serial section transmission EM (SSTEM), and immunohistochemical imaging. We used SSTEM for the rod-dense perifoveal area of macaque retina, reconfirmed ON (cone) bipolar cells to be classified as invaginating midget bipolar (IMB), diffuse bipolar (DB)4, DB5, DB6, giant bipolar (GB), and blue bipolar (BB) types, and clarified their type-specific connectivity. DB4 cells made reciprocal synapses with a kind of ON-OFF lateral amacrine cell, similar to OFF DB2 cells. GB cells contacted rods and cones, similar to OFF DB3b cells. Retinal circuits formed by GB and DB3b cells are thought to substantiate the psychophysical finding of fast rod signals in mesopic vision. DB6 cell output synapses were directed to ON midget ganglion (MG) cells at 70% of ribbon contacts, similar to OFF DB1 cells that directed 60% of ribbon contacts to OFF MG cells. IMB cells contacted medium- or long-wavelength sensitive (M/L-) cones but not short-wavelength sensitive (S-) cones, while BB cells contacted S-cones but not M/L-cones. However, IMB and BB dendrites had similar morphological architectures, and a BB cell contacting a single S-cone resembled an IMB cell. Thus, both IMB and BB may be the ON bipolar counterparts of the OFF flat midget bipolar (FMB) type, likewise DB4 of DB2, DB5 of DB3a, DB6 of DB1, and GB of DB3b OFF bipolar type. The ON DB plus GB, and OFF DB cells predominantly contacted M/L-cones and their outputs were directed mainly to parasol ganglion (PG) cells but also moderately to MG cells. BB cells directed S-cone-driven outputs almost exclusively to small bistratified ganglion (SBG) cells. Some FMB cells predominantly contacted S-cones and their outputs were directed to OFF MG cells. Thus, two

  6. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  7. Characterisation of CD4 T cells in healthy and diseased koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) using cell-type-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mangar, Chandan; Armitage, Charles W; Timms, Peter; Corcoran, Lynn M; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2016-07-01

    The koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) is an arboreal herbivorous marsupial that is an Australian icon. Koalas in many parts of Australia are under multiple threats including habitat destruction, dog attacks, vehicular accidents, and infectious diseases such as Chlamydia spp. and the koala retrovirus (KoRV), which may contribute to the incidence of lymphoma and leukaemia in this species. Due to a lack of koala-specific immune reagents and assays there is currently no way to adequately analyse the immune response in healthy, diseased or vaccinated animals. This paper reports the production and characterisation of the first anti-koala CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb). The koala CD4 gene was identified and used to develop recombinant proteins for mAb production. Fluorochrome-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used to measure the levels of CD4(+) lymphocytes collected from koala spleens (41.1%, range 20-45.1%) lymph nodes (36.3%, range 19-55.9%) and peripheral blood (23.8%, range 17.3-35%) by flow cytometry. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD4 mAb was used for western blot to determine an approximate size of 52 kDa for the koala CD4 molecule and used in immunohistochemistry to identify CD4(+) cells in the paracortical region and germinal centres of spleen and lymph nodes. Using the anti-CD4 mab we showed that CD4 cells from vaccinated, but not control, koalas proliferated following in vitro stimulation with UV-inactivated Chlamydia pecorum and recombinant chlamydial antigens. Since CD4(+) T cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in clearing chlamydial infection in both human and mouse infections, using this novel antibody will help determine the role CD4(+) T cells play in protection against chlamydial infection in koalas and also enhance our knowledge of how KoRV affects the koala immune system.

  8. The composed antigenic structure of the adenovirus hexon protein.

    PubMed

    Nász, I

    1988-01-01

    Three panels of MAbs were prepared against AV1, AV35, and BAV2 hexons, respectively. It was shown, that in all cases, antibodies are developed against the genus specific determinant of the adenovirus hexon. The other MAbs specified numerous identical or overlapping epitopes on the hexon types studied. The epitopes could be characterized as intertype-, intersubgenus-, subgenus- and type-specific ones beside the genus-specific determinant based on the RPs of the MAbs from indirect ELISA and passive HA results. The identical epitopes are present in more than one copy on the trimeric form of the hexon capsomer. The epitopes on the hexon molecule could be separated into three antigenic sites, of which one antigenic site is characterized by seven epitope clusters (antigenic site II). Monoclonal antibodies were able to precipitate different hexon types in gel diffusion tests by which the differentiation of the distinct epitopes seemed to be possible. With the help of monoclonal antibodies to AV1 hexon, 17 hours after the infection, hexons (or epitopes) were detected in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of the infected cells showing different distribution patterns in indirect immunofluorescence assay.

  9. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photoreceptors, and corresponding signaling pathways have evolved, in almost all kingdoms of life, to monitor light continuously and adjust their growth and development accordingly. However, considering the fact that different cell types should be enable to trigger distinct light signaling pathways according to their needs, cell-type specific light signaling pathways are required to guarantee cell type-matched modulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to different light signals. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, which has only 2 cell types with clear division of labor, possesses cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways which allow differential regulation of genes involved in various cellular and metabolic pathways in response to environmental light. The existence of cell-type specific light signaling pathways in multicellular organism like Volvox reflects an early development of cell-type specific signaling mechanisms during evolution to ensure maintenance of differentiation.

  10. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photoreceptors, and corresponding signaling pathways have evolved, in almost all kingdoms of life, to monitor light continuously and adjust their growth and development accordingly. However, considering the fact that different cell types should be enable to trigger distinct light signaling pathways according to their needs, cell-type specific light signaling pathways are required to guarantee cell type-matched modulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to different light signals. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, which has only 2 cell types with clear division of labor, possesses cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways which allow differential regulation of genes involved in various cellular and metabolic pathways in response to environmental light. The existence of cell-type specific light signaling pathways in muticellular organism like Volvox reflects an early development of cell-type specific signaling mechanisms during evolution to ensure maintenance of differentiation. PMID:25874475

  11. Development of a multiplex taqMan real-time PCR assay for typing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae based on type-specific indels identified through whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Bernard J; Benitez, Alvaro J; Desai, Heta P; Morrison, Shatavia S; Diaz, Maureen H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2017-03-01

    We developed a multiplex real-time PCR assay for simultaneously detecting M. pneumoniae and typing into historically-defined P1 types. Typing was achieved based on the presence of short type-specific indels identified through whole genome sequencing. This assay was 100% specific compared to existing methods and may be useful during epidemiologic investigations.

  12. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  13. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen A A A What's in this article? ... en español Muestra de materia fecal: antígeno de H. pylori What It Is Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria ...

  14. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Neurath, A.R.; Strick, N.; Baker, L.; Krugman, S.

    1982-07-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid-phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bound adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure.

  15. Radioimmunoassays of hidden viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A R; Strick, N; Baker, L; Krugman, S

    1982-01-01

    Antigens corresponding to infectious agents may be present in biological specimens only in a cryptic form bound to antibodies and, thus, may elude detection. We describe a solid phase technique for separation of antigens from antibodies. Immune complexes are precipitated from serum by polyethylene glycol, dissociated with NaSCN, and adsorbed onto nitrocellulose or polystyrene supports. Antigens remain topographically separated from antibodies after removal of NaSCN and can be detected with radiolabeled antibodies. Genomes from viruses immobilized on nitrocellulose can be identified by nucleic acid hybridization. Nanogram quantities of sequestered hepatitis B surface and core antigens and picogram amounts of hepatitis B virus DNA were detected. Antibody-bond adenovirus, herpesvirus, and measles virus antigens were discerned by the procedure. Images PMID:6956871

  16. Naturally Acquired Human Immunity to Pneumococcus Is Dependent on Antibody to Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reglinski, Mark; Jose, Ricardo J.; Marshall, Helina; de Vogel, Corné; Gordon, Stephen; Petersen, Fernanda C.; Baxendale, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Naturally acquired immunity against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is thought to be dependent on anti-capsular antibody. However nasopharyngeal colonisation by Streptococcus pneumoniae also induces antibody to protein antigens that could be protective. We have used human intravenous immunoglobulin preparation (IVIG), representing natural IgG responses to S. pneumoniae, to identify the classes of antigens that are functionally relevant for immunity to IPD. IgG in IVIG recognised capsular antigen and multiple S. pneumoniae protein antigens, with highly conserved patterns between different geographical sources of pooled human IgG. Incubation of S. pneumoniae in IVIG resulted in IgG binding to the bacteria, formation of bacterial aggregates, and enhanced phagocytosis even for unencapsulated S. pneumoniae strains, demonstrating the capsule was unlikely to be the dominant protective antigen. IgG binding to S. pneumoniae incubated in IVIG was reduced after partial chemical or genetic removal of bacterial surface proteins, and increased against a Streptococcus mitis strain expressing the S. pneumoniae protein PspC. In contrast, depletion of type-specific capsular antibody from IVIG did not affect IgG binding, opsonophagocytosis, or protection by passive vaccination against IPD in murine models. These results demonstrate that naturally acquired protection against IPD largely depends on antibody to protein antigens rather than the capsule. PMID:28135322

  17. Antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, Cesar G; Lujan, Hugo D

    2009-12-01

    Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation, both in vitro and within the intestines of infected individuals. Variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) cover the entire surface of the trophozoites and are the main antigens recognized by the host. Only 1 of about 200 VSP genes encoded by the Giardia genome is expressed on the surface of individual Giardia cells at any time; however, VSP antigen switching occurs spontaneously. In the recent year, significant advances in the knowledge of the antigen switching process have been achieved, which strongly suggests that antigenic variation in Giardia is regulated at the post-transcriptional level by a mechanism similar to RNA interference (RNAi). Several enzymes of the RNAi pathway are directly involved in VSP mRNA silencing and/or translational repression. Although several questions remain regarding how individual VSP antigens are selected for expression on the parasite surface, it is clear that an epigenetic mechanism is involved. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of this fascinating mechanism, analyse conflicting information regarding the structure of VSPs as it relates to the host's immune response, and highlight the major issues that need to be resolved to fully understand antigenic variation in this important pathogen.

  18. Serospecific antigens of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Otten, S; Iyer, S; Johnson, W; Montgomery, R

    1986-01-01

    Serospecific antigens isolated by EDTA extraction from four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were analyzed for their chemical composition, molecular heterogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunological properties. The antigens were shown to be lipopolysaccharides and to differ from the lipopolysaccharides of other gram-negative bacteria. The serospecific antigens contained rhamnose, mannose, glucosamine, and two unidentified sugars together with 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate, phosphate, and fatty acids. The fatty acid composition was predominantly branched-chain acids with smaller amounts of 3-hydroxymyristic acid. The antigens contain periodate-sensitive groups; mannosyl residues were completely cleaved by periodate oxidation. Hydrolysis of the total lipopolysaccharide by acetic acid resulted in the separation of a lipid A-like material that cross-reacted with the antiserum to lipid A from Salmonella minnesota but did not comigrate with it on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. None of the four antigens contained heptose. All of the antigen preparations showed endotoxicity when tested by the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. The results of this study indicate that the serogroup-specific antigens of L. pneumophila are lipopolysaccharides containing an unusual lipid A and core structure and different from those of other gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:3017918

  19. K99 surface antigen of Escherichia coli: antigenic characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, R E

    1978-01-01

    K99 prepared by acid precipitation hemagglutinated guinea pig erythrocytes, whereas K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex did not. K99 purified by either procedure hemagglutinated horse erythrocytes. K99 prepared by acid precipitation contained a second antigen not presnet in the K99 prepared by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. This antigen could be detected by immunoprecipitation with some, but not all, sera prepared against K99-positive Escherichia coli strains. It was assumed that this second antigen is not K99 and is responsible for the guinea pig erythrocyte hemagglutination reaction. Furthermore, the second antigen has an isoelectric point of 4.2, which has been reported by Morris and co-workers to be the isoelectric point of K99. Images PMID:83300

  20. A gene-type-specific enhancer regulates the carbamyl phosphate synthetase I promoter by cooperating with the proximal GAG activating element.

    PubMed Central

    Goping, I S; Lamontagne, S; Shore, G C; Nguyen, M

    1995-01-01

    The rat carbamyl phosphate synthetase I gene is expressed in two cell types: hepatocytes and epithelial cells of the intestinal mucosa. The proximal promoter contains a single activating element, GAG, two repressor elements (sites I and III) and an anti-repressor element (site II). Although these elements together exhibit the potential for complex regulation, they are unable to confer tissue-specific promoter activity. Here we have identified a cell-type-specific enhancer that lies 10 kilobases upstream of the promoter. Unexpectedly, the enhancer also functioned in a gene-type-specific manner. The enhancer stimulated promoter activity exclusively through the proximal GAG element. Abrogation of GAG, either directly by mutation of GAG or indirectly by sites I and III repressors, abolished enhancer activation. Conversely, activation of the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter by the enhancer required the introduction of GAG. The requirement for GAG, therefore, functions to constrain the enhancer to a specific target promoter. PMID:7784176

  1. The role of myostatin and activin receptor IIB in the regulation of unloading-induced myofiber type-specific skeletal muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Lyle W; Knoblauch, Mark; Clarke, Mark S F

    2015-09-15

    Chronic unloading induces decrements in muscle size and strength. This adaptation is governed by a number of molecular factors including myostatin, a potent negative regulator of muscle mass. Myostatin must first be secreted into the circulation and then bind to the membrane-bound activin receptor IIB (actRIIB) to exert its atrophic action. Therefore, we hypothesized that myofiber type-specific atrophy observed after hindlimb suspension (HLS) would be related to myofiber type-specific expression of myostatin and/or actRIIB. Wistar rats underwent HLS for 10 days, after which the tibialis anterior was harvested for frozen cross sectioning. Simultaneous multichannel immunofluorescent staining combined with differential interference contrast imaging was employed to analyze myofiber type-specific expression of myostatin and actRIIB and myofiber type cross-sectional area (CSA) across fiber types, myonuclei, and satellite cells. Hindlimb suspension (HLS) induced significant myofiber type-specific atrophy in myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIx (P < 0.05) and MHC IIb myofibers (P < 0.05). Myostatin staining associated with myonuclei was less in HLS rats compared with controls, while satellite cell staining for myostatin remained unchanged. In contrast, the total number myonuclei and satellite cells per myofiber was reduced in HLS compared with ambulatory control rats (P < 0.01). Sarcoplasmic actRIIB staining differed between myofiber types (I < IIa < IIx < IIb) independent of loading conditions. Myofiber types exhibiting the greatest cytoplasmic staining of actRIIB corresponded to those exhibiting the greatest degree of atrophy following HLS. Our data suggest that differential expression of actRIIB may be responsible for myostatin-induced myofiber type-selective atrophy observed during chronic unloading.

  2. Root Type-Specific Reprogramming of Maize Pericycle Transcriptomes by Local High Nitrate Results in Disparate Lateral Root Branching Patterns1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lithio, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The adaptability of root system architecture to unevenly distributed mineral nutrients in soil is a key determinant of plant performance. The molecular mechanisms underlying nitrate dependent plasticity of lateral root branching across the different root types of maize are only poorly understood. In this study, detailed morphological and anatomical analyses together with cell type-specific transcriptome profiling experiments combining laser capture microdissection with RNA-seq were performed to unravel the molecular signatures of lateral root formation in primary, seminal, crown, and brace roots of maize (Zea mays) upon local high nitrate stimulation. The four maize root types displayed divergent branching patterns of lateral roots upon local high nitrate stimulation. In particular, brace roots displayed an exceptional architectural plasticity compared to other root types. Transcriptome profiling revealed root type-specific transcriptomic reprogramming of pericycle cells upon local high nitrate stimulation. The alteration of the transcriptomic landscape of brace root pericycle cells in response to local high nitrate stimulation was most significant. Root type-specific transcriptome diversity in response to local high nitrate highlighted differences in the functional adaptability and systemic shoot nitrogen starvation response during development. Integration of morphological, anatomical, and transcriptomic data resulted in a framework underscoring similarity and diversity among root types grown in heterogeneous nitrate environments. PMID:26811190

  3. Cell type-specific long-term plasticity at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal interneurons expressing either parvalbumin or CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Wiebke; Szabo, Andras; Somogyi, Jozsef; Somogyi, Peter; Lamsa, Karri P

    2010-01-27

    Different GABAergic interneuron types have specific roles in hippocampal function, and anatomical as well as physiological features vary greatly between interneuron classes. Long-term plasticity of interneurons has mostly been studied in unidentified GABAergic cells and is known to be very heterogeneous. Here we tested whether cell type-specific plasticity properties in distinct GABAergic interneuron types might underlie this heterogeneity. We show that long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD), two common forms of synaptic plasticity, are expressed in a highly cell type-specific manner at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal GABAergic neurons. Both LTP and LTD are generated in interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV+), whereas interneurons with similar axon distributions but expressing cannabinoid receptor-1 show no lasting plasticity in response to the same protocol. In addition, LTP or LTD occurs in PV+ interneurons with different efferent target domains. Perisomatic-targeting PV+ basket and axo-axonic interneurons express LTP, whereas glutamatergic synapses onto PV+ bistratified cells display LTD. Both LTP and LTD are pathway specific, independent of NMDA receptors, and occur at synapses with calcium-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors. Plasticity in interneurons with CP-AMPA receptors strongly modulates disynaptic GABAergic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal cells. We propose that long-term plasticity adjusts the synaptic strength between pyramidal cells and interneurons in a cell type-specific manner and, in the defined CA1 interneurons, shifts the spatial pattern of inhibitory weight from pyramidal cell dendrites to the perisomatic region.

  4. Natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability.

    PubMed

    Graves, Christopher J; Ros, Vera I D; Stevenson, Brian; Sniegowski, Paul D; Brisson, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that evolvability - the capacity to evolve by natural selection - is itself the object of natural selection is highly intriguing but remains controversial due in large part to a paucity of direct experimental evidence. The antigenic variation mechanisms of microbial pathogens provide an experimentally tractable system to test whether natural selection has favored mechanisms that increase evolvability. Many antigenic variation systems consist of paralogous unexpressed 'cassettes' that recombine into an expression site to rapidly alter the expressed protein. Importantly, the magnitude of antigenic change is a function of the genetic diversity among the unexpressed cassettes. Thus, evidence that selection favors among-cassette diversity is direct evidence that natural selection promotes antigenic evolvability. We used the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, as a model to test the prediction that natural selection favors amino acid diversity among unexpressed vls cassettes and thereby promotes evolvability in a primary surface antigen, VlsE. The hypothesis that diversity among vls cassettes is favored by natural selection was supported in each B. burgdorferi strain analyzed using both classical (dN/dS ratios) and Bayesian population genetic analyses of genetic sequence data. This hypothesis was also supported by the conservation of highly mutable tandem-repeat structures across B. burgdorferi strains despite a near complete absence of sequence conservation. Diversification among vls cassettes due to natural selection and mutable repeat structures promotes long-term antigenic evolvability of VlsE. These findings provide a direct demonstration that molecular mechanisms that enhance evolvability of surface antigens are an evolutionary adaptation. The molecular evolutionary processes identified here can serve as a model for the evolution of antigenic evolvability in many pathogens which utilize similar strategies to establish chronic infections.

  5. Common antigen structures of HL-A antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y.; Tanigaki, N.; Yagi, Y.; Pressman, D.

    1973-01-01

    Antigenic determinants recognizable by rabbits were found to be present on the molecular fragments (48,000 Daltons) which were obtained by papain-solubilization of the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells and which carried the HL-A determinants. Results were obtained which suggest that these antigenic determinants are present in common on these molecular fragments carrying HL-A determinants regardless of their HL-A specificity and are restricted to the molecular fragments which carry HL-A determinants. The study was made by use of radioimmune methods involving the binding of radioiodine-labelled soluble HL-A antigen preparations by anti-HL-A alloantisera and by rabbit antisera raised against the membrane fractions of cultured human lymphoid cells. PMID:4119543

  6. How does antigen retrieval work?

    PubMed

    Leong, Trishe Y-M; Leong, Anthony S-Y

    2007-03-01

    The introduction of antigen retrieval has enabled immunohistology to become an integral component of morphologic diagnosis, routinely employed in cancer diagnosis, and for the identification of therapeutic and prognostic markers. The mechanism of antigen retrieval, however, remains speculative with the key to our understanding embedded in the actions of formaldehyde on proteins. One commonly held concept is that heat primarily breaks down protein cross-linkages that occur with aldehyde fixation, thus "unmasking" protein epitopes of interest. Enzymatic pretreatment is also thought to have a similar action whereas such "breakages" are the result of extremely rapid molecular movement induced by microwaves and ultrasound. The formation of rigid cagelike calcium complexes during formaldehyde fixation is another suggested mechanism of antigen masking requiring chelating agents for reversal. A more recent suggestion for the antigen retrieval phenomenon has evoked the Mannich reaction, which occurs with the cross-linking of some proteins. Such cross-linkages can be hydrolyzed by heat or alkalis so that the process of antigen retrieval may be the simple removal of such cross-linked proteins that are sterically interfering with the binding of antibodies to linear protein epitopes in the tissue section. We are clearly not yet in possession of all the answers to the problem.

  7. DIFFERENTIATION OF GROUP A STREPTOCOCCI WITH A COMMON R ANTIGEN INTO THREE SEROLOGICAL TYPES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE BACTERICIDAL TEST

    PubMed Central

    Lancefield, Rebecca C.

    1957-01-01

    In further study of streptococci having the R antigen, the bactericidal test has been used instead of the mouse protection test in investigating the type-specific M antigens of these organisms. The results have been confirmed by M anti-M precipitin tests, and a correlation between the M and T antigens of the strains has been shown. On the basis of a specific M antigen, type 28 has been shown to comprise Griffith's strain Small and four other R-containing strains. A number of other strains previously thought to belong to type 28 on the basis of R antigen reactions have now been identified as belonging either to type 2 or to a new type, designated 48, which shows a one-way cross-relationship to type 13. The bactericidal test is suggested as a useful method for assessing M antigen in group A streptococci and for establishing type-specificity by means of a biological test which is more widely applicable than the standard mouse protection test. PMID:13475611

  8. Cell type-specific filamin complex regulation by a novel class of HECT ubiquitin ligase is required for normal cell motility and patterning

    PubMed Central

    Blagg, Simone L.; Battom, Suzanne E.; Annesley, Sarah J.; Keller, Thomas; Parkinson, Katie; Wu, Jasmine M. F.; Fisher, Paul R.; Thompson, Christopher R. L.

    2011-01-01

    Differential cell motility, which plays a key role in many developmental processes, is perhaps most evident in examples of pattern formation in which the different cell types arise intermingled before sorting out into discrete tissues. This is thought to require heterogeneities in responsiveness to differentiation-inducing signals that result in the activation of cell type-specific genes and ‘salt and pepper’ patterning. How differential gene expression results in cell sorting is poorly defined. Here we describe a novel gene (hfnA) that provides the first mechanistic link between cell signalling, differential gene expression and cell type-specific sorting in Dictyostelium. HfnA defines a novel group of evolutionarily conserved HECT ubiquitin ligases with an N-terminal filamin domain (HFNs). HfnA expression is induced by the stalk differentiation-inducing factor DIF-1 and is restricted to a subset of prestalk cells (pstO). hfnA− pstO cells differentiate but their sorting out is delayed. Genetic interactions suggest that this is due to misregulation of filamin complex activity. Overexpression of filamin complex members phenocopies the hfnA− pstO cell sorting defect, whereas disruption of filamin complex function in a wild-type background results in pstO cells sorting more strongly. Filamin disruption in an hfnA− background rescues pstO cell localisation. hfnA− cells exhibit altered slug phototaxis phenotypes consistent with filamin complex hyperactivity. We propose that HfnA regulates filamin complex activity and cell type-specific motility through the breakdown of filamin complexes. These findings provide a novel mechanism for filamin regulation and demonstrate that filamin is a crucial mechanistic link between responses to differentiation signals and cell movement in patterning based on ‘salt and pepper’ differentiation and sorting out. PMID:21389049

  9. Variants in human papillomavirus receptor and associated genes are associated with type-specific HPV infection and lesion progression of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Jianyang; Chen, Tingting; Yang, Shizhou; Huang, Yongjie; Hong, Die; Li, Yang; Chen, Xiaojing; Wang, Xinyu; Cheng, Xiaodong; Lu, Weiguo; Xie, Xing

    2016-06-28

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infects cervical epithelial cells through cellular membrane receptors, and then induces the initiation and progression of cervical cancer. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may impact the susceptibility and outcome of diseases, but it's still unknown whether variant in HPV receptor and associated genes is associated with type-specific HPV infection and cervical lesion progression. We examined 96 SNPs in 8 genes which may participate in the HPV infection process in 875 samples with HPV negative or single HPV16, 18, 52, 58 positive from 3299 cervical exfoliated cell samples, by Illumina BeadXpress VeraCode platform, and analyzed the correlation between the SNPs and type-specific HPV infection and cervical lesions progression. We found rs28384376 in EGFR and rs12034979 in HSPG2 significantly correlated to HPV16 infection; rs2575738, rs2575712, rs2575735 in SDC2 and rs6697265 in HSPG2 significantly correlated to HPV18 infection; rs10510097 in FGFR2, rs12718946 in EGFR significantly correlated to HPV52 infection; rs4947972 in EGFR, rs2981451 in FGFR2, rs2575735 in SDC2 significantly correlated to HPV58 infection. And rs3135772, rs1047057 and rs2556537 in FGFR2, rs12034979 in HSPG2, rs16894821 in SDC2 significantly correlated to cervical lesion progression induced by HPV16 infection; rs6697265 and rs6680566 in HSPG2, rs16860426 in ITGA6 by HPV18 infection; rs878949 in HSPG2, rs12718946 and rs12668175 in EGFR by HPV52 infection; no SNP by HPV58 infection. Our findings suggest that HPV receptor and associated gene variants may influence the susceptibilities to HPV type-specific infection and cervical lesion progression, which might have a potential application value in cervical cancer screening and therapy.

  10. Neuronal Expression and Cell-Type-Specific Gene-Silencing of Best1 in Thalamic Reticular Nucleus Neurons Using pSico-Red System

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Young; Lee, Seung Eun; Hwang, Eun Mi

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the cell-type expression pattern of a certain gene can be achieved by using cell-type-specific gene manipulation. Recently, cre-recombinase-dependent gene-silencing tool, pSico has become popular in neuroscientific research. However, pSico has a critical limitation that gene-silenced cell cannot be identified by fluorescence, due to an excision of the reporter gene for green fluorescence protein (GFP). To overcome this limitation, we newly developed pSico-Red, with mCherry gene as a reporter outside two loxP sites, so that red mCherry signal is detected in all transfected cells. When a cell expresses cre, GFP is excised and shRNA is enabled, resulting in disappearance of GFP. This feature of pSico-Red provides not only cell-type-specific gene-silencing but also identification of cre expressing cells. Using this system, we demonstrated for the first time the neuronal expression of the Bestrophin-1 (Best1) in thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and TRN-neuron-specific gene-silencing of Best1. We combined adeno-associated virus (AAV) carrying Best1-shRNA in pSico-Red vector and transgenic mouse expressing cre under the promoter of distal-less homeobox 5/6 (DLX5/6), a marker for inhibitory neurons. Firstly, we found that almost all of inhibitory neurons in TRN express Best1 by immunohistochemistry. Using pSico-Red virus, we found that 80% of infected TRN neurons were DLX5/6-cre positive but parvalbumin negative. Finally, we found that Best1 in DLX5/6-cre positive neurons were significantly reduced by Best1-shRNA. Our study demonstrates that TRN neurons strongly express Best1 and that pSico-Red is a valuable tool for cell-type-specific gene manipulation and identification of specific cell population. PMID:27358580

  11. The Relationship between Muscle Fiber Type-Specific PGC-1α Content and Mitochondrial Content Varies between Rodent Models and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gouspillou, Gilles; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Norris, Brandon; Barbat-Artigas, Sébastien; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Morais, Jose A.; Burelle, Yan; Taivassalo, Tanja; Hepple, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    PGC-1α regulates critical processes in muscle physiology, including mitochondrial biogenesis, lipid metabolism and angiogenesis. Furthermore, PGC-1α was suggested as an important regulator of fiber type determination. However, whether a muscle fiber type-specific PGC-1α content exists, whether PGC-1α content relates to basal levels of mitochondrial content, and whether such relationships are preserved between humans and classically used rodent models are all questions that have been either poorly addressed or never investigated. To address these issues, we investigated the fiber type-specific content of PGC-1α and its relationship to basal mitochondrial content in mouse, rat and human muscles using in situ immunolabeling and histochemical methods on muscle serial cross-sections. Whereas type IIa fibers exhibited the highest PGC-1α in all three species, other fiber types displayed a hierarchy of type IIx>I>IIb in mouse, type I = IIx> IIb in rat, and type IIx>I in human. In terms of mitochondrial content, we observed a hierarchy of IIa>IIx>I>IIb in mouse, IIa >I>IIx> IIb in rat, and I>IIa> IIx in human skeletal muscle. We also found in rat skeletal muscle that type I fibers displayed the highest capillarization followed by type IIa >IIx>IIb. Finally, we found in human skeletal muscle that type I fibers display the highest lipid content, followed by type IIa>IIx. Altogether, our results reveal that (i) the fiber type-specific PGC-1α and mitochondrial contents were only matched in mouse, (ii) the patterns of PGC-1α and mitochondrial contents observed in mice and rats do not correspond to that seen in humans in several respects, and (iii) the classical phenotypes thought to be regulated by PGC-1α do not vary exclusively as a function of PGC-1α content in rat and human muscles. PMID:25121500

  12. The phosphorylated C-terminus of cAR1 plays a role in cell-type-specific gene expression and STATa tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, C; Moniakis, J; Kim, J Y; Brown, J M; Hereld, D; Devreotes, P N; Firtel, R A

    2001-05-01

    cAMP receptors mediate some signaling pathways via coupled heterotrimeric G proteins, while others are G-protein-independent. This latter class includes the activation of the transcription factors GBF and STATa. Within the cellular mounds formed by aggregation of Dictyostelium, micromolar levels of cAMP activate GBF function, thereby inducing the transcription of postaggregative genes and initiating multicellular differentiation. Activation of STATa, a regulator of culmination and ecmB expression, results from cAMP receptor-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation and nuclear localization, also in mound-stage cells. During mound development, the cAMP receptor cAR1 is in a low-affinity state and is phosphorylated on multiple serine residues in its C-terminus. This paper addresses possible roles of cAMP receptor phosphorylation in the cAMP-mediated stimulation of GBF activity, STATa tyrosine phosphorylation, and cell-type-specific gene expression. To accomplish this, we have expressed cAR1 mutants in a strain in which the endogenous cAMP receptors that mediate postaggregative gene expression in vivo are deleted. We then examined the ability of these cells to undergo morphogenesis and induce postaggregative and cell-type-specific gene expression and STATa tyrosine phosphorylation. Analysis of cAR1 mutants in which the C-terminal tail is deleted or the ligand-mediated phosphorylation sites are mutated suggests that the cAR1 C-terminus is not essential for GBF-mediated postaggregative gene expression or STATa tyrosine phosphorylation, but may play a role in regulating cell-type-specific gene expression and morphogenesis. A mutant receptor, in which the C-terminal tail is constitutively phosphorylated, exhibits constitutive activation of STATa tyrosine phosphorylation in pulsed cells in suspension and a significantly impaired ability to induce cell-type-specific gene expression. The constitutively phosphorylated receptor also exerts a partial dominant negative effect on

  13. Cell type-specific and activity-dependent dynamics of action potential-evoked Ca2+ signals in dendrites of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Evstratova, Alesya; Chamberland, Simon; Topolnik, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In most central neurons, action potentials (APs), generated in the initial axon segment, propagate back into dendrites and trigger considerable Ca2+ entry via activation of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs). Despite the similarity in its underlying mechanisms, however, AP-evoked dendritic Ca2+ signalling often demonstrates a cell type-specific profile that is determined by the neuron dendritic properties. Using two-photon Ca2+ imaging in combination with patch-clamp whole-cell recordings, we found that in distinct types of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons Ca2+ transients evoked by backpropagating APs not only were shaped by the interneuron-specific properties of dendritic Ca2+ handling but also involved specific Ca2+ mechanisms that were regulated dynamically by distinct activity patterns. In dendrites of regularly spiking basket cells, AP-evoked Ca2+ rises were of large amplitude and fast kinetics; however, they decreased with membrane hyperpolarization or following high-frequency firing episodes. In contrast, AP-evoked Ca2+ elevations in dendrites of Schaffer collateral-associated cells exhibited significantly smaller amplitude and slower kinetics, but increased with membrane hyperpolarization. These cell type-specific properties of AP-evoked dendritic Ca2+ signalling were determined by distinct endogenous buffer capacities of the interneurons examined and by specific types of VSCCs recruited by APs during different patterns of activity. Furthermore, AP-evoked Ca2+ transients summated efficiently during theta-like bursting and were associated with the induction of long-term potentiation at inhibitory synapses onto both types of interneurons. Therefore, the cell type-specific profile of AP-evoked dendritic Ca2+ signalling is shaped in an activity-dependent manner, such that the same pattern of hippocampal activity can be differentially translated into dendritic Ca2+ signals in different cell types. However, Cell type-specific differences in Ca

  14. Easy-to-Fabricate and High-Sensitivity LSPR Type Specific Protein Detection Sensor Using AAO Nano-Pore Size Control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae-Wan; Lee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sang-Won; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Kwon, Jin-Beom; Kim, Ok-Sik; Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Eung-Soo; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2017-04-13

    In this study, we developed a pore size/pore area-controlled optical biosensor-based anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructure. As the pore size of AAO increases, the unit cell of AAO increases, which also increases the non-pore area to which the antibody binds. The increase in the number of antibodies immobilized on the surface of the AAO enables effective detection of trace amounts of antigen, because increased antigen-antibody bonding results in a larger surface refractive index change. High sensitivity was thus achieved through amplification of the interference wave of two vertically-incident reflected waves through the localized surface plasmon resonance phenomenon. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was evaluated by measuring the change in wavelength with the change in the refractive index of the device surface, and sensitivity was increased with increasing pore-size and non-pore area. The sensitivity of the fabricated sensor was improved and up to 11.8 ag/mL serum amyloid A1 antigen was detected. In addition, the selectivity of the fabricated sensor was confirmed through a reaction with a heterogeneous substance, C-reactive protein antigen. By using hard anodization during fabrication of the AAO, the fabrication time of the device was reduced and the AAO chip was fabricated quickly and easily.

  15. HLA antigens and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Houssin, A; Soulillou, J P; Denis, J; Guimbretiere, J; Guenel, J

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the frequencies of HLA-A, -B antigens in 73 Berger's disease patients, plus HLA-DR antigens in 35 of them, and compared the percentages of antigens frequencies with those of a local and national panel. This study does not confirm the positive associations with HLA-Bw35 or HLA-B12 which have been previously reported. The HLA-DR typing only showed increased frequency of blanks in the patients (P smaller than 0.01, but no significant corr.P). Patients with Berger's disease and renal failure have a higher (but still not significant) HLA-Bw35 frequency than those without renal failure. The reasons for the discrepancy between our group and others are analysed.

  16. Mammalian non-CG methylations are conserved and cell-type specific and may have been involved in the evolution of transposon elements.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weilong; Zhang, Michael Q; Wu, Hong

    2016-08-30

    Although non-CG methylations are abundant in several mammalian cell types, their biological significance is sparsely characterized. We gathered 51 human and mouse DNA methylomes from brain neurons, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, primordial germ cells and oocytes. We utilized an unbiased sub-motif prediction method and reported CW as the representative non-CG methylation context, which is distinct from CC methylation in terms of sequence context and genomic distribution. A two-dimensional comparison of non-CG methylations across cell types and species was performed. Unambiguous studies of sequence preferences and genomic region enrichment showed that CW methylation is cell-type specific and is also conserved between humans and mice. In brain neurons, it was found that active long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) lacked CW methylations but not CG methylations. Coincidentally, both human Alu and mouse B1 elements preferred high CW methylations at specific loci during their respective evolutionary development. Last, the strand-specific distributions of CW methylations in introns and long interspersed nuclear elements are also cell-type specific and conserved. In summary, our results illustrate that CW methylations are highly conserved among species, are dynamically regulated in each cell type, and are potentially involved in the evolution of transposon elements.

  17. Identifying Cell Type-Specific Transcription Factors by Integrating ChIP-seq and eQTL Data–Application to Monocyte Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Mudra; Ramsey, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel computational approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) that are candidate regulators in a human cell type of interest. Our approach involves integrating cell type-specific expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data and TF data from chromatin immunoprecipitation-to-tag-sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments in cell lines. To test the method, we used eQTL data from human monocytes in order to screen for TFs. Using a list of known monocyte-regulating TFs, we tested the hypothesis that the binding sites of cell type-specific TF regulators would be concentrated in the vicinity of monocyte eQTLs. For each of 397 ChIP-seq data sets, we obtained an enrichment ratio for the number of ChIP-seq peaks that are located within monocyte eQTLs. We ranked ChIP-seq data sets according to their statistical significances for eQTL overlap, and from this ranking, we observed that monocyte-regulating TFs are more highly ranked than would be expected by chance. We identified 27 TFs that had significant monocyte enrichment scores and mapped them into a protein interaction network. Our analysis uncovered two novel candidate monocyte-regulating TFs, BCLAF1 and SIN3A. Our approach is an efficient method to identify candidate TFs that can be used for any cell/tissue type for which eQTL data are available. PMID:28008225

  18. Mammalian non-CG methylations are conserved and cell-type specific and may have been involved in the evolution of transposon elements

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Weilong; Zhang, Michael Q.; Wu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Although non-CG methylations are abundant in several mammalian cell types, their biological significance is sparsely characterized. We gathered 51 human and mouse DNA methylomes from brain neurons, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, primordial germ cells and oocytes. We utilized an unbiased sub-motif prediction method and reported CW as the representative non-CG methylation context, which is distinct from CC methylation in terms of sequence context and genomic distribution. A two-dimensional comparison of non-CG methylations across cell types and species was performed. Unambiguous studies of sequence preferences and genomic region enrichment showed that CW methylation is cell-type specific and is also conserved between humans and mice. In brain neurons, it was found that active long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE-1) lacked CW methylations but not CG methylations. Coincidentally, both human Alu and mouse B1 elements preferred high CW methylations at specific loci during their respective evolutionary development. Last, the strand-specific distributions of CW methylations in introns and long interspersed nuclear elements are also cell-type specific and conserved. In summary, our results illustrate that CW methylations are highly conserved among species, are dynamically regulated in each cell type, and are potentially involved in the evolution of transposon elements. PMID:27573482

  19. Evaluation of combined general primer-mediated PCR sequencing and type-specific PCR strategies for determination of human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical cell specimens.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Véronique; Mascaux, Corinne; Weyn, Christine; Bernis, Aurore; Celio, Nathalie; Lefèvre, Philippe; Kaufman, Leonard; Garbar, Christian

    2007-03-01

    A strategy combining human papillomavirus general primer (mainly the PGMY primers)-directed PCR sequencing and type-specific PCR is presented. DNA samples were first tested in general primer-mediated PCR. The amplified fragments of positive samples after ethidium bromide-stained DNA gel analysis were further sequenced, and corresponding DNA samples were further analyzed by PCR using type-specific primers for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, and 52. The comparison of the results of 157 samples analyzed by this strategy in parallel with the Hybrid Capture 2 tests and with the HPV INNO-LiPA (Innogenetics line probe assay) shows that this method is suitable for HPV detection and genotyping in cervical cell samples. Although the PCR sequencing method is as sensitive as the HPV INNO-LiPA for HPV detection, our method allows the identification of a broader range of HPV types. In contrast, the HPV INNO-LiPA was less time-consuming and better identified coinfections.

  20. Evaluation of Combined General Primer-Mediated PCR Sequencing and Type-Specific PCR Strategies for Determination of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Cervical Cell Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Véronique; Mascaux, Corinne; Weyn, Christine; Bernis, Aurore; Celio, Nathalie; Lefèvre, Philippe; Kaufman, Leonard; Garbar, Christian

    2007-01-01

    A strategy combining human papillomavirus general primer (mainly the PGMY primers)-directed PCR sequencing and type-specific PCR is presented. DNA samples were first tested in general primer-mediated PCR. The amplified fragments of positive samples after ethidium bromide-stained DNA gel analysis were further sequenced, and corresponding DNA samples were further analyzed by PCR using type-specific primers for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31, and 52. The comparison of the results of 157 samples analyzed by this strategy in parallel with the Hybrid Capture 2 tests and with the HPV INNO-LiPA (Innogenetics line probe assay) shows that this method is suitable for HPV detection and genotyping in cervical cell samples. Although the PCR sequencing method is as sensitive as the HPV INNO-LiPA for HPV detection, our method allows the identification of a broader range of HPV types. In contrast, the HPV INNO-LiPA was less time-consuming and better identified coinfections. PMID:17229855

  1. Mouse skeletal muscle fiber-type specific macroautophagy and muscle wasting is regulated by a Fyn/STAT3/Vps34 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Eijiro; Bastie, Claire C.; Koga, Hiroshi; Wang, Yichen; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Skeletal muscle atrophy induced by aging (sarcopenia), inactivity and prolonged fasting states (starvation) is predominantly restricted to glycolytic type II muscle fibers and typical spares oxidative type I fibers. However, the mechanisms accounting for muscle fiber type specificity of atrophy have remained enigmatic. In the current study, we that although the Fyn tyrosine kinase activated the mTORC1 signaling complex, it also induced marked atrophy of glycolytic fibers with relatively less effect on oxidative muscle fibers. This was due to inhibition of macroautophagy via an mTORC1-independent but STAT3-dependent reduction in Vps34 protein levels and decreased Vps34/p150/Beclin1/Atg14 complexes. Physiologically, in the fed sate endogenous Fyn kinase activity was increased in glycolytic but not oxidative skeletal muscle. In parallel, Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation increased with decreased Vps34 protein levels. Moreover, fed/starved regulation of Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation and Vps34 protein levels was prevented in skeletal muscle of Fyn null mice. These data demonstrate a novel Fyn/STAT3/Vps34 pathway that is responsible for fiber type specific regulation of macroautophagy and skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:22745922

  2. Identifying Cell Type-Specific Transcription Factors by Integrating ChIP-seq and eQTL Data-Application to Monocyte Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Mudra; Ramsey, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel computational approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) that are candidate regulators in a human cell type of interest. Our approach involves integrating cell type-specific expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data and TF data from chromatin immunoprecipitation-to-tag-sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments in cell lines. To test the method, we used eQTL data from human monocytes in order to screen for TFs. Using a list of known monocyte-regulating TFs, we tested the hypothesis that the binding sites of cell type-specific TF regulators would be concentrated in the vicinity of monocyte eQTLs. For each of 397 ChIP-seq data sets, we obtained an enrichment ratio for the number of ChIP-seq peaks that are located within monocyte eQTLs. We ranked ChIP-seq data sets according to their statistical significances for eQTL overlap, and from this ranking, we observed that monocyte-regulating TFs are more highly ranked than would be expected by chance. We identified 27 TFs that had significant monocyte enrichment scores and mapped them into a protein interaction network. Our analysis uncovered two novel candidate monocyte-regulating TFs, BCLAF1 and SIN3A. Our approach is an efficient method to identify candidate TFs that can be used for any cell/tissue type for which eQTL data are available.

  3. Rapid, sensitive, type specific PCR detection of the E7 region of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 from paraffin embedded sections of cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lesnikova, Iana; Lidang, Marianne; Hamilton-Dutoit, Steven; Koch, Jørn

    2010-01-22

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and in particularly infection with HPVs 16 and 18, is a central carcinogenic factor in the uterine cervix. We established and optimized a PCR assay for the detection and discrimination of HPV types 16 and 18 in archival formaldehyde fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) sections of cervical cancer.Tissue blocks from 35 cases of in situ or invasive cervical squamous cell carcinoma and surrogate FFPE sections containing the cell lines HeLa and SiHa were tested for HPV 16 and HPV18 by conventional PCR using type specific primers, and for the housekeeping gene beta-actin. Using HPV 16 E7 primers, PCR products with the expected length were detected in 18 of 35 of FFPE sections (51%). HPV 18 E7 specific sequences were detected in 3 of 35 FFPE sections (9%).In our experience, the PCR technique is a robust, simple and sensitive way of type specific detection of HPV16 and HPV18 genes in FFPE tissue. That makes this technique applicable to routine practices of HPV detection.

  4. A cell type-specific view on the translation of mRNAs from ROS-responsive genes upon paraquat treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Benina, Maria; Ribeiro, Dimas Mendes; Gechev, Tsanko S; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Schippers, Jos H M

    2015-02-01

    Oxidative stress causes dramatic changes in the expression levels of many genes. The formation of a functional protein through successful mRNA translation is central to a coordinated cellular response. To what extent the response towards reactive oxygen species (ROS) is regulated at the translational level is poorly understood. Here we analysed leaf- and tissue-specific translatomes using a set of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines expressing a FLAG-tagged ribosomal protein to immunopurify polysome-bound mRNAs before and after oxidative stress. We determined transcript levels of 171 ROS-responsive genes upon paraquat treatment, which causes formation of superoxide radicals, at the whole-organ level. Furthermore, the translation of mRNAs was determined for five cell types: mesophyll, bundle sheath, phloem companion, epidermal and guard cells. Mesophyll and bundle sheath cells showed the strongest response to paraquat treatment. Interestingly, several ROS-responsive transcription factors displayed cell type-specific translation patterns, while others were translated in all cell types. In part, cell type-specific translation could be explained by the length of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs). Our analysis reveals insights into the translational regulation of ROS-responsive genes, which is important to understanding cell-specific responses and functions during oxidative stress.

  5. [Investigation of HPV-DNA in cervical smear samples by two different methods: MY09/11 consensus PCR and type-specific real-time PCR].

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Fatih; Gümral, Ramazan; Sener, Kenan; Yiğit, Nuri; Dede, Murat; Yapar, Mehmet; Kubar, Ayhan

    2012-10-01

    Cervical cancer that has been proven to be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the second most common cancer in women worldwide and is a leading cause of cancer deaths in women in developing countries. Cervical cancers can be detected in the early stages by screening programs since a long latency period exists between the beginning of HPV infection and the development of cervical cancer. HPV-DNA testing is widely used throughout the world and today is an important part of cervical cancer screening programs. In this study, we analyzed the presence of HPV-DNA in 356 cervical smear samples by two different methods which are MY09/11 consensus real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) and type-specific Rt-PCR. All samples were also tested by type-specific PCR, regardless of consensus PCR results. PCR analysis were performed using the type- specific primers and TaqMan probes that were designed for a total of 13 different HPV types; two low risk HPV and 11 high risk HPV types. A total of 142 different isolates, 95 being high risk HPV isolates, 39 low risk HPV isolates and eight unidentified isolates, were determined in 109 (30.6%) smear samples that were defined as HPV-DNA positive by at least one of the two methods. Frequencies of detection of high risk HPV types in HPV-positive samples were as follows respectively: HPV-16; 32 (33.7%), HPV-52; 12 (12.6%), HPV-58; 11 (11.6%), HPV-18; 7 (7.4%), HPV-31; 7 (7.4%), HPV-35; 7 (7.4%), HPV-68; 6 (6.3%), HPV-33; 4 (4.2%), HPV-82; 4 (4.2%), HPV-39; 3 (3.2%) and HPV-45; 2 (2.1%). Various cytologic atypia were reported in 84 (23.6%) smear samples according to the simultaneously performed cytopathologic examination. Single HPV type was detected in 72 (71.3%) and multiple HPV types were detected in 29 (28.7%) of 101 smear samples with the exception of the unidentified isolates by type-specific RtPCR. HPV-18, HPV-33 and HPV-35 had higher detection rates of 7.4, 3.7 and 3.0 fold in mixed infections than single ones

  6. Antigenic determinants and functional domains in core antigen and e antigen from hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salfeld, J; Pfaff, E; Noah, M; Schaller, H

    1989-01-01

    The precore/core gene of hepatitis B virus directs the synthesis of two polypeptides, the 21-kilodalton subunit (p21c) forming the viral nucleocapsid (serologically defined as core antigen [HBcAg]) and a secreted processed protein (p17e, serologically defined as HBe antigen [HBeAg]). Although most of their primary amino acid sequences are identical, HBcAg and HBeAg display different antigenic properties that are widely used in hepatitis B virus diagnosis. To locate and to characterize the corresponding determinants, segments of the core gene were expressed in Escherichia coli and probed with a panel of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassays or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blots, and competition assays. Three distinct major determinants were characterized. The single conformational determinant responsible for HBc antigenicity in the assembled core (HBc) and a linear HBe-related determinant (HBe1) were both mapped to an overlapping hydrophilic sequence around amino acid 80; a second HBe determinant (HBe2) was assigned to a location in the vicinity of amino acid 138 but found to require for its antigenicity the intramolecular participation of the extended sequence between amino acids 10 and 140. It is postulated that HBcAg and HBeAg share common basic three-dimensional structure exposing the common linear determinant HBe1 but that they differ in the presentation of two conformational determinants that are either introduced (HBc) or masked (HBe2) in the assembled core. The simultaneous presentation of HBe1 and HBc, two distinctly different antigenic determinants with overlapping amino acid sequences, is interpreted to indicate the presence of slightly differently folded, stable conformational states of p21c in the hepatitis B virus nucleocapsid. Images PMID:2463383

  7. A functional cyclic AMP response element plays a crucial role in neuroendocrine cell type-specific expression of the secretory granule protein chromogranin A.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Mahata, S K; Mahata, M; Webster, N J; Parmer, R J; O'Connor, D T

    1995-01-01

    Chromogranin A, a soluble acidic protein, is a ubiquitous component of secretory vesicles throughout the neuroendocrine system. We reported previously the cloning and initial characterization of the mouse chromogranin A gene promoter, which showed that the promoter contains both positive and negative domains and that a proximal promoter spanning nucleotides -147 to +42 bp relative to the transcriptional start site is sufficient for neuroendocrine cell type-specific expression. The current study was undertaken to identify the particular elements within this proximal promoter that control tissue-specific expression. We found that deletion or point mutations in the potential cAMP response element (CRE) site at -68 bp virtually abolished promoter activity specifically in neuroendocrine (PC12 chromaffin or AtT20 corticotrope) cells, with little effect on activity in control (NIH3T3 fibroblast) cells; thus, the CRE box is necessary for neuroendocrine cell type-specific activity of the chromogranin A promoter. Furthermore, the effect of the CRE site is enhanced in the context of intact (wild-type) promoter sequences between -147 and -100 bp. DNase I footprint analysis showed that these regions (including the CRE box) bind nuclear proteins present in both neuroendocrine (AtT20) and control (NIH3T3) cells. In AtT20 cells, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and factor-specific antibody supershifts showed that an oligonucleotide containing the chromogranin A CRE site formed a single, homogeneous protein-DNA complex containing the CRE-binding protein CREB. However, in control NIH3T3 cells we found evidence for an additional immunologically unrelated protein in this complex. A single copy of this oligonucleotide was able to confer neuroendocrine-specific expression to a heterologous (thymidine kinase) promoter, albeit with less fold selectivity than the full proximal chromogranin A promoter. Hence, the CRE site was partially sufficient to explain the neuroendocrine cell type

  8. Serial type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) load measurement allows differentiation between regressing cervical lesions and serial virion productive transient infections.

    PubMed

    Depuydt, Christophe E; Jonckheere, Jef; Berth, Mario; Salembier, Geert M; Vereecken, Annie J; Bogers, Johannes J

    2015-08-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is strongly associated with the development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or cancer. Not all persistent infections lead to cancer. Viral load measured at a single time-point is a poor predictor of the natural history of HPV infections. However the profile of viral load evolution over time could distinguish nonprogressive from progressive (carcinogenic) infections. A retrospective natural history study was set up using a Belgian laboratory database including more than 800,000 liquid cytology specimens. All samples were submitted to qPCR identifying E6/E7 genes of 18 HPV types. Viral load changes over time were assessed by the linear regression slope. Database search identified 261 untreated women with persistent type-specific HPV DNA detected (270 infections) in at least three of the last smears for a average period of 3.2 years. Using the coefficient of determination (R²) infections could be subdivided in a latency group (n = 143; R² < 0.85) and a regressing group (n = 127; R² ≥ 0.85). In (≥ 3) serial viral load measurements, serial transient infections with latency is characterized by a nonlinear limited difference in decrease or increase of type-specific viral load (R² < 0.85 and slopes between 2 measurements 0.0010 and -0.0010 HPV copies/cell per day) over a longer period of time (1553 days), whereas regression of a clonal cell population is characterized by a linear (R² ≥ 0.85) decrease (-0.0033 HPV copies/cell per day) over a shorter period of time (708 days; P < 0.001). Using serial HPV type-specific viral load measurements we could for the first time identify regressing CIN2 and CIN3 lesions. Evolution of the viral load is an objective measurable indicator of the natural history of HPV infections and could be used for future triage in HPV-based cervical screening programs.

  9. Mating type-specific cell-cell recognition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: cell wall attachment and active sites of a- and alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Cappellaro, C; Baldermann, C; Rachel, R; Tanner, W

    1994-01-01

    Mating type-specific agglutination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae a and alpha cells depends on the heterophilic interaction of two cell surface glycoproteins, the gene products of AG alpha 1 and AGA2. Evidence is presented with immunogold labelling that the alpha-agglutinin is part of the outer fimbrial cell wall coat. The a-agglutinin is bound via two S-S bridges (Cys7 and Cys50) to a cell wall component, most probably the gene product of AGA1. His273 of alpha-agglutinin has previously been shown to be essential for a- and alpha-agglutinin interaction and a model based on two opposing ion-pairs had been proposed. By site-directed mutagenesis this possibility has now been excluded. With the help of various peptides, either chemically synthesized, obtained by proteolysis of intact glycosylated a-agglutinin or prepared from a fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, the biologically active region of a-agglutinin was located at the C-terminus of the molecule. A peptide consisting of the C-terminal 10 amino acids (GSPIN-TQYVF) was active in nanomolar concentrations. Saccharide moieties, therefore, are not essential for the mating type-specific cell-cell interaction; glycosylated peptides are, however, four to five times more active than non-glycosylated ones. Comparisons of the recognition sequences of the S. cerevisiae agglutinins with that of the Dictyostelium contact site A glycoprotein (gp80), as well as with those of the various families of cell adhesion molecules of higher eucaryotes, have been made and are discussed. Images PMID:7957044

  10. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  11. HIV Antigens for Disease Intervention.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    and the transmembrane protein gp41 . HIV-1 vaccine development efforts conducted in this contract include developing strategies of modifying the...antigenicity of HIV envelope protein. The approaches adopted involve analysis of the possible function for N-linked glycosylation sites of gp 120 and gp41 ... gp41 . The role of N-linked sugars. a leucine zipper structure motif and the long cytoplasmic domain of gp4l in virus assembly, virus infectivity and

  12. Allergy to cockroach antigens in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Romański, B; Dziedziczko, A; Pawlik-Miskiewicz, K; Wilewska-Klubo, T; Zbikowska-Gotz, M

    1981-01-01

    Cockroach allergy was investigated in a group of 56 patients with atopic bronchial asthma (37 men and 19 women with ages ranging from 16 to 65) all allergic to house dust antigen. In all patients, both intracutaneous tests and bronchial provocation tests were performed with cockroach antigen prepared from the species most common in Poland, Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis. Positive skin reactions to cockroach antigen were found in 17 patients while an immediate bronchoconstrictive response was noted in 11. In the authors opinion, cockroach antigens may be partly responsible for the antigenic properties of house dust and may play a causative role in some cases of atopic asthma.

  13. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  14. Regulation of antigenic variation in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Prucca, César G; Rivero, Fernando D; Luján, Hugo D

    2011-01-01

    Antigenic variation, a clonal phenotypic variation developed by microorganisms, involves the permanent switching of homologous, antigenically different cell surface molecules. In pathogenic microorganisms, antigenic variation is often described as a mechanism to evade the host immune system and therefore is responsible for the generation of chronic and/or recurrent infections. However, antigenic variation has also been involved in expanding host diversity and differential courses of the diseases. The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia undergoes antigenic variation through the continuous exchange of approximately 200 variant-specific surface proteins. Here we review the principal issues regarding the significance of antigenic variation during Giardia infections, the particular features of the variant-specific surface proteins, and the current knowledge on the mechanisms that regulate this process, as well as the relevance of disrupting antigenic variation as a novel approach to design effective antiparasitic vaccines.

  15. Type-Specific HPV Prevalence in Cervical Cancer and High-Grade Lesions in Latin America and the Caribbean: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ciapponi, Agustín; Bardach, Ariel; Glujovsky, Demián; Gibbons, Luz; Picconi, María Alejandra

    2011-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Latin America and the Caribbean (LA&C), showing some of the highest incidence and mortality rates worldwide. Information on HPV type distribution in high-grade cervical lesions (HSIL) and invasive cervical cancer (ICC) is crucial to predict the future impact of HPV16/18 vaccines and screening programmes, and to establish an appropriate post-vaccinal virologic surveillance. The aim was to assess the prevalence of HPV types in HSIL and ICC in studies in LA&C. Methods and Findings We performed a systematic review, following the MOOSE guidelines for systematic reviews of observational studies, and the PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Inclusion criteria were at least ten cases of HSIL/ICC, and HPV-type elicitation. The search, without language restrictions, was performed in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, LILACS from inception date to December 2009, proceedings, reference lists and consulting experts. A meta-analysis was performed using arc-sine transformations to stabilize the variance of simple proportions. Seventy-nine studies from 18 countries were identified, including 2446 cases of HSIL and 5540 of ICC. Overall, 46.5% of HSIL cases harbored HPV 16 and 8.9% HPV18; in ICC, 53.2% of cases harbored HPV 16 and13.2% HPV 18. The next five most common types, in decreasing frequency, were HPV 31, 58, 33, 45, and 52. Study's limitations comprise the cross-sectional design of most included studies and their inherent risk of bias, the lack of representativeness, and variations in the HPV type-specific sensitivity of different PCR protocols. Conclusions This study is the broadest summary of HPV type distribution in HSIL and ICC in LA&C to date. These data are essential for local decision makers regarding HPV screening and vaccination policies. Continued HPV surveillance would be useful, to assess the potential for changing type-specific HPV prevalence in the post

  16. The Type-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Response Elicited by a Dengue Vaccine Candidate Is Focused on Two Amino Acids of the Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    VanBlargan, Laura A.; Mukherjee, Swati; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Durbin, Anna P.; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Pierson, Theodore C.

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that circulate in nature as four distinct serotypes (DENV1-4). These emerging pathogens are responsible for more than 100 million human infections annually. Severe clinical manifestations of disease are predominantly associated with a secondary infection by a heterotypic DENV serotype. The increased risk of severe disease in DENV-sensitized populations significantly complicates vaccine development, as a vaccine must simultaneously confer protection against all four DENV serotypes. Eliciting a protective tetravalent neutralizing antibody response is a major goal of ongoing vaccine development efforts. However, a recent large clinical trial of a candidate live-attenuated DENV vaccine revealed low protective efficacy despite eliciting a neutralizing antibody response, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the humoral immune response against dengue infection. In this study, we sought to identify epitopes recognized by serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies elicited by monovalent DENV1 vaccination. We constructed a panel of over 50 DENV1 structural gene variants containing substitutions at surface-accessible residues of the envelope (E) protein to match the corresponding DENV2 sequence. Amino acids that contribute to recognition by serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies were identified as DENV mutants with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by DENV1 immune sera, but not cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies elicited by DENV2 vaccination. We identified two mutations (E126K and E157K) that contribute significantly to type-specific recognition by polyclonal DENV1 immune sera. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis of sera from 24 participants of a phase I clinical study revealed a markedly reduced capacity to neutralize a E126K/E157K DENV1 variant. Sera from 77% of subjects recognized the E126K/E157K DENV1 variant and DENV2 equivalently (<3-fold difference). These data indicate the type-specific

  17. Systematic identification and annotation of human methylation marks based on bisulfite sequencing methylomes reveals distinct roles of cell type-specific hypomethylation in the regulation of cell identity genes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Shumei; Lv, Jie; Li, Song; Shang, Shipeng; Jia, Shanshan; Wei, Yanjun; Wang, Fang; Su, Jianzhong; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-08

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mark that is critical for gene regulation in multicellular eukaryotes. Although various human cell types may have the same genome, these cells have different methylomes. The systematic identification and characterization of methylation marks across cell types are crucial to understand the complex regulatory network for cell fate determination. In this study, we proposed an entropy-based framework termed SMART to integrate the whole genome bisulfite sequencing methylomes across 42 human tissues/cells and identified 757 887 genome segments. Nearly 75% of the segments showed uniform methylation across all cell types. From the remaining 25% of the segments, we identified cell type-specific hypo/hypermethylation marks that were specifically hypo/hypermethylated in a minority of cell types using a statistical approach and presented an atlas of the human methylation marks. Further analysis revealed that the cell type-specific hypomethylation marks were enriched through H3K27ac and transcription factor binding sites in cell type-specific manner. In particular, we observed that the cell type-specific hypomethylation marks are associated with the cell type-specific super-enhancers that drive the expression of cell identity genes. This framework provides a complementary, functional annotation of the human genome and helps to elucidate the critical features and functions of cell type-specific hypomethylation.

  18. Dose-dependent and cell type-specific cell death and proliferation following in vitro exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Hochstrasser, Tanja; Frank, Hans-Georg; Schmitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave (rESW) therapy is widely used in musculoskeletal disorders and wound repair. However, the mechanisms of action are still largely unknown. The current study compared the effects of rESWs on two cell types. Human fetal foreskin fibroblasts (HFFF2) and human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3 were exposed to 0, 100, 200, 500 or 5000 rESWs generated with a Swiss DolorClast device (2.5 bar, 1 Hz). FACS analysis immediately after rESW exposure showed that initially, rESWs rather induced mechanical cell destruction than regulated or programmed cell death. Cell damage was nearly negated by reducing cavitation. Furthermore, cell viability decreased progressively with higher numbers of rESWs. Exposure to rESWs had no impact on growth potential of JEG-3 cells, but dose-dependently increased growth potential of HFFF2 cells. Cultivation of cells that were initially exposed to sham-rESWs in conditioned media increased the growth potential of HFFF2 cells, nevertheless, an even stronger effect was achieved by direct exposure to rESWs. Additionally, cell cycle distribution analysis demonstrated a shift in proportion from G0/G1 to G2/M phase in HFFF2 cells, but not in JEG-3 cells. These data demonstrate that rESWs leads to initial and subsequent dose-dependent and cell type-specific effects in vitro. PMID:27477873

  19. Cell-type-specific mechanisms of transcriptional repression by the homeotic gene products UBX and ABD-A in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Appel, B; Sakonju, S

    1993-01-01

    The homeotic genes of Drosophila melanogaster, which are required for specification of segmental identities, encode proteins capable of regulating gene expression. We have chosen to study the organization and function of a regulatory target in an attempt to learn how homeotic gene products provide appropriate transcriptional controls. We identified 30 common binding sites for the proteins encoded by the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and abdominal-A (abd-A) genes within a negatively regulated target, the P2 promoter of the Antennapedia (Antp) gene. By systematically mutagenizing binding sites and observing the resulting P2 expression pattern in embryos, we have found evidence for cell-type-specific interactions that are mediated by these sequences. In certain neuronal cells, UBX and ABD-A proteins appear to repress by competing for common binding sites with another homeodomain protein, which we propose to be ANTP acting to induce P2 transcription in an autoregulatory manner. In sets of cells that contribute to the tracheal system, UBX and ABD-A repress by counteracting the function of a factor acting at independent sites. The latter mechanism of repression requires only that multiple homeodomain binding sequences be present and is not dependent on any particular binding site. Images PMID:8096172

  20. Muscle Fiber Type Specific Activation of the Slow Myosin Heavy Chain 2 Promoter by a Non-canonical E-box

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Kristina; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2016-01-01

    Different mechanisms control skeletal muscle fiber type gene expression at specific times in vertebrate development. Embryonic myogenesis leading to formation of primary muscle fibers in avian species is largely directed by myoblast cell commitment to the formation of diverse fiber types. In contrast, development of different secondary fiber types during fetal myogenesis is partly determined by neural influences. In both primary and secondary chicken muscle fibers, differential expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene distinguishes fast from fast/slow muscle fibers. This study focused on the transcriptional regulation of the slow MyHC2 gene in primary myotubes formed from distinct fast/slow and fast myogenic cell lineages. Promoter deletion analyses identified a discrete 86bp promoter segment that conferred fiber type, lineage-specific gene expression in fast/slow versus fast myoblast derived primary myotubes. Sequence analysis and promoter activity assays determined that this segment contains two functional cis-regulatory elements. One element is a non-canonical E-box, and electromobility shift assays demonstrated that both cis-elements interacted with the E-protein, E47. The results indicate that primary muscle fiber type specific expression of the slow MyHC2 gene is controlled by a novel mechanism involving a transcriptional complex that includes E47 at a non-canonical E-box. PMID:26707643

  1. FoxO1 regulates muscle fiber-type specification and inhibits calcineurin signaling during C2C12 myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Shi, Xin-e; Liu, Yue-guang; Yang, Gong-she

    2011-02-01

    Adult skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized into slow-oxidative and fast-glycolytic subtypes based on specialized metabolic and contractile properties. The Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) transcription factor governs muscle growth, metabolism, and cell differentiation, and has been shown to be involved in regulating muscle fiber type specification. However, to date, the mechanism behind FoxO1-mediated fiber type diversity is still unclear. In this article, FoxO1 being expressed preferentially in fast twitch fiber enriched muscles is reported. Moreover, the autors also detected that FoxO1 expression decreased in both fast and slow muscles from mice undergoing endurance exercise which induced a fast-to-slow fiber type transition. Using C2C12 myoblast, constitutively active FoxO1 mutant altered the proportion of muscle fiber type composition toward a fast-glycolytic phenotype and attenuated calcineurin phosphatase activity. In addition, a transcriptionally inactive FoxO1 by resveratrol triggered the expression of genes related to slow-oxidative muscle but not sufficient to induce a complete slow fiber transformation. Taken together, these results suggest that FoxO1 up-regulates fast fiber-type formation and down-regulates muscle oxidative capacity at least in part through inhibition of the calcineurin pathway.

  2. A cell-type-specific defect in border cell formation in the Acacia mangium root cap developing an extraordinary sheath of sloughed-off cells

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Izuki; Tange, Takeshi; Osawa, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Root caps release border cells, which play central roles in microbe interaction and root protection against soil stresses. However, the number and connectivity of border cells differ widely among plant species. Better understanding of key border-cell phenotype across species will help define the total function of border cells and associated genes. Methods The spatio-temporal detachment of border cells in the leguminous tree Acacia mangium was investigated by using light and fluorescent microscopy with fluorescein diacetate, and their number and structural connectivity compared with that in soybean (Glycine max). Key Results Border-like cells with a sheet structure peeled bilaterally from the lateral root cap of A. mangium. Hydroponic root elongation partially facilitated acropetal peeling of border-like cells, which accumulate as a sheath that covers the 0- to 4-mm tip within 1 week. Although root elongation under friction caused basipetal peeling, lateral root caps were minimally trimmed as compared with hydroponic roots. In the meantime, A. mangium columella caps simultaneously released single border cells with a number similar to those in soybean. Conclusions These results suggest that cell type-specific inhibitory factors induce a distinct defective phenotype in single border-cell formation in A. mangium lateral root caps. PMID:21712296

  3. Cell type-specific abundance of 4EBP1 primes prostate cancer sensitivity or resistance to PI3K pathway inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Andrew C.; Nguyen, Hao G.; Wen, Lexiaochuan; Edlind, Merritt P.; Carroll, Peter R.; Kim, Won; Ruggero, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibitors against the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway, a frequently deregulated signaling pathway in cancer, are clinically promising, but the development of drug resistance is a major limitation. We found that 4EBP1, the central inhibitor of cap-dependent translation, was a critical regulator of both prostate cancer initiation and maintenance downstream of mTOR signaling in a genetic mouse model. 4EBP1 abundance was distinctly different between the epithelial cell types of the normal prostate. Of tumor-prone prostate epithelial cell types, luminal epithelial cells exhibited the highest transcript and protein abundance of 4EBP1 and the lowest protein synthesis rates, which mediated resistance to the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway inhibitor MLN0128. Decreasing total 4EBP1 abundance reversed resistance in drug-sensitive cells. Increased 4EBP1 abundance was a common feature in prostate cancer patients that had been treated with the PI3K pathway inhibitor BKM120; thus 4EBP1 may be associated with drug resistance in human tumors. Our findings reveal a molecular program controlling cell type-specific 4EBP1 abundance coupled to the regulation of global protein synthesis rates that renders each epithelial cell type of the prostate uniquely sensitive or resistant to inhibitors of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:26577921

  4. Tight, cell type-specific control of LNX expression in the nervous system, at the level of transcription, translation and protein stability.

    PubMed

    Lenihan, Joan A; Saha, Orthis; Mansfield, Louise M; Young, Paul W

    2014-11-15

    LNX1 and LNX2 are E3 ubiquitin ligases that can interact with Numb - a key regulator of neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. LNX1 can target Numb for proteasomal degradation, and Lnx mRNAs are prominently expressed in the nervous system, suggesting that LNX proteins play a role in neural development. This hypothesis remains unproven, however, largely because LNX proteins are present at very low levels in vivo. Here, we demonstrate expression of both LNX1 and LNX2 proteins in the brain for the first time. We clarify the cell-type specific expression of LNX isoforms in both the CNS and PNS, and identify a novel LNX1 isoform. Using luciferase reporter assays, we show that the 5' untranslated region of the Lnx1_variant 2 mRNA, that generates the LNX1p70 isoform, strongly suppresses protein production. This effect is mediated in part by the presence of upstream open reading frames (uORFs), but also by a sequence element that decreases both mRNA levels and translational efficiency. By contrast, uORFs do not negatively regulate LNX1p80 or LNX2 expression. Instead, we find some evidence that protein turnover via proteasomal degradation may influence LNX1p80 levels in cells. These observations provide plausible explanations for the low levels of LNX1 proteins detected in vivo.

  5. A Mutation in the Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Dependent Oxidoreductase FOXRED1 Results in Cell-Type-Specific Assembly Defects in Oxidative Phosphorylation Complexes I and II

    PubMed Central

    Zurita Rendón, Olga; Antonicka, Hana; Horvath, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Complex I (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a large multisubunit enzyme that catalyzes the first step in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). In mammals, complex I biogenesis occurs in a stepwise manner, a process that requires the participation of several nucleus-encoded accessory proteins. The FAD-dependent oxidoreductase-containing domain 1 (FOXRED1) protein is a complex I assembly factor; however, its specific role in the assembly pathway remains poorly understood. We identified a homozygous missense mutation, c.1308 G→A (p.V421M) in FOXRED1 in a patient who presented with epilepsy and severe psychomotor retardation. A patient myoblast line showed a severe reduction in complex I, associated with the accumulation of subassemblies centered around ∼340 kDa, and a milder decrease in complex II, all of which were rescued by retroviral expression of wild-type FOXRED1. Two additional assembly factors, AIFM1 and ACAD9, coimmunoprecipitated with FOXRED1, and all were associated with a 370-kDa complex I subassembly that, together with a 315-kDa subassembly, forms the 550-kDa subcomplex. Loss of FOXRED1 function prevents efficient formation of this midassembly subcomplex. Although we could not identify subassemblies of complex II, our results establish that FOXRED1 function is both broader than expected, involving the assembly of two flavoprotein-containing OXPHOS complexes, and cell type specific. PMID:27215383

  6. Multi-site study of HPV type-specific prevalence in women with cervical cancer, intraepithelial neoplasia and normal cytology, in England

    PubMed Central

    Howell-Jones, R; Bailey, A; Beddows, S; Sargent, A; de Silva, N; Wilson, G; Anton, J; Nichols, T; Soldan, K; Kitchener, H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the prevalence of type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) infections is necessary to predict the expected, and to monitor the actual, impact of HPV immunisation and to design effective screening strategies for vaccinated populations. Methods: Residual specimens of cervical cytology (N=4719), CIN3/CGIN and cervical cancer biopsies (N=1515) were obtained from sites throughout England, anonymised and tested for HPV DNA using the Linear Array typing system (Roche). Results: The prevalence of HPV 16 and/or 18 (with or without another high-risk (HR) type) was 76% in squamous cell carcinomas, 82% in adeno/adenosquamous carcinomas and 63% and 91% in CIN3 and CGIN, respectively. Of all HR HPV-infected women undergoing cytology, non-vaccine HPV types only were found in over 60% of those with mild dyskaryosis or below, and in <20% of those with cancer. In women of all ages undergoing screening, HR HPV prevalence was 16% and HPV 16 and/or 18 prevalence was 5%. Conclusion: Pre-immunisation, high-grade cervical disease in England was predominantly associated with HPV 16 and/or 18, which promises a high impact from HPV immunisation in due course. Second-generation vaccines and screening strategies need to consider the best ways to detect and prevent disease due to the remaining HR HPV types. PMID:20628396

  7. Antigenic Variation of Campylobacter Flagella

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    Cultures were grown at 37"C zation, the flagellum is a major antigen of the campylobacter in anaerobic jars on chocolate -blood agar plates. An atmo- cell...Protein epitopes to the serospecificity of the LIO 8 serogroup. This solubilized in sample buffer was stacked in 4.5% acrylamide thermolabile serogroup...were grown for 24 h and then streaked ELISA. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on one side of a chocolate -blood agar plate from which a was

  8. Persistence of antigen in nonarthritic joints.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Glynn, L E

    1975-01-01

    The presence of antigen, IgG and C3 was shown by radioautography and immunofluorescence in the collagenous tissues of the joints of animals injected intra-articularly with antigen after having been previously immunized with that antigen in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. Since these joints were shown to be virtually free of inflammatory reactions, we suggest that the persistence of immune complexes activating complement cannot fully explain the chronicity of experimental allergic arthritis. Images PMID:769709

  9. Antigenic variation in African trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, David

    2014-01-01

    Studies on Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSGs) and antigenic variation in the African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, have yielded a remarkable range of novel and important insights. The features first identified in T. brucei extend from unique to conserved-among-trypanosomatids to conserved-among-eukaryotes. Consequently, much of what we now know about trypanosomatid biology and much of the technology available has its origin in studies related to VSGs. T. brucei is now probably the most advanced early branched eukaryote in terms of experimental tractability and can be approached as a pathogen, as a model for studies on fundamental processes, as a model for studies on eukaryotic evolution or often all of the above. In terms of antigenic variation itself, substantial progress has been made in understanding the expression and switching of the VSG coat, while outstanding questions continue to stimulate innovative new approaches. There are large numbers of VSG genes in the genome but only one is expressed at a time, always immediately adjacent to a telomere. DNA repair processes allow a new VSG to be copied into the single transcribed locus. A coordinated transcriptional switch can also allow a new VSG gene to be activated without any detectable change in the DNA sequence, thereby maintaining singular expression, also known as allelic exclusion. I review the story behind VSGs; the genes, their expression and switching, their central role in T. brucei virulence, the discoveries that emerged along the way and the persistent questions relating to allelic exclusion in particular. PMID:24859277

  10. Antigenic heterogeneity of vascular endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Page, C.; Rose, M.; Yacoub, M.; Pigott, R.

    1992-01-01

    The antigenic status of vascular endothelium from different sites of the normal adult and fetal human cardiovascular system was investigated. Tissues included aorta (n = 9), pulmonary artery (n = 8), coronary artery (n = 6), ventricle/atrium (n = greater than 10), lymph node (n = 2), fetal whole heart (n = 3), and umbilical cord (n = 7). Frozen sections were studied using monoclonal antibodies recognizing endothelial markers (EN4, vWf, Pal-E, and 44G4), vascular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ELAM, VCAM, and PECAM), the monocyte/endothelial marker (OKM5), and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (class I and class II). Results demonstrate that capillary endothelium is phenotypically different from endothelial cells (EC) lining large vessels. Capillary EC strongly express MHC classes I and II, ICAM, and OKM5, which are variably weak to undetectable on large vessels. In contrast, the large vessels strongly express vWf and appear to constitutively express ELAM-1. This suggests that the capillary EC may be more efficient at antigen presentation or more susceptible to immune attack in vivo. Interestingly, normal coronary arteries, unlike all other large vessels, express MHC class II and VCAM molecules. Future studies should concentrate on comparative functional studies between capillary, coronary, and large vessel EC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1519671

  11. Protective cellular antigen of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J R; Stonger, K A

    1980-04-01

    Cellular antigens of Clostridium chauvoei, strain IRP-128, were demonstrated to be important in induction of immunity against this bacterium in guinea pigs. At least one major component of the cellular antigen complex was heat-labile. Acid extraction of the bacterial cells, followed by selective purification for flagella, led to the preparation of an acid extract antigen that possessed a high degree of immunogenicity. The acid extract antigen contained flagellar components and was resolved into two major and approximately five minor protein components by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  12. [Antigenic relationships between Debaryomyces strains (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Aksoycan, N

    1980-01-01

    The results of the agglutinations between homologous and heterologous Debaryomyces strains and their agglutinating sera are shown in table I. According to these findings, D. hansenii and D. marama are antigenically different from other Debaryomyces strains in this genus. In a previous study Aksoycan et al. have shown a common antigenic factor between D. hansenii, D. marama strains and Salmonella 0:7 antigen. This factor was not present in other six strains of Debaryomyces. These results also show that D. tamarii does not have any antigenic relationship with the other seven species of Debaryomyces in this genus.

  13. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  14. Radial immunodiffusion: a simple and rapid method for detection of Marek's disease antigen(s).

    PubMed

    Marquardt, W W

    1972-05-01

    A qualitative radial immunodiffusion technique is described which detects antigen(s) in feathers from live or dead chickens infected with Marek's disease herpesvirus. Antiserum, which is incorporated into a support medium, reacts with antigen(s) in the feather tip producing a radial precipitin ring. Antigen(s) was detected in 93.3% of experimentally inoculated chickens 21 days postinoculation and in 100% of infected birds subsequently tested through 6 weeks. No antigen was detectable in the feathers of uninoculated control chickens. The technique is simple and rapid to perform. Positive tests could be detected after 1 to 2 hours of incubation. Antigen detection by the radial immunodiffusion test correlated well with other criteria of infection. This technique should have application as a laboratory research tool and as an adjunct for a rapid flock diagnosis of Marek's disease.

  15. Interleukin-6 and leukemia inhibitory factor induction of JunB is regulated by distinct cell type-specific cis-acting elements.

    PubMed

    Sjin, R M; Lord, K A; Abdollahi, A; Hoffman, B; Liebermann, D A

    1999-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 plays an important role in a wide range of biological activities, including differentiation of murine M1 myeloid leukemic cells into mature macrophages. At the onset of M1 differentiation, a set of myeloid differentiation primary response (MyD) genes are induced, including the proto-oncogene for JunB. In order to examine the molecular nature of the mechanisms by which IL-6 activates the immediate early expression of MyD genes, JunB was used as a paradigm. A novel IL-6 response element, -65/-52 IL-6RE, to which a 100-kDa protein complex is bound, has been identified on the JunB promoter. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-induced activation of JunB in M1 cells was also mediated via the -65/-52 IL-6RE. The STAT3 and CRE-like binding sites of the JunB promoter, identified as IL-6-responsive elements in HepG2 liver cells were found, however, to play no role in JunB inducibility by IL-6 in M1 myeloid cells. Conversely, the -65/-52 IL-6RE is shown not to be necessary for JunB inducibility by IL-6 or LIF in liver cells. It appears, therefore, that immediate early activation of JunB is regulated differently in M1 myeloid cells than in HepG2 liver cells. This indicates that distinct cis-acting control elements participate in cell type-specific induction of JunB by members of the IL-6 cytokine superfamily.

  16. Cell-Type Specific Channelopathies in the Prefrontal Cortex of the fmr1-/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome123

    PubMed Central

    Brager, Darrin H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene resulting in the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. FXS patients display several behavioral phenotypes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction. Voltage-gated ion channels, some of which are regulated by FMRP, heavily influence PFC neuron function. Although there is evidence for brain region-specific alterations to the function a single type of ion channel in FXS, it is unclear whether subtypes of principal neurons within a brain region are affected uniformly. We tested for alterations to ion channels critical in regulating neural excitability in two subtypes of prefrontal L5 pyramidal neurons. Using somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we provide evidence that the functional expression of h-channels (Ih) is down-regulated, whereas A-type K+ channel function is up-regulated in pyramidal tract-projecting (PT) neurons in the fmr1-/y mouse PFC. This is the opposite pattern of results from published findings from hippocampus where Ih is up-regulated and A-type K+ channel function is down-regulated. Additionally, we find that somatic Kv1-mediated current is down-regulated, resulting in increased excitability of fmr1-/y PT neurons. Importantly, these h- and K+ channel differences do not extend to neighboring intratelencephalic-projecting neurons. Thus, the absence of FMRP has divergent effects on the function of individual types of ion channels not only between brain regions, but also variable effects across cell types within the same brain region. Given the importance of ion channels in regulating neural circuits, these results suggest cell-type-specific phenotypes for the disease. PMID:26601124

  17. Ovalbumin expression in the oviduct magnum of hens is related to the rate of egg laying and shows distinct stress-type-specific responses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J P; Zhang, Q; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Jiang, M J; Luo, H; Lin, H

    2016-10-01

    Three trials were performed to evaluate the association of ovalbumin (OVA) abundance in the oviduct magnum with egg production and the underlying regulatory mechanism by glucocorticoids. In trial 1, twenty Hy-Line Brown layers (56-60 weeks of age) with different combinations (n = 5/combination) of laying rate (high or low) and egg weight (high or low) were selected from an initial group of 300. An upregulated expression of magnum OVA was observed (p < 0.05) in hens with higher laying rate, regardless of egg weight. In trial 2, eighty Hy-Line Brown layers (80-90 weeks of age) were subjected to the forced moulting (n = 8). The abundance of OVA transcript and protein in the magnum was significantly decreased during moulting (p < 0.01), and the same was true for laying rate (p < 0.01) and serum oestrogen (p < 0.05). In trial 3, forty-five 56-week-old Hy-Line Brown layers were kept individually (n = 15) in the following conditions for 10 days: constant optimal ambient temperature at 23 °C and ad libitum feeding, high ambient temperature at 32 °C for 6 h/day (10:00-16:00) and ad libitum feeding (32AL), and constant optimal ambient temperature at 23 °C and pair-fed to the 32AL hens. In spite of elevated corticosterone in circulation, OVA synthesis, blood oestrogen and laying rate were not affected by heat exposure (p > 0.05). These results allow concluding that OVA expression in the oviduct magnum of hens is related to the rate of egg laying and shows distinct stress-type-specific responses.

  18. p53 shapes genome-wide and cell type-specific changes in microRNA expression during the human DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Janky, Rekin’s; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Aerts, Stein; Madan Babu, M; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2014-01-01

    The human DNA damage response (DDR) triggers profound changes in gene expression, whose nature and regulation remain uncertain. Although certain micro-(mi)RNA species including miR34, miR-18, miR-16 and miR-143 have been implicated in the DDR, there is as yet no comprehensive description of genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs triggered by DNA breakage in human cells. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with rigorous integrative computational analyses, to describe genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs during the human DDR. The changes affect 150 of 1523 miRNAs known in miRBase v18 from 4–24 h after the induction of DNA breakage, in cell-type dependent patterns. The regulatory regions of the most-highly regulated miRNA species are enriched in conserved binding sites for p53. Indeed, genome-wide changes in miRNA expression during the DDR are markedly altered in TP53-/- cells compared to otherwise isogenic controls. The expression levels of certain damage-induced, p53-regulated miRNAs in cancer samples correlate with patient survival. Our work reveals genome-wide and cell type-specific alterations in miRNA expression during the human DDR, which are regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. These findings provide a genomic resource to identify new molecules and mechanisms involved in the DDR, and to examine their role in tumor suppression and the clinical outcome of cancer patients. PMID:25486198

  19. AmpA protein functions by different mechanisms to influence early cell type specification and to modulate cell adhesion and actin polymerization in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Cost, Hoa N; Noratel, Elizabeth F; Blumberg, Daphne D

    2013-01-01

    The Dictyostelium discoideum ampA gene encodes a multifunctional regulator protein that modulates cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions and actin polymerization during growth and is necessary for correct cell type specification and patterning during development. Insertional inactivation of the ampA gene results in defects that define two distinct roles for the ampA gene during development. AmpA is necessary in a non-cell autonomous manner to prevent premature expression of a prespore gene marker. It is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for the anterior like cells, which express the ampA gene, to migrate to the upper cup during culmination. It is also necessary to prevent excessive cell-cell agglutination when cells are developed in a submerged suspension culture. Here, we demonstrate that a supernatant source of AmpA protein, added extracellularly, can prevent the premature mis-expression of the prespore marker. Synthetic oligopeptides are used to identify the domain of the AmpA protein that is important for preventing cells from mis-expressing the prespore gene. We further demonstrate that a factor capable of inducing additional cells to express the prespore gene marker accumulates extracellularly in the absence of AmpA protein. While the secreted AmpA acts extracellularly to suppress prespore gene expression, the effects of AmpA on cell agglutination and on actin polymerization in growing cells are not due to an extracellular role of secreted AmpA protein. Rather, these effects appear to reflect a distinct cell autonomous role of the ampA gene. Finally, we show that secretion of AmpA protein is brought about by elevating the levels of expression of ampA so that the protein accumulates to an excessive level.

  20. Cell-type-specific and differentiation-status-dependent variations in cytotoxicity of tributyltin in cultured rat cerebral neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oyanagi, Koshi; Tashiro, Tomoko; Negishi, Takayuki

    2015-08-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is an organotin used as an anti-fouling agent for fishing nets and ships and it is a widespread environmental contaminant at present. There is an increasing concern about imperceptible but serious adverse effect(s) of exposure to chemicals existing in the environment on various organs and their physiological functions, e.g. brain and mental function. Here, so as to contribute to improvement of and/or advances in in vitro cell-based assay systems for evaluating brain-targeted adverse effect of chemicals, we tried to evaluate cell-type-specific and differentiation-status-dependent variations in the cytotoxicity of TBT towards neurons and astrocytes using the four culture systems differing in the relative abundance of these two types of cells; primary neuron culture (> 95% neurons), primary neuron-astrocyte (2 : 1) mix culture, primary astrocyte culture (> 95% astrocytes), and passaged astrocyte culture (100% proliferative astrocytes). Cell viability was measured at 48 hr after exposure to TBT in serum-free medium. IC50's of TBT were 198 nM in primary neuron culture, 288 nM in primary neuron-astrocyte mix culture, 2001 nM in primary astrocyte culture, and 1989 nM in passaged astrocyte culture. Furthermore, in primary neuron-astrocyte mix culture, vulnerability of neurons cultured along with astrocytes to TBT toxicity was lower than that of neurons cultured purely in primary neuron culture. On the other hand, astrocytes in primary neuron-astrocyte mix culture were considered to be more vulnerable to TBT than those in primary or passaged astrocyte culture. The present study demonstrated variable cytotoxicity of TBT in neural cells depending on the culture condition.

  1. In vitro model for DNA double-strand break repair analysis in breast cancer reveals cell type-specific associations with age and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Miriam; Kaufmann, Julia; Stahl, Andreea; Gundelach, Theresa; Janni, Wolfgang; Hoffmann, Isabell; Keimling, Marlen; Hampp, Stephanie; Ihle, Michaela; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    Dysfunction of homologous recombination is a common denominator of changes associated with breast cancer-predisposing mutations. In our previous work, we identified a functional signature in peripheral blood lymphocytes from women who were predisposed that indicated a shift from homologous recombination to alternative, error-prone DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways. To capture both hereditary and nonhereditary factors, we newly established a protocol for isolation and ex vivo analysis of epithelial cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition cells (EMTs), and fibroblasts from breast cancer specimens (147 patients). By applying a fluorescence-based test system, we analyzed the error-prone DSB repair pathway microhomology-mediated end joining in these tumor-derived cell types and peripheral blood lymphocytes. In parallel, we investigated DNA lesion processing by quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of histone H2AX phosphorylated on Ser139 focus after radiomimetic treatment. Our study reveals elevated histone H2AX phosphorylated on Ser139 damage removal in epithelial cells, not EMTs, and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor sensitivities, which suggested a DSB repair pathway shift with increasing patient age. Of interest, we found elevated microhomology-mediated end joining in EMTs, not epithelial cells, from patients who received a treatment recommendation of adjuvant chemotherapy, that is, those with high-risk tumors. Our discoveries of altered DSB repair activities in cells may serve as a method to further classify breast cancer to predict responsiveness to adjuvant chemotherapy and/or therapeutics that target DSB repair-dysfunctional tumors.-Deniz, M., Kaufmann, J., Stahl, A., Gundelach, T., Janni, W., Hoffmann, I., Keimling, M., Hampp, S., Ihle, M., Wiesmüller, L. In vitro model for DNA double-strand break repair analysis in breast cancer reveals cell type-specific associations with age and prognosis.

  2. Cell-Type-Specific H+-ATPase Activity in Root Tissues Enables K+ Retention and Mediates Acclimation of Barley (Hordeum vulgare) to Salinity Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyi; Pottosin, Igor; Bose, Jayakumar; Zhu, Min; Velarde-Buendia, Ana; Massart, Amandine; Azzarello, Elisa; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    While the importance of cell type specificity in plant adaptive responses is widely accepted, only a limited number of studies have addressed this issue at the functional level. We have combined electrophysiological, imaging, and biochemical techniques to reveal the physiological mechanisms conferring higher sensitivity of apical root cells to salinity in barley (Hordeum vulgare). We show that salinity application to the root apex arrests root growth in a highly tissue- and treatment-specific manner. Although salinity-induced transient net Na+ uptake was about 4-fold higher in the root apex compared with the mature zone, mature root cells accumulated more cytosolic and vacuolar Na+, suggesting that the higher sensitivity of apical cells to salt is not related to either enhanced Na+ exclusion or sequestration inside the root. Rather, the above differential sensitivity between the two zones originates from a 10-fold difference in K+ efflux between the mature zone and the apical region (much poorer in the root apex) of the root. Major factors contributing to this poor K+ retention ability are (1) an intrinsically lower H+-ATPase activity in the root apex, (2) greater salt-induced membrane depolarization, and (3) a higher reactive oxygen species production under NaCl and a larger density of reactive oxygen species-activated cation currents in the apex. Salinity treatment increased (2- to 5-fold) the content of 10 (out of 25 detected) amino acids in the root apex but not in the mature zone and changed the organic acid and sugar contents. The causal link between the observed changes in the root metabolic profile and the regulation of transporter activity is discussed. PMID:27770060

  3. The I4895T Mutation in the Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Induces Fiber-Type Specific Alterations in Skeletal Muscle that Mimic Premature Aging

    PubMed Central

    Boncompagni, Simona; Loy, Ryan E.; Dirksen, Robert T.; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The I4898T (IT) mutation in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is linked to a form of central core disease (CCD) in humans and results in a non leaky channel and excitation-contraction uncoupling. We characterized age- and fiber type-dependent alterations in muscle ultrastructure, as well as the magnitude and spatiotemporal properties of evoked Ca2+ release in heterozygous Ryr1I4895T/WT (IT/+) knock-in mice on a mixed genetic background. The results indicate a classical but mild CCD phenotype that includes muscle weakness and the presence of mitochondrial-deficient areas in type I fibers. Electrically-evoked Ca2+ release is significantly reduced in single FDB fibers from young and old IT/+ mice. Structural changes are strongly fiber type-specific, affecting type I and IIB/IIX fibers in very distinct ways, and sparing type IIA fibers. Ultrastructural alterations in our IT/+ mice are also present in wild type, but at a lower frequency and older ages, suggesting that the disease mutation on the mixed background promotes an acceleration of normal age-dependent changes. The observed functional and structural alterations and their similarity to age-associated changes are entirely consistent with the known properties of the mutated channel, which result in reduced calcium release as is also observed in normal aging muscle. In strong contrast to these observations, a subset of patients with the analogous human heterozygous mutation and IT/+ mice on an inbred 129S2/SvPasCrl background exhibit a more severe disease phenotype, which is not directly consistent with the mutated channel properties. PMID:20961389

  4. Acyl-CoA binding protein expression is fiber type- specific and elevated in muscles from the obese insulin-resistant Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Franch, Jesper; Knudsen, Jens; Ellis, Bronwyn A; Pedersen, Preben K; Cooney, Gregory J; Jensen, Jørgen

    2002-02-01

    Accumulation of acyl-CoA is hypothesized to be involved in development of insulin resistance. Acyl-CoA binds to acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) with high affinity, and therefore knowledge about ACBP concentration is important for interpreting acyl-CoA data. In the present study, we used a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantify ACBP concentration in different muscle fiber types. Furthermore, ACBP concentration was compared in muscles from lean and obese Zucker rats. Expression of ACBP was highest in the slow-twitch oxidative soleus muscle and lowest in the fast-twitch glycolytic white gastrocnemius (0.46 +/- 0.02 and 0.16 +/- 0.005 microg/mg protein, respectively). Expression of ACBP was soleus > red gastrocnemius > extensor digitorum longus > white gastrocnemius. Similar fiber type differences were found for carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT)-1, and a correlation was observed between ACBP and CPT-1. Muscles from obese Zucker rats had twice the triglyceride content, had approximately twice the long-chain acyl CoA content, and were severely insulin resistant. ACBP concentration was approximately 30% higher in all muscles from obese rats. Activities of CPT-1 and 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were increased in muscles from obese rats, whereas citrate synthase activity was similar. In conclusion, ACBP expression is fiber type-specific with the highest concentration in oxidative muscles and the lowest in glycolytic muscles. The 90% increase in the concentration of acyl-CoA in obese Zucker muscle compared with only a 30% increase in the concentration of ACBP supports the hypothesis that an increased concentration of free acyl-CoA is involved in the development of insulin resistance.

  5. Cell-Type-Specific H+-ATPase Activity in Root Tissues Enables K+ Retention and Mediates Acclimation of Barley (Hordeum vulgare) to Salinity Stress.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Lana; Zhang, Jingyi; Pottosin, Igor; Bose, Jayakumar; Zhu, Min; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Velarde-Buendia, Ana; Massart, Amandine; Hill, Camilla Beate; Roessner, Ute; Bacic, Antony; Wu, Honghong; Azzarello, Elisa; Pandolfi, Camilla; Zhou, Meixue; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Mancuso, Stefano; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    While the importance of cell type specificity in plant adaptive responses is widely accepted, only a limited number of studies have addressed this issue at the functional level. We have combined electrophysiological, imaging, and biochemical techniques to reveal the physiological mechanisms conferring higher sensitivity of apical root cells to salinity in barley (Hordeum vulgare). We show that salinity application to the root apex arrests root growth in a highly tissue- and treatment-specific manner. Although salinity-induced transient net Na(+) uptake was about 4-fold higher in the root apex compared with the mature zone, mature root cells accumulated more cytosolic and vacuolar Na(+), suggesting that the higher sensitivity of apical cells to salt is not related to either enhanced Na(+) exclusion or sequestration inside the root. Rather, the above differential sensitivity between the two zones originates from a 10-fold difference in K(+) efflux between the mature zone and the apical region (much poorer in the root apex) of the root. Major factors contributing to this poor K(+) retention ability are (1) an intrinsically lower H(+)-ATPase activity in the root apex, (2) greater salt-induced membrane depolarization, and (3) a higher reactive oxygen species production under NaCl and a larger density of reactive oxygen species-activated cation currents in the apex. Salinity treatment increased (2- to 5-fold) the content of 10 (out of 25 detected) amino acids in the root apex but not in the mature zone and changed the organic acid and sugar contents. The causal link between the observed changes in the root metabolic profile and the regulation of transporter activity is discussed.

  6. Rickettsia rickettsii infection of human macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells reveals activation of both common and cell type-specific host response mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rydkina, Elena; Turpin, Loel C; Sahni, Sanjeev K

    2010-06-01

    Although inflammation and altered barrier functions of the vasculature, due predominantly to the infection of endothelial cell lining of small and medium-sized blood vessels, represent salient pathological features of human rickettsioses, the interactions between pathogenic rickettsiae and microvascular endothelial cells remain poorly understood. We have investigated the activation of nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and secretion of chemokines and prostaglandins after Rickettsia rickettsii infection of human cerebral, dermal, and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in comparison with pulmonary artery cells of macrovascular origin. NF-kappaB and p38 kinase activation and increased HO-1 mRNA expression were clearly evident in all cell types, along with relatively similar susceptibility to R. rickettsii infection in vitro but considerable variations in the intensities/kinetics of the aforementioned host responses. As expected, the overall activation profiles of macrovascular endothelial cells derived from human pulmonary artery and umbilical vein were nearly identical. Interestingly, cerebral endothelial cells displayed a marked refractoriness in chemokine production and secretion, while all other cell types secreted various levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) in response to infection. A unique feature of all microvascular endothelial cells was the lack of induced COX-2 expression and resultant inability to secrete prostaglandin E(2) after R. rickettsii infection. Comparative evaluation thus yields the first experimental evidence for the activation of both common and unique cell type-specific host response mechanisms in macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells infected with R. rickettsii, a prototypical species known to cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever in humans.

  7. Cell-type-specific activity of the human papillomavirus type 18 upstream regulatory region in transgenic mice and its modulation by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, A; Auewarakul, P; Garcia-Carranca, A; Ovseiovich, R; Gaissert, H; Gissmann, L

    1993-01-01

    The upstream regulatory region (URR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) harbors transcriptional promoter and enhancer elements which are thought to determine the cell-type specificity of the virus. In order to study the regulation of HPV-18 expression in vivo, we constructed transgenic mice carrying the bacterial lacZ gene under the control of the HPV-18 URR. Analysis of beta-galactosidase activity by histochemical staining of tissue sections of four independent transgenic mice showed that the viral promoter was specifically active in epithelial cells within a variety of organs (e.g., tongue, ovary, uterus, testis, and small intestine). Very strong staining was observed in newborn transgenic mice in contrast to a weak activity found during fetal life. Determination of beta-galactosidase activity in crude extracts from tissues of three lines of transgenic mice proved to be a useful tool for a quantitative analysis of transgene expression. In mice from two different transgenic lines treated with dexamethasone such measurements revealed a biphasic effect of the hormone on the activity of the enzyme in the stratified epithelium of the tongue (transient increase followed by a decrease). Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed similar changes in beta-galactosidase mRNA in that tissue. Treatment with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) led to a twofold increase in both enzymatic activity and mRNA levels. Finally, combined treatments with dexamethasone and TPA showed that both factors interfered with each other in their respective effects on transgene expression, suggesting that a cross-talk mechanism between transcription factors could be involved in the regulation of the HPV-18 URR. Images PMID:8411377

  8. p53 shapes genome-wide and cell type-specific changes in microRNA expression during the human DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Janky, Rekin's; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Aerts, Stein; Madan Babu, M; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2014-01-01

    The human DNA damage response (DDR) triggers profound changes in gene expression, whose nature and regulation remain uncertain. Although certain micro-(mi)RNA species including miR34, miR-18, miR-16 and miR-143 have been implicated in the DDR, there is as yet no comprehensive description of genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs triggered by DNA breakage in human cells. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with rigorous integrative computational analyses, to describe genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs during the human DDR. The changes affect 150 of 1523 miRNAs known in miRBase v18 from 4-24 h after the induction of DNA breakage, in cell-type dependent patterns. The regulatory regions of the most-highly regulated miRNA species are enriched in conserved binding sites for p53. Indeed, genome-wide changes in miRNA expression during the DDR are markedly altered in TP53-/- cells compared to otherwise isogenic controls. The expression levels of certain damage-induced, p53-regulated miRNAs in cancer samples correlate with patient survival. Our work reveals genome-wide and cell type-specific alterations in miRNA expression during the human DDR, which are regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. These findings provide a genomic resource to identify new molecules and mechanisms involved in the DDR, and to examine their role in tumor suppression and the clinical outcome of cancer patients.

  9. Identification of common and cell type specific LXXLL motif EcR cofactors using a bioinformatics refined candidate RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During Drosophila development, titers of the steroid ecdysone trigger and maintain temporal and tissue specific biological transitions. Decades of evidence reveal that the ecdysone response is both unique to specific tissues and distinct among developmental timepoints. To achieve this diversity in response, the several isoforms of the Ecdysone Receptor, which transduce the hormone signal to the genome level, are believed to interact with tissue specific cofactors. To date, little is known about the identity of these cofactor interactions; therefore, we conducted a bioinformatics informed, RNAi luciferase reporter screen against a subset of putative candidate cofactors identified through an in silico proteome screen. Candidates were chosen based on criteria obtained from bioinformatic consensus of known nuclear receptor cofactors and homologs, including amino acid sequence motif content and context. Results The bioinformatics pre-screen of the Drosophila melanogaster proteome was successful in identifying an enriched putative candidate gene cohort. Over 80% of the genes tested yielded a positive hit in our reporter screen. We have identified both cell type specific and common cofactors which appear to be necessary for proper ecdysone induced gene regulation. We have determined that certain cofactors act as co-repressors to reduce target gene expression, while others act as co-activators to increase target gene expression. Interestingly, we find that a few of the cofactors shared among cell types have a reversible roles to function as co-repressors in certain cell types while in other cell types they serve as co-activators. Lastly, these proteins are highly conserved, with higher order organism homologs also harboring the LXXLL steroid receptor interaction domains, suggesting a highly conserved mode of steroid cell target specificity. Conclusions In conclusion, we submit these cofactors as novel components of the ecdysone signaling pathway in order to

  10. Promoters with the octamer DNA motif (ATGCAAAT) can be ubiquitous or cell type-specific depending on binding affinity of the octamer site and Oct-factor concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Kemler, I; Bucher, E; Seipel, K; Müller-Immerglück, M M; Schaffner, W

    1991-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene promoters contain the octamer sequence motif ATGCAAAT which is recognized by cellular transcription factors (Oct factors). Besides the ubiquitous Oct-1 factor, there is also a group of related factors (Oct-2 factors) encoded by a separate gene. The Oct-2 gene is regulated in a cell-type specific manner, and the protein is present in large amounts in B lymphocytes. We have previously shown that simple composite promoters of an octamer/TATA box type are poorly active in non-B cells but are strongly responsive to ectopic expression of Oct-2A factor, a major representative of the lymphocyte Oct-2 factors. In the present study we have tested the activity of a number of composite promoters and natural Ig promoters, and their response to Oct-1 and Oct-2 factors. Unexpectedly, we find that octamer/TATA promoters with a high affinity octamer site direct ubiquitous expression. By contrast, promoter constructions that behave in a B cell-specific manner tend to have a weak octamer binding site. These promoters are responsive to ectopic expression of additional Oct-factor, irrespective of whether it is Oct-1 or Oct-2. Using natural Ig promoters rather than composite promoters, we find that an IgH promoter is well transcribed in non-B cells via the ubiquitous Oct-1 factor, while Ig kappa and Ig lambda light chain promoters require additional Oct factor for maximal expression. It seems therefore likely that during B cell differentiation, Ig heavy chain promoters can be activated by Oct-1, before the appearance of Oct-2 factors. Oct-2 factors then would serve to boost the expression from Ig light chain promoters, which are known to be activated only after successful heavy chain gene rearrangement. Images PMID:2014164

  11. Human papillomavirus infections in Mexican women with normal cytology, precancerous lesions, and cervical cancer: type-specific prevalence and HPV coinfections.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Salgado-Bernabé, Manuel Eduardo; Ramos-González, Norma Patricia; Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Arias-Flores, Rafael; Medina-Díaz, Irma M; Hernández-Garza, Fernando; Santos-López, Gerardo; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence and genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) provides the basis for designing HPV prevention programs. The prevalence rates of type-specific HPV and coinfections in samples of Mexican women were investigated in 822 women aged 18-87 years. HPV detection was performed using a Linear Array™ genotyping test. HPV infection was found in 12.4% of controls, 46.3% of those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 1, and 100% of those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 or cervical cancer. HPV 16 was the most prevalent type in all diagnosis groups. The HPV types most frequently found in cervical cancers were 16, 18, 45, 52, 58, and 39; HPV types 16, 62, 51, 84, 18, 53, and CP6108 were the most prevalent in control women. Considering HPV-positive samples only, coinfections occurred most often in controls (63%) and were less frequent in those with cervical cancer (26%). The most frequent viral types in coinfections with HPV 16 in control women were HPV 62, 51, and 84; in women with cervical cancers, HPV 18, 39, and 70 were most common. In conclusion, in addition to HPV types 16 and 18, types 45, 39, 58, 52, and 71 were found in cervical cancers in Mexican women (78%); among them, only 65% were attributable to HPV types 16 and 18. Therefore, it is necessary to consider these viral types in the design of new vaccines, and to determine whether certain HPV types coinfecting with HPV 16 in precursor lesions determine tumor progression or regression.

  12. Antigen-Presenting Cells and Antigen Presentation in Tertiary Lymphoid Organs

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Catherine E.; Benson, Robert A.; Bedaj, Marija; Maffia, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs) form in territorialized niches of peripheral tissues characterized by the presence of antigens; however, little is known about mechanism(s) of antigen handling by ectopic lymphoid structures. In this mini review, we will discuss the role of antigen-presenting cells and mechanisms of antigen presentation in TLOs, summarizing what is currently known about this facet of the formation and function of these tissues as well as identifying questions yet to be addressed. PMID:27872626

  13. Host antigens on avian oncoviruses: evidence for virus envelope antigens related to specific chicken erythrocyte membrane antigens.

    PubMed

    Aupoix, M; Vigier, P; Blanchet, J P

    1980-01-01

    Avian sarcoma viruses (ASV) of subgroups A to D, produced by chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), are inactivated to a high degree by rabbit antisera to the membrane antigens of adult chicken and chick embryo erythrocytes, notably by antisera to an antigen of embryo erythrocytes, which is lost by adult erythrocytes and to another antigen specific to the latter erythrocytes. Contrary to virus inactivation by anti-CEF serum reported earlier, virus inactivation by the antisera to these two age-specific antigens does not require complement and is not paralleled by virolysis but by aggregation of virions. The two antigens related, or identical, to the age-specific erythrocyte membrane antigens thus shown to be present on the virus envelope do not pre-exist, or pre-exist only in a low amount, on the CEF membrane, since the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is not removed by absorption with CEF. Their appearance on the virus does not depend on cell transformation but only on infection, since both antigens are found on a ts ASV mutant produced at restrictive temperature by untransformed CEF and the virus-inactivating capacity of their antisera is removed by absorption with CEF infected with Rous-associated virus (RAV-1). These findings suggest that infection of CEF by avian oncoviruses may elicit the appearance, or enhance the expression at the cell surface of antigens characteristic of another cell type which may contribute to the formation of specific virus budding sites.

  14. Evidence for horizontal gene transfer of two antigenically distinct O antigens in Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antigenic variation is one mechanism pathogens use to avoid immune-mediated competition between closely related strains. Here, we show that two Bordetella bronchiseptica strains, RB50 and 1289, express two antigenically distinct O-antigen serotypes (O1 and O2 respectively). When 18 additional B. b...

  15. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  16. A computational framework for influenza antigenic cartography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2010-10-07

    Influenza viruses have been responsible for large losses of lives around the world and continue to present a great public health challenge. Antigenic characterization based on hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay is one of the routine procedures for influenza vaccine strain selection. However, HI assay is only a crude experiment reflecting the antigenic correlations among testing antigens (viruses) and reference antisera (antibodies). Moreover, antigenic characterization is usually based on more than one HI dataset. The combination of multiple datasets results in an incomplete HI matrix with many unobserved entries. This paper proposes a new computational framework for constructing an influenza antigenic cartography from this incomplete matrix, which we refer to as Matrix Completion-Multidimensional Scaling (MC-MDS). In this approach, we first reconstruct the HI matrices with viruses and antibodies using low-rank matrix completion, and then generate the two-dimensional antigenic cartography using multidimensional scaling. Moreover, for influenza HI tables with herd immunity effect (such as those from Human influenza viruses), we propose a temporal model to reduce the inherent temporal bias of HI tables caused by herd immunity. By applying our method in HI datasets containing H3N2 influenza A viruses isolated from 1968 to 2003, we identified eleven clusters of antigenic variants, representing all major antigenic drift events in these 36 years. Our results showed that both the completed HI matrix and the antigenic cartography obtained via MC-MDS are useful in identifying influenza antigenic variants and thus can be used to facilitate influenza vaccine strain selection. The webserver is available at http://sysbio.cvm.msstate.edu/AntigenMap.

  17. Intestinal Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiota that populate the mammalian intestine are critical for proper host physiology, yet simultaneously pose a potential danger. Intestinal antigen-presenting cells, namely macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs), are integral components of the mucosal innate immune system that maintain co-existence with the microbiota in face of this constant threat. Intestinal macrophages and DCs integrate signals from the microenvironment to orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses that ultimately lead to durable tolerance of the microbiota. Tolerance is not a default response, however, because macrophages and DCs remain poised to vigorously respond to pathogens that breach the epithelial barrier. In this review, we summarize the salient features of macrophages and DCs in the healthy and inflamed intestine and discuss how signals from the microbiota can influence their function. PMID:25976247

  18. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  19. Mapping Mammalian Cell-type-specific Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq Data in the TC-YIK Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lizio, Marina; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hasegawa, Akira; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Severin, Jessica; Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK) which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs) and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5), we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD), we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE). The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), and ISL1, and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6, and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 50 kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e., TF-TF only), NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1, and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6, and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting Ch

  20. Regulation of the human cardiac/slow-twitch troponin C gene by multiple, cooperative, cell-type-specific, and MyoD-responsive elements.

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, T H; Prentice, H; Gahlmann, R; Kedes, L

    1993-01-01

    The cardiac troponin C (cTnC) gene produces identical transcripts in slow-twitch skeletal muscle and in heart muscle (R. Gahlmann, R. Wade, P. Gunning, and L. Kedes, J. Mol. Biol. 201:379-391, 1988). A separate gene encodes the fast-twitch skeletal muscle troponin C and is not expressed in heart muscle. We have used transient transfection to characterize the regulatory elements responsible for skeletal and cardiac cell-type-specific expression of the human cTnC (HcTnC) gene. At least four separate elements cooperate to confer tissue-specific expression of this gene in differentiated myotubes; a basal promoter (between -61 and -13) augments transcription 9-fold, upstream major regulatory sequences (between -68 and -142 and between -1319 and -4500) augment transcription as much as 39-fold, and at least two enhancer-like elements in the first intron (between +58 and +1028 and between +1029 and +1523) independently augment transcription 4- to 5-fold. These enhancers in the first intron increase myotube-specific chloramphenicol acetyltransferase activity when linked to their own promoter elements or to the heterologous simian virus 40 promoter, and the effects are multiplicative rather than additive. Each of the major myotube regulatory regions is capable of responding directly or indirectly to the myogenic determination factor, MyoD.A MyoD expression vector in 10T1/2 cells induced constructs carrying either the upstream HcTnC promoter elements or the first intron of the gene 300- to 500-fold. Expression was inhibited by cotransfection with Id, a negative regulator of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. The basal promoter contains five tandem TGGGC repeats that interact with Sp1 or an Sp1-like factor in nuclear extracts. Mutational analysis of this element demonstrated that two of the five repeat sequences were sufficient to support basal level muscle cell-specific transcription. Whereas the basal promoter is also critical for expression in cardiac myocytes

  1. Comparison of oncogenic HPV type-specific viral DNA load and E6/E7 mRNA detection in cervical samples: results from a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Broccolo, Francesco; Fusetti, Lisa; Rosini, Sandra; Caraceni, Donatella; Zappacosta, Roberta; Ciccocioppo, Lucia; Matteoli, Barbara; Halfon, Philippe; Malnati, Mauro S; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca

    2013-03-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) genotype viral load and E6/E7 mRNA detection are proposed as surrogate markers of malignant cervical lesion progression. Currently, the use of commercially available DNA-based or mRNA-based tests is under investigation. In this study, the viral DNA load and E6/E7 mRNA detection of the five most common HR-HPV types detected in cervical cancer worldwide were compared in 308 cervical samples by using in-house type-specific quantitative real-time PCR assays and PreTect HPV-Proofer test, respectively. Sensitivity and negative predictive values were higher for the HPV-DNA assays combined (95.0% and 96.0%, respectively) than the RNA assays (77.0% and 88.0%, respectively); conversely, the mRNA test showed a higher specificity and higher positive predictive value (81.7% and 66.9%, respectively) than the DNA test (58.6% and 52.5%, respectively) for detecting histology-confirmed high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. A significantly higher association between viral DNA load and severity of disease was observed for HPV 16 and 31 (γ = 0.62 and γ = 0.40, respectively) than for the other HPV types screened. A good degree of association between the two assays was found for detection of HPV 16 (k = 0.83), HPV 18 (k = 0.72), HPV 33 (k = 0.66), and HPV 45 (k = 0.60) but not for HPV 31 (k = 0.24). Sequence analysis in L1 and E6-LCR regions of HPV 31 genotypes showed a high level of intra-type variation. HR-HPV viral DNA load was significantly higher in E6/E7 mRNA positive than negative samples (P < 0.001), except for HPV 31. These findings suggest that transcriptional and replicative activities can coexist within the same sample.

  2. Cell-type-specific sub- and suprathreshold receptive fields of layer 4 and layer 2/3 pyramids in rat primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Medini, P

    2011-09-08

    Connectivity of cortical pyramidal neurons is layer-specific in the primary visual cortex (V1) and this is thought to be reflected in different receptive field (RF) properties of layer 4 and layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons (L4Ps and L2/3Ps, respectively). However, it remains unclear how the two cell populations convert incoming visually driven synaptic inputs into action potential (AP) outputs. Here I compared postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) and AP responses of L4Ps and L2/3Ps in the binocular portion of rat V1 by intrinsic optical imaging (IOI)-targeted whole-cell recordings followed by anatomical identification and dendritic reconstructions. L2/3Ps had about 2-fold longer dendritic branches and a higher number of branch points and endings in their apical portions. Functionally, L2/3Ps had more hyperpolarized resting potentials and lower rates of spontaneous APs (medians: 0.07 vs. 0.60 AP/s). PSP responses to optimally oriented moving bars were comparable in terms of amplitude (16.0±0.9 vs. 17.3±1.1 mV for L2/3Ps and L4Ps, respectively), reliability and size of the RF. The modulated component of subthreshold responses of L4Ps to optimal sinusoidal drifting gratings was larger and their PSP onset latency in response to bars flashed in the cell's RF center were shorter (60 vs. 86 ms). In contrast to the similarities of PSP responses to moving bars, AP responses of L2/3Ps were more sparse (medians: 0.7 vs. 2.9 APs/stimulus passage), less reliable, but sharper in terms of angular size. Based on the differences of subthreshold inputs, I conclude that L4Ps may receive mostly thalamic inputs, whereas L2/3Ps may receive both thalamic and cortical inputs from layer 4. The comparable subthreshold responses to moving bars are converted by L2/3Ps into sparser but sharper AP outputs possibly by cell-type-specific AP-generating mechanisms or differences in visually driven inhibitory inputs.

  3. Type-specific inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor localization in the vomeronasal organ and its interaction with a transient receptor potential channel, TRPC2

    PubMed Central

    Brann, Jessica H.; Dennis, John C.; Morrison, Edward E.; Fadool, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor portion of the accessory olfactory system and transduces chemical cues that identify social hierarchy, reproductive status, conspecifics and prey. Signal transduction in VNO neurons is apparently accomplished via an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-activated calcium conductance that includes a different set of G proteins than those identified in vertebrate olfactory sensory neurons. We used immunohistochemical (IHC) and SDS–PAGE/western analysis to localize three IP3 receptors (IP3R) in the rat VNO epithelium. Type-I IP3R expression was weak or absent. Antisera for type-II and -III IP3R recognized appropriate molecular weight proteins by SDS–PAGE, and labeled protein could be abolished by pre-adsorption of the respective antibody with antigenic peptide. In tissue sections, type-II IP3R immunoreactivity was present in the supporting cell zone but not in the sensory cell zone. Type-III IP3R immunoreactivity was present throughout the sensory zone and overlapped that of transient receptor potential channel 2 (TRPC2) in the microvillar layer of sensory epithelium. Co-immunoprecipitation of type-III IP3R and TRPC2 from VNO lysates confirmed the overlapping immunoreactivity patterns. The protein–protein interaction complex between type-III IP3R and TRPC2 could initiate calcium signaling leading to electrical signal production in VNO neurons. PMID:12472899

  4. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains.

  5. Tumor antigens as related to pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Douglass, H O

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented suggesting the presence of pancreas tumor-associated antigens. Slow progress has been made during the past few years in the identification of pancreatic tumor antigens that may be of clinical usefulness and it seems unlikely that many of the practical problems now being faced in identification and isolation of these antigens and in development of a specific, sensitive assay will be solved by conventional immunochemical approaches. The study of antigen and/or antibody purified from immune complexes in the host and the application of leukocyte adherence inhibition techniques to immunodiagnosis of pancreatic cancer are among the new approaches that may provide effective alternatives in the study of pancreatic tumor antigens.

  6. CD1 antigen presentation: how it works.

    PubMed

    Barral, Duarte C; Brenner, Michael B

    2007-12-01

    The classic concept of self-non-self discrimination by the immune system focused on the recognition of fragments from proteins presented by classical MHC molecules. However, the discovery of MHC-class-I-like CD1 antigen-presentation molecules now explains how the immune system also recognizes the abundant and diverse universe of lipid-containing antigens. The CD1 molecules bind and present amphipathic lipid antigens for recognition by T-cell receptors. Here, we outline the recent advances in our understanding of how the processes of CD1 assembly, trafficking, lipid-antigen binding and T-cell activation are achieved and the new insights into how lipid antigens differentially elicit CD1-restricted innate and adaptive T-cell responses.

  7. Antigenicity of two turkey astrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Saif, Y M

    2004-12-01

    Astroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. These viruses cause gastroenteritis in humans and in a variety of animal species, including turkey poults. Only human astroviruses are well characterized antigenically. In the current study, two turkey astrovirus isolates, TAstV1987 and TAstV2001, were antigenically compared using cross-neutralization tests in turkey embryos, as well as cross-reactivity of the two isolates by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The antigenic relatedness values (R) were calculated using the Archetti and Horsfall formula. The R value based on the cross-neutralization tests was 0.56%, which indicates that TAstV1987 and TAstV2001 belong to different serotypes; the R value of the two viruses based on ELISA was 70.7%, which suggests these two viruses share common antigen(s).

  8. Calcium-dependent antigen binding as a novel modality for antibody recycling by endosomal antigen dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hironiwa, N; Ishii, S; Kadono, S; Iwayanagi, Y; Mimoto, F; Habu, K; Igawa, T; Hattori, K

    2016-01-01

    The pH-dependent antigen binding antibody, termed a recycling antibody, has recently been reported as an attractive type of second-generation engineered therapeutic antibody. A recycling antibody can dissociate antigen in the acidic endosome, and thus bind to its antigen multiple times. As a consequence, a recycling antibody can neutralize large amounts of antigen in plasma. Because this approach relies on histidine residues to achieve pH-dependent antigen binding, which could limit the epitopes that can be targeted and affect the rate of antigen dissociation in the endosome, we explored an alternative approach for generating recycling antibodies. Since calcium ion concentration is known to be lower in endosome than in plasma, we hypothesized that an antibody with antigen-binding properties that are calcium-dependent could be used as recycling antibody. Here, we report a novel anti-interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R) antibody, identified from a phage library that binds to IL-6R only in the presence of a calcium ion. Thermal dynamics and a crystal structure study revealed that the calcium ion binds to the heavy chain CDR3 region (HCDR3), which changes and possibly stabilizes the structure of HCDR3 to make it bind to antigen calcium dependently (PDB 5AZE). In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that this calcium-dependent antigen-binding antibody can dissociate its antigen in the endosome and accelerate antigen clearance from plasma, making it a novel approach for generating recycling antibody.

  9. Diverse Endogenous Antigens for Mouse Natural Killer T Cells: Self-Antigens That Are Not Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Bo; Speak, Anneliese O; Shepherd, Dawn; Butters, Terry; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer T cells with an invariant antigen receptor (iNKT cells) represent a highly conserved and unique subset of T lymphocytes having properties of innate and adaptive immune cells. They have been reported to regulate a variety of immune responses, including the response to cancers and the development of autoimmunity. The development and activation of iNKT cells is dependent on self-antigens presented by the CD1d antigen-presenting molecule. It is widely believed that these self-antigens are glycosphingolipids (GSLs), molecules that contain ceramide as the lipid backbone. Here we used a variety of methods to show that mammalian antigens for mouse iNKT cells need not be GSLs, including the use of cell lines deficient in GSL biosynthesis and an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis. Presentation of these antigens required the expression of CD1d molecules that could traffic to late endosomes, the site where self-antigen is acquired. Extracts of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) contain a self-antigen that could stimulate iNKT cells when added to plates coated with soluble, recombinant CD1d molecules. The antigen(s) in these extracts are resistant to sphingolipid-specific hydrolase digestion, consistent with the results using live APCs. Lyosphosphatidylcholine, a potential self-antigen that activated human iNKT cell lines, did not activate mouse iNKT cell hybridomas. Our data indicate that there may be more than one type of self-antigen for iNKT cells, that the self-antigens comparing mouse and human may not be conserved, and that the search to identify these molecules should not be confined to GSLs. PMID:21191069

  10. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  11. Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens

    PubMed Central

    Christmann, Benjamin S.; Abrahamsson, Thomas R.; Bernstein, Charles N.; Duck, L. Wayne; Mannon, Peter J.; Berg, Göran; Björkstén, Bengt; Jenmalm, Maria C.; Elson, Charles O.

    2015-01-01

    Background While immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response to the immune response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods Human serum was collected from adults and from children followed from birth to seven years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed using a novel protein microarray. Results Nearly every individual tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age, and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic individuals. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota may be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:26014812

  12. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Antigenic Convergence

    PubMed Central

    Campo, David S.; Dimitrova, Zoya; Yokosawa, Jonny; Hoang, Duc; Perez, Nestor O.; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Khudyakov, Yury

    2012-01-01

    Vaccine development against hepatitis C virus (HCV) is hindered by poor understanding of factors defining cross-immunoreactivity among heterogeneous epitopes. Using synthetic peptides and mouse immunization as a model, we conducted a quantitative analysis of cross-immunoreactivity among variants of the HCV hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Analysis of 26,883 immunological reactions among pairs of peptides showed that the distribution of cross-immunoreactivity among HVR1 variants was skewed, with antibodies against a few variants reacting with all tested peptides. The HVR1 cross-immunoreactivity was accurately modeled based on amino acid sequence alone. The tested peptides were mapped in the HVR1 sequence space, which was visualized as a network of 11,319 sequences. The HVR1 variants with a greater network centrality showed a broader cross-immunoreactivity. The entire sequence space is explored by each HCV genotype and subtype. These findings indicate that HVR1 antigenic diversity is extensively convergent and effectively limited, suggesting significant implications for vaccine development. PMID:22355779

  14. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies. PMID:26862167

  15. Serum immunoglobulin levels in Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Peters, C. J.; Johnson, K. M.

    1972-01-01

    Ig levels were determined by radial immunodiffusion in uncomplicated cases of acute hepatitis with or without Australia antigenaemia. Initial sera from Australia antigen negative cases showed a striking elevation in IgM levels when compared to Australia antigen positive cases (6·5 versus 1·9 mg/ml). None of twenty-four Australia antigen positive cases exceeded 3 mg/ml IgM, and only 3/58 Australia antigen negative cases exhibited values below 3 mg/ml. Intial sera from Australia antigen positive and Australia antigen negative subjects did not differ in concentration of IgG, IgA, or IgD. Serial determinations of IgG revealed a transient fall in patients with Australia antigen positive hepatitis, and a rise in Australia antigen negative cases. Asymptomatic, Australia antigen positive, Guaymi Indian subjects were compared to matched Australia antigen negative controls from the same indigenous group and no differences in the concentration of IgG, IgM, IgA or IgD were found, although elevations of IgG and IgM were common in both groups. No evidence of abnormal proteins was found when sera were tested by cellulose acetate electrophoresis or by immunoelectrophoresis versus immunoglobulin-specific antisera. Ultracentrifugal analysis failed to detect `7S' IgM. PMID:4625396

  16. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    DOE PAGES

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. Thismore » “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.« less

  17. Antigen clasping by two antigen-binding sites of an exceptionally specific antibody for histone methylation

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Takamitsu; Lai, Darson; Dementieva, Irina S.; Montaño, Sherwin P.; Kurosawa, Kohei; Zheng, Yupeng; Akin, Louesa R.; Świst-Rosowska, Kalina M.; Grzybowski, Adrian T.; Koide, Akiko; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Koide, Shohei

    2016-02-09

    Antibodies have a well-established modular architecture wherein the antigen-binding site residing in the antigen-binding fragment (Fab or Fv) is an autonomous and complete unit for antigen recognition. Here, we describe antibodies departing from this paradigm. We developed recombinant antibodies to trimethylated lysine residues on histone H3, important epigenetic marks and challenging targets for molecular recognition. Quantitative characterization demonstrated their exquisite specificity and high affinity, and they performed well in common epigenetics applications. Surprisingly, crystal structures and biophysical analyses revealed that two antigen-binding sites of these antibodies form a head-to-head dimer and cooperatively recognize the antigen in the dimer interface. This “antigen clasping” produced an expansive interface where trimethylated Lys bound to an unusually extensive aromatic cage in one Fab and the histone N terminus to a pocket in the other, thereby rationalizing the high specificity. A long-neck antibody format with a long linker between the antigen-binding module and the Fc region facilitated antigen clasping and achieved both high specificity and high potency. Antigen clasping substantially expands the paradigm of antibody–antigen recognition and suggests a strategy for developing extremely specific antibodies.

  18. Antigen affinity and antigen dose exert distinct influences on CD4 T-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keck, Simone; Schmaler, Mathias; Ganter, Stefan; Wyss, Lena; Oberle, Susanne; Huseby, Eric S; Zehn, Dietmar; King, Carolyn G

    2014-10-14

    Cumulative T-cell receptor signal strength and ensuing T-cell responses are affected by both antigen affinity and antigen dose. Here we examined the distinct contributions of these parameters to CD4 T-cell differentiation during infection. We found that high antigen affinity positively correlates with T helper (Th)1 differentiation at both high and low doses of antigen. In contrast, follicular helper T cell (TFH) effectors are generated after priming with high, intermediate, and low affinity ligand. Unexpectedly, memory T cells generated after priming with very low affinity antigen remain impaired in their ability to generate secondary Th1 effectors, despite being recalled with high affinity antigen. These data challenge the view that only strongly stimulated CD4 T cells are capable of differentiating into the TFH and memory T-cell compartments and reveal that differential strength of stimulation during primary T-cell activation imprints unique and long lasting T-cell differentiation programs.

  19. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  20. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  1. Antigen presentation by Hodgkin's disease cells.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R I; Cossman, J; Diehl, V; Volkman, D J

    1985-11-01

    The L428 tumor cell line is a long-term tissue culture of Reed-Sternberg cells which was derived from the pleural effusion of a patient with Hodgkin's disease. The L428 cells express all known cell surface antigens, cytochemical staining, and cytologic features of freshly explanted Reed-Sternberg cells. In addition to the previously described HLA-DR cell surface antigens, the L428 cells are now demonstrated to express both DS and SB alloantigens. Thus, the L428 cells express all of the known subclasses of the human immune response genes that are located in the major histocompatibility complex. Furthermore, the L428 cells are capable of presenting soluble antigen to T cells in a genetically restricted fashion. T cell lines were established from normal donors previously immunized with tetanus toxoid. The T cells utilized were incapable of tetanus toxoid-induced proliferation unless antigen-presenting cells were added to the cultures. However, T cells from the two normal donors, which like the L428 cells expressed HLA-DR 5, demonstrated significant proliferative responses when cultured with tetanus toxoid and L428 cells. No proliferative response was observed when the L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells for a DR (4,-), DR (2,-) or DR (1,7) T cell line. The tetanus toxoid dose-response curve was similar regardless of whether autologous mononuclear leukocytes or L428 cells were used as antigen-presenting cells. The T cell proliferation induced by soluble antigen was also blocked by anti-HLA-DR antibody. Thus, functionally, Hodgkin's disease may be classified as a tumor of antigen-presenting cells.

  2. Triiodothyronine regulates angiogenic growth factor and cytokine secretion by isolated human decidual cells in a cell-type specific and gestational age-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Vasilopoulou, E.; Loubière, L.S.; Lash, G.E.; Ohizua, O.; McCabe, C.J.; Franklyn, J.A.; Kilby, M.D.; Chan, S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    , TRβ1) required for thyroid hormone-responsiveness in uNK cells and macrophages from the first trimester. The viability of total decidual cells and the different cell isolates were unaffected by T3 so changes in cell numbers could not account for any observed effects. In the first trimester, T3 decreased VEGF-A secretion by total decidual cells (P < 0.05) and increased angiopoietin-2 secretion by stromal-depleted cells (P < 0.05) but in the second trimester total decidual cells showed only increased angiogenin secretion (P < 0.05). In the first trimester, T3 reduced IL-10 secretion by total decidual cells (P < 0.05), and reduced granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (P < 0.01), IL-8 (P < 0.05), IL-10 (P < 0.01), IL-1β (P < 0.05) and monocyte chemotactic protein -1 (P < 0.001) secretion by macrophages, but increased tumour necrosis factor-α secretion by stromal-depleted cells (P < 0.05) and increased IL-6 by uNK cells (P < 0.05). In contrast, in the second trimester T3 increased IL-10 secretion by total decidual cells (P < 0.01) but did not affect cytokine secretion by uNK cells and macrophages. Conditioned media from first trimester T3-treated total decidual cells and macrophages did not alter EVT invasion compared with untreated controls. Thus, treatment of decidual cells with T3 resulted in changes in both angiogenic growth factor and cytokine secretion in a cell type-specific and gestational age-dependent manner, with first trimester decidual macrophages being the most responsive to T3 treatment, but these changes in decidual cell secretome did not affect EVT invasion in vitro. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION Our results are based on in vitro findings and we cannot be certain if a similar response occurs in human pregnancy in vivo. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Optimal maternal thyroid hormone concentrations could play a critical role in maintaining a balanced inflammatory response in early pregnancy to prevent fetal immune rejection and promote

  3. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric P; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E; Chan, Ying N; Lai, Jennifer I; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2015-10-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain.

  4. Computer aided selection of candidate vaccine antigens

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Immunoinformatics is an emergent branch of informatics science that long ago pullulated from the tree of knowledge that is bioinformatics. It is a discipline which applies informatic techniques to problems of the immune system. To a great extent, immunoinformatics is typified by epitope prediction methods. It has found disappointingly limited use in the design and discovery of new vaccines, which is an area where proper computational support is generally lacking. Most extant vaccines are not based around isolated epitopes but rather correspond to chemically-treated or attenuated whole pathogens or correspond to individual proteins extract from whole pathogens or correspond to complex carbohydrate. In this chapter we attempt to review what progress there has been in an as-yet-underexplored area of immunoinformatics: the computational discovery of whole protein antigens. The effective development of antigen prediction methods would significantly reduce the laboratory resource required to identify pathogenic proteins as candidate subunit vaccines. We begin our review by placing antigen prediction firmly into context, exploring the role of reverse vaccinology in the design and discovery of vaccines. We also highlight several competing yet ultimately complementary methodological approaches: sub-cellular location prediction, identifying antigens using sequence similarity, and the use of sophisticated statistical approaches for predicting the probability of antigen characteristics. We end by exploring how a systems immunomics approach to the prediction of immunogenicity would prove helpful in the prediction of antigens. PMID:21067543

  5. Microscale purification of antigen-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Eric P.; Normandin, Erica; Osei-Owusu, Nana Yaw; Mahan, Alison E.; Chan, Ying N.; Lai, Jennifer I.; Vaccari, Monica; Rao, Mangala; Franchini, Genoveffa; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of the Fc domain is an important driver of antibody effector function. While assessment of antibody glycoform compositions observed across total plasma IgG has identified differences associated with a variety of clinical conditions, in many cases it is the glycosylation state of only antibodies against a specific antigen or set of antigens that may be of interest, for example, in defining the potential effector function of antibodies produced during disease or after vaccination. Historically, glycoprofiling such antigen-specific antibodies in clinical samples has been challenging due to their low prevalence, the high sample requirement for most methods of glycan determination, and the lack of high-throughput purification methods. New methods of glycoprofiling with lower sample requirements and higher throughput have motivated the development of microscale and automatable methods for purification of antigen-specific antibodies from polyclonal sources such as clinical serum samples. In this work, we present a robot-compatible 96-well plate-based method for purification of antigen-specific antibodies, suitable for such population level glycosylation screening. We demonstrate the utility of this method across multiple antibody sources, using both purified plasma IgG and plasma, and across multiple different antigen types, with enrichment factors greater than 1000-fold observed. Using an on-column IdeS protease treatment, we further describe staged release of Fc and Fab domains, allowing for glycoprofiling of each domain. PMID:26078040

  6. Murine cell-mediated immune response recognizes an enterovirus group-specific antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Beck, M A; Tracy, S M

    1989-01-01

    Splenocytes taken from mice inoculated with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) (Nancy) developed an in vitro proliferative response against CVB3 antigen. This response could not be detected earlier than 8 days postinoculation but could be detected up to 28 days after exposure to CB3. CVB3-sensitized splenocytes responded not only to the CVB3 antigen but to other enteroviruses as well. This response was found to be enterovirus specific in that no response was detected to a non-enteroviral picornavirus, encephalomyocarditis virus, or to an unrelated influenza virus. The generation of a splenocyte population capable of responding to an enterovirus group antigen(s) was not limited to inoculation of mice with CVB3, as similar responses were generated when mice were inoculated with CVB2. Cell subset depletions revealed that the major cell type responding to the enterovirus group antigen(s) was the CD4+ T cell. Current evidence suggests that the group antigen(s) resides in the structural proteins of the virus, since spleen cells from mice inoculated with a UV-inactivated, highly purified preparation of CVB3 virions also responded in vitro against enteroviral antigens. PMID:2476566

  7. TL antigen as a transplantation antigen recognized by TL-restricted cytotoxic T cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to broadly expressed classical class I antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, structurally closely related TL antigens are expressed in a highly restricted fashion. Unlike classical class I antigens, TL antigens are not known to be targets of cytotoxic T cells or to mediate graft rejection. Whereas classical class I antigens function as antigen-presenting molecules to T cell receptors (TCR), the role of TL is yet to be defined. To elucidate the function of TL, we have derived transgenic mice expressing TL in most tissues including skin by introducing a TL gene, T3b of C57BL/6 mouse origin, driven by the H-2Kb promoter. By grafting the skin of transgenic mice, we demonstrate that TL can serve as a transplantation antigen and mediate a TCR-alpha/beta+ CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response. This T cell recognition of TL does not require antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. Furthermore, we show that C57BL/6 F1 mice develop CD8+ T cells that are cytotoxic for C57BL/6 TL+ leukemia cells, providing further support for the concept that aberrantly expressed nonmutated proteins such as TL can be recognized as tumor antigens. PMID:8113675

  8. Antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccines of various antigenic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K M; Monto, A S; Foster, D A

    1990-02-01

    Four inactivated influenza vaccines (containing the recommended antigens for the 1985-1986 influenza season) of various antigenic concentration levels were randomly administered to 140 study participants. The effect of the increasing antigen concentration resulted in significantly higher influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody levels 3 weeks after vaccination for the A/H1N1 antigen but not for the A/H3N2 or B antigens. Also, at 3 weeks after vaccination, there were significantly lower antibody titer levels associated with increasing age for the A/H1N1 and B antigens (adjusting for the prevaccination antibody titer and antigen content).

  9. Antigen cross-presentation of immune complexes.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Stout, Madeleine; Fiebiger, Edda

    2014-01-01

    The ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to cross-present tumor antigens has long been a focus of interest to physicians, as well as basic scientists, that aim to establish efficient cell-based cancer immune therapy. A prerequisite for exploiting this pathway for therapeutic purposes is a better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the induction of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses when initiated by DCs via cross-presentation. The ability of humans DC to perform cross-presentation is of utmost interest, as this cell type is a main target for cell-based immunotherapy in humans. The outcome of a cross-presentation event is guided by the nature of the antigen, the form of antigen uptake, and the subpopulation of DCs that performs presentation. Generally, CD8α(+) DCs are considered to be the most potent cross-presenting DCs. This paradigm, however, only applies to soluble antigens. During adaptive immune responses, immune complexes form when antibodies interact with their specific epitopes on soluble antigens. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes target Fc-gamma receptors on DCs to shuttle exogenous antigens efficiently into the cross-presentation pathway. This receptor-mediated cross-presentation pathway is a well-described route for the induction of strong CD8(+) T cell responses. IgG-mediated cross-presentation is intriguing because it permits the CD8(-) DCs, which are commonly considered to be weak cross-presenters, to efficiently cross-present. Engaging multiple DC subtypes for cross-presentation might be a superior strategy to boost CTL responses in vivo. We here summarize our current understanding of how DCs use IgG-complexed antigens for the efficient induction of CTL responses. Because of its importance for human cell therapy, we also review the recent advances in the characterization of cross-presentation properties of human DC subsets.

  10. Do lymphocytes from Chagasic patients respond to heart antigens?

    PubMed Central

    Todd, C W; Todd, N R; Guimaraes, A C

    1983-01-01

    Lymphocyte transformation studies of nonadherent lymphocytes from chronic Chagasic and uninfected persons demonstrated that responses of all individuals to a mouse heart homogenate showed a correlation with responses to streptococcal antigens. Considering the known cross-reactions between streptococcal and cardiac antigens and the high reactivity of Chagasic patients to streptococcal antigens, it is possible that positive lymphocyte transformation to unfractionated heart antigen preparations may not represent specific reactivity to heart antigens. PMID:6404836

  11. The antigenic relationship between Brettanomyces-Debaryomyces strains and the Salmonella cholerae-suis O antigen.

    PubMed

    Aksoycan, N; Sağanak, I; Wells, G

    1978-01-01

    The immune sera for Brettanomyces lambicus, B. claussenii, Debaryomyces hansenii and D. marama agglutinated Salmonella cholerae-suis (0:6(2), 7). The immune serum for S. cholerae-suis agglutinated B. lambicus, B. clausenni, D. hansenii and D. marama. Absorption and agglutination cross-tested demonstrated common antigen factor(s) in the tested yeasts and Salmonella 0:7 antigen.

  12. Antigen Presentation by MHC-Dressed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs) process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide–MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI) and/or MHC class II (MHCII) from neighboring cells through a process of cell–cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide–MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC. PMID:25601867

  13. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  14. Superexpression of tuberculosis antigens in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Sheveleva, Anna A; Frolova, Olga Y; Komarova, Tatjana V; Zvereva, Anna S; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    Recent developments in genetic engineering allow the employment of plants as factories for 1/foreign protein production. Thus, tuberculosis (TB) ESAT6 antigen was expressed in different plant systems, but the level of vaccine protein accumulation was extremely low. We describe the technology for superexpression of TB vaccine proteins (Ag85B, ESAT6, and ESAT6:Ag85B fusion) in plant leaves which involves: (i) construction of tobacco mosaic virus-based vectors with the coat protein genes substituted by those for TB antigens; (ii) Agrobacterium-mediated delivery to plant leaf tissues of binary vectors containing the cDNA copy of the vector virus genome; and (iii) replication of virus vectors in plant cells under conditions suppressing the virus-induced gene silencing. This technology enables efficient production of the TB vaccine proteins in plants; in particular, the level of Ag85B antigen accumulation was not less than 800 mg/kg of fresh leaves. Expression of TB antigens in plant cells as His(6)-tagged proteins promoted their isolation and purification by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Deletion of transmembrane domains from Ag85B caused a dramatic increase in its intracellular stability. We propose that the strategy of TB antigens superproduction in a plant might be used as a basis for the creation of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine against TB.

  15. Whole Tumor Antigen Vaccines: Where Are We?

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Coukos, George; Kandalaft, Lana E.

    2015-01-01

    With its vast amount of uncharacterized and characterized T cell epitopes available for activating CD4+ T helper and CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocytes simultaneously, whole tumor antigen represents an attractive alternative source of antigens as compared to tumor-derived peptides and full-length recombinant tumor proteins for dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy. Unlike defined tumor-derived peptides and proteins, whole tumor lysate therapy is applicable to all patients regardless of their HLA type. DCs are essentially the master regulators of immune response, and are the most potent antigen-presenting cell population for priming and activating naïve T cells to target tumors. Because of these unique properties, numerous DC-based immunotherapies have been initiated in the clinics. In this review, we describe the different types of whole tumor antigens that we could use to pulse DCs ex vivo and in vivo. We also discuss the different routes of delivering whole tumor antigens to DCs in vivo and activating them with toll-like receptor agonists. PMID:26343191

  16. Beyond antigens and adjuvants: formulating future vaccines.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Tyson J; Zmolek, Andrew C; Irvine, Darrell J

    2016-03-01

    The need to optimize vaccine potency while minimizing toxicity in healthy recipients has motivated studies of the formulation of vaccines to control how, when, and where antigens and adjuvants encounter immune cells and other cells/tissues following administration. An effective subunit vaccine must traffic to lymph nodes (LNs), activate both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system, and persist for a sufficient time to promote a mature immune response. Here, we review approaches to tailor these three aspects of vaccine function through optimized formulations. Traditional vaccine adjuvants activate innate immune cells, promote cell-mediated transport of antigen to lymphoid tissues, and promote antigen retention in LNs. Recent studies using nanoparticles and other lymphatic-targeting strategies suggest that direct targeting of antigens and adjuvant compounds to LNs can also enhance vaccine potency without sacrificing safety. The use of formulations to regulate biodistribution and promote antigen and inflammatory cue co-uptake in immune cells may be important for next-generation molecular adjuvants. Finally, strategies to program vaccine kinetics through novel formulation and delivery strategies provide another means to enhance immune responses independent of the choice of adjuvant. These technologies offer the prospect of enhanced efficacy while maintaining high safety profiles necessary for successful vaccines.

  17. Neural antigen-specific autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Raffaele; Lennon, Vanda A

    2012-07-01

    Neural-specific autoantibodies have been documented and their diagnostic utility validated in diseases affecting the neuraxis from cerebral cortex to the somatic, autonomic, and enteric nervous system and skeletal muscle. These neurological disorders occur both idiopathically and in a paraneoplastic context. Molecular identification of the antigens has expedited development of confirmatory and high-throughput tests for serum and cerebrospinal fluid, which permit early diagnosis and reveal the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms. The autoantibodies are classifiable on the basis of antigen location: intracellular (nuclear or cytoplasmic) or plasma membrane. Immunohistopathological studies of patients' biopsied and autopsied tissues suggest that effector T cells mediate the autoimmune neurological disorders for which defining autoantibodies recognize intracellular antigens. Antigens within intact cells are inaccessible to circulating antibody, and the associated neurological deficits rarely improve with antibody-depleting therapies. Tumoricidal therapies may arrest neurological progression, but symptom reversal is rare. In contrast, autoantibodies specific for plasma membrane antigens have pathogenic potential, and the associated neurological deficits are often amenable to antibody-depleting immunotherapy, such as plasma exchange and anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody therapy. These reversible neurological disorders are frequently misdiagnosed as neurodegenerative. The focus of this review is the immunobiology, pathophysiology, and clinical spectrum of autoimmune neurological disorders accompanied by neural-specific IgGs.

  18. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  19. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  20. A human papilloma virus testing algorithm comprising a combination of the L1 broad-spectrum SPF10 PCR assay and a novel E6 high-risk multiplex type-specific genotyping PCR assay.

    PubMed

    van Alewijk, Dirk; Kleter, Bernhard; Vent, Maarten; Delroisse, Jean-Marc; de Koning, Maurits; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Quint, Wim; Colau, Brigitte

    2013-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) epidemiological and vaccine studies require highly sensitive HPV detection and genotyping systems. To improve HPV detection by PCR, the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) LiPA system and a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific system (MPTS123) that uses Luminex xMAP technology were combined into a new testing algorithm. To evaluate this algorithm, cervical swabs (n = 860) and cervical biopsy specimens (n = 355) were tested, with a focus on HPV types detected by the MPTS123 assay (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, 6, and 11). Among the HPV-positive samples, identifications of individual HPV genotypes were compared. When all MPTS123 targeted genotypes were considered together, good overall agreement was found (κ = 0.801, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.784 to 0.818) with identification by SPF10 LiPA, but significantly more genotypes (P < 0.0001) were identified by the MPTS123 PCR Luminex assay, especially for HPV types 16, 35, 39, 45, 58, and 59. An alternative type-specific assay was evaluated that is based on detection of a limited number of HPV genotypes by type-specific PCR and a reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA). This assay showed results similar to those of the expanded MPTS123 Luminex assay. These results confirm the fact that broad-spectrum PCRs are hampered by type competition when multiple HPV genotypes are present in the same sample. Therefore, a testing algorithm combining the broad-spectrum PCR and a range of type-specific PCRs can offer a highly accurate method for the analysis of HPV infections and diminish the rate of false-negative results and may be particularly useful for epidemiological and vaccine studies.

  1. Evaluation of Type-Specific Real-Time PCR Assays Using the LightCycler and J.B.A.I.D.S. for Detection of Adenoviruses in Species HAdV-C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-27

    the new assays. Type-specific TaqMan real-time PCR assays were designed and used independently to successfully identify 16 representative specimens...react with other adenoviruses outside of species HAdV-C, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza , or respiratory disease causing bacteria. These assays...rapid individual and public health responses. Results LightCycler and J.B.A.I.D.S. TaqMan real-time PCR assays The detection of Human adenoviruses C1

  2. Immune responses to vaccines involving a combined antigen-nanoparticle mixture and nanoparticle-encapsulated antigen formulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weifeng; Wang, Lianyan; Liu, Yuan; Chen, Xiaoming; Liu, Qi; Jia, Jilei; Yang, Tingyuan; Qiu, Shaohui; Ma, Guanghui

    2014-07-01

    Many physicochemical characteristics significantly influence the adjuvant effect of micro/nanoparticles; one critical factor is the kinetics of antigen exposure to the immune system by particle-adjuvanted vaccines. Here, we investigated how various antigen-nanoparticle formulations impacted antigen exposure to the immune system and the resultant antigen-specific immune responses. We formulated antigen with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by encapsulating antigen within nanoparticles or by simply mixing soluble antigen with the nanoparticles. Our results indicated that the combined formulation (composed of antigen encapsulated in nanoparticles and antigen mixed with nanoparticles) induced more powerful antigen-specific immune responses than each single-component formulation. Mice immunized with the combined vaccine formulation displayed enhanced induction of antigen-specific IgG antibodies with high avidity, increased cytokine secretion by splenocytes, and improved generation of memory T cell. Enhanced immune responses elicited by the combined vaccine formulation might be attributed to the antigen-depot effect at the injection site, effective provision of both adequate initial antigen exposure and long-term antigen persistence, and efficient induction of dendritic cell (DC) activation and follicular helper T cell differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Understanding the effect of antigen-nanoparticle formulations on the resultant immune responses might have significant implications for rational vaccine design.

  3. Polyomavirus T Antigens Activate an Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbi, Nicholas S.; Gupta, Tushar; Coxon, Andrew; Pipas, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic expression of Simian Virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (LT) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) increased levels of mRNAs encoding interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanism by which T antigen increases levels of ISGs in MEFs remains unclear. We present evidence that expression of T antigen from SV40, Human Polyomaviruses BK (BKV) or JC (JCV) upregulate production of ISGs in MEFs, and subsequently result in an antiviral state, as determined by inhibition of VSV or EMCV growth. The first 136 amino acids of LT are sufficient for these activities. Furthermore, increased ISG expression and induction of the antiviral state requires STAT1. Finally, the RB binding motif of LT is necessary for activation of STAT1. We conclude that the induction of the STAT1 mediated innate immune response in MEFs is a common feature shared by SV40, BKV and JCV. PMID:25589241

  4. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  5. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Maksim V; Ter Beest, Martin; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-03-01

    Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here, we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for the podosomes of dendritic cells.

  6. Human thymus contains amnion epithelial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, B L; Yeh, C J; Faulk, W P

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies produced in rabbits to detergent-solubilized human amnion were found to react with Hassall's corpuscles in human thymus. Following nomenclature for placental antigens, the immunogenic group responsible for these antibodies has been tentatively designated as amnion antigens 1 (AA1). The anti-AA1 antisera did not react with other thymic components, nor did they react with any other extra-embryonic tissues than amniotic epithelium. Some adult ectodermally derived tissues, such as breast ductal and corneal epithelium, reacted with anti-AA1, but others such as skin and vagina did not. These findings link an antigenic relationship between amniotic epithelium and certain ectodermal derivatives. Amnion exists long before these tissues are formed, raising the possibility that amniotic epithelium may play an inductive role in their development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6343232

  7. Collective Genetic Interaction Effects and the Role of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hyung Jun; Yu, Chenggang; Reifman, Jaques

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when immune cells fail to develop or lose their tolerance toward self and destroy body’s own tissues. Both insufficient negative selection of self-reactive T cells and impaired development of regulatory T cells preventing effector cell activation are believed to contribute to autoimmunity. Genetic predispositions center around the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II loci involved in antigen presentation, the key determinant of CD4+ T cell activation. Recent studies suggested that variants in the MHC region also exhibit significant non-additive interaction effects. However, collective interactions involving large numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contributing to such effects are yet to be characterized. In addition, relatively little is known about the cell-type-specificity of such interactions in the context of cellular pathways. Here, we analyzed type 1 diabetes (T1D) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) genome-wide association data sets via large-scale, high-performance computations and inferred collective interaction effects involving MHC SNPs using the discrete discriminant analysis. Despite considerable differences in the details of SNP interactions in T1D and RA data, the enrichment pattern of interacting pairs in reference epigenomes was remarkably similar: statistically significant interactions were epigenetically active in cell-type combinations connecting B cells to T cells and intestinal epithelial cells, with both helper and regulatory T cells showing strong disease-associated interactions with B cells. Our results provide direct genetic evidence pointing to the important roles B cells play as antigen-presenting cells toward CD4+ T cells in the context of central and peripheral tolerance. In addition, they are consistent with recent experimental studies suggesting that the repertoire of B cell-specific self-antigens in the thymus are critical to the effective control of corresponding autoimmune activation

  8. Separation of soluble Brucella antigens by gel-filtration chromatography.

    PubMed

    McGhee, J R; Freeman, B A

    1970-07-01

    Soluble precipitating antigens of Brucella suis have been, in various degrees, purified by filtration on Sephadex gels. The most useful gels employed were Sephadex G-150, Sephadex G-200, and Sepharose 4B. Although not all fractions proved to be immunologically pure, some crude molecular-size estimates of most of the 13 soluble antigens of the Brucella cell could be given. In addition, monospecific antisera to three purified Brucella antigens have been prepared. By using purified preparations, physical and chemical data were obtained on two major antigens, E and 1, and a minor antigen, f. Antigen E is not an agglutinogen and may be toxic. Antigen 1 is of low molecular weight and is neither toxic nor agglutinogenic. The minor antigen f is an agglutinogen as well as a precipitinogen and is found on the cell surface. Both major antigens, when purified, were immunogenic in rabbits.

  9. MassARRAY Spectrometry Is More Sensitive than PreTect HPV-Proofer and Consensus PCR for Type-Specific Detection of High-Risk Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Cervical Cancer▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Partha; Chandna, Puneet; Bamezai, R. N. K.; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Lear, Adrian; Ratnam, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Type-specific detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) is indicated for better risk stratification and clinical management of women testing positive for HPV and for epidemiologic surveillance. MassARRAY spectrometry (MassARRAY; Sequenom) is a novel method for type-specific detection of 15 high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68, and -73. PreTect HPV-Proofer (Proofer; Norchip) is a type-specific assay that detects E6/E7 mRNA from five high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, and -45. The performance of these tests for type-specific identification of HPV was assessed with cervical specimens from 192 cases of cervical cancer in comparison with consensus MY09/MY11 PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing (consensus PCR). The overall HPV detection rates were 94.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.7, 97.9), 83.3% (95% CI, 78.1, 88.5), and 86.5% (95% CI, 81.7, 91.3) for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. All tests were negative in six (3.1%) of the 192 cases. Considering only the specimens that contained at least one of the five types targeted by Proofer, the detection rates were 96.6%, 91.4%, and 86.9% for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. MassARRAY detected multiple infections in 14.1%, Proofer detected multiple infections in 3.6%, and consensus PCR failed to detect any multiple infections. The agreement was highest at 86.0% (kappa = 0.76) between MassARRAY and Proofer and lowest at 81.8% (kappa = 0.69) between Proofer and consensus PCR. In conclusion, MassARRAY is a highly sensitive and accurate method for type-specific detection of oncogenic HPV in cervical cancer, with Proofer showing impressive performance. PMID:21813716

  10. MassARRAY spectrometry is more sensitive than PreTect HPV-Proofer and consensus PCR for type-specific detection of high-risk oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Basu, Partha; Chandna, Puneet; Bamezai, R N K; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Lear, Adrian; Ratnam, Sam

    2011-10-01

    Type-specific detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) is indicated for better risk stratification and clinical management of women testing positive for HPV and for epidemiologic surveillance. MassARRAY spectrometry (MassARRAY; Sequenom) is a novel method for type-specific detection of 15 high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68, and -73. PreTect HPV-Proofer (Proofer; Norchip) is a type-specific assay that detects E6/E7 mRNA from five high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, and -45. The performance of these tests for type-specific identification of HPV was assessed with cervical specimens from 192 cases of cervical cancer in comparison with consensus MY09/MY11 PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing (consensus PCR). The overall HPV detection rates were 94.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.7, 97.9), 83.3% (95% CI, 78.1, 88.5), and 86.5% (95% CI, 81.7, 91.3) for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. All tests were negative in six (3.1%) of the 192 cases. Considering only the specimens that contained at least one of the five types targeted by Proofer, the detection rates were 96.6%, 91.4%, and 86.9% for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. MassARRAY detected multiple infections in 14.1%, Proofer detected multiple infections in 3.6%, and consensus PCR failed to detect any multiple infections. The agreement was highest at 86.0% (kappa = 0.76) between MassARRAY and Proofer and lowest at 81.8% (kappa = 0.69) between Proofer and consensus PCR. In conclusion, MassARRAY is a highly sensitive and accurate method for type-specific detection of oncogenic HPV in cervical cancer, with Proofer showing impressive performance.

  11. Targeting carbohydrate antigens in HIV vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Pashov, Anastas; Canziani, Gabriela; Macleod, Stewart; Plaxco, Jason; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2005-03-18

    Peptide mimotopes provide a strategy to augment human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) specific carbohydrate reactive immune responses. Their antigenic and immunological properties will depend on the optimization of motif clustering and multimerization. We observe that structural variants of the same mimetic motif, linear versus cyclic, can be used to tune the properties of the antibodies elicited. The expansion of the database of mimotope sequence motifs can be increased by analyzing structures that bind to HIV directed monoclonal antibody 2G12 and the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), fostering new mimotope designs. Such analysis indicates that these reagents bind to subsets of mannosyl antigens on the envelope (env) protein.

  12. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  13. Antigen Processing and Remodeling of the Endosomal Pathway: Requirements for Antigen Cross-Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Compeer, Ewoud Bernardus; Flinsenberg, Thijs Willem Hendrik; van der Grein, Susanna Geertje; Boes, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen as peptide/class I major histocompatibility complex complexes plays a central role in the elicitation of CD8+ T cell clones that mediate anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. While it has been clear that there are specific subsets of professional antigen presenting cells capable of antigen cross-presentation, identification of mechanisms involved is still ongoing. Especially amongst dendritic cells (DC), there are specialized subsets that are highly proficient at antigen cross-presentation. We here present a focused survey on the cell biological processes in the endosomal pathway that support antigen cross-presentation. This review highlights DC-intrinsic mechanisms that facilitate the cross-presentation of endocytosed antigen, including receptor-mediated uptake, maturation-induced endosomal sorting of membrane proteins, dynamic remodeling of endosomal structures and cell surface-directed endosomal trafficking. We will conclude with the description of pathogen-induced deviation of endosomal processing, and discuss how immune evasion strategies pertaining endosomal trafficking may preclude antigen cross-presentation. PMID:22566920

  14. Cell-free antigens of Sporothrix brasiliensis: antigenic diversity and application in an immunoblot assay.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Paes, Rodrigo; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Pizzini, Cláudia Vera; Reis, Rosani Santos; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Peralta, José Mauro; Gutierrez-Galhardo, Maria Clara; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria

    2012-11-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis diagnosed by isolation of the fungus in culture. Serological tests for help in diagnosis in general do not use purified or recombinant antigens, because there is a paucity of described immunoreactive proteins, especially for the new described Sporothrix species, such as Sporothrix brasiliensis. This study aims to characterise antigens from S. brasiliensis and verify their application in serodiagnosis of sporotrichosis. An immunoblot assay allied with computer-based analysis was used to identify putative antigenic molecules in a cell-free extracts of both morphological phases of this fungus, and to delineate antigenic polymorphism among seven S. brasiliensis isolates and one S. schenckii Brazilian strain. The mycelial and yeast phase of the fungus originated 14 and 23 reactive bands, respectively, which were variable in intensity. An 85 kDa antigen, verified in the yeast phase of the fungus, was observed in all strains used and the immunodominant protein was identified. This protein, however, cross-react with serum samples from patients infected with other pathogens. The results show that the S. brasiliensis cell-free antigen extract is a single and inexpensive source of antigens, and can be applied on the sporotrichosis serodiagnosis.

  15. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies.

  16. Lea blood group antigen on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dunstan, R.A.; Simpson, M.B.; Rosse, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    One- and two-stage radioligand assays were used to determine if human platelets possess the Lea antigen. Goat IgG anti-Lea antibody was purified by multiple adsorptions with Le(a-b-) human red blood cells, followed by affinity chromatography with synthetic Lea substance and labeling with /sup 125/I. Human IgG anti-Lea antibody was used either in a two stage radioassay with /sup 125/I-labeled mouse monoclonal IgG anti-human IgG as the second antibody or, alternatively, purified by Staph protein A chromatography, labeled with /sup 125/I, and used in a one-stage radioassay. Platelets from donors of appropriate red blood cell phenotypes were incubated with the antisera, centrifuged through phthalate esters, and assayed in a gamma scintillation counter. Dose response and saturation curve analysis demonstrate the presence of Lewis a antigen on platelets from Lea+ donors. Furthermore, platelets from an Le(a-b-) donor incubated in Le (a+b-) plasma adsorb Lea antigen in a similar manner to red blood cells. The clinical significance of these antigens in platelet transfusion remains undefined.

  17. Wegener's granulomatosis and autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, D R; Maxwell, A P; Watt, L

    1988-01-01

    We report five cases of Wegener's granulomatosis all of whom had clinical and histological evidence of disease activity at presentation and in whom autoantibodies to neutrophil antigens were detected. This test may prove useful for the diagnosis of this serious condition and help to monitor disease activity during treatment. PMID:3068870

  18. Development of Prototype Filovirus Recombinant Antigen Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Boisen, Matt L.; Oottamasathien, Darin; Jones, Abigail B.; Millett, Molly M.; Nelson, Diana S.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Oda, Shun-ichiro; Hartnett, Jessica N.; Rowland, Megan M.; Heinrich, Megan L.; Akdag, Marjan; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Fullah, Mohammed; Baimba, Francis; Gbakie, Michael; Safa, Sadiki; Fonnie, Richard; Kanneh, Lansana; Cross, Robert W.; Geisbert, Joan B.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Kulakosky, Peter C.; Grant, Donald S.; Shaffer, Jeffery G.; Schieffelin, John S.; Wilson, Russell B.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Branco, Luis M.; Garry, Robert F.; Khan, S. Humarr; Pitts, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Throughout the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, major gaps were exposed in the availability of validated rapid diagnostic platforms, protective vaccines, and effective therapeutic agents. These gaps potentiated the development of prototype rapid lateral flow immunodiagnostic (LFI) assays that are true point-of-contact platforms, for the detection of active Ebola infections in small blood samples. Methods. Recombinant Ebola and Marburg virus matrix VP40 and glycoprotein (GP) antigens were used to derive a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Antibodies were tested using a multivariate approach to identify antibody-antigen combinations suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and LFI assay development. Results. Polyclonal antibodies generated in goats were superior reagents for capture and detection of recombinant VP40 in test sample matrices. These antibodies were optimized for use in antigen-capture ELISA and LFI assay platforms. Prototype immunoglobulin M (IgM)/immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISAs were similarly developed that specifically detect Ebola virus–specific antibodies in the serum of experimentally infected nonhuman primates and in blood samples obtained from patients with Ebola from Sierra Leone. Conclusions. The prototype recombinant Ebola LFI assays developed in these studies have sensitivities that are useful for clinical diagnosis of acute ebolavirus infections. The antigen-capture and IgM/IgG ELISAs provide additional confirmatory assay platforms for detecting VP40 and other ebolavirus-specific immunoglobulins. PMID:26232440

  19. Radioimmunoassay for hepatitis B core antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnelli, E.; Pereira, C.; Triolo, G.; Vernace, S.; Paronetto, F.

    1982-02-01

    Serum hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) is an important marker of hepatitis B virus replication. We describe an easy, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determination of HBcAg in detergent-treated serum pellets containing Dane particles. Components of a commercial kit for anticore determination are used, and HBcAG is measured by competitive inhibition of binding of /sub 125/I-labeled antibodies to HBcAg with HBcAg-coated beads. We assayed for HBcAG in the sera of 49 patients with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive chronic hepatitis, 50 patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis, and 30 healthy volunteers. HBcAg was detected in 41% of patients with HBsAg-positive chronic hepatitis but not in patients with HBsAg-negative chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis Be antigen (an antigen closely associated with the core of Dane particles) determined in the same sera by radioimmunoassay, was not detected in 50% of HBcAg-positive sera.

  20. Study of an Anthrax Protective Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-24

    have been studied, and the biological and chemical properties of the latter have been determined , as well. We have used a milk-peptone medium for...antigen, a significant role of the organic compounds used as the cEergy source was established. Glucose, saccharose and dextran proved to be the best

  1. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  2. ANTIGENICITY OF POLYPEPTIDES (POLY ALPHA AMINO ACIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Paul H.; Gerulat, Bernard F.; Pinchuck, Paul

    1964-01-01

    A new group of synthetic random polymers of α-L-amino acids has been studied for immunogenicity. With the glutamic acid and alanine copolymers, those consisting of almost equimolar amounts of the two (G60A40 and G40A60) were effective antigens in rabbits whereas those with higher glutamic acid contents (G75A25, G90A10) were poor antigens. The substitution of alanine by valine or leucine (G75V25 and G80Leu20) produced copolymers which were poor antigens in rabbits but effective in guinea pigs. L70A30, although capable of "non-specifically" precipitating serum proteins, was shown not to be antigenic in either rabbits or guinea pigs. The introduction of alanine into glutamic acid and lysine polymers (GLA series) enhanced the immunogenicity of the terpolymers, i.e., GLA30 > GLA20 > GLA10 > GL. The mechanism by which this may be accomplished is discussed as possibly being related to the reduction of the interactions between glutamyl and lysyl residues which allows the carboxyl groups to act as strong immunogenic determinants. PMID:14176288

  3. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  4. Degenerate interfaces in antigen-antibody complexes.

    PubMed

    Decanniere, K; Transue, T R; Desmyter, A; Maes, D; Muyldermans, S; Wyns, L

    2001-10-26

    In most of the work dealing with the analysis of protein-protein interfaces, a single X-ray structure is available or selected, and implicitly it is assumed that this structure corresponds to the optimal complex for this pair of proteins. However, we have found a degenerate interface in a high-affinity antibody-antigen complex: the two independent complexes of the camel variable domain antibody fragment cAb-Lys3 and its antigen hen egg white lysozyme present in the asymmetric unit of our crystals show a difference in relative orientation between antibody and antigen, leading to important differences at the protein-protein interface. A third cAb-Lys3-hen lysozyme complex in a different crystal form adopts yet another relative orientation. Our results show that protein-protein interface characteristics can vary significantly between different specimens of the same high-affinity antibody-protein antigen complex. Consideration should be given to this type of observation when trying to establish general protein-protein interface characteristics.

  5. Rational antigen modification as a strategy to upregulate or downregulate antigen recognition.

    PubMed

    Abrams, S I; Schlom, J

    2000-02-01

    Recent and rapid advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of antigen recognition by CD8(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes have led to the birth of possibilities for site-directed, rational modification of cognate antigenic determinants. This immunologic concept has vast biomedical implications for regulation of host immunity against the pathogenesis of diverse disease processes. The upregulation of antigen-specific T-cell responses by 'agonistic' peptides would be most desirable in response to invasive pathogenic challenges, such as infectious and neoplastic disease, while the downregulation of antigen-specific T-cell responses by 'antagonistic' peptides would be most efficacious during inappropriate pathologic consequences, such as autoimmunity. The capacity to experimentally manipulate intrinsic properties of cognate peptide ligands to appropriately alter the nature, course and potency of cellular immune interactions has important potential in both preventive and therapeutic clinical paradigms.

  6. Two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell clones display heterogeneity in antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, M T; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1989-01-01

    Evidence from various antigen systems suggests that antigen processing can be one factor that determines the repertoire of immunogenic peptides. Thus, processing events may account for some of the disparity between the available and expressed helper T-cell repertoires. In this report, we demonstrate that the immunodominant T-cell determinant in ovalbumin [p323-339; ovalbumin-(323-339) heptadecapeptide] is processed differently by two genetically identical antigen-presenting cell lines, M12 and A20. The ovalbumin-specific T-cell-T-cell hybridomas, DO-11.10 and 3DO-54.8, were used to detect processed antigen. These T-T hybridomas have different fine specificities for the p323-339 determinant. A20 cells presented native ovalbumin well to both T-T hybridomas, whereas M12 cells presented native ovalbumin well to 3DO-54.8 but very inefficiently to DO-11.10. M12 and A20 cells effectively stimulated both T-T hybridomas with the same concentrations of the immunogenic synthetic peptide p323-339. Therefore, M12 cells and DO-11.10 can interact with each other, and both T-T hybridomas have similar sensitivities for the same immunogenic peptide. We conclude that genetically identical antigen-presenting cells can display heterogeneity in the fine processing of an immunodominant T-cell determinant, and synthetic model peptides that represent the minimal stimulatory sequence of a T-cell determinant are not necessarily identical to the structure of in vivo processed antigen. Heterogeneity in antigen processing by individual antigen-presenting cells would serve to increase the repertoire of immunogenic peptides that are presented to T cells. PMID:2470101

  7. Comparison of the detection of HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 by type-specific DNA- and E6/E7 mRNA-based assays of HPV DNA positive women with abnormal Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Salimović-Bešić, Irma; Tomić-Čiča, Anja; Smailji, Admir; Hukić, Mirsada

    2013-12-01

    This study compares the type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test with E6/E7 mRNA detection assay because of their importance in cervical cancer screening programs. A total of 105 women with positive high-risk Hybrid Capture 2 or Abbott RealTime High Risk HPV screening test and an abnormal cervical Pap smear were enrolled in the study. HPV typing was performed by multiplex real-time PCR (HPV High Risk Typing Real-TM test). HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 E6/E7 mRNAs were determined by type-specific real-time NASBA assay (NucliSENS EasyQ HPV v1.1). Infections caused by HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 types increased with severity of cervical cytology (p=0.008). Global positivity of five HPV E6/E7 mRNAs was lower than DNA positivity within women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (p=0.016; p=0.008). High agreement of the tests was found in the groups of women with low-grade (p=1.000; p=0.063) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (p=0.250; p=0.125). Type-specific agreement of both diagnostic approaches was high regardless of cytology. Based on the found differences between HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 E6/E7 mRNA and DNA positivity, further study is needed to test the role of mRNA testing in the triage of women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance in Pap smear.

  8. mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells are heterogeneous, and cyclic AMP does not act directly to stabilize cell-type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Manrow, R E; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    We reevaluated the use of 32PO4 pulse-chases for analyzing mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium cells. We found that completely effective PO4 chases could not be obtained in developing cells and that, as a consequence, the decay rates exhibited by some mRNAs were influenced by the rates at which they were transcribed. In developing cells disaggregated in the presence of cyclic AMP, the poly(A)+ mRNA population turned over with an apparent half-life of 4 h, individual mRNA decay rates were heterogeneous, and some prestalk and prespore mRNAs appeared to decay with biphasic kinetics. In cells disaggregated in the absence of cyclic AMP, all prestalk and prespore mRNAs decayed with biphasic kinetics. During the first 1 to 1.5 h after disaggregation in the absence of cyclic AMP, the cell-type-specific mRNAs were selectively degraded, decaying with half-lives of 20 to 30 min; thereafter, the residual prestalk and prespore mRNA molecules decayed at rates that were similar to those measured in the presence of cyclic AMP. This short-term labilization of cell-type-specific mRNAs was observed even for those species not requiring cyclic AMP for their accumulation in developing cells. The observation that cell-type specific mRNAs can decay at similar rates in disaggregated cells with or without cyclic AMP indicates that this compound does not act directly to stabilize prestalk and prespore mRNAs during development and that its primary role in the maintenance of cyclic-AMP-dependent mRNAs is likely to be transcriptional. Images PMID:2847029

  9. Antigenic evaluation of a recombinant baculovirus-expressed Sarcocystis neurona SAG1 antigen.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G D; Lakritz, J; Saville, W J; Livingston, R S; Dubey, J P; Middleton, J R; Marsh, A E

    2004-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary parasite associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). This is a commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in the Americas that infects the central nervous system of horses. Current serologic assays utilize culture-derived parasites as antigen. This method requires large numbers of parasites to be grown in culture, which is labor intensive and time consuming. Also, a culture-derived whole-parasite preparation contains conserved antigens that could cross-react with antibodies against other Sarcocystis species and members of Sarcocystidae such as Neospora spp., Hammondia spp., and Toxoplasma gondii. Therefore, there is a need to develop an improved method for the detection of S. neurona-specific antibodies. The sera of infected horses react strongly to surface antigen 1 (SnSAG1), an approximately 29-kDa protein, in immunoblot analysis, suggesting that it is an immunodominant antigen. The SnSAG1 gene of S. neurona was cloned, and recombinant S. neurona SAG1 protein (rSnSAG1-Bac) was expressed with the use of a baculovirus system. By immunoblot analysis, the rSnSAG1-Bac antigen detected antibodies to S. neurona from naturally infected and experimentally inoculated equids, cats, rabbit, mice, and skunk. This is the first report of a baculovirus-expressed recombinant S. neurona antigen being used to detect anti-S. neurona antibodies in a variety of host species.

  10. Comparison of Schistosoma mansoni Soluble Cercarial Antigens and Soluble Egg Antigens for Serodiagnosing Schistosome Infections

    PubMed Central

    Doenhoff, Mike; Aitken, Cara; Bailey, Wendi; Ji, Minjun; Dawson, Emily; Gilis, Henk; Spence, Grant; Alexander, Claire; van Gool, Tom

    2012-01-01

    A Schistosoma mansoni cercarial antigen preparation (cercarial transformation fluid – SmCTF) was evaluated for detection of anti-schistosome antibodies in human sera in 4 collaborating laboratories. The performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. mansoni egg antigens (SmSEA) in an indirect enzyme-immunoassay (ELISA) antigen assay, the latter being used routinely in 3 of the 4 participating laboratories to diagnose S. mansoni and S. haematobium infections. In the fourth laboratory the performance of SmCTF was compared with that of S. japonicum egg antigens (SjSEA) in ELISA for detection of anti-S. japonicum antibodies. In all 4 laboratories the results given by SmCTF in ELISA were very similar to those given by the antigen preparation routinely used in the respective laboratory to detect anti-schistosome antibodies in human infection sera. In so far as the ELISA results from SmCTF are thus so little different from those given by schistosome egg antigens and also cheaper to produce, the former is a potentially useful new diagnostic aid for schistosomiasis. PMID:23029577

  11. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  12. Prevalence of type-specific antibody against type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex virus in women with abnormal cervical cytology: evidence towards pre-pubertal vaccination of sero-negative female subjects.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Whitney, J E; Hartley, C

    1977-01-01

    Patients with abnormal cervical cytology demonstrated a higher prevalence of type-specific complement-fixing antibody to type 2 herpes simplex virus than patients with negative cervical cytology and patients with carcinoma of other body sites. Case-control differences were apparent irrespective of age, socio-economic class and marital status. By contrast, case groups demonstrated a lower prevalence of subjects with type 1 specific antibody. This raises the possibility that pre-adolescent exposure to type 1 herpes simplex virus may offer some measure of protection against pre-malignant and malignant cervical pathology.

  13. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  14. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  15. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  16. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  17. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  18. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  19. Cellular Antigens in the Structure of Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    the previously described method. 𔄁xzracts of the Dolichos biflorus L seeds (to calculate antigen A) and Cytisus sessilifolius L. seeds (to calculate...find the group antigen A and phytohemagglutinins "from seeds Cytisus sessilefolius L. in order to calculate antigen H. As h -6- "Fable 4 shows virus

  20. Detection of squamous epithelial intercellular substance antigen(s) in Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnesditskaya, E V

    1980-01-01

    Using pemphigus sera containing high titres (1:1000) of non-species-specific antibodies to tissue-specific intercellular substance (ICS) antigen(s) of cover stratified epithelia (skin, oesophagus, vagina and so forth), we detected analogous antigen(s) by immunofluorescence in the ICS of the epithelium of Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus. The results obtained, together with well-known data from histological and embryological studies, confirm the histogenetic relationship of the epithelium of thymus corpuscles and cover epithelia of ectodermal origin. ICS antigen(s) is related to the series of hetero-organic antigens, which probably take part in the natural immunological tolerance formation to the antigens of the organism's own tissues.

  1. Association of type- and group-specific antigens with the cell wall of serotype III group B streptococcus.

    PubMed Central

    Doran, T I; Mattingly, S J

    1982-01-01

    The type-specific antigens (TSA) of group B streptococcus (GBS) represent the primary virulence factors for these organisms, yet little is known about their relationship to the cell surface of GBS. Crude cell walls of serotype III GBS strain 110 were purified by extraction with sodium dodecyl sulfate, LiCl, and urea, which removed essentially all of the protein associated with the cell wall as determined by amino acid analysis. Only those amino acids found in peptidoglycan were present, which included alanine, lysine, and glutamate (3.5:1:1 molar ratio). In contrast, these procedures resulted in the release of only 4.6% of the wall-associated TSA, indicating that protein was not the primary means by which TSA was bound to the cell surface. Mutanolysin (20 micrograms/ml) treatment of purified cell walls resulted in the release of 95% of the wall-associated TSA. The covalent association of TSA, the group B polysaccharide, and the peptidoglycan was demonstrated by the presence of N-acetylmuramic acid, rhamnose, alanine, glutamate, and lysine in mutanolysin-extracted TSA material purified by DEAE-Sephacel anion exchange and Sepharose 4B gel chromatography. Chemical analysis of purified cell walls revealed that group B antigen and peptidoglycan comprised 37.4 and 36.5%, respectively, whereas TSA accounted for 22.1 to 24.5% of the weight of the purified walls. Of the total 283.5 mg of TSA produced per 10-liter culture of GBS strain 110, 8.4% was released into the supernatant fluid. The remainder (249 mg) comprised the cell wall antigen. As described above, 4.6% of the cell wall antigen was extractable by nonenzymatic methods, which represented 3.8% of the total TSA, whereas 87.8% of the total TSA produced appeared to be covalently attached to the cell wall. PMID:7047392

  2. Development of SYBR green-based real-time PCR and duplex nested PCR assays for quantitation and differential detection of species- or type-specific porcine Torque teno viruses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y W; Dryman, B A; Harrall, K K; Vaughn, E M; Roof, M B; Meng, X J

    2010-12-01

    Porcine Torque teno virus (TTV), a single-stranded circular DNA virus, has been incriminated in swine diseases recently. Multiple infection with porcine TTV species 1 (PTTV1) and species 2 (PTTV2), each consisting of two types (PTTV1a and 1b) or subtypes (PTTV2b and 2c), in a single pig had been reported by our group previously. The present study described three novel assays for quantitation and differential detection of porcine TTV. First, we developed two SYBR green-based real-time PCR assays to quantify viral loads of two porcine TTV species, respectively. The PTTV1- and PTTV2-specific real-time PCR primer sequences were selected to target conserved regions identified by multiple alignments of ten available porcine TTV full-length genomes. Furthermore, by coupling the two singleplex PCR assays, a duplex real-time PCR assay followed by melting curve analysis was established for simultaneous detection and differentiation of PTTV1 and PTTV2. In addition, a type-specific duplex nested PCR was also developed to simultaneously detect and distinguish between the two types, PTTV1a and 1b, in PTTV1 species. These assays provide rapid and practical tools for molecular diagnosis of species- or type-specific porcine TTV.

  3. The effect of antigen encapsulation in chitosan particles on uptake, activation and presentation by antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Zaharoff, David A

    2013-03-01

    Particle-based vaccine delivery systems are under exploration to enhance antigen-specific immunity against safe but poorly immunogenic polypeptide antigens. Chitosan is a promising biomaterial for antigen encapsulation and delivery due to its ability to form nano- and microparticles in mild aqueous conditions thus preserving the antigenicity of loaded polypeptides. In this study, the influence of chitosan encapsulation on antigen uptake, activation and presentation by antigen presenting cells (APCs) is explored. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model protein antigens and encapsulated in chitosan particles via precipitation-coacervation at loading efficiencies >89%. Formulation conditions were manipulated to create antigen-encapsulated chitosan particles (AgCPs) with discrete nominal sizes (300 nm, 1 μm, and 3 μm). Uptake of AgCPs by dendritic cells and macrophages was found to be dependent on particle size, antigen concentration and exposure time. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that uptake of AgCPs enhanced upregulation of surface activation markers on APCs and increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lastly, antigen-specific T cells exhibited higher proliferative responses when stimulated with APCs activated with AgCPs versus soluble antigen. These data suggest that encapsulation of antigens in chitosan particles enhances uptake, activation and presentation by APCs.

  4. [Platelet antigens: immunology and immuno-allergology].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, J C; Palma-Carlos, A G

    1996-02-01

    Platelet immunology allows the understanding of clinical findings in a genetic and serologic basis. Blood platelets bear common antigens and same specific antigens, classified in five groups (HPA 1 to 5), that are localized on membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib alpha, IIb and IIIa. Antiplatelet autoimmunization is generally due to IgG antibodies against membrane complexes IIb/IIIa or Ib/lX. Antiplatelet alloimmunization, clinically resulting in Posttransfusion Purpura and Neonatal Thrombocytopenia is more frequently associated with anti-IIb/IIIa antibodies, either anti-HPA-1a or HPA-1b. Finally, platelet participation in immunoallergic reactions is discussed, focusing both platelet activation by allergen itself and platelet recruitment by other inflammatory cells.

  5. Methamphetamine inhibits antigen processing, presentation, and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Tallóczy, Zsolt; Martinez, Jose; Joset, Danielle; Ray, Yonaton; Gácser, Attila; Toussi, Sima; Mizushima, Noboru; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Nosanchuk, Josh; Goldstein, Harris; Loike, John; Sulzer, David; Santambrogio, Laura

    2008-02-08

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is abused by over 35 million people worldwide. Chronic Meth abuse may be particularly devastating in individuals who engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners because it is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for obtaining HIV and associated secondary infections. We report the first specific evidence that Meth at pharmacological concentrations exerts a direct immunosuppressive effect on dendritic cells and macrophages. As a weak base, Meth collapses the pH gradient across acidic organelles, including lysosomes and associated autophagic organelles. This in turn inhibits receptor-mediated phagocytosis of antibody-coated particles, MHC class II antigen processing by the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, and antigen presentation to splenic T cells by dendritic cells. More importantly Meth facilitates intracellular replication and inhibits intracellular killing of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, two major AIDS-related pathogens. Meth exerts previously unreported direct immunosuppressive effects that contribute to increased risk of infection and exacerbate AIDS pathology.

  6. Recovery of antigenically reactive HIV-2 cores.

    PubMed

    Chrystie, I L; Almeida, J D

    1989-03-01

    Negative staining studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been hampered by the fragile nature of the particles. Although detergent treatment is capable of releasing cores from HIV-2 particles, these are unstable and do not retain morphological integrity. Addition of glutaraldehyde will stabilise these structures but, if used at too high a concentration, will destroy their antigenicity. This study shows that if both detergent and glutaraldehyde are used in correct proportions, antigenically reactive cores can be recovered from HIV-2 cell cultures. More specifically we show that a mixture of 0.1% Nonidet P40 and 0.1% glutaraldehyde produces preparations of HIV-2 cores that are suitable for immune electron microscopy. These cores reacted positively, that is, formed immune complexes, with both human HIV-2 antisera and a mouse monoclonal antibody that, although directed against p24 (HIV-1), reacts also with p25 (HIV-2).

  7. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  8. T Helper Cell Tolerance to Ubiquitous Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    NAKKEN, BRITT; DAVIS, KAREN E.; PAN, ZIJIAN; BACHMANN, MICHAEL; FARRIS, A. DARISE

    2007-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of anti-nuclear autoantibodies. In order to understand the immunologic events leading to the development of such antibodies, knowledge of mechanisms of immune tolerance to nuclear antigens is required. By utilizing adoptive T cell transfer strategies with transgenic mouse models expressing nuclear neo-self antigens, T cell tolerance to the lupus-related nuclear antigens human La and nRNP A has been demonstrated. These findings also indicate the existence in normal animals of autoreactive B cells continuously presenting nuclear antigen, suggesting that nuclear antigens are not sequestered from the immune system. Investigations of CD4+ T cell tolerance to non-nuclear antigens have revealed a number of mechanisms that protect the host from autoreactivity, including autoreactive T cell deletion, regulatory T cell development and anergy induction. Recent studies using T cell receptor and neo-self nuclear antigen transgenic mice are revealing the importance of such mechanisms in maintaining tolerance to nuclear antigens. Mechanisms of tolerogenic antigen presentation, identification of tolerogenic antigen source(s), and the pathways leading to loss of tolerance to nuclear antigens in systemic autoimmune disease states are currently being sought. PMID:14629620

  9. Neutralization of reovirus: the gene responsible for the neutralization antigen

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The S1 genome segment of reovirus is linked to type specificity as determined by neutralization antibody. This gene segment codes for a minor outer capsid polypeptide (sigma1). Therefore, sigma1 is the peptide responsible for induction of neutralization antibody and confers type specificity. This biologic property of reovirus was defined using hybrid recombinants clones between reovirus types 1 and 3 and 2 and 3. PMID:925604

  10. Isolation and In vivo Transfer of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of antigen presenting cells in vivo is a method used by immunologists to examine the potency of antigen presentation by a selected population of cells. This method is most commonly used to analyze presentation of protein antigens to MHC class I or II restricted T cells, but it can also be used for studies of nonconventional antigens such as CD1-presented lipids. In a recent study focusing on CD1d-restricted glycolipid antigen presentation to Natural Killer T cells, we compared antigen presenting properties of splenic B cells, CD8αPos dendritc cells (DCs) and CD8αNeg DCs (Arora et al., 2014). This protocol describes the detailed method used for isolation of these cell populations, and their transfer into recipient mice to analyze their antigen presenting properties. PMID:27390759

  11. Detection of functional class II-associated antigen: role of a low density endosomal compartment in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a functional assay to identify processed antigen in subcellular fractions from antigen-presenting cells; stimulatory activity in this assay may be caused by either free peptide fragments or by complexes of peptide fragments and class II molecules present on organellar membrane sheets and vesicles. In addition, we have developed a functional assay to identify proteolytic activity in subcellular fractions capable of generating antigenic peptides from intact proteins. These techniques permit the direct identification of intracellular sites of antigen processing and class II association. Using a murine B cell line stably transfected with a phosphorylcholine (PC)-specific membrane-bound immunoglobulin (Ig), we show that PC- conjugated antigens are rapidly internalized and efficiently degraded to generate processed antigen within an early low density compartment. Proteolytic activity capable of generating antigenic peptide fragments from intact proteins is found within low density endosomes and a dense compartment consistent with lysosomes. However, neither processed peptide nor peptide-class II complexes are detected in lysosomes from antigen-pulsed cells. Furthermore, blocking the intracellular transport of internalized antigen from the low density endosome to lysosomes does not inhibit the generation of processed antigen. Therefore, antigens internalized in association with membrane Ig on B cells can be efficiently processed in low density endosomal compartments without the contribution of proteases present within denser organelles. PMID:7722450

  12. Exosome targeting of tumor antigens expressed by cancer vaccines can improve antigen immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Rountree, Ryan B; Mandl, Stefanie J; Nachtwey, James M; Dalpozzo, Katie; Do, Lisa; Lombardo, John R; Schoonmaker, Peter L; Brinkmann, Kay; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Laus, Reiner; Delcayre, Alain

    2011-08-01

    MVA-BN-PRO (BN ImmunoTherapeutics) is a candidate immunotherapy product for the treatment of prostate cancer. It encodes 2 tumor-associated antigens, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), and is derived from the highly attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus stock known as MVA-BN. Past work has shown that the immunogenicity of antigens can be improved by targeting their localization to exosomes, which are small, 50- to 100-nm diameter vesicles secreted by most cell types. Exosome targeting is achieved by fusing the antigen to the C1C2 domain of the lactadherin protein. To test whether exosome targeting would improve the immunogenicity of PSA and PAP, 2 additional versions of MVA-BN-PRO were produced, targeting either PSA (MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2) or PAP (MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2) to exosomes, while leaving the second transgene untargeted. Treatment of mice with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 led to a striking increase in the immune response against PAP. Anti-PAP antibody titers developed more rapidly and reached levels that were 10- to 100-fold higher than those for mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. Furthermore, treatment with MVA-BN-PAP-C1C2 increased the frequency of PAP-specific T cells 5-fold compared with mice treated with MVA-BN-PRO. These improvements translated into a greater frequency of tumor rejection in a PAP-expressing solid tumor model. Likewise, treatment with MVA-BN-PSA-C1C2 increased the antigenicity of PSA compared with treatment with MVA-BN-PRO and resulted in a trend of improved antitumor efficacy in a PSA-expressing tumor model. These experiments confirm that targeting antigen localization to exosomes is a viable approach for improving the therapeutic potential of MVA-BN-PRO in humans.

  13. Genetic diversity and antigenicity variation of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Takemae, Hitoshi; Simking, Pacharathon; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe clinical disease in cattle worldwide. The genetic diversity of parasite antigens often results in different immune profiles in infected animals, hindering efforts to develop immune control methodologies against the B. bovis infection. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the merozoite surface antigen-1 (msa-1) gene using 162 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from cattle populations reared in different geographical regions of Thailand. The identity scores shared among 93 msa-1 gene sequences isolated by PCR amplification were 43.5-100%, and the similarity values among the translated amino acid sequences were 42.8-100%. Of 23 total clades detected in our phylogenetic analysis, Thai msa-1 gene sequences occurred in 18 clades; seven among them were composed of sequences exclusively from Thailand. To investigate differential antigenicity of isolated MSA-1 proteins, we expressed and purified eight recombinant MSA-1 (rMSA-1) proteins, including an rMSA-1 from B. bovis Texas (T2Bo) strain and seven rMSA-1 proteins based on the Thai msa-1 sequences. When these antigens were analyzed in a western blot assay, anti-T2Bo cattle serum strongly reacted with the rMSA-1 from T2Bo, as well as with three other rMSA-1 proteins that shared 54.9-68.4% sequence similarity with T2Bo MSA-1. In contrast, no or weak reactivity was observed for the remaining rMSA-1 proteins, which shared low sequence similarity (35.0-39.7%) with T2Bo MSA-1. While demonstrating the high genetic diversity of the B. bovis msa-1 gene in Thailand, the present findings suggest that the genetic diversity results in antigenicity variations among the MSA-1 antigens of B. bovis in Thailand.

  14. New diagnostic antigens for early trichinellosis: the excretory-secretory antigens of Trichinella spiralis intestinal infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ge Ge; Liu, Ruo Dan; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiao Lin; Liu, Chun Yin; Zhang, Xi; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The excretory-secretory (ES) antigens from Trichinella spiralis muscle larvae (ML) are the most commonly used diagnostic antigens for trichinellosis, but anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies cannot be detected until 2-3 weeks after infection; there is an obvious window period between Trichinella infection and antibody positivity. Intestinal infective larvae (IIL) are the first invasive stage during Trichinella infection, and their ES antigens are firstly exposed to the immune system and might be the early diagnostic markers of trichinellosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the early diagnostic values of IIL ES antigens for trichinellosis. The IIL were collected from intestines of infected mice at 6 h postinfection (hpi), and IIL ES antigens were prepared by incubation for 18 h. Anti-Trichinella IgG antibodies in mice infected with 100 ML were detectable by ELISA with IIL ES antigens as soon as 10 days postinfection (dpi), but ELISA with ML ES antigens did not permit detection of infected mice before 12 dpi. When the sera of patients with trichinellosis at 19 dpi were assayed, the sensitivity (100 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was evidently higher than 75 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05) The specificity (96.86 %) of ELISA with IIL ES antigens was also higher than 89.31 % of ELISA with ML ES antigens (P < 0.05). The IIL ES antigens provided a new source of diagnostic antigens and could be considered as a potential early diagnostic antigen for trichinellosis.

  15. From the antigen-presenting cell to the antigen-presenting vesicle: the exosomes.

    PubMed

    Schartz, Noël Emile Célestin; Chaput, Nathalie; André, Fabrice; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2002-08-01

    Exosomes are membrane vesicles of 30 to 100 nm in diameter, of endocytic origin, and are produced and secreted in vitro by living cells of diverse origin. In vivo and in vitro experiments suggest, from their particular proteomic composition, that exosomes are involved in the transfer of tumor antigens to antigen presenting cells, and in the stimulation of a specific immune response. In this review, we provide a molecular characterization of exosomes. The hypotheses accounting for exosome biogenesis will be outlined. Finally, we will describe their bioactivities and discuss their potential relevance and clinical implementation for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Cloning and functional analysis of spliced isoforms of human nuclear factor I-X: interference with transcriptional activation by NFI/CTF in a cell-type specific manner.

    PubMed Central

    Apt, D; Liu, Y; Bernard, H U

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of the epithelial specificity of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) enhancer pointed out an important role of nuclear factor I (NFI). In epithelial cells, NFI proteins are derived from the NFI-C gene and referred to as NFI/CTF. In contrast, fibroblasts, where the enhancer is inactive, express high levels of NFI from the NFI-X gene. To compare NFI-C and NFI-X derived transcription factors, we cloned and functionally investigated two differentially spliced forms of NFI-X from human fibroblasts. NFI-X1 has 95% homology with a transcript previously identified in hamster liver cells. NFI-X2, a spliced variant, misses 41 amino acids of the proline-rich activation domain. NFI-X expression, examined by Northern blots, shows strong cell-type specific variation in comparison with NFI/CTF. While the transcriptional activation domain of NFI-X2, functionally tested as GAL4-fusion protein in epithelial and fibroblast cells, activates transcription from promoter as well as enhancer position similar to NFI/CTF-1, the activation domain of NFI-X1 fails to activate transcription from enhancer position. In Drosophila cells, void of endogenous NFI proteins, full length NFI/CTF-1 and NFI-X2 activate a reporter construct containing only NFI sites as well as the NFI dependent HPV-16 enhancer. In contrast, NFI-X1 fails to activate the HPV-16 enhancer. Furthermore, overexpression of NFI-X1 in epithelial cells down-regulates the HPV-16 enhancer. Our findings suggest that the family of NFI transcription factors should not be viewed as constitutive activators, but rather, that NFI-C and NFI-X have divergent functions after binding in promoter or enhancer position. This property, combined with the differential expression of NFI-X, can achieve cell-type specificity of NFI dependent promoters and enhancers. Images PMID:7937100

  17. The complex becomes more complex: protein-protein interactions of SnRK1 with DUF581 family proteins provide a framework for cell- and stimulus type-specific SnRK1 signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Nietzsche, Madlen; Schießl, Ingrid; Börnke, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    In plants, SNF1-related kinase (SnRK1) responds to the availability of carbohydrates as well as to environmental stresses by down-regulating ATP consuming biosynthetic processes, while stimulating energy-generating catabolic reactions through gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation. The functional SnRK1 complex is a heterotrimer where the catalytic α subunit associates with a regulatory β subunit and an activating γ subunit. Several different metabolites as well as the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have been shown to modulate SnRK1 activity in a cell- and stimulus-type specific manner. It has been proposed that tissue- or stimulus-specific expression of adapter proteins mediating SnRK1 regulation can at least partly explain the differences observed in SnRK1 signaling. By using yeast two-hybrid and in planta bi-molecular fluorescence complementation assays we were able to demonstrate that proteins containing the domain of unknown function (DUF) 581 could interact with both isoforms of the SnRK1α subunit (AKIN10/11) of Arabidopsis. A structure/function analysis suggests that the DUF581 is a generic SnRK1 interaction module and co-expression with DUF581 proteins in plant cells leads to reallocation of the kinase to specific regions within the nucleus. Yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that SnRK1 and DUF581 proteins share common interaction partners inside the nucleus. The analysis of available microarray data implies that expression of the 19 members of the DUF581 encoding gene family in Arabidopsis is differentially regulated by hormones and environmental cues, indicating specialized functions of individual family members. We hypothesize that DUF581 proteins could act as mediators conferring tissue- and stimulus-type specific differences in SnRK1 regulation. PMID:24600465

  18. The complex becomes more complex: protein-protein interactions of SnRK1 with DUF581 family proteins provide a framework for cell- and stimulus type-specific SnRK1 signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Nietzsche, Madlen; Schießl, Ingrid; Börnke, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    In plants, SNF1-related kinase (SnRK1) responds to the availability of carbohydrates as well as to environmental stresses by down-regulating ATP consuming biosynthetic processes, while stimulating energy-generating catabolic reactions through gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation. The functional SnRK1 complex is a heterotrimer where the catalytic α subunit associates with a regulatory β subunit and an activating γ subunit. Several different metabolites as well as the hormone abscisic acid (ABA) have been shown to modulate SnRK1 activity in a cell- and stimulus-type specific manner. It has been proposed that tissue- or stimulus-specific expression of adapter proteins mediating SnRK1 regulation can at least partly explain the differences observed in SnRK1 signaling. By using yeast two-hybrid and in planta bi-molecular fluorescence complementation assays we were able to demonstrate that proteins containing the domain of unknown function (DUF) 581 could interact with both isoforms of the SnRK1α subunit (AKIN10/11) of Arabidopsis. A structure/function analysis suggests that the DUF581 is a generic SnRK1 interaction module and co-expression with DUF581 proteins in plant cells leads to reallocation of the kinase to specific regions within the nucleus. Yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that SnRK1 and DUF581 proteins share common interaction partners inside the nucleus. The analysis of available microarray data implies that expression of the 19 members of the DUF581 encoding gene family in Arabidopsis is differentially regulated by hormones and environmental cues, indicating specialized functions of individual family members. We hypothesize that DUF581 proteins could act as mediators conferring tissue- and stimulus-type specific differences in SnRK1 regulation.

  19. Cloning and expression of genes encoding Haemophilus somnus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Chikami, G; Yarnall, M; Smith, J; Guiney, D G

    1988-01-01

    A genomic library of Haemophilus somnus 2336, a virulent isolate from a calf with pneumonia (later used to reproduce H. somnus experimental pneumonia), was constructed in the cosmid vector pHC79. The gene bank in Escherichia coli DH1 was screened by filter immunoassay with convalescent-phase serum, which reacted with several outer membrane antigens of H. somnus. On Western blotting (immunoblotting) of immunoreactive colonies, five clones were found to express proteins which comigrated with H. somnus surface antigens. Three clones (DH1 pHS1, pHS3, and pHS4) expressed both a 120-kilodalton (kDa) antigen and a 76-kDa antigen, one clone (DH1 pHS2) expressed only the 76-kDa antigen, and the fifth clone (DH1 pHS5) expressed a 60-kDa antigen. The 120-kDa and 76-kDa antigens were found internally, whereas the 60-kDa protein was detected in the DH1 pHS5 culture supernatant as membrane blebs or insoluble protein. Both the H. somnus 120-kDa antigen and the recombinant 120-kDa antigen had immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity. Restriction endonuclease mapping demonstrated that the genomic DNA inserts of clones expressing the 76-kDa antigen shared a common 28.4-kilobase-pair region, and the three clones also expressing the 120-kDa antigen shared an additional 7.0-kilobase-pair region. The restriction endonuclease map of pHS5, which expressed the 60-kDa antigen, was not similar to the maps of the other four plasmids. Since these three H. somnus antigens reacted with protective convalescent-phase serum, the recombinants which express these proteins should be useful in further studies of protective immunity in bovine H. somnus disease. Images PMID:2843469

  20. LOCALIZATION OF ANTIGEN IN TISSUE CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Coons, Albert H.; Leduc, Elizabeth H.; Kaplan, Melvin H.

    1951-01-01

    The fate of three proteins, crystalline hen's egg albumin, crystalline bovine plasma albumin, and human plasma γ-globulin, was traced after intravenous injection into mice. This was done by preparing frozen sections of quick-frozen tissue, allowing what foreign protein might be present in the section to react with homologous antibody labelled with fluorescein, and examining the section under the fluorescence microscope. By this means, which employs the serological specificity of the protein as a natural "marker," all three of these proteins were found in the cells of the reticulo-endothelial system, the connective tissue, the vascular endothelium, the lymphocytes of spleen and lymph node, and the epithelium of the kidney tubules, the liver, and in very small amounts in the adrenal. The central nervous system was not studied. All three persisted longest in the reticulo-endothelial system and the connective tissue, and in the doses employed egg white (10 mg.) was no longer detectable after 1 day, bovine albumin (10 mg.) after 2 days, and human γ-globulin (4 mg.) after 6 days, although in a somewhat higher dose (10 mg.) human γ-globulin persisted longer than 8 days. Egg albumin differed from the others in not being detectable in the cells of the renal glomerulus. It was found that each of the three proteins was present in the nuclei of each cell type enumerated above, often in higher concentration than in the cytoplasm. Further, some of the nuclei not only contained antigen, soon after injection, but were also surrounded by a bright ring associated with the nuclear membrane. By means of photographic records under the fluorescence microscope of sections stained for antigen, and direct observation under the light microscope of the same field subsequently stained with hematoxylin and eosin, it could be determined that the antigen was not adsorbed to chromatin or nucleoli, but was apparently in solution in the nuclear sap. PMID:14803641

  1. Purification and characterization of the major antigen WI-1 from Blastomyces dermatitidis yeasts and immunological comparison with A antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, B S; Jones, J M

    1994-01-01

    The lack of well-defined antigens from Blastomyces dermatitidis has hampered the ability to reliably diagnose human infection and study the immunobiology of blastomycosis. We recently discovered a novel surface protein on B. dermatitidis yeasts, designated WI-1, and demonstrated it to be a key antigenic target of humoral and cellular responses during infection. In the present article, we purified and characterized WI-1 and compared it immunologically with the only Blastomyces antigen commercially available, A antigen. WI-1 was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography over a DEAE-cellulose column. It eluted from the column at a point on the salt gradient corresponding to 460 to 490 mM NaCl, reflecting its acidic pI of approximately equal to 5.2. Purified WI-1 had a molecular mass of 120 kDa and contained a large amount of cysteine (85 residues) and aromatic amino acids but undetectable carbohydrate. In contrast, A antigen had a molecular mass of 135 kDa and contained 37% carbohydrate. Immunological comparison of the two antigens showed that, when radiolabeled, WI-1 was more reactive with anti-Blastomyces antisera than A antigen but did not cross-react with anti-Histoplasma antisera. Proteinase digestion of WI-1 eliminated its recognition by anti-WI-1 and anti-Blastomyces antisera. Proteinase treatment of A antigen had no effect on its recognition by anti-Blastomyces or anti-Histoplasma antisera, but periodate treatment abolished recognition by anti-Histoplasma antisera, indicating that the cross-reactive determinant(s) of A antigen is displayed on the accompanying carbohydrate. In further studies, anti-WI-1 antiserum reacted with A antigen and, conversely, anti-A antiserum and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reacted with WI-1, indicating a shared determinant on the two antigens. A recombinant 25-amino-acid repeat, recently cloned from WI-1 and found to be the major target of antibody recognition of WI-1, reacted strongly with anti-A antiserum and MAbs. In MAb

  2. Protective antibody titres and antigenic competition in multivalent Dichelobacter nodosus fimbrial vaccines using characterised rDNA antigens.

    PubMed

    Raadsma, H W; O'Meara, T J; Egerton, J R; Lehrbach, P R; Schwartzkoff, C L

    1994-03-01

    The relationship between K-agglutination antibody titres and protection against experimental challenge with Dichelobacter nodosus, the effect of increasing the number of D. nodosus fimbrial antigens, and the importance of the nature of additional antigens in multivalent vaccines on antibody response and protection against experimental challenge with D. nodosus were examined in Merino sheep. A total of 204 Merino sheep were allocated to one of 12 groups, and vaccinated with preparations containing a variable number of rDNA D. nodosus fimbrial antigens. The most complex vaccine contained ten fimbrial antigens from all major D. nodosus serogroups, while the least complex contained a single fimbrial antigen. In addition to D. nodosus fimbrial antigens, other bacterial rDNA fimbrial antigens (Moraxella bovis Da12d and Escherichia coli K99), and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used in some vaccines. Antibody titres to fimbrial antigens and BSA were measured by agglutination and ELISA tests, respectively. Antibody titres were determined on five occasions (Weeks 0, 3, 6, 8, and 11 after primary vaccination). All sheep were exposed to an experimental challenge with virulent isolates of D. nodosus from either serogroup A or B, 8 weeks after primary vaccination. For D. nodosus K-agglutinating antibody titres, a strong negative correlation between antibody titre and footrot lesion score was observed. This relationship was influenced by the virulence of the challenge strain. Increasing the number of fimbrial antigens in experimental rDNA D. nodosus fimbrial vaccines resulted in a linear decrease in K-agglutinating antibody titres to individual D. nodosus serogroups. Similarly, a linear decrease in protection to challenge with homologous serogroups was observed as the number of D. nodosus fimbrial antigens represented in the vaccine increased. The reduction in antibody titres in multicomponent vaccines is thought to be due to antigenic competition. The level of competition

  3. Soluble antigens from group B streptococci induce cytokine production in human blood cultures.

    PubMed Central

    von Hunolstein, C; Totolian, A; Alfarone, G; Mancuso, G; Cusumano, V; Teti, G; Orefici, G

    1997-01-01

    Group B streptococcal antigens stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 production in human blood cultures in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The minimal concentrations of type-specific polysaccharides, lipoteichoic acid, and group-specific polysaccharide required to produce these effects were, respectively, 0.01, 1, and 10 microg/ml. Cell separation experiments indicated that monocytes were the cell type mainly responsible for cytokine production. Time course studies indicated that TNF-alpha was released before the other cytokines. TNF-alpha, however, did not appear to directly induce IL-1beta, as shown by blockade experiments with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies. IL-6 levels were moderately but significantly decreased by anti-TNF-alpha. These data indicate that several products from group B streptococci are able to directly stimulate human monocytes to release TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6. These findings may be clinically relevant, since proinflammatory cytokines can mediate pathophysiologic changes during sepsis. PMID:9317001

  4. Characterization of the cellular antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast form.

    PubMed Central

    Casotto, M

    1990-01-01

    Antigenic components of the yeast extract of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Linder 2511 cultured for 3, 8, 20, 30, and 60 days were examined by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. The 3-day extract was chosen for characterization of the antigenic components because its stability did not vary with time and it contained all antigens identified by patient sera. Antibodies to cross-reacting antigens of P. brasiliensis extracts were detected in sera from patients with histoplasmosis, candidiasis, and aspergillosis. The 58-, 57-, 21-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) antigens were specific for P. brasiliensis, while the 48- and 45-kDa antigens were specific for paracoccidioidomycosis. The Western blot technique is a useful tool for the diagnosis of disease and revealed heterogeneity in the responses of patient sera. The combination of the 58-, 57-, and 45-kDa proteins confirmed a diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis (87% of the cases). Images PMID:2380351

  5. Human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Fukunishi, T; Barcos, M; Tanigaki, N; Pressman, D

    1979-01-01

    Human Ia-like antigens in liver and kidney were shown by the immunofluorescence assay to be present mostly in the endothelial-mesenchymal cells of these organs. The parenchymal cells apparently contained no human Ia-like antigens. The antigens in liver and kidney were purified and shown to have the same subunit structure as human Ia-like antigens of cultured B-lymphoid cells. The human Ia-like antigens in non-lymphoid organs, not only in liver and kidney but also in testis, heart, muscle and brain, carried all the xenoantigenic characteristics of human Ia-like antigens expressed on lymphoid cells of B-cell lineage. Images Figure 1 PMID:389786

  6. Lessons learned from cancer vaccine trials and target antigen choice.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of tumor antigens have been targeted in cancer immunotherapy studies. Traditionally, the focus has been on commonly overexpressed antigens shared across many patients and/or tumor types. As the field has progressed, the identity of human tumor rejection antigens has broadened. Immunologic monitoring of clinical trials has slowly elucidated candidate biomarkers of immune response and clinical response, and conversely, of immune dysfunction and suppression. We have utilized MART-1/Melan-A in our melanoma studies and observed a high frequency of immune responses and several significant clinical responses in patients vaccinated with this melanosomal protein. Alpha-fetoprotein is a shared, overexpressed tumor antigen and secreted glycoprotein that we have tested in hepatocellular cancer vaccines. Our recent studies have identified immunosuppressive and immune-skewing activities of this antigen. The choice of target antigen and its form can have unexpected effects.

  7. Identification of antigenically related polypeptides at centrioles and basal bodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, W; Fung, B; Shyamala, M; Kasamatsu, H

    1981-04-01

    An antigen localized at the centriolar region has been identified by indirect immunofluorescence studies in African green monkey kidney, human, hamster, rat, and mouse cells. The antigen consists of two polypeptides of 14,000 and 17,000 daltons. A related antigen is also present at the basal body region in ciliated cells from chicken, cat, mouse, pig, steer, and rabbit trachea and from rabbit fimbria. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the immunoreactive antigen is indeed located in the region around the basal bodies of ciliated cat tracheal cells. Thus, we have found an antigen that is common to a variety of cell types from many different animal sources and is specifically associated with both centrioles and basal bodies. The possible role of the antigen in differentiation is discussed.

  8. Identification of antigenically related polypeptides at centrioles and basal bodies.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, W; Fung, B; Shyamala, M; Kasamatsu, H

    1981-01-01

    An antigen localized at the centriolar region has been identified by indirect immunofluorescence studies in African green monkey kidney, human, hamster, rat, and mouse cells. The antigen consists of two polypeptides of 14,000 and 17,000 daltons. A related antigen is also present at the basal body region in ciliated cells from chicken, cat, mouse, pig, steer, and rabbit trachea and from rabbit fimbria. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the immunoreactive antigen is indeed located in the region around the basal bodies of ciliated cat tracheal cells. Thus, we have found an antigen that is common to a variety of cell types from many different animal sources and is specifically associated with both centrioles and basal bodies. The possible role of the antigen in differentiation is discussed. Images PMID:6166008

  9. Antigen presentation for priming T cells in central system.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Shaoni; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2017-01-01

    Generation of myelin antigen-specific T cells is a major event in neuroimmune responses that causes demyelination. The antigen-priming of T cells and its location is important in chronic and acute inflammation. In autoimmune multiple sclerosis, the effector T cells are considered to generate in periphery. However, the reasons for chronic relapsing-remitting events are obscure. Considering mechanisms, a feasible aim of research is to investigate the role of antigen-primed T cells in lupus cerebritis. Last thirty years of investigations emphasize the relevance of microglia and infiltrated dendritic cells/macrophages as antigen presenting cells in the central nervous system. The recent approach towards circulating B-lymphocytes is an important area in the context. Here, we analyze the existing findings on antigen presentation in the central nervous system. The aim is to visualize signaling events of myelin antigen presentation to T cells and lead to the strategy of future goals on immunotherapy research.

  10. Overview of Plant-Made Vaccine Antigens against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Clemente, Marina; Corigliano, Mariana G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an overview of vaccine antigens against malaria produced in plants. Plant-based expression systems represent an interesting production platform due to their reduced manufacturing costs and high scalability. At present, different Plasmodium antigens and expression strategies have been optimized in plants. Furthermore, malaria antigens are one of the few examples of eukaryotic proteins with vaccine value expressed in plants, making plant-derived malaria antigens an interesting model to analyze. Up to now, malaria antigen expression in plants has allowed the complete synthesis of these vaccine antigens, which have been able to induce an active immune response in mice. Therefore, plant production platforms offer wonderful prospects for improving the access to malaria vaccines. PMID:22911156

  11. Predicted complementarity determining regions of the T cell antigen receptor determine antigen specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, C D; Eidelman, F J; Duncan, A; Hooshmand, F; Hedrick, S M

    1995-01-01

    The antigen receptor on T cells (TCR) has been predicted to have a structure similar to a membrane-anchored form of an immunoglobulin F(ab) fragment. Virtually all of the conserved amino acids that are important for inter- and intramolecular interactions in the VH-VL pair are also conserved in the TCR V alpha and V beta chains. A molecular model of the TCR has been constructed by homology and we have used the information from this, as well as the earlier structural predictions of others, to study the basis for specificity. Specifically, regions of a TCR cloned from an antigen-specific T cell were stitched into the corresponding framework of a second TCR. Results indicate that the substitution of amino acid sequences corresponding to the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of immunoglobulin can convey the specificity for antigen and major histocompatibility complex molecules. These data are consistent with a role, but not an exclusive role, for CDR3 in antigen peptide recognition. Images PMID:7534228

  12. Mycobacterium leprae antigens involved in human immune responses. I. Identification of four antigens by monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, W.J.; Hellqvist, L.; Basten, A.; Raison, R.L.

    1985-12-01

    Four distinct antigens were identified in soluble sonicates of Mycobacterium leprae by using a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity studies with other mycobacterial species were conducted by using ELISA and immunoblot assays, and demonstrated that determinants on two of the antigens were present in many mycobacteria, whereas the other two were limited in distribution. Competitive inhibition experiments with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies showed cross-inhibition between antibodies identifying two of the four antigenicbands. These two bands, of M/sub tau/ 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD, were resistant to protease treatment after immunoblotting. In contrast the two other bands of 16 and 70 KD were protease-sensitive. Although all four bands reacted with some human lepromatous leprosy sera in immunoblots, the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands were most prominent. Lepromatous leprosy sera also inhibited the binding of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies to each of the four antigens, with the mean titer causing 50% inhibition being higher for antibodies reacting with the 4.5 to 6 KD and 30 to 40 KD bands. These findings indicated that all four antigens were involved in the human B cell response to M. leprae.

  13. Induction of antigen-specific T suppressor cells by soluble Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Finkel, B E; Murphy, J W

    1988-01-01

    In naturally acquired paracoccidioidomycosis, patients have depressed in vivo and in vitro cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen. In addition, it has been reported that these patients have significant levels of circulating paracoccidioidal antigen in their sera. The primary purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of P. brasiliensis antigen on the CMI responses in a mouse model. On the basis of findings with other fungal agents, we predicted that circulating paracoccidioidal antigen may be inducing suppressor cells which modulate the CMI response. In this study, we show (i) that a soluble P. brasiliensis culture filtrate antigen (Pb.Ag) emulsified in complete Freund adjuvant and injected subcutaneously into mice induces reasonably high levels of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in CBA/J mice; (ii) that Pb.Ag elicits DTH reactions specific for P. brasiliensis when injected into footpads of immunized mice; and (iii) that an intravenous injection of Pb.Ag induces a population of lymph node and spleen cells which, upon adoptive transfer, suppress the afferent limb of the DTH response to paracoccidioidal antigen. The afferent suppressor cells can be detected in spleens as early as 5 days after Pb.Ag treatment, are present in significant numbers by 7 days in both spleens and lymph nodes, and are virtually absent by 14 days. In contrast, at 14 days after antigen injection, efferent suppressor cells were detected in spleens and lymph nodes. The Pb.Ag-induced afferent suppressor cells specifically inhibit the antiparacoccidioidal DTH response. They are nylon wool-nonadherent cells, and their activity is abrogated by anti-Thy-1 and complement treatment, indicating that they are T lymphocytes. The phenotype of these afferent suppressor T cells is L3T4+ Lyt-1+2- I-J+. The Pb.Ag-specific suppressor cells described in this paper are similar to the Ts1 cells in the azobenzenearsonate, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl, and

  14. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    antigens expressed on breast tumors. Towards this end we are developing peptide mimotopes of tumor associated carbohydrate antigens as they are T cell...dependent antigens. In our progress to date we have shown the 1) immunization with peptide mimotope activates a specific cellular response to a model murine...tumor cell line; 2) vaccination of mice with peptide eradicates established tumor; 3) Immunization with DNA format of the peptide suppresses tumor

  15. Controlled Release of Antigens for One Dose Immunization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    microencapsulation of antigen coated alum or by microencapsulating clusters of smaller (᝺ microns) microcapsules . Microcapsules under 10 microns in... microencapsulation were studied to determine what criteria must be satisfied to provide a protective immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen... microencapsulated in poly (DL-lactide-co- glycolide) in a form that was too large to be phagocytized and had an antigen release profile similar to that achieved with

  16. Mapping epitopes and antigenicity by site-directed masking

    PubMed Central

    Paus, Didrik; Winter, Greg

    2006-01-01

    Here we describe a method for mapping the binding of antibodies to the surface of a folded antigen. We first created a panel of mutant antigens (β-lactamase) in which single surface-exposed residues were mutated to cysteine. We then chemically tethered the cysteine residues to a solid phase, thereby masking a surface patch centered on each cysteine residue and blocking the binding of antibodies to this region of the surface. By these means we mapped the epitopes of several mAbs directed to β-lactamase. Furthermore, by depleting samples of polyclonal antisera to the masked antigens and measuring the binding of each depleted sample of antisera to unmasked antigen, we mapped the antigenicity of 23 different epitopes. After immunization of mice and rabbits with β-lactamase in Freund’s adjuvant, we found that the antisera reacted with both native and denatured antigen and that the antibody response was mainly directed to an exposed and flexible loop region of the native antigen. By contrast, after immunization in PBS, we found that the antisera reacted only weakly with denatured antigen and that the antibody response was more evenly distributed over the antigenic surface. We suggest that denatured antigen (created during emulsification in Freund’s adjuvant) elicits antibodies that bind mainly to the flexible regions of the native protein and that this explains the correlation between antigenicity and backbone flexibility. Denaturation of antigen during vaccination or natural infections would therefore be expected to focus the antibody response to the flexible loops. PMID:16754878

  17. Antigenic relationship between influenza B viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Chakraverty, Pratima

    1971-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether antigenic groupings exist among influenza B viruses. Altogether, 22 influenza type B strains isolated during the years 1940-68 were examined by reciprocal haemagglutination-inhibition, strain-specific complement-fixation, and serum neutralization tests with sera produced in ferrets and guinea-pigs. It was found that the strain-specific complement-fixation test was superior for separating influenza B viruses into groups whereas the haemagglutination-inhibition and serum neutralization tests were better for demonstrating similarities. The results obtained with these three immunological techniques confirmed that antigenic variation exists among influenza B viruses, although it is not as clearcut as among influenza A viruses. The results were subjected to numerical taxonomic analysis. Dendrograms and minimum-spanning trees were constructed, using methods based on cluster analysis of similarity coefficients. Four main groups of influenza B viruses were established, although they were all interlinked. The results of this study do not justify the separation of influenza B viruses into subtypes similar to those of influenza A viruses. PMID:5317011

  18. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  19. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and Its Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Peón, Alberto N.; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2013-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage) and canids (in its adult stage) that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models. PMID:23484125

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Identify Novel Neural Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Richard; Niday, Evelyn; Matus, Andrew

    1982-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were raised against synaptic plasma membranes from rat cerebellum. The hybridomas were screened with a solid-phase immunoassay, the positive lines were characterized by their immunoperoxidase staining pattern on cerebellum, and the specific polypeptide antigens were identified on protein blots. Among the Mabs described are some that stain only neurons or only glia and others that react with specific parts of cells, such as axons, dendrites, and synapses. Many Mabs reveal novel relationships between antigens and the cells in which they occur. For example, a Mab designated 7D5 reacts with a family of > 30 proteins but stains only glial cells. Several Mabs stain punctate sites of synaptic size and distribution in the cerebellar cortex but each reacts with a different subset of polypeptides. One of the most restricted cytological staining patterns is given by 12D5, which stains punctate sites in the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex and reacts with a single polypeptide band of apparent Mr 270,000. These results illustrate the feasibility of raising Mabs that can be used to follow the expression of specific gene products during brain development.

  1. Immunoregulation by Taenia crassiceps and its antigens.

    PubMed

    Peón, Alberto N; Espinoza-Jiménez, Arlett; Terrazas, Luis I

    2013-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps is a cestode parasite of rodents (in its larval stage) and canids (in its adult stage) that can also parasitize immunocompromised humans. We have studied the immune response elicited by this helminth and its antigens in mice and human cells, and have discovered that they have a strong capacity to induce chronic Th2-type responses that are primarily characterized by high levels of Th2 cytokines, low proliferative responses in lymphocytes, an immature and LPS-tolerogenic profile in dendritic cells, the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and, specially, alternatively activated macrophages. We also have utilized the immunoregulatory capabilities of this helminth to successfully modulate autoimmune responses and the outcome of other infectious diseases. In the present paper, we review the work of others and ourselves with regard to the immune response induced by T. crassiceps and its antigens, and we compare the advances in our understanding of this parasitic infection model with the knowledge that has been obtained from other selected models.

  2. Identification of Salmonella O antigens by coagglutination.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J O; Britt, L E; Harrell, W K

    1984-01-01

    This study concerns the preparation of reagents for identifying the somatic O antigens of Salmonella enteritidis. Coagglutination reagents (COAGs) with antibody fixed to killed and stabilized protein A-bearing staphylococci were prepared with antisera which were used for identifying the somatic O antigens of S. enteritidis by the slide agglutination test. The reactions of the COAGs were compared with those obtained with the grouping antisera in routine slide agglutination tests in which 41 or more serologically different Salmonella strains, representing most of the known groups, were used. One-third of the COAGs gave identical reactions to those of the slide agglutination antisera. The reactions of the other COAGs varied from the slide agglutination antisera results, some by many reactions and others by only a few. The coagglutination procedure was more reactive than the routine slide agglutination test and resulted in cross-reactions which were not observed in the original grouping antisera. More COAGs were specific when they were tested with alcohol-treated cultures than with live cultures. Coagglutination conserves antiserum, allowing about 12 times as many tests for a given volume of group-specific glycerolized antiserum as does the slide agglutination method. PMID:6203928

  3. Antigen-Presenting Cells in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2017-02-06

    Professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the skin include dendritic cells, monocytes, and macrophages. They are highly dynamic, with the capacity to enter skin from the peripheral circulation, patrol within tissue, and migrate through lymphatics to draining lymph nodes. Skin APCs are endowed with antigen sensing, processing, and presenting machinery and play key roles in initiating, modulating, and resolving cutaneous inflammation. Skin APCs are a highly heterogeneous population with functionally specialized subsets that are developmentally imprinted and modulated by local tissue microenvironmental and inflammatory cues. This review explores recent advances that have allowed for a more accurate taxonomy of APC subsets found in both mouse and human skin. It also examines the functional specificity of individual APC subsets and their collaboration with other immune cell types that together promote adaptive T cell and regional cutaneous immune responses during homeostasis, inflammation, and disease. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Immunology Volume 35 is April 26, 2017 . Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  4. Autoantibodies and their antigens in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2009-08-01

    Autoantibody detection assists in the diagnosis and allows differentiation of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) type 1 (AIH-1), characterized by antinuclear antibody (ANA) and/or smooth muscle antibody (SMA), and type 2 (AIH-2), distinguished by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or antibodies to liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1). Detection of atypical perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) and anti-soluble liver antigen (SLA) antibodies can act as an additional pointer toward the diagnosis of AIH, particularly in the absence of the conventional autoantibodies. Routine autoantibody testing by indirect immunofluorescence has been recently complemented by molecular assays based on purified or recombinant antigens. Although the AIH-1-specific ANA and SMA targets need better definition, those of anti-LKM1 and anti-LC1 in AIH-2 have been clearly identified; the fine specificity of antibody reactivity and its clinical relevance to disease pathogenesis are the focus of ongoing investigation. This article critically discusses the current knowledge of the diagnostic and clinical significance of AIH-related autoantibody reactivities, focusing on key issues that the physician needs to be aware of to be able to request the appropriate testing and to interpret correctly the laboratory results within the clinical context of the patient.

  5. Emerging Antigens Involved in Allergic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Commins, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    New allergic diseases can “emerge” because of exposure to a novel antigen, because the immune responsiveness of the subject changes, or because of a change in the behavior of the population. Novel antigens have entered the environment as new pests in the home (e.g., Asian lady beetle or stink bugs), in the diet (e.g., prebiotics or wheat isolates), or because of the spread of a biting arthropod (e.g., ticks). Over the last few years, a significant new disease has been identified, which has changed the paradigm for food allergy. Bites of the tick, Amblyomma americanum, are capable of inducing IgE antibodies to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which is associated with two novel forms of anaphylaxis. In a large area of the southeastern United States, the disease of delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meat is now common. This disease challenges many previous rules about food allergy and provides a striking model of an emerging allergic disease. PMID:24095162

  6. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats.

  7. Antigen-Specific versus Non-Antigen-Specific Immunoadsorption in ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Koch, Raphael; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Busch, Veit; Wolters, Heiner; Kelsch, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ABO-incompatible (ABOi) renal transplantation (RTx) from living donors is an established procedure to expand the donor pool for patients with end stage renal disease. Immunoadsorption (IA) is a standard procedure for the removal of preformed antibodies against the allograft. In this study, antigen-specific and non-antigen-specific IA in ABOi RTx were compared. Patients and Methods 10 patients underwent antigen-specific IA (Glycosorb group) and 13 patients non-antigen-specific IA (Immunosorba group). The effects of both procedures regarding antibody reduction, number of treatments, complications, costs, as well as the allograft function and patient survival were compared between both groups. Results Although the IgG levels were reduced equally by both procedures (p=0.82), the reduction of the IgM level was more effective in the Glycosorb group (p=0.0172). Patients in both groups required a median number of 6 IA before ABOi RTx. Allograft function at one year after AB0i RTx was similar in both groups (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 66 vs. 64 ml/min/1.73m² respectively), with a death-censored graft survival of 90.0% and 92.3% respectively. Complication rates did not differ between procedures. Due to the reuse of non-antigen-specific Immunosorba columns, costs were considerably lower in this group; however, the use of the Immunosorba-based IA was less time-efficient. Conclusion Considering upcoming alternatives as simultaneous performance of dialysis and IA or a possible reuse of Glycosorb columns, this might become less relevant in the future. PMID:26121389

  8. Blood group ABO and Lewis antigens in bladder tumors: correlation between glycosyltransferase activity and antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Orntoft, T F; Wolf, H

    1988-01-01

    Pronounced changes in the expression of ABO and Lewis antigens have been observed in transitional cell carcinomas compared with normal urothelium. These changes are associated with changes in the activity of blood-group gene-encoded glycosyltransferases. This paper describes the correlation between blood-group antigen expression and the activity of glycosyltransferases in transitional cell carcinomas. Examined individuals were A1A2BO, Lewis, and secretor typed by the use of blood and saliva. The activity of alpha-2-, and alpha-4-L-fucosyltransferases as well as the alpha-3-N-acetyl-D-galactosaminyltransferase were determined as p-moles of labelled sugar incorporated by Lacto-N-biose I and 2'-fucosyllactose, respectively, per 100,000 carcinoma cells. In 3 non-secretors whose erythrocytes types as Le(a+b-), the alpha-2-L-fucosyltransferase activity was similar to that in 3 secretors, and the Leb antigen could be demonstrated to be present by monoclonal antibodies, both by immunohistological and immunochemical means. In 11 tumors from A individuals, the A1-transferase was severely reduced in 9 individuals who showed a loss of A antigen expression, and present in 2 individuals with A antigen expression in cytoplasmic vesicles. In conclusion, we demonstrate a good correlation between individual glycosyltransferase activity and expression of blood group Leb and loss of expression of blood group A in transitional cell carcinomas. Immunostaining of neutral glycolipids separated by TLC showed the Leb-active glycolipids to be simple hexa-saccharides in both secretors and non-secretors.

  9. MHC structure and function – antigen presentation. Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The setting for the occurrence of an immune response is that of the need to cope with a vast array of different antigens from both pathogenic and non-pathogenic sources. When the first barriers against infection and innate defense fail, adaptive immune response enters the stage for recognition of the antigens by means of extremely variable molecules, namely immunoglobulins and T-cell receptors. The latter recognize the antigen exposed on cell surfaces, in the form of peptides presented by the HLA molecule. The first part of this review details the central role played by these molecules, establishing the close connection existing between their structure and their antigen presenting function. PMID:25807245

  10. The Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Antigen Cross Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Gong, Jianlin; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that bind tumor antigens and mediate their uptake into antigen presenting cells. HSP–antigen complexes are then directed toward either the MHC class I pathway through antigen cross presentation or the conventional class II pathway, leading to activation of T cell subsets. Uptake of HSP-chaperoned polypeptides can involve both receptor-mediated and receptor-independent routes, and mechanisms of antigen sorting between the Class I and II pathways after uptake are currently under investigation. The processes involved in internalization of HSP–antigen complexes differ somewhat from the mechanisms previously determined for (unchaperoned) particulate and free soluble antigens. A number of studies show that HSP-facilitated antigen cross presentation requires uptake of the complexes by scavenger receptors (SR) followed by processing in the proteasome, and loading onto MHC class I molecules. In this review we have examined the roles of HSPs and SR in antigen uptake, sorting, processing, cell signaling, and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:22566944

  11. Bayesian nonparametric clustering in phylogenetics: modeling antigenic evolution in influenza.

    PubMed

    Cybis, Gabriela B; Sinsheimer, Janet S; Bedford, Trevor; Rambaut, Andrew; Lemey, Philippe; Suchard, Marc A

    2017-01-18

    Influenza is responsible for up to 500,000 deaths every year, and antigenic variability represents much of its epidemiological burden. To visualize antigenic differences across many viral strains, antigenic cartography methods use multidimensional scaling on binding assay data to map influenza antigenicity onto a low-dimensional space. Analysis of such assay data ideally leads to natural clustering of influenza strains of similar antigenicity that correlate with sequence evolution. To understand the dynamics of these antigenic groups, we present a framework that jointly models genetic and antigenic evolution by combining multidimensional scaling of binding assay data, Bayesian phylogenetic machinery and nonparametric clustering methods. We propose a phylogenetic Chinese restaurant process that extends the current process to incorporate the phylogenetic dependency structure between strains in the modeling of antigenic clusters. With this method, we are able to use the genetic information to better understand the evolution of antigenicity throughout epidemics, as shown in applications of this model to H1N1 influenza. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Enhancement of Antigen-Specific Suppression by Muramyl Dipeptide

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Thomas A.; Krieger, Nancy J.; Pesce, Amadeo; Michael, J. Gabriel

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the synthetic adjuvant MDP (N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglu-tamine) on the generation of antigen-specific suppression was investigated. Suppression of the anti-bovine serum albumin response, which was achieved by intravenous administration of a peptic fragment of the antigen, was greatly enhanced by simultaneous administration of MDP. Induction of suppression by a combination of bovine serum albumin fragments and MDP was found to be antigen specific and appeared to occur via the generation of antigen-specific suppressor T cells. PMID:6187686

  13. Pasteurella haemolytica antigens associated with resistance to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Simons, K R; Confer, A W; Panciera, R J; Clinkenbeard, K D

    1989-01-01

    Antigens associated with whole Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A serotype 1, a capsular carbohydrate-protein extract of the organism, and P. haemolytica leukotoxin were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antigens of the electrophoresed preparations were detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with sera from cattle which were either nonvaccinated or vaccinated with live or killed P. haemolytica vaccines and had variable degrees of resistance to experimental pneumonic pasteurellosis. Distinct, easily recognizable antigens of these preparations were identified, and the antibody responses to these antigens were quantified by densitometry. To determine their importance to disease resistance, we then compared antibody responses with experimental lesion scores. Antibody reactivity to surface antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and present in two or more of the preparations were detected at 86, 66, 51, 49, 34, 31, and 16 kilodaltons (kDa). Of these, antibody responses to antigens at 86, 49, and 31 kDa appeared most important based on their concentration and significance levels. Antibody reactivity to leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and common with important surface antigens were detected at 86, 66, and 49 kDa. Antibody responses to unique leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance were present at 92 and 58 kDa. Images PMID:2917783

  14. T-cell responses to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, P K; Waterfield, J D; Gascoigne, N R; Sharrock, C E; Mitchison, N A

    1982-01-01

    We have investigated the helper and cytotoxic T-cell response to minor histocompatibility antigens and generated long term antigen-specific cell lines to them. Antigen-specific activity was selected for by regular restimulation with irradiated cells bearing the antigens in the presence of interleukin 2, so that alloreactivity to other cell surface antigens was gradually lost. Helper T cells cultured over several months were active in vivo and in vitro, but the culturing method eventually selected for cytotoxic T cells at the expense of helper T cells, with concomitant changes in the proportions of cells expressing the Lyt phenotypes. Individual long term cultures of cytotoxic T cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens were restricted by either H2K or D but not both. Helper T cells to minor histocompatibility antigens derived directly from primed F1 mice did not show restriction to the priming parental haplotype. This is consistent with antigen reprocessing by the F1 antigen presenting cells such that populations of helper T cells restricted by both parental H-2 haplotypes were primed. F1 cytotoxic T cells were restricted to the parental H-2 haplotype used for in vitro boosting, irrespective of which H-2 was used for in vivo priming. PMID:6214502

  15. Antigenic variation among Borrelia spp. in relapsing fever.

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, K S; Farmer, S G; Komorowski, R A; Knox, K K

    1986-01-01

    Seven antigens of Borrelia hermsii, B. parkeri, and B. turicatae with isoelectric points in the range of 4.4 to 5.0 and molecular masses of 40 to 43 kilodaltons played a role in the relapse phenomenon of relapsing fever. Based upon location of the antigens in the outer envelope, the molecular weight, and Western blot analysis, the antigens from each phase of spirochetemia appeared to be a mixture of the serotype-specific antigens of cloned B. hermsii. Images PMID:3536750

  16. Immunochemical properties of antigen-specific monkey T-cell suppressor factor induced with a Streptococcus mutans antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, J R; Zanders, E D; Kontiainen, S; Lehner, T

    1980-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor factor could be released from monkey suppressor T cells induced in vitro with a protein antigen isolated from the carcinogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. The suppressor activity was due to the factor itself and not to carryover of free antigen. Characterization of the monkey factor revealed it to have a molecular weight of ca. 70,000, and to contain a constant region and determinants encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The presence of immunoglobulin determinants could not be demonstrated. However, by virtue of its adsorption to specific antigen, an antigen-combining site was shown to be present. The possible regulatory role of streptococcal antigen-specific suppressor factor in protection against dental caries is discussed. PMID:6164645

  17. Do FY antigens act as minor histocompatibility antigens in the graft-versus-host disease paradigm after human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Chaabane, Manel; Kaabi, Houda; Torjemane, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Othmane, Tarek; Hmida, Slama

    2012-03-01

    FY antigens are candidate minor histocompatibility antigens relevant to renal allograft rejection, but no data have been reported about their role in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of donor/recipient disparity at FY antigens on the incidence of GVHD in Tunisian patients receiving an HLA-identical HSCT. This work enrolled 105 Tunisian pairs of recipients and their HLA-identical sibling donors of HSCs. FY genotyping was performed with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method and donor/recipient disparity for these antigens was analyzed at two levels: incompatibility and nonidentity. The case-control analyses showed no significant correlation between FY disparity and the incidence of either acute or chronic GVHD. Sample size calculation showed that 572 cases and 1716 controls would be necessary to be able to detect a significant association with 80% power and two-sided type I error level of 5% (α=0.05). The lack of association in the studied cohort may be explained by the low immunogenicity of FY antigens in HSCT context, compared with other antigens such as HA-1 and CD31.

  18. Tissue- and cell type-specific expression of cytochrome P450 1A1 and cytochrome P450 1A2 mRNA in the mouse localized in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Dey, A; Jones, J E; Nebert, D W

    1999-08-01

    We used in situ hybridization to examine organ- and cell type-specific constitutive and 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC)-inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNA expression in various tissues of the C57BL/6N mouse. In situ hybridization was carried out 10 hr after the mice had received intraperitoneal 3MC, or vehicle alone. We detected levels of 3MC-induced CYP1A1 mRNA in: liver (centrilobular, more so than periportal, regions); lung (Clara Type II cells much more than Type I epithelial cells); brain, especially endothelial cells lining the vascular surface of the choroid plexus; the digestive tract (duodenum > jejunum > ileum > colon > esophagus > stomach--in particular, the villous epithelium, plus cells surrounding glands in the lamina propria); renal corpuscles of the kidney; the ovary (medulla more so than cortex); and the endothelial cells of blood vessels throughout the animal. Constitutive CYP1A1 mRNA was not detectable by in situ hybridization in any of these tissues. In contrast, constitutive CYP1A2 mRNA was measurable in liver, and 3MC-inducible CYP1A2 mRNA was observed only in liver, lung, and duodenum (having cell-type locations similar to those of CYP1A1); the other above-mentioned tissues were negative for CYP1A2 mRNA. These data demonstrate the striking differences in tissue- and cell type-specific expression between the two members of the mouse Cypla subfamily. Because of the ubiquitous nature of 3MC-inducible CYP1A1 throughout the animal rather than just "portals of entry," these results support our hypothesis that CYP1A1, induced by particular endogenous signals in various tissues and cell types, might participate in one or more critical life processes--in addition to its well-established role of metabolism of polycyclic hydrocarbons, certain drugs, and other environmental pollutants.

  19. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  20. Antibody-induced antigenic modulation is antigen dependent: characterization of 22 proteins on a malignant human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Pesando, J.M.; Hoffman, P.; Abed, M.

    1986-12-01

    Expression of several of the surface antigens on normal and malignant hematopoietic cells is reduced or is modulated by incubation with specific antibodies. Although antigenic modulation provides a means by which cells can escape antibody-mediated immune destruction, the physiologic significance and frequency of this phenomenon are both poorly understood. To begin to address these issues, the authors identified and characterized surface antigens on the malignant B cell line Laz 221 established from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Indirect immunofluorescence analysis with the use of 26 hematopoietic cell populations and immune precipitation studies with the use of iodinated ALL cells indicate the 163 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) identify 22 different proteins on this cell line, including at least six previously described surface molecules. Seven of these antigens are expressed by all nucleated cells examined, whereas only the ..mu.. chain of immunoglobulin is B cell specific. Studies that made use of multiple MoAb specific for the same antigen suggest that the capacity for antigenic modulation is an intrinsic property of individual antigens. These studies also suggest that the murine immune response to shared human antigens varies from one immunizing cell population to another. Immunogenicity of individual human antigens in the mouse may be a function of their cell surface environment.

  1. A universal computational model for predicting antigenic variants of influenza A virus based on conserved antigenic structures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yousong; Wang, Dayan; Wang, Jianhong; Li, Kenli; Tan, Zhongyang; Shu, Yuelong; Jiang, Taijiao

    2017-01-01

    Rapid determination of the antigenicity of influenza A virus could help identify the antigenic variants in time. Currently, there is a lack of computational models for predicting antigenic variants of some common hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses. By means of sequence analysis, we demonstrate here that multiple HA subtypes of influenza A virus undergo similar mutation patterns of HA1 protein (the immunogenic part of HA). Further analysis on the antigenic variation of influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 showed that the amino acid residues’ contribution to antigenic variation highly differed in these subtypes, while the regional bands, defined based on their distance to the top of HA1, played conserved roles in antigenic variation of these subtypes. Moreover, the computational models for predicting antigenic variants based on regional bands performed much better in the testing HA subtype than those did based on amino acid residues. Therefore, a universal computational model, named PREDAV-FluA, was built based on the regional bands to predict the antigenic variants for all HA subtypes of influenza A viruses. The model achieved an accuracy of 0.77 when tested with avian influenza H9N2 viruses. It may help for rapid identification of antigenic variants in influenza surveillance. PMID:28165025

  2. F41 pili as protective antigens of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli that produce F41, K99, or both pilus antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Runnels, P L; Moseley, S L; Moon, H W

    1987-01-01

    Pigs suckling dams that have been vaccinated with pilus antigen are protected against challenge with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains that express the same pilus antigen. However, some ETEC strains express more than one pilus antigen. Pregnant swine were vaccinated either with E. coli HB101 that harbored a recombinant plasmid coding for F41 expression (F41+) or with the HB101 parent strain that carries the pHC79 vector (F41-). Suckling pigs born to vaccinated dams were challenged with ETEC that expressed either K99, F41, or both pilus antigens. Production of F41 in vivo was demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay of sections of ileum and by seroconversion against F41 antigen by pigs challenged with F41+ and K99+ F41+ ETEC strains. The F41+ vaccine protected against challenge with an F41+ ETEC strain. In contrast, F41+ vaccination did not protect against challenge with K99+ or K99+ F41+ ETEC strains. The F41- vaccine did not protect against challenge with any strain used. The results indicate that K99+ F41+ ETEC strains produce F41 antigen in the small intestine during disease and that F41+ vaccination can be a protective antigen if the challenge strain expresses only F41 antigen, but that F41+ vaccination may not protect against strains that produce both K99 and F41 antigens. PMID:2880807

  3. A Role For Mitochondria In Antigen Processing And Presentation.

    PubMed

    Bonifaz, Lc; Cervantes-Silva, Mp; Ontiveros-Dotor, E; López-Villegas, Eo; Sánchez-García, Fj

    2014-09-23

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signaling process. However, the role of mitochondria in antigen presenting cells during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing, and -presentation process. Here we show that HEL-loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APCs, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1-2 h following antigen exposure thus suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analyzed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC-peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes that endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48-62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taking together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APCs mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC-T immune synapse. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of antigenic cartography in vaccine seed strain selection.

    PubMed

    Fouchier, Ron A M; Smith, Derek J

    2010-03-01

    Human influenza A viruses are classic examples of antigenically variable pathogens that have a seemingly endless capacity to evade the host's immune response. The viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins are the main targets of our antibody response to combat infections. HA and NA continuously change to escape from humoral immunity, a process known as antigenic drift. As a result of antigenic drift, the human influenza vaccine is updated frequently. The World Health Organization (WHO) coordinates a global influenza surveillance network that, by the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, routinely characterizes the antigenic properties of circulating strains in order to select new seed viruses for such vaccine updates. To facilitate a quantitative interpretation and easy visualization of HI data, a new computational technique called "antigenic cartography" was developed. Since its development, antigenic cartography has been applied routinely to assist the WHO with influenza surveillance activities. Until recently, antigenic variation was not considered a serious issue with influenza vaccines for poultry. However, because of the diversification of the Asian H5N1 lineage since 1996 into multiple genetic clades and subclades, and because of the long-term use of poultry vaccines against H5 in some parts of the world, this issue needs to be re-addressed. The antigenic properties of panels of avian H5N1 viruses were characterized by HI assay, using mammalian or avian antisera, and analyzed using antigenic cartography methods. These analyses revealed antigenic differences between circulating H5N1 viruses and the H5 viruses used in poultry vaccines. Considerable antigenic variation was also observed within and between H5N1 clades. These observations have important implications for the efficacy and long-term use of poultry vaccines.

  5. Collaborative study on antigens for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis*

    PubMed Central

    Mott, K. E.; Dixon, H.

    1982-01-01

    Eight research laboratories in Europe and the United States of America were selected on the basis of having published data on Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum antigens to participate in a study of various antigen/test combinations for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. The serum bank consisted of 395 well documented sera from four endemic areas in Brazil (2 areas), Kenya, and the Philippines. Altogether, 21 S. mansoni and four S. japonicum antigen and immunoassay combinations were evaluated. S. mansoni egg antigens yielded a higher combined sensitivity than adult worm antigens, irrespective of their purity, in active S. mansoni infections before and after specific treatment. Quantitative seroreactivity of characterized S. mansoni egg antigens showed good correlation with faecal egg counts in the 5-14 year age group. No correlation between morbidity related to S. mansoni and seroreactivity was observed in any test system. Three S. japonicum egg antigens showed high sensitivity and specificity in relation to the presence or absence of eggs in the stool. The quantitative seroreactivity of the characterized S. japonicum egg antigens correlated directly with the intensity of S. japonicum infection in all age groups. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using several different procedures, performed well with the antigens used in the study. The indium slide immunoassay (ISI), a simple qualitative visual test system using an S. mansoni egg antigen, demonstrated a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. The results did not indicate the superiority of any particular immunodiagnostic method for detecting antischistosome antibodies. This collaborative study is considered a first step towards developing and standardizing antigens for immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis. PMID:6983926

  6. Fine structure of A and M antigens from Brucella biovars.

    PubMed

    Meikle, P J; Perry, M B; Cherwonogrodzky, J W; Bundle, D R

    1989-09-01

    Brucella A and M epitopes were found on single O-polysaccharide chains of all biotype strains of this species. Lipopolysaccharides from the type and reference strains of five of the six Brucella species, B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, B. canis, and B. neotomae, were extracted and purified. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, in conjunction with silver staining and immunoblotting developed by monoclonal antibodies, showed bands characteristic of A, M, or mixed A and M antigens. The A antigen previously described as an exclusively alpha 1,2-linked homopolymer of 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose was shown by 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to possess a fine structure consistent with the low-frequency occurrence of alpha 1, 3-linked 4,6-dideoxy-4-formamido-D-mannopyranose residues. This feature was previously attributed only to the M antigen, which is also a homopolymer of the same sugar. B. melitensis biotype 3 and B. suis biotype 4 lipopolysaccharides showed characteristics of mixed A and M antigens. Immunoabsorption of these O polysaccharides on a column of immobilized A-antigen-specific monoclonal antibody enriched polymer chains with A-antigen characteristics but did not eliminate M epitopes. Composite A- and M-antigen characteristics resulted from O polysaccharides in which the frequency of alpha 1,3 linkages, and hence, M-antigen characteristics, varied. All biotypes assigned as A+ M- expressed one or two alpha 1,3-linked residues per polysaccharide O chain. M antigens (M+ A-) also possessed a unique M epitope as well as a tetrasaccharide determinant common to A-antigen structures. B. canis and B. abortus 45/20, both rough strains, expressed low-molecular-weight A antigen.

  7. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen: a proteomics view.

    PubMed

    Naryzhny, S N

    2008-11-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cell cycle marker protein, is well known as a DNA sliding clamp for DNA polymerase delta and as an essential component for eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication and repair. Due to its mobility inside nuclei, PCNA is dynamically presented in a soluble or chromatin-associated form. The heterogeneity and specific modifications of PCNA may reflect its multiple functions and the presence of many binding partners in the cell. The recent proteomics approaches applied to characterizing PCNA interactions revealed multiple PCNA partners with a wide spectrum of activity and unveiled the possible existence of new PCNA functions. Since more than 100 PCNA-interacting proteins and several PCNA modifications have already been reported, a proteomics point of view seems exactly suitable to better understand the role of PCNA in cellular functions.

  8. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability.

    PubMed

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J; Beeson, James G; Plowe, Christopher V

    2015-12-22

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines.

  9. Engineering antigen-specific immunological tolerance.

    SciTech Connect

    Kontos, Stephan; Grimm, Alizee J.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-05-01

    Unwanted immunity develops in response to many protein drugs, in autoimmunity, in allergy, and in transplantation. Approaches to induce immunological tolerance aim to either prevent these responses or reverse them after they have already taken place. We present here recent developments in approaches, based on engineered peptides, proteins and biomaterials, that harness mechanisms of peripheral tolerance both prophylactically and therapeutically to induce antigenspecific immunological tolerance. These mechanisms are based on responses of B and T lymphocytes to other cells in their immune environment that result in cellular deletion or ignorance to particular antigens, or in development of active immune regulatory responses. Several of these approaches are moving toward clinical development, and some are already in early stages of clinical testing.

  10. PROSTATE SPECIFIC MEMBRANE ANTIGEN-BASED IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Joseph R.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Anand, Alok; Deh, Kofi; Tagawa, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy affecting men in North America. Despite significant efforts, conventional imaging of PC does not contribute to patient management as much as imaging performed for other common cancers. Given the lack of specificity in conventional imaging techniques, one possible solution is to screen for PC specific antigenic targets and generate agents able to specifically bind. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is over-expressed in PC tissue, with low levels of expression in the small intestine, renal tubular cells and salivary gland. The first clinical agent for targeting PSMA was 111In-capromab, involving an antibody recognizing the internal domain of PSMA. The second- and third-generation humanized PSMA binding antibodies have the potential to overcome some of the limitations inherent to capromab pendetide i.e. inability to bind to live PC cells. One example is the humanized monoclonal antibody J591 (Hu mAb J591) that was developed primarily for therapeutic purposes but also has interesting imaging characteristics including the identification of bone metastases in PC. The major disadvantage of use of mAb for imaging is slow target recognition and background clearance in an appropriate timeframe for diagnostic imaging. Urea-based compounds such as small molecule inhibitors may also present promising agents for PC imaging with SPECT and PET. Two such small-molecule inhibitors targeting PSMA, MIP-1072 and MIP-1095, have exhibited high affinity for PSMA. The uptake of 123I-MIP-1072 and 123I-MIP-1095 in PC xenografts have imaged successfully with favorable properties amenable to human trials. While advances in conventional imaging will continue, Ab and small molecule imaging exemplified by PSMA targeting have the greatest potential to improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22658884

  11. Activating point mutations in the common beta subunit of the human GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 receptors suggest the involvement of beta subunit dimerization and cell type-specific molecules in signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B J; D'Andrea, R; Gonda, T J

    1995-01-01

    We have combined retroviral expression cloning with random mutagenesis to identify two activating point mutations in the common signal-transducing subunit (h beta c) of the receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 by virtue of their ability to confer factor independence on the haemopoietic cell line, FDC-P1. One mutation (V449E) is located within the transmembrane domain and, by analogy with a similar mutation in the neu oncogene, may act by inducing dimerization of h beta c. The other mutation (I374N) lies in the extracellular, membrane-proximal portion of h beta c. Neither of these mutants, nor a previously described mutant of h beta c (FI delta, which has a small duplication in the extracellular region), was capable of inducing factor independence in CTLL-2 cells, while only V449E could induce factor independence in BAF-B03 cells. These results imply that the extracellular and transmembrane mutations act by different mechanisms. Furthermore, they imply that the mutants, and hence also wild-type h beta c, interact with cell type-specific signalling molecules. Models are presented which illustrate how these mutations may act and predict some of the characteristics of the putative receptor-associated signalling molecules. Images PMID:7556069

  12. Evaluation of type-specific real-time PCR assays using the LightCycler and J.B.A.I.D.S. for detection of adenoviruses in species HAdV-C.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morris S; Hudson, Nolan Ryan; Gibbins, Carl; Fischer, Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    Sporadically, HAdVs from species HAdV-C are detected in acute respiratory disease outbreaks. To rapidly type these viruses, we designed real-time PCR assays that detect and discriminate between adenovirus types HAdV-C1, -C2, -C5, and -C6. Sixteen clinical isolates from the California Department of Public Health were used to validate the new assays. Type-specific TaqMan real-time PCR assays were designed and used independently to successfully identify 16 representative specimens. The lower limit of detection for our LightCycler singleplex real-time PCR assays were calculated to be 100, 100, 100, and 50 genomic copies per reaction for HAdV-C1, HAdV-C2, HAdV-C5 and HAdV-C6, respectively. The results for the singleplex J.B.A.I.D.S. assays were similar. Our assays did not cross-react with other adenoviruses outside of species HAdV-C, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, or respiratory disease causing bacteria. These assays have the potential to be useful as diagnostic tools for species HAdV-C infection.

  13. Synthesis of factor VIII antigen by cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Nachman, R; Levine, R; Jaffe, E A

    1977-10-01

    Immunoprecipitates containing guinea pig Factor VIII antigen were prepared from guinea pig plasma with a cross-reacting rabbit anti-human Factor VIII. Monospecific antisera to guinea pig Factor VIII antigen were produced in rabbits by using these washed immunoprecipitates as immunogens. The resulting antisera to guinea pig Factor VIII antigen detected Factor VIII antigen in guinea pig plasma and inhibited the von Willebrand factor activity in guinea pig plasma. This antibody also detected Factor VIII antigen in a solubilized protein mixture prepared from isolated cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes. Cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes were labeled with radio-active leucine. By radioautography, 96.2% of the radio-activity was present in megakaryocytes. The radio-active Factor VIII antigen present in the solubilized cell protein mixture was isolated by immunoprecipitation and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The results demonstrate that cultured guinea pig megakaryocytes synthesize Factor VIII antigen which contains the same polypeptide subunit (mol wt 200,000) present in guinea pig plasma Factor VIII antigen.

  14. Blastomyces Antigen Detection for Diagnosis and Management of Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Novicki, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Blastomyces spp. antigen testing was evaluated over a 10-year period in an area where blastomycosis is endemic. Antigen testing was less sensitive than previously reported, but serial urine testing was useful in monitoring disease resolution or progression. Culture and cytopathology remain the gold standard for diagnosis and exclusion of this infection. PMID:26338856

  15. Immunochemical analysis of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, D D; Saint, R B; Rickard, M D; Mitchell, G F

    1986-12-01

    Previously we reported the isolation of several Escherichia coli clones expressing fragments of Taenia taeniaeformis antigens as beta-galactosidase fused proteins (Bowtell, Saint, Rickard & Mitchell, 1984). Here we describe the isolation of additional antigen-expressing clones from a larval cDNA library and the assignment of these clones to 7 antigen families. These were isolated with a polyspecific rabbit antiserum raised to the oncosphere. Since this serum was capable of reacting with a large number of antigens, it was important to develop techniques for rapidly determining the identity of the native T. taeniaeformis molecule corresponding to a cloned antigen gene. These included active immunization of rabbits with fused proteins and several techniques involving affinity purification on immobilized fused proteins. The reactivity of the antigen-positive clones with sera from humans infected with related parasites was also assessed. Finally, immunization of mice with several fused proteins failed to protect against subsequent infection, although antigens previously identified as candidate host-protective antigens (Bowtell, Mitchell, Anders, Lightowlers & Rickard, 1983) have yet to be identified in the expression library.

  16. Acid test: lipid antigens get into the groove.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell; Sullivan, Barbara A

    2008-06-01

    How do CD1 molecules load lipid antigens? In this issue of Immunity, Relloso et al. (2008) uncover how lysosomal pH targets amino acids in CD1b, causing it to open and attain a conformation more receptive to lipid antigens.

  17. Germinal center reaction: antigen affinity and presentation explain it all.

    PubMed

    Oropallo, Michael A; Cerutti, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The selection and expansion of B cells undergoing affinity maturation in the germinal center is a hallmark of humoral immunity. A recent paper in Nature provides new insights into the relationships between the affinity of the immunoglobulin receptor for antigen, the ability of B cells to present antigen to T cells, and the processes of selection, mutation, and clonal expansion in the germinal center.

  18. Blastomyces Antigen Detection for Diagnosis and Management of Blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Frost, Holly M; Novicki, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Blastomyces spp. antigen testing was evaluated over a 10-year period in an area where blastomycosis is endemic. Antigen testing was less sensitive than previously reported, but serial urine testing was useful in monitoring disease resolution or progression. Culture and cytopathology remain the gold standard for diagnosis and exclusion of this infection.

  19. Antigens provide immunity against Ich in channel catfish trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to determine effects of 1) types of Ich antigens and routes of immunization, 2) methods of inactivated trophonts, and 3) antigen doses on fish immune protection against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis Fouquet (Ich). All catfish immunized with live theronts by immersion, live the...

  20. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  1. Antigen Loss Variants: Catching Hold of Escaping Foes

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Maulik; Müller, Rolf; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-1990s, the field of cancer immunotherapy has seen steady growth and selected immunotherapies are now a routine and preferred therapeutic option of certain malignancies. Both active and passive cancer immunotherapies exploit the fact that tumor cells express specific antigens on the cell surface, thereby mounting an immune response specifically against malignant cells. It is well established that cancer cells typically lose surface antigens following natural or therapy-induced selective pressure and these antigen-loss variants are often the population that causes therapy-resistant relapse. CD19 and CD20 antigen loss in acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, respectively, and lineage switching in leukemia associated with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements are well-documented evidences in this regard. Although increasing number of novel immunotherapies are being developed, majority of these do not address the control of antigen loss variants. Here, we review the occurrence of antigen loss variants in leukemia and discuss the therapeutic strategies to tackle the same. We also present an approach of dual-targeting immunoligand effectively retargeting NK cells against antigen loss variants in MLL-associated leukemia. Novel immunotherapies simultaneously targeting more than one tumor antigen certainly hold promise to completely eradicate tumor and prevent therapy-resistant relapses. PMID:28286501

  2. Production of Antigens and Antibodies for Diagnosis of Arbovirus Diseases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-20

    for Germiston, Qalyub, Sicilian, vesicular stomatitis Indiana, and Ganjam viruses . The antigens were inactivated with beta-propiolactone. Rabbits were...immunized successfully intravenously with Ross River, Germiston, and Japanese encephalitis viruses using immunogens grown in RK-13 rabbit kidney...vesicular stomatitis Indiana, and Ganjam viruses . The antigens were inactivated with beta-propiolactone. Rabbits were immunized successfully intravenously

  3. Complex of simian virus 40 large tumor antigen and 48,000-dalton host tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, D S; Carroll, R B

    1981-01-01

    Simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T Ag) can be separated by sucrose gradient sedimentation into a rapidly sedimenting, maximally phosphorylated fraction and a slowly sedimenting, less phosphorylated fraction. The Mr 48,000 host tumor antigen (48,000 HTA, also called nonviral T Ag) is preferentially complexed with the maximally phosphorylated T Ag. Pulse-labeled T Ag sediments as a 5-6S monomer, whereas T Ag radiolabeled for progressively longer periods slowly increases in sedimentation coefficient to give a broad distribution between 5 S and greater than 28 S. Mutation in the viral A locus causes a decrease in T Ag phosphorylation and a marked decrease in 48,000 HTA binding, shifting the sedimentation coefficient of T Ag to the monomer value. The more highly phosphorylated T Ag also has the highest affinity for chromatin. Images PMID:6941238

  4. Comparison of Binax Legionella Urinary Antigen EIA kit with Binax RIA Urinary Antigen kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Hackman, B A; Plouffe, J F; Benson, R F; Fields, B S; Breiman, R F

    1996-01-01

    The Legionella Urinary Antigen EIA kit (Binax, Portland, Maine) was compared with the EQUATE RIA Legionella Urinary Antigen kit (Binax) for its ability to detect the presence of urinary antigens to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Urine specimens from patients without Legionnaires' disease (n = 33) were negative by both methods (specificity, 100%). Twenty (77%) of 26 urine specimens from patients with Legionnaires' disease positive by the radioimmunoassay kit were also positive by the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit. If the cutoff for a positive EIA result were lowered to a ration of > or = 2.5, 23 of 26 (88%) urine specimens would have been positive by EIA and the specificity would remain 100%. Use of the EIA kit is an acceptable method for detecting L. pneumophila serogroup 1 urinary antigens by laboratories that do not want to handle radioactive materials. PMID:8735125

  5. Frequency of Mia antigen: A pilot study among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Rosamma, N.L.; Karna, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The Miltenberger (Mi) classes represent a group of phenotypes for red cells that carry low frequency antigens associated with the MNSs blood group system. This pilot study was aimed at determining the Mia antigen positivity in the blood donor population in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. The study was performed between June to August 2014 on eligible blood donors willing to participate. Antigen typing was performed using monoclonal anti-Mia antiserum by tube technique. Only one of the 1000 blood donors (0.1%) tested was found to be Mia antigen positive. The Mia antigen can, therefore, be considered as being rare in the Indian blood donor population. PMID:27488007

  6. Complex Antigens Drive Permissive Clonal Selection in Germinal Centers.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Masayuki; Schmidt, Aaron G; Nojima, Takuya; Feng, Feng; Watanabe, Akiko; Kitamura, Daisuke; Harrison, Stephen C; Kepler, Thomas B; Kelsoe, Garnett

    2016-03-15

    Germinal center (GC) B cells evolve toward increased affinity by a Darwinian process that has been studied primarily in genetically restricted, hapten-specific responses. We explored the population dynamics of genetically diverse GC responses to two complex antigens-Bacillus anthracis protective antigen and influenza hemagglutinin-in which B cells competed both intra- and interclonally for distinct epitopes. Preferred VH rearrangements among antigen-binding, naive B cells were similarly abundant in early GCs but, unlike responses to haptens, clonal diversity increased in GC B cells as early "winners" were replaced by rarer, high-affinity clones. Despite affinity maturation, inter- and intraclonal avidities varied greatly, and half of GC B cells did not bind the immunogen but nonetheless exhibited biased VH use, V(D)J mutation, and clonal expansion comparable to antigen-binding cells. GC reactions to complex antigens permit a range of specificities and affinities, with potential advantages for broad protection.

  7. The global antigenic diversity of swine influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nicola S; Russell, Colin A; Langat, Pinky; Anderson, Tavis K; Berger, Kathryn; Bielejec, Filip; Burke, David F; Dudas, Gytis; Fonville, Judith M; Fouchier, Ron Am; Kellam, Paul; Koel, Bjorn F; Lemey, Philippe; Nguyen, Tung; Nuansrichy, Bundit; Peiris, Js Malik; Saito, Takehiko; Simon, Gaelle; Skepner, Eugene; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Webby, Richard J; Van Reeth, Kristien; Brookes, Sharon M; Larsen, Lars; Watson, Simon J; Brown, Ian H; Vincent, Amy L

    2016-04-15

    Swine influenza presents a substantial disease burden for pig populations worldwide and poses a potential pandemic threat to humans. There is considerable diversity in both H1 and H3 influenza viruses circulating in swine due to the frequent introductions of viruses from humans and birds coupled with geographic segregation of global swine populations. Much of this diversity is characterized genetically but the antigenic diversity of these viruses is poorly understood. Critically, the antigenic diversity shapes the risk profile of swine influenza viruses in terms of their epizootic and pandemic potential. Here, using the most comprehensive set of swine influenza virus antigenic data compiled to date, we quantify the antigenic diversity of swine influenza viruses on a multi-continental scale. The substantial antigenic diversity of recently circulating viruses in different parts of the world adds complexity to the risk profiles for the movement of swine and the potential for swine-derived infections in humans.

  8. Dengue viruses cluster antigenically but not as discrete serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Katzelnick, Leah C.; Fonville, Judith M.; Gromowski, Gregory D.; Arriaga, Jose Bustos; Green, Angela; James, Sarah L.; Lau, Louis; Montoya, Magelda; Wang, Chunling; VanBlargan, Laura A.; Russell, Colin A.; Thu, Hlaing Myat; Pierson, Theodore C.; Buchy, Philippe; Aaskov, John G.; Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Gibbons, Robert V.; Tesh, Robert B.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Durbin, Anna; Simmons, Cameron P.; Holmes, Edward C.; Harris, Eva; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Smith, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    The four genetically divergent dengue virus (DENV) types are traditionally classified as serotypes. Antigenic and genetic differences among the DENV types influence disease outcome, vaccine-induced protection, epidemic magnitude, and viral evolution. We characterized antigenic diversity in the DENV types by antigenic maps constructed from neutralizing antibody titers obtained from African green monkeys and after human vaccination and natural infections. Genetically, geographically, and temporally, diverse DENV isolates clustered loosely by type, but we found many are as similar antigenically to a virus of a different type as to some viruses of the same type. Primary infection antisera did not neutralize all viruses of the same DENV type any better than other types did up to two years after infection and did not show improved neutralization to homologous type isolates. That the canonical DENV types are not antigenically homogenous has implications for vaccination and research on the dynamics of immunity, disease, and the evolution of DENV. PMID:26383952

  9. Genetic Basis for Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Biosynthesis in Bordetellae

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Andrew; Allen, Andrew G.; Cadisch, Joanna; Thomas, Richard; Stevens, Kim; Churcher, Carol M.; Badcock, K. L.; Parkhill, Julian; Barrell, Bart; Maskell, Duncan J.

    1999-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella parapertussis express a surface polysaccharide, attached to a lipopolysaccharide, which has been called O antigen. This structure is absent from Bordetella pertussis. We report the identification of a large genetic locus in B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis that is required for O-antigen biosynthesis. The locus is replaced by an insertion sequence in B. pertussis, explaining the lack of O-antigen biosynthesis in this species. The DNA sequence of the B. bronchiseptica locus has been determined and the presence of 21 open reading frames has been revealed. We have ascribed putative functions to many of these open reading frames based on database searches. Mutations in the locus in B. bronchiseptica and B. parapertussis prevent O-antigen biosynthesis and provide tools for the study of the role of O antigen in infections caused by these bacteria. PMID:10417135

  10. Mosaic VSGs and the Scale of Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, James P. J.; Wang, Huanhuan; Barry, J. David

    2013-01-01

    A main determinant of prolonged Trypanosoma brucei infection and transmission and success of the parasite is the interplay between host acquired immunity and antigenic variation of the parasite variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat. About 0.1% of trypanosome divisions produce a switch to a different VSG through differential expression of an archive of hundreds of silent VSG genes and pseudogenes, but the patterns and extent of the trypanosome diversity phenotype, particularly in chronic infection, are unclear. We applied longitudinal VSG cDNA sequencing to estimate variant richness and test whether pseudogenes contribute to antigenic variation. We show that individual growth peaks can contain at least 15 distinct variants, are estimated computationally to comprise many more, and that antigenically distinct ‘mosaic’ VSGs arise from segmental gene conversion between donor VSG genes or pseudogenes. The potential for trypanosome antigenic variation is probably much greater than VSG archive size; mosaic VSGs are core to antigenic variation and chronic infection. PMID:23853603

  11. Induction of the autoantigen proliferating cell nuclear antigen in T lymphocytes by a mycobacterial antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Haftel, H M; Chang, Y; Hinderer, R; Hanash, S M; Holoshitz, J

    1994-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. To determine the potential effect of mycobacterial antigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analyzed PBMC incubated with the acetone-precipitable fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (APMT) for changes in cellular protein expression. Two-dimensional gel analysis showed induction of a 36-kD polypeptide identified as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a known autoantigen, after incubation with AP-MT. PCNA plays a role in cell proliferation and is expressed as a late growth regulated factor. However, its synthesis in response to AP-MT was induced as an early event. The early induction of PCNA was regulated at a posttranscriptional level and was restricted to T cells. Treatment of PBMC with known T cell mitogens, namely PHA, anti-CD3 antibodies, and staphylococcal superantigens failed to induce an early PCNA increase. The distinct characteristics of the AP-MT effect on PCNA expression suggest a separate mechanism of induction in response to AP-MT, compared with the late increase observed in response to mitogens. The induction of PCNA in response to mycobacterial antigens may represent a pathogenically relevant mechanism in autoimmunity. Images PMID:7929811

  12. A role for mitochondria in antigen processing and presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Cervantes-Silva, Mariana P; Ontiveros-Dotor, Elizabeth; López-Villegas, Edgar O; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2015-01-01

    Immune synapse formation is critical for T-lymphocyte activation, and mitochondria have a role in this process, by localizing close to the immune synapse, regulating intracellular calcium concentration, and providing locally required ATP. The interaction between antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and T lymphocytes is a two-way signalling process. However, the role of mitochondria in APCs during this process remains unknown. For APCs to be able to activate T lymphocytes, they must first engage in an antigen-uptake, -processing and -presentation process. Here we show that hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) -loaded B lymphocytes, as a type of APC, undergo a small but significant mitochondrial depolarization by 1–2 hr following antigen exposure, suggesting an increase in their metabolic demands. Inhibition of ATP synthase (oligomycin) or mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) (Ruthenium red) had no effect on antigen uptake. Therefore, antigen processing and antigen presentation were further analysed. Oligomycin treatment reduced the amount of specific MHC–peptide complexes but not total MHC II on the cell membrane of B lymphocytes, which correlated with a decrease in antigen presentation. However, oligomycin also reduced antigen presentation by B lymphocytes, which endogenously express HEL and by B lymphocytes loaded with the HEL48–62 peptide, although to a lesser extent. ATP synthase inhibition and MCU inhibition had a clear inhibitory effect on antigen processing (DQ-OVA). Taken together these results suggest that ATP synthase and MCU are relevant for antigen processing and presentation. Finally, APC mitochondria were found to re-organize towards the APC–T immune synapse. PMID:25251370

  13. Shared HLA antigens and reproductive performance among Hutterites.

    PubMed Central

    Ober, C L; Martin, A O; Simpson, J L; Hauck, W W; Amos, D B; Kostyu, D D; Fotino, M; Allen, F H

    1983-01-01

    Shared histocompatibility antigens between spouses may affect reproductive outcome adversely as a result of prenatal selection against compatible fetuses. Evidence from both animal and human studies suggest that histocompatible fetuses may not initiate a maternal immunologic response that prevents rejection of the embryo. Therefore, parents sharing HLA antigens may produce compatible fetuses and consequently experience a greater frequency of early fetal losses and show poorer reproductive outcome than couples not sharing antigens. In the Hutterites, an inbred human isolate that proscribes contraception, we tested the hypothesis that couples sharing HLA antigens have poorer reproductive outcomes than couples who do not. The Hutterites are characterized by high fertility and large family sizes. Couples that share zero (no. = 21), one (no. = 15), and more than one (no. = 10) HLA-A or HLA-B antigens were compared for reproductive performance. Median intervals between births were larger among couples that share more than one antigen in eight of 11 intervals examined. In addition, the median intervals from marriage to first, fifth, and tenth birth were consistently larger among couples that share more than one antigen. Differences among the groups appear to become larger with increasing parity, suggesting that the effect of histocompatibility on reproductive performance becomes more evident in later pregnancies. These differences in reproductive performance between couples that share zero, one, or more than one HLA-A or HLA-B antigens may have significant evolutionary consequences. However, our results demonstrate that sharing HLA antigens does not preclude normal pregnancy and caution should be exercised before concluding that shared HLA antigens are solely responsible for repeated fetal losses. PMID:6577788

  14. Carbohydrate-Mediated Targeting of Antigen to Dendritic Cells Leads to Enhanced Presentation of Antigen to T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Eddie W.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Seeberger, Peter H.; Hacohen, Nir

    2009-01-01

    The unique therapeutic value of dendritic cells (DCs) for the treatment of allergy, autoimmunity and transplant rejection is predicated upon our ability to selectively deliver antigens, drugs or nucleic acids to DCs in vivo. Here we describe a method for delivering whole protein antigens to DCs based on carbohydrate-mediated targeting of DC-expressed lectins. A series of synthetic carbohydrates was chemically-coupled to a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), and each conjugate was evaluated for its ability to increase the efficiency of antigen presentation by murine DCs to OVA-specific T cells (CD4+ and CD8+). In vitro data are presented that demonstrate that carbohydrate modification of OVA leads to a 50-fold enhancement of presentation of antigenic peptide to CD4+ T cells. A tenfold enhancement is observed for CD8+ T cells; this indicates that the targeted lectin(s) can mediate cross-presentation of antigens on MHC class I. Our data indicate that the observed enhancements in antigen presentation are unique to OVA that is conjugated to complex oligosaccharides, such as a high-mannose nonasaccharide, but not to monosaccharides. Taken together, our data suggest that a DC targeting strategy that is based upon carbohydrate-lectin interactions is a promising approach for enhancing antigen presentation via class I and class II molecules. PMID:18186095

  15. HLA-DR antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with specificity of autoantibody responses to nuclear antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, J S; Klippel, J H; Penner, E; Reichlin, M; Steinberg, A D; Chused, T M; Scherak, O; Graninger, W; Hartter, E; Zielinski, C C

    1987-01-01

    HLA-DR antigens and autoantibodies to the nuclear or cytoplasmic antigens Ro/SSA, La/SSB, Sm, and RNP were determined in North American and Austrian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Analysis of the association of antibodies to these ribonucleic acid (RNA)-protein antigens with HLA-DR antigens showed that HLA-DR3 was related to the presence of anti-Ro/SSA or anti-La/SSB, or both. In contrast, anti-Sm or anti-RNP, or both were associated with HLA-DR4. HLA-DR5 was associated with absence of these autoantibodies. The data extend evidence for the complexity and heterogeneity of SLE. Moreover, they indicate that, in SLE, genes linked to those coding for HLA-DR antigens, are related to the specificity of autoantibody responses rather than to the primary immunological abnormalities of this disorder. PMID:3498447

  16. The influence of type-specific human papillomavirus infections on the detection of cervical precancer and cancer: A population-based study of opportunistic cervical screening in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Cosette M; Hunt, William C; Cuzick, Jack; Langsfeld, Erika; Robertson, Michael; Castle, Philip E

    2014-08-01

    There are limited data on the prospective risks of detecting cervical precancer and cancer in United States (US) populations specifically where the delivery of opportunistic cervical screening takes place outside managed care and in the absence of organized national programs. Such data will inform the management of women with positive screening results before and after widespread human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and establishes a baseline preceding recent changes in US cervical cancer screening guidelines. Using data reported to the statewide passive surveillance systems of the New Mexico HPV Pap Registry, we measured the 3-year HPV type-specific cumulative incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or more severe (CIN2+) and grade 3 or more severe (CIN3+) detected during real-world health care delivery across a diversity of organizations, payers, clinical settings, providers and patients. A stratified sample of 47,541 cervical cytology specimens from a screening population of 379,000 women underwent HPV genotyping. Three-year risks for different combinations of cytologic interpretation and HPV risk group ranged from <1% (for several combinations) to approximately 70% for CIN2+ and 55% for CIN3+ in women with high-grade (HSIL) cytology and HPV16 infection. A substantial proportion of CIN2+ (35.7%) and CIN3+ (30.9%) were diagnosed following negative cytology, of which 62.3 and 78.2%, respectively, were high-risk HPV positive. HPV16 had the greatest 3-year risks (10.9% for CIN2+,8.0% for CIN3+) followed by HPV33, HPV31, and HPV18. Positive results for high-risk HPV, especially HPV16, the severity of cytologic interpretation, and age contribute independently to the risks of CIN2+ and CIN3+.

  17. Chronic treatment with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation in rat skeletal muscles in a fiber type-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Buhl, E S; Jessen, N; Schmitz, O; Pedersen, S B; Pedersen, O; Holman, G D; Lund, S

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that chronic administration of AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide- 1-beta-D-ribofuranoside), an activator of the AMP-activated protein kinase, increases hexokinase activity and the contents of total GLUT4 and glycogen in rat skeletal muscles. To explore whether AICAR also affects insulin-stimulated glucose transport and GLUT4 cell surface content, Wistar rats were subcutaneously injected with AICAR for 5 days in succession (1 mg/g body wt). Maximally insulin-stimulated (60 nmol/l) glucose uptake was markedly increased in epitrochlearis (EPI) muscle (average 63%, P < 0.001, n = 18-19) and in extensor digitorum longus muscle (average 26%, P < 0.001, n = 26-30). In contrast, administration of AICAR did not maximally influence insulin-stimulated glucose transport in soleus muscle. Studies of EPI muscle with the 4,4'-O-[2-[2-[2-[2-[2-[6-(biotinylamino)hexanoyl]amino]ethoxy]ethoxy] ethoxy]-4-(1-azi-2,2,2,-trifluoroethyl)benzoyl]amino-1,3-propanediyl]bis-D-mannose photolabeling technique showed a concomitant increase (average 68%, P < 0.02) in cell surface GLUT4 content after insulin exposure in AICAR-injected rats when compared with controls. In conclusion, 5 days of AICAR administration induces a pronounced fiber type-specific increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 cell surface content in rat skeletal muscle with the greatest effect observed on white fast-twitch glycolytic muscles (EPI). These results are comparable with the effects of chronic exercise training, and it brings the AMP-activated protein kinase into focus as a new interesting target for future pharmacological intervention in insulin-resistant conditions.

  18. Optimization of amino acid type-specific 13C and 15N labeling for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins by solution- and solid-state NMR with the UPLABEL algorithm.

    PubMed

    Hefke, Frederik; Bagaria, Anurag; Reckel, Sina; Ullrich, Sandra Johanna; Dötsch, Volker; Glaubitz, Clemens; Güntert, Peter

    2011-02-01

    We present a computational method for finding optimal labeling patterns for the backbone assignment of membrane proteins and other large proteins that cannot be assigned by conventional strategies. Following the approach of Kainosho and Tsuji (Biochemistry 21:6273-6279 (1982)), types of amino acids are labeled with (13)C or/and (15)N such that cross peaks between (13)CO(i - 1) and (15)NH(i) result only for pairs of sequentially adjacent amino acids of which the first is labeled with (13)C and the second with (15)N. In this way, unambiguous sequence-specific assignments can be obtained for unique pairs of amino acids that occur exactly once in the sequence of the protein. To be practical, it is crucial to limit the number of differently labeled protein samples that have to be prepared while obtaining an optimal extent of labeled unique amino acid pairs. Our computer algorithm UPLABEL for optimal unique pair labeling, implemented in the program CYANA and in a standalone program, and also available through a web portal, uses combinatorial optimization to find for a given amino acid sequence labeling patterns that maximize the number of unique pair assignments with a minimal number of differently labeled protein samples. Various auxiliary conditions, including labeled amino acid availability and price, previously known partial assignments, and sequence regions of particular interest can be taken into account when determining optimal amino acid type-specific labeling patterns. The method is illustrated for the assignment of the human G-protein coupled receptor bradykinin B2 (B(2)R) and applied as a starting point for the backbone assignment of the membrane protein proteorhodopsin.

  19. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  20. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens

    PubMed Central

    Childs, Lauren M.; Baskerville, Edward B.; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype–phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens. PMID:26194759

  1. Trade-offs in antibody repertoires to complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Childs, Lauren M; Baskerville, Edward B; Cobey, Sarah

    2015-09-05

    Pathogens vary in their antigenic complexity. While some pathogens such as measles present a few relatively invariant targets to the immune system, others such as malaria display considerable antigenic diversity. How the immune response copes in the presence of multiple antigens, and whether a trade-off exists between the breadth and efficacy of antibody (Ab)-mediated immune responses, are unsolved problems. We present a theoretical model of affinity maturation of B-cell receptors (BCRs) during a primary infection and examine how variation in the number of accessible antigenic sites alters the Ab repertoire. Naive B cells with randomly generated receptor sequences initiate the germinal centre (GC) reaction. The binding affinity of a BCR to an antigen is quantified via a genotype-phenotype map, based on a random energy landscape, that combines local and distant interactions between residues. In the presence of numerous antigens or epitopes, B-cell clones with different specificities compete for stimulation during rounds of mutation within GCs. We find that the availability of many epitopes reduces the affinity and relative breadth of the Ab repertoire. Despite the stochasticity of somatic hypermutation, patterns of immunodominance are strongly shaped by chance selection of naive B cells with specificities for particular epitopes. Our model provides a mechanistic basis for the diversity of Ab repertoires and the evolutionary advantage of antigenically complex pathogens.

  2. Standardization and characterization of antigens for the diagnosis of aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; Arechavala, Alicia; Carissimi, Mariana; Sorrentino, Julia Medeiros; Aquino, Valério Rodrigues; Daboit, Tatiane Caroline; Kammler, Luana; Negroni, Ricardo; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize antigens for the diagnosis of aspergillosis. Nine strains of Aspergillus species Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus flavus , and Aspergillus niger were grown in Sabouraud and Smith broth to produce exoantigens. The antigens were tested by immunodiffusion against sera from patients with aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses. The protein fraction of the antigens was detected by SDS-PAGE; Western blot and representative bands were assessed by mass spectrometry coupled to a nano Acquity UltraPerformance LC and analyzed by the Mascot search engine. Concurrently, all sera were tested with Platelia Aspergillus EIA. The most reactive antigens to sera from patients infected by A. fumigatus were produced by A. fumigatus MG2 Sabouraud and pooled A. fumigatus Sabouraud samples, both with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 100% and 97%, respectively. Aspergillus niger and A. flavus antigens were reactive against A. niger and A. flavus sera, each one with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Two proteins, probably responsible for antigenic activity, β-glucosidase in A. fumigatus and α-amylase in A. niger were attained. The commercial kit had a specificity of 22%, sensitivity of 100%, positive predictive value of 48%, and negative predictive value of 100%. The antigens produced showed high sensitivity and specificity and can be exploited for diagnostics of aspergilloma.

  3. JL1, a novel differentiation antigen of human cortical thymocyte

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Expression of a novel thymocyte differentiation antigen, JL1, defined by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) developed against human thymocytes showed a specificity for stage II double positive (CD4+CD8+) human cortical thymocytes. This antigen was not expressed at detectable levels on medullary thymocytes, mature peripheral leukocytes, bone marrow cells or on other types of tissues elsewhere in the human body. Immunohistologic analysis revealed that JL1 had a clear pattern of distribution on cortical thymocytes. Immunoprecipitation of 125I- labeled cell lysates from human thymocytes and Molt-4 leukemic cell line with anti-JL1 mAb yielded a 120-130-kD single chain glycoprotein. When immunoprecipitation of cell lysate was done after endoglycosidase F treatment, JL1 antigen was still detected by antibody but the band showed a reduction in apparent molecular mass of approximately 5 kD. This suggests that, although JL1 molecule contains carbohydrate group, this does not form a critical part of the antigenic determinant for anti-JL1 antibody. JL1 antigen appears to be the first double positive, stage-specific differentiation antigen of human thymocyte reported so far. This antigen would be a useful marker for lymphoblastic malignancy of stage II thymocyte origin and it may be involved in the thymocyte education process. PMID:8376947

  4. Development of IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, C; Costello, A M; Rook, G A; Stanford, J L

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies link mycobacterial and human heat shock protein antigens with autoimmune diseases. Little is known about the development of antibody responses to these antigens in children. IgG responses to mycobacterial antigens were studied in children living in the UK (an environment low in mycobacteria) who had not received BCG vaccination. Age curves of IgG response to sonicates from different species of mycobacteria were similar suggesting that the greater part of the developing IgG response is to the common antigens shared by all mycobacteria. The major part of the IgG response was to carbohydrate antigens: lipoarabinomannan is a mycobacterial cell wall carbohydrate and was confirmed as a major immunodominant antigen. Infants showed a marked early response to the mycobacterial 65 kilodalton (kDa) and 70 kDa heat shock proteins, but not to the human 65 kDa heat shock protein. The early IgG response to heat shock proteins may reflect cross reactivity to proteins released by a wide variety of bacteria (possibly from breakdown in the gut) or recognition of other immunodominant antigens with high levels of cross reactivity to self. PMID:8285775

  5. Molecular Mimics of the Tumour Antigen MUC1

    PubMed Central

    James, Tharappel C.; Bond, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as “self”, and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as ‘proof of principle’ we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1) from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides. PMID:23166757

  6. Update on antigen-specific immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Walter, Roland B

    2015-06-01

    Among the few drugs that have shown a benefit for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in randomized clinical trials over the last several decades is the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). Undoubtedly, this experience has highlighted the value of antigen-specific immunotherapy in AML. A wide variety of therapeutics directed against several different antigens on AML cells are currently explored in preclinical and early clinical studies. On the one hand, these include passive strategies such as unconjugated antibodies targeting one or more antigens, antibodies armed with drugs, toxic proteins, or radionuclides, or adoptive immunotherapies, in particular utilizing T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or modified T cell receptor (TCR) genes; on the other hand, these include active strategies such as vaccinations. With the documented benefit for GO and the emerging data with several classes of therapeutics in other leukemias, in particular small bispecific antibodies and CAR T cells, the future is bright. Nevertheless, a number of important questions related to the choice of target antigen(s), patient population, exact treatment modality, and supportive care needs remain open. Addressing such questions in upcoming studies will ultimately be required to optimize the clinical use of antigen-specific immunotherapies in AML and ensure that such treatments become an effective, versatile tool for this disease for which the outcomes have remained unsatisfactory in many patients.

  7. Rational design of protamine nanocapsules as antigen delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Presas, Elena; Dalmau-Mena, Inmaculada; Martínez-Pulgarín, Susana; Alonso, Covadonga; Escribano, José M; Alonso, María J; Csaba, Noemi Stefánia

    2017-01-10

    Current challenges in global immunization indicate the demand for new delivery strategies, which could be applied to the development of new vaccines against emerging diseases, as well as to improve safety and efficacy of currently existing vaccine formulations. Here, we report a novel antigen nanocarrier consisting of an oily core and a protamine shell, further stabilized with pegylated surfactants. These nanocarriers, named protamine nanocapsules, were rationally designed to promote the intracellular delivery of antigens to immunocompetent cells and to trigger an efficient and long-lasting immune response. Protamine nanocapsules have nanometric size, positive zeta potential and high association capacity for H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin, a protein that was used here as a model antigen. The new formulation shows an attractive stability profile both, as an aqueous suspension or a freeze-dried powder formulation. In vitro studies showed that protamine nanocapsules were efficiently internalized by macrophages without eliciting significant toxicity. In vivo studies indicate that antigen-loaded nanocapsules trigger immune responses comparable to those achieved with alum, even when using significantly lower antigen doses, thus indicating their adjuvant properties. These promising in vivo data, alongside with their versatility for the loading of different antigens and oily immunomodulators and their excellent stability profile, make these nanocapsules a promising platform for the delivery of antigens.

  8. Changes in structural and antigenic properties of proteins by radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    1995-08-01

    Radiation effect on structural and antigenic properties of proteins (0.2% in 0.01 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4) were investigated using ovalbumin (OVA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Aggregation of OVA and BSA was induced by radiation and the molecular mass increased significantly in N 2. Significant changes in surface hydrophobicity and [ θ] 222 nm of CD were also observed by radiation showing the destruction of secondary structure of proteins. Antigenicity of irradiated OVA measured by the method of immunodiffusion was decreased by radiation, and the reactivity to anti-OVA antibody was almost diminished at 8 kGy in N 2 and 4 kGy in O 2, respectively. The reactivity of BSA was diminished at 4 kGy both in N 2 and O 2. Changes in hydrophobicity of OVA did not correspond to the decrease in antigenicity, whereas the changes in [ θ] 222 nm relatively well corresponded to the antigenicity. The SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analysis showed that radiation at higher doses induced the production of protein aggregates and degraded fragments with reactivity to the specific antibodies. These results suggest that the main part of conformation-dependent antigenic structure (conformational epitope) is easily lost by radiation, but some antigenicity, which is mostly due to the amino acid sequence-dependent antigenic structures (sequential epitopes), remains even at higher dose.

  9. Atomic structure of anthrax protective antigen pore elucidates toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L; Collier, R John; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-05-28

    Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen, lethal factor, and oedema factor, is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in humans and animals. Protective antigen forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes lethal factor and oedema factor into the cytosol of target cells. Protective antigen is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. On the basis of biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a phi (Φ)-clamp composed of phenylalanine (Phe)427 residues of protective antigen catalyses protein translocation via a charge-state-dependent Brownian ratchet. Although atomic structures of protective antigen prepores are available, how protective antigen senses low pH, converts to active pore, and translocates lethal factor and oedema factor are not well defined without an atomic model of its pore. Here, by cryo-electron microscopy with direct electron counting, we determine the protective antigen pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed.

  10. Duality of β-glucan microparticles: antigen carrier and immunostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Baert, Kim; De Geest, Bruno G; De Greve, Henri; Cox, Eric; Devriendt, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Designing efficient recombinant mucosal vaccines against enteric diseases is still a major challenge. Mucosal delivery of recombinant vaccines requires encapsulation in potent immunostimulatory particles to induce an efficient immune response. This paper evaluates the capacity of β-glucan microparticles (GPs) as antigen vehicles and characterizes their immune-stimulatory effects. The relevant infectious antigen FedF was chosen to be loaded inside the microparticles. The incorporation of FedF inside the particles was highly efficient (roughly 85%) and occurred without antigen degradation. In addition, these GPs have immunostimulatory effects as well, demonstrated by the strong reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by porcine neutrophils upon their recognition. Although antigen-loaded GPs still induce ROS production, antigen loading decreases this production by neutrophils for reasons yet unknown. However, these antigen-loaded GPs are still able to bind their specific β-glucan receptor, demonstrated by blocking complement receptor 3, which is the major β-glucan receptor on porcine neutrophils. The dual character of these particles is confirmed by a T-cell proliferation assay. FedF-loaded particles induce a significantly higher FedF-specific T-cell proliferation than soluble FedF. Taken together, these results show that GPs are efficient antigen carriers with immune-stimulatory properties. PMID:27330289

  11. Response to self antigen imprints regulatory memory in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Gratz, Iris K.; Paw, Jonathan S.; Lee, Karen; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Abbas, Abul K.

    2012-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in tissues is achieved through a delicate balance between pathogenic T cell responses directed at tissue-specific antigens and the ability of the tissue to inhibit these responses. The mechanisms by which tissues and the immune system communicate to establish and maintain immune homeostasis are currently unknown. Clinical evidence suggests that chronic or repeated exposure to self antigen within tissues leads to an attenuation of pathologic autoimmune responses, possibly as a means to mitigate inflammatory damage and preserve function. Many human organ-specific autoimmune diseases are characterized by the initial presentation of the disease being the most severe, with subsequent flares being of lesser severity and duration1. In fact, these diseases often spontaneously resolve, despite persistent tissue autoantigen expression2. In the practice of antigen-specific immunotherapy (antigen-SIT), allergens or self antigens are repeatedly injected in the skin, with a diminution of the inflammatory response occurring after each successive exposure3. Although these findings suggest that tissues acquire the ability to attenuate autoimmune reactions upon repeated responses to antigens, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we show that upon expression of self antigen in a peripheral tissue, thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Treg cells) become activated, proliferate and differentiate into more potent suppressors, which mediate resolution of organ-specific autoimmunity. After resolution of the inflammatory response, activated Treg cells are maintained in the target tissue and are primed to attenuate subsequent autoimmune reactions when antigen is re-expressed. Thus, Treg cells function to confer ‘regulatory memory’ to the target tissue. These findings provide a framework for understanding how Treg cells respond when exposed to self antigen in peripheral tissues and offer mechanistic insight into how tissues regulate autoimmunity. PMID

  12. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  13. Designing malaria vaccines to circumvent antigen variability✩

    PubMed Central

    Ouattara, Amed; Barry, Alyssa E.; Dutta, Sheetij; Remarque, Edmond J.; Beeson, James G.; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2016-01-01

    Prospects for malaria eradication will be greatly enhanced by an effective vaccine, but parasite genetic diversity poses a major impediment to malaria vaccine efficacy. In recent pre-clinical and field trials, vaccines based on polymorphic Plasmodium falciparum antigens have shown efficacy only against homologous strains, raising the specter of allele-specific immunity such as that which plagues vaccines against influenza and HIV. The most advanced malaria vaccine, RTS,S, targets relatively conserved epitopes on the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein. After more than 40 years of development and testing, RTS,S, has shown significant but modest efficacy against clinical malaria in phase 2 and 3 trials. Ongoing phase 2 studies of an irradiated sporozoite vaccine will ascertain whether the full protection against homologous experimental malaria challenge conferred by high doses of a whole organism vaccine can provide protection against diverse strains in the field. Here we review and evaluate approaches being taken to design broadly cross-protective malaria vaccines. PMID:26475447

  14. Structural and antigenic analysis of meningococcal piliation.

    PubMed Central

    Olafson, R W; McCarthy, P J; Bhatti, A R; Dooley, J S; Heckels, J E; Trust, T J

    1985-01-01

    Pilin with an Mr of 16,500 was purified to homogeneity from Neisseria meningitidis SP3428. Procedures which provided useful separation during purification included high-pressure liquid chromatography with a TSK size exclusion column, Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography with SP-Sephadex, and preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The amino acid composition of this pilin was similar to that previously reported for this species. The sequence of N-terminal 51 amino acids was also determined. The protein lacked a modified phenylalanine at the amino terminus and displayed six residues which were different from Neisseria gonorrhoeae in that region of the molecule determined to be the lectin-binding domain. Monoclonal antibody raised to this pilin was employed, along with a monoclonal antibody to an epitope common to all gonococcal pilins, to analyze the intra- and interstrain heterogeneity of meningococcal piliation. The results indicate that N. meningitidis displays considerable intra- and interstrain heterogeneity with respect to both pilus subunit size and antigenicity. The Mr of subunits ranged from 13,000 to 20,000. Images PMID:2580788

  15. Pericyte Antigens in Perivascular Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Asatrian, Greg; Mravic, Marco; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Dry, Sarah M.; Peault, Bruno; James, Aaron W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear line of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from pericytes or modified perivascular cells. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor (previously termed hemangiopericytoma) was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation. Methods Here, we systematically examine pericyte immunohistochemical markers among glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, angioleiomyoma, and solitary fibrous tumor. Immunohistochemical staining and semiquantification was performed using well-defined pericyte antigens, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Results Glomus tumor and myopericytoma demonstrate diffuse staining for all pericyte markers, including immunohistochemical reactivity for αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Malignant glomus tumors all showed some degree of pericyte marker immunoreactivity, although it was significantly reduced. Angioleiomyoma shared a similar αSMA + CD146 + PDGFRβ+ immunophenotype; however, this was predominantly seen in the areas of perivascular tumor growth. Solitary fibrous tumors showed patchy PDGFRβ immunoreactivity only. Discussion In summary, pericyte marker expression is a ubiquitous finding in glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma. Malignant glomus tumor shows a comparative reduction in pericyte marker expression, which may represent partial loss of pericytic differentiation. Pericyte markers are essentially not seen in solitary fibrous tumor. The combination of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ immunohistochemical stainings may be of utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26085647

  16. Immunization with viral antigens: infectious haematopoietic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Winton, J R

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  17. 4-1BB chimeric antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Campana, Dario; Schwarz, Herbert; Imai, Chihaya

    2014-01-01

    In addition to T-cell receptor signals, T lymphocytes require costimulatory signals for robust activation. Among these, those mediated by 4-1BB (CD137, TNFRSF9) are critical for tumor immunity. 4-1BB is expressed in T-cell receptor-activated lymphocytes as well as natural killer cells and other hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. 4-1BB ligation induces a signaling cascade that results in cytokine production, expression of antiapoptotic molecules, and enhanced immune responses. In line with the described function of 4-1BB, its addition to CD3ζ chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) increases their capacity to provoke T-cell expansion and antitumor activity. The results of preclinical studies with 4-1BB CARs have been corroborated by encouraging results from clinical trials. Advantages and disadvantages of 4-1BB CARs versus CARs bearing other costimulatory components remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we discuss the properties of 4-1BB, the design of 4-1BB CARs, and the function of T lymphocytes and natural killer cells expressing them.

  18. Persistence of acanthamoeba antigen following acanthamoeba keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y; Matheson, M; Dart, J; Cree, I

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the hypothesis that persistent corneal and scleral inflammation following acanthamoeba keratitis is not always caused by active amoebic infection but can be due to persisting acanthamoebic antigens
METHODS—24 lamellar corneal biopsy and penetrating keratoplasty specimens were obtained from 14 consecutive patients at various stages of their disease and divided for microscopy and culture. Histological sections were immunostained and screened for the presence of Acanthamoeba cysts by light microscopy. Cultures were carried out using partly homogenised tissues on non-nutrient agar seeded with E coli. Clinical data were obtained retrospectively from the case notes of these patients.
RESULTS—Of the 24 specimens, 20 were obtained from eyes that were clinically inflamed at the time of surgery. Acanthamoeba cysts were present in 16 (80%) of these 20 specimens, while only five (25%) were culture positive. Acanthamoeba cysts were found to persist for up to 31 months after antiamoebic treatment.
CONCLUSION—These findings support the hypothesis that Acanthamoeba cysts can remain in corneal tissue for an extended period of time following acanthamoeba keratitis and may cause persistent corneal and scleral inflammation in the absence of active amoebic infection. In view of these findings, prolonged intensive antiamoebic therapy may be inappropriate when the inflammation is due to retained antigen rather than to viable organisms

 PMID:11222330

  19. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  20. Demonstration of protective antigen carried by flagella of Clostridium chauvoei.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Y; Minamoto, N; Tanaka, S

    1984-01-01

    The protective antigen present on the flagella of Clostridium chauvoei was studied by the mouse protection test. A partially purified flagella preparation (PPF) showed protective antigenicity after two intraperitoneal injections of 2 micrograms as protein, while the protective antigenicity of nonflagellated mutants (NFM) was 100-fold less than that of the flagellated parent strain. Although the protective effect of antisera against the whole cells and PPF, in terms of ED50 values, was mostly lost after absorption with the parent strain, that of antisera after absorption with NFMs showed no appreciable loss. These results suggest that the flagella of Cl. chauvoei play some role in inducing protective immunity in mice.

  1. T-cell recognition of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in erythrocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii: inhibition of parasitemia by this antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, B; Engels, A; Camus, D; Haque, A

    1993-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the presence of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in the erythrocyte stage from Plasmodium yoelii (265 BY strain) and Plasmodium falciparum through recognition by T cells primed in vivo with antigens from each of these parasites. BALB/c mice are naturally resistant to P. falciparum but are susceptible to P. yoelii infection. Mice that had recovered from P. yoelii primary infection became resistant to a second infection. A higher in vitro proliferative response to a soluble blood stage preparation of P. falciparum was observed in splenic cells from immune animals than in those from mice with a patent P. yoelii infection. The antigen-induced proliferative response was enhanced when animals were exposed to a secondary infection. Animals exposed to a challenge infection were treated with anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies to deplete the corresponding subset of T cells. There was a marked diminution in P. falciparum antigen-induced proliferative response in the total splenic cell populations from CD8-depleted but not from CD4-depleted mice. In CD8-depleted and nondepleted animals, the antigen-induced proliferation in the total cell populations was markedly lower than in the T-cell-rich populations, indicating inhibitory activities of B cells and/or macrophages. There was no such difference in the stimulation between total and T-enriched cell populations from CD4-depleted animals. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the presence of an almost equal percentage of CD8+ (59.6%) and CD4+ (64%) T cells in the spleen preparations following in vivo depletion of CD4- and CD8-bearing T cells, respectively. When cultured with P. yoelii blood stage antigen, splenocytes from animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen displayed a significant proliferative response which was markedly diminished by treatment with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement. Animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen and then challenged with P. yoelii blood stage

  2. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of membrane antigen expression.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, Jean-Luc

    2002-11-01

    Immunological analysis for cell antigens has been performed by flow cytometry in a qualitative fashion for over thirty years. During that time it has become increasingly apparent that quantitative measurements such as number of antigens per cell provide unique and useful information. This unit on quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) describes the most commonly used protocols, both direct and indirect, and the major methods of analysis for the number of antibody binding sites on a cell or particle. Practical applications include detection of antigen under- or overexpression in hematological malignancies, distinguishing between B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and precise diagnosis of certain rare diseases.

  3. Bacterial vectors for the delivery of tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Toussaint, Bertrand; Le Gouëllec, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of bacterial vectors, which offer ease of production and efficiency, has become an important mechanism for the delivery of protein antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vivo. Proof of concept studies has been carried out utilizing different bacteria in various cancer models with some in clinical trials. Here we described the way to prepare Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) vaccines based on a virulence-attenuated strain to test the efficacy of different fragments of a well-known tumor antigen. This protocol could be applied to efficacy studies in murine models of human cancers.

  4. Isolation and purification of antigenic components of Cryptococcus.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Karen L; Levitz, Stuart M

    2009-01-01

    The encapsulated fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are significant agents of life-threatening infections, particularly in persons with suppressed cell-mediated immunity. This chapter provides detailed methodology for the purification of two of the major antigen fractions of C. neoformans: glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) and mannoprotein (MP). GXM is the primary component of the polysaccharide capsule, which is the major cryptococcal virulence factor. In contrast, MPs have been identified as key antigens that stimulate T-cell responses. Purification of GXM and MP should assist investigators studying the antigenic, biochemical, and virulence properties of Cryptococcus species.

  5. Genetic and antigenic diversity of the surface protective antigen proteins of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    To, Ho; Nagai, Shinya

    2007-07-01

    The surface protective antigen (Spa) protein of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae has been shown to be highly immunogenic and is a potential candidate for a new vaccine against erysipelas. In this study, we cloned and sequenced spa genes from all E. rhusiopathiae serovar reference strains as well as from a serovar 18 strain which was not classified as any species in the genus Erysipelothrix. Sequence analysis revealed that the Spa proteins could be classified into three molecular species, including SpaA, which was previously found in serovars 1a and 2, and the newly designated SpaB and SpaC proteins. The SpaA protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 1a, 1b, 2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 15, 16, 17, and N, the SpaB protein is produced by E. rhusiopathiae serovars 4, 6, 11, 19, and 21, and the SpaC protein is produced only by serovar 18. The amino acid sequence similarity was high among members of each Spa type (96 to 99%) but low between different Spa types ( approximately 60%). The greatest diversity in Spa proteins was found in the N-terminal half of the molecule (50 to 57% similarity), which was shown to be involved in immunoprotection. Coinciding with this, immunoblot analysis revealed that rabbit antisera specific to each Spa reacted strongly with the homologous Spa protein but weakly with heterologous Spa proteins. A mouse cross-protection study showed that the three recombinant Spa (rSpa) proteins elicited complete protection against challenge with homologous strains but that the level of protection against challenge with heterologous strains varied depending on the rSpa protein used for immunization. Our study is the first to demonstrate sequence and antigenic diversity in Spa proteins and to indicate that rSpaC may be the most promising antigen for use as a vaccine component because of its broad cross-protectiveness.

  6. Alanine mutagenesis of the primary antigenic escape residue cluster, c1, of apical membrane antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S; Clayton, Joshua W; Pool, Christopher D; Haynes, J David; Gasser, Robert A; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2010-02-01

    Antibodies against apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) inhibit invasion of Plasmodium merozoites into red cells, and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms on AMA1 allow the parasite to escape inhibitory antibodies. The availability of a crystal structure makes it possible to test protein engineering strategies to develop a monovalent broadly reactive vaccine. Previously, we showed that a linear stretch of polymorphic residues (amino acids 187 to 207), localized within the C1 cluster on domain 1, conferred the highest level of escape from inhibitory antibodies, and these were termed antigenic escape residues (AER). Here we test the hypothesis that immunodampening the C1 AER will divert the immune system toward more conserved regions. We substituted seven C1 AER of the FVO strain Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 with alanine residues (ALA). The resulting ALA protein was less immunogenic than the native protein in rabbits. Anti-ALA antibodies contained a higher proportion of cross-reactive domain 2 and domain 3 antibodies and had higher avidity than anti-FVO. No overall enhancement of cross-reactive inhibitory activity was observed when anti-FVO and anti-ALA sera were compared for their ability to inhibit invasion. Alanine mutations at the C1 AER had shifted the immune response toward cross-strain-reactive epitopes that were noninhibitory, refuting the hypothesis but confirming the importance of the C1 cluster as an inhibitory epitope. We further demonstrate that naturally occurring polymorphisms that fall within the C1 cluster can predict escape from cross-strain invasion inhibition, reinforcing the importance of the C1 cluster genotype for antigenic categorization and allelic shift analyses in future phase 2b trials.

  7. Characterization of New Breast Tumor-Specific Antigens Using a Novel Antigen Discovery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    The tyrosinase gene codes for an antigen recognized by autologous cytolytic T lymphocytes on HLA-A2 melanomas. JExp Med 178, no. 2:489. 2. Coulie...cold PBS, pelleted and stored at -800 C for later use. Detergent lysis buffer (1% CHAPS) and a cocktail of protease inhibitors (2 mM PMSF, 100 gM...40 REFERENCES 1. Brichard, V., Van Pel, A., Wolfel, T., Wolfel, C., De Plaen, E., Lethe, B., Coulie, P., and Boon, T. The tyrosinase gene codes for

  8. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: