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Sample records for 5a genotype frequency

  1. Rapid, Sensitive, and Accurate Evaluation of Drug Resistant Mutant (NS5A-Y93H) Strain Frequency in Genotype 1b HCV by Invader Assay.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Satoshi; Ochi, Hidenori; Murakami, Eisuke; Uchida, Takuro; Kan, Hiromi; Akamatsu, Sakura; Hayes, C Nelson; Abe, Hiromi; Miki, Daiki; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Aikata, Hiroshi; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-01-01

    Daclatasvir and asunaprevir dual oral therapy is expected to achieve high sustained virological response (SVR) rates in patients with HCV genotype 1b infection. However, presence of the NS5A-Y93H substitution at baseline has been shown to be an independent predictor of treatment failure for this regimen. By using the Invader assay, we developed a system to rapidly and accurately detect the presence of mutant strains and evaluate the proportion of patients harboring a pre-treatment Y93H mutation. This assay system, consisting of nested PCR followed by Invader reaction with well-designed primers and probes, attained a high overall assay success rate of 98.9% among a total of 702 Japanese HCV genotype 1b patients. Even in serum samples with low HCV titers, more than half of the samples could be successfully assayed. Our assay system showed a better lower detection limit of Y93H proportion than using direct sequencing, and Y93H frequencies obtained by this method correlated well with those of deep-sequencing analysis (r = 0.85, P <0.001). The proportion of the patients with the mutant strain estimated by this assay was 23.6% (164/694). Interestingly, patients with the Y93H mutant strain showed significantly lower ALT levels (p=8.8 x 10-4), higher serum HCV RNA levels (p=4.3 x 10-7), and lower HCC risk (p=6.9 x 10-3) than those with the wild type strain. Because the method is both sensitive and rapid, the NS5A-Y93H mutant strain detection system established in this study may provide important pre-treatment information valuable not only for treatment decisions but also for prediction of disease progression in HCV genotype 1b patients. PMID:26083687

  2. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Andolina, Andrea; Merli, Marco; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Morsica, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs) were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV) or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV) was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4%) in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2%) in 1a isolates, p = 0.040). Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1%) G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5%) harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001). Finally, 28 (2.3%) G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs. PMID:27023593

  3. Frequency of Natural Resistance within NS5a Replication Complex Domain in Hepatitis C Genotypes 1a, 1b: Possible Implication of Subtype-Specific Resistance Selection in Multiple Direct Acting Antivirals Drugs Combination Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bagaglio, Sabrina; Andolina, Andrea; Merli, Marco; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Morsica, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Different HCV subtypes may naturally harbor different resistance selection to anti-NS5a inhibitors. 2761 sequences retrieved from the Los Alamos HCV database were analyzed in the NS5a domain 1, the target of NS5a inhibitors. The NS5a resistance-associated polymorphisms (RAPs) were more frequently detected in HCV G1b compared to G1a. The prevalence of polymorphisms associated with cross-resistance to compounds in clinical use (daclatasvir, DCV, ledipasvir, LDV, ombitasvir, and OMV) or scheduled to come into clinical use in the near future (IDX719, elbasvir, and ELV) was higher in G1b compared to G1a (37/1552 (2.4%) in 1b sequences and 15/1209 (1.2%) in 1a isolates, p = 0.040). Interestingly, on the basis of the genotype-specific resistance pattern, 95 (6.1%) G1b sequences had L31M RAP to DCV/IDX719, while 6 sequences of G1a (0.5%) harbored L31M RAP, conferring resistance to DCV/LDV/IDX719/ELV (p < 0.0001). Finally, 28 (2.3%) G1a and none of G1b isolates harbored M28V RAP to OMV (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, the pattern of subtype-specific resistance selection in the naturally occurring strains may guide the treatment option in association with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting different regions, particularly in patients that are difficult to cure, such as those with advanced liver disease or individuals who have failed previous DAAs. PMID:27023593

  4. Hepatitis C virus genotyping in Greece: unexpected high prevalence of genotype 5a in a Greek island.

    PubMed

    Karatapanis, Stylianos; Tsoplou, Panagiota; Papastergiou, Vasilios; Vasiageorgi, Aggeliki; Stampori, Maria; Saitis, Ioannis; Tsitsopoulos, Eustathios; Lisgos, Phillipos; Skorda, Lamprini; Ketikoglou, Ioannis; Goulis, Ioannis

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 5 (G5) is a rare genotype reported mainly in South Africa. However, increasing data suggest the sporadic presence of this genotype in different European countries. To assess the epidemiology of HCV-G5 in Greece, genotyping was performed in 973 consecutive patients infected with HCV, referred to 7 hepatology centers throughout Greece, from January 2005 to December 2009. Genotype 5a (19 patients, 1.9%) was the fifth most prevalent genotype after genotype 1 (408 patients, 41.9%), genotype 3 (318 patients, 32.7%), genotype 4 (158 patients, 16.2%), and genotype 2 (70 patients, 7.2%). The majority of patients infected with G5 (16/19,84.2%) were referred to the General Hospital of Rhodes, an island in south-east Greece. The HCV genotype distribution in that particular island, indicates a particularly high G5 prevalence of 12.8%, after genotype 1 (40%), genotype 3 (28%), and genotype 4 (15%). Among the patients from Rhodes infected with G5 (n = 16), 13 (81.2%) were females. The mean age was 62.3 ± 6.5 years, significantly older than the patients infected with other HCV genotypes (mean age 40.6 ± 7.2, P < 0.0001). Nine out of the 16 cases (56.2%) presented features of high pre-treatment viral loads. Advanced liver fibrosis (Metavir F3-F4) was found in four out of five performed liver biopsies. Ten patients received treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and a sustained viral response were achieved in six cases. The source of infection is unknown but parenteral iatrogenic routes of transmission seem to have contributed significantly to the spread of genotype 5a in this region. PMID:22170541

  5. The COL5A1 genotype is associated with range of motion

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung-Taek; Kim, Chang-Sun; Kim, Woo-Nam; Min, Seok-Ki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of our study was to investigate the association between COL5A1 genotype and Range of Motion as measured by the passive straight leg raise (SLR) and whole body join laxity (WBJL) in Asian population. [Methods] One hundred and seventy seven participants including Korean and Japanese college students (male = 109, female = 68) participated in the study. Each subject performed the passive straight leg raise and whole body join laxity test. Genotyping for the COL5A1 (rs 12722) polymorphism was performed using the TaqMan approach. The COL5A1 genotype exhibited a Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium distribution in our population. [Results] The physical parameters including height, weight, and BMI were higher in < 90° group than > 90° group. The SLR exhibited significant difference among the COL5A1 group. However, the WBJL did not differ significantly among the COL5A1 genotype, but significant difference was seen in CC genotype when compared to CT (2.99 ± 1.72) or TT (2.70 ± 1.52) genotype. [Conclusion] We concluded that COL5A1 gene polymorphism is associated with increased SLR ROM in Asian population. PMID:26244122

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a Subgenomic Replicons for Evaluation of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wose Kinge, Constance N.; Espiritu, Christine; Prabdial-Sing, Nishi; Sithebe, Nomathamsaqa Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists as six major genotypes that differ in geographical distribution, pathogenesis, and response to antiviral therapy. In vitro replication systems for all HCV genotypes except genotype 5 have been reported. In this study, we recovered genotype 5a full-length genomes from four infected voluntary blood donors in South Africa and established a G418-selectable subgenomic replicon system using one of these strains. The replicon derived from the wild-type sequence failed to replicate in Huh-7.5 cells. However, the inclusion of the S2205I amino acid substitution, a cell culture-adaptive change originally described for a genotype 1b replicon, resulted in a small number of G418-resistant cell colonies. HCV RNA replication in these cells was confirmed by quantification of viral RNA and detection of the nonstructural protein NS5A. Sequence analysis of the viral RNAs isolated from multiple independent cell clones revealed the presence of several nonsynonymous mutations, which were localized mainly in the NS3 protein. These mutations, when introduced back into the parental backbone, significantly increased colony formation. To facilitate convenient monitoring of HCV RNA replication levels, the mutant with the highest replication level was further modified to express a fusion protein of firefly luciferase and neomycin phosphotransferase. Using such replicons from genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 4a, and 5a, we compared the effects of various HCV inhibitors on their replication. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro replication system for HCV genotype 5a, which will be useful for the development of pan-genotype anti-HCV compounds. PMID:24982066

  7. Discovery of fused tricyclic core containing HCV NS5A inhibitors with pan-genotype activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wensheng; Coburn, Craig A; Yang, De-Yi; Meinke, Peter T; Wong, Michael; Rosenblum, Stuart B; Chen, Kevin X; Njoroge, George F; Chen, Lei; Dwyer, Michael P; Jiang, Yueheng; Nair, Anilkumar G; Selyutin, Oleg; Tong, Ling; Zeng, Qingbei; Zhong, Bin; Ji, Tao; Hu, Bin; Agrawal, Sony; Xia, Ellen; Zhai, Ying; Liu, Rong; Kong, Rong; Ingravallo, Paul; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; Nomeir, Amin; Fells, James; Kozlowski, Joseph A

    2016-07-01

    HCV NS5A inhibitors have demonstrated impressive in vitro potency profiles in HCV replicon assays and robust HCV RNA titer reduction in the clinic making them attractive components for inclusion in an all oral fixed dose combination regimen for the treatment of HCV infection. Herein, we describe research efforts that led to the discovery of a series of fused tricyclic core containing HCV NS5A inhibitors such as 24, 39, 40, 43, and 44 which have pan-genotype activity and are orally bioavailable in the rat. PMID:27180013

  8. Discovery of Thienoimidazole-Based HCV NS5A Genotype 1a and 1b Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon; Xu, Jinwang; Reddy, T Jagadeeswar; Morris, Mark; Cottrell, Kevin M; Cadilhac, Caroline; Henderson, James A; Nicolas, Oliver; Bilimoria, Darius; Denis, Francois; Mani, Nagraj; Ewing, Nigel; Shawgo, Rebecca; L'Heureux, Lucille; Selliah, Subajini; Chan, Laval; Chauret, Nathalie; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Namchuk, Mark N; Grillot, Anne-Laure; Bennani, Youssef L; Das, Sanjoy K; Maxwell, John P

    2014-03-13

    The discovery of potent thienoimidazole-based HCV NS5A inhibitors is herein reported. A novel method to access the thienoimidazole [5,5]-bicyclic system is disclosed. This method gave access to a common key intermediate (6) that was engaged in Suzuki or Sonogashira reactions with coupling partners bearing different linkers. A detailed study of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the linkers revealed that aromatic linkers with linear topologies are required to achieve high potency for both 1a and 1b HCV genotypes. Compound 20, with a para-phenyl linker, was identified as a potential lead displaying potencies of 17 and 8 pM against genotype 1a and 1b replicons, respectively. PMID:24900811

  9. Discovery of ABT-267, a pan-genotypic inhibitor of HCV NS5A.

    PubMed

    DeGoey, David A; Randolph, John T; Liu, Dachun; Pratt, John; Hutchins, Charles; Donner, Pamela; Krueger, A Chris; Matulenko, Mark; Patel, Sachin; Motter, Christopher E; Nelson, Lissa; Keddy, Ryan; Tufano, Michael; Caspi, Daniel D; Krishnan, Preethi; Mistry, Neeta; Koev, Gennadiy; Reisch, Thomas J; Mondal, Rubina; Pilot-Matias, Tami; Gao, Yi; Beno, David W A; Maring, Clarence J; Molla, Akhter; Dumas, Emily; Campbell, Andrew; Williams, Laura; Collins, Christine; Wagner, Rolf; Kati, Warren M

    2014-03-13

    We describe here N-phenylpyrrolidine-based inhibitors of HCV NS5A with excellent potency, metabolic stability, and pharmacokinetics. Compounds with 2S,5S stereochemistry at the pyrrolidine ring provided improved genotype 1 (GT1) potency compared to the 2R,5R analogues. Furthermore, the attachment of substituents at the 4-position of the central N-phenyl group resulted in compounds with improved potency. Substitution with tert-butyl, as in compound 38 (ABT-267), provided compounds with low-picomolar EC50 values and superior pharmacokinetics. It was discovered that compound 38 was a pan-genotypic HCV inhibitor, with an EC50 range of 1.7-19.3 pM against GT1a, -1b, -2a, -2b, -3a, -4a, and -5a and 366 pM against GT6a. Compound 38 decreased HCV RNA up to 3.10 log10 IU/mL during 3-day monotherapy in treatment-naive HCV GT1-infected subjects and is currently in phase 3 clinical trials in combination with an NS3 protease inhibitor with ritonavir (r) (ABT-450/r) and an NS5B non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor (ABT-333), with and without ribavirin. PMID:24400777

  10. Susceptibilities of Genotype 1a, 1b, and 3 Hepatitis C Virus Variants to the NS5A Inhibitor Elbasvir

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Yeh, Wendy W.; Ludmerer, Steven W.; Jumes, Patricia A.; Marshall, William L.; Kong, Stephanie; Ingravallo, Paul; Black, Stuart; Pak, Irene; DiNubile, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Elbasvir is an investigational NS5A inhibitor with in vitro activity against multiple HCV genotypes. Antiviral activity of elbasvir was measured in replicons derived from wild-type or resistant variants of genotypes 1a, 1b, and 3. The barrier to resistance was assessed by the number of resistant colonies selected by exposure to various elbasvir concentrations. In a phase 1b dose-escalating study, virologic responses were determined in 48 noncirrhotic adult men with chronic genotype 1 or 3 infections randomized to placebo or elbasvir from 5 to 50 mg (genotype 1) or 10 to 100 mg (genotype 3) once daily for 5 days. The NS5A gene was sequenced from plasma specimens obtained before, during, and after treatment. Elbasvir suppressed the emergence of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Variants selected by exposure to high elbasvir concentrations typically encoded multiple amino acid substitutions (most commonly involving loci 30, 31, and 93), conferring high-level elbasvir resistance. In the monotherapy study, patients with genotype 1b had greater reductions in HCV RNA levels than patients with genotype 1a at all elbasvir doses; responses in patients with genotype 3 were generally less pronounced than for genotype 1, particularly at lower elbasvir doses. M28T, Q30R, L31V, and Y93H in genotype 1a, L31V and Y93H in genotype 1b, and A30K, L31F, and Y93H in genotype 3 were the predominant RAVs selected by elbasvir monotherapy. Virologic findings in patients were consistent with the preclinical observations. NS5A-RAVs emerged most often at amino acid positions 28, 30, 31, and 93 in both the laboratory and clinical trial. (The MK-8742 P002 trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01532973.) PMID:26303801

  11. Discovery of MK-8742: an HCV NS5A inhibitor with broad genotype activity.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Craig A; Meinke, Peter T; Chang, Wei; Fandozzi, Christine M; Graham, Donald J; Hu, Bin; Huang, Qian; Kargman, Stacia; Kozlowski, Joseph; Liu, Rong; McCauley, John A; Nomeir, Amin A; Soll, Richard M; Vacca, Joseph P; Wang, Dahai; Wu, Hao; Zhong, Bin; Olsen, David B; Ludmerer, Steven W

    2013-12-01

    The NS5A protein plays a critical role in the replication of HCV and has been the focus of numerous research efforts over the past few years. NS5A inhibitors have shown impressive in vitro potency profiles in HCV replicon assays, making them attractive components for inclusion in all oral combination regimens. Early work in the NS5A arena led to the discovery of our first clinical candidate, MK-4882 [2-((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-5-(2-(4-(5-((S)-pyrrolidin-2-yl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl)phenyl)benzofuran-5-yl)-1H-imidazole]. While preclinical proof-of-concept studies in HCV-infected chimpanzees harboring chronic genotype 1 infections resulted in significant decreases in viral load after both single- and multiple-dose treatments, viral breakthrough proved to be a concern, thus necessitating the development of compounds with increased potency against a number of genotypes and NS5A resistance mutations. Modification of the MK-4882 core scaffold by introduction of a cyclic constraint afforded a series of tetracyclic inhibitors, which showed improved virologic profiles. Herein we describe the research efforts that led to the discovery of MK-8742, a tetracyclic indole-based NS5A inhibitor, which is currently in phase 2b clinical trials as part of an all-oral, interferon-free regimen for the treatment of HCV infection. PMID:24127258

  12. HLA Haplotypes and Genotypes Frequencies in Brazilian Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sippert, Emília Ângela; Silva, Cléverson de Oliveira e; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Marques, Silvia Barbosa Dutra; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) have a pivotal role in immune response and may be involved in antigen recognition of periodontal pathogens. However, the associations of HLA with chronic periodontitis (CP) have not been previously studied in the Brazilian population. In an attempt to clarify the issue of genetic predisposition to CP, we examined the distribution of HLA alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in patients from Southern Brazil. One hundred and eight CP patients and 151 healthy and unrelated controls with age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched were HLA investigated by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific oligonucleotides. To exclude smoking as a predisposing factor, statistical analyses were performed in the total sample and in nonsmoking individuals. The significant results showed a positive association of the A∗02/HLA-B∗40 haplotype with CP (total samples: 4.2% versus 0%, Pc = 0.03; nonsmokers: 4.3% versus 0%, Pc = 0.23) and a lower frequency of HLA-B∗15/HLA-DRB1∗11 haplotype in CP compared to controls (total samples: 0.0% versus 4.3%, Pc = 0.04; nonsmokers: 0 versus 5.1%, Pc = 1.0). In conclusion, the HLA-A∗02/B∗40 haplotype may contribute to the development of CP, while HLA-B∗15/DRB1∗11 haplotype might indicate resistance to disease among Brazilians. PMID:26339134

  13. Sequence-based in silico analysis of well studied Hepatitis C Virus epitopes and their variants in other genotypes (particularly genotype 5a) against South African human leukocyte antigen backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Host genetics influence the outcome of HCV disease. HCV is also highly mutable and escapes host immunity. HCV genotypes are geographically distributed and HCV subtypes have been shown to have distinct repertoires of HLA-restricted viral epitopes which explains the lack of cross protection across genotypes observed in some studies. Despite this, immune databases and putative epitope vaccines concentrate almost exclusively on HCV genotype 1 class I-epitopes restricted by the HLA-A*02 allele. While both genotype and allele predominate in developed countries, we hypothesise that HCV variation and population genetics will affect the efficacy of proposed epitope vaccines in South Africa. This in silico study investigates HCV viral variability within well-studied epitopes identified in genotype 1 and uses algorithms to predict the immunogenicity of their variants from other less studied genotypes and thus rate the most promising vaccine candidates for the South African population. Six class I- and seven class II- restricted epitope sequences within the core, NS3, NS4B and NS5B regions were compared across the six HCV genotypes using local genotype 5a sequence data together with global data. Common HLA alleles in the South African population are A30:01, A02:01, B58:02, B07:02; DRB1*13:01 and DRB1*03:01. Epitope binding to 13 class I- and 8 class –II alleles were described using web-based prediction servers, Immune Epitope Database, (IEDB) and Propred. Online population coverage tools were used to assess vaccine efficacy. Results Despite the homogeneity of genotype 1 and genotype 5 over the epitopes, there was limited promiscuity to local HLA-alleles.Host differences will make a putative vaccine less effective in South Africa. Of the 6 well-characterized class I- epitopes, only 2 class I- epitopes were promiscuous and 3 of the 7 class-II epitopes were better conserved and promiscuous. By fine tuning the putative vaccine using an optimal cocktail of genotype 1

  14. Palindromic-nucleotide substitutions (PNS) of hepatitis C virus genotypes 1 and 5a from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Prabdial-Sing, N; Giangaspero, M; Puren, A J; Mahlangu, J; Barrow, P; Bowyer, S M

    2011-08-01

    The HCV stem-loop subdomains III-a, -b and -c have been shown to reflect the characteristics of the virus and identify isolates by genus, genotype and subtype. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotype-specific PNS within the 5'UTR of prevalent HCV genotypes (1 and 5a) found in South Africa. The genotype 5a (N = 35) and genotype 1 sequences (N=20) were from patients presenting with liver disease or haemophilia, respectively. PNS HCV typing characteristics, defined previously, were observed. The PNS method differentiated subtypes 1a and 1c from subtype 1b by the base change at nucleotide position 243. A lack of structural data from the variable loci V1 of the 5'UTR did not allow us to further differentiate the subtypes of 1. A nucleotide change from a thymine (T) to a cytosine (C) at position 183 was found among genotype 5a sequences. This mutation changed the stable U-AA bond to a Y AA bulge at base-pair position 32. There was an insertion of a single adenine (A) at position 207. At present PNS analysis is labour intensive but, with development of further software to aid the computer analysis, it has the potential to provide a rapid, reliable alternative to phylogenetic analysis. PMID:21600241

  15. Genotype and allelic frequencies of a newly identified mutation causing blindness in jordanian awassi sheep flocks.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K I Z; Ababneh, H; Awawdeh, F T; Al-Massad, M A; Al-Majali, A M

    2012-01-01

    A total of 423 blood samples were collected (during 2009 and 2010) from all the ram holdings at three major Jordanian governmental Awassi breeding stations (Al-Khanasry, Al-Mushairfa and Al-Fjaje) and two private flocks. All blood samples were screened for the presence of mutations at the CNGA3 gene (responsible for day blindness in Awassi sheep) using RFLP-PCR. The day blindness mutation was detected in all studied flocks. The overall allele and genotype frequencies of all studied flocks of the day blindness mutation were 0.088 and 17.49%, respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies were higher in station flocks than the farmer flocks (0.121, 24.15 and 0.012, 2.32, respectively). Al-Mushairfa and Al-Khanasry stations have the highest genotype and allele frequencies for the day blindness mutation that were 27.77, 30.00% and 0.14, 0.171, respectively. The investigated farmer flocks have low percentages (0.03, 5.88% at Al-Shoubak and 0.005 and 1.05%, at Al-Karak, respectively for genotype and allele frequencies) compared with the breeding stations. Ram culling strategy was applied throughout the genotyping period in order to gradually eradicate this newly identified day blindness mutation from Jordanian Breeding station, since they annually distribute a high percentage of improved rams to farmer's flocks. PMID:25049475

  16. Genotype and Allelic Frequencies of a Newly Identified Mutation Causing Blindness in Jordanian Awassi Sheep Flocks

    PubMed Central

    Jawasreh, K. I. Z.; Ababneh, H.; Awawdeh, F. T.; Al-Massad, M. A.; Al-Majali, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 423 blood samples were collected (during 2009 and 2010) from all the ram holdings at three major Jordanian governmental Awassi breeding stations (Al-Khanasry, Al-Mushairfa and Al-Fjaje) and two private flocks. All blood samples were screened for the presence of mutations at the CNGA3 gene (responsible for day blindness in Awassi sheep) using RFLP-PCR. The day blindness mutation was detected in all studied flocks. The overall allele and genotype frequencies of all studied flocks of the day blindness mutation were 0.088 and 17.49%, respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies were higher in station flocks than the farmer flocks (0.121, 24.15 and 0.012, 2.32, respectively). Al-Mushairfa and Al-Khanasry stations have the highest genotype and allele frequencies for the day blindness mutation that were 27.77, 30.00% and 0.14, 0.171, respectively. The investigated farmer flocks have low percentages (0.03, 5.88% at Al-Shoubak and 0.005 and 1.05%, at Al-Karak, respectively for genotype and allele frequencies) compared with the breeding stations. Ram culling strategy was applied throughout the genotyping period in order to gradually eradicate this newly identified day blindness mutation from Jordanian Breeding station, since they annually distribute a high percentage of improved rams to farmer’s flocks. PMID:25049475

  17. KRLMM: an adaptive genotype calling method for common and low frequency variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SNP genotyping microarrays have revolutionized the study of complex disease. The current range of commercially available genotyping products contain extensive catalogues of low frequency and rare variants. Existing SNP calling algorithms have difficulty dealing with these low frequency variants, as the underlying models rely on each genotype having a reasonable number of observations to ensure accurate clustering. Results Here we develop KRLMM, a new method for converting raw intensities into genotype calls that aims to overcome this issue. Our method is unique in that it applies careful between sample normalization and allows a variable number of clusters k (1, 2 or 3) for each SNP, where k is predicted using the available data. We compare our method to four genotyping algorithms (GenCall, GenoSNP, Illuminus and OptiCall) on several Illumina data sets that include samples from the HapMap project where the true genotypes are known in advance. All methods were found to have high overall accuracy (> 98%), with KRLMM consistently amongst the best. At low minor allele frequency, the KRLMM, OptiCall and GenoSNP algorithms were observed to be consistently more accurate than GenCall and Illuminus on our test data. Conclusions Methods that tailor their approach to calling low frequency variants by either varying the number of clusters (KRLMM) or using information from other SNPs (OptiCall and GenoSNP) offer improved accuracy over methods that do not (GenCall and Illuminus). The KRLMM algorithm is implemented in the open-source crlmm package distributed via the Bioconductor project (http://www.bioconductor.org). PMID:24886250

  18. High Frequency of CYP2D6 Ultrarapid Metabolizer Genotype in the Finnish Population.

    PubMed

    Pietarinen, Paavo; Tornio, Aleksi; Niemi, Mikko

    2016-09-01

    CYP2D6 participates in the biotransformation of many commonly used drugs. Large genetic variability in CYP2D6 results in a wide interindividual variability in the response to CYP2D6 substrate drugs. Previous studies have assessed the phenotype and genotype distributions of CYP2D6 in relatively small Finnish population samples. The aim of our study was to investigate the frequencies of CYP2D6 genotypes in a larger Finnish population cohort of 857 healthy volunteers. The volunteers were genotyped for 10 CYP2D6 genetic variants (*2, *3, *4, *5, *6, *9, *10, *17, *39, *41) and copy number variation performed with TaqMan genotyping assays and copy number assay targeting exon 9. CYP2D6 phenotypes were inferred from the genotype data with the classical and activity score methods. According to the classical method, a large majority of the study cases were extensive metabolizers (EM; 87.3%; 95% confidence interval 84.9-89.3) and the second largest group was ultrarapid metabolizers (UM; 7.2%; 5.7-9.2%). Intermediate (IM) and poor metabolizers (PM) were in clear minority (3.0%; 2.1-4.4% and 2.3%; 1.5-3.6%, respectively). The activity score method yielded similar phenotype predictions. These results show that the frequency of UM genotype is higher and that of PM and IM genotype is lower in the Finnish population than in other North European populations. Accordingly, CYP2D6 genetic profile of the Finnish population differs from its geographically close neighbours, which has implications for the effective and safe use of drugs metabolized by CYP2D6. PMID:27038154

  19. AB070. Mutations of SRD5A2 in Vietnamese patients: phenotype and genotype

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Vu Chi; Thao, Bui Phuong; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Fukami, Maki

    2015-01-01

    A rare form of the 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD), 5α-reductase deficiency was first described in patients with pseudovaginal perineoscrotal hypospadias, microphallus, and cryptorchid testes in 1974 by Imperato-McGinley et al. and Walsh et al. This undervirilization in the male is due to an alteration in the 5α-reductase type 2 gene (SRD5A2), which encodes for 5α-reductase activity. Our registry of 750 patients with DSD showed no definitive diagnosis in 80% of cases with 46,XY DSD. Our aim is to identify mutations in SRD5A2 gene and to describe phenotype of detected mutative cases. Mutation analysis was performed for genomic DNA extracted from WBC of 10 patients with 46,XY DSD using PCR and direct sequencing. We identified mutations of SRD5A2 gene in two cases. The first case presented with isolated micropenis at birth, two palpable testes in the normal scrotum. Pelvic ultrasound showed no ovaries and uterus, karyotype was 46,XY and SRY was positive. Serum FSH level was 2.4 UI/L; LH level was 0.9 UI/L and testosterone level was 0.4 nmol/L at 8 years of age. A homozygous missense mutation (p.R237G) was identified in the SRD5A2 gene. The second case presented with microphallus, penoscrotal hypospadias, and gonad bilateral in labioscrotal folds. No uterus and ovaries were found by pelvic ultrasound. Karyotype was 46,XY and SRY was positive. A novel homozygous missense mutation (c.659C>T; p.S220L) was identified in the SRD5A2 gene. Mutation analysis of SRD5A2 gene helps to make definitive diagnosis for patients with 46,XY DSD.

  20. Discovery of thienoimidazole-based HCV NS5A inhibitors. Part 2: non-symmetric inhibitors with potent activity against genotype 1a and 1b.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon; Bilimoria, Darius; Cadilhac, Caroline; Cottrell, Kevin M; Denis, Francois; Dietrich, Evelyne; Ewing, Nigel; Henderson, James A; L'Heureux, Lucille; Mani, Nagraj; Morris, Mark; Nicolas, Olivier; Reddy, T Jagadeeswar; Selliah, Subajini; Shawgo, Rebecca S; Xu, Jinwang; Chauret, Nathalie; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Chan, Laval C; Das, Sanjoy K; Grillot, Anne-Laure; Bennani, Youssef L; Maxwell, John P

    2015-02-15

    The discovery of non-symmetric thienoimidazole-containing HCV NS5A inhibitors is described. The inhibitors herein reported display high potencies against both genotype 1a and 1b. In this follow-up manuscript, we discuss the importance of the linker aromaticity to achieve high potency, particularly against genotype 1a. PMID:25597006

  1. Discovery of ravidasvir (PPI-668) as a potent pan-genotypic HCV NS5A inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min; Peng, Eric; Huang, Ningwu; Huang, Qi; Huq, Anja; Lau, Meiyen; Colonno, Richard; Li, Leping

    2016-09-15

    This Letter describes the synthesis, representative structure activity relationship (SAR), activity and PK profiles of a series of functionalized benzimidazole-naphthylene-imidazole derivatives as HCV NS5A inhibitors. This effort successfully led to the discovery of ravidasvir (PPI-668), which has been well tolerated and shown high sustained viral response rates as a key component in all-oral combination regimens in multiple human clinical trials. PMID:27506559

  2. Differences in genotype frequencies of salt-sensitive genes between fishing and nonfishing communities in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Masanori; Takeshima, Taro; Okayama, Masanobu; Kajii, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the differences in genotype frequencies of salt-sensitive genes between residents of fishing communities (FCs) and nonfishing communities (NFCs). Methods The subjects included 18,156 individuals (8,043 males [44%] and 10,113 females [56%]; average age: 57.2±16.1 years) from the general population who were registered with large-scale genome banks and resided in 30 prefectures and 78 different regions in Japan. The measurement items were age, sex, blood pressure, presence or absence of hypertension, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and smoking habit. Furthermore, to analyze the genotype frequencies of salt-sensitive genes, α-adducin 1 (ADD1), angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1), and guanine nucleotide-binding protein β peptide 3 (GNB3) were measured. According to the 2004 government classification of municipalities (cities, towns, and villages), communities existing in areas bordering an ocean and with an ocean port were defined as FCs (28 areas). The others were defined as NFCs (50 areas). A logistic regression model was used for comparison of genotype frequencies between subjects residing in FCs and NFCs. Results Of the included subjects, 4,916 (27.0%) and 13,240 (73.0%) resided in FCs and NFCs, respectively. In FCs, the mean age was 59.4±16.7 years and men accounted for 41.0% of the cohort (n=2,015). In NFCs, the mean age was 56.4±15.8 years and men accounted for 45.5% of the cohort (n=6,028). The adjusted odds ratios of the AA and AG genotypes compared with the GG genotype for AGT were 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68–0.95) and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.64–0.91), respectively. The adjusted odds ratio of the CC genotype compared with AA for AT1 was 0.63 (95% CI: 0.40–0.93). Conclusion The incidence of the salt-sensitive genotypes AGT and AT1 in residents of FCs were significantly lower than in NFCs. PMID:27110136

  3. Frequency distribution analysis of activation times and regional fibrosis in murine Scn5a+/− hearts: The effects of ageing and sex

    PubMed Central

    Jeevaratnam, Kamalan; Rewbury, Rebecca; Zhang, Yanmin; Guzadhur, Laila; Grace, Andrew A.; Lei, Ming; Huang, Christopher L.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Both Brugada Syndrome (BrS) and progressive cardiac conduction defect (PCCD) are associated respectively with diffuse and discrete alterations in conduction pathways affected by ageing and sex. This study assessed for contributions of such processes to the mechanism of conduction changes in Scn5a+/− and WT hearts stratified by age (3 and 12 months) and sex. In vivo electrocardiographic chest-lead assessment demonstrated greater incidences of bundle branch block in all Scn5a+/− mice compared to WT. Frequency analysis of right ventricular (RV) epicardial activation obtained from a 64-channel multi-electrode array demonstrated greater prominence of late conducting components in Scn5a+/− compared to WT male, and in male compared to female Scn5a+/− following stratification by genotype and sex. Similar differences were observed between old male Scn5a+/− and young male Scn5a+/−, old female Scn5a+/−, and old male WT, following stratification by genotype, age and sex. These findings directly correlated with histomorphometric assessment of regional fibrosis in both septa and free walls preferentially involving the RV. We demonstrate complex alterations in conduction distributions suggesting a conversion of normal to slow-conducting tissue, modulated by ageing and sex, coupled with fibrosis in Scn5a+/− hearts. These features suggest an overlap between pathophysiological processes related to BrS and PCCD in Scn5a+/− hearts. PMID:22968175

  4. Clinical Resistance to Velpatasvir (GS-5816), a Novel Pan-Genotypic Inhibitor of the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Protein.

    PubMed

    Lawitz, Eric J; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Doehle, Brian P; Worth, Angela S; McNally, John; Brainard, Diana M; Link, John O; Miller, Michael D; Mo, Hongmei

    2016-09-01

    Velpatasvir (VEL, GS-5816) is a novel pan-genotypic hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor with activity against genotype 1 (GT1) to GT6 HCV replicons. In a phase 1b 3-day monotherapy study, patients treated with a 150-mg dose of GS-5816 had a mean maximal HCV RNA decline of ≥3.3 log10 IU/ml in GT1a, -1b, -2, -3, and -4. This report characterizes virologic resistance to VEL in these patients. NS5A resistance-associated substitutions (RASs) were detected by deep sequencing (1% cutoff) pretreatment in 22/70 patients, i.e., 10/35 (29%) patients with GT1a, 1/8 (13%) with GT1b, 4/8 (50.0%) with GT2, 5/17 (29.4%) with GT3, and 2/2 (100.0%) with GT4. In GT1a and GT3 patients, pretreatment RASs were associated with a slightly reduced HCV RNA response compared to that of patients without pretreatment RASs; among patients with GT1b, GT2, and GT4, no significant difference in response was observed in those with or without pretreatment RASs. Following treatment, the pattern of emergent RASs was more complex for GT1a than for the other genotypes. In GT1a, substitutions emerged at positions M28, Q30, L31, P32, H58, E92, and Y93, with the most prevalent substitutions at positions Y93, M28, and L31. RASs were observed at two positions in GT1b and GT2 (Y93 and L31), three positions in GT3 (Y93, L31, and E92), and four positions in GT4 (L28, M31, P32L, and Y93). RASs that were present pretreatment persisted through the 48-week follow-up period; however, RASs emerging during treatment were more likely to decline both in prevalence and in frequency within the viral population during follow-up. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01740791.). PMID:27353271

  5. Accounting for genotype uncertainty in the estimation of allele frequencies in autopolyploids.

    PubMed

    Blischak, Paul D; Kubatko, Laura S; Wolfe, Andrea D

    2016-05-01

    Despite the increasing opportunity to collect large-scale data sets for population genomic analyses, the use of high-throughput sequencing to study populations of polyploids has seen little application. This is due in large part to problems associated with determining allele copy number in the genotypes of polyploid individuals (allelic dosage uncertainty-ADU), which complicates the calculation of important quantities such as allele frequencies. Here, we describe a statistical model to estimate biallelic SNP frequencies in a population of autopolyploids using high-throughput sequencing data in the form of read counts. We bridge the gap from data collection (using restriction enzyme based techniques [e.g. GBS, RADseq]) to allele frequency estimation in a unified inferential framework using a hierarchical Bayesian model to sum over genotype uncertainty. Simulated data sets were generated under various conditions for tetraploid, hexaploid and octoploid populations to evaluate the model's performance and to help guide the collection of empirical data. We also provide an implementation of our model in the R package polyfreqs and demonstrate its use with two example analyses that investigate (i) levels of expected and observed heterozygosity and (ii) model adequacy. Our simulations show that the number of individuals sampled from a population has a greater impact on estimation error than sequencing coverage. The example analyses also show that our model and software can be used to make inferences beyond the estimation of allele frequencies for autopolyploids by providing assessments of model adequacy and estimates of heterozygosity. PMID:26607217

  6. Allele Frequencies Net Database: Improvements for storage of individual genotypes and analysis of existing data.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Eduardo Jose Melos; McCabe, Antony; Gonzalez-Galarza, Faviel F; Jones, Andrew R; Middleton, Derek

    2016-03-01

    The Allele Frequencies Net Database (AFND) is a freely accessible database which stores population frequencies for alleles or genes of the immune system in worldwide populations. Herein we introduce two new tools. We have defined new classifications of data (gold, silver and bronze) to assist users in identifying the most suitable populations for their tasks. The gold standard datasets are defined by allele frequencies summing to 1, sample sizes >50 and high resolution genotyping, while silver standard datasets do not meet gold standard genotyping resolution and/or sample size criteria. The bronze standard datasets are those that could not be classified under the silver or gold standards. The gold standard includes >500 datasets covering over 3 million individuals from >100 countries at one or more of the following loci: HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1 and -DRB1 - with all loci except DPA1 present in more than 220 datasets. Three out of 12 geographic regions have low representation (the majority of their countries having less than five datasets) and the Central Asia region has no representation. There are 18 countries that are not represented by any gold standard datasets but are represented by at least one dataset that is either silver or bronze standard. We also briefly summarize the data held by AFND for KIR genes, alleles and their ligands. Our second new component is a data submission tool to assist users in the collection of the genotypes of the individuals (raw data), facilitating submission of short population reports to Human Immunology, as well as simplifying the submission of population demographics and frequency data. PMID:26585775

  7. Allelic frequency and genotypes of prion protein at codon 136 and 171 in Iranian Ghezel sheep breeds

    PubMed Central

    Zadeh, Reza Ashrafi; Omrani, Mir Davood; Ramezani, Fatemeh; Amniattalab, Amir

    2011-01-01

    PrP genotypes at codons 136 and 171 in 120 Iranian Ghezel sheep breeds were studied using allele-specific PCR amplification and compared with the well-known sheep breeds in North America, the United States and Europe. The frequency of V allele and VV genotype at codon 136 of Ghezel sheep breed was significantly lower than AA and AV. At codon 171, the frequency of allele H was significantly lower than Q and R. Despite the similarities of PrP genotypes at codons 136 and 171 between Iranian Ghezel sheep breeds and some of the studied breeds, significant differences were found with others. Planning of effective breeding control and successful eradication of susceptible genotypes in Iranian Ghezel sheep breeds will not be possible unless the susceptibility of various genotypes in Ghezel sheep breeds to natural or experimental scrapie has been elucidated. PMID:21778818

  8. High Frequency of Human Papillomavirus Genotype 16 Among Patients With Anogenital Warts

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoobi, Reza; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Afshar, Nasim; Pazyar, Nader; Hamidifard, Mojtaba; Sharifpour, Chia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered the most prevalent sexually transmitted virus infection. Human Papillomavirus 16 and 18 have been documented as high-risk HPV infections and responsible for 70% of all cervical cancers. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine HPV genotypes in patients with anogenital warts. Patients and Methods: In this study lesion samples were collected from 54 patients with an age ranged of 19 to 44 years. Initially, DNA extraction was carried out for all samples followed by detection of HPV DNA by the polymerase chain reaction. The positive PCR products were sequenced and the results were blasted to determine HPV genotypes. Results: Out of 54 samples, 46 (85.18%) cases showed positive results for HPV DNA. A total of 26 (56.6%) samples were males and 20 (43.4%) females while eight (14.81%) showed HPV negative results. Overall, 37 (80%) patients had multiple sexual partners, and nine (20%) had one sexual partner. The frequency of anogenital warts was higher in married patients. The results of sequencing revealed that frequency of HPV16, HPV11 and HPV6 was 58.69%, 26.08% and 15.21%, respectively. Conclusions: Human Papillomavirus 16 as a high risk HPV was found to have the highest frequency among patients with anogenital warts. PMID:26862384

  9. Metabolism and Disposition of Pan-Genotypic Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Ombitasvir in Humans.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianwei; Serby, Michael; Surber, Bruce; Lee, Anthony J; Ma, Junli; Badri, Prajakta; Menon, Rajeev; Kavetskaia, Olga; de Morais, Sonia M; Sydor, Jens; Fischer, Volker

    2016-08-01

    Ombitasvir (also known as ABT-267) is a potent inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), which has been developed in combination with paritaprevir/ritonavir and dasabuvir in a three direct-acting antiviral oral regimens for the treatment of patients infected with HCV genotype 1. This article describes the mass balance, metabolism, and disposition of ombitasvir in humans without coadministration of paritaprevir/ritonavir and dasabuvir. Following the administration of a single 25-mg oral dose of [(14)C]ombitasvir to four healthy male volunteers, the mean total percentage of the administered radioactive dose recovered was 92.1% over the 192-hour sample collection in the study. The recovery from the individual subjects ranged from 91.4 to 93.1%. Ombitasvir and corresponding metabolites were primarily eliminated in feces (90.2% of dose), mainly as unchanged parent drug (87.8% of dose), but minimally through renal excretion (1.9% of dose). Biotransformation of ombitasvir in human involves enzymatic amide hydrolysis to form M23 (dianiline), which is further metabolized through cytochrome P450-mediated oxidative metabolism (primarily by CYP2C8) at the tert-butyl group to generate oxidative and/or C-desmethyl metabolites. [(14)C]Ombitasvir, M23, M29, M36, and M37 are the main components in plasma, representing about 93% of total plasma radioactivity. The steady-state concentration measurement of ombitasvir metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis in human plasma following multiple doses of ombitasvir, in combination with paritaprevir/ritonavir and dasabuvir, confirmed that ombitasvir is the main component (51.9% of all measured drug-related components), whereas M29 (19.9%) and M36 (13.1%) are the major circulating metabolites. In summary, the study characterized ombitasvir metabolites in circulation, the metabolic pathways, and the elimination routes of the drug. PMID:27179128

  10. Genotype and allele frequencies of isoniazid-metabolizing enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in Latvian tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Igumnova, Viktorija; Capligina, Valentina; Krams, Alvils; Cirule, Andra; Elferts, Didzis; Pole, Ilva; Jansone, Inta; Bandere, Dace; Ranka, Renate

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacogenomic testing of tuberculosis drug-metabolizing enzyme genes was proposed as a strategy to identify patients at risk for suboptimal responses to medications. However, variations of the genotype frequencies among ethnic groups exist and new alleles are been identified. The aim of this study was to identify polymorphisms of genes encoding metabolic enzymes NAT2 and GSTM1 in tuberculosis patients in Latvia and to estimate the frequency of NAT2 slow acetylator and GSTM1 null genotypes. In total, 85 DNA samples were genotyped, all individuals were Caucasian. An ethnic heterogeneity reflecting the multiethnic population of the country was observed. 49 patients were Latvians, 30 were Russians and 6 of other ethnicity. In total, 7 NAT2 alleles were identified: *4, *5, *6, *7, *11, *12, * and *13. The most frequent was the slow acetylation allele NAT2*6 (frequency 0.388) followed by the slow acetylation allele NAT2*5 and the rapid acetylation allele NAT2*4 (frequencies 0.306 and 0.194, respectively). The predominance of slow (51.8%) and intermediate (43.5%) acetylators compared with rapid acetylators (4.7%) was observed. The GSTM1 null genotype was detected in 48.2% of tuberculosis patients. When subgroup analysis was performed according to ethnicity, the results showed that neither NAT2 allele frequencies nor GSTM1 null genotype frequency did not differ significantly in TB patients of Latvian or Russian ethnicity. Overall, genotyping results were similar with previous reports of a NAT2 gene variation and GSTM1 null genotype frequency in Caucasians. Our findings have a contribution for the pharmacogenetics-based tuberculosis therapy in Latvia in future. PMID:27236516

  11. Minor Allele Frequency Changes the Nature of Genotype by Environment Interactions.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, Brad; Neale, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    In the classical twin study, phenotypic variation is often partitioned into additive genetic (A), common (C) and specific environment (E) components. From genetical theory, the outcome of genotype by environment interaction is expected to inflate A when the interacting factor is shared (i.e., C) between the members of a twin pair. We show that estimates of both A and C can be inflated. When the shared interacting factor changes the size of the difference between homozygotes' means, the expected sibling or DZ twin correlation is .5 if and only if the minor allele frequency (MAF) is .5; otherwise the expected DZ correlation is greater than this value, consistent (and confounded) with some additional effect of C. This result is considered in the light of the distribution of minor allele frequencies for polygenic traits. Also discussed is whether such interactions take place at the locus level or affect an aggregated biological structure or system. Interactions with structures or endophenotypes that result from the aggregated effects of many loci will generally emerge as part of the A estimate. PMID:27105628

  12. Effects on sister chromatid exchange frequency of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 genotype and smoking in vinyl chloride workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, R H; Wang, J D; Hsieh, L L; Du, C L; Cheng, T J

    1998-12-01

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is a human carcinogen. However, the exact mechanism of carcinogenesis remains unclear. VCM may be metabolized by cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Thus workers with inherited variant metabolic enzyme activities may have an altered risk of genotoxicity. This study was designed to investigate which risk factors might affect sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) workers. Study subjects were 44 male workers from three PVC factories. Questionnaires were administered to obtain detailed histories of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, occupations, and medications. SCE frequency in peripheral lymphocytes was determined using a standardized method, and CYP2E1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and ALDH2 genotypes were identified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Analysis revealed that smoking status and exposure to VCM were significantly associated with increased SCE frequency. The presence of ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes was also significantly associated with an elevation of SCE frequency (9. 5 vs. 8.1, p<0.01). However, CYP2E1, GSTM1 or GSTT1 genotypes were not significantly associated with SCE frequency. When various genotypes were considered together, combination of CYP2E1 c1c2/c2c2 with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 showed an additive effect on SCE frequency. Similar results were also found for the combination of smoking with CYP2E1, or smoking with ALDH2. These results suggest that VCM workers with ALDH2 1-2/2-2 genotypes, who also smoke, may have increased risk of DNA damage. PMID:9838066

  13. Frequency and distribution of FCN2 and FCN3 functional variants among MBL2 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bjarnadottir, Helga; Arnardottir, Margret; Ludviksson, Bjorn Runar

    2016-05-01

    The six types of pattern recognition molecules (PRMs) that initiate complement via the lectin pathway (LP) comprise collectins and ficolins. The importance of having various PRMs to initiate the LP is currently unclear. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a collectin member of the LP PRMs. MBL deficiency is common with mild clinical consequence. Thus, the lack of MBL may be compensated for by the other PRMs. We hypothesized that variants FCN2 + 6424 and FCN3 + 1637delC that cause gene-dose-dependent reduction in ficolin-2 and ficolin-3 levels, respectively, may be rare in MBL-deficient individuals due to the importance of compensation within the LP. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution and frequency of these variants among MBL2 genotypes in healthy subjects. The allele frequency of FCN2 + 6424 and FCN3 + 1637delC was 0.099 and 0.015, respectively, in the cohort (n = 498). The frequency of FCN2 + 6424 tended to be lower among MBL-deficient subjects (n = 53) than among MBL-sufficient subjects (n = 445) (0.047 versus 0.106, P = 0.057). In addition, individuals who were homozygous for FCN2 + 6424 were sufficient MBL producers. The frequency of FCN3 + 1637delC did not differ between the groups. The frequency of FCN2 + 6424 was similar in FCN3 + 1637delC carriers (n = 15) versus wild type (n = 498). Furthermore, subjects that were heterozygote carriers of both FCN2 + 6424 and FCN3 + 1637delC were sufficient MBL producers. In conclusion, FCN2 + 6424 carriers with MBL deficiency tend to be rare among healthy individuals. MBL-deficient individuals with additional LP PRM defects may be at risk to morbidity. PMID:26795763

  14. Comparison of oleic acid metabolism in the soybean (Glycine max (L. ) Merr. ) genotypes Williams and A5, a mutant with decreased linoleic acid in the seed

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.A.; Rinne, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The metabolism of oleoyl coenzyme A (CoA) was examined in developing seed from two soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) genotypes: Williams, a standard cultivar and A5, a mutant containing nearly twice the oleic acid (18:1) content of Williams. The in vitro rates of esterification of oleoyl-CoA to lysophosphatides by acyl-CoA: lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase was similar in both genotypes and lysophosphatidyl-ethanolamine was a poor substrate. Crude extracts desaturated exogenous (1-/sup 14/C)dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine at 14% of the rate achieved with (1-/sup 14/C)oleoyl-CoA, and 50 micromolar lysophosphaatidylcholine. The desaturase enzyme also required NADH for full activity. Extracts from Williams contained 1.5-fold more oleoyl phosphatidylcholine desaturase activity, on a fresh weight basis, than did A5 and appeared to have a similar affinity for oleoyl-CoA. There was 1.2- to 1.9-fold more linoleic acid (18:2) in phosphatidylcholine from Williams than from A5, measured at two stages of development, but both genotypes had a similar distribution of fatty acids in the one and two positions. Phosphatidylethanolamine in A5 contained relatively more linoleic acid (18:2) in the one position than did Williams. The increased oleic acid (18:1) content in A5 appeared to be a result of decreased rates of 18:1 desaturation of oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine in this genotype.

  15. Inference of population structure using multilocus genotype data: linked loci and correlated allele frequencies.

    PubMed Central

    Falush, Daniel; Stephens, Matthew; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2003-01-01

    We describe extensions to the method of Pritchard et al. for inferring population structure from multilocus genotype data. Most importantly, we develop methods that allow for linkage between loci. The new model accounts for the correlations between linked loci that arise in admixed populations ("admixture linkage disequilibium"). This modification has several advantages, allowing (1) detection of admixture events farther back into the past, (2) inference of the population of origin of chromosomal regions, and (3) more accurate estimates of statistical uncertainty when linked loci are used. It is also of potential use for admixture mapping. In addition, we describe a new prior model for the allele frequencies within each population, which allows identification of subtle population subdivisions that were not detectable using the existing method. We present results applying the new methods to study admixture in African-Americans, recombination in Helicobacter pylori, and drift in populations of Drosophila melanogaster. The methods are implemented in a program, structure, version 2.0, which is available at http://pritch.bsd.uchicago.edu. PMID:12930761

  16. Delayed conduction and its implications in murine Scn5a+/− hearts: independent and interacting effects of genotype, age, and sex

    PubMed Central

    Poh Tee, Sui; Zhang, Yanmin; Rewbury, Rebecca; Guzadhur, Laila; Duehmke, Rudolf; Grace, Andrew A.; Lei, Ming; Huang, Christopher L.-H.

    2010-01-01

    We explored for relationships between SCN5A haploinsufficiency, implicated in clinical arrhythmogenicity, and right ventricular (RV) conduction disorders in Langendorff-perfused, male and female, and young (3 months) and old (>12 month old) Scn5a+/− and wild type (WT) hearts. The investigated conditions of genotype, age, and sex affected latencies but not repolarization time courses of RV monophasic action potentials. This prompted examination of the patterns of RV epicardial activation, its dispersion, and their interrelationships as possible arrhythmic mechanisms using a 64-channel, multi-electrode array. Mean ventricular activation times (T*MEAN), spatial dispersions (D*S) between recording channels/cardiac cycle, and maximum activation times (T*MAX) representing the slowest possible conduction in any given heart were all higher in old male Scn5a+/− compared with young male and old female Scn5a+/− and old male WT. Temporal dispersions (D*T) of recording channels were similarly higher in old male Scn5a+/− compared with old male WT. All groupings of D*T, D*S, and T*MAX nevertheless linearly correlated with T*MEAN, with indistinguishable slopes. The variates explored thus influence D*T, D*S, and T*MAX through actions on T*MEAN. These findings in turn correlated with increased levels of fibrosis in young male, young female, and old male Scn5a+/− compared with the corresponding WTs. We thus demonstrate for the first time independent and interacting effects of genotype, age, and sex on epicardial conduction and its dispersions at least partially attributable to fibrotic change, resulting in the greatest effects in old male Scn5a+/− in an absence of alterations in repolarization time courses. This directly implicates altered depolarization in the clinical arrhythmogenicity associated with Scn5a+/−. PMID:21127902

  17. Phenotype-Genotype Correlations and Estimated Carrier Frequencies of Primary Hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Katharina; Cogal, Andrea G; Bergstralh, Eric J; Seide, Barbara M; Olson, Julie B; Meek, Alicia M; Lieske, John C; Milliner, Dawn S; Harris, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by oxalate accumulation in the kidneys and other organs. Three loci have been identified: AGXT (PH1), GRHPR (PH2), and HOGA1 (PH3). Here, we compared genotype to phenotype in 355 patients in the Rare Kidney Stone Consortium PH registry and calculated prevalence using publicly available whole-exome data. PH1 (68.4% of families) was the most severe PH type, whereas PH3 (11.0% of families) showed the slowest decline in renal function but the earliest symptoms. A group of patients with disease progression similar to that of PH3, but for whom no mutation was detected (11.3% of families), suggested further genetic heterogeneity. We confirmed that the AGXT p.G170R mistargeting allele resulted in a milder PH1 phenotype; however, other potential AGXT mistargeting alleles caused more severe (fully penetrant) disease. We identified the first PH3 patient with ESRD; a homozygote for two linked, novel missense mutations. Population analysis suggested that PH is an order of magnitude more common than determined from clinical cohorts (prevalence, approximately 1:58,000; carrier frequency, approximately 1:70). We estimated PH to be approximately three times less prevalent among African Americans than among European Americans because of a limited number of common European origin alleles. PH3 was predicted to be as prevalent as PH1 and twice as common as PH2, indicating that PH3 (and PH2) cases are underdiagnosed and/or incompletely penetrant. These results highlight a role for molecular analyses in PH diagnostics and prognostics and suggest that wider analysis of the idiopathic stone-forming population may be beneficial. PMID:25644115

  18. Effect of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Core and NS5A Mutations on Response to Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Arai, Makoto; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core- and NS5A-region mutations are associated with response to peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy. A total of 103 patients with high HCV genotype 1b viral loads (≥ 100 KIU/mL) were treated with the combination therapy. Pretreatment mutations in the core region and interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) in the NS5A region were analyzed. In univariate analysis, arginine and leucine at positions 70 and 91 in the core region, defined as double wild (DW)-type, were associated with early virologic response (p = 0.002), sustained virologic response (SVR) (p = 0.004), and non-response (p = 0.005). Non-threonine at position 110 was associated with SVR (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the following pretreatment predictors of SVR: hemoglobin level ≥ 14 g/dL (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, p = 0.04); platelet count ≥ 14 × 10⁴/mm³ (OR 5.2, p = 0.04); aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio < 0.9 (OR 6.17, p = 0.009); DW-type (OR 6.8, p = 0.02); non-threonine at position 110 (OR 14.5, p = 0.03); and ≥ 2 mutations in the ISDR (OR 12.3, p = 0.02). Patients with non-DW-type, non-threonine at position 110, and < 2 ISDR mutations showed significantly lower SVR rates than others (11/45 (24.4%) vs. 27/37 (73.0%), respectively; p < 0.001). SVR can be predicted through core and NS5A region mutations and host factors like hemoglobin, platelet count, and AST/ALT ratio in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy. PMID:26370958

  19. Effect of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1b Core and NS5A Mutations on Response to Peginterferon Plus Ribavirin Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Arai, Makoto; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Kanda, Tatsuo; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b core- and NS5A-region mutations are associated with response to peginterferon α-2b plus ribavirin combination therapy. A total of 103 patients with high HCV genotype 1b viral loads (≥100 KIU/mL) were treated with the combination therapy. Pretreatment mutations in the core region and interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) in the NS5A region were analyzed. In univariate analysis, arginine and leucine at positions 70 and 91 in the core region, defined as double wild (DW)-type, were associated with early virologic response (p = 0.002), sustained virologic response (SVR) (p = 0.004), and non-response (p = 0.005). Non-threonine at position 110 was associated with SVR (p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis showed the following pretreatment predictors of SVR: hemoglobin level ≥ 14 g/dL (odds ratio (OR) 6.2, p = 0.04); platelet count ≥ 14 × 104/mm3 (OR 5.2, p = 0.04); aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio < 0.9 (OR 6.17, p = 0.009); DW-type (OR 6.8, p = 0.02); non-threonine at position 110 (OR 14.5, p = 0.03); and ≥2 mutations in the ISDR (OR 12.3, p = 0.02). Patients with non-DW-type, non-threonine at position 110, and <2 ISDR mutations showed significantly lower SVR rates than others (11/45 (24.4%) vs. 27/37 (73.0%), respectively; p < 0.001). SVR can be predicted through core and NS5A region mutations and host factors like hemoglobin, platelet count, and AST/ALT ratio in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients treated with peginterferon and ribavirin combination therapy. PMID:26370958

  20. Hepatitis B virus infection in blood donors in Argentina: prevalence of infection, genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Pisano, María Belén; Blanco, Sebastián; Carrizo, Horacio; Ré, Viviana Elizabeth; Gallego, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the prevalence of HBV infection based on detection of HBsAg and HBV-DNA by NAT in 70,102 blood donors in Argentina (Córdoba province) and shows the viral genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection (OBI) in this population. Forty-two donors were confirmed positive for HBV infection (0.06 %), and four had OBI. Genotype F was the most prevalent (71.4 %), followed by A (14.3 %), C (7.1 %) and D (7.1 %). This is the first report of the prevalence of confirmed HBV infection and the high frequency of occult HBV infection in a blood bank in Argentina. PMID:27383207

  1. Fish scales and SNP chips: SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in individual and pooled DNA from historical samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA extracted from historical samples is an important resource for understanding genetic consequences of anthropogenic influences and long-term environmental change. However, such samples generally yield DNA of a lower amount and quality, and the extent to which DNA degradation affects SNP genotyping success and allele frequency estimation is not well understood. We conducted high density SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in both individual DNA samples and pooled DNA samples extracted from dried Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) scales stored at room temperature for up to 35 years, and assessed genotyping success, repeatability and accuracy of allele frequency estimation using a high density SNP genotyping array. Results In individual DNA samples, genotyping success and repeatability was very high (> 0.973 and > 0.998, respectively) in samples stored for up to 35 years; both increased with the proportion of DNA of fragment size > 1000 bp. In pooled DNA samples, allele frequency estimation was highly repeatable (Repeatability = 0.986) and highly correlated with empirical allele frequency measures (Mean Adjusted R2 = 0.991); allele frequency could be accurately estimated in > 95% of pooled DNA samples with a reference group of at least 30 individuals. SNPs located in polyploid regions of the genome were more sensitive to DNA degradation: older samples had lower genotyping success at these loci, and a larger reference panel of individuals was required to accurately estimate allele frequencies. Conclusions SNP genotyping was highly successful in degraded DNA samples, paving the way for the use of degraded samples in SNP genotyping projects. DNA pooling provides the potential for large scale population genetic studies with fewer assays, provided enough reference individuals are also genotyped and DNA quality is properly assessed beforehand. We provide recommendations for future studies intending to conduct high-throughput SNP

  2. Allele and genotype frequencies of metabolic genes in Native Americans from Argentina and Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Bailliet, G; Santos, M R; Alfaro, E L; Dipierri, J E; Demarchi, D A; Carnese, F R; Bianchi, N O

    2007-03-01

    Interethnic differences in the allele frequencies of CYP2D6, NAT2, GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions have been documented for Caucasians, Asians, and Africans population. On the other hand, data on Amerindians are scanty and limited to a few populations from southern areas of South America. In this report we analyze the frequencies of 11 allele variants of CYP2D6 and 4 allele variants of NAT2 genes, and the frequency of GSTM1 and GSTT1 homozygous deleted genotypes in a sample of 90 donors representing 8 Native American populations from Argentina and Paraguay, identified as Amerindians on the basis of their geographic location, genealogical data, mitochondrial- and Y-chromosome DNA markers. For CYP2D6, 88.6% of the total allele frequency corresponded to *1, *2, *4 and *10 variants. Average frequencies for NAT2 *4, *5, *6 and *7 alleles were 51.2%, 25%, 6.1%, and 20.1%, respectively. GSTM1 deletion ranged from 20% to 66%, while GSTT1 deletion was present in four populations in less than 50%. We assume that CYP2D6 *2, *4, *10, *14; NAT2 *5, *7 alleles and GSTM1 and GSTT1 *0/*0 genotypes are founder variants brought to America by the first Asian settlers. PMID:17194620

  3. PrP genotype frequencies and risk evaluation for scrapie in dairy sheep breeds from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martemucci, Giovanni; Iamartino, Daniela; Blasi, Michele; D'Alessandro, Angela Gabriella

    2015-12-01

    Concerns regarding scrapie in sheep breeding have increased in the last few decades. The present study was carried out in dairy sheep breeds from southern Italy. In order to find breeding animals resistant to scrapie, the PrP genes of 1,205 animals from entire flocks of dairy native Apulian Leccese and Altamurana breeds, and Sicilian Comisana breed, were analysed for polymorphisms at codons 136, 154, and 171 related to scrapie resistance/susceptibility. The Altamurana breed was considered as two populations (Alt-Cav and Alt-Cra-Zoe), based on presumed cross-breeding. A total of five alleles and ten different genotypes were found. The ARQ allele was predominant for all breeds followed by ARR, the most resistant allele to scrapie, which was highly prevalent in Comisana (50%) and in native Alt-Cav (42.4%). The VRQ allele, associated with the highest susceptibility to scrapie, was detected at not negligeable levels in allocthonous Comisana (3.5%), at a low frequency (0.2%) in native Leccese and Alt-Cra-Zoe, while it was absent in Alt-Cav. The frequencies of PrP genotypes with a very low susceptibility risk to scrapie (R1) was higher in Comisana and Alt-Cav. The most susceptible genotype, ARQ/VRQ, was found only in Comisana. Within the Altamurana breed, there were notable differences between Alt-Cav and Alt-Cra-Zoe sheep. The Alt-Cav was characterised by the absence of VRQ and AHQ alleles and by the higher frequency of the ARR/ARR genotype (18.7%). Breeding programs, mainly in endangered breeds such as Altamurana, should be conducted gradually, combining resistance to scrapie, maintenance of genetic variability, and production. PMID:26549664

  4. Real-time PCR genotyping and frequency of the myostatin F94L mutation in beef cattle breeds.

    PubMed

    Vankan, D M; Waine, D R; Fortes, M R S

    2010-04-01

    This research developed two real-time PCR assays, employing high-resolution melt and allele-specific analysis to accurately genotype the F94L mutation in cattle. This mutation (g.433C > A) in the growth differentiation factor 8 or myostatin gene has recently been shown to be functionally associated with increased muscle mass and carcass yield in cattle. The F94L mutation is not, like other myostatin mutations, associated with reduced fertility and dystocia. It is therefore a candidate for introgression into other breeds to improve retail beef yield and the development of a simple and accurate test to genotype this specific mutation is warranted. Variations in the efficiency of enzyme cleavage compromised the accuracy of genotyping by published methods, potentially resulting in an overestimation of the frequency of the mutant allele. The frequency of the F94L mutation was determined by real-time PCR in 1140 animals from 15 breeds of cattle in Australia. The mutation was present in Simmental (0.8%), Piedmontese (2%), Droughtmaster (4%) and Limousin (94.2%) but not found in Salers, Angus, Poll Hereford, Hereford, Gelbvieh, Charolais, Jersey, Brahman, Holstein, Shorthorn or Maine Anjou. The low prevalence of F94L in all beef breeds except Limousin indicates the significant potential for this mutation to improve retail yield in Australian beef cattle. PMID:22444040

  5. Efficacy of interferon-based antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C infected with genotype 5: a meta-analysis of two large prospective clinical trials.

    PubMed

    D'Heygere, François; George, Christophe; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Decaestecker, Jochen; Nakad, Antoine; Adler, Michael; Delwaide, Jean; Laureys, Annick; Nevens, Frederik

    2011-05-01

    The characteristics and response rate to pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG-INF + RBV) of patients with chronic hepatitis C infected with genotype 5 are poorly documented. A meta-analysis of two large phase III/IV prospective randomized clinical trials conducted in Belgium in patients with chronic hepatitis C (n = 1,073 patients) was performed in order to compare the response to antiviral therapy of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 5 with that of other HCV genotypes. A subset of HCV-1 infected patients selected from within the study database were selected to match the HCV-5 sample for known prognostic factors. In Belgium HCV-5 is responsible for a significant minority of cases of chronic hepatitis C CHC (4.5%) and is characterized by a more advanced age (58.4 years), a high frequency of cirrhosis (27.7%), a specific mode of HCV acquisition, and a particular geographic origin (66.7% of patients from West Flanders). The primary comparative analysis showed that response to treatment with PEG-INF + RBV of HCV-5 is similar to HCV-1 and lower compared to HCV-2/3. The analysis of the matched patient subgroup demonstrates that the HCV-5 "intrinsic sensitivity" to PEG-IFN + RBV therapy is identical to HCV-1, with a sustained virological response of 55% in both groups. In contrast to previous publications, this meta-analysis suggests that HCV-5 response to treatment is closer to HCV-1 than to HCV-2/3 and suggests that in Belgium HCV-5 infection should be treated with the same antiviral regimen as HCV-1. PMID:21412790

  6. Linear relationship between Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) genotypic frequencies and disease severity on wheat roots in the field.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, Lionel; Gosme, Marie; Lucas, Philippe; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Sarniguet, Alain

    2007-02-01

    In order to investigate potential links existing between Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) population structure and disease development during polyetic take-all epidemics in sequences of Ggt host cereals, seven epidemics in fields with different cropping histories were monitored during the seasons 2001/2002 (two fields), 2002/2003 (two fields) and 2003/2004 (three fields). Take-all incidence and severity were measured at stem elongation and Ggt populations were characterized. The 73 isolates collected in the two fields in 2001/2002 were distributed into two multilocus genotypes, G1 and G2 according to amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. A monolocus molecular marker amplified by F-12 random amplification polymorphism DNA primer sizing between 1.9 and 2.0 kb that gave strictly the same distinction between the two multilocus genotypes was further applied to measure G1/G2 frequencies among Ggt populations in all fields (266 isolates). The ratios of G1 to G2 differed between fields with different cropping histories. A linear relationship between G2 frequency among Ggt populations and disease severity at stem elongation was measured during the three cropping seasons. When take-all decline was observed, G2 frequencies were low in first wheat crops, highest in short-term sequences and intermediate in longer sequences of consecutive crops of Ggt host cereals. This pattern could be the result of population selection by environmental conditions, in particular by microbial antagonism during the parasitic phase of the fungus. In order to better understand take-all epidemic dynamics, the distinction between these two genotypes could be a basis to develop models that link approaches of quantitative epidemiology and advances in population genetics of Ggt. PMID:17222147

  7. Investigation of a Case of Genotype 5a Hepatitis C Virus Transmission in a French Hemodialysis Unit Using Epidemiologic Data and Deep Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Aho-Glélé, L S; Giraudon, H; Astruc, K; Soltani, Z; Lefebvre, A; Pothier, P; Bour, J B; Manoha, C

    2016-02-01

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. A patient was recently found to be HCV seropositive during hemodialysis follow-up. OBJECTIVE To determine whether nosocomial transmission had occurred and which viral populations were transmitted. DESIGN HCV transmission case. SETTING A dialysis unit in a French hospital. METHODS Molecular and epidemiologic investigations were conducted to determine whether 2 cases were related. Risk analysis and auditing procedures were performed to determine the transmission pathway(s). RESULTS Sequence analyses of the NS5b region revealed a 5a genotype in the newly infected patient. Epidemiologic investigations suggested that a highly viremic genotype 5a HCV-infected patient who underwent dialysis in the same unit was the source of the infection. Phylogenetic analysis of NS5b and hypervariable region-1 sequences revealed a genetically related virus (>99.9% nucleotide identity). Deep sequencing of hypervariable region-1 indicated that HCV quasispecies were found in the source whereas a single hypervariable region-1 HCV variant was found in the newly infected patient, and that this was identical to the major variant identified in the source patient. Risk analysis and auditing procedures were performed to determine the transmission pathway(s). Nosocomial patient-to-patient transmission via healthcare workers' hands was the most likely explanation. In our dialysis unit, this unique incident led to the adjustment of infection control policy. CONCLUSIONS The data support transmission of a unique variant from a source with a high viral load and genetic diversity. This investigation also underlines the need to periodically evaluate prevention and control practices. PMID:26510471

  8. Frequency and genotypic distribution of GB virus C (GBV-C) among Colombian population with Hepatitis B (HBV) or Hepatitis C (HCV) infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background GB virus C (GBV-C) is an enveloped positive-sense ssRNA virus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. Studies on the genetic variability of the GBV-C reveals the existence of six genotypes: genotype 1 predominates in West Africa, genotype 2 in Europe and America, genotype 3 in Asia, genotype 4 in Southwest Asia, genotype 5 in South Africa and genotype 6 in Indonesia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and genotypic distribution of GBV-C in the Colombian population. Methods Two groups were analyzed: i) 408 Colombian blood donors infected with HCV (n = 250) and HBV (n = 158) from Bogotá and ii) 99 indigenous people with HBV infection from Leticia, Amazonas. A fragment of 344 bp from the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) was amplified by nested RT PCR. Viral sequences were genotyped by phylogenetic analysis using reference sequences from each genotype obtained from GenBank (n = 160). Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were conducted using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to obtain the MCC tree using BEAST v.1.5.3. Results Among blood donors, from 158 HBsAg positive samples, eight 5.06% (n = 8) were positive for GBV-C and from 250 anti-HCV positive samples, 3.2%(n = 8) were positive for GBV-C. Also, 7.7% (n = 7) GBV-C positive samples were found among indigenous people from Leticia. A phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of the following GBV-C genotypes among blood donors: 2a (41.6%), 1 (33.3%), 3 (16.6%) and 2b (8.3%). All genotype 1 sequences were found in co-infection with HBV and 4/5 sequences genotype 2a were found in co-infection with HCV. All sequences from indigenous people from Leticia were classified as genotype 3. The presence of GBV-C infection was not correlated with the sex (p = 0.43), age (p = 0.38) or origin (p = 0.17). Conclusions It was found a high frequency of GBV-C genotype 1 and 2 in blood donors. The presence of genotype 3 in indigenous population was previously reported from Santa Marta region in Colombia and

  9. Interferon sensitivity-determining region of nonstructural region 5A of hepatitis C virus genotype 1b correlates with serum alanine aminotransferase levels in chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, K; Ito, H; Watanabe, K; Yano, M; Ishigami, M; Mizutani, T; Sasaki, Y; Goto, H

    2005-03-01

    The mutations in the interferon (IFN) sensitivity-determining region (ISDR) of nonstructural region 5A (NS5A) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been correlated with response to IFN therapy. NS5A appears to disrupt a host antiviral pathway that plays a role in suppressing virus replication and protects hepatocytes from apoptosis. We assessed whether ISDR correlates with viral load and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Serum viral load and ALT levels were prospectively measured bimonthly by HCV core protein assay and monthly, respectively, for 22 months in 87 patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1b. ISDR of HCV was directly sequenced from the products of reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction of HCV RNA. Five patients had four or more substitutions (mutant type), 33 had 1-3 (intermediate type), and 49 had no substitutions (wild type) in ISDR. The numbers of substitutions in ISDR were inversely correlated with mean viral load over a 22-month period (r = 0.292, P = 0.0060) and directly with mean serum ALT levels (r = 0.360, P = 0.0006). The numbers of substitutions in ISDR was significantly larger in the patients with changes of viral load more than fivefold during the 22 months (1.4 +/- 2.4) than in those without changes (0.6 +/- 0.8) (P = 0.0188). The present study demonstrates that the patients with more substitutions in ISDR had significantly higher serum ALT levels and smaller viral load. These results suggest that NS5A with more substitutions in ISDR may lose the ability to block host antiviral pathways and to protect hepatocytes from apoptosis. PMID:15720528

  10. Comparing the effects of genetic drift and fluctuating selection on genotype frequency changes in the scarlet tiger moth.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, R B

    2005-01-22

    One of the recurring arguments in evolutionary biology is whether evolution occurs principally through natural selection or through neutral processes such as genetic drift. A 60-year-long time series of changes in the genotype frequency of a colour polymorphism of the scarlet tiger moth, Callimorpha dominula, was used to compare the relative effects of genetic drift and variable natural selection. The analysis showed that most of the variation in frequency was the result of genetic drift. In addition, although selection was acting, mean fitness barely increased. This supports the 'Red Queen's hypothesis' that long-term improvements in fitness may not occur, because populations have to keep pace with changes in the environment. PMID:15695213

  11. Genotypic effects on the frequency of homoeologous and homologous recombination in Brassica napus × B. carinata hybrids.

    PubMed

    Mason, Annaliese S; Nelson, Matthew N; Castello, Marie-Claire; Yan, Guijun; Cowling, Wallace A

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the influence of genotype on homoeologous and homologous recombination frequency in eight different Brassica napus (AAC(n)C(n)) × B. carinata (BBC(c)C(c)) interspecific hybrids (genome composition C(n)C(c)AB). Meiotic recombination events were assessed through microsatellite marker analysis of 67 unreduced microspore-derived progeny. Thirty-four microsatellite markers amplified 83 A-, B-, C(n)- and C(c)-genome alleles at 64 loci, of which a subset of seven markers amplifying 26 alleles could be used to determine allele copy number. Hybrid genotypes varied significantly in loss of A- and B-genome alleles (P < 0.0001), which ranged from 6 to 22% between hybrid progeny sets. Allele copy number analysis revealed 19 A-C, 3 A-B and 10 B-C duplication/deletion events attributed to homoeologous recombination. Additionally, 55 deletions and 19 duplications without an accompanying dosage change in homoeologous alleles were detected. Hybrid progeny sets varied in observed frequencies of loss, gain and exchange of alleles across the A and B genomes as well as in the diploid C genome. Self-fertility in hybrid progeny decreased as the loss of B-genome loci (but not A-genome loci) increased. Hybrid genotypes with high levels of homologous and homoeologous exchange may be exploited for genetic introgressions between B. carinata and B. napus (canola), and those with low levels may be used to develop stable synthetic Brassica allopolyploids. PMID:21046065

  12. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, W; Marier, E; Stewart, P; Konold, T; Street, S; Langeveld, J; Windl, O; Ortiz-Pelaez, A

    2016-02-13

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level. PMID:26755614

  13. Prion protein genotype survey confirms low frequency of scrapie-resistant K222 allele in British goat herds

    PubMed Central

    Goldmann, W.; Stewart, P.; Konold, T.; Street, S.; Langeveld, J.; Windl, O.; Ortiz-Pelaez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scrapie in goats is a transmissible, fatal prion disease, which is endemic in the British goat population. The recent success in defining caprine PRNP gene variants that provide resistance to experimental and natural classical scrapie has prompted the authors to conduct a survey of PRNP genotypes in 10 goat breeds and 52 herds to find goats with the resistant K222 allele. They report here the frequencies in 1236 tested animals of the resistance-associated K222 and several other alleles by breed and herd. Eight animals were found to be heterozygous QK222 goats (0.64 per cent genotype frequency, 95 per cent CI 0.28 to 1.27 per cent) but no homozygous KK222 goats were detected. The K222 allele was found in Saanen, Toggenburg and Anglo-Nubian goats. The fact that only a few goats with the K222 allele have been identified does not preclude the possibility to design and implement successful breeding programmes at national level. PMID:26755614

  14. Genotype and allele frequencies of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporter genes affecting immunosuppressants in the Spanish white population.

    PubMed

    Bosó, Virginia; Herrero, María J; Buso, Enrique; Galán, Juan; Almenar, Luis; Sánchez-Lázaro, Ignacio; Sánchez-Plumed, Jaime; Bea, Sergio; Prieto, Martín; García, María; Pastor, Amparo; Sole, Amparo; Poveda, José Luis; Aliño, Salvador F

    2014-04-01

    Interpatient variability in drug response can be widely explained by genetically determined differences in metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters, and drug targets, leading to different pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behaviors of drugs. Genetic variations affect or do not affect drug responses depending on their influence on protein activity and the relevance of such proteins in the pathway of the drug. Also, the frequency of such genetic variations differs among populations, so the clinical relevance of a specific variation is not the same in all of them. In this study, a panel of 33 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 14 different genes (ABCB1, ABCC2, ABCG2, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, MTHFR, NOD2/CARD15, SLCO1A2, SLCO1B1, TPMT, and UGT1A9), encoding for the most relevant metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters relating to immunosuppressant agents, was analyzed to determine the genotype profile and allele frequencies in comparison with HapMap data. A total of 570 Spanish white recipients and donors of solid organ transplants were included. In 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms, statistically significant differences in allele frequency were observed. The largest differences (>100%) occurred in ABCB1 rs2229109, ABCG2 rs2231137, CYP3A5 rs776746, NOD2/CARD15 rs2066844, TPMT rs1800462, and UGT1A9 rs72551330. In conclusion, differences were recorded between the Spanish and other white populations in terms of allele frequency and genotypic distribution. Such differences may have implications in relation to dose requirements and drug-induced toxicity. These data are important for further research to help explain interindividual pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability in response to drug therapy. PMID:24232128

  15. NS5A sequence heterogeneity of hepatitis C virus genotype 4a predicts clinical outcome of pegylated-interferon-ribavirin therapy in Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    El-Shamy, Ahmed; Shoji, Ikuo; El-Akel, Wafaa; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Deng, Lin; El-Raziky, Maissa; Jiang, Da-peng; Esmat, Gamal; Hotta, Hak

    2012-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4) is the cause of approximately 20% of the 180 million cases of chronic hepatitis C in the world. HCV-4 infection is common in the Middle East and Africa, with an extraordinarily high prevalence in Egypt. Viral genetic polymorphisms, especially within core and NS5A regions, have been implicated in influencing the response to pegylated-interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN/RBV) combination therapy in HCV-1 infection. However, this has not been confirmed in HCV-4 infection. Here, we investigated the impact of heterogeneity of NS5A and core proteins of HCV-4, mostly subtype HCV-4a, on the clinical outcomes of 43 Egyptian patients treated with PEG-IFN/RBV. Sliding window analysis over the carboxy terminus of NS5A protein identified the IFN/RBV resistance-determining region (IRRDR) as the most prominent region associated with sustained virological response (SVR). Indeed, 21 (84%) of 25 patients with SVR, but only 5 (28%) of 18 patients with non-SVR, were infected with HCV having IRRDR with 4 or more mutations (IRRDR ≥ 4) (P = 0.0004). Multivariate analysis identified IRRDR ≥ 4 as an independent SVR predictor. The positive predictive value of IRRDR ≥ 4 for SVR was 81% (21/26; P = 0.002), while its negative predictive value for non-SVR was 76% (13/17; P = 0.02). On the other hand, there was no significant correlation between core protein polymorphisms, either at residue 70 or at residue 91, and treatment outcome. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate for the first time that IRRDR ≥ 4, a viral genetic heterogeneity, would be a useful predictive marker for SVR in HCV-4 infection when treated with PEG-IFN/RBV. PMID:22993188

  16. The frequency of SLCO1B1*5 polymorphism genotypes among Russian and Sakha (Yakutia) patients with hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Sychev, Dmitrij Alekseevitch; Shuev, Grigorij Nikolaevich; Chertovskih, Jana Valer’evna; Maksimova, Nadezhda Romanovna; Grachev, Andrej Vladimirovich; Syrkova, Ol’ga Aleksandrovna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Statins are the most commonly prescribed medicines for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. At the same time, up to 25% of patients cannot tolerate or have to discontinue the statin therapy due to statin-induced myopathy. In a majority of cases, statin-induced myopathy is attributed to SLCO1B1 gene polymorphism. The strongest association between statin-induced myopathy and SLCO1B1 gene polymorphism was described for simvastatin. Our research was focused on the frequency of SLCO1B1*5 genetic variant in the Russian population and in the native population of Sakha (Yakutia). Materials and methods A total of 1,071 hyperlipidemic Russian and 76 hyperlipidemic Sakha (Yakutian) patients were included in the study. Genotypes of SLCO1B1*5 (c.521T>C, rs4149056) were determined with polymerase chain reaction amplification. The results of our study were compared with data about hyperlipidemic patients in available publications. Results In the Russian population 665 (62%) patients had TT genotype of SLCO1B1*5, 346 (32%) patients had TC genotype, and in 60 patients (6%) CC variant was found (Hardy–Weinberg’s chi-square test was 3.1 P=0.21). In comparison with Brazil, France, the People’s Republic of China, Japan, and the native population of Sakha (Yakutia), C-allele, which causes an increased risk of statin-induced myopathy, was found significantly more often in the Russian population. In the native population of Sakha (Yakutia) SLCO1B1 polymorphism was TT – 62 (82%), TC – 11 (14%), CC – 3 (4%) (Hardy–Weinberg’s chi-square test was 5.13 P=0.077). In comparison with data from Brazil, France, the People’s Republic of China, and Japan, C-allele frequency in the Sakha (Yakutian) population was not significantly different. Conclusion Thus, we have studied the incidence of pathologic SLCO1B1 c.521C-allele in Russian and Sakha hyperlipidemic patients. The presence of SLCO1B1 C-allele in patients with hyperlipidemia forces us to be more careful in

  17. Real-Time PCR Genotyping Assay for GM2 Gangliosidosis Variant 0 in Toy Poodles and the Mutant Allele Frequency in Japan

    PubMed Central

    RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; YABUKI, Akira; KOHYAMA, Moeko; MITANI, Sawane; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; UDDIN, Mohammad Mejbah; CHANG, Hye-Sook; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; KISHIMOTO, Miori; YAMABE, Remi; YAMATO, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT GM2 gangliosidosis variant 0 (Sandhoff disease, SD) is a fatal, progressive neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the HEXB gene. In canine SD, a pathogenic mutation (c.283delG) of the canine HEXB gene has been identified in toy poodles. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR genotyping assay was developed and evaluated for rapid and large-scale genotyping and screening for this mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of toy poodles in Japan to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The real-time PCR assay clearly showed all genotypes of canine SD. The assay was suitable for large-scale survey as well as diagnosis, because of its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated a carrier frequency of 0.2%, suggesting that the current mutant allele frequency is low in Japan. However, there may be population stratification in different places, because of the founder effect by some carriers. Therefore, this new assay will be useful for the prevention and control of SD in toy poodles. PMID:24161966

  18. NS5A resistance leading to failure of 24-week therapy with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and ribavirin for the treatment of hepatitis C genotype 1a infection in a HIV-1 co-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Sevastianova, Ksenia; Dean, Jonathan; Bannan, Ciaran; Coghlan, Miriam; Farrell, Gillian; Murray, Catherine; De Gascun, Cillian F; Bergin, Colm

    2016-09-01

    Herein we report a previously undescribed case of treatment-emergent non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) resistance mutations, Q30H and Y93C, leading to a failure of 24-week course of sofosbuvir/ledipasvir+ribavirin therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1a in interferon-experienced, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patient with cirrhosis. PMID:27454231

  19. High Frequency of vacA s1m2 Genotypes Among Helicobacter pylori Isolates From Patients With Gastroduodenal Disorders in Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pajavand, Hamid; Alvandi, Amirhooshang; Mohajeri, Parviz; Bakhtyari, Somaye; Bashiri, Homayoon; Kalali, Behnam; Gerhard, Markus; Najafi, Farid; Abiri, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori infection and related diseases outcome are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial, host and environmental factors. Several distinct virulence factors of H. pylori have been shown to be associated with different clinical outcomes. Here we focused on vacA and cagA genotypes of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric disorder. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of two toxins and genotypes of VacA toxin in patients referred to a central hospital in the west of Iran (Imam Reza hospital, Kermanshah) during 2011 - 2012. Patients and Methods: Samples were collected from patients infected with H. pylori. Gastric biopsy specimens from the stomach antrum and corpus were cultured. PCR analysis was performed for genotyping H. pylori vacA and cagA genes. Results: Helicobacter pylori was isolated from 48% (96/200) of patients with gastroduodenal disorders. In 81/96 (84%) cases, the cagA gene was present. Among different genotypes of vacA, two s1m2 and s2m2 genotypes were dominant with frequency of 39.5% and 50%, respectively. The frequency of the s1m1 genotype was 7.2% (7/96), which is much lower than elsewhere. H. pylori isolates with positive results for cagA gene and vacA s1m2 genotypes showed statistically significant correlation with peptic ulcer (s1m2 13/34 [38.2%] P = 0.003). However, isolates of H. pylori infection with cagA gene and vacA s2m2 genotypes were significantly associated with development of gastritis (s2m2 41/42 [97.6%] P = 0.000). Conclusions: About 90% of H. pylori strains potentially contained vacA s2m2 and s1m2 genotypes. Infection with H. pylori strain containing the cagA gene or the vacA s1m1 and s1m2 genotypes was associated with increased incidence of peptic ulcer disease (PUD). PMID:26862378

  20. Anti-folate drug resistance in Africa: meta-analysis of reported dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) mutant genotype frequencies in African Plasmodium falciparum parasite populations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) genes of Plasmodium falciparum are associated with resistance to anti-folate drugs, most notably sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Molecular studies document the prevalence of these mutations in parasite populations across the African continent. However, there is no systematic review examining the collective epidemiological significance of these studies. This meta-analysis attempts to: 1) summarize genotype frequency data that are critical for molecular surveillance of anti-folate resistance and 2) identify the specific challenges facing the development of future molecular databases. Methods This review consists of 220 studies published prior to 2009 that report the frequency of select dhfr and dhps mutations in 31 African countries. Maps were created to summarize the location and prevalence of the highly resistant dhfr triple mutant (N51I, C59R, S108N) genotype and dhps double mutant (A437G and K540E) genotype in Africa. A hierarchical mixed effects logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various factors on reported mutant genotype frequency. These factors include: year and location of study, age and clinical status of sampled population, and reporting conventions for mixed genotype data. Results A database consisting of dhfr and dhps mutant genotype frequencies from all African studies that met selection criteria was created for this analysis. The map illustrates particularly high prevalence of both the dhfr triple and dhps double mutant genotypes along the Kenya-Tanzania border and Malawi. The regression model shows a statistically significant increase in the prevalence of both the dhfr triple and dhps double mutant genotypes in Africa. Conclusion Increasing prevalence of the dhfr triple mutant and dhps double mutant genotypes in Africa are consistent with the loss of efficacy of SP for treatment of clinical malaria in most parts of this continent

  1. Analysis of sequences of hepatitis C virus NS5A genotype 1 in HIV-coinfected patients with a null response to nitazoxanide or peg-interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Sede, M; Laufer, N; Ojeda, D; Gun, A; Cahn, P; Quarleri, J

    2013-09-01

    Even though new drugs have been approved for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, the risk of drug-drug interactions and concern about overlapping toxicities has hindered the development of studies in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals. Traditional treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (peg-IFN + RBV) is very expensive and has a low rate of sustained virological response in coinfected patients, especially if they are infected with HCV genotype 1. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a drug that is being evaluated for the treatment of chronic HCV infection, both in HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Understanding the NTZ resistance mechanism could allow the development of resistance to be minimized and would expand the treatment options, mainly in special populations such as HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Similarly to IFN, NTZ increases the activity of the cellular protein kinase activated by double-stranded RNA (PKR), a key kinase in the innate antiviral response. In order to elucidate whether sequence heterogeneity in the PKR-binding domain of HCV NS5A genotype 1 could influence the antiviral activity of either NTZ monotherapy or peg-IFN + RBV, baseline and end-of-therapy plasma samples from two groups of eleven non-responder HIV/HCV-coinfected patients that had received NTZ or peg-IFN + RBV were studied. Most of the HCV NS5A sequences examined at the end of therapy did not change from the baseline, even after 30 days course of antiviral therapy. An extensive comparison of HCV NS5A genotype 1 and 4 sequences from the database with reported IFN therapy outcome was performed in order to infer their phylogenetic relationships. The HCV genotype 1 NS5A nucleotide sequences from therapy-non-responder patients were intermingled amongst those from the database, irrespective of their IFN-therapy outcome. When comparing NS5A-PKRBD amino acid sequences, significant differences were observed in genotype 4, but not in genotype 1 (p < 0.0001 and p

  2. Rapid genotyping assays for the 4-base pair deletion of canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene and low frequency of the mutant allele in Border Collie dogs.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, encoded by the MDR1 or ABCB1 gene, is an integral component of the blood-brain barrier as an efflux pump for xenobiotics crucial in limiting drug uptake into the central nervous system. Dogs homozygous for a 4-base pair deletion of the canine MDR1 gene show altered expression or function of P-glycoprotein, resulting in neurotoxicosis after administration of the substrate drugs. In the present study, the usefulness of microchip electrophoresis for genotyping assays detecting this deletion mutation was evaluated. Mutagenically separated polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and real-time PCR assays were newly developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies dogs in Japan to determine the allele frequency in this breed. Microchip electrophoresis showed advantages in detection sensitivity and time saving over other modes of electrophoresis. The MS-PCR assay clearly discriminated all genotypes. Real-time PCR assay was most suitable for a large-scale survey due to its high throughput and rapidity. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier and mutant allele frequencies were 0.49% and 0.25%, respectively, suggesting that the mutant allele frequency in Border Collies is markedly low compared to that in the susceptible dog breeds such as rough and smooth Collies. PMID:22362942

  3. Novel rapid genotyping assays for neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs and high frequency of the mutant allele in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Chang, Hye-Sook; Yabuki, Akira; Kawamichi, Takuji; Kawahara, Natsuko; Hayashi, Daisuke; Hossain, Mohammad A; Rahman, Mohammad M; Uddin, Mohammad M; Yamato, Osamu

    2011-11-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) constitutes a group of recessively inherited lysosomal storage diseases that primarily affect neuronal cells. Such diseases share certain clinical and pathologic features in human beings and animals. Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in Border Collie dogs was first detected in Australia in the 1980s, and the pathogenic mutation was shown to be a nonsense mutation (c.619C>T) in exon 4 in canine CLN5 gene. In the present study, novel rapid genotyping assays including polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR primer-induced restriction analysis, mutagenically separated PCR, and real-time PCR with TaqMan minor groove binder probes, were developed. The utility of microchip electrophoresis was also evaluated. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of Border Collies in Japan using these assays to determine the current allele frequency in Japan, providing information to control and prevent this disease in the next stage. All assays developed in the current study are available to discriminate these genotypes, and microchip electrophoresis showed a timesaving advantage over agarose gel electrophoresis. Of all assays, real-time PCR was the most suitable for large-scale examination because of its high throughput. The genotyping survey demonstrated that the carrier frequency was 8.1%. This finding suggested that the mutant allele frequency of NCL in Border Collies is high enough in Japan that measures to control and prevent the disease would be warranted. The genotyping assays developed in the present study could contribute to the prevention of NCL in Border Collies. PMID:22362793

  4. Predicting the consequences of selecting on PrP genotypes on PrP frequencies, performance and inbreeding in commercial meat sheep populations

    PubMed Central

    Man, Wing-Young N; Lewis, Ronald M; Boulton, Kay; Villanueva, Beatriz

    2007-01-01

    Selection programmes based on prion protein (PrP) genotypes are being implemented for increasing resistance to scrapie. Commercial meat sheep populations participating in sire-referencing schemes were simulated to investigate the effect of selection on PrP genotypes on ARR and VRQ allele frequencies, inbreeding and genetic gain in a performance trait under selection. PrP selection strategies modelled included selection against the VRQ allele and in favour of the ARR allele. Assuming realistic initial PrP frequencies, selection against the VRQ allele had a minimal impact on performance and inbreeding. However, when selection was also in favour of the ARR allele and the frequency of this allele was relatively low, there was a loss of up to three to four years of genetic gain over the 15 years of selection. Most loss in gain occurred during the first five years. In general, the rate of inbreeding was reduced when applying PrP selection. Since animals were first selected on their PrP genotype before being selected on the performance trait, the intensity of selection on performance was weaker under PrP selection (compared with no PrP selection). Eradication of the VRQ allele or fixation of the ARR allele within 15 years of selection was possible only with PrP selection targeting all breeding animals. PMID:18053577

  5. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KOHYAMA, Moeko; TADA, Naomi; MITSUI, Hiroko; TOMIOKA, Hitomi; TSUTSUI, Toshihiko; YABUKI, Akira; RAHMAN, Mohammad Mahbubur; KUSHIDA, Kazuya; MIZUKAMI, Keijiro; YAMATO, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder. PMID:26549343

  6. Real-time PCR genotyping assay for canine progressive rod-cone degeneration and mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Moeko; Tada, Naomi; Mitsui, Hiroko; Tomioka, Hitomi; Tsutsui, Toshihiko; Yabuki, Akira; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Mizukami, Keijiro; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Canine progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD) is a middle- to late-onset, autosomal recessive, inherited retinal disorder caused by a substitution (c.5G>A) in the canine PRCD gene that has been identified in 29 or more purebred dogs. In the present study, a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR assay was developed and evaluated for rapid genotyping and large-scale screening of the mutation. Furthermore, a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of the three most popular breeds in Japan (Toy Poodles, Chihuahuas and Miniature Dachshunds) to determine the current mutant allele frequency. The assay separated all the genotypes of canine PRCD rapidly, indicating its suitability for large-scale surveys. The results of the survey showed that the mutant allele frequency in Toy Poodles was high enough (approximately 0.09) to allow the establishment of measures for the prevention and control of this disorder in breeding kennels. The mutant allele was detected in Chihuahuas for the first time, but the frequency was lower (approximately 0.02) than that in Toy Poodles. The mutant allele was not detected in Miniature Dachshunds. This assay will allow the selective breeding of dogs from the two most popular breeds (Toy Poodle and Chihuahua) in Japan and effective prevention or control of the disorder. PMID:26549343

  7. Lyme disease risk not amplified in a species-poor vertebrate community: similar Borrelia burgdorferi tick infection prevalence and OspC genotype frequencies

    PubMed Central

    States, S.L.; Brinkerhoff, R. J.; Carpi, G.; Steeves, T.K.; Folsom-O'Keefe, C.; DeVeaux, M.; Diuk-Wasser, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of biodiversity declines on human health are currently debated, but empirical assessments are lacking. Lyme disease provides a model system to assess relationships between biodiversity and human disease because the etiologic agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is transmitted in the United States by the generalist black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) among a wide range of mammalian and avian hosts. The ‘dilution effect’ hypothesis predicts that species-poor host communities dominated by white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) will pose the greatest human risk because P. leucopus infects the largest numbers of ticks, resulting in higher human exposure to infected I. scapularis ticks. P. leucopus-dominated communities are also expected to maintain a higher frequency of those B. burgdorferi outer surface protein C (ospC) genotypes that this host species more efficiently transmits (‘multiple niche polymorphism’ hypothesis). Because some of these genotypes are human invasive, an additive increase in human disease risk is expected in species-poor settings. We assessed these theoretical predictions by comparing I. scapularis nymphal infection prevalence, density of infected nymphs and B. burgdorferi genotype diversity at sites on Block Island, RI, where P. leucopus dominates the mammalian host community, to species-diverse sites in northeastern Connecticut. We found no support for the dilution effect hypothesis; B. burgdorferi nymphal infection prevalence was similar between island and mainland and the density of B. burgdorferi infected nymphs was higher on the mainland, contrary to what is predicted by the dilution effect hypothesis. Evidence for the multiple niche polymorphism hypothesis was mixed: there was lower ospC genotype diversity at island than mainland sites, but no overrepresentation of genotypes with higher fitness in P. leucopus or that are more invasive in humans. We conclude that other mechanisms explain similar nymphal infection prevalence in

  8. Differential frequency of NKG2C/KLRC2 deletion in distinct African populations and susceptibility to Trachoma: a new method for imputation of KLRC2 genotypes from SNP genotyping data.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Adriana; Makalo, Pateh; Joof, Hassan; Burr, Sarah; Ramadhani, Athumani; Massae, Patrick; Malisa, Aiweda; Mtuy, Tara; Derrick, Tamsyn; Last, Anna R; Nabicassa, Meno; Cassama, Eunice; Houghton, Joanna; Palmer, Christine D; Pickering, Harry; Burton, Matthew J; Mabey, David C W; Bailey, Robin L; Goodier, Martin R; Holland, Martin J; Roberts, Chrissy H

    2016-08-01

    NKG2C is an activating receptor that is preferentially expressed on natural killer (NK) cells. The gene encoding NKG2C (killer cell lectin-like receptor C2, KLRC2) is present at different copy numbers in the genomes of different individuals. Deletion at the NKG2C locus was investigated in a case-control study of 1522 individuals indigenous to East- and West-Africa and the association with the ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection and its sequelae was explored. The frequency of homozygous KLRC2 deletion was 13.7 % in Gambians and 4.7 % in Tanzanians. A significantly higher frequency of the deletion allele was found in West-Africans from the Gambia and Guinea-Bissau (36.2 % p = 2.105 × 10(-8), 26.8 % p = 0.050; respectively) in comparison to East-African Tanzanians where the frequency of the deletion is comparable to other human populations (20.9 %). We found no evidence for an association between the numbers of KLRC2 gene copies and the clinical manifestations of trachoma (follicular trachoma or conjunctival scarring). A new method for imputation of KLRC2 genotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in 2621 individuals from the Gambia further confirmed these results. Our data suggest that NKG2C does not play a major role in trachomatous disease. We found that the deletion allele is present at different frequencies in different populations but the reason behind these differences is currently not understood. The new method offers the potential to use SNP arrays from genome wide association studies to study the frequency of KLRC2 deletion in other populations and its association with other diseases. PMID:27312142

  9. Detection of the frequency, antimicrobial susceptibility, and genotypic discrimination of Aeromonas strains isolated from municipally treated tap water samples by cultivation and AP-PCR.

    PubMed

    Emekdas, Gurol; Aslan, Gonul; Tezcan, Seda; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Yildiz, Cilem; Ozturhan, Hakan; Durmaz, Riza

    2006-04-01

    The frequency, antibiotic susceptibility, and genotypic discrimination of Aeromonas strains isolated from municipally treated drinking tap water distribution systems were investigated in this study. We have analyzed 148 tap water samples collected from 8 different locations by bacterial cultivation and arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Gram negative, hemolytic, oxidase (+) and catalase (+) bacterial colonies were applied to the study. Identification of bacterial colonies was done by conventional biochemical method and API ID 20E panel (BioMerieux-France). Molecular epidemiological discrimination of the isolates was done by AP-PCR. Aeromonas spp. was detected in 6 of 148 (4%) tap water samples from 8 different locations. Five isolates were identified as Aeromonas hydrophila and one isolate was identified as Vibrio fluvialis by conventional biochemical method. These data were also confirmed by API 20E panel. One of 6 isolates was resistant to gentamicin, 2 of 6 isolates were resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, 4 of 6 isolates were resistant to ampicillin and ampicillin-sulbactam and all of 6 isolates were resistant to cephalothin. All isolates were found to be susceptible to amikacin, aztreonam, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin. All 6 strains of Aeromonas were discriminated by AP-PCR and were determined that all isolates were from different genotypic sources. Although the frequency of the isolates was under the standard limits, the results indicate that hemolytic A. hydrophila are present in municipally treated tap water samples in Mersin City. While all strains were genotypically distinct, all of them were resistant to first generation beta lactam antibiotics tested in this study. PMID:16427154

  10. Stratification by smoking status reveals an association of CHRNA5-A3-B4 genotype with body mass index in never smokers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Amy E; Morris, Richard W; Fluharty, Meg E; Bjorngaard, Johan H; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Gabrielsen, Maiken E; Campbell, Archie; Marioni, Riccardo; Kumari, Meena; Hällfors, Jenni; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Kaakinen, Marika; Cavadino, Alana; Postmus, Iris; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Skaaby, Tea; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Treur, Jorien L; Willemsen, Gonneke; Dale, Caroline; Wannamethee, S Goya; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Räikkönen, Katri; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; McConnachie, Alex; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Wong, Andrew; Dalgård, Christine; Paternoster, Lavinia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Tyrrell, Jessica; Horwood, John; Fergusson, David M; Kennedy, Martin A; Frayling, Tim; Nohr, Ellen A; Christiansen, Lene; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Kuh, Diana; Watt, Graham; Eriksson, Johan; Whincup, Peter H; Vink, Jacqueline M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie; Linneberg, Allan; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J Wouter; Power, Christine; Hyppönen, Elina; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Preisig, Martin; Borodulin, Katja; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kivimaki, Mika; Smith, Blair H; Hayward, Caroline; Romundstad, Pål R; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Munafò, Marcus R; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-12-01

    We previously used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster associated with heaviness of smoking within smokers to confirm the causal effect of smoking in reducing body mass index (BMI) in a Mendelian randomisation analysis. While seeking to extend these findings in a larger sample we found that this SNP is associated with 0.74% lower body mass index (BMI) per minor allele in current smokers (95% CI -0.97 to -0.51, P = 2.00 × 10(-10)), but also unexpectedly found that it was associated with 0.35% higher BMI in never smokers (95% CI +0.18 to +0.52, P = 6.38 × 10(-5)). An interaction test confirmed that these estimates differed from each other (P = 4.95 × 10(-13)). This difference in effects suggests the variant influences BMI both via pathways unrelated to smoking, and via the weight-reducing effects of smoking. It would therefore be essentially undetectable in an unstratified genome-wide association study of BMI, given the opposite association with BMI in never and current smokers. This demonstrates that novel associations may be obscured by hidden population sub-structure. Stratification on well-characterized environmental factors known to impact on health outcomes may therefore reveal novel genetic associations. PMID:25474695

  11. Stratification by Smoking Status Reveals an Association of CHRNA5-A3-B4 Genotype with Body Mass Index in Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Fluharty, Meg E.; Bjorngaard, Johan H.; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Gabrielsen, Maiken E.; Campbell, Archie; Marioni, Riccardo; Kumari, Meena; Hällfors, Jenni; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Kaakinen, Marika; Cavadino, Alana; Postmus, Iris; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.; Skaaby, Tea; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Treur, Jorien L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Dale, Caroline; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Lahti, Jari; Palotie, Aarno; Räikkönen, Katri; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; McConnachie, Alex; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Wong, Andrew; Dalgård, Christine; Paternoster, Lavinia; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Tyrrell, Jessica; Horwood, John; Fergusson, David M.; Kennedy, Martin A.; Frayling, Tim; Nohr, Ellen A.; Christiansen, Lene; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Kuh, Diana; Watt, Graham; Eriksson, Johan; Whincup, Peter H.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie; Linneberg, Allan; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Power, Christine; Hyppönen, Elina; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Preisig, Martin; Borodulin, Katja; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kivimaki, Mika; Smith, Blair H.; Hayward, Caroline; Romundstad, Pål R.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Munafò, Marcus R.; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    We previously used a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene cluster associated with heaviness of smoking within smokers to confirm the causal effect of smoking in reducing body mass index (BMI) in a Mendelian randomisation analysis. While seeking to extend these findings in a larger sample we found that this SNP is associated with 0.74% lower body mass index (BMI) per minor allele in current smokers (95% CI -0.97 to -0.51, P = 2.00×10−10), but also unexpectedly found that it was associated with 0.35% higher BMI in never smokers (95% CI +0.18 to +0.52, P = 6.38×10−5). An interaction test confirmed that these estimates differed from each other (P = 4.95×10−13). This difference in effects suggests the variant influences BMI both via pathways unrelated to smoking, and via the weight-reducing effects of smoking. It would therefore be essentially undetectable in an unstratified genome-wide association study of BMI, given the opposite association with BMI in never and current smokers. This demonstrates that novel associations may be obscured by hidden population sub-structure. Stratification on well-characterized environmental factors known to impact on health outcomes may therefore reveal novel genetic associations. PMID:25474695

  12. Correlation between mutations in the core and NS5A genes of hepatitis C virus genotypes 1a, 1b, 3a, 3b, 6f and the response to pegylated interferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumthip, K; Pantip, C; Chusri, P; Thongsawat, S; O'Brien, A; Nelson, K E; Maneekarn, N

    2011-04-01

    Several studies have reported correlation between mutations in core and NS5A proteins of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and response to interferon (IFN) therapy. In particular, mutations in NS5A protein have been shown to correlate with responsiveness to IFN treatment of HCV-1b in Japanese patients. This study investigated whether amino acid (aa) mutations in the core and NS5A proteins of HCV-1a, 1b, 3a, 3b and 6f correlated with the response to pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) therapy in Thai patients. The entire sequences of core and NS5A of HCV from 76 HCV-infected patients were analysed in comparison with corresponding reference sequences. The data revealed that the number of aa mutations in full-length NS5A, its C-terminus, IFN sensitivity-determining region, variable region 3 (V3) and V3 plus flanking region of HCV-1b NS5A protein were significantly higher in responders than in the treatment failure group (P = 0.010, 0.031, 0.046, 0.020 and 0.006, respectively). Similar results were found in a putative protein kinase R binding domain region in HCV-6f NS5A protein (P = 0.022). Moreover, specific aa substitutions in NS5A that appeared to be associated with responders or the treatment failure group were observed at positions 78 and 305 for HCV-1b (P = 0.028), 64 and 52 for HCV-1a (P = 0.033) and 6f (P = 0.045). Nevertheless, analysis of aa sequences of core protein revealed highly conserved sequences among HCV genotypes and no significant differences between the viruses from responders and the treatment failure group. Our findings indicate that mutations in aa residues of NS5A of HCV-1a, 1b and 6f correlated well with responsiveness to Peg-IFN and RBV combination therapy. PMID:20955493

  13. DNA-PCR system FGA (FIBRA)--genotype and allele frequencies in a sample of western Germany (Düsseldorf region).

    PubMed

    Huckenbeck, W; Scheil, H G; Kuntze, K

    1999-12-01

    Frequency data for the STR system FGA (HumFibra) were obtained from a Caucasoid German population sample (Düsseldorf area) of 424 unrelated individuals. PCR products were detected by horizontal polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis and a total of 16 alleles was identified by side-by-side comparison with a commercially available sequenced ladder. The observed genotype distribution showed no significant deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The high information content (pooled German data: rate of heterozygosity = 0.8626; probability of match = 0.0344; mean exclusion chance = 0.7240) render this system a useful tool not only in forensic casework (criminal and paternity cases) but in population genetics too. PMID:10646230

  14. Oligonucleotides that Exist in High Frequency in EST-unigenes are Useful in Producing Polymorphism among Watermelon Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we report a simple procedure for developing and using a new type of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers, named ‘high frequency oligonucleotides - targeting active genes (HFO-TAG)’. The HFO-TAG primers are constructed by first using a “practical extraction and report language (Per...

  15. Mutations in the core and NS5A region of hepatitis C virus genotype 1b and correlation with response to pegylated-interferon-alpha 2b and ribavirin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Katano, Y; Ishigami, M; Itoh, A; Hirooka, Y; Nakano, I; Urano, F; Yoshioka, K; Toyoda, H; Kumada, T; Goto, H

    2011-04-01

    Mutations in two regions of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been implicated in influencing response to interferon (IFN) therapy. Substitutions in the NS5A region of HCV have been associated with response to IFN therapy, and this region has been known as the IFN sensitivity-determining region (ISDR). The mutations in the core region of HCV have also been reported to predict IFN response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether amino acid substitutions in the core region and ISDR among patients with HCV genotype 1b affect the response to IFN therapy. A total of 213 patients who completed IFN treatment were randomly selected. All patients received pegylated-IFN-alpha 2b once each week, plus oral ribavirin daily for 48 weeks. Of the 213 patients, 117 (54.9%) showed early virologic response (EVR), with HCV-negativity, at 12 weeks. Factors related to EVR on multivariate analysis were non-Gln70 and Leu91 in the core region, and ISDR mutant-type. One hundred and two (47.9%) showed a sustained virologic response (SVR). SVR occurred more frequently in patients without Gln70 (55.4%) than in those with Gln70 (21.3%) (P < 0.0001). SVR was achieved in 43.6% of patients with wild-type ISDR and 62.5% of patients with mutant-type (P = 0.0227). Of the 34 patients who simultaneously had non-Gln70 and mutant-type ISDR, 26 (76.5%) achieved SVR. Factors related to SVR on multivariate analysis were non-Gln70 and ISDR mutant-type. In conclusion, amino acid substitutions in the core region and ISDR were useful for predicting the response to IFN in patients with HCV genotype 1b. PMID:20367792

  16. Estimation of population allele frequencies from next-generation sequencing data: pool-versus individual-based genotyping.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathieu; Foucaud, Julien; Gharbi, Karim; Cézard, Timothée; Galan, Maxime; Loiseau, Anne; Thomson, Marian; Pudlo, Pierre; Kerdelhué, Carole; Estoup, Arnaud

    2013-07-01

    Molecular markers produced by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing genetic research. However, the costs of analysing large numbers of individual genomes remain prohibitive for most population genetics studies. Here, we present results based on mathematical derivations showing that, under many realistic experimental designs, NGS of DNA pools from diploid individuals allows to estimate the allele frequencies at single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with at least the same accuracy as individual-based analyses, for considerably lower library construction and sequencing efforts. These findings remain true when taking into account the possibility of substantially unequal contributions of each individual to the final pool of sequence reads. We propose the intuitive notion of effective pool size to account for unequal pooling and derive a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate this parameter directly from the data. We provide a user-friendly application assessing the accuracy of allele frequency estimation from both pool- and individual-based NGS population data under various sampling, sequencing depth and experimental error designs. We illustrate our findings with theoretical examples and real data sets corresponding to SNP loci obtained using restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing in pool- and individual-based experiments carried out on the same population of the pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea pityocampa). NGS of DNA pools might not be optimal for all types of studies but provides a cost-effective approach for estimating allele frequencies for very large numbers of SNPs. It thus allows comparison of genome-wide patterns of genetic variation for large numbers of individuals in multiple populations. PMID:23730833

  17. The Combination of Grazoprevir, a Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS3/4A Protease Inhibitor, and Elbasvir, an HCV NS5A Inhibitor, Demonstrates a High Genetic Barrier to Resistance in HCV Genotype 1a Replicons.

    PubMed

    Lahser, Frederick C; Bystol, Karin; Curry, Stephanie; McMonagle, Patricia; Xia, Ellen; Ingravallo, Paul; Chase, Robert; Liu, Rong; Black, Todd; Hazuda, Daria; Howe, Anita Y M; Asante-Appiah, Ernest

    2016-05-01

    The selection of resistance-associated variants (RAVs) against single agents administered to patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) necessitates that direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) targeting multiple viral proteins be developed to overcome failure resulting from emergence of resistance. The combination of grazoprevir (formerly MK-5172), an NS3/4A protease inhibitor, and elbasvir (formerly MK-8742), an NS5A inhibitor, was therefore studied in genotype 1a (GT1a) replicon cells. Both compounds were independently highly potent in GT1a wild-type replicon cells, with 90% effective concentration (EC90) values of 0.9 nM and 0.006 nM for grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. No cross-resistance was observed when clinically relevant NS5A and NS3 RAVs were profiled against grazoprevir and elbasvir, respectively. Kinetic analyses of HCV RNA reduction over 14 days showed that grazoprevir and elbasvir inhibited prototypic NS5A Y93H and NS3 R155K RAVs, respectively, with kinetics comparable to those for the wild-type GT1a replicon. In combination, grazoprevir and elbasvir interacted additively in GT1a replicon cells. Colony formation assays with a 10-fold multiple of the EC90 values of the grazoprevir-elbasvir inhibitor combination suppressed emergence of resistant colonies, compared to a 100-fold multiple for the independent agents. The selected resistant colonies with the combination harbored RAVs that required two or more nucleotide changes in the codons. Mutations in the cognate gene caused greater potency losses for elbasvir than for grazoprevir. Replicons bearing RAVs identified from resistant colonies showed reduced fitness for several cell lines and may contribute to the activity of the combination. These studies demonstrate that the combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir exerts a potent effect on HCV RNA replication and presents a high genetic barrier to resistance. The combination of grazoprevir and elbasvir is currently approved for

  18. Extended genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus and frequency of genotypes and subtypes in cattle in Italy between 1995 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Luzzago, Camilla; Lauzi, Stefania; Ebranati, Erika; Giammarioli, Monica; Moreno, Ana; Cannella, Vincenza; Masoero, Loretta; Canelli, Elena; Guercio, Annalisa; Caruso, Claudio; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Mia, Gian Mario; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Peletto, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Genetic typing of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has distinguished BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 species and an emerging putative third species (HoBi-like virus), recently detected in southern Italy, signaling the occurrence of natural infection in Europe. Recognizing the need to update the data on BVDV genetic variability in Italy for mounting local and European alerts, a wide collection of 5' UTR sequences (n = 371) was selected to identify the frequency of genotypes and subtypes at the herd level. BVDV-1 had the highest frequency, followed by sporadic BVDV-2. No novel HoBi-like viruses were identified. Four distribution patterns of BVDV-1 subtypes were observed: highly prevalent subtypes with a wide temporal-spatial distribution (1b and 1e), low prevalent subtypes with a widespread geographic distribution (1a, 1d, 1g, 1h, and 1k) or a restricted geographic distribution (1f), and sporadic subtypes detected only in single herds (1c, 1j, and 1l). BVDV-1c, k, and l are reported for the first time in Italy. A unique genetic variant was detected in the majority of herds, but cocirculation of genetic variants was also observed. Northern Italy ranked first for BVDV introduction, prevalence, and dispersion. Nevertheless, the presence of sporadic variants in other restricted areas suggests the risk of different routes of BVDV introduction. PMID:25045658

  19. Extended Genetic Diversity of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus and Frequency of Genotypes and Subtypes in Cattle in Italy between 1995 and 2013

    PubMed Central

    Lauzi, Stefania; Ebranati, Erika; Giammarioli, Monica; Cannella, Vincenza; Masoero, Loretta; Canelli, Elena; Guercio, Annalisa; Caruso, Claudio; Ciccozzi, Massimo; De Mia, Gian Mario; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Zehender, Gianguglielmo

    2014-01-01

    Genetic typing of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has distinguished BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 species and an emerging putative third species (HoBi-like virus), recently detected in southern Italy, signaling the occurrence of natural infection in Europe. Recognizing the need to update the data on BVDV genetic variability in Italy for mounting local and European alerts, a wide collection of 5′ UTR sequences (n = 371) was selected to identify the frequency of genotypes and subtypes at the herd level. BVDV-1 had the highest frequency, followed by sporadic BVDV-2. No novel HoBi-like viruses were identified. Four distribution patterns of BVDV-1 subtypes were observed: highly prevalent subtypes with a wide temporal-spatial distribution (1b and 1e), low prevalent subtypes with a widespread geographic distribution (1a, 1d, 1g, 1h, and 1k) or a restricted geographic distribution (1f), and sporadic subtypes detected only in single herds (1c, 1j, and 1l). BVDV-1c, k, and l are reported for the first time in Italy. A unique genetic variant was detected in the majority of herds, but cocirculation of genetic variants was also observed. Northern Italy ranked first for BVDV introduction, prevalence, and dispersion. Nevertheless, the presence of sporadic variants in other restricted areas suggests the risk of different routes of BVDV introduction. PMID:25045658

  20. Enhancement of the Replication of Hepatitis C Virus Replicons of Genotypes 1 to 4 by Manipulation of CpG and UpA Dinucleotide Frequencies and Use of Cell Lines Expressing SECL14L2 for Antiviral Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Martin-Gans, Marion; Simmonds, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has improved greatly through the use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, their effectiveness and potential for drug resistance development in non-genotype 1 variants of HCV remain relatively unexplored, as in vitro assays to assess drug susceptibility are poorly developed and unsuited for a transient-transfection format. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of dinucleotide frequency changes in the replicon and the use of a SEC14L2-expressing cell line on the replication of HCVs of different genotypes and evaluated the resulting assay formats for measurements of susceptibility to the DAA sofosbuvir. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides from the luciferase gene used in HCV replicons of genotype 1b (Con1) and genotype 2a (JFH-1) achieved between 10- and 100-fold enhancement of replication over that of the wild type posttransfection. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides in the neomycin gene or deletion of the whole gene in replicons of genotype 3a (S52) and genotype 4a (ED43) enhanced replication, but phenotypic effects on altering luciferase gene composition were minimal. A further 10-fold replication enhancement of replicons from all four genotypes was achieved by using a transgenic Huh7.5 cell line expressing SECL14L2, whose expression showed a dose-dependent effect on HCV replication that was reversible by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of gene expression. By combining these strategies, the 100- to 1,000-fold enhancement of replication allowed the susceptibility of all four genotypes to the RNA polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir to be robustly determined in a transient-transfection assay format. These methods of replication enhancement provide new tools for monitoring the susceptibility and resistance of a wide range of HCV genotypes to DAAs. PMID:26953209

  1. Enhancement of the Replication of Hepatitis C Virus Replicons of Genotypes 1 to 4 by Manipulation of CpG and UpA Dinucleotide Frequencies and Use of Cell Lines Expressing SECL14L2 for Antiviral Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Witteveldt, Jeroen; Martin-Gans, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has improved greatly through the use of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). However, their effectiveness and potential for drug resistance development in non-genotype 1 variants of HCV remain relatively unexplored, as in vitro assays to assess drug susceptibility are poorly developed and unsuited for a transient-transfection format. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of dinucleotide frequency changes in the replicon and the use of a SEC14L2-expressing cell line on the replication of HCVs of different genotypes and evaluated the resulting assay formats for measurements of susceptibility to the DAA sofosbuvir. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides from the luciferase gene used in HCV replicons of genotype 1b (Con1) and genotype 2a (JFH-1) achieved between 10- and 100-fold enhancement of replication over that of the wild type posttransfection. Removal of CpG and UpA dinucleotides in the neomycin gene or deletion of the whole gene in replicons of genotype 3a (S52) and genotype 4a (ED43) enhanced replication, but phenotypic effects on altering luciferase gene composition were minimal. A further 10-fold replication enhancement of replicons from all four genotypes was achieved by using a transgenic Huh7.5 cell line expressing SECL14L2, whose expression showed a dose-dependent effect on HCV replication that was reversible by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of gene expression. By combining these strategies, the 100- to 1,000-fold enhancement of replication allowed the susceptibility of all four genotypes to the RNA polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir to be robustly determined in a transient-transfection assay format. These methods of replication enhancement provide new tools for monitoring the susceptibility and resistance of a wide range of HCV genotypes to DAAs. PMID:26953209

  2. High density genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing and association identifies common and low frequency SNPs, and novel candidate genes influencing cow milk traits

    PubMed Central

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M.; Peters, Sunday O.; Akwanji, Kingsley A.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have increased the ability to detect sequence variations for complex trait improvement. A high throughput genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method was used to generate 515,787 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from which 76,355 SNPs with call rates >85% and minor allele frequency ≥1.5% were used in genome wide association study (GWAS) of 44 milk traits in 1,246 Canadian Holstein cows. GWAS was accomplished with a mixed linear model procedure implementing the additive and dominant models. A strong signal within the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 14 was associated with test day fat percentage. Several SNPs were associated with eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, CLA:9c11t and gamma linolenic acid. Most of the significant SNPs for 44 traits studied are novel and located in intergenic regions or introns of genes. Novel potential candidate genes for milk traits or mammary gland functions include ERCC6, TONSL, NPAS2, ACER3, ITGB4, GGT6, ACOX3, MECR, ADAM12, ACHE, LRRC14, FUK, NPRL3, EVL, SLCO3A1, PSMA4, FTO, ADCK5, PP1R16A and TEP1. Our study further demonstrates the utility of the GBS approach for identifying population-specific SNPs for use in improvement of complex dairy traits. PMID:27506634

  3. High density genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing and association identifies common and low frequency SNPs, and novel candidate genes influencing cow milk traits.

    PubMed

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M; Peters, Sunday O; Akwanji, Kingsley A; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Zhao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have increased the ability to detect sequence variations for complex trait improvement. A high throughput genome wide genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) method was used to generate 515,787 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from which 76,355 SNPs with call rates >85% and minor allele frequency ≥1.5% were used in genome wide association study (GWAS) of 44 milk traits in 1,246 Canadian Holstein cows. GWAS was accomplished with a mixed linear model procedure implementing the additive and dominant models. A strong signal within the centromeric region of bovine chromosome 14 was associated with test day fat percentage. Several SNPs were associated with eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid, arachidonic acid, CLA:9c11t and gamma linolenic acid. Most of the significant SNPs for 44 traits studied are novel and located in intergenic regions or introns of genes. Novel potential candidate genes for milk traits or mammary gland functions include ERCC6, TONSL, NPAS2, ACER3, ITGB4, GGT6, ACOX3, MECR, ADAM12, ACHE, LRRC14, FUK, NPRL3, EVL, SLCO3A1, PSMA4, FTO, ADCK5, PP1R16A and TEP1. Our study further demonstrates the utility of the GBS approach for identifying population-specific SNPs for use in improvement of complex dairy traits. PMID:27506634

  4. Frequency of group A rotavirus with mixed G and P genotypes in bovines: predominance of G3 genotype and its emergence in combination with G8/G10 types.

    PubMed

    Malik, Yashpal S; Sharma, Kuldeep; Vaid, Nirupama; Chakravarti, Somendu; Chandrashekar, K M; Basera, Sanjay S; Singh, Rashmi; Minakshi; Prasad, Gaya; Gulati, Baldev R; Bhilegaonkar, Kiren N; Pandey, Awadh B

    2012-09-01

    The present study describes the genotypic distribution of rotaviruses (RVs) in an Indian bovine population with unexpectedly higher proportions of G3 alone or in combination of G8/G10. PCR-genotyping confirmed that 39.4% (13/33) of the prevalent RVs were the G3 type while 60.6% (20/33) were dual G3G10 or G3G8 types. P typing revealed that 93.9% (31/33) of the samples were P[11] while 6.1% (2/33) possessed a dual P[1]P[11] type. Sequence analysis of the VP7 gene from G3 strains viz. B-46, 0970, and BR-133 showed that these strains had sequence identities of 90.5% to 100% with other bovine G3 strains. The highest identity (98.9% to 100%) was observed with RUBV3 bovine G3 strains from eastern India. The G3 strains (B-46, 0970, and BR-133) showed 97.5% to 98.8% sequence homologies with the Indian equine RV strain Erv-80. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that G3 strains clustered with bovine RUBV3 and J-63, and equine Erv-80 G3. Overall, these results confirmed that the incidence of infection by RVs with the G3 genotype and mixed genotypes in the bovine population was higher than previously predicted. This finding reinforces the importance of constantly monitoring circulating viral strains with the G3 genotype in future surveillance studies. PMID:23006956

  5. Strong HCV NS3/4a, NS4b, NS5a, NS5b-specific cellular immune responses induced in Rhesus macaques by a novel HCV genotype 1a/1b consensus DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Latimer, Brian; Toporovski, Roberta; Yan, Jian; Pankhong, Panyupa; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Welles, Seth L; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Weiner, David B; Kutzler, Michele A

    2014-01-01

    Chronic HCV is a surreptitious disease currently affecting approximately 3% of the world's population that can lead to liver failure and cancer decades following initial infection. However, there are currently no vaccines available for the prevention of chronic HCV. From patients who acutely resolve HCV infection, it is apparent that a strong and broad cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is important in HCV clearance. DNA vaccines are naked plasmid DNA molecules that encode pathogen antigens to induce a pathogen-specific immune response. They are inexpensive to produce and have an excellent safety profile in animals and humans. Additionally, DNA vaccines are able to induce strong CTL responses, making them well-suited for an HCV vaccine. We aimed to maximize vaccine recipients' opportunity to induce a broad T cell response with a novel antigenic sequence, multi-antigen vaccine strategy. We have generated DNA plasmids encoding consensus sequences of HCV genotypes 1a and 1b non-structural proteins NS3/4a, NS4b, NS5a, and NS5b. Rhesus macaques were used to study the immunogenicity of these constructs. Four animals were immunized 3 times, 6 weeks apart, at a dose of 1.0mg per antigen construct, as an intramuscular injection followed by in vivo electroporation, which greatly increases DNA uptake by local cells. Immune responses were measured 2 weeks post-immunization regimen (PIR) in immunized rhesus macaques and showed a broad response to multiple HCV nonstructural antigens, with up to 4680 spot-forming units per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as measured by Interferon-γ ELISpot. In addition, multiparametric flow cytometry detected HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses by intracellular cytokine staining and detected HCV-specific CD107a+/GrzB+ CD8+ T cells indicating an antigen specific cytolytic response 2 weeks PIR compared with baseline measurements. At the final study time point, 6 weeks PIR, HCV-specific CD45RA- memory-like T cells

  6. Data on IL-6 c.-174 G>C genotype and allele frequencies in patients with coronary heart disease in dependence of cardiovascular outcome.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Stefan; Schlitt, Axel; Benten, Ann-Christin; Hofmann, Britt; Schaller, Hans-Günter; Schulz, Susanne

    2016-09-01

    In this data article we present data on the distribution of alleles and genotypes of the interleukin (IL)-6 c.-174 G>C polymorphism (rs 1800795) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) in dependence of the incidence of new cardiovascular events (combined endpoint: myocardial infarction, stroke/TIA, cardiac death, death according to stroke) within three years follow-up. Moreover, we investigated putative associations between individual expression of IL-6 genotypes and IL-6 serum level. This investigation is a subanalysis of the article entitled "The Interleukin 6 c.-174 CC genotype is a predictor for new cardiovascular events in patients with coronary heart disease within three years follow-up" (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01045070) (Reichert et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27570807

  7. Compressed Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Yaniv; Gordon, Assaf; Brand, Michael; Hannon, Gregory J.; Mitra, Partha P.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades we have steadily increased our knowledge on the genetic basis of many severe disorders. Nevertheless, there are still great challenges in applying this knowledge routinely in the clinic, mainly due to the relatively tedious and expensive process of genotyping. Since the genetic variations that underlie the disorders are relatively rare in the population, they can be thought of as a sparse signal. Using methods and ideas from compressed sensing and group testing, we have developed a cost-effective genotyping protocol to detect carriers for severe genetic disorders. In particular, we have adapted our scheme to a recently developed class of high throughput DNA sequencing technologies. The mathematical framework presented here has some important distinctions from the ’traditional’ compressed sensing and group testing frameworks in order to address biological and technical constraints of our setting. PMID:21451737

  8. Genotyping methods.

    PubMed

    Tümmler, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping allows for the identification of bacterial isolates to the strain level and provides basic information about the evolutionary biology, population biology, taxonomy, ecology, and genetics of bacteria. Depending on the underlying question and available resources, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains may be typed by anonymous fingerprinting techniques or electronically portable sequence-based typing methods such as multiple locus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), multilocus sequence typing, or oligonucleotide microarray. Macrorestriction fragment pattern analysis is a genotyping method that is globally applicable to all bacteria and hence has been and still is the reference method for strain typing in bacteriology. Agarose-embedded chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a rare-cutting restriction endonuclease and the generated 20-70 fragments are then separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The chapter provides a detailed step-by-step manual for SpeI genome fingerprinting of Pseudomonas chromosomes that has been optimized for SpeI fragment pattern analysis of P. aeruginosa. PMID:24818895

  9. Is the COL5A1 rs12722 gene polymorphism associated with running economy?

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Pasqua, Leonardo A; Bueno, Salomão; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Matsuda, Monique; Marquezini, Monica; Saldiva, Paulo H

    2014-01-01

    The COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism is considered to be a novel genetic marker for endurance running performance. It has been postulated that COL5A1 rs12722 may influence the elasticity of tendons and the energetic cost of running. To date, there are no experimental data in the literature supporting the relationship between range of motion, running economy, and the COL5A1 rs12722 gene polymorphism. Therefore, the main purpose of the current study was to analyze the influence of the COL5A1rs12722 polymorphism on running economy and range of motion. One hundred and fifty (n = 150) physically active young men performed the following tests: a) a maximal incremental treadmill test, b) two constant-speed running tests (10 km · h(-1)) and 12 km · h(-1)) to determine the running economy, and c) a sit-and-reach test to determine the range of motion. All of the subjects were genotyped for the COL5A1 rs12722 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The genotype frequencies were TT = 27.9%, CT = 55.8%, and CC = 16.3%. There were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for running economy measured at 10 km · h(-1) (p = 0.232) and 12 km · h(-1) (p = 0.259). Similarly, there were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for range of motion (p = 0.337). These findings suggest that the previous relationship reported between COL5A1 rs12722 genotypes and running endurance performance might not be mediated by the energetic cost of running. PMID:25188268

  10. Is the COL5A1 rs12722 Gene Polymorphism Associated with Running Economy?

    PubMed Central

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Pasqua, Leonardo A.; Bueno, Salomão; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Matsuda, Monique; Marquezini, Monica; Saldiva, Paulo H.

    2014-01-01

    The COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism is considered to be a novel genetic marker for endurance running performance. It has been postulated that COL5A1 rs12722 may influence the elasticity of tendons and the energetic cost of running. To date, there are no experimental data in the literature supporting the relationship between range of motion, running economy, and the COL5A1 rs12722 gene polymorphism. Therefore, the main purpose of the current study was to analyze the influence of the COL5A1rs12722 polymorphism on running economy and range of motion. One hundred and fifty (n = 150) physically active young men performed the following tests: a) a maximal incremental treadmill test, b) two constant-speed running tests (10 km•h−1 and 12 km•h−1) to determine the running economy, and c) a sit-and-reach test to determine the range of motion. All of the subjects were genotyped for the COL5A1 rs12722 single-nucleotide polymorphism. The genotype frequencies were TT = 27.9%, CT = 55.8%, and CC = 16.3%. There were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for running economy measured at 10 km•h−1 (p = 0.232) and 12 km•h−1 (p = 0.259). Similarly, there were no significant differences between COL5A1 genotypes for range of motion (p = 0.337). These findings suggest that the previous relationship reported between COL5A1 rs12722 genotypes and running endurance performance might not be mediated by the energetic cost of running. PMID:25188268

  11. The changing epidemiology pattern and frequency distribution of hepatitis C virus in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Butt, Sadia; Idrees, Muhammad; Akbar, Haji; ur Rehman, Irshad; Awan, Zunaira; Afzal, Samia; Hussain, Abrar; Shahid, Muhammad; Manzoor, Sobia; Rafique, Shazia

    2010-07-01

    Information regarding the changing pattern in hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes/subtypes and resulting disease outcome is not well known. The specific objective of this study was to find out the frequency distribution of HCV genotypes and changing pattern of various HCV genotypes overtime in well-characterized Pakistani HCV isolates. The genotype distribution of HCV from all the four provinces of Pakistan was tracked for a period of 10 years (2000-2009) on total 20,552 consecutive anti-HCV and HCV RNA positive patients sample using type-specific genotyping assay. Of these, 16,891 (82.2%) samples were successfully genotyped. Of these 11,189 (54.4%) were males and 9363 (45.55%) were females. Of the successfully genotyped samples, 12,537 (74.2%) were with 3a, 1834 (10.9%) with 3b, 50 (0.24%) with 3c, 678 (3.3%) with 1a, 170 (0.83%) with 1b, 49 (0.24%) with 1c, 431 (2.1%) with 2a, 48 (0.23%) with 2b, 3 (0.01%) with 2c, 13 (0.06%) with 5a, 12 (0.06%) with 6a, 101 (0.49%) with 4, and 965 (4.7%) were with mixed-genotype infection. A changing pattern of HCV genotypes prevalence was observed in Pakistan overtime, with an increase in the relative proportion of genotype 3a and mixed genotypes and a decrease of genotypes 3b, 2b, 4, 5a and 2a. This changed HCV genotype pattern might have direct impact on HCV disease outcome and new therapeutic strategies may be needed. PMID:20438863

  12. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Janahi, Essam M.; Al-Mannai, Mariam; Singh, Hemlata; Jahromi, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately 170 million people are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, making it one of the world’s major infectious diseases. There are no published population based studies about the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Bahrain. Objectives: Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of HCV genotypes and subtypes among a large sample of patients with chronic HCV infection in Bahrain. Patients and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 202 HCV positive patients; of them 128 had a viral load (> 500 IU/mL) suitable for the type-specific genotyping assay. Gender-wise and age-wise differences in the distribution of HCV genotypes were determined by Chi Square and Fisher’s Exact tests. Results: The predominant genotype among Bahraini patients was type 1 (36.71%), followed by genotypes 3 and 4 (15.6% each) and the lowest frequency was found for genotype 2 (3.9%). Among genotype 1, subtype 1b had the highest frequency (21.09%), followed by subtype 1a (14.06%). Among genotype 3, subtype 3a had the highest frequency (11.72%), while among genotype 4, most of subtypes were undetermined. The frequency of all different HCV genotypes was higher in male patients compared to female patients. Genotype 1 was most common in the age group of 51 - 60 years (38.3%), genotype 2 in 21 - 30 years (60%) and genotype 3 in 51 - 60 years (30%), while genotype 4 was most frequent among the age group > 61 (40%). Conclusions: The most common HCV genotype in Bahrain was subtype 1b followed by 1a and 3a. Further studies involving sources of transmission in Bahrain are required to enhance control measures for HCV infection. PMID:26977163

  13. Molecular Models of STAT5A Tetramers Complexed to DNA Predict Relative Genome-Wide Frequencies of the Spacing between the Two Dimer Binding Motifs of the Tetramer Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, Bangalore K.; Li, Peng; Lin, Jian-Xin; Leonard, Warren J.

    2016-01-01

    STAT proteins bind DNA as dimers and tetramers to control cellular development, differentiation, survival, and expansion. The tetramer binding sites are comprised of two dimer-binding sites repeated in tandem. The genome-wide distribution of the spacings between the dimer binding sites shows a distinctive, non-random pattern. Here, we report on estimating the feasibility of building possible molecular models of STAT5A tetramers bound to a DNA double helix with all possible spacings between the dimer binding sites. We found that the calculated feasibility estimates correlated well with the experimentally measured frequency of tetramer-binding sites. This suggests that the feasibility of forming the tetramer complex was a major factor in the evolution of this DNA sequence variation. PMID:27537504

  14. Estimation of Genotype Distributions and Posterior Genotype Probabilities for β-Mannosidosis in Salers Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J. F.; Abbitt, B.; Walter, J. P.; Davis, S. K.; Jaques, J. T.; Ochoa, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    β-Mannosidosis is a lethal lysosomal storage disease inherited as an autosomal recessive in man, cattle and goats. Laboratory assay data of plasma β-mannosidase activity represent a mixture of homozygous normal and carrier genotype distributions in a proportion determined by genotype frequency. A maximum likelihood approach employing data transformations for each genotype distribution and assuming a diallelic model of inheritance is described. Estimates of the transformation and genotype distribution parameters, gene frequency, genotype fitness and carrier probability were obtained simultaneously from a sample of 2,812 observations on U.S. purebred Salers cattle with enzyme activity, age, gender, month of pregnancy, month of testing, and parents identified. Transformations to normality were not required, estimated gene and carrier genotype frequencies of 0.074 and 0.148 were high, and the estimated relative fitness of heterozygotes was 1.36. The apparent overdominance in fitness may be due to a nonrandom sampling of progeny genotypes within families. The mean of plasma enzyme activity was higher for males than females, higher in winter months, lower in summer months and decreased with increased age. Estimates of carrier probabilities indicate that the test is most effective when animals are sampled as calves, although effectiveness of the plasma assay was less for males than females. Test effectiveness was enhanced through averaging repeated assays of enzyme activity on each animal. Our approach contributes to medical diagnostics in several ways. Rather than assume underlying normality for the distributions comprising the mixture, we estimate transformations to normality for each genotype distribution simultaneously with all other model parameters. This process also excludes potential biases due to data preadjustment for systematic effects. We also provide a method for partitioning phenotypic variation within each genotypic distribution which allows an assessment

  15. Impact of 5A/6A polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase-3 on recurrent atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in Chinese.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Ya; Han, Li-Ya; Huang, Xiang-Dong; Guan, Chao-Hong; Mao, Xin-Lei; Ye, Zu-Sen

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the impact of the 5A/6A polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) on recurrence of atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in Chinese. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of MMP-3 serum level and 5A/6A genetic polymorphism with the recurrence of atherosclerotic ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population. We analyzed 106 large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) recurrent ischemic stroke patients and 545 LAA first onset ischemic stroke patients from January 2009 to June 2014. Serum MMP-3 concentrations were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The genotypes of MMP-3 promoter polymorphism (-1171 5A/6A) were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequencies of MMP-3 5A/6A+5A/5A (32.08% vs. 21.47%, p = 0.02) genotype and 5A (16.98% vs. 11.01%, p = 0.01) allele in the recurrent group was significantly higher than those in the first onset group. After adjustment for vascular risk factors, multivariate logistic regression analysis suggested that the MMP-3 5A/6A+5A/5A genotype was an independent risk factor for LAA recurrent ischemic stroke (odds ratio [OR], 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-2.79, p = 0.021). No significant difference was observed for the MMP-3 serum concentrations between the recurrent group and the first onset group (22.23 ± 8.31 vs. 21.49 ± 7.89 ng/ul, t = 0.88, p = 0.38). The MMP-3 (-1171 5A/6A) polymorphism may contribute to LAA recurrent ischemic stroke susceptibility. Analysis of 5A/6A polymorphism in MMP-3 may identify patients at higher risk for LAA ischemic stroke recurrence, who may be selected for intensive preventive therapy. PMID:26314579

  16. Geographic distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campiotto, S; Pinho, J R R; Carrilho, F J; Da Silva, L C; Souto, F J D; Spinelli, V; Pereira, L M M B; Coelho, H S M; Silva, A O; Fonseca, J C; Rosa, H; Lacet, C M C; Bernardini, A P

    2005-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimension with a population of different ethnic backgrounds. Thus, a wide variation in the frequencies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes is expected to occur. To address this point, 1,688 sequential samples from chronic HCV patients were analyzed. HCV-RNA was amplified by the RT-PCR from blood samples collected from 1995 to 2000 at different laboratories located in different cities from all Brazilian States. Samples were collected in tubes containing a gel separator, centrifuged in the site of collection and sent by express mail in a refrigerated container to Laboratório Bioquímico Jardim Paulista, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. HCV-RNA was extracted from serum and submitted to RT and nested PCR using standard procedures. Nested PCR products were submitted to cycle sequencing reactions without prior purification. Sequences were analyzed for genotype determination and the following frequencies were found: 64.9% (1,095) for genotype 1, 4.6% (78) for genotype 2, 30.2% (510) for genotype 3, 0.2% (3) for genotype 4, and 0.1% (2) for genotype 5. The frequencies of HCV genotypes were statistically different among Brazilian regions (P = 0.00017). In all regions, genotype 1 was the most frequent (51.7 to 74.1%), reaching the highest value in the North; genotype 2 was more prevalent in the Center-West region (11.4%), especially in Mato Grosso State (25.8%), while genotype 3 was more common in the South (43.2%). Genotypes 4 and 5 were rarely found and only in the Southeast, in São Paulo State. The present data indicate the need for careful epidemiological surveys throughout Brazil since knowing the frequency and distribution of the genotypes would provide key information for understanding the spread of HCV. PMID:15665987

  17. Fetal Vegf Genotype is More Important for Abortion Risk than Mother Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Yalcintepe, Sinem Atik; Silan, Fatma; Hacivelioglu, Servet Ozden; Uludag, Ahmet; Cosar, Emine; Ozdemir, Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    VEGF gene has been reported to be related with many diseases and recurrent pregnancy loss in various studies. Concerning the role of VEGF polymorphisms in pregnancy losses, generally mothers genotypes have been analyzed. To evaluate the association between VEGF A +405G/C (rs2010963), −460T/C (rs833061), +936C/T (rs3025039) and - 2578A/C (rs699947) polymorphisms and spontaneous abortion, we studied the genotypes of spontaneously aborted fetuses, their mothers and healthy controls. 23 spontaneously aborted fetal materials, 22 mothers who had these abortions and 86 healthy controls were included in this study. rs2010963, rs833061, rs3025039 and rs699947 polymorphisms were analyzed by Real Time PCR technique after genomic DNA isolation from all subjects. The frequencies of VEGF A rs2010963 GG genotype and rs2010963 G allele were higher in fetuses compared both with mothers and healthy controls. VEGF A rs3025039 TT genotype and rs3025039 T allele frequencies were higher in fetuses comparing with mothers. VEGF A rs833061 CT and TT genotypes frequencies were higher in fetuses comparing with mothers. We ascertained that VEGF A rs2010963, rs833061 and rs3025039 are the risk factors for spontaneous abortion in fetal genotypes comparing with their mothers and healthy controls. PMID:25035858

  18. Ant colony optimization as a method for strategic genotype sampling.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simulation study was carried out to develop an alternative method of selecting animals to be genotyped. Simulated pedigrees included 5000 animals, each assigned genotypes for a bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based on assumed allelic frequencies of 0.7/ 0.3 and 0.5/0.5. In addition...

  19. Negative frequency-dependent selection between Pasteuria penetrans and its host Meloidogyne arenaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In negative frequency-dependant selection (NFDS), parasite genotypes capable of infecting the numerically dominant host genotype are favored, while host genotypes resistant to the dominant parasite genotype are favored, creating a cyclical pattern of resistant genotypes in the host population and, a...

  20. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  1. HCV genotypes in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Benani, A; El-Turk, J; Benjelloun, S; Sekkat, S; Nadifi, S; Hda, N; Benslimane, A

    1997-08-01

    To determine the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes circulating in Morocco, virus isolates from 105 chronically infected and 19 hemodialysis patients were examined using the line probe assay. Genotypes 1 and 2 only were found among Moroccan patients. Subtypes 1b (47.6%) and 2a/2c (37.1%) were the most common, whereas subtype 1a (2.8%) was less common. Among the hemodialysis patients, only genotype 1 was found with a prevalence of 68.4% for subtype 1b and 15.8% for the subtype 1a. It was also shown that the HCV genotypes distribution varies with age in both studied populations. Subtype 1b was most prevalent among older patients, whereas subtype 2a/2c was mainly found among younger ones. Although Morocco belongs to the African continent, the circulating HCV strains are similar to those observed in some American and European countries. PMID:9260687

  2. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk Assessment ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Lipid Profile ; Triglycerides Were you looking instead for APOE genotyping ordered ... the skin called xanthomas, a high level of triglycerides in the blood, and atherosclerosis that develops at ...

  3. Human platelet antigen gene frequencies in the Austrian population.

    PubMed

    Holensteiner, A; Walchshofer, S; Adler, A; Kittl, E M; Mayr, W R; Panzer, S

    1995-01-01

    Gene frequencies for the human platelet antigen systems HPA-1, -2, -3, and -5 were determined directly from DNA isolated from cord blood of more than 900 randomly selected Caucasoid newborns in Vienna, Austria. Genotyping was performed by specific amplification of the respective regions coding for platelet glycoproteins GP Ib, IIb, IIIa, and Ia by PCR. These PCR products were analyzed after restriction enzyme digestion and electrophoresis. The observed gene frequencies were: HPA-1a: 0.852, HPA-1b: 0.148; HPA-2a: 0.918, HPA-2b: 0.082; HPA-3a: 0.612, HPA-3b: 0.388; HPA-5a: 0.892, HPA-5b: 0.108. There was a good fit with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Results from serological determinations and genotyping showed no discrepancies. PMID:7607581

  4. Regulation of tillering in sorghum: genotypic effects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Koo; Luquet, Delphine; van Oosterom, Erik; Dingkuhn, Michael; Hammer, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Genotypic variation in tillering can be caused by differences in the carbon supply–demand balance within a plant. The aim of this study was to understand and quantify the effects of genotype on tillering as a consequence of the underlying internal competition for carbohydrates. Methods Five sorghum hybrids, derived from inbred lines with a common genetic background and with similar phenology and plant height but contrasting tillering, were grown in five experiments. The experiments covered a wide range in radiation and temperature conditions, so that number of tillers produced varied significantly. Data on leaf area, tiller number, and biomass accumulation and partitioning were collected at regular intervals. To quantify internal plant competition for carbohydrates, a carbohydrate supply–demand index (S/Dindex) was developed and related to variation in tillering. Key Results The appearance of main shoot leaves and tillers was highly co-ordinated across genotypes. High-tillering hybrids had a greater appearance frequency of early tiller ranks than low-tillering hybrids, and this was associated with narrower and hence smaller main shoot leaves. A generalized S/Dindex of internal plant competition accounted for most of the observed variation in maximum tiller number (Ntiller,max) across genotypes. However, genotypic differences in the relationship between the S/Dindex and Ntiller,max suggested that high-tillering hybrids also had a lower S/D threshold at which tillers appeared, possibly associated with hormonal effects. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that genotypic differences in tillering were associated with differences in plant carbon S/D balance, associated with differences in leaf size and in the threshold at which tillers grow out. The results provide avenues for phenotyping of mapping populations to identify genomic regions regulating tillering. Incorporating the results in crop growth simulation models could provide

  5. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  6. Mixed genotype transmission bodies and virions contribute to the maintenance of diversity in an insect virus

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo, Gabriel; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia; Caballero, Primitivo; López-Ferber, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    An insect nucleopolyhedrovirus naturally survives as a mixture of at least nine genotypes. Infection by multiple genotypes results in the production of virus occlusion bodies (OBs) with greater pathogenicity than those of any genotype alone. We tested the hypothesis that each OB contains a genotypically diverse population of virions. Few insects died following inoculation with an experimental two-genotype mixture at a dose of one OB per insect, but a high proportion of multiple infections were observed (50%), which differed significantly from the frequencies predicted by a non-associated transmission model in which genotypes are segregated into distinct OBs. By contrast, insects that consumed multiple OBs experienced higher mortality and infection frequencies did not differ significantly from those of the non-associated model. Inoculation with genotypically complex wild-type OBs indicated that genotypes tend to be transmitted in association, rather than as independent entities, irrespective of dose. To examine the hypothesis that virions may themselves be genotypically heterogeneous, cell culture plaques derived from individual virions were analysed to reveal that one-third of virions was of mixed genotype, irrespective of the genotypic composition of the OBs. We conclude that co-occlusion of genotypically distinct virions in each OB is an adaptive mechanism that favours the maintenance of virus diversity during insect-to-insect transmission. PMID:19939845

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis genotypes in a cross-sectional study of urogenital samples from remote Northern and Central Australia

    PubMed Central

    Giffard, Philip M; Brenner, Nicole C; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Garland, Suzanne M; Holt, Deborah C; Andersson, Patiyan; Lilliebridge, Rachael A; Tong, Steven Y C; Karimi, Mahdad; Boylan, Prudence; Ryder, Nathan; Johns, Tracy; Singh, Gurmeet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective was to determine the frequency of trachoma genotypes of Chlamydia trachomatis-positive urogenital tract (UGT) specimens from remote areas of the Australian Northern Territory (NT). Setting The setting was analysis of remnants of C. trachomatis positive primarily UGT specimens obtained in the course of clinical practice. The specimens were obtained from two pathology service providers. Participants From 3356 C. trachomatis specimens collected during May 2012–April 2013, 439 were selected for genotyping, with a focus on specimens from postpubescent patients, in remote Aboriginal communities where ocular trachoma is potentially present. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure was the proportion of successfully genotyped UGT specimens that were trachoma genotypes. The secondary outcome measures were the distribution of genotypes, and the frequencies of different classes of specimens able to be genotyped. Results Zero of 217 successfully genotyped UGT specimens yielded trachoma genotypes (95% CI for frequency=0–0.017). For UGT specimens, the genotypes were E (41%), F (22%), D (21%) and K (7%), with J, H and G and mixed genotypes each at 1–4%. Four of the five genotyped eye swabs yielded trachoma genotype Ba, and the other genotype J. Two hundred twenty-two specimens (50.6%) were successfully genotyped. Urine specimens were less likely to be typable than vaginal swabs (p<0.0001). Conclusions Unlike in some other studies, in the remote NT, trachoma genotypes of C. trachomatis were not found circulating in UGT specimens from 2012 to 2013. Therefore, C. trachomatis genotypes in UGT specimens from young children can be informative as to whether the organism has been acquired through sexual contact. We suggest inclusion of C. trachomatis genotyping in guidelines examining the source of sexually transmitted infections in young children in areas where trachoma genotypes may continue to circulate, and continued

  8. Mass genotyping by sequencing technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large scale genotyping of a moderate number of loci is cost prohibitive with current chip-based technologies. We demonstrate the ability to use next generation sequencing technologies to genotype many DNA samples for a moderate number of loci – a mass genotyping by sequencing technology (MGST). Ou...

  9. Monotonicity is a key feature of genotype-phenotype maps

    PubMed Central

    Gjuvsland, Arne B.; Wang, Yunpeng; Plahte, Erik; Omholt, Stig W.

    2013-01-01

    It was recently shown that monotone gene action, i.e., order-preservation between allele content and corresponding genotypic values in the mapping from genotypes to phenotypes, is a prerequisite for achieving a predictable parent-offspring relationship across the whole allele frequency spectrum. Here we test the consequential prediction that the design principles underlying gene regulatory networks are likely to generate highly monotone genotype-phenotype maps. To this end we present two measures of the monotonicity of a genotype-phenotype map, one based on allele substitution effects, and the other based on isotonic regression. We apply these measures to genotype-phenotype maps emerging from simulations of 1881 different 3-gene regulatory networks. We confirm that in general, genotype-phenotype maps are indeed highly monotonic across network types. However, regulatory motifs involving incoherent feedforward or positive feedback, as well as pleiotropy in the mapping between genotypes and gene regulatory parameters, are clearly predisposed for generating non-monotonicity. We present analytical results confirming these deep connections between molecular regulatory architecture and monotonicity properties of the genotype-phenotype map. These connections seem to be beyond reach by the classical distinction between additive and non-additive gene action. PMID:24223579

  10. SRD5A2 gene mutations and polymorphisms in Spanish 46,XY patients with a disorder of sex differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cancio, M; Audí, L; Andaluz, P; Torán, N; Piró, C; Albisu, M; Gussinyé, M; Yeste, D; Clemente, M; Martínez-Mora, J; Blanco, A; Granada, M L; Marco, M; Ferragut, J; López-Siguero, J P; Beneyto, M; Carles, C; Carrascosa, A

    2011-12-01

    One hundred and forty-six index patients with 46,XY DSD in whom gonads were confirmed as testes were consecutively studied for a molecular diagnosis during the period 2002-2010. AR gene was analysed in all patients as the first candidate gene, yielding a mutation in 42.5% of cases and SRD5A2 gene was analysed as the second candidate gene, resulting in the characterization of 10 different mutations (p.Y91D, p.G115D, p.Q126R, p.R171S, p.Y188CfsX9, p.N193S, p.A207D, p.F219SfsX60, p.R227Q and p.R246W) in nine index patients (6.2% of the total number of 46,XY DSD patients). One of the mutations (p.Y188CfsX9) has never been reported. In addition, we genotyped SRD5A2 gene p.V89L and c.281+15T>C polymorphisms in 46,XY DSD and in 156 normal adult males and found that patients with SRD5A2 mutations or without a known molecular diagnosis presented a higher frequency of homozygous p.L89, homozygous TT and combined CCTT genotypes compared with controls. This result suggests that 46,XY DSD patient phenotypes may be influenced by SRD5A2 polymorphism genotypes. SRD5A2 gene mutations may not be as infrequent as previously considered in 46,XY DSD patients with variable degrees of external genitalia virilization at birth and normal T production and appears to be the second aetiology in our series. PMID:21631525

  11. Development of an improved genotyping assay for the detection of hepatitis C virus genotypes and subtypes in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Muhammad

    2008-06-01

    A new genotyping system was established for the specific detection of HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3a, 3b, 3c, 4a-h, 5a and 6a during the course of this study. The system is based on entire core region and a part of 5' noncoding region (5'NCR) with genotype-specific primers. Genotype-specific primers were designed on the basis of 114 HCV isolates. Serum samples with known genotypes were used as positive controls to validate the assay developed and to generate PCR band patterns. Band patterns generated from the clinical serum samples from HCV patients were compared to the patterns produced from these control samples. In addition, the type-specific bands were sequenced from the test patients and control clinical samples to validate further the test results. To determine sensitivity and specificity of the assay, a total 260 samples were analyzed simultaneously by this HCV genotyping method and that developed by Ohno and Murex HCV Serotyping 1-6 Assay. The system showed 79.2% concordance with Ohno's system and 65.38% with serotyping system. Samples with discordant results were sequenced and their genotypes were determined by molecular evolutionary analysis. The data indicate that the method described in this study may offer better sensitivity and specificity for the detection directly of HCV genotypes present at low levels in HCV patient samples. PMID:18423633

  12. Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes and Precore and Core Mutants in Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sitnik, Roberta; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Bertolini, Dennis Armando; Bernardini, Antonio Plinio; da Silva, Luiz Caetano; Carrilho, Flair José

    2004-01-01

    A method for genotyping hepatitis B virus by partial HBsAg gene sequencing with primers common to all known genotypes was developed. Mutations related to anti-HBs resistance are also detected with this method. Samples from 103 Brazilian patients were analyzed. Precore and core region of these viruses were also sequenced in 101 patients. Genotypes A, B, C, D, and F were found with frequencies of 49.5, 2.9, 13.6, 24.3, and 9.7%, respectively. Genotypes B and C were found only in Asian patients, whereas genotypes A, D, and F were more common in patients without an Asian background. Precore mutants were found in 32 (31.7%) of 101 patients, with a higher frequency in those infected with genotype D (22 of 25 [88.0%]). Analysis of nucleotide 1858 showed presence of thymine in all patients with genotypes B, C, and D and in a few patients with genotypes A (10.0%) and F (30.0%), who showed more frequently the presence of cytosine. This nucleotide was closely related to the presence of precore mutants. Mutations in the basal core promoter were found in 64 of 101 (63.4%) samples. These mutations were more frequent in patients infected with genotype F (90.0%) and less frequent in patients infected with genotype B (33.3%). Deletions in this region were found in two genotype C-infected patients. PMID:15184419

  13. COMT genotype, gambling activity, and cognition.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Leppink, Eric W; Redden, Sarah A; Odlaug, Brian L; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological studies of adults with problem gambling indicate impairments across multiple cognitive domains. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) plays a unique role in the regulation of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex, and has been implicated in the cognitive dysfunction evident in problem gambling. This study examined adults with varying levels of gambling behavior to determine whether COMT genotype was associated with differences in gambling symptoms and cognitive functioning. 260 non-treatment-seeking adults aged 18-29 years with varying degrees of gambling behavior provided saliva samples for genotyping COMT val158met (rs4680). All subjects underwent clinical evaluations and neurocognitive assessment of decision-making, working memory, and impulsivity. The Val/Val COMT genotype was associated with the largest percentage of subjects with gambling disorder (31.8%), a rate significantly different from the Val/Met (13.2%) group (p = 0.001). The Val/Val COMT group was also associated with significantly more gambling disorder diagnostic criteria being met, greater frequency of gambling behavior, and significantly worse cognitive performance on the Cambridge Gamble Task (risk adjustment and delay aversion) and the Spatial Working Memory task (total errors). This study adds to the growing literature on the role of COMT in impulsive behaviors by showing that the Val/Val genotype was associated with specific clinical and cognitive elements among young adults who gamble, in the absence of differences on demographic measures and other cognitive domains. Future work should consider using genotyping to explore whether certain polymorphisms predict subsequent development of impulsive behaviors including gambling disorder, and treatment outcomes. PMID:26028545

  14. Sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome in southern China: epidemiological survey and SCN5A gene screening

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianding; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Yuan, Ping; Shi, Nianqing; Zhou, Feng; Ye, Bin; Tan, Bi-Hua; Kroboth, Stacie; Tang, Shuangbo; Lu, Ciyong

    2010-01-01

    Based on autopsy data collected in Southern China from 2001–2006, 975 cases of sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS) were surveyed. Genetic screening of SCN5A, the gene encoding the voltage dependent cardiac Na channel, was performed in 74 available SUNDS cases. The annual occurrence rate of SUNDS in the area was estimated to be 1 per 100,000 people. 80.6% of deaths occurred between the ages of 21 to 40 years and the case number peaked at age 30 years. In 75.4% of cases where witnesses were present, victims died in their sleep between 11 PM and 4 AM and many showed abrupt respiratory distress shortly preceding death. The monthly distribution of emergency fever cases in the area during the same period was positively correlated to that of SUNDS cases (rs = 0.611, P = 0.0025). Four polymorphisms in SCN5A were identified in both SUNDS and control groups. Compared with controls, the allele frequency of C5457 and C3666+69 were significant higher in SUNDS (P<0.005) while the genotypes of both 5457CC (P=0.012, OR=2.0, 95% CI=1.3–3.2) and 3666+69CC (P=0.004, OR=2.1, 95% CI=1.3–3.3) in SUNDS cases were significantly higher. This is the first report of an epidemiological survey and SCN5A gene screening in SUNDS in the Han population of China. The genotypes of 5457CC and 3666+69CC in SCN5A gene may be Chinese SUNDS susceptible polymorphisms. PMID:20110800

  15. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fim-A genotype distribution among Colombians

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Adriana; Parra, Beatriz; Botero, Javier Enrique; Contreras, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with periodontitis and exhibit a wide array of virulence factors, including fimbriae which is encoded by the FimA gene representing six known genotypes. Objetive: To identify FimA genotypes of P. gingivalis in subjects from Cali-Colombia, including the co-infection with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. Methods: Subgingival samples were collected from 151 people exhibiting diverse periodontal condition. The occurrence of P. gingivalis, FimA genotypes and other bacteria was determined by PCR. Results: P. gingivalis was positive in 85 patients. Genotype FimA II was more prevalent without reach significant differences among study groups (54.3%), FimA IV was also prevalent in gingivitis (13.0%). A high correlation (p= 0.000) was found among P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia co-infection. The FimA II genotype correlated with concomitant detection of T. denticola and T. forsythia. Conclusions: Porphyromonas gingivalis was high even in the healthy group at the study population. A trend toward a greater frequency of FimA II genotype in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was determined. The FimA II genotype was also associated with increased pocket depth, greater loss of attachment level, and patients co-infected with T. denticola and T. forsythia. PMID:26600627

  16. Genotyping Sleep Disorders Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shadan, Farhad F.; Dawson, Arthur; Cronin, John W.; Jamil, Shazia M.; Grizas, Alexandra P.; Koziol, James A.; Kline, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The genetic susceptibility factors underlying sleep disorders might help us predict prognoses and responses to treatment. Several candidate polymorphisms for sleep disorders have been proposed, but there has as yet inadequate replication or validation that the candidates may be useful in the clinical setting. Methods To assess the validity of several candidate associations, we obtained saliva deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples and clinical information from 360 consenting research participants who were undergoing clinical polysomnograms. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped. These were thought to be related to depression, circadian sleep disorders, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome (RLS), excessive sleepiness, or to slow waves in sleep. Results With multivariate generalized linear models, the association of TEF rs738499 with depressive symptoms was confirmed. Equivocal statistical evidence of association of rs1801260 (the C3111T SNP in the CLOCK gene) with morningness/eveningness and an association of Apolipoprotein E (APOE) rs429358 with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were obtained, but these associations were not strong enough to be of clinical value by themselves. Predicted association of SNPs with sleep apnea, RLS, and slow wave sleep were not confirmed. Conclusion The SNPs tested would not, by themselves, be of use for clinical genotyping in a sleep clinic. PMID:20396431

  17. The Variants Within the COL5A1 Gene are Associated with Reduced Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Skiers.

    PubMed

    Stępień-Słodkowska, Marta; Ficek, Krzysztof; Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Maciejewska-Karłowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Leońska-Duniec, Agata; Stępiński, Miłosz; Ziętek, Paweł; Król, Paweł; Chudecka, Monika; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-03-29

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of the BstUI RFLP C/T (rs 12722) and DpnII RFLP C/T (rs 13946) COL5A1 polymorphisms, individually and as haplotypes, with anterior cruciate ligament ruptures in recreational skiers. Subjects were 138 male recreational skiers with surgically diagnosed primary anterior cruciate ligament ruptures. The control group consisted of 183 apparently healthy male recreational skiers, who were without any self-reported history of ligament or tendon injury. DNA was extracted from buccal cells donated by the subjects and genotyping was carried out using real-time PCR. The genotype distributions for both polymorphisms met Hardy-Weinberg expectations in both groups. There were no significant differences in genotype distribution of allele frequencies of COL5A1 BstUI RFLP C/T and COL5A1 DpnII RFLP C/T polymorphisms between the ACL rupture and control groups. The T-T (BstUI RFLP T, DpnII RFLP T) haplotype was the most common (55.6%). The haplotype T-C was not present in any of the subjects. There was an underrepresentation tendency of the C-T haplotype in the study group compared to controls under recessive mode of inheritance. Higher frequency of the COL5A1 BstUI RFLP C/T and COL5A1DpnII RFLP C/T polymorphisms haplotype is associated with reduced risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in a group of apparently healthy male recreational skiers. PMID:25964814

  18. An index of information content for genotype probabilities derived from segregation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kinghorn, B P

    1997-02-01

    A genotype probability index (GPI) is proposed to indicate the information content of genotype probabilities derived from a segregation analysis. Typically, some individuals are genotyped at a marker locus or a quantitative trait locus, and segregation analysis is used to make genotype inferences about ungenotyped relatives. Genotype probabilities for a two-allele autosomal locus are plotted on a triangular surface. The GPI has a value of zero at the point corresponding to Hardy-Weinberg frequencies, and a value of 100% at the vertices of the triangle. Trigonometric functions are used to help calculate intermediate index values. It is proposed that such an index can be useful to help identify which ungenotyped individuals or loci should be genotyped to maximize the benefit/cost of genotyping operations. PMID:9071600

  19. Determination of self-incompatibility groups of sweet cherry genotypes from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ipek, A; Gulen, H; Akcay, M E; Ipek, M; Ergin, S; Eris, A

    2011-01-01

    Determination of S-allele combinations of sweet cherry genotypes and cultivars has importance for both growers and breeders. We determined S-allele combinations of 40 local Turkish sweet cherry genotypes using a PCR-based method. Ten different S-alleles were detected. Although the most common S-allele was S3, as also found in Western genotypes and cultivars, there were some differences in the frequencies of some S-alleles between Turkish and Western sweet cherry genotypes. According to their S-allele compositions, 30 local Turkish sweet cherry genotypes were assigned to 10 previously identified incompatibility groups. For the remaining genotypes, whose S-allele combinations did not fit to any previous incompatibility groups, three more incompatibility groups, XLII, XLIII and XLIV, were proposed. Results obtained from this study will help both sweet cherry growers and breeders to better manage these local Turkish sweet cherry genotypes in their orchards. PMID:21341217

  20. Arrhythmic substrate, slowed propagation and increased dispersion in conduction direction in the right ventricular outflow tract of murine Scn5a+/− hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Guzadhur, L; Jeevaratnam, K; Salvage, S C; Matthews, G D K; Lammers, W J; Lei, M; Huang, C L-H; Fraser, J A

    2014-01-01

    Aim To test a hypothesis attributing arrhythmia in Brugada Syndrome to right ventricular (RV) outflow tract (RVOT) conduction abnormalities arising from Nav1.5 insufficiency and fibrotic change. Methods Arrhythmic properties of Langendorff-perfused Scn5a+/− and wild-type mouse hearts were correlated with ventricular effective refractory periods (VERPs), multi-electrode array (MEA) measurements of action potential (AP) conduction velocities and dispersions in conduction direction (CD), Nav1.5 expression levels, and fibrotic change, as measured at the RVOT and RV. Two-way anova was used to test for both independent and interacting effects of anatomical region and genotype on these parameters. Results Scn5a+/− hearts showed greater arrhythmic frequencies during programmed electrical stimulation at the RVOT but not the RV. The Scn5a+/− genotype caused an independent increase of VERP regardless of whether the recording site was the RVOT or RV. Effective AP conduction velocities (CV†s), derived from fitting regression planes to arrays of observed local activation times were reduced in Scn5a+/− hearts and at the RVOT independently. AP conduction velocity magnitudes derived by averaging MEA results from local vector analyses, CV*, were reduced by the Scn5a+/− genotype alone. In contrast, dispersions in conduction direction, were greater in the RVOT than the RV, when the atrioventricular node was used as the pacing site. The observed reductions in Nav1.5 expression were attributable to Scn5a+/−, whereas increased levels of fibrosis were associated with the RVOT. Conclusions The Scn5a+/− RVOT recapitulates clinical findings of increased arrhythmogenicity through reduced CV† reflecting reduced CV* attributable to reduced Nav1.5 expression and increased CD attributable to fibrosis. PMID:24913289

  1. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  2. Incorporating duplicate genotype data into linear trend tests of genetic association: methods and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Bryce; Brown, Marshall; McLellan, Brian; Bekmetjev, Airat; Tintle, Nathan L

    2009-01-01

    The genome-wide association (GWA) study is an increasingly popular way to attempt to identify the causal variants in human disease. Duplicate genotyping (or re-genotyping) a portion of the samples in a GWA study is common, though it is typical for these data to be ignored in subsequent tests of genetic association. We demonstrate a method for including duplicate genotype data in linear trend tests of genetic association which yields increased power. We also consider the cost-effectiveness of collecting duplicate genotype data and find that when the relative cost of genotyping to phenotyping and sample acquisition costs is less than or equal to the genotyping error rate it is more powerful to duplicate genotype the entire sample instead of spending the same money to increase the sample size. Duplicate genotyping is particularly cost-effective when SNP minor allele frequencies are low. Practical advice for the implementation of duplicate genotyping is provided. Free software is provided to compute asymptotic and permutation based tests of association using duplicate genotype data as well as to aid in the duplicate genotyping design decision. PMID:19492982

  3. AN EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM GENOTYPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of 11 previously described species differentiation and genotyping PCR protocols for detection of Cryptosporidium parasites. Genomic DNA from three species of Crytosporidium parasites (genotype 1 and genotype 2 of C. parvum, C. muris, a...

  4. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility. PMID:26886161

  5. Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Moazeni, Mohammad; Yousefi, Morteza; Saneie, Behnam; Hosseini-Safa, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Hydatidosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus is one of the most important zoonotic diseases, throughout most parts of the world. Hydatidosis is endemic in Iran and responsible for approximately 1% of admission to surgical wards. There are extensive genetic variations within E. granulosus and 10 different genotypes (G1–G10) within this parasite have been reported. Identification of strains is important for improvement of control and prevention of the disease. No new review article presented the situation of Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran in the recent years; therefore in this paper we reviewed the different studies regarding Echinococcus granulosus genotypes in Iran. PMID:24834298

  6. Human papillomavirus infections in women seeking cervical Papanicolaou cytology of Durango, Mexico: prevalence and genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Reyes-Romero, Miguel Arturo; Carrera-Rodríguez, Margarita

    2006-01-01

    Background HPV infection in women from developing countries is an important public health problem. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalences of HPV infection and HPV genotypes in a female population of Durango City, Mexico. Also to determine whether any socio-demographic characteristic from the women associated with HPV infection exists. Methods Four hundred and ninety eight women seeking cervical Papanicolaou examination in three public Health Centers were examined for HPV infection. All women were tested for HPV DNA PCR by using HPV universal primers. In addition, all positive HPV DNA PCR samples were further analyzed for genotyping of HPV genotype 16, 18 and 33. Socio-demographic characteristics from each participant were also obtained. Results Twenty-four out of four hundred and ninety-eight (4.8%) women were found infected by HPV. HPV genotype 16 was found in 18 out of the 24 (75%) infected women. Two of them were also coinfected by HPV genotype 18 (8.3%). In the rest 6 PCR positive women, genotyping for HPV genotypes 16, 18 and 33 were negative. Conclusion The prevalence of HPV in women of Durango City is low; however, most infected women have high risk HPV genotype. The women who were studied showed low frequency of risk factors for HPV infection and this may explain the low prevalence of HPV infection. The high frequency of high risk HPV genotypes observed might explain the high rate of mortality for cervical cancer in our region. PMID:16504014

  7. Identification of zoonotic genotypes of Giardia duodenalis.

    PubMed

    Sprong, Hein; Cacciò, Simone M; van der Giessen, Joke W B

    2009-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis, originally regarded as a commensal organism, is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a gastrointestinal disease of humans and animals. Giardiasis causes major public and veterinary health concerns worldwide. Transmission is either direct, through the faecal-oral route, or indirect, through ingestion of contaminated water or food. Genetic characterization of G. duodenalis isolates has revealed the existence of seven groups (assemblages A to G) which differ in their host distribution. Assemblages A and B are found in humans and in many other mammals, but the role of animals in the epidemiology of human infection is still unclear, despite the fact that the zoonotic potential of Giardia was recognised by the WHO some 30 years ago. Here, we performed an extensive genetic characterization of 978 human and 1440 animal isolates, which together comprise 3886 sequences from 4 genetic loci. The data were assembled into a molecular epidemiological database developed by a European network of public and veterinary health Institutions. Genotyping was performed at different levels of resolution (single and multiple loci on the same dataset). The zoonotic potential of both assemblages A and B is evident when studied at the level of assemblages, sub-assemblages, and even at each single locus. However, when genotypes are defined using a multi-locus sequence typing scheme, only 2 multi-locus genotypes (MLG) of assemblage A and none of assemblage B appear to have a zoonotic potential. Surprisingly, mixtures of genotypes in individual isolates were repeatedly observed. Possible explanations are the uptake of genetically different Giardia cysts by a host, or subsequent infection of an already infected host, likely without overt symptoms, with a different Giardia species, which may cause disease. Other explanations for mixed genotypes, particularly for assemblage B, are substantial allelic sequence heterogeneity and/or genetic recombination. Although the zoonotic

  8. Effects of plant genotype and insect dispersal rate on the population dynamics of a forest pest.

    PubMed

    Moran, Emily V; Bewick, Sharon; Cobbold, Christina A

    2013-12-01

    It has been shown that plant genotype can strongly affect not only individual herbivore performance, but also community composition and ecosystem function. Few studies, however, have addressed how plant genotype affects herbivore population dynamics. In this paper, we used a simulation modeling approach to ask how the genetic composition of a forest influences pest outbreak dynamics, using the example of aspen (Populus tremuloides) and forest tent caterpillars (FTC; Malacosoma disstria). Specifically, we examined how plant genotype, the relative size of genotypic patches, and the rate of insect dispersal between them, affect the frequency, amplitude, and duration of outbreaks. We found that coupling two different genotypes does not necessarily result in an averaging of insect dynamics. Instead, depending on the ratio of patch sizes, when dispersal rates are moderate, outbreaks in the two-genotype case may be more or less severe than in forests of either genotype alone. Thresholds for different dynamic behaviors were similar for all genotypic combinations. Thus, the qualitative behavior of a stand of two different genotypes can be predicted based on the response of the insect to each genotype, the relative sizes of the two patches, and the scale of insect dispersal. PMID:24597225

  9. Correlated genotypes in friendship networks

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, James H.; Settle, Jaime E.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that humans tend to associate with other humans who have similar characteristics, but it is unclear whether this tendency has consequences for the distribution of genotypes in a population. Although geneticists have shown that populations tend to stratify genetically, this process results from geographic sorting or assortative mating, and it is unknown whether genotypes may be correlated as a consequence of nonreproductive associations or other processes. Here, we study six available genotypes from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to test for genetic similarity between friends. Maps of the friendship networks show clustering of genotypes and, after we apply strict controls for population stratification, the results show that one genotype is positively correlated (homophily) and one genotype is negatively correlated (heterophily). A replication study in an independent sample from the Framingham Heart Study verifies that DRD2 exhibits significant homophily and that CYP2A6 exhibits significant heterophily. These unique results show that homophily and heterophily obtain on a genetic (indeed, an allelic) level, which has implications for the study of population genetics and social behavior. In particular, the results suggest that association tests should include friends’ genes and that theories of evolution should take into account the fact that humans might, in some sense, be metagenomic with respect to the humans around them. PMID:21245293

  10. Newcastle disease: genotypic variation and gross pathology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are currently 18 genotypes described for class II Newcastle disease viruses and one genotype for class I. While class I viruses are globally distributed in wild birds, the class II genotypes are found more selectively in different countries. For instance the NDV isolates in genotype V are mo...

  11. Genotypic variability for protoplast regeneration in Saintpaulia ionantha (H. Wendl.).

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, T; Grunewaldt, J

    1995-08-01

    The behaviour of eleven Saintpaulia ionantha (H. Wendl.) genotypes in protoplast culture was compared. Isolation of protoplasts from young shootlets regenerated in vitro on leaf explants, yielded 0.7 to 1.8 × 10(6) protoplasts per gram fresh weight. In all cultivars and breeding lines tested, cell divisions were observed. The mean division frequencies varied between 1.0 and 5.0% after 14 days, and between 6.4 and 13.8% after 24 days of culture. In ten genotypes callussing and shoot regeneration were achieved. The difference between the genotypes in shoot regeneration rate, between 2 and 68%, was more pronounced. The comparison of four cytokinins indicated hat thidiazuron was most effective for shoot regeneration, but often resulted in poorer shoot quality than benzylaminopurine. PMID:24186626

  12. Plasticity, memory and the adaptive landscape of the genotype

    PubMed Central

    l, C. P

    1998-01-01

    The adaptive value of epigenetic inheritance systems is investigated in a simple mathematical framework. These systems enable the environmentally induced phenotypes to be transmitted between generations. The frequencies of the different epigenetic variants are determined by the plasticity and the efficiency of transmission (called memory). Plasticity and memory are genetically determined. This paper studies the evolution of a quantitative character, its plasticity and memory, on the adaptive landscape. Due to the dual inheritance of the character, selection acts on two levels: on the phenotypes of the same genotype, and on the different genotypes. Plasticity generates the raw material, and memory increases the strength of phenotypic selection. If the character is far from the peak of the landscape, then dual inheritance of the character can be advantageous for the genotype. Near the peak it is more favourable to suppress phenotypic variation. This would lead to genetic assimilation.

  13. Relationship between CATSPERB, NR5A2 gene polymorphisms and Peak Bone Mineral Density in College Students in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Liu, Wenya; HUA, Ma; Shi, Raoni; Wang, Haitao; Yang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Peak bone mineral density (PBMD) is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, genes explains most of variation. As the novel candidate genes CATSPERB and NR5A2 may have been associated with spinal PBMD in adult. This study was to investigate the relationship among these two genes^ PBMD and the life style factors in young female. Methods The rs1298989 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the CATSPERB gene and the rs3762397 SNP of the NR5A2 gene were genotyped using SNaPshot® in 359 students from Xinjiang. The prospective study included 203 Han and 156 Uyghur subjects. PBMD was measured using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Calcium, phosphate and alkaline phosphatase were measured by ELISA method. Physical activity, dietary calcium and life styles were assessed by questionnaire. Results Both SNPs showed differences in genotype and allele frequencies (P < 0.05) between the Han and Uyghur subjects. Total calcium intake, energy intake, tea and milk intake were also significantly different between two groups (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed an association between PBMD and vitamin D intake (P = 0.000), milk (P = 0.000), exercise (P = 0.029), rs1298989 (P = 0.028), energy intake (P = 0.043). Conclusion This study demonstrated the polymorphisms of the rs1298989 and rs3762397 are associated with PBMD both in Han and Uyghur subjects. PBMD, in Xinjiang, appears to be associated with several known factors that are well described in the literature. While the genotypes of rs1298989 and rs3762397 do not appear have a strong effect on the PBMD. PMID:25927035

  14. PEPA-1* genotype affects return rate for hatchery steelhead

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reisenbichler, R.R.; Hayes, M.C.; Rubin, S.P.; Wetzel, L.A.; Baker, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Allozymes continue to be useful as genetic markers in a variety of studies; however, their utility often hinges on the selective neutrality of the allelic variation. Our study tested for neutrality between the two most common alleles (*100 and *110) at the cytosol nonspecific dipeptidase locus (PEPA-1*) in steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss from Dworshak National Fish Hatchery in Idaho. We tested for differential growth and survival among fish with the * 100/100, *100/ 110, and *110/110 genotypes rearing in a hatchery or a natural stream. We repeated the study for two year-classes, using heterozygous (*100/110) adults to make the experimental crosses. This design avoided differences in family contribution among genotypes because each cross produced all three genotypes. We divided the progeny from each family into two groups. One group was reared in a hatchery for 1 year and then released for migration to the sea and subsequent return to the hatchery as adults. The other group was released into a natural stream and monitored for 3 years. We found no significant differences in size or survival among PEPA-1* genotypes for either the naturally reared fish or the hatchery-reared fish immediately prior to release as smolts. For females, survival to returning adult also was similar among genotypes; however, hatchery-reared males with the *110/110 genotype returned at a higher rate than did males with the *100/ 100 genotype; heterozygous males were intermediate. These results indicate that selection occurs at the PEPA-1* locus or at one or more loci tightly linked to it. The finding of nearly equal frequencies for these two alleles in the source population suggests that selection differentials among genotypes reverse or vary from year to year; otherwise, steady directional selection would drive the *100 allele to low frequencies or extinction. Locus PEPA-1* seems inappropriate for genetic marks in studies of steelhead that span the full life cycle and probably should be avoided

  15. TDZ, auxin and genotype effects on leaf organogenesis in Fragaria.

    PubMed

    Landi, L; Mezzetti, B

    2006-04-01

    The different types of organogenic (roots and adventitious shoots) and callus formation responses of leaves from 30-day-old proliferating shoots of different Fragaria spp. genotypes were studied in response to MS medium supplemented with 4.54 microM 1-phenyl-3-(1,2,3-thiadiazol-5-yl) urea (thidiazuron; TDZ) alone and in combination with 0.98 microM indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), 0.84 microM 3-benzo[b]selenienyl acetic acid (BSAA) or 0.90 microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). The study included: nine octoploid Fragaria x ananassa cultivars and breeding selections; two octoploid breeding selections from F. virginiana glauca inter-species crosses; two diploid F. vesca cultivars; and one diploid clone of F. nubicola Lindl. TDZ plus IBA promoted the highest shoot regeneration efficiencies from leaves of nearly all of the genotypes, while the TDZ/BSAA and TDZ/2,4-D combinations promoted high regeneration efficiencies for only some of the genotypes (Alpina W.O., Sveva, AN 91.371.53, Onda, Paros and FO93.143.5). For the more efficient regenerating genotypes, IBA induced the highest frequency of regenerating leaves, while BSAA induced the highest number of regenerated shoots from leaves and more callus production for most of the genotypes. PMID:16231183

  16. Ant colony optimization as a method for strategic genotype sampling.

    PubMed

    Spangler, M L; Robbins, K R; Bertrand, J K; Macneil, M; Rekaya, R

    2009-06-01

    A simulation study was carried out to develop an alternative method of selecting animals to be genotyped. Simulated pedigrees included 5000 animals, each assigned genotypes for a bi-allelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based on assumed allelic frequencies of 0.7/0.3 and 0.5/0.5. In addition to simulated pedigrees, two beef cattle pedigrees, one from field data and the other from a research population, were used to test selected methods using simulated genotypes. The proposed method of ant colony optimization (ACO) was evaluated based on the number of alleles correctly assigned to ungenotyped animals (AK(P)), the probability of assigning true alleles (AK(G)) and the probability of correctly assigning genotypes (APTG). The proposed animal selection method of ant colony optimization was compared to selection using the diagonal elements of the inverse of the relationship matrix (A(-1)). Comparisons of these two methods showed that ACO yielded an increase in AK(P) ranging from 4.98% to 5.16% and an increase in APTG from 1.6% to 1.8% using simulated pedigrees. Gains in field data and research pedigrees were slightly lower. These results suggest that ACO can provide a better genotyping strategy, when compared to A(-1), with different pedigree sizes and structures. PMID:19220227

  17. Practical applications of genotypic surveys for forensic STR testing.

    PubMed

    Holt, C L; Stauffer, C; Wallin, J M; Lazaruk, K D; Nguyen, T; Budowle, B; Walsh, P S

    2000-08-14

    Legitimate genotype frequency estimation for multiallelic loci relies on component allele frequencies, as population surveys represent only a fraction of possible DNA profiles. Multilocus genotypes from two ethnic human populations, African American (n=195) and U.S. Caucasian (n=200), were compiled at 13 STR loci that are used worldwide in forensic investigation (D3S1358, vWA, FGA, D16S539, TH01, TPOX, CSF1PO, D8S1179, D21S11, D18S51, D5S818, D13S317, and D7S820). Sex-specific AmpFlSTR multiplexes provided stringent PCR-based STR typing specifically optimized for multicolor fluorescence detection. Heterozygosity at each STR locus ranged from 0.57 to 0.89 and encompassed from seven (TH01) to twenty-one (D21S11) alleles. Homozygosity tests, tests based on the distinct numbers of observed homozygous and heterozygous classes, log likelihood ratio tests, and exact tests assessed that the degree of divergence from theoretical Hardy-Weinberg proportions for all 13 STRs does not have practical consequence in genotype frequency estimation. Departures from linkage equilibrium, between loci, that imposed significance to forensic calculations were not indicated by observed variance of the number of heterozygous loci or Karlin interclass correlation tests. For forensic casework, reliable multilocus profile estimates may be obtained from the product of component genotype frequencies, each calculated through application of the Hardy-Weinberg equation to population database allele frequency estimates reported here. The average probability that two randomly selected, unrelated individuals possess an identical thirteen-locus DNA profile was one in 1.8x10(15) African Americans and one in 3.8x10(14) U.S. Caucasians. PMID:10940595

  18. Bayesian inference of recent migration rates using multilocus genotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gregory A; Rannala, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    A new Bayesian method that uses individual multilocus genotypes to estimate rates of recent immigration (over the last several generations) among populations is presented. The method also estimates the posterior probability distributions of individual immigrant ancestries, population allele frequencies, population inbreeding coefficients, and other parameters of potential interest. The method is implemented in a computer program that relies on Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to carry out the estimation of posterior probabilities. The program can be used with allozyme, microsatellite, RFLP, SNP, and other kinds of genotype data. We relax several assumptions of early methods for detecting recent immigrants, using genotype data; most significantly, we allow genotype frequencies to deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium proportions within populations. The program is demonstrated by applying it to two recently published microsatellite data sets for populations of the plant species Centaurea corymbosa and the gray wolf species Canis lupus. A computer simulation study suggests that the program can provide highly accurate estimates of migration rates and individual migrant ancestries, given sufficient genetic differentiation among populations and sufficient numbers of marker loci. PMID:12663554

  19. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  20. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes among hemodialysis patients in Tehran--a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed Mohammadmehdi; Keyvani, Hossein; Kasiri, Hossein; Kazemeyni, Seyed Mohammad; Basiri, Abbas; Aghel, Nazanin; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed

    2006-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus has substantial heterogeneity of genotypes throughout the world. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HCV genotypes, risk factors and clinical implications in cases of hemodialysis living in Tehran. A total of 155 patients treated by hemodialysis, who had been identified to be anti-HCV positive at 45 medical centers in Tehran, were enrolled. Genotyping was using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) on HCV-RNA positive samples. HCV-RNA was detected in 66 (42.6%) patients. Genotyping of HCV-RNA positive serum samples demonstrated that subtypes 3a and 1a were predominant accounting for 30.3 and 28.8%, respectively. The distribution of other HCV genotypes showed genotype 1b, 18.2%; genotype 4, 16.7%; mixed genotypes 1a and 1b, 3%; and genotype 3b, 3%. Genotype 2 was not detected in this study. Statistically significant differences were identified between HCV infected and non-HCV infected patients regarding history of hemodialysis unit changes more than two times (P = 0.01), and history of hemodialysis for more than 20 years (P = 0.02). However, blood transfusion, mean duration of hemodialysis therapy and the history of solid organ transplantation did not differ between these two groups. This study indicates that the dominant HCV genotypes among patients treated by hemodialysis living in Tehran were 3a and 1a, and considering previous reports from the general population, genotype 4 was strongly associated with hemodialysis. The duration of treatment by hemodialysis and, in turn, more hemodialysis unit changes will lead to more frequent HCV infections. PMID:16555284

  1. Transforming microbial genotyping: a robotic pipeline for genotyping bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, Brian; Haase, Jana K; Velayudhan, Vimalkumar; Murphy, Ronan A; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of < €25 per strain. Since developing this pipeline, >200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost. PMID:23144721

  2. Transforming Microbial Genotyping: A Robotic Pipeline for Genotyping Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Vimalkumar; Murphy, Ronan A.; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of < €25 per strain. Since developing this pipeline, >200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost. PMID:23144721

  3. Synergistic Activity of Combined NS5A Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Donald R; Nower, Peter T; Gao, Min; Fridell, Robert; Wang, Chunfu; Hewawasam, Piyasena; Lopez, Omar; Tu, Yong; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Belema, Makonen; Roberts, Susan B; Cockett, Mark; Sun, Jin-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) is a first-in-class hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural 5A replication complex inhibitor (NS5A RCI) that is clinically effective in interferon-free combinations with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting alternate HCV proteins. Recently, we reported NS5A RCI combinations that enhance HCV inhibitory potential in vitro, defining a new class of HCV inhibitors termed NS5A synergists (J. Sun, D. R. O'Boyle II, R. A. Fridell, D. R. Langley, C. Wang, S. Roberts, P. Nower, B. M. Johnson F. Moulin, M. J. Nophsker, Y. Wang, M. Liu, K. Rigat, Y. Tu, P. Hewawasam, J. Kadow, N. A. Meanwell, M. Cockett, J. A. Lemm, M. Kramer, M. Belema, and M. Gao, Nature 527:245-248, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature15711). To extend the characterization of NS5A synergists, we tested new combinations of DCV and NS5A synergists against genotype (gt) 1 to 6 replicons and gt 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses. The kinetics of inhibition in HCV-infected cells treated with DCV, an NS5A synergist (NS5A-Syn), or a combination of DCV and NS5A-Syn were distinctive. Similar to activity observed clinically, DCV caused a multilog drop in HCV, followed by rebound due to the emergence of resistance. DCV-NS5A-Syn combinations were highly efficient at clearing cells of viruses, in line with the trend seen in replicon studies. The retreatment of resistant viruses that emerged using DCV monotherapy with DCV-NS5A-Syn resulted in a multilog drop and rebound in HCV similar to the initial decline and rebound observed with DCV alone on wild-type (WT) virus. A triple combination of DCV, NS5A-Syn, and a DAA targeting the NS3 or NS5B protein cleared the cells of viruses that are highly resistant to DCV. Our data support the observation that the cooperative interaction of DCV and NS5A-Syn potentiates both the genotype coverage and resistance barrier of DCV, offering an additional DAA option for combination therapy and tools for explorations of NS5A function. PMID:26711745

  4. Different methods of selecting animals for genotyping to maximize the amount of genetic information known in the population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simulation study was carried out to develop and compare different methods of sampling animals to be genotyped. The simulated pedigrees included 5,000 animals and were assigned genotypes based on assumed allelic frequencies (favorable/unfavorable) of 0.3/0.7, 0.5/0.5, and 0.8/0.2. A real beef cat...

  5. INVESTIGATION OF STAT5A, FSHR AND LHR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN TURKISH INDIGENOUS CATTLE BREEDS (EAST ANATOLLAN RED, SOUTH ANATOLIAN RED, TURKISH GREY, ANATOLIAN BLACK AND ZAVOT).

    PubMed

    Arslan, K; Akyüz, B; Agaoglu, O Korkmaz

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the allelic and genotypic profiles of the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5A (STAT5A), Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptors (FSHR), and Luteinizing Hormone Receptor (LHR) genes in five indigenous cattle breeds in Turkey. For this purpose, a total of 329 cattle from East Anatolian Red (EAR), South Anatolian Red (SAR), Turkish Grey (TG), Anatolian Black (AB), and Zavot were genotyped using by PCR-RFLP method. A215 bp fragment of STAT5A, a 306bp fragment of FSHR, and a 303 bp fragment of LHR were amplified and digested with AvaI, AluI, and HhaI restriction enzymes, respectively. In this study two types of alleles C and Tfor STAT5A, C and G for FSHR and C and T for LHR were observed. The highest frequencies for STAT5A-C and STAT5A-T alleles were estimated for the Zavot and TG breeds (0.86) and the EAR breed (0.29), respectively. The highest frequency for FSHR-C and FSHR-G alleles was estimated for the Zavot breed (0.72) and the AB and SARbreeds (0.35), respectively. The highest frequency for LHR-C and LHR-T alleles was estimated for the EAR breed (0.75) and the AB breed (0.39), respectively. According to FT values, a small level of genetic diversity was found among five cattle breeds. The F(ST) value was calculated 0.019 between AB and Zavot. And, the value was significant (p < 0.001), while the other F(ST) values were not significant. According to the genetic distance values (Nei), the highest genetic distance was found between AB and TG while the smallest genetic distance was found between Zavot and TG. The chi-square test showed that the TG and Zavot breeds were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) for STAT5A gene; the EAR, SAR, TG, and Zavot breeds were in HWE for FSHR gene and the EAR, SAR, and TG breeds were in HWE for LHR gene. In conclusion, further investigation is required to determine the correlation of the FSHR and LHR genes with early puberty for the improvement of sexual precocity, and it is

  6. Mapping quantitative trait loci by genotyping haploid tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, R L

    1999-01-01

    Mapping strategies based on a half- or full-sib family design have been developed to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for outcrossing species. However, these strategies are dependent on controlled crosses where marker-allelic frequency and linkage disequilibrium between the marker and QTL may limit their application. In this article, a maximum-likelihood method is developed to map QTL segregating in an open-pollinated progeny population using dominant markers derived from haploid tissues from single meiotic events. Results from the haploid-based mapping strategy are not influenced by the allelic frequencies of markers and their linkage disequilibria with QTL, because the probabilities of QTL genotypes conditional on marker genotypes of haploid tissues are independent of these population parameters. Parameter estimation and hypothesis testing are implemented via expectation/conditional maximization algorithm. Parameters estimated include the additive effect, the dominant effect, the population mean, the chromosomal location of the QTL in the interval, and the residual variance within the QTL genotypes, plus two population parameters, outcrossing rate and QTL-allelic frequency. Simulation experiments show that the accuracy and power of parameter estimates are affected by the magnitude of QTL effects, heritability levels of a trait, and sample sizes used. The application and limitation of the method are discussed. PMID:10430598

  7. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  8. Bulk Genotyping of Biopsies Can Create Spurious Evidence for Hetereogeneity in Mutation Content

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C.; Kuhner, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    When multiple samples are taken from the neoplastic tissues of a single patient, it is natural to compare their mutation content. This is often done by bulk genotyping of whole biopsies, but the chance that a mutation will be detected in bulk genotyping depends on its local frequency in the sample. When the underlying mutation count per cell is equal, homogenous biopsies will have more high-frequency mutations, and thus more detectable mutations, than heterogeneous ones. Using simulations, we show that bulk genotyping of data simulated under a neutral model of somatic evolution generates strong spurious evidence for non-neutrality, because the pattern of tissue growth systematically generates differences in biopsy heterogeneity. Any experiment which compares mutation content across bulk-genotyped biopsies may therefore suggest mutation rate or selection intensity variation even when these forces are absent. We discuss computational and experimental approaches for resolving this problem. PMID:27105344

  9. Bulk Genotyping of Biopsies Can Create Spurious Evidence for Hetereogeneity in Mutation Content.

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C; Kuhner, Mary K

    2016-04-01

    When multiple samples are taken from the neoplastic tissues of a single patient, it is natural to compare their mutation content. This is often done by bulk genotyping of whole biopsies, but the chance that a mutation will be detected in bulk genotyping depends on its local frequency in the sample. When the underlying mutation count per cell is equal, homogenous biopsies will have more high-frequency mutations, and thus more detectable mutations, than heterogeneous ones. Using simulations, we show that bulk genotyping of data simulated under a neutral model of somatic evolution generates strong spurious evidence for non-neutrality, because the pattern of tissue growth systematically generates differences in biopsy heterogeneity. Any experiment which compares mutation content across bulk-genotyped biopsies may therefore suggest mutation rate or selection intensity variation even when these forces are absent. We discuss computational and experimental approaches for resolving this problem. PMID:27105344

  10. Serological Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus in Infected Patients in Zanjan Province

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolreza; Erfanmanesh, Maryam; Ghasemi, Sousan; Mohammadi, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), a public health problem, is an enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus and a member of the Hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Liver cancer, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver are the outcomes of chronic infection with HCV. HCV isolates show significant heterogeneity in genetics around the world. Therefore, determining HCV genotypes is a vital step in determining prognosis and planning therapeutic strategies. Objectives: As distribution of HCV genotypes is different in various geographical regions and HCV genotyping of patients has not been investigated in Zanjan City, this study was designed for the first time, to determine HCV genotypes in the region and to promote the impact of the treatment. Materials and Methods: Serum samples of 136 patients were collected and analyzed for anti-HCV antibodies using ELISA (The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. Then, positive samples were exposed to RT-PCR, which was performed under standard condition. Afterwards, they investigated for genotyping using allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), and HCV genotype 2.0 line probe assay (LiPA). Results: Samples indicated 216 bp bands on 2% agarose gel. Analyses of the results demonstrated that the most dominant subtype was 3a with frequency of 38.26% in Zanjan Province followed by subtypes of 1b, 1a, 2, and 4 with frequencies of 25.73%, 22.05%, 5.14%, and 4.41%, respectively. The frequency of unknown HCV genotypes was 4.41%. Conclusions: According to the results, it was found that HCV high prevalent genotype in Zanjan is subtype 3a. Analysis of the results provides identification of certain HCV genotypes, and these valuable findings could affect the type and duration of the treatment. PMID:25368655

  11. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  12. Effects of challenge with a virulent genotype II strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on piglets vaccinated with an attenuated genotype I strain vaccine.

    PubMed

    Roca, M; Gimeno, M; Bruguera, S; Segalés, J; Díaz, I; Galindo-Cardiel, I J; Martínez, E; Darwich, L; Fang, Y; Maldonado, J; March, R; Mateu, E

    2012-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is endemic in most parts of Asia, where genotype I and II strains of diverse virulence may coexist. This study evaluated the outcome of infection with a highly virulent Asian genotype II PRRSV isolate in piglets vaccinated with a genotype I vaccine. Twenty-one 3-week-old piglets were divided in three groups: Pigs in group V (n=8) were vaccinated with an attenuated genotype I commercial PRRSV vaccine, while pigs in group U (n=8) and a control group (group C; n=5) were unvaccinated; 6 weeks later, pigs in groups V and U were challenged intranasally with a highly virulent strain of genotype II PRRSV (1×10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious doses/mL), while pigs in group C received a placebo. Over a period of 21 days after challenge, vaccinated pigs had significantly lower mortality (0/8 versus 2/8), fewer days of fever, a lower frequency of catarrhal bronchopneumonia, higher weight gains (13.4 versus 6.6 kg) and lower levels of viraemia compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. Immunisation with a genotype I attenuated PRRSV vaccine provided partial protection against challenge with a highly virulent genotype II strain. PMID:22264642

  13. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in north eastern Algeria: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rouabhia, Samir; Sadelaoud, Mourad; Chaabna-Mokrane, Karima; Toumi, Wided; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of various hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes present in patients from north eastern Algeria. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 435 HCV infected patients from northeast Algeria, detected in the Sadelaoud laboratory and diagnosed between January 2010 and December 2012. The patients were diagnosed with HCV infection in their local hospitals and referred to be assessed for HCV genotype before the antiviral treatment. Demographic information (sex, age and address), genotype, subtype and viral load were retrieved from the patient medical records. The serum samples were tested by the type-specific genotyping assay. RESULTS: The majority of the patients (82.5%) were from the central part of the examined region (P = 0.002). The mean age of the patients studied was 53.6 ± 11.5 years. HCV genotype 1 was the most frequent (88.7%), followed by genotypes 2 (8.5%), 4 (1.1%), 3 (0.9%) and 5 (0.2%). Genotype 6 was not detected in these patients. Mixed infection across the HCV subtypes was detected in twenty patients (4.6%). The genotype distribution was related to age and region. Genotype 1 was significantly less frequent in the ≥ 60 age group than in the younger age group (OR = 0.2; 95%CI: 0.1-0.5, P < 0.001). Furthermore, genotype 1 was more frequent in the central part of the examined region than elsewhere (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The HCV genotype (type 1b was dominant) distribution in Algeria is different from those in other northern countries of Africa. PMID:23898373

  14. Incident Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Distribution and Multiple Infection in Australian Prisons.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melanie R; Li, Hui; Teutsch, Suzy; Betz-Stablein, Brigid; Luciani, Fabio; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a highly diverse pathogen that is classified into seven distinct genotypes. Simultaneous or sequential reinfection with multiple HCV genotypes is recognized in high-risk populations, such as injecting drug users (IDUs). Multiple infection is of clinical concern as different genotypes have various sensitivities to current antiviral therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the frequency of multiple infection and of the genotypes currently being transmitted is clinically relevant. An Australian cohort of IDUs (n = 123), identified with primary incident infection, was followed for multiple infection by regular HCV RNA testing between 2005 and 2013. A total of 354 samples were tested. Sequencing of primary incident infections revealed that genotype 3a was the most common circulating genotype, followed by genotype 1a. Examination of longitudinally collected samples identified complex patterns of multiple infection, including reinfection and superinfection. In those with multiple infection, there was no apparent evidence of homotypic immunity conferring protection against reinfection of the same subtype. This study revealed frequent multiple infection in a high-risk prisoner cohort, illustrating the complex nature of HCV infection and reinfection and highlighting the need for pan-genotypic antiviral therapies. PMID:27170021

  15. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability. PMID:27525915

  16. Potential antioxidant response to coffee - A matter of genotype?

    PubMed

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M; Smith, Robert A; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R; Marko, Doris

    2014-12-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the - 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the - 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential. PMID:25606436

  17. Potential antioxidant response to coffee — A matter of genotype?

    PubMed Central

    Hassmann, Ute; Haupt, Larisa M.; Smith, Robert A.; Winkler, Swantje; Bytof, Gerhard; Lantz, Ingo; Griffiths, Lyn R.; Marko, Doris

    2014-01-01

    In a human intervention study, coffee combining natural green coffee bean constituents and dark roast products was identified as a genotype-dependent inducer of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, significantly affecting Nrf2 gene expression and downstream GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription. The observed transcriptional changes correlated with the presence of specific Nrf2 genotypes suggesting their influence on both Nrf2 and subsequent ARE-dependent GST1A1 and UGT1A1 transcription. While the presence of the − 653 SNP seems to be advantageous, resulting in higher Nrf2, GST1A1 and UGT1A1 gene transcription following coffee consumption, in contrast, the presence of the − 651 SNP significantly down-regulated the response to the study coffee. Furthermore, the presence of the B/B genotype in GST1A1 along with the frequency of the [TA]6/6 and [TA]7/7 polymorphisms in UGT1A1 appeared to significantly increase sensitivity toward coffee-induced gene transcription. This data suggests that when examining the role of the Nrf2/ARE pathway in the regulation of antioxidative and chemopreventive phase II efficacy, individual genotypes should be included when considering the potency of bioactive food/food constituents and their therapeutic potential. PMID:25606436

  18. Current software for genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Nothnagel, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Genotype imputation for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been shown to be a powerful means to include genetic markers in exploratory genetic association studies without having to genotype them, and is becoming a standard procedure. A number of different software programs are available. In our experience, user-friendliness is often the deciding factor in the choice of software to solve a particular task. We therefore evaluated the usability of three publicly available imputation programs: BEAGLE, IMPUTE and MACH. We found all three programs to perform well with HapMap reference data, with little effort needed for data preparation and subsequent association analysis. Each of them has different strengths and weaknesses, however, and none is optimal for all situations. PMID:19706367

  19. Dual daclatasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of genotype 3 chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Traditionally, therapy has been focused on pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin, with clinical trials demonstrating that HCV genotype 1 had the lowest response rate (40-50%), while genotype 3 had an intermediate response rate (60-70%). Recently, significant advances have been made with all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, which have significantly improved cure rates for HCV genotype 1. Accordingly, HCV genotype 3 is now potentially the most difficult to treat. One of the most potent DAA medications is sofosbuvir, a pan-genotypic nucleotide analogue that inhibits the NS5B polymerase of HCV. Daclatasvir, a pan-genotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex, was recently approved in the United States for treatment of HCV genotype 3 in conjunction with sofosbuvir. This combination may provide a powerful tool in the treatment of HCV genotype 3. PMID:26560449

  20. Ryan XV-5A model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The duct-fan method of propulsion which would enable aircraft to take off helicopter-like was tested with models like this one, the Ryan XV- 5A, which was built and flown at NASA Ames. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 84) and Crafting Flight (page106), by James Schultz.

  1. Differences in CYP2C9 Genotype and Enzyme Activity Between Swedes and Koreans of Relevance for Personalized Medicine: Role of Ethnicity, Genotype, Smoking, Age, and Sex.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Fazleen H M; Lundblad, Mia; Ramsjo, Margareta; Kang, Ju-Hee; Roh, Hyung-Keun; Bertilsson, Leif; Eliasson, Erik; Aklillu, Eleni

    2015-06-01

    Global personalized medicine demands the characterization of person-to-person and between-population differences in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. CYP2C9 pharmacokinetic pathway is subject to modulation by both genetic and environmental factors. CYP2C9 genotype-based dose recommendations (e.g., for warfarin) is advocated. However, the overall contribution of genotype for variation in enzyme activity may differ between populations. We evaluated the importance of ethnicity, genotype, smoking, body weight, age, and sex for CYP2C9 enzyme activity. CYP2C9 genotype and phenotype was determined in 148 Swedes and 146 Koreans using losartan as a probe. CYP2C9 enzyme activity was assessed using urinary losartan/metabolite E-3174 ratio. The frequency of CYP2C9 defective variant alleles (*2 and *3) was significantly higher in Swedes (10.8% and 12.5%) than in Koreans (0% and 5.8%). In matched genotypes, CYP2C9 enzyme activity was significantly lower in Swedes compared to Koreans (p<0.0001). In a univariate analysis, age, weight, ethnicity, genotype, and smoking were significant predictors of CYP2C9 phenotype. A stepwise multivariate analysis indicated ethnicity, genotype, and smoking remained as significant predictors of CYP2C9 enzyme activity, accounting for 50% of the total variance. In both study populations, CYP2C9 genotype was a significant predictor of CYP2C9 enzyme activity, but its contribution in explaining the total variance was lower in Koreans (26.6%) than Swedes (40%). In conclusion, we report significantly lower CYP2C9 enzyme activity in Swedes compared to Koreans, partly but not exclusively due to CYP2C9 pharmacogenetic variations. Ethnicity and environment factors need to be considered together with genotype for population-specific dose optimization and global personalized medicine. PMID:25977991

  2. Is cytochrome P450 2C9 genotype associated with NSAID gastric ulceration?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer H; Begg, Evan J; Kennedy, Martin A; Roberts, Rebecca; Barclay, Murray L

    2001-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to explore whether genetic variation of cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) contributes to NSAID-associated gastric ulceration. The hypothesis tested was that CYP2C9 poor metabolizer genotype would predict higher risk of gastric ulceration in patients on NSAIDs that are metabolized by CYP2C9, due to higher plasma NSAID concentrations. Methods Peripheral blood DNA samples from 23 people with a history of gastric ulceration attributed to NSAIDs metabolized by CYP2C9, and from 32 people on NSAIDs without gastropathy, were analysed to determine CYP2C9 genotype. Results The following genotypes were found: *1/*1 (wild type) in 70% of cases and 58% of controls, *1/*2 in 17% of cases and 29% of controls, *1/*3 in 13% of cases and 13% of controls. The difference between case and control nonwild-type genotype frequency was 11.5% (95% CI −14,37%), with the direction of the difference being against the hypothesis. No individuals with homozygote poor metaboliser genotype were identified. The differences in genotype frequencies between the two groups were not significant and the frequencies were similar to those in a large published population study. Ninety-five percent binomial confidence interval analysis confirms that there is no apparent clinically significant relationship between CYP2C9 genotype and risk of gastric ulceration although a small difference in risk in poor metabolizers cannot be excluded. Conclusions These results do not support the hypothesis that gastric ulceration resulting from NSAID usage is linked to the poor metabolizing genotypes of CYP2C9. PMID:11422024

  3. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  4. LinkImpute: Fast and Accurate Genotype Imputation for Nonmodel Organisms.

    PubMed

    Money, Daniel; Gardner, Kyle; Migicovsky, Zoë; Schwaninger, Heidi; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Myles, Sean

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining genome-wide genotype data from a set of individuals is the first step in many genomic studies, including genome-wide association and genomic selection. All genotyping methods suffer from some level of missing data, and genotype imputation can be used to fill in the missing data and improve the power of downstream analyses. Model organisms like human and cattle benefit from high-quality reference genomes and panels of reference genotypes that aid in imputation accuracy. In nonmodel organisms, however, genetic and physical maps often are either of poor quality or are completely absent, and there are no panels of reference genotypes available. There is therefore a need for imputation methods designed specifically for nonmodel organisms in which genomic resources are poorly developed and marker order is unreliable or unknown. Here we introduce LinkImpute, a software package based on a k-nearest neighbor genotype imputation method, LD-kNNi, which is designed for unordered markers. No physical or genetic maps are required, and it is designed to work on unphased genotype data from heterozygous species. It exploits the fact that markers useful for imputation often are not physically close to the missing genotype but rather distributed throughout the genome. Using genotyping-by-sequencing data from diverse and heterozygous accessions of apples, grapes, and maize, we compare LD-kNNi with several genotype imputation methods and show that LD-kNNi is fast, comparable in accuracy to the best-existing methods, and exhibits the least bias in allele frequency estimates. PMID:26377960

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Diversity among Intravenous Drug Users in Yunnan Province, Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenlong; Feng, Ruilin; Wu, Zhongxiang; Cun, Wei; Dong, Shaozhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, high proportions (15.6%–98.7%) of intravenous drug users (IDUs) in China were found to be positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Yunnan Province is located in southwestern China and borders one of the world's most important opium-producing regions, thus it is an important drug trafficking route to other regions of China. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we assessed 100 HCV-positive plasma samples from IDUs who were enrolled through the Kunming Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2012. HCV C/E1 fragments were PCR-amplified and sequenced. We identified eight HCV subtypes (1a, 1b, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6n, 6u and 6v), of which genotype 6 was most predominant (frequency, 47%) followed by genotypes 3 (41%) and 1 (12%). HCV subtypes 6n (30%) and 3b (29%) were most common and were identified in 59% of the IDUs. We compared HCV genotypes among IDUs in Yunnan Province with those from other regions and found that the distribution patterns of HCV genotypes in Yunnan Province were similar to those in southern China, but different from those in eastern China. However, the distribution patterns of HCV subtypes varied among Yunnan Province and southern China, despite the shared similar genotypes. A comparison of the current data with those previously reported showed that the frequency of HCV genotype 6 increased from 25% to 47% within 5 years, especially subtypes 6a (5% to 15%) and 6n (11.2% to 30%). In contrast, the frequencies of subtypes 3b and 1b decreased by almost 50% within 5 years. Conclusion/Significance Our results provided further information to support the assertion that drug trafficking routes influence HCV transmission patterns among IDUs in Yunnan Province. The frequency of HCV genotypes and subtypes changed rapidly among IDUs in Yunnan Province and subtypes 6a and 6n may have originated in Vietnam and Myanmar, respectively. PMID:24358211

  6. Prevalence of HCV genotypes in district Mardan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 170 million people are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide. The prevalence of chronic HCV infections in Pakistan is about 5%, with most individuals being infected with HCV genotype 3a. Data on HCV genotypes distribution across various districts of the country are scarce. One example is district Mardan from where such data is available only from 17 individuals. Accordingly, the present study aimed at determining HCV genotypes distribution among 177 HCV RNA positive individuals from district Mardan. Findings Serum samples (n = 215) from patients suspected of hepatitis C were collected and processed for Nested PCR based detection and subsequent genotyping. Gender-wise and age-wise differences in HCV prevalence and HCV genotypes distribution were determined by χ2 test. Out of the total 215 serum samples, 177 were found to be positive for HCV RNA. The genotype 3a was the most predominant genotype among HCV RNA positive samples with a prevalence of 90.3%, followed by genotype 1a (5.6%), mixed genotypes (2.8%), genotype 3b (0.6%) and genotype 4 (0.6%). The HCV prevalence was higher in young individuals than old people and was indicative of reduced survival rate beyond 40 years. Conclusion HCV genotype 3a is the most predominant genotype in district Mardan. The state of the art preventive and therapeutic strategies should be implemented to control the spread of HCV infections. Further temporal studies involving different geographical areas of Pakistan, are required to improve the control measures for HCV infection. PMID:23514695

  7. [Genotypic specificity of schizophrenic psychoses].

    PubMed

    Shakhmatova-Pavlova, I V; Gindilis, V M; Rokhlina, M L; Kozlova, I A

    1980-01-01

    A total of 610 probands with a disease manifestation in childhood, middle and old age and their families were examined by the clinico-genealogical method. The results allowed conclusions that (1) there is an undoubted genetic relationship between schizophrenia of childhood, middle and old age; and that (2) among the closest relatives in families of the probands there is no significant (in comparison to the general population) accumulation of non-schizophrenic pathology. The latter indicates a high genotypic specificity of schizophrenia. PMID:7415694

  8. Haemoglobin polymorphism in Gadus morhua: Genotypic differences in maturing age and within-season gonad maturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mork, J.; Giskeödegård, R.; Sundnes, G.

    1983-09-01

    276 specimens of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua L.) were caught during spawning in a restricted area of the Trondheimsfjord, Norway, in April and May 1979. Genotypes at the polymorphic haemoglobin locus Hbl differed significantly with respect to mean age at maturation (in males) and mean gonadic development stage (in females). There was no indication of population mixing in the genotypic composition at Hbl or at any of the 4 polymorphic tissue enzyme loci investigated ( LDH-3, IDH-1, PGM, and PGI-1. The findings obtained were considered with regard to temperature-related differences in the functional properties of Hbl molecules, and genotypic differences in growth, age at maturation, and fishing mortality. At the present stage of investigation, the natural selection pattern seems directional and strong. However, the Hbl allele frequencies observed in cod from the examined areas reveal no detectable changes over a period of two decades (˜ 4 generations). The current pattern of commercial exploitation causes, through size selection, a modification of the rate of erosion of the inferior allele, but additional factors must be in force, which play a role in its current abundance in an evolutionary perspective. The observed Hbl genotypic differences in the exact within-season time for spawning might be one such factor. A potential sexual difference in genotypic fitness might be another, but this has yet to be confirmed. The apparent existence of considerable natural and artificial selection forces acting upon cod haemoglobin genotypes makes Hbl allele frequencies unreliable for use in population structure analyses.

  9. Host-parasite Red Queen dynamics with phase-locked rare genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rabajante, Jomar F.; Tubay, Jerrold M.; Ito, Hiromu; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Morita, Satoru; Yoshimura, Jin; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between hosts and parasites have been hypothesized to cause winnerless coevolution, called Red Queen dynamics. The canonical Red Queen dynamics assume that all interacting genotypes of hosts and parasites undergo cyclic changes in abundance through negative frequency-dependent selection, which means that any genotype could become frequent at some stage. However, this prediction cannot explain why many rare genotypes stay rare in natural host-parasite systems. To investigate this, we build a mathematical model involving multihost and multiparasite genotypes. In a deterministic and controlled environment, Red Queen dynamics occur between two genotypes undergoing cyclic dominance changes, whereas the rest of the genotypes remain subordinate for long periods of time in phase-locked synchronized dynamics with low amplitude. However, introduction of stochastic noise in the model might allow the subordinate cyclic host and parasite types to replace dominant cyclic types as new players in the Red Queen dynamics. The factors that influence such evolutionary switching are interhost competition, specificity of parasitism, and degree of stochastic noise. Our model can explain, for the first time, the persistence of rare, hardly cycling genotypes in populations (for example, marine microbial communities) undergoing host-parasite coevolution. PMID:26973878

  10. Host-parasite Red Queen dynamics with phase-locked rare genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rabajante, Jomar F; Tubay, Jerrold M; Ito, Hiromu; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Morita, Satoru; Yoshimura, Jin; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between hosts and parasites have been hypothesized to cause winnerless coevolution, called Red Queen dynamics. The canonical Red Queen dynamics assume that all interacting genotypes of hosts and parasites undergo cyclic changes in abundance through negative frequency-dependent selection, which means that any genotype could become frequent at some stage. However, this prediction cannot explain why many rare genotypes stay rare in natural host-parasite systems. To investigate this, we build a mathematical model involving multihost and multiparasite genotypes. In a deterministic and controlled environment, Red Queen dynamics occur between two genotypes undergoing cyclic dominance changes, whereas the rest of the genotypes remain subordinate for long periods of time in phase-locked synchronized dynamics with low amplitude. However, introduction of stochastic noise in the model might allow the subordinate cyclic host and parasite types to replace dominant cyclic types as new players in the Red Queen dynamics. The factors that influence such evolutionary switching are interhost competition, specificity of parasitism, and degree of stochastic noise. Our model can explain, for the first time, the persistence of rare, hardly cycling genotypes in populations (for example, marine microbial communities) undergoing host-parasite coevolution. PMID:26973878

  11. Rotavirus Genotypes in Belarus, 2008–2012

    PubMed Central

    Semeiko, Galina; Yermalovich, Marina; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R.; Bowen, Michael D.; Samoilovich, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008–2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008–2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country. PMID:25218086

  12. Prion genotypes of scrapie-infected Canadian sheep 1998–2008

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Noel P.; O’Rourke, Katherine I.; Feng, Yuqin; Rendulich, Jasmine; DiFruscio, Cathleen; Balachandran, Aru

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the genetics of the prion protein gene (PRNP) at codons 136, 154, and 171 for sheep diagnosed with naturally acquired classical scrapie in Canada between 1998 and 2008. Genotyping analysis was performed on 249 sheep with confirmed classical scrapie infection representing 98 flocks from 6 provinces. A further case-control analysis of 3 of these flocks compared the genotypes between infected sheep (n = 72) and those of their healthy flockmates (n = 1990). The incidence of classical scrapie in the Canadian sheep population was highly associated with the ARQ haplotype (91.8%) and the ARQ/ARQ genotype (91.6%). In addition, the ARQ haplotype was found at significantly higher frequency in scrapie-infected sheep when compared with their healthy flockmates. Comparison with other published data suggests that the scrapie risk of PRNP genotypes differs between Canada and countries where the VRQ allele is associated with the highest susceptibility to infection. PMID:20885849

  13. Genotyping of Canine parvovirus in western Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Páez-Magallan, Varinia; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin; De Cervantes-Mireles, Raúl Leonel; López-Amezcua, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is one of the most common infectious agents related to high morbidity rates in dogs. In addition, the virus is associated with severe gastroenteritis, diarrhea, and vomiting, resulting in high death rates, especially in puppies and nonvaccinated dogs. To date, there are 3 variants of the virus (CPV-2a, CPV-2b, and CPV-2c) circulating worldwide. In Mexico, reports describing the viral variants circulating in dog populations are lacking. In response to this deficiency, a total of 41 fecal samples of suspected dogs were collected from October 2013 through April 2014 in the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Guadalajara in western Mexico. From these, 24 samples resulted positive by polymerase chain reaction, and the viral variant was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Five positive diagnosed samples were selected for partial sequencing of the vp2 gene and codon analysis. The results demonstrated that the current dominant viral variant in Mexico is CPV-2c. The current study describes the genotyping of CPV strains, providing valuable evidence of the dominant frequency of this virus in a dog population from western Mexico. PMID:25525144

  14. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-21

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  15. Hepatitis B virus: the genotype E puzzle.

    PubMed

    Andernach, Iris E; Hübschen, Judith M; Muller, Claude P

    2009-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is highly endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. One of the two genotypes A and E dominates in most countries. With several subgenotypes and variants, genotype A is more diverse in Africa (4.00%) than in the rest of the world (2.96%), suggesting an African origin and a long history on the continent. Despite the African slave trade, genotype E has only sporadically been found within the Americas, indicating that this genotype was introduced only during the past 200 years into the general African population. A short history for this genotype in Africa is also supported by its conspicuously low genetic diversity (1.75%), which contrasts, however, with its excessively high HBsAg prevalence and its extensive spread throughout the vast West-African genotype E crescent. We discuss the spread and routes of transmission of genotype E and suggest that the distribution and current high prevalence levels of HBV (genotype E) in Africa are the result of the extensive use of unsafe needles, potentially solving the current African genotype E puzzle and shedding new light on the high HBV prevalence in Africa. PMID:19475565

  16. Additional novel Cryptosporidium genotypes in ornamental fishes.

    PubMed

    Morine, M; Yang, R; Ng, J; Kueh, S; Lymbery, A J; Ryan, U M

    2012-12-21

    Current knowledge on the prevalence and genotypes of Cryptosporidium in fishes is still limited. This study investigated the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in 171 ornamental fishes, belonging to 33 species, collected from 8 commercial aquariums around Perth, Western Australia. All samples were screened by nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA locus. A total of 6 positives were identified by PCR at the 18S locus from 4 different species of fishes (red eye tetra, Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae; gold gourami, Trichogaster trichopterus; neon tetra, Paracheirodon innesi; goldfish, Carassius auratus auratus), giving an overall prevalence of 3.5% (6/171). Four different genotypes were identified, only one of which has been previously reported in fish; piscine genotype 4 in a neon tetra isolate, a rat genotype III-like isolate in a goldfish, a novel genotype in three isolates from red eye (piscine genotype 7) which exhibited a 3.5% genetic distance from piscine genotype 1 and a piscine genotype 6-like from a gold gourami (1% genetic distance). Further biological and genetic characterisation is required to determine the relationship of these genotypes to established species and strains of Cryptosporidium. PMID:22819587

  17. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  18. KIR Genotypic Diversity Can Track Ancestries in Heterogeneous Populations: A Potential Confounder for Disease Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Komal Manpreet; Phung, Yume T.; Kohla, Mohamed S.; Lan, Billy Y-A; Chan, Sharon; Suen, Diana L.; Murad, Sahar; Rheault, Shana; Davidson, Peter; Evans, Jennifer; Singh, Manpreet; Dohil, Sofie; Osorio, Robert W.; Wakil, Adil E.; Page, Kimberly; Feng, Sandy; Cooper, Stewart L.

    2014-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are encoded by highly polymorphic genes that regulate the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and other lymphocyte subsets, and likely play key roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Association studies increasingly implicate KIR in disease predisposition and outcome but could be confounded by unknown KIR genetic structure in heterogeneous populations. To examine this we characterized the diversity of 16 KIR genes in 712 Northern Californians (NC) stratified by selfassigned ethnicities, and compared the profiles of KIR polymorphism with other US and global populations using a reference database. Sixty-eight distinct KIR genotypes were characterized: 58 in 457 Caucasians (NCC); 17 in 47 African Americans (NCAA); 21 in 80 Asians (NCA); 20 in 74 Hispanics (NCH) and 18 in 54 “other” ethnicities (NCO). KIR genotype patterns and frequencies in the 4 defined ethnicities were compared with each other and with 34 global populations by phylogenetic analysis. Although there were no population-specific genotypes, the KIR genotype frequency patterns faithfully traced the ancestry of NCC, NCAA and NCA but not of NCH whose ancestries are known to be more heterogeneous. KIR genotype frequencies can therefore track ethnic ancestries in modern urban populations. Our data emphasize the importance of selecting ethnically matched controls in KIR based studies to avert spurious associations. PMID:21898189

  19. Evaluation of the Abbott Real Time HCV genotype II assay for Hepatitis C virus genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Berk, Elife; Gokahmetoglu, Selma; Ercal, Baris Derya; Celik, Ilhami

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The determination of HCV genotypes and subtypes is very important for the selection of antiviral therapy and epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay in HCV genotyping of HCV infected patients in Kayseri, Turkey. Methods: One hundred patients with chronic hepatitis C admitted to our hospital were evaluated between June 2012 and December 2012, HCV RNA levels were determined by the COBAS® AmpliPrep/COBAS® TaqMan® 48 HCV test. HCV genotyping was investigated by the Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay. With the exception of genotype 1, subtypes of HCV genotypes could not be determined by Abbott assay. Sequencing analysis was used as the reference method. Results: Genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 were observed in 70, 4, 2 and 24 of the 100 patients, respectively, by two methods. The concordance between the two systems to determine HCV major genotypes was 100%. Of 70 patients with genotype 1, 66 showed infection with subtype 1b and 4 with subtype 1a by Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay. Using sequence analysis, 61 showed infection with subtype 1b and 9 with subtype 1a. In determining of HCV genotype 1 subtypes, the difference between the two methods was not statistically significant (P>0.05). HCV genotype 4 and 3 samples were found to be subtype 4d and 3a, respectively, by sequence analysis. There were four patients with genotype 2. Sequence analysis revealed that two of these patients had type 2a and the other two had type 2b. Conclusion: The Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay yielded results consistent with sequence analysis. However, further optimization of the Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay for subtype identification of HCV is required. PMID:26649001

  20. The potential effect of metallothionein 2A - 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism on blood cadmium, lead, zinc and copper levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kayaalti, Zeliha Aliyev, Vugar; Soeylemezoglu, Tuelin

    2011-10-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, metal-binding proteins. Because of their rich thiol groups, MTs bind to the biologically essential metals and perform these metals' homeostatic regulations; absorb the heavy metals and assist with their transportation and extraction. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the metallothionein 2A (MT2A) core promoter region - 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu levels in the blood samples. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the standard polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique using the 616 blood samples and the genotype frequencies were found as 86.6% homozygote typical (AA), 12.8% heterozygote (AG) and 0.6% homozygote atypical (GG). Metal levels were analyzed by dual atomic absorption spectrophotometer system and the average levels of Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu in the blood samples were 1.69 {+-} 1.57 ppb, 30.62 {+-} 14.13 ppb, 0.98 {+-} 0.49 ppm and 1.04 {+-} 0.45 ppm, respectively. As a result; highly statistically significant associations were detected between the - 5 A/G core promoter region SNP in the MT2A gene and Cd, Pb and Zn levels (p = 0.004, p = 0.012 and p = 0.002, respectively), but no association was found with Cu level (p = 0.595). Individuals with the GG genotype had statistically lower Zn level and higher Cd and Pb levels in the blood samples than individuals with AA and AG genotypes. This study suggests that having the GG genotype individuals may be more sensitive for the metal toxicity and they should be more careful about protecting their health against the toxic effects of the heavy metals. - Highlights: > MT2A -5A/G SNP has strong effect on the Cd, Pb and Zn levels in the blood. > MT2A GG individuals should be more careful for their health against metal toxicity. > This SNP might be considered as a biomarker for risk of disease related to metals.

  1. Genotyping for cytochrome P450 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ann K; King, Barry P; Leathart, Julian B S

    2006-01-01

    Protocols for the extraction of DNA from human blood and for genotyping for a number of common cytochrome P450 polymorphisms using either polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism or PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis are described. Rapid high-throughput techniques are also available for analyses of this type, but they require access to specialized equipment and are not considered here. General guidelines for performing amplification using PCR are described together with electrophoresis protocols for analysis of restriction digests of PCR products with agarose and polyacrylamide gels including the use of polyacrylamide-based gels for SSCP analysis. Protocols for the following specific isoforms and alleles are also provided: CYP1A1 (*2B and *4 alleles), CYP2C8 (*3 and *4 alleles), CYP2C9 (*2, *3, and *11 alleles), CYP2C19 (*2 and *3 alleles), CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *5, and *6 alleles), CYP2E1 (*5A, *5B, and *6 alleles), and CYP3A5 (*3 allele). PMID:16719392

  2. Genetic Variation of Capsid Protein VP7 in Genotype G4 Human Rotavirus Strains: Simultaneous Emergence and Spread of Different Lineages in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Karin; Matson, David O.; Gomez, Jorge A.

    2002-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most-common cause of severe diarrhea in young children. Complete rotavirus characterization includes determination of the antigenic type of the two outer capsid proteins, VP7 and VP4, designated G and P types, respectively. During a nationwide rotavirus surveillance study, genotype G4 frequency increased during the second year. To evaluate further the mechanism of emergence and the relationship among G4 strains, the genetic diversity of VP7 capsid protein in these samples was studied in detail. Overall nucleotide sequence divergence ranged from less than 0.1 to 19.5%, a higher divergence than that observed for other rotavirus G types (0.1 to 9%). Sequences were classified into two major lineages (designated I and II) based on their nucleotide distances. The most heterogeneous lineage was further subdivided into four sublineages (designated Ia to Id). Most Argentine sequences were of sublineages Ib and Ic, which were confirmed to be independent sequence clusters by parsimony analysis. This study describes different lineages and sublineages within G4 strains and shows that Argentine strains are distantly related to reference strain ST3. The appearance of at least two G4 genotype (sub)lineages during 1998 demonstrates that the increased frequency of these strains was due to the synchronized emergence of different groups of strains. PMID:12037057

  3. Smarter clustering methods for SNP genotype calling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Tseng, George C.; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Bean, Lora J. H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Most genotyping technologies for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers use standard clustering methods to ‘call’ the SNP genotypes. These methods are not always optimal in distinguishing the genotype clusters of a SNP because they do not take advantage of specific features of the genotype calling problem. In particular, when family data are available, pedigree information is ignored. Furthermore, prior information about the distribution of the measurements for each cluster can be used to choose an appropriate model-based clustering method and can significantly improve the genotype calls. One special genotyping problem that has never been discussed in the literature is that of genotyping of trisomic individuals, such as individuals with Down syndrome. Calling trisomic genotypes is a more complicated problem, and the addition of external information becomes very important. Results: In this article, we discuss the impact of incorporating external information into clustering algorithms to call the genotypes for both disomic and trisomic data. We also propose two new methods to call genotypes using family data. One is a modification of the K-means method and uses the pedigree information by updating all members of a family together. The other is a likelihood-based method that combines the Gaussian or beta-mixture model with pedigree information. We compare the performance of these two methods and some other existing methods using simulation studies. We also compare the performance of these methods on a real dataset generated by the Illumina platform (www.illumina.com). Availability: The R code for the family-based genotype calling methods (SNPCaller) is available to be downloaded from the following website: http://watson.hgen.pitt.edu/register. Contact: liny@upmc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18826959

  4. Allozyme genotype in mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, during mercury exposure: Temporal stability, concentration effects and field verification

    SciTech Connect

    Heagler, M.G. Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, New Brunswick )

    1993-02-01

    Genotype frequencies at nine enzyme loci were examined in a population of mosquito fish, Gambusia holbrooki, during acute inorganic mercury exposure at three concentration. Genotype at one locus, glucose phosphate isomerase-2 (Gpi-2), was correlated with time to death (TTD) at the low mercury concentration, but genotypes at none of the nine loci were related to TTD at the medium or the high mercury concentration. A survey of mosquitofish from a mercury-contaminated canal was undertaken to determine if the results of laboratory exposures could be used to predict accurately the genetic profile of mercury-contaminated field populations. Mosquitofish collected from the contaminated canal had a significantly lower frequency of the Gpi-2[sup 38] allele than mosquitofish collected from the adjacent noncontaminated river. The Gpi-2 allozymes may be useful as an indicator of pollutant stress if used in conjunction with a thorough understanding of the structure and history of the population.

  5. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25373754

  6. minimac2: faster genotype imputation

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hinds, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Genotype imputation is a key step in the analysis of genome-wide association studies. Upcoming very large reference panels, such as those from The 1000 Genomes Project and the Haplotype Consortium, will improve imputation quality of rare and less common variants, but will also increase the computational burden. Here, we demonstrate how the application of software engineering techniques can help to keep imputation broadly accessible. Overall, these improvements speed up imputation by an order of magnitude compared with our previous implementation. Availability and implementation: minimac2, including source code, documentation, and examples is available at http://genome.sph.umich.edu/wiki/Minimac2 Contact: cfuchsb@umich.edu, goncalo@umich.edu PMID:25338720

  7. Estimating Genotype- and Environment-Specific Heritabilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advantages of computing genotype- and environment-specific heritabilities are discussed. A statistical approach is used in which logvariances of both genotype by environment interaction and error are modeled as random variables. Resulting estimators of variances are weighted averages of a pool...

  8. Filling in missing genotypes using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unknown genotypes can be made known (imputed) from observed genotypes at the same or nearby loci of relatives using pedigree haplotyping, or from matching allele patterns (regardless of pedigree) using population haplotyping. Fortran program findhap.f90 was designed to combine population and pedigre...

  9. Using genotypic information to reduce disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this presentation is to provide a cursory overview of how genotypic data may be utilized by veterinarians in the future. Genotypic information is accumulating at a rapid pace. This information may reveal deleterious genes, quantitative trait loci, and genetic predisposition for a ...

  10. Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotype imputation efficiency in Nelore cattle was evaluated in different scenarios of lower density (LD) chips, imputation methods and sets of animals to have their genotypes imputed. Twelve commercial and virtual custom LD chips with densities varying from 7K to 75K SNPs were tested. Customized L...

  11. Genomic evaluations with many more genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Genomic evaluations have quickly become more reliable over the last two years in many countries as more animals were genotyped for 50,000 markers. Evaluations can also include animals genotyped with more or fewer markers using new tools such as 777,000 or 2,900 marker chips recently intr...

  12. Genotyping analysis of 3 RET polymorphisms demonstrates low somatic mutation rate in Chinese Hirschsprung disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Qian; Li, Qi; Cheng, Wei; Qiao, Guoliang; Xiao, Ping; Gan, Liang; Su, Lin; Miao, Chunyue; Li, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic mosaicism has been reported for both coding and non-coding sequences in the RET gene in Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) patients. This study aimed to investigate somatic mutation rate in Chinese population by comparing both homozygous genotype percentage and risk allele frequency of 3 RET single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among blood and colon samples. Methods: DNA was extracted from 59 HSCR blood samples, 59 control blood samples and 76 fresh frozen colon tissue samples (grouped into ganglionic, transitional and aganglionic level). Genotype status of rs2435357 and rs2506030 was examined by competitive allele specific hydrolysis probes (Taqman) PCR technology, and rs2506004 was examined by Sanger sequencing. Homozygous genotype percentage and risk allele frequency were calculated for each type of sample and compared by chi-square test. P<0.05 was regarded as being statistically significant. Results: Colon tissue DNA samples showed similar frequency of SNPs as that of the blood DNA samples in HSCR patients, both of which are significantly higher than the control blood group (rs2435357 TT genotype: 71.2%, 74.7% versus 22.0% in HSCR blood, HSCR colon and control blood DNA respectively, P=0.000; rs2506004 AA genotype: 72.4%, 83.1% versus 25.5%, P=0.000; rs2506030 GG genotype: 79.7%, 77.2% versus 54.2%, P=0.000 and 0.004). With respect to DNA extracted from ganglionic, transitional and aganglionic levels, no statistically significant difference was demonstrated in those 3 regions (rs2435357: P=0.897; rs2506004: P=0.740; rs2506030: P=0.901). Conclusion: Our data does not support the notion that high frequency of somatic changes as an underlying etiology of Chinese HSCR population. PMID:26191260

  13. Parallel genotypic adaptation: when evolution repeats itself

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Troy E.; Burke, John M.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, parallel genotypic adaptation was considered unlikely because phenotypic differences were thought to be controlled by many genes. There is increasing evidence, however, that phenotypic variation sometimes has a simple genetic basis and that parallel adaptation at the genotypic level may be more frequent than previously believed. Here, we review evidence for parallel genotypic adaptation derived from a survey of the experimental evolution, phylogenetic, and quantitative genetic literature. The most convincing evidence of parallel genotypic adaptation comes from artificial selection experiments involving microbial populations. In some experiments, up to half of the nucleotide substitutions found in independent lineages under uniform selection are the same. Phylogenetic studies provide a means for studying parallel genotypic adaptation in non-experimental systems, but conclusive evidence may be difficult to obtain because homoplasy can arise for other reasons. Nonetheless, phylogenetic approaches have provided evidence of parallel genotypic adaptation across all taxonomic levels, not just microbes. Quantitative genetic approaches also suggest parallel genotypic evolution across both closely and distantly related taxa, but it is important to note that this approach cannot distinguish between parallel changes at homologous loci versus convergent changes at closely linked non-homologous loci. The finding that parallel genotypic adaptation appears to be frequent and occurs at all taxonomic levels has important implications for phylogenetic and evolutionary studies. With respect to phylogenetic analyses, parallel genotypic changes, if common, may result in faulty estimates of phylogenetic relationships. From an evolutionary perspective, the occurrence of parallel genotypic adaptation provides increasing support for determinism in evolution and may provide a partial explanation for how species with low levels of gene flow are held together. PMID:15881688

  14. Genotypic differences in behavioural entropy: unpredictable genotypes are composed of unpredictable individuals

    PubMed Central

    Stamps, Judy A.; Saltz, Julia B.; Krishnan, V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-genotypic variability (IGV) occurs when individuals with the same genotype, raised in the same environment and then tested under the same conditions, express different trait values. Game theoretical and bet-hedging models have suggested two ways that a single genotype might generate variable behaviour when behavioural variation is discrete rather than continuous: behavioural polyphenism (a genotype produces different types of individuals, each of which consistently expresses a different type of behaviour) or stochastic variability (a genotype produces one type of individual who randomly expresses different types of behaviour over time). We first demonstrated significant differences across 14 natural genotypes of male Drosophila melanogaster in the variability (as measured by entropy) of their microhabitat choice, in an experiment in which each fly was allowed free access to four different types of habitat. We then tested four hypotheses about ways that within-individual variability might contribute to differences across genotypes in the variability of microhabitat choice. There was no empirical support for three hypotheses (behavioural polymorphism, consistent choice, or time-based choice), nor could our results be attributed to genotypic differences in activity levels. The stochastic variability hypothesis accurately predicted the slope and the intercept of the relationship across genotypes between entropy at the individual level and entropy at the genotype level. However, our initial version of the stochastic model slightly but significantly overestimated the values of individual entropy for each genotype, pointing to specific assumptions of this model that might need to be adjusted in future studies of the IGV of microhabitat choice. This is among a handful of recent studies to document genotypic differences in behavioural IGV, and the first to explore ways that genotypic differences in within-individual variability might contribute to differences among

  15. Human papillomavirus infection and P53 codon 72 genotypes in a Hispanic population at high-risk for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Haws, Andrea L Fuessel; Woeber, Sabine; Gomez, Miroslava; Garza, Noe; Gomez, Yvonne; Rady, Peter; He, Qin; Zhang, Lifang; Grady, James J; McCormick, Joseph B; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; Tyring, Stephen K

    2005-10-01

    Cervical cancer mortality is high in Texas, especially among Hispanic women living in south Texas and adjacent Mexico. Though human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has a causal role in the development of cervical cancer, there are no published data on the prevalence of HPV genotypes in this underscreened region. We studied 398 Hispanic women on both sides of the border along the lower Rio Grande River to determine the prevalence of HPV genotypes and risk factors for cervical cancer. Using a nested PCR system HPV was detected in 62% of cervical specimens, including all the known high-risk HPV genotypes, with HPV16 and HPV18 the most frequent (30.6% and 23.0%, respectively). Multiple infections were common (29.4% of the infected specimens), and where this occurred we were more likely to find high-risk HPV genotypes. We examined host p53 codon 72 genotype frequencies and found that patients with cervical abnormalities and women with HPV16 and HPV18 infections had a lower genotype frequency of the homozygous (AA) previously reported to be associated with cervical cancer, than uninfected women with no abnormalities. In this US/Mexico border population high rates of potentially oncogenic HPV viruses and multiple infections are consistent with observed elevated cervical cancer rates. These data are further evidence that in this underserved population HPV infections are associated with high rates of malignancy, but that host p53 genotypic variations are unlikely to be primary factors in oncogenesis. PMID:16121365

  16. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato GENOTYPES IN DOMESTIC LIVESTOCK AND HUMANS IN GOLESTAN PROVINCE, IRAN.

    PubMed

    Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Tanzifi, Asal; Rostami, Sima; Rostami, Masoomeh; Fasihi Harandi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a globally parasitic zoonosis caused by larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus. This study investigated E. granulosus genotypes isolated from livestock and humans in the Golestan province, northern Iran, southeast of the Caspian sea, using partial sequencing data of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase 1 (nad1) mitochondrial genes. Seventy E. granulosus isolates were collected from animals in slaughterhouses: 18 isolates from sheep, 40 from cattle, nine from camels, two from buffaloes and one from a goat, along with four human isolates (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues) from CE patients of provincial hospitals. All isolates were successfully analysed by PCR amplification and sequencing. The sequence analysis found four E. granulosus genotypes among the 74 CE isolates: G1 (78.3%), G2 (2.7%), G3 (15%) and G6 (4%). The G1-G3 complex genotype was found in all of the sheep, goat, cattle and buffalo isolates. Among the nine camel isolates, the frequency of G1-G3 and G6 genotypes were 66.7% and 33.3%, respectively. All four human CE isolates belonged to E. granulosus sensu stricto. This study reports the first occurrence of the G2 genotype in cattle from Iran and confirms the previously reported G3 genotype in camels in the same country. PMID:27253740

  17. Association of RBP4 Genotype with Phenotypic Reproductive Traits of Sows.

    PubMed

    Marantidis, A; Laliotis, G P; Avdi, M

    2016-01-01

    PCR-RFLP was applied to a commercial crossbred pig population in order to investigate the association between polymorphism (SNP) of Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) gene and reproductive performance. 400 sows were genotyped and 2000 records of reproductive traits were used in order to retrieve information about the allele frequencies and the association of the RBP4 gene with main reproductive characteristics of the population. A deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed as a result of the AB genotype excess. In addition, the AA genotype saw statistically significant higher values of (i) the total number of born piglets (p < 0.05), (ii) the number of piglets born alive (p < 0.01), and (iii) the number of weaned piglets (p < 0.01). The number of the mummified piglets and the number of the piglets born dead did not differ between the various RBP4 genotypes. Interestingly, the AA genotype had a negative impact (p < 0.05) on the number of piglets born dead, resulting indirectly in a larger litter size. In conclusion, the AA genotype and in extension the A allele of RBP4 gene are in favor of producing larger litter size, suggesting that the RBP4 gene may be used in Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS) programs for a rapid improvement of the reproductive characteristics in pigs. PMID:26885398

  18. Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato GENOTYPES IN DOMESTIC LIVESTOCK AND HUMANS IN GOLESTAN PROVINCE, IRAN

    PubMed Central

    SHARBATKHORI, Mitra; TANZIFI, Asal; ROSTAMI, Sima; ROSTAMI, Masoomeh; HARANDI, Majid FASIHI

    2016-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a globally parasitic zoonosis caused by larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus. This study investigated E. granulosus genotypes isolated from livestock and humans in the Golestan province, northern Iran, southeast of the Caspian sea, using partial sequencing data of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and NADH dehydrogenase 1 (nad1) mitochondrial genes. Seventy E. granulosus isolates were collected from animals in slaughterhouses: 18 isolates from sheep, 40 from cattle, nine from camels, two from buffaloes and one from a goat, along with four human isolates (formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues) from CE patients of provincial hospitals. All isolates were successfully analysed by PCR amplification and sequencing. The sequence analysis found four E. granulosus genotypes among the 74 CE isolates: G1 (78.3%), G2 (2.7%), G3 (15%) and G6 (4%). The G1-G3 complex genotype was found in all of the sheep, goat, cattle and buffalo isolates. Among the nine camel isolates, the frequency of G1-G3 and G6 genotypes were 66.7% and 33.3%, respectively. All four human CE isolates belonged to E. granulosus sensu stricto. This study reports the first occurrence of the G2 genotype in cattle from Iran and confirms the previously reported G3 genotype in camels in the same country. PMID:27253740

  19. Prevalence of HPV High-Risk Genotypes in Three Cohorts of Women in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)

    PubMed Central

    Zohoncon, Theodora M.; Bisseye, Cyrille; Djigma, Florencia W.; Yonli, Albert T.; Compaore, Tegwinde R.; Sagna, Tani; Ouermi, Djeneba; Ouédraogo, Charlemagne M.R.; Pietra, Virginio; Nikiéma, Jean-Baptiste; Akpona, Simon A.; Simpore, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The development of cervical cancer is associated with high-risk Human papilloma viruses (HPV-HR). In sub-Saharan Africa cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women and the leading cause of death attributed to malignant tumors. This study aims to identify HPV genotypes within the 30′S and 50′S HPV families found in two previous studies from our laboratory, and to determine the prevalence of twelve HPV-HR genotypes in a population of women in Ouagadougou. The twelve HPV-HR genotypes were determined by real-time multiplex PCR, in 180 samples from the general population and among a group of HIV-1 infected women. The most common genotypes found were HPV-35 (29.4%) and HPV-31 (26.1%) of the 30′S family, and HPV-52 (29.4%) and HPV-58 (20.6%) of the 50′S family. Multiple infections of HPV-HR were observed in 78.03% of infected women. The frequencies of HPV genotypes from the 30′S and 50′S families were higher, while the genotypes HPV-16 and18 were lower among the women in our study. PMID:24106609

  20. Association of RBP4 Genotype with Phenotypic Reproductive Traits of Sows

    PubMed Central

    Marantidis, A.; Laliotis, G. P.; Avdi, M.

    2016-01-01

    PCR-RFLP was applied to a commercial crossbred pig population in order to investigate the association between polymorphism (SNP) of Retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) gene and reproductive performance. 400 sows were genotyped and 2000 records of reproductive traits were used in order to retrieve information about the allele frequencies and the association of the RBP4 gene with main reproductive characteristics of the population. A deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was observed as a result of the AB genotype excess. In addition, the AA genotype saw statistically significant higher values of (i) the total number of born piglets (p < 0.05), (ii) the number of piglets born alive (p < 0.01), and (iii) the number of weaned piglets (p < 0.01). The number of the mummified piglets and the number of the piglets born dead did not differ between the various RBP4 genotypes. Interestingly, the AA genotype had a negative impact (p < 0.05) on the number of piglets born dead, resulting indirectly in a larger litter size. In conclusion, the AA genotype and in extension the A allele of RBP4 gene are in favor of producing larger litter size, suggesting that the RBP4 gene may be used in Marker-Assisted Selection (MAS) programs for a rapid improvement of the reproductive characteristics in pigs. PMID:26885398

  1. Differential viability of phosphoglucose isomerase allozyme genotypes of marine snails in nonionic detergent and crude oil-surfactant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lavie, B.; Nevo, E.; Zoller, U.

    1984-10-01

    The effects of a nonionic detergent and of crude oil-detergent mixtures in aqueous solutions on the allozyme frequencies of phosphoglucose isomerase (Pgi) genotypes were tested in the Mediterranean marine gastropods Monodonta turbinata and M. turbiformis. Our results indicate differential survivorship of electrophoretical Pgi allozyme genotypes for both detergent alone and for crude oil-detergent mixtures. These results reflect the adaptive nature of some Pgi genotypes in these marine gastropods and seem inconsistent with the neutral theory of allozyme polymorphisms. Furthermore, these findings suggest that allozyme variants demonstrate a differential tolerance to these organic pollutants and can, therefore, be used as detectors of organic pollutants in the sea.

  2. Complexity of the alpha-globin genotypes identified with thalassemia screening in Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Origa, Raffaella; Paglietti, Maria E; Sollaino, Maria C; Desogus, Maria F; Barella, Susanna; Loi, Daniela; Galanello, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    α-Thalassemia commonly results from deletions or point mutations in one or both α-globin genes located on chromosome 16p13.3 giving rise to complex and variable genotypes and phenotypes. Rarely, unusual non-deletion defects or atypical deletions down-regulate the expression of the α-globin gene. In the last decade of the program for β-thalassemia carrier screening and genetic counseling in Sardinia, the association of new techniques of molecular biology such as gene sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) to conventional methods has allowed to better define several thalassemic genotypes and the complex variability of the α-cluster with its flanking regions, with a high frequency of different genotypes and compound heterozygosity for two α mutations even in the same family. The exact molecular definition of the genotypes resulting from the interactions among the large number of α-thalassemia determinants and with β-thalassemia, is important for a correct correlation of genotype-phenotype and to prevent underdiagnosis of carrier status which could hamper the effectiveness of a screening program particularly in those regions where a high frequency of hemoglobinopathies is present. PMID:23896219

  3. Frequency spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call "frequency spirals." These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  4. SNPflow: A Lightweight Application for the Processing, Storing and Automatic Quality Checking of Genotyping Assays

    PubMed Central

    Schönherr, Sebastian; Neuner, Mathias; Forer, Lukas; Specht, Günther; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Kronenberg, Florian; Coassin, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) play a prominent role in modern genetics. Current genotyping technologies such as Sequenom iPLEX, ABI TaqMan and KBioscience KASPar made the genotyping of huge SNP sets in large populations straightforward and allow the generation of hundreds of thousands of genotypes even in medium sized labs. While data generation is straightforward, the subsequent data conversion, storage and quality control steps are time-consuming, error-prone and require extensive bioinformatic support. In order to ease this tedious process, we developed SNPflow. SNPflow is a lightweight, intuitive and easily deployable application, which processes genotype data from Sequenom MassARRAY (iPLEX) and ABI 7900HT (TaqMan, KASPar) systems and is extendible to other genotyping methods as well. SNPflow automatically converts the raw output files to ready-to-use genotype lists, calculates all standard quality control values such as call rate, expected and real amount of replicates, minor allele frequency, absolute number of discordant replicates, discordance rate and the p-value of the HWE test, checks the plausibility of the observed genotype frequencies by comparing them to HapMap/1000-Genomes, provides a module for the processing of SNPs, which allow sex determination for DNA quality control purposes and, finally, stores all data in a relational database. SNPflow runs on all common operating systems and comes as both stand-alone version and multi-user version for laboratory-wide use. The software, a user manual, screenshots and a screencast illustrating the main features are available at http://genepi-snpflow.i-med.ac.at. PMID:23527209

  5. A Chrysodeixis chalcites Single-Nucleocapsid Nucleopolyhedrovirus Population from the Canary Islands Is Genotypically Structured To Maximize Survival

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Alexandra; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia

    2013-01-01

    A Chrysodeixis chalcites single-nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus wild-type isolate from the Canary Islands, Spain, named ChchSNPV-TF1 (ChchTF1-wt), appears to have great potential as the basis for a biological insecticide for control of the pest. An improved understanding of the genotypic structure of this wild-type strain population should facilitate the selection of genotypes for inclusion in a bioinsecticidal product. Eight genetically distinct genotypes were cloned in vitro: ChchTF1-A to ChchTF1-H. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis confirmed that ChchTF1-A accounted for 36% of the genotypes in the wild-type population. In bioassays, ChchTF1-wt occlusion bodies (OBs) were significantly more pathogenic than any of the component single-genotype OBs, indicating that genotype interactions were likely responsible for the pathogenicity phenotype of wild-type OBs. However, the wild-type population was slower killing and produced higher OB yields than any of the single genotypes alone. These results strongly suggested that the ChchTF1-wt population is structured to maximize its transmission efficiency. Experimental OB mixtures and cooccluded genotype mixtures containing the most abundant and the rarest genotypes, at frequencies similar to those at which they were isolated, revealed a mutualistic interaction that restored the pathogenicity of OBs. In OB and cooccluded mixtures containing only the most abundant genotypes, ChchTF1-ABC, OB pathogenicity was even greater than that of wild-type OBs. The ChchTF1-ABC cooccluded mixture killed larvae 33 h faster than the wild-type population and remained genotypically and biologically stable throughout five successive passages in vivo. In conclusion, the ChchTF1-ABC mixture shows great potential as the active ingredient of a bioinsecticide to control C. chalcites in the Canary Islands. PMID:24096419

  6. Leptin genotype is associated with lactation performance and health of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Chebel, R C; Susca, F; Santos, J E P

    2008-07-01

    The objectives were to evaluate the associations among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the R4C locus in exon 2 of the leptin gene and the lactational performance and health of Holstein cows. Eight hundred and fourteen lactating dairy cows had their DNA sequenced in exon 2 of the leptin gene to determine the presence of SNP in the R4C locus. Cows were milked 3 times daily, and yields of milk and milk components were recorded monthly individually during the first 305 d of lactation. Cows were examined daily by herd personnel for diagnosis of health events such as retained fetal membranes, displacement of abomasum, lameness, and mastitis. Resulting genotypes were CC (34.6%), CT (48.2%), and TT (17.2%). Cows bearing the CT genotype had lower body condition (2.98 +/- 0.02) during the first 62 d in milk (DIM) than cows homozygous for the C (3.02 +/- 0.02) and T (3.04 +/- 0.03) alleles. Leptin genotype was associated with yields of milk and milk components, and cows homozygous for the C allele were less productive than those carrying the CT and TT genotypes. The 305-d yields of 3.5% fat-corrected milk, milk fat, and milk true protein were less in CC compared with CT cows by 258, 12, and 10.7 kg, respectively. Cows carrying the TT genotype had increased incidence of displacement of abomasum (4.3%), but genotype did not affect the incidence of retained fetal membranes, clinical and subclinical mastitis, or lameness. Risk of developing at least one clinical health disorder was influenced by leptin genotype, and cows carrying the CT genotype had the lowest risk for developing any disease (19.6%). Mating decisions to increase the frequency of cows heterozygous in the R4C locus may improve productivity and health. PMID:18565947

  7. Stepwise Threshold Clustering: A New Method for Genotyping MHC Loci Using Next-Generation Sequencing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Stutz, William E.; Bolnick, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    Genes of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are of great interest to biologists because of their important role in immunity and disease, and their extremely high levels of genetic diversity. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies are quickly becoming the method of choice for high-throughput genotyping of multi-locus templates like MHC in non-model organisms.Previous approaches to genotyping MHC genes using NGS technologies suffer from two problems:1) a “gray zone” where low frequency alleles and high frequency artifacts can be difficult to disentangle and 2) a similar sequence problem, where very similar alleles can be difficult to distinguish as two distinct alleles. Here were present a new method for genotyping MHC loci – Stepwise Threshold Clustering (STC) – that addresses these problems by taking full advantage of the increase in sequence data provided by NGS technologies. Unlike previous approaches for genotyping MHC with NGS data that attempt to classify individual sequences as alleles or artifacts, STC uses a quasi-Dirichlet clustering algorithm to cluster similar sequences at increasing levels of sequence similarity. By applying frequency and similarity based criteria to clusters rather than individual sequences, STC is able to successfully identify clusters of sequences that correspond to individual or similar alleles present in the genomes of individual samples. Furthermore, STC does not require duplicate runs of all samples, increasing the number of samples that can be genotyped in a given project. We show how the STC method works using a single sample library. We then apply STC to 295 threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) samples from four populations and show that neighboring populations differ significantly in MHC allele pools. We show that STC is a reliable, accurate, efficient, and flexible method for genotyping MHC that will be of use to biologists interested in a variety of downstream applications. PMID

  8. Influence of CYP2C9 Genotype on warfarin dose among African American and European Americans.

    PubMed

    Limdi, Na; Goldstein, Ja; Blaisdell, Ja; Beasley, Tm; Rivers, Ca; Acton, Rt

    2007-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytochrome P4502C9 (CYP2C9) plays a vital role in drug metabolism. There has been an increased effort to identify polymorphisms within the gene and determine their clinical consequences. However, most of these efforts have focused on populations of European descent. Herein we report the influence of CYP2C9 genotype on warfarin dose among European American and African American patients. We also identify two new mutations; one in the coding region and one in the non-coding region of the CYP2C9 gene. METHODS: Patients (≥20 years of age) are enrolled after obtaining medical, lifestyle and concomitant medication history. Changes in International Normalized Ratio (INR), warfarin dose, co-medications, diet, physical activity and the occurrence of complications are documented. CYP2C9 genotype was determined using PCR-RFLP and pyrosequencing. Differences in genotype frequencies and HWE assumptions were assessed using χ(2) statistics and exact tests. The genotype dose association was evaluated using multivariable linear regression. RESULTS: This report includes 490 patients (mean age 60.6 ± 15.6, 51.3% men). African American patients comprise 48.9% of the cohort with mean follow-up of 13.5 (±10.6) months. Both the CYP2C9 *2 and *3 allele were more frequent in European Americans (11.24%, 5.1%) compared to African Americans (1.1% and 1.8%). CYP2C9 *5 (0.9%), *6 (0.4%), and *11 (1.1%) variants were only observed in African Americans. The variant genotype is more frequent among European Americans compared to African Americans (29.8% vs. 9.73%, p<0.0001). Warfarin dose was significantly related to CYP2C9 genotype (p<0.0001) both in univariate and multivariate analyses. Multivariable race-specific analyses highlight the contribution of CYP2C9 genotype among European American but not among African American patients. CONCLUSION: The variant CYP2C9 genotype is more frequent among European Americans compared to African Americans. Among African Americans the variant

  9. Predictive Factors for Sustained Virological Response after Treatment with Pegylated Interferon α-2a and Ribavirin in Patients Infected with HCV Genotypes 2 and 3

    PubMed Central

    Niederau, Claus; Mauss, Stefan; Schober, Andreas; Stoehr, Albrecht; Zimmermann, Tim; Waizmann, Michael; Moog, Gero; Pape, Stefan; Weber, Bernd; Isernhagen, Konrad; Sandow, Petra; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Alshuth, Ulrich; Steffens, Hermann; Hüppe, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous trials have often defined genotype 2 and 3 patients as an “easy to treat” group and guidelines recommend similar management. Aims The present study looks for differences between the two genotypes and analyzes predictive factors for SVR. Methods Prospective, community-based cohort study involving 421 physicians throughout Germany. The analysis includes 2,347 patients with untreated chronic HCV genotype 2 (n = 391) and 3 (n = 1,956) infection treated with PEG-IFN α-2a plus ribavirin between August 2007 and July 2012. Results When compared with genotype 2 patients, those with genotype 3 were younger, had a shorter duration of infection, lower values of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and BMI, a higher frequency of drug use as infection mode and male gender (p<0.0001, respectively), and a higher APRI score (p<0.005). SVR was higher in genotype 2 when compared with genotype 3 (64.7% vs. 56.9%, p = 0.004). By multivariate analysis of genotype 2 patients, low baseline γ -GT and RVR predicted SVR. In genotype 3 age ≤45 years, cholesterol>130 mg/dl, a low APRI score, and a γ-GT ≥3-times ULN, RVR, and RBV starting dose were associated with SVR by multivariate analysis. Conclusions The present study corroborates that liver fibrosis is more pronounced in genotype 3 vs. 2. SVR is higher in genotype 2 versus genotype 3 partly because of follow-up problems in genotype 3 patients, in particular in those infected by drug use. Thus, subgroups of genotype 3 patients have adherence problems and need special attention also because they often have significant liver fibrosis. Trial Registration Verband Forschender Arzneimittelhersteller e.V., Berlin, Germany ML21645 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02106156 PMID:25238535

  10. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir fixed-dose combination for treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 infection.

    PubMed

    Nehra, V; Tan, E M; Rizza, S A; Temesgen, Z

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 accounts for 8-13% of all chronic HCV infections worldwide. Patients with HCV genotype 4 have been reported to have poor treatment responses to PEGylated interferon and ribavirin regimens. Recently a single tablet, fixed-dose combination of sofosbuvir, an RNA-directed RNA polymerase (NS5B) inhibitor, and ledipasvir, a nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor, has been approved for treatment of chronic HCV infection. Two studies using the fixed-dose combination in chronic HCV genotype 4 for 12 weeks reported sustained virologic response rates at 12 weeks (SVR12) of 93-95%. Data also support the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir in chronic HCV genotype 4 and HIV co-infection. Administered as a single once-daily oral regimen, this ribavirin- and interferon-free regimen is well tolerated, with low potential for adverse effects and represents a significant advancement in the treatment of chronic HCV genotype 4 infection. PMID:27092340

  11. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Francisco CA; Souto, Francisco JD; Nabuco, Leticia C; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Coelho, Henrique Sergio M; Franz, Helena Cristina F; Saraiva, Joao Carlos P; Virgolino, Helaine A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Melo, Mabel MM; Martins, Regina MB; Gomes, Selma A

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Results Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%), and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%). Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2%) and Central (47.6%) regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13%) countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5%) belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. Conclusion The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin) indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F isolates belonged to

  12. Mouse Models of SCN5A-Related Cardiac Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickael; Montnach, Jérôme; Baró, Isabelle; Charpentier, Flavien

    2012-01-01

    Mutations of SCN5A gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5, underlie hereditary cardiac arrhythmic syndromes such as the type 3 long QT syndrome, cardiac conduction diseases, the Brugada syndrome, the sick sinus syndrome, a trial standstill, and numerous overlap syndromes. Patch-clamp studies in heterologous expression systems have provided important information to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships of these diseases. However, they could not clarify how SCN5A mutations can be responsible for such a large spectrum of diseases, for the late age of onset or the progressiveness of some of these diseases and for the overlapping syndromes. Genetically modified mice rapidly appeared as promising tools for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac SCN5A-related arrhythmic syndromes and several mouse models have been established. This review presents the results obtained on these models that, for most of them, recapitulate the clinical phenotypes of the patients. This includes two models knocked out for Nav1.5 β1 and β3 auxiliary subunits that are also discussed. Despite their own limitations that we point out, the mouse models still appear as powerful tools to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of SCN5A-related diseases and offer the opportunity to investigate the secondary cellular consequences of SCN5A mutations such as the expression remodeling of other genes. This points out the potential role of these genes in the overall human phenotype. Finally, they constitute useful tools for addressing the role of genetic and environmental modifiers on cardiac electrical activity. PMID:22737129

  13. Evaluating Imputation Algorithms for Low-Depth Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS) Data.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ariel W; Hamblin, Martha T; Jannink, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    sample Pearson correlation between observed and imputed genotype dosages at the site and individual level; computation time served as a second metric for comparison. We then set out to examine factors affecting imputation accuracy, such as levels of missing data, read depth, minor allele frequency (MAF), and reference panel composition. PMID:27537694

  14. Evaluating Imputation Algorithms for Low-Depth Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS) Data

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    sample Pearson correlation between observed and imputed genotype dosages at the site and individual level; computation time served as a second metric for comparison. We then set out to examine factors affecting imputation accuracy, such as levels of missing data, read depth, minor allele frequency (MAF), and reference panel composition. PMID:27537694

  15. Genotype imputation in the domestic dog.

    PubMed

    Friedenberg, S G; Meurs, K M

    2016-10-01

    Application of imputation methods to accurately predict a dense array of SNP genotypes in the dog could provide an important supplement to current analyses of array-based genotyping data. Here, we developed a reference panel of 4,885,283 SNPs in 83 dogs across 15 breeds using whole genome sequencing. We used this panel to predict the genotypes of 268 dogs across three breeds with 84,193 SNP array-derived genotypes as inputs. We then (1) performed breed clustering of the actual and imputed data; (2) evaluated several reference panel breed combinations to determine an optimal reference panel composition; and (3) compared the accuracy of two commonly used software algorithms (Beagle and IMPUTE2). Breed clustering was well preserved in the imputation process across eigenvalues representing 75 % of the variation in the imputed data. Using Beagle with a target panel from a single breed, genotype concordance was highest using a multi-breed reference panel (92.4 %) compared to a breed-specific reference panel (87.0 %) or a reference panel containing no breeds overlapping with the target panel (74.9 %). This finding was confirmed using target panels derived from two other breeds. Additionally, using the multi-breed reference panel, genotype concordance was slightly higher with IMPUTE2 (94.1 %) compared to Beagle; Pearson correlation coefficients were slightly higher for both software packages (0.946 for Beagle, 0.961 for IMPUTE2). Our findings demonstrate that genotype imputation from SNP array-derived data to whole genome-level genotypes is both feasible and accurate in the dog with appropriate breed overlap between the target and reference panels. PMID:27129452

  16. Try235Phe homozygous mutation of the steroid 5-a reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) gene in a Turkish patient.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Mesut; Durmaz, Erdem; Gursoy, Semin; Bircan, Iffet; Akcurin, Sema

    2014-01-01

    Steroid 5-a reductase type 2 isoenzyme (SRD5A2) deficiency is a male-limited autosomal recessive disorder that results in decreased conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone with various de.gree of incomplete virilization in affected 46, XY infants. No clear genotype-phenotype relationship has been reported till date; moreover, the same mutation can result in considerable heterogeneity in clinical manifestations. Of 6 documented cases with Try235Phe homozygous mutation of the SRD5A2 gene, 3 patients had predominantly female external genitalia whereas the other 3 had predominantly male phenotype. We report Try235Phe homozygous mutation of the SRD5A2 gene in a Turkish patient who was initially assigned as a girl because of the predominantly female appearance of the external genitalia. PMID:25266188

  17. Comparison of Prion Allele Frequency found in Suffolk and Targhee Sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scrapie is a class of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy that affects sheep and goats. The objective of this study was to compare genotypic and allelic frequencies among USSES Targhee and Suffolk sheep. A total of 122 sheep were genotyped for codon 171 with allele specific primers in 2 separate...

  18. Hepatitis B virus genotype A: design of reference sequences for sub-genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qun; Zhu, Huilan; Zhang, Yafei; Li, Xu; Zhang, Zhenhua

    2016-06-01

    Genotype A of hepatitis B virus (HBV/A) is widespread and is currently divided into six sub-genotypes. Suitable reference sequences for different sub-genotypes can facilitate research on HBV/A. However, the current reference sequences for this virus are insufficient. In the present work, we retrieved 442 full-length HBV/A genomic sequences from the GenBank database and classified them into sub-genotypes by phylogenetic analysis. By the maximum likelihood method using the MEGA6.0 software, we established the reference sequences for different HBV/A sub-genotypes. Our analyses demonstrated that these reference sequences clustered phylogenetically with known strains, indicating that the reference sequences we established indeed belonged to the right sub-genotypes. HBV/A subtype sequences were selected by geographic origins and grouped as sub-genotypes including A1-South Africa, A2-Europe, A3-Cameroon, and A5-Haiti. Reference sequences of sub-genotypes A1, A2, A3, and A5 were constructed and deposited into GenBank (KP234050-KP234053). By applying phylogenetic analyses, we further determined the time to most recent common ancestor of HBV/A lineages. In conclusion, these newly established reference sequences can provide suitable reference standards for studies on the molecular biology and virology of HBV genotype A. PMID:27002608

  19. Inferring haplotypes from genotypes on a pedigree with mutations, genotyping errors and missing alleles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Bung; Jiang, Tao

    2011-04-01

    Inferring the haplotypes of the members of a pedigree from their genotypes has been extensively studied. However, most studies do not consider genotyping errors and de novo mutations. In this paper, we study how to infer haplotypes from genotype data that may contain genotyping errors, de novo mutations, and missing alleles. We assume that there are no recombinants in the genotype data, which is usually true for tightly linked markers. We introduce a combinatorial optimization problem, called haplotype configuration with mutations and errors (HCME), which calls for haplotype configurations consistent with the given genotypes that incur no recombinants and require the minimum number of mutations and errors. HCME is NP-hard. To solve the problem, we propose a heuristic algorithm, the core of which is an integer linear program (ILP) using the system of linear equations over Galois field GF(2). Our algorithm can detect and locate genotyping errors that cannot be detected by simply checking the Mendelian law of inheritance. The algorithm also offers error correction in genotypes/haplotypes rather than just detecting inconsistencies and deleting the involved loci. Our experimental results show that the algorithm can infer haplotypes with a very high accuracy and recover 65%-94% of genotyping errors depending on the pedigree topology. PMID:21523936

  20. Studies on Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism and Genotype Distributions in Turkish Preeclampsia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bereketoğlu, Ceyhun; Kasap, Mülkiye; Pazarbaşı, Ayfer

    2012-01-01

    Placental, immune and genetic factors are thought to play an important role in preeclampia (PE)'s pathophysiology. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE) plays a vital role in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS) which regulates blood pressure by converting angiotensin I into a powerfull vasoconstrictor angiotensin II. A deletion polymorphism (D allele) has been reported to be associated with elevated ACE activity. The aim of the this study was to investigate whether there is an association between angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism and PE. In this study, 120 preeclamptic and 116 normotensive Turkish pregnant women were genotyped for ACE I/D polymorphism and the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of this polymorphism in preeclampsia and controls were evaluated. Codominant, dominant and recessive models were appplied in ACE gene I/D polymorphism. In the codominant model, DD genotype was found significantly more frequent in preeclampsia than controls (P = 0.016). Moreover, in dominant model (DD frequency versus DI+II frequency) there was a significant relation between DD genotype and preeclampsia (P = 0.006). D allele frequency was 64.6% in preeclampsia while it was 56.1% in controls (P = 0.062). In conclusion, there was significant difference in genotype distribution between preeclampsia and controls. PMID:22545216

  1. Evaluation of polymorphisms in the sulfonamide detoxification genes NAT2, CYB5A, and CYB5R3 in patients with sulfonamide hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, James; Abouraya, Mahmoud; Motsinger-Reif, Alison; Yale, Steven; McCarty, Catherine; Trepanier, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether polymorphisms in the sulfonamide detoxification genes, CYB5A (encoding cytochrome b5), CYB5R3 (encoding cytochrome b5 reductase), or NAT2 (encoding N-acetyltransferase 2) were over-represented in patients with delayed sulfonamide drug hypersensitivity, compared to control patients that tolerated a therapeutic course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole without adverse event. Methods DNA from 99 non-immunocompromised patients with sulfonamide hypersensitivity that were identified from the Personalized Medicine Research Project at the Marshfield Clinic, and from 99 age-, race-, and gender-matched drug-tolerant controls, were genotyped for four CYB5A and five CYB5R3 polymorphisms, and for all coding NAT2 SNPs. Results CYB5A and CYB5R3 SNPs were found at low allele frequencies (less than 3–4%), which did not differ between hypersensitive and tolerant patients. NAT2 allele and haplotype frequencies, as well as inferred NAT2 phenotypes, also did not differ between groups (60% vs. 59% slow acetylators). Finally, no difference in NAT2 status was found in a subset of patients with more severe hypersensitivity signs (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms; DRESS) compared to tolerant patients. Conclusions We found no evidence for a substantial involvement of these 9 CYB5A or CYB5R3 polymorphisms in sulfonamide HS risk, although minor effects cannot be completely ruled out. Despite careful medical record review and full re-sequencing of the NAT2 coding region, we found no association of NAT2 coding alleles with sulfonamide hypersensitivity (predominantly cutaneous eruptions) in this adult Caucasian population. PMID:22850190

  2. Frequency-dependent viability in mutant strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, J W; Sheen, F M

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of genotypic frequencies on egg-to-adult viabilities in pairwise combinations of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The experiments involved mixture of a total of 42,000 eggs in varying proportions under controlled densities and observation of surviving adults. Viabilities were found to depend on frequencies in several genotypic combinations. In the most extreme case, the absolute viability of cn;bw females increased monotonically from 54% when common to 70% when rare. The results illustrate several statistical and methodological problems that might explain why some experiments have failed to detect frequency-dependent viabilities. These problems include heterogeneity between replications, sex differences in susceptibility to competition, and strong dependence of the experimental outcome on the choice of competitor genotypes. PMID:1901577

  3. Gene frequencies of human platelet alloantigens 1–5 in two Arab populations

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Abdel Halim A.; Abdel Hamed, Alaa Eldin S.; Abdalla, Essam M.; Almawi, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of the human platelet alloantigens (HPA) arise from single base pair substitutions in alleles and lead to changes in amino acids of glycoproteins expressed on platelets. The aim of this study was to determine the gene frequencies of the five common HPA (HPA-1 to −5) in Egyptians and Jordanians and to compare these data with those established for other populations. Materials and methods HPA genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. Results The gene frequencies obtained in Egyptians were: HPA-1a/b, 0.767/0.233; HPA-2a/b, 0.759/0.241; HPA-3a/b, 0.704/0.296; HPA-4a/b, 1/0; HPA-5a/b, 0.728/0.272, while the frequencies in Jordanians were: HPA-1a/b, 0.821/0.179; HPA-2a/b, 0.877/0.123; HPA-3a/b, 0.660/0.340; HPA-4a/b, 1/0; HPA-5a/b, 0.795/0.205. The observed gene frequencies in both populations were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The gene frequencies for HPA-2b and HPA-5b among Egyptians were the highest reported among Arabs. Except for HPA-2, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPA-1 to −5 between the two populations. Conclusion The distributions of HPA alleles among Egyptians and Jordanians are similar to those reported for other Arabs. This study reports the first data on gene frequencies of HPA in Egyptians and Jordanians. PMID:23736919

  4. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A1, A2, B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. Methods The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. Results The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). Conclusion In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for future

  5. Tetraploidization events by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent in apomictic citrus and are dependent on genotype and environment

    PubMed Central

    Aleza, Pablo; Froelicher, Yann; Schwarz, Sergio; Agustí, Manuel; Hernández, María; Juárez, José; Luro, François; Morillon, Raphael; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Polyploidy is a major component of plant evolution. The citrus gene pool is essentially diploid but tetraploid plants are frequently encountered in seedlings of diploid apomictic genotypes. The main objectives of the present study were to establish the origin of these tetraploid plants and to ascertain the importance of genotypic and environmental factors on tetraploid formation. Methods Tetraploid seedlings from 30 diploid apomictic genotypes were selected by flow cytometry and genotyped with 24 single sequence repeat (SSR) markers to analyse their genetic origin. Embryo rescue was used to grow all embryos contained in polyembryonic seeds of ‘Tardivo di Ciaculli’ mandarin, followed by characterization of the plantlets obtained by flow cytometry and SSR markers to accurately establish the rate of tetraploidization events and their potential tissue location. Inter-annual variations in tetraploid seedling rates were analysed for seven genotypes. Variation in tetraploid plantlet rates was analysed between different seedlings of the same genotype (‘Carrizo’ citrange; Citrus sinensis × Poncirus trifoliata) from seeds collected in different tropical, subtropical and Mediterranean countries. Key Results Tetraploid plants were obtained for all the studied diploid genotypes, except for four mandarins. All tetraploid plants were identical to their diploid maternal line for SSR markers and were not cytochimeric. Significant genotypic and environmental effects were observed, as well as negative correlation between mean temperature during the flowering period and tetraploidy seedling rates. The higher frequencies (20 %) of tetraploids were observed for citranges cultivated in the Mediterranean area. Conclusions Tetraploidization by chromosome doubling of nucellar cells are frequent events in apomictic citrus, and are affected by both genotypic and environmental factors. Colder conditions in marginal climatic areas appear to favour the expression of

  6. Temporal variation in coat colour (genotypes) supports major changes in the Nordic cattle population after Iron Age.

    PubMed

    Niemi, M; Sajantila, A; Vilkki, J

    2016-08-01

    Variation in coat colour genotypes of archaeological cattle samples from Finland was studied by sequencing 69 base pairs of the extension locus (melanocortin 1-receptor, MC1R) targeting both a transition and a deletion defining the three main alleles, such as dominant black (E(D) ), wild type (E(+) ) and recessive red (e). The 69-bp MC1R sequence was successfully analysed from 23 ancient (1000-1800 AD) samples. All three main alleles and genotype combinations were detected with allele frequencies of 0.26, 0.17 and 0.57 for E(D) , E(+) and e respectively. Recessive red and dominant black alleles were detected in both sexes. According to the best of our knowledge, this is the first ancient DNA study defining all three main MC1R alleles. Observed MC1R alleles are in agreement with calculated phenotype frequencies from historical sources. The division of ancient Finnish cattle population into modern Finnish breeds with settled colours was dated to the 20th century. From the existing genotyped populations in Europe (43 breeds, n = 2360), the closest match to ancient MC1R genotype frequencies was with the Norwegian native multicoloured breeds. In combined published genotype data of ancient (n = 147) and genotypes and phenotypes of modern Nordic cattle (n = 738), MC1R allele frequencies showed temporal changes similar to neutral mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal haplotypes analysed earlier. All three markers indicate major change in genotypes in Nordic cattle from the Late Iron Age to the Medieval period followed by slower change through the historical periods until the present. PMID:27297978

  7. Protective Effect of Human Leukocyte Antigen B27 in Hepatitis C Virus Infection Requires the Presence of a Genotype-Specific Immunodominant CD8+ T-Cell Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, Nadine; Fitzmaurice, Karen; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Kemper, Michael N.; Humphreys, Isla; McKiernan, Susan; Kelleher, Dermot; Lohmann, Volker; Bowness, Paul; Huzly, Daniela; Rosen, Hugo R.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Lauer, Georg M.; Allen, Todd M.; Barnes, Eleanor; Roggendorf, Michael; Blum, Hubert E.; Thimme, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) is associated with protection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This protective role is linked to single immunodominant HLA-B27-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes in both infections. In order to define the relative contribution of a specific HLA-B27-restricted epitope to the natural course of HCV infection, we compared the biological impact of the highly conserved HCV genotype 1 epitope, for which the protective role has been described, with the corresponding region in genotype 3 that differs in its sequence by three amino acid residues. The genotype 3a peptide was not recognized by CD8+ T cells specific for the genotype 1 peptide. Furthermore, patients with acute or chronic infection with HCV genotype 3a did not mount T-cell responses to this epitope region, and their autologous viral sequences showed no evidence of T-cell pressure. Finally, we found a significantly higher frequency of HLA-B27 positivity in patients with chronic HCV genotype 3a infection compared to genotype 1 infection, indicating that there is no protection by HLA-B27 in HCV genotype 3 infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that the protective effect of HLA-B27 is limited to HCV genotype 1 infection and does not expand to other genotypes such as genotype 3a. This can most likely be explained by intergenotype sequence diversity leading to the loss of the immunodominant HLA-B27 epitope in viral strains other than genotype 1. Our results underline the central role of a single HLA-B27-restricted epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell response in mediating protection in HCV genotype 1 infection. PMID:20034048

  8. The utility of low-density genotyping for imputation in the Thoroughbred horse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the dramatic reduction in the cost of high-density genotyping that has occurred over the last decade, it remains one of the limiting factors for obtaining the large datasets required for genomic studies of disease in the horse. In this study, we investigated the potential for low-density genotyping and subsequent imputation to address this problem. Results Using the haplotype phasing and imputation program, BEAGLE, it is possible to impute genotypes from low- to high-density (50K) in the Thoroughbred horse with reasonable to high accuracy. Analysis of the sources of variation in imputation accuracy revealed dependence both on the minor allele frequency of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) being imputed and on the underlying linkage disequilibrium structure. Whereas equidistant spacing of the SNPs on the low-density panel worked well, optimising SNP selection to increase their minor allele frequency was advantageous, even when the panel was subsequently used in a population of different geographical origin. Replacing base pair position with linkage disequilibrium map distance reduced the variation in imputation accuracy across SNPs. Whereas a 1K SNP panel was generally sufficient to ensure that more than 80% of genotypes were correctly imputed, other studies suggest that a 2K to 3K panel is more efficient to minimize the subsequent loss of accuracy in genomic prediction analyses. The relationship between accuracy and genotyping costs for the different low-density panels, suggests that a 2K SNP panel would represent good value for money. Conclusions Low-density genotyping with a 2K SNP panel followed by imputation provides a compromise between cost and accuracy that could promote more widespread genotyping, and hence the use of genomic information in horses. In addition to offering a low cost alternative to high-density genotyping, imputation provides a means to combine datasets from different genotyping platforms, which is becoming

  9. 42 CFR 5a.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability. 5a.2 Section 5a.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL PHYSICIAN... Public Health Service Act....

  10. 42 CFR 5a.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Applicability. 5a.2 Section 5a.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL PHYSICIAN... Public Health Service Act....

  11. 42 CFR 5a.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applicability. 5a.2 Section 5a.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL PHYSICIAN... Public Health Service Act....

  12. 42 CFR 5a.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Applicability. 5a.2 Section 5a.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL PHYSICIAN... Public Health Service Act....

  13. 42 CFR 5a.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Applicability. 5a.2 Section 5a.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL PHYSICIAN... Public Health Service Act....

  14. Imputation of ungenotyped parental genotypes in dairy and beef cattle from progeny genotypes.

    PubMed

    Berry, D P; McParland, S; Kearney, J F; Sargolzaei, M; Mullen, M P

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the accuracy of imputing the genotype of parents using information on the genotype of their progeny and a family-based and population-based imputation algorithm. Two separate data sets were used, one containing both dairy and beef animals (n=3122) with high-density genotypes (735 151 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) and the other containing just dairy animals (n=5489) with medium-density genotypes (51 602 SNPs). Imputation accuracy of three different genotype density panels were evaluated representing low (i.e. 6501 SNPs), medium and high density. The full genotypes of sires with genotyped half-sib progeny were masked and subsequently imputed. Genotyped half-sib progeny group sizes were altered from 4 up to 12 and the impact on imputation accuracy was quantified. Up to 157 and 258 sires were used to test the accuracy of imputation in the dairy plus beef data set and the dairy-only data set, respectively. The efficiency and accuracy of imputation was quantified as the proportion of genotypes that could not be imputed, and as both the genotype concordance rate and allele concordance rate. The median proportion of genotypes per animal that could not be imputed in the imputation process decreased as the number of genotyped half-sib progeny increased; values for the medium-density panel ranged from a median of 0.015 with a half-sib progeny group size of 4 to a median of 0.0014 to 0.0015 with a half-sib progeny group size of 8. The accuracy of imputation across different paternal half-sib progeny group sizes was similar in both data sets. Concordance rates increased considerably as the number of genotyped half-sib progeny increased from four (mean animal allele concordance rate of 0.94 in both data sets for the medium-density genotype panel) to five (mean animal allele concordance rate of 0.96 in both data sets for the medium-density genotype panel) after which it was relatively stable up to a half-sib progeny group size

  15. Clustered Tuberculosis in a Low-Burden Country: Nationwide Genotyping through 15 Years

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, A. B.; Kok-Jensen, A.; Bygbjerg, I. C.; Andersen, P. H.; Thomsen, V. O.; Kamper-Jørgensen, M.; Lillebaek, T.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has proved to be a powerful tool in tuberculosis surveillance, epidemiology, and control. Based on results obtained through 15 years of nationwide IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) genotyping of M. tuberculosis cases in Denmark, a country on the way toward tuberculosis elimination, we discuss M. tuberculosis transmission dynamics and point to areas for control interventions. Cases with 100% identical genotypes (RFLP patterns) were defined as clustered, and a cluster was defined as cases with an identical genotype. Of 4,601 included cases, corresponding to 76% of reported and 97% of culture-verified tuberculosis cases in the country, 56% were clustered, of which 69% were Danes. Generally, Danes were more often in large clusters (≥50 persons), older (mean age, 45 years), and male (male/female ratio, 2.5). Also, Danes had a higher cluster frequency within a 2-year observation window (60.8%), and higher clustering rate of new patterns over time, compared to immigrants. A dominant genotype, cluster 2, constituted 44% of all clustered and 35% of all genotyped cases. This cluster was primarily found among Danish males, 30 to 59 years of age, often socially marginalized, and with records of alcohol abuse. In Danes, cluster 2 alone was responsible for the high cluster frequency level. Immigrants had a higher incidence of clustered tuberculosis at a younger age (0 to 39 years). To achieve tuberculosis elimination in Denmark, high-risk transmission environments, like the cluster 2 enviornment in Danes, and specific transmission chains in immigrants in the capital area, e.g., homeless/socially marginalized Somalis/Greenlanders, often with alcohol abuse, must be targeted, including groups with a high risk of reactivation. PMID:22675129

  16. Genotype/allelic combinations as potential predictors of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nasibullin, Timur R; Timasheva, Yanina R; Sadikova, Regina I; Tuktarova, Ilsiyar A; Erdman, Vera V; Nikolaeva, Irina E; Sabo, Jan; Kruzliak, Peter; Mustafina, Olga E

    2016-01-01

    In order to find new informative predictors of myocardial infarction, we performed an analysis of genotype frequencies of polymorphic markers of SELE (rs2076059, 3832T > C), SELP (rs6131, S290 N), SELL (rs1131498, F206L), ICAM1 (rs5498, K469E), VCAM1 (rs3917010, c.928 + 420A > C), PECAM1 (rs668, V125L), VEGFA (rs35569394, -2549(18)I/D), CCL2 (rs1024611, -2518A > G), NOS3 (rs1799983, E298D), and DDAH1 (rs669173, c.303 + 30998A > G) genes in the group of Russian men with myocardial infarction (N = 315) and the control group of corresponding ethnicity, gender, and age (N = 286). Using Markov chain Monte-Carlo method (APSampler), we found genotype combinations associated with increased and decreased risk of myocardial infarction. The most significant associations were detected for PECAM1*V/V + DDAH1*C (OR = 4.17 CI 1.56-11.15 Pperm = 0.005) SELE*C + VEGFA*I + CCL2*G + VCAM1*A + NOS3*D (OR = 2.74 CI 1.66-4.52 Pperm = 2.09 × 10(-5)), and VEGFA*D/D + CCL2*A + DDAH1*C (OR = 0.44 CI 0.28-0.7 Pperm = 7.89 × 10(-5)) genotype combinations. PMID:26662939

  17. Genotyping the GGGCGG Tandem Repeat Promoter Polymorphism in the 5-Lipoxygenase Enzyme Gene (ALOX5) by Pyrosequencing Assay

    PubMed Central

    Schentrup, Anzeela M.; Allayee, Hooman; Lima, John J.; Johnson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Efficient genotyping methods for many biologically significant repeat genetic polymorphisms, particularly in GC-rich regions of the genome, are limited. In particular, a short tandem repeat polymorphism [GGCGGG] in the promoter region of ALOX5 has been implicated as an important marker for inflammatory diseases. We developed a pyrosequencing assay to genotype the ALOX5 short tandem repeat polymorphism using pyrosequencing technology that will make assessing this important genetic marker in large, diverse populations more accessible than using current methods. Materials and Methods: We used a nested polymerase chain reaction approach to amplify DNA for pyrosequencing. Population allele frequencies were assessed in two cohorts of previously collected human DNA samples with 188 and 1032 samples, respectively. Sixteen genetic samples with known genotypes were used to confirm the accuracy of the method. Results and Discussion: Genotypes were 100% concordant with samples of known genotype. Genotype frequencies in European American, Hispanic, and African American agreed with previously published results (wild-type homozygotes 66%, 64%, and 19%, respectively). The method presented here will facilitate both genetic association and pharmacogenomic research on this polymorphism in large samples that are ethnically and/or racially admixed. PMID:19473080

  18. Variations in APOE genotype distribution in children from areas with different adult cardiovascular disease mortality in Spain.

    PubMed

    Garcés, C; Cantos, M; Benavente, M; Granizo, J J; Cano, B; Viturro, E; De Oya, M

    2004-08-01

    We investigate whether a varying distribution of the APOE genotype could help explain regional differences in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality in Spain. APOE genotypes were examined by PCR in 1,274 randomly selected healthy children from four Spanish regions with different adult IHD mortality rates (northwest and central Spain with low rates and southeast and southern Spain with high rates). In the population as a whole the prevalence of the higher risk APOE*3/*4 genotype is 16.8% and the prevalence of the APOE*4 allele is 10.1%. In northwest Spain the frequencies of the APOE*3/*4 genotype (12.9%) and of the APOE*4 allele (8.3%) are smaller than in the other regions. The southeast region shows statistically higher frequencies of the APOE*3/*4 genotype (22.5%) and of the APOE*4 allele (13.2%) than in the other regions or in the group as a whole. We can conclude that Spain is not homogeneous in terms of APOE genotype distribution. Although the prevalence of the APOE*4 allele is generally low, there are areas with higher prevalence of the APOE*4 allele and a higher incidence of adult IHD mortality. This allows us to conclude that in Spain this genetic determinant can be associated with IHD mortality in relatively isolated populations. PMID:15754976

  19. Microsatellite based analysis of genetic diversity of popular black pepper genotypes in South India.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nisha; Prasanth, V P; Soniya, E V

    2011-08-01

    The genotypes of black pepper are morphologically and genotypically highly diverse and carry all the cumulative variations inherited and maintained through generations. The present study describes the Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) or microsatellite based assessment of genetic diversity among forty popular genotypes and four different species of black pepper in Southern region of India. For isolation of SSR primers, our earlier attempts with enrichment strategies like 'Triplex affinity capture' did not extract a single SSR primer due to close proximity of restriction sites to the SSR motif. Hence we developed a 'Sequential Reverse Genome Walking (SRGW)' strategy with better enrichment efficiency of 72% that generated seven new SSR primers. Genotyping precisely discriminated majority of genotypes which indicated that the SSR primers are very informative. A total of 62 alleles with an average of 15.5 alleles over 4 loci were identified. All the SSR primers showed an average Polymorphism Information Content (PIC) value of 0.85. The estimated average Shared Allele Frequency ranged between 1.57 and 20.12%. The PCA plot revealed four closely related individual groups and identified Karimunda, Wild pepper and a local landrace 'local b' as the most divergent genotypes. Cluster analysis exposed the genetic relatedness between hybrids and selections with other known cultivars. The introduction of black pepper from South India to Malaysia was emphasized from the observation of genetic similarity of Malaysian cultivar 'Kuching' with other indigenous popular cultivars. The study was first to portray the precise genetic relatedness among the major indigenous genotypes of black pepper. PMID:21874534

  20. ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprinting in elite Japanese athletes.

    PubMed

    Mikami, E; Fuku, N; Murakami, H; Tsuchie, H; Takahashi, H; Ohiwa, N; Tanaka, H; Pitsiladis, Y P; Higuchi, M; Miyachi, M; Kawahara, T; Tanaka, M

    2014-02-01

    The ACTN3 R577X genotype has been found to associate with sprint/power phenotypes in all elite athlete cohorts investigated. This association has not been extensively studied in elite Asian athletes. The present study was undertaken to investigate the association between the ACTN3 R577X genotype and elite Japanese track and field athlete status. 299 elite Japanese track and field athletes (134 sprint/power athletes; 165 endurance/middle-power athletes) and 649 Japanese controls were genotyped for the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism. All athletes were of national or international level. Sprint/power athletes showed a higher frequency of RR + RX genotype than controls (111/134 [82.8%] vs. 478/649 [73.7%], P = 0.025 under the R-dominant model), while there was no significant difference between endurance/middle-power athletes and controls (126/165 [76.4%] vs. 478/649 [73.7%], P = 0.48 under the R-dominant model). Sprinters with the RR + RX genotype had significantly faster personal best times for the 100 m than those with XX genotype (10.42 ± 0.05 s vs. 10.64 ± 0.09 s, P = 0.042); no such association was found in the 400 m sprinters (47.02 ± 0.36 s vs. 47.56 ± 0.99 s, P = 0.62). ACTN3 R577X genotype is associated with sprint/power performance in elite Japanese track and field athletes, especially short sprint performance. PMID:23868678

  1. Detection of rare and possibly carcinogenic human papillomavirus genotypes as single infections in invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Daan; Alemany, Laia; Guimera, Nuria; de Sanjose, Silvia; de Koning, Maurits; Molijn, Anco; Jenkins, David; Bosch, Xavier; Quint, Wim

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types to the burden of cervical cancer has been well established. However, the role and contribution of phylogenetically related HPV genotypes and rare variants remains uncertain. In a recent global study of 8977 HPV-positive invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs), the genotype remained unidentified in 3.7% by the HPV SPF10 PCR-DEIA-LiPA25 (version 1) algorithm. The 331 ICC specimens with unknown genotype were analysed by a novel sequence methodology, using multiple selected short regions in L1. This demonstrated HPV genotypes that have infrequently or never been detected in ICC, ie HPV26, 30, 61, 67, 68, 69, 73 and 82, and rare variants of HPV16, 18, 26, 30, 34, 39, 56, 67, 68, 69, 82 and 91. These are not identified individually by LiPA25 and only to some extent by other HPV genotyping assays. Most identified genotypes have a close phylogenetic relationship with established carcinogenic HPVs and have been classified as possibly carcinogenic by IARC. Except for HPV85, all genotypes in α-species 5, 6, 7, 9 and 11 were encountered as single infections in ICCs. These species of established and possibly carcinogenic HPV types form an evolutionary clade. We have shown that the possibly carcinogenic types were detected only in squamous cell carcinomas, which were often keratinizing and diagnosed at a relatively higher mean age (55.3 years) than those associated with established carcinogenic types (50.9 years). The individual frequency of the possibly carcinogenic types in ICCs is low, but together they are associated with 2.25% of the 8338 included ICCs with a single HPV type. This fraction is greater than seven of the established carcinogenic types individually. This study provides evidence that possibly carcinogenic HPV types occur as single infections in invasive cervical cancer, strengthening the circumstantial evidence of a carcinogenic role. PMID:22711526

  2. High-throughput RAD-SNP genotyping for characterization of sugar beet genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput SNP genotyping provides a rapid way of developing resourceful set of markers for delineating the genetic architecture and for effective species discrimination. In the presented research, we demonstrate a set of 192 SNPs for effective genotyping in sugar beet using high-throughput mar...

  3. Field Response of Sugarcane Genotypes to Freeze Stress with Genotype x Environment Effects on Quality Traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freeze stress is a constraint to sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) with negative effect on sucrose yield, particularly during the harvest season. To understand its impact on the performance of genotypes developed by the Canal Point (CP) breeding program, the genotype by environment (GxE) interaction was app...

  4. Prevalence of Null Genotypes of Glutathione S-Transferase T1 (GSTT1) and M1 (GSTM1) in Seven Iranian Populations

    PubMed Central

    NASSERI, Gholamreza; ZAHEDI, Tahereh; MOUSAVI-KAZEROONI, Fatemeh; SAADAT, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have revealed significant differences between populations for genotypic frequencies of glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) and M1 (GSTM1) polymorphisms. In order to find the frequency of the null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 in Iranian populations, the present study was carried out. Methods: The total study subjects consisted of 1340 unrelated healthy Muslims/Iranian. From these 297, 200, 123, 168, 152, 200, and 200 individuals from Tabriz (East Azerbaijan Province; belong to Azaris), Yasuj (Kohgiluyeh-va-Boyerahmad Province; belong to Lurs), Abarku (Yazd Province; belong to Persians), Zahedan (Sistan-va-Balouchestan Province; belong to Balouchis), Zahedan (Sistan-va-Balouchestan Province; belong to Sistanis), Kermanshah (Kermanshah Province; belong to Kurds), and Gorgan (Golestan Province; belong to Turkmen) respectively. The genotypes were detected by multiplex PCR. Results: The frequency of GSTM1 null genotype among Azaris, Lurs, Persians, Balouchis, Sistanis, Kurds, and Turkmen was 43.8, 50.0, 52.0, 50.0, 51.3, 56.0, and 53.0%, respectively. There was no significant difference between these populations for the genotypic distribution of the GSTM1 polymorphism (χ2=8.47, df=6, P=0.206). The frequency of GSTT1 null genotype among Azaris, Lurs, Persians, Balouchis, Sistanis, Kurds, and Turkmen was 18.2, 17.0, 29.3, 20.8, 17.8, 18.5, and 23.0%, respectively. There was very similarity between Azaris, Kurds and Lurs for the frequency of GSTT1 genotypes (χ2=0.17, df=2, P=0.916). Conclusion: By comparing the frequency of GSTT1 genotypes among Iranian populations, Caucasians and Asians, it is concluded that Azaris, Kurds and Lurs were similar to each other. Taken together, it is suggested that although Azaris are Turkish speaking belong to Caucasians. PMID:26811816

  5. Rapid high resolution MHC class I genotyping of Chinese rhesus macaques by capillary reference strand mediated conformational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Blasky, Alex J.; Karl, Julie A.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Read, Daniel S.; O’Connor, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) provide well-established models for studying human disease pathogenesis and vaccine development. When challenged with infectious agents macaques exhibit individual differences in susceptibility. An important determinant of these differences is the complement of major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I sequences expressed by each animal. Although previous studies have reported strong associations between MHC expression and disease outcome, a rapid, cost effective method for high resolution MHC genotyping in macaques is lacking. Here, we adapted a modified heteroduplex assay, reference strand mediated conformational analysis (RSCA), to an ABI 3130xl capillary electrophoresis genetic analyzer for macaque MHC class I genotyping. For validation, we investigated the concordance of RSCA genotyping for fourteen MHC class I sequences in twelve Chinese rhesus macaques whose genotypes were established through cDNA cloning and sequencing of MHC class I sequences. We observed a concordance greater than 98% between RSCA and the cloning and sequencing data. Further, RSCA confirmed the presence of MHC haplotype sharing between three macaques as predicted previously by microsatellite analysis. RSCA genotyping of an additional 25 Chinese rhesus macaques demonstrated that the frequency of these fourteen MHC class I sequences ranged from 5 to 32%, with the Mamu-A1*2601 sequence being most common in this cohort. Capillary RSCA genotyping has the potential to enable researchers to rapidly evaluate MHC class I genotypes in rhesus macaques and associate specific MHC sequences with disease susceptibility. PMID:18629489

  6. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  7. Precise genotyping and recombination detection of Enterovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chieh-Hua; Wang, Yu-Bin; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EV) with different genotypes cause diverse infectious diseases in humans and mammals. A correct EV typing result is crucial for effective medical treatment and disease control; however, the emergence of novel viral strains has impaired the performance of available diagnostic tools. Here, we present a web-based tool, named EVIDENCE (EnteroVirus In DEep conception, http://symbiont.iis.sinica.edu.tw/evidence), for EV genotyping and recombination detection. We introduce the idea of using mixed-ranking scores to evaluate the fitness of prototypes based on relatedness and on the genome regions of interest. Using phylogenetic methods, the most possible genotype is determined based on the closest neighbor among the selected references. To detect possible recombination events, EVIDENCE calculates the sequence distance and phylogenetic relationship among sequences of all sliding windows scanning over the whole genome. Detected recombination events are plotted in an interactive figure for viewing of fine details. In addition, all EV sequences available in GenBank were collected and revised using the latest classification and nomenclature of EV in EVIDENCE. These sequences are built into the database and are retrieved in an indexed catalog, or can be searched for by keywords or by sequence similarity. EVIDENCE is the first web-based tool containing pipelines for genotyping and recombination detection, with updated, built-in, and complete reference sequences to improve sensitivity and specificity. The use of EVIDENCE can accelerate genotype identification, aiding clinical diagnosis and enhancing our understanding of EV evolution. PMID:26678286

  8. Detection of the SHV genotype polymorphism of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacterium

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUNLONG; JI, XIAOLI; DENG, XIAOHUI; ZHOU, YINGFENG; NI, XIAOQING; LIU, XIAOKANG

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) is due to the extensive usage of the extended-spectrum cephalosporins and leads to huge financial loss worldwide, whilst presenting a challenge to the clinical treatment. The aim of the present study was to delineate the frequency of ESBL occurrence in Enterobacteriaceae and confirm the SHV genotype. A random collection of 153 Escherichia coli isolates (E. coli) and 70 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were tested. The amplification products obtained by polymerase chain reaction were sequenced. Isolates with novel mutations were transformed to E. coli DH5 α. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was obtained by a microdilution method. The relevance ratio of ESBL was 67.7% and the proportion of the SHV β-lactamase gene (blaSHV) was 18.5%. A new genotype of β-lactamase was demonstrated and submitted to GenBank. A total of 12 mutational sites were found in 28 ESBL-producing isolates, including four nonsense mutations. Sensitive-rates of 28 ESBL-producing isolates to imipenem were 100%, and resistant-rates to penicillin, amoxicillin and oxacillin were 100%. The MIC of DH5 α-F8 to penicillin, oxacillin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefoperazone/sulbactam, imipenem and netilmicin was 512, 512, 2, 0.03, 0.06, 4, 0.015 and 32 respectively. In conclusion, ESBL and SHV-28 is the most prevalent bla. Imipenem is the most effective antibiotic to ESBL, and the 4th-generation cephalosporins and β-lactamase inhibitor compound are also effective. ESBL is mediated by plasmids and able to spread among different Enterobacteriaceae. In conclusion, new mutations of the blaSHV gene exist from at least 2010. PMID:26075080

  9. Genotyping common and rare variation using overlapping pool sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies set the stage for large, population based studies, in which the ANA or RNA of thousands of individuals will be sequenced. Currently, however, such studies are still infeasible using a straightforward sequencing approach; as a result, recently a few multiplexing schemes have been suggested, in which a small number of ANA pools are sequenced, and the results are then deconvoluted using compressed sensing or similar approaches. These methods, however, are limited to the detection of rare variants. Results In this paper we provide a new algorithm for the deconvolution of DNA pools multiplexing schemes. The presented algorithm utilizes a likelihood model and linear programming. The approach allows for the addition of external data, particularly imputation data, resulting in a flexible environment that is suitable for different applications. Conclusions Particularly, we demonstrate that both low and high allele frequency SNPs can be accurately genotyped when the DNA pooling scheme is performed in conjunction with microarray genotyping and imputation. Additionally, we demonstrate the use of our framework for the detection of cancer fusion genes from RNA sequences. PMID:21989232

  10. The APOE Genotype in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Mehlig, Kirsten; Rosengren, Annika; Torén, Kjell; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wikkelsö, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Amyloid plaque has been reported in brain biopsies from patients with idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and proposed as a significant feature of the pathophysiology. Presence of the apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) allele is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aims To compare the distribution of APOE genotype in iNPH patients with an age-matched population-based control group and with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. Methods APOE genotype frequencies were determined in 77 iNPH patients (50 men and 27 women, mean age 71.7 years) diagnosed with iNPH, a sample of 691 AD patients and 638 age-matched population controls (299 men and 339 women) from the INTERGENE cohort. Results The APOE distribution did not differ significantly between the iNPH patients and the control population. The per e4-allele odds-ratio (OR) of iNPH was given by OR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.50, 1.60) that was considerably smaller than the per-allele OR of AD, OR = 5.34 (4.10, 7.00). Conclusion The results suggest that the APOE-related risk of AD in patients with iNPH is not higher than in the general population. PMID:27441602

  11. Evaluation of Interferon Resistance in Newly Established Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Miki; Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Nakagawa, Mina; Watanabe, Takako; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Otani, Satoshi; Goto, Fumio; Nagata, Hiroko; Kaneko, Shun; Nitta, Sayuri; Murakawa, Miyako; Nishimura-Sakurai, Yuki; Azuma, Seishin; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Mori, Kenichi; Yagi, Shintaro; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b is known to exhibit treatment resistance with respect to interferon (IFN) therapy. Substitution of amino acids 70 and 91 in the core region of the 1b genotype is a significant predictor of liver carcinogenesis and poor response to pegylated-IFN-α and ribavirin therapy. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been clearly elucidated because of limitations of the HCV genotype 1b infectious model. Recently, the TPF1-M170T HCV genotype 1b cell culture system was established, in which the clone successfully replicates and infects Huh-7-derived Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare IFN resistance in various HCV clones using this system. Methods: HCV core amino acid substitutions R70Q and L91M were introduced to the TPF1-M170T clone and then transfected into Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. To evaluate the production of each virus, intracellular HCV core antigens were measured. Results were confirmed with Western blot analysis using anti-NS5A antibodies, and IFN sensitivity was subsequently measured. Results: Each clone was transfected successfully compared with JFH-1, with a significant difference in intracellular HCV core antigen (p < 0.05), an indicator of continuous HCV replication. Among all clones, L91M showed the highest increase in the HCV core antigen and HCV protein. There was no significant resistance against IFN treatment in core substitutions; however, IFN sensitivity was significantly different between the wildtype core and JFH-1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A novel genotype 1b HCV cell culture was constructed with core amino acid substitutions, which demonstrated IFN resistance of genotype 1b. This system will be useful for future analyses into the mechanisms of HCV genotype 1b treatment. PMID:27047766

  12. Genome-Wide Association Mapping of Yield and Grain Quality Traits in Winter Wheat Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, W.; Ogbonnaya, F. C.; Jighly, A.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.; Sohail, Q.; Rajaram, S.; Baum, M.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the genetic basis of yield and grain quality traits in winter wheat genotypes using association mapping approach, and identify linked molecular markers for marker assisted selection. A total of 120 elite facultative/winter wheat genotypes were evaluated for yield, quality and other agronomic traits under rain-fed and irrigated conditions for two years (2011–2012) at the Tel Hadya station of ICARDA, Syria. The same genotypes were genotyped using 3,051 Diversity Array Technologies (DArT) markers, of which 1,586 were of known chromosome positions. The grain yield performance of the genotypes was highly significant both in rain-fed and irrigated sites. Average yield of the genotypes ranged from 2295 to 4038 kg/ha and 4268 to 7102 kg/ha under rain-fed and irrigated conditions, respectively. Protein content and alveograph strength (W) ranged from 13.6–16.1% and 217.6–375 Jx10-4, respectively. DArT markers wPt731910 (3B), wPt4680 (4A), wPt3509 (5A), wPt8183 (6B), and wPt0298 (2D) were significantly associated with yield under rain-fed conditions. Under irrigated condition, tPt4125 on chromosome 2B was significantly associated with yield explaining about 13% of the variation. Markers wPt2607 and wPt1482 on 5B were highly associated with protein content and alveograph strength explaining 16 and 14% of the variations, respectively. The elite genotypes have been distributed to many countries using ICARDA’s International system for potential direct release and/or use as parents after local adaptation trials by the NARSs of respective countries. The QTLs identified in this study are recommended to be used for marker assisted selection after through validation using bi-parental populations. PMID:26496075

  13. Allosterism in human complement component 5a ((h)C5a): a damper of C5a receptor (C5aR) signaling.

    PubMed

    Rana, Soumendra; Sahoo, Amita Rani; Majhi, Bharat Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The phenomena of allosterism continues to advance the field of drug discovery, by illuminating gainful insights for many key processes, related to the structure-function relationships in proteins and enzymes, including the transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), both in normal as well as in the disease states. However, allosterism is completely unexplored in the native protein ligands, especially when a small covalent change significantly modulates the pharmacology of the protein ligands toward the signaling axes of the GPCRs. One such example is the human C5a ((h)C5a), the potent cationic anaphylatoxin that engages C5aR and C5L2 to elicit numerous immunological and non-immunological responses in humans. From the recently available structure-function data, it is clear that unlike the mouse C5a ((m)C5a), the (h)C5a displays conformational heterogeneity. However, the molecular basis of such conformational heterogeneity, otherwise allosterism in (h)C5a and its precise contribution toward the overall C5aR signaling is not known. This study attempts to decipher the functional role of allosterism in (h)C5a, by exploring the inherent conformational dynamics in (m)C5a, (h)C5a and in its point mutants, including the proteolytic mutant des-Arg(74)-(h)C5a. Prima facie, the comparative molecular dynamics study, over total 500 ns, identifies Arg(74)-Tyr(23) and Arg(37)-Phe(51) "cation-π" pairs as the molecular "allosteric switches" on (h)C5a that potentially functions as a damper of C5aR signaling. PMID:26212097

  14. Effects of prolactin receptor genotype on the litter size of Mangalica.

    PubMed

    Tempfli, Károly; Farkas, Gergely; Simon, Zsolt; Bali Papp, Agnes

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to detect different alleles of the prolactin receptor (PRLR) gene and to examine their effects on the litter size of the indigenous Hungarian pig, the Mangalica. G1789A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was investigated as a candidate for litter size. Samples from 80 purebred Mangalica sows and data of their 335 litters were provided by Olmos & Tóth Ltd. Hair follicles were used to isolate the required DNA. Allelic discrimination was performed by means of the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method using the AluI restriction enzyme and agarose gel electrophoresis. In the population examined, the A allele was found to be preferable in the Mangalica breed group. The most advantageous AA genotype was the least prevalent (8.75%), while the frequencies of AB and BB were 40% and 51.25%, respectively. Remarkably, the average number of piglets born alive per litter was 1.11 ± 0.39 higher in sows with AA as compared to those with BB genotype. By raising the frequency of the AA genotype, the litter size is likely to increase. However, the effect of PRLR genotypes can differ among pig breeds and even lines. Further studies may be required to observe and estimate possible pleiotropic effects of this polymorphism on other traits. PMID:21665580

  15. Clinical significance of human papillomavirus genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main causative agent for its development. HPV is a heterogeneous virus, and a persistent infection with a high-risk HPV contributes to the development of cancer. In recent decades, great advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of HPV, and HPV’s significance in cervical cancer prevention and management has received increased attention. In this review, we discuss the role of HPV genotyping in cervical cancer by addressing: clinically important issues in HPV virology; the current application of HPV genotyping in clinical medicine; and potential future uses for HPV genotyping. PMID:26768784

  16. MHC genotype and near-deterministic mortality in grey seals.

    PubMed

    de Assunção-Franco, M; Hoffman, J I; Harwood, J; Amos, W

    2012-01-01

    The Major Histocompatability Complex (MHC) is one of the best known and best characterised components of the immune system, yet its functions remain somewhat enigmatic, including both anti-pathogen activity and kin recognition. To explore the importance of the MHC relative to literally hundreds of other components of the immune system, we compared MHC genotype frequencies between pups and adults in the grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), one of many marine mammals that exhibit low allelic diversity. We find that one allele is strongly associated with pup survival, pups being more likely to be found dead if they lack it, while total allele number is a remarkably strong predictor of survivorship to adulthood. We estimate that approximately 70% of mortality can be attributed to the MHC. Our study therefore shows that low MHC allele diversity belies its critical role in determining whether a weaned pup negotiates disease to become a breeding adult. PMID:22997548

  17. Wnt5a Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Asem, Marwa S; Buechler, Steven; Wates, Rebecca Burkhalter; Miller, Daniel L; Stack, M Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Wnt5a is involved in activating several non-canonical WNT signaling pathways, through binding to different members of the Frizzled- and Ror-family receptors. Wnt5a signaling is critical for regulating normal developmental processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, adhesion and polarity. However, the aberrant activation or inhibition of Wnt5a signaling is emerging as an important event in cancer progression, exerting both oncogenic and tumor suppressive effects. Recent studies show the involvement of Wnt5a in regulating cancer cell invasion, metastasis, metabolism and inflammation. In this article, we review findings regarding the molecular mechanisms and roles of Wnt5a signaling in various cancer types, and highlight Wnt5a in ovarian cancer. PMID:27571105

  18. Host genotype by parasite genotype interactions underlying the resistance of anopheline mosquitoes to Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Louis; Halbert, Jean; Durand, Patrick; Gouagna, Louis C; Koella, Jacob C

    2005-01-01

    Background Most studies on the resistance of mosquitoes to their malaria parasites focus on the response of a mosquito line or colony against a single parasite genotype. In natural situations, however, it may be expected that mosquito-malaria relationships are based, as are many other host-parasite systems, on host genotype by parasite genotype interactions. In such systems, certain hosts are resistant to one subset of the parasite's genotypes, while other hosts are resistant to a different subset. Methods To test for genotype by genotype interactions between malaria parasites and their anopheline vectors, different genetic backgrounds (families consisting of the F1 offspring of individual females) of the major African vector Anopheles gambiae were challenged with several isolates of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (obtained from naturally infected children in Kenya). Results Averaged across all parasites, the proportion of infected mosquitoes and the number of oocysts found in their midguts were similar in all mosquito families. Both indices of resistance, however, differed considerably among isolates of the parasite. In particular, no mosquito family was most resistant to all parasites, and no parasite isolate was most infectious to all mosquitoes. Conclusions These results suggest that the level of mosquito resistance depends on the interaction between its own and the parasite's genotype. This finding thus emphasizes the need to take into account the range of genetic diversity exhibited by mosquito and malaria field populations in ideas and studies concerning the control of malaria. PMID:15644136

  19. Prevalence of interleukin-28B single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes in patients with hepatitis C infection in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Minakari, Mohammad; Golshani, Marjan; Yaran, Majid; Ataei, Behrooz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C infection is one of the most common causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Due to limited efficacy and side-effects of treatment, identification of the determinants of response to treatment is an important issue. Nowadays, genotyping of interleukin (IL)-28B is one of the strongest tests used for prediction of sustained virological response. The prevalence of IL28B genotypes varies across different ethnicities. This study presents data on IL28B single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs12979860) in a group of Iranian hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients already diagnosed for hepatitis C enrolled the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood samples. Specific primers were used to amplify IL28B gene (rs12979860). The rs129679860 SNP was genotyped by real-time polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan® probes. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.16 years (25–42 years). Ninety-nine subjects were male and 1 was female. The frequency of HCV genotypes was as follows: Genotype 3a: 53%, genotype 1a: 42%, genotype 1b: 2%, mixed genotype (1a + 3a): 1% and 2%: Nontypable. IL28B rs12979860 genotypes were TT in 17 patients (17%), CT in 41 patients (41%), and CC in the remaining 42 patients (42%). Conclusion: The prevalence of C allele is much higher in our population study than in African American HCV patients (62.5% and 40% respectively), which can explain better response to treatment in our patients. PMID:27308262

  20. Circulation of HRSV in Belgium: from multiple genotype circulation to prolonged circulation of predominant genotypes.

    PubMed

    Houspie, Lieselot; Lemey, Philippe; Keyaerts, Els; Reijmen, Eva; Vergote, Valentijn; Vankeerberghen, Anne; Vaeyens, Freya; De Beenhouwer, Hans; Van Ranst, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Molecular surveillance of HRSV in Belgium for 15 consecutive seasons (1996-2011) revealed a shift from a regular 3-yearly cyclic pattern, into a yearly alternating periodicity where HRSV-B is replaced by HRSV-A. Phylogenetic analysis for HRSV-A demonstrated the stable circulation of GA2 and GA5, with GA2 being dominant over GA5 during 5 consecutive seasons (2006-2011). We also identified 2 new genotype specific amino acid mutations of the GA2 genotype (A122 and Q156) and 7 new GA5 genotype specific amino acid mutations (F102, I108, T111, I125, D161, S191 and L217). Several amino acid positions, all located in the second hypervariable region of HRSV-A were found to be under positive selection. Phylogenetic analysis of HRSV-B showed the circulation of GB12 and GB13, where GB13 represented 100% of the isolated strains in 4 out of 5 consecutive seasons (2007-2011). Amino acids under positive selection were all located in the aminoterminal hypervariable region of HRSV-B, except one amino acid located in the conserved region. The genotype distribution within the HRSV-B subgroup has evolved from a co-circulation of multiple genotypes to the circulation of a single predominant genotype. The Belgian GB13 strains circulating since 2006, all clustered under the BAIV branch and contained several branch specific amino acid substitutions. The demographic history of genotypes GA2, GA5 and GB13 demonstrated a decrease in the total GA2 and GA5 population size, coinciding with the global expansion of the GB13 population. The emergence of the GB13 genotype resulted in a newly established balance between the predominant genotypes. PMID:23577109

  1. Genotypic Context and Epistasis in Individuals and Populations.

    PubMed

    Sackton, Timothy B; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-07-14

    Genes encode components of coevolved and interconnected networks. The effect of genotype on phenotype therefore depends on genotypic context through gene interactions known as epistasis. Epistasis is important in predicting phenotype from genotype for an individual. It is also examined in population studies to identify genetic risk factors in complex traits and to predict evolution under selection. Paradoxically, the effects of genotypic context in individuals and populations are distinct and sometimes contradictory. We argue that predicting genotype from phenotype for individuals based on population studies is difficult and, especially in human genetics, likely to result in underestimating the effects of genotypic context. PMID:27419868

  2. Simultaneous Genotyping and Quantification of Hepatitis B Virus for Genotypes B and C by Real-Time PCR Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Xiu-Yu; Guo, Jin-Jun; Zeng, Ai-Zhong; Hu, Jie-Li; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Shan, You-Lan; Huang, Ai-Long

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important cause of human chronic liver diseases and is a major public health problem. Viral load and HBV genotype play critical roles in determining clinical outcomes and response to antiviral treatment in hepatitis B patients. Viral genotype detection and quantification assays are currently in use with different levels of effectiveness. In this study, the performance of a real-time genotyping and quantitative PCR (GQ-PCR)-based assay was evaluated. Through the use of genotype-specific primers and probes, this assay provides simultaneous identification and quantification of genotypes B and C in a single reaction. Our GQ-PCR correctly identified all predefined genotypes B and C, and no cross-reaction between genotypes B and C were observed. The GQ-PCR identified more cases of HBV infections with mixed genotypes B and C than direct sequencing did. Samples from 127 HBV-infected Chinese patients were genotyped with GQ-PCR, revealing 56.7% HBV as genotype B, 13.4% as genotype C, and 29.8% as mixed genotypes B and C. This assay provides a reliable, efficient, and cost-effective means for quantification of the B and C genotypes of HBV in single or mixed infections. This assay is suitable for sequential monitoring of viral load levels and for determining the relationship between the genotype viral load and stage of disease in Asians. PMID:20720032

  3. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes Among Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Hormozgan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Farzaneh; Moosavy, Seyed Hamid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Eghbali, Hajar; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 170 million people in the world are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Determination of HCV genotype before starting the treatment is required, because HCV genotype affects the course of treatment and drug dosage Objectives We aimed to evaluate HCV genotypes among patients with positive results for anti-HCV in Bandar Abbas from 2011 to 2012. Patients and Methods Five hundred and nine consecutive patients with established chronic HCV infection referred to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center, Blood Transfusion and Center for Special Diseases from March 2011 to March 2012 were enrolled in this cross sectional study. Five mL of peripheral blood was taken from precipitants and viral RNA extracted after plasma separation. Hepatitis C virus RNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) assay and then HCV genotypes analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. Results In overall, 509 patients enrolled to this study. The mean age of these patients was 38.87 ± 9.55 years ranging from 1 to 90 years. Routs of transmission were: 238 (46.7%) inject of substance, 149 (29.3%) unknown rout, 62 (12.2%) blood transfusion, 50 (9.8%) sexual contact, and 10 (2%) mother to child. Frequency of HCV genotypes were: 316 (62.1%) 1a, 117 (23%) 1b, and 76 (14.9%) 3a. there was no significant association between HCV genotypes and gender, educational degree, risk factor of Hepatitis C, job, monthly income, HIV infection, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, Intravenous drug injection, and underlying disease (P > 0.05). Conclusions This results the same as many similar studies demonstrated that common HCV genotypes in Iranian patients were 1a, 3a and 1b, respectively. Patients with 1a and 1b genotypes have lower responses to interferon treatment, and it is reasonable to perform early screening to diagnose and determine HCV genotype for effective treatment and diagnose high-risk cases. PMID:24403914

  4. How to Relate Complex DNA Repair Genotypes to Pathway Function and, Ultimately, Health Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, IM

    2002-01-09

    Exposure to ionizing radiation increases the incidence of cancer. However, predicting which individuals are at most risk from radiation exposure is a distant goal. Predictive ability is needed to guide policies that regulate radiation exposure and ensure that medical treatments have maximum benefit and minimum risk. Differences between people in susceptibility to radiation are largely based on their genotype, the genes inherited from their parents. Among the important genes are those that produce proteins that repair DNA damaged by radiation. Base Excision Repair (BER) proteins repair single strand breaks and oxidized bases in DNA. Double Strand Break Repair proteins repair broken chromosomes. Using technologies and information from the Human Genome Project, we have previously determined that the DNA sequence of DNA repair genes varies within the human population. An average of 3-4 different variants were found that affect the protein for each of 37 genes studied. The average frequency of these variants is 5%. Given the many genes in each DNA repair pathway and their many variants, technical ability to determine an individual's repair genotype greatly exceeds ability to interpret the information. A long-term goal is to relate DNA repair genotypes to health risk from radiation. This study focused on the BER pathway. The BER genes are known, variants of the genes have been identified at LLNL, and LLNL had recently developed an assay for BER function using white blood cells. The goal of this initial effort was to begin developing data that could be used to test the hypothesis that many different genotypes have similar DNA repair capacity phenotypes (function). Relationships between genotype and phenotype could then be used to group genotypes with similar function and ultimately test the association of groups of genotypes with health risk from radiation. Genotypes with reduced repair function are expected to increase risk of radiation-induced health effects. The goal

  5. ApoE (Apolipoprotein E) Genotyping

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are no clear-cut tests to diagnose Alzheimer disease during life. Health practitioners can, however, make a reasonably accurate clinical diagnosis of AD by ruling out other potential causes of dementia and checking for a genetic predisposition to AD with APOE genotyping as supplemental ...

  6. Camelina: Adaptation and performance of genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Camelina (Camelina sativa L. Crantz) has shown potential as an alternative and biofuel crop in cereal-based cropping systems. Our study investigated the adaption, performance, and yield stability among camelina genotypes across diverse US Pacific Northwest (PNW) environments. Seven named camelina ge...

  7. Selection of Shade Tolerant Tall Fescue Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tall fescue (Schedonorus arundinaceus) is genetically variable for many agronomic traits, so it might be possible to increase its persistence and productivity in shaded agroforestry applications. The objective of this research was to identify high yielding, shade-tolerant genotypes. Seed was obtai...

  8. Infectivity of the cervine genotype of Cryptosporidium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidiosis is a diarrheal disease of humans and animals caused by parasites in the genus Cryptosporidium, a genus comprising 19 valid species and 40 genotypes. Most human infections are caused by C. hominis and C. parvum. To a lesser extent infections with C. meleagridis, C. felis, C. canis, ...

  9. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  10. In Vitro Conservation of Sweet Potato Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima; Tavares, Fernanda Ferreira; dos Santos, Maria Clézia; Menezes, Thays Saynara Alves; de Santana, Aléa Dayane Dantas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for the in vitro conservation of sweet potato genotypes using the slow growth technique. The first experiment was conducted in a 4 × 5 × 2 factorial scheme, testing four genotypes (IPB-007, IPB-052, IPB-072, and IPB-137), five concentrations of abscisic acid (ABA) (0.0, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 8.0 mg·L−1), and two temperatures (18 and 25°C). The second experiment was conducted in a 4 × 3 × 3 factorial scheme at 18°C, testing four genotypes (IPB-007, IPB-052, IPB-072, and IPB-137), three variations of MS salts (50, 75, and 100%), and three concentrations of sucrose (10, 20, and 30 g·L−1). Every three months, we evaluated the survival (%), shoot height, and shoot viability. In vitro conservation of the sweet potato genotypes IPB-052 and IPB-007 was obtained over three and six months, respectively, using MS medium plus 2.0 mg·L−1 of ABA at either 18 or 25°C. Genotypes IPB-072 and IPB-137 can be kept for three and six months, respectively, in MS medium without ABA at 18°C. It is possible to store IPB-052 and IPB-072 for six months and IPB-007 and IPB-137 for nine months using 30 g·L−1 of sucrose and 50% MS salts. PMID:24563627

  11. Schizophrenia miR-137 Locus Risk Genotype is Associated with DLPFC Hyperactivation

    PubMed Central

    van Erp, Theo G.M.; Guella, Ilaria; Vawter, Marquis P.; Turner, Jessica; Brown, Gregory G.; McCarthy, Gregory; Greve, Douglas N.; Glover, Gary H.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Lim, Kelvin O.; Bustillo, Juan R.; Belger, Aysenil; Ford, Judith M.; Mathalon, Daniel H.; Diaz, Michele; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background MiR-137 dysregulation has been implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia, but its functional role remains to be determined. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired on 48 schizophrenia patients and 63 healthy volunteers (total sample size n=111 subjects), with similar mean age and sex distribution, while subjects performed a Sternberg Item Response Paradigm with memory loads of 1, 3, and 5 numbers. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) retrieval activation for the working memory load of 3 numbers, for which hyperactivation had been shown in schizophrenia patients compared with controls, was extracted. The genome-wide association study confirmed schizophrenia risk SNP rs1625579 (miR-137 locus) was genotyped (schizophrenia: GG n=0, GT n=9, TT n=39; healthy volunteers: GG=2, GT n=15, and TT n=46). Fisher's Exact Test examined the effect of diagnosis on rs1625579 allele frequency distribution (p=ns). Mixed model regression analyses examined the effects of diagnosis and genotype on working memory performance measures and DLPFC activation. Results Patients showed significantly higher left DLPFC retrieval activation on working memory load 3, lower working memory performance and longer response times compared with controls. There was no effect of genotype on working memory performance or response times in either group. However, individuals with the rs1625579 TT genotype had significantly higher left DLPFC activation than those with the GG/GT genotypes. Conclusion Our study suggests that the rs1625579 TT (miR-137 locus) schizophrenia risk genotype is associated with the schizophrenia risk phenotype DLPFC hyperactivation commonly considered a measure of brain inefficiency. PMID:23910899

  12. Multilocus genotyping of Giardia duodenalis isolates from calves in Oromia Special Zone, Central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Wegayehu, Teklu; Karim, Md Robiul; Erko, Berhanu; Zhang, Longxian; Tilahun, Getachew

    2016-09-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a widespread protozoan parasite that infects human and other mammals. Assessing the zoonotic transmission of the infection requires molecular characterization as there is considerable genetic variation within the species. This study was conducted to identify assemblages of Giardia duodenalis in dairy calves; and to assess the potential role of cattle isolates in zoonotic transmission in central Ethiopia. A total of 449 fecal samples were collected and screened using microscopy and PCR targeting the small-subunit (ssu) rRNA, triose phosphate isomerase (tpi), β-giardin (bg) and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) genes. The overall prevalence of Giardia duodenalis in dairy calves was found to be 9.6% (43/449). The prevalence of infection based on sex, age and breed difference was statistically not significant (p>0.05). Genotyping results revealed the presence of assemblage E and assemblage A (AI). The genotypic frequency reported was 95.3% (41/43) for assemblage E and 4.7% (2/43) for assemblage A. There was one mixed infection with assemblages AI and E. Sequence analyses showed the existence of 10 genotypes within assemblage E. One genotype that showed novel nucleotide substitution was identified at the ssu rRNA locus. The other 9 genotypes, 3 at each locus, were identified at the tpi, the bg and the gdh loci with two of the gdh genotypes were novel. Findings of the current study indicate the occurrence of the livestock-specific assemblage E and the potentially zoonotic assemblage A, with the former being more prevalent. Although the zoonotic assemblage was less prevalent, there is a possibility of zoonotic human infection as AI is reported from both animals and humans. PMID:27268147

  13. New insights for C5a and C5a receptors in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunguang; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    The complement system plays a central role in inflammation and immunity. Among the complement activation products, C5a is one of the most potent inflammatory peptides with a broad spectrum of functions. There is strong evidence for complement activation including elevated plasma level of C5a in humans and animals with sepsis. C5a exerts its effects through the C5a receptors. Of the two receptors that bind C5a, the C5aR (CD88) is known to mediate signaling activity, whereas the function of another C5a binding receptor, C5L2, remains largely unknown. Here, we review the critical role of C5a in sepsis and summarize evidence indicating that both C5aR and C5L2 act as regulating receptors for C5a during sepsis. PMID:23233853

  14. Haplotypes of the TaGS5-A1 Gene Are Associated with Thousand-Kernel Weight in Chinese Bread Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shasha; Yan, Xuefang; Wang, Yongyan; Liu, Hongmei; Cui, Dangqun; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, we cloned TaGS5 gene and found the association of TaGS5-A1 alleles with agronomic traits. In this study, the promoter sequence of the TaGS5-A1 gene was isolated from bread wheat. Sequencing results revealed that a G insertion was found in position -1925 bp of the TaGS5-A1 gene (Reference to ATG), which occurred in the Sp1 domain of the promoter sequence. Combined with previous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the TaGS5-A1 exon sequence, four genotypes were formed at the TaGS5-A1 locus and were designated as TaGS5-A1a-a, TaGS5-A1a-b, TaGS5-A1b-a, and TaGS5-A1b-b, respectively. Analysis of the association of TaGS5-A1 alleles with agronomic traits indicated that cultivars with the TaGS5-A1a-b allele possessed significantly higher thousand-kernel weight (TKW) and lower plant height than cultivars with the TaGS5-A1a-a allele, and cultivars with the TaGS5-A1b-b allele showed higher TKW than cultivars with the TaGS5-A1b-a allele. The differences of these traits between the TaGS5-A1a-a and TaGS5-A1a-b alleles were larger than those of the TaGS5-A1b-a and TaGS5-A1b-b alleles, suggesting that the -1925G insertion plays the more important role in TaGS5-A1a genotypes than in TaGS5-A1b genotypes. qRT-PCR indicated that TaGS5-A1b-b possessed the significantly highest expression level among four TaGS5-A1 haplotypes in mature seeds and further showed a significantly higher expression level than TaGS5-A1b-a at five different developmental stages of the seeds, suggesting that high expression of TaGS5-A1 was positively associated with high TKW in bread wheat. This study could provide a relatively superior genotype in view of TKW in wheat breeding programs and could also provide important information for dissection of the regulatory mechanism of the yield-related traits. PMID:27375643

  15. Discovery of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine-based inhibitors of HCV NS5A.

    PubMed

    DeGoey, David A; Betebenner, David A; Grampovnik, David J; Liu, Dachun; Pratt, John K; Tufano, Michael D; He, Wenping; Krishnan, Preethi; Pilot-Matias, Tami J; Marsh, Kennan C; Molla, Akhteruzzaman; Kempf, Dale J; Maring, Clarence J

    2013-06-15

    Efforts to improve the genotype 1a potency and pharmacokinetics of earlier naphthyridine-based HCV NS5A inhibitors resulted in the discovery of a novel series of pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine compounds, which displayed potent inhibition of HCV genotypes 1a and 1b in the replicon assay. SAR in this system revealed that the introduction of amides bearing an additional 'E' ring provided compounds with improved potency and pharmacokinetics. Introduction of a chiral center on the amide portion resulted in the observation of a stereochemical dependence for replicon potency and provided a site for the attachment of functional groups useful for improving the solubility of the series. Compound 21 was selected for administration in an HCV-infected chimpanzee. Observation of a robust viral load decline provided positive proof of concept for inhibition of HCV replication in vivo for the compound series. PMID:23642966

  16. Halothane genotype and pork quality. 3. Comminuted meat products derived from the three halothane genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, P; Mellett, F D; Hoffman, L C

    2000-02-01

    The effect of the halothane gene on cured meat products was investigated using the meat from 60 Landrace×Large White pigs of known halothane genotype (NN=25, Nn=19, nn=16). Results for the two types of fresh sausage manufactured (with and without rusk) indicated that the NN pigs (15.7%) had lower total moisture losses (P<0.05) compared to the nn pigs (18.9%), with Nn being intermediate (17.4%) for the sausage without rusk. Where rusk was added, there were no significant differences between genotypes for moisture losses (NN=12.6%, Nn=13. 0%, nn=14.2%). Taste panel evaluations of the fresh sausages made without rusk indicated no genotypic influence for juiciness, however the sausage made with the rusk was judged the juiciest for the nn genotype, with Nn being intermediate and NN the least juiciest. The smoking and cooking losses during manufacturing of the emulsion product (vienna) indicated that the nn genotype (12.5%) had significantly (P<0.05) higher total losses than the Nn genotype (11. 3%), with NN being intermediate (12.4%). PMID:22060606

  17. Staphylococcus aureus genotype B and other genotypes isolated from cow milk in European countries.

    PubMed

    Cosandey, A; Boss, R; Luini, M; Artursson, K; Bardiau, M; Breitenwieser, F; Hehenberger, E; Lam, Th; Mansfeld, M; Michel, A; Mösslacher, G; Naskova, J; Nelson, S; Podpečan, O; Raemy, A; Ryan, E; Salat, O; Zangerl, P; Steiner, A; Graber, H U

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is globally one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in cattle. Previous studies, however, have demonstrated in Swiss cows that Staph. aureus isolated from bovine intramammary infection is genetically heterogeneous, with Staph. aureus genotype B (GTB) and GTC being the most prominent genotypes. In addition, Staph. aureus GTB was found to be contagious, whereas Staph. aureus GTC and all the remaining genotypes were involved in individual cow disease. The aim of this study was to subtype strains of Staph. aureus isolated from bovine mastitic milk and bulk tank milk to obtain a unified view of the presence of bovine staphylococcal subtypes in 12 European countries. A total of 456 strains of Staph. aureus were subjected to different typing methods: ribosomal spacer PCR, detection of enterotoxin genes, and detection of gene polymorphisms (lukE, coa). Major genotypes with their variants were combined into genotypic clusters (CL). This study revealed 5 major CL representing 76% of all strains and comprised CLB, CLC, CLF, CLI, and CLR. The clusters were characterized by the same genetic properties as the Swiss isolates, demonstrating high clonality of bovine Staph. aureus. Interestingly, CLB was situated in central Europe whereas the other CL were widely disseminated. The remaining 24% of the strains comprised 41 genotypes and variants, some of which (GTAM, GTBG) were restricted to certain countries; many others, however, were observed only once. PMID:26585469

  18. Global Distribution and Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Jane P; Humphreys, Isla; Flaxman, Abraham; Brown, Anthony; Cooke, Graham S; Pybus, Oliver G; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exhibits high genetic diversity, characterized by regional variations in genotype prevalence. This poses a challenge to the improved development of vaccines and pan-genotypic treatments, which require the consideration of global trends in HCV genotype prevalence. Here we provide the first comprehensive survey of these trends. To approximate national HCV genotype prevalence, studies published between 1989 and 2013 reporting HCV genotypes are reviewed and combined with overall HCV prevalence estimates from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project. We also generate regional and global genotype prevalence estimates, inferring data for countries lacking genotype information. We include 1,217 studies in our analysis, representing 117 countries and 90% of the global population. We calculate that HCV genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, comprising 83.4 million cases (46.2% of all HCV cases), approximately one-third of which are in East Asia. Genotype 3 is the next most prevalent globally (54.3 million, 30.1%); genotypes 2, 4, and 6 are responsible for a total 22.8% of all cases; genotype 5 comprises the remaining <1%. While genotypes 1 and 3 dominate in most countries irrespective of economic status, the largest proportions of genotypes 4 and 5 are in lower-income countries. Conclusion: Although genotype 1 is most common worldwide, nongenotype 1 HCV cases—which are less well served by advances in vaccine and drug development—still comprise over half of all HCV cases. Relative genotype proportions are needed to inform healthcare models, which must be geographically tailored to specific countries or regions in order to improve access to new treatments. Genotype surveillance data are needed from many countries to improve estimates of unmet need. (Hepatology 2015;61:77–87) PMID:25069599

  19. Diversification of CRISPR within coexisting genotypes in a natural population of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kuno, Sotaro; Sako, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) confers adaptive immunity against phages via sequence fragments (spacers) derived from mobile genetic elements (MGEs), thus serving as a memory of past host-phage co-evolution. To understand co-evolutionary dynamics in natural settings, we examined CRISPR diversity in 94 isolates of Microcystis aeruginosa from a small eutrophic pond. Fifty-two isolates possessed the CRISPR and were classified into 22 different CRISPR-related genotypes, suggesting stable coexistence of multiple genotypes with different phage susceptibility. Seven CRISPR-related genotypes showed variation of spacers at the leader-end of the CRISPR, indicating active spacer addition from MGEs. An abundant phylotype (based on the internal transcribed spacer of the rRNA gene) contained different CRISPR spacer genotypes with the same CRISPR-associated cas2 gene. These data suggest that selective phage infection and possibly plasmid transfer may contribute to maintenance of multiple genotypes of M. aeruginosa and that rapid co-evolution within a host-phage combination may be driven by increased contact frequency. Forty-two isolates lacked detectable CRISPR loci. Relative abundance of the CRISPR-lacking genotypes in the population suggests that CRISPR loss may be selected for enhanced genetic exchange. PMID:24586036

  20. Regrowth patterns and rosette attributes contribute to the differential compensatory responses of Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes to apical damage.

    PubMed

    Scholes, D R; Wszalek, A E; Paige, K N

    2016-03-01

    A plant's compensatory performance refers to its ability to maintain or increase its reproductive output following damage. The ability of a plant to compensate depends on numerous factors including the type, severity, frequency and timing of damage, the environmental conditions and the plant's genotype. Upon apical damage, a cascade of hormonal and genetic responses often produces dramatic changes in a plant's growth, development, architecture and physiology. All else being equal, this response is largely dependent on a plant's genotype, with different regrowth patterns displayed by different genotypes of a given species. In this study, we compare the architectural and growth patterns of two Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes following apical damage. Specifically, we characterise regrowth patterns of the genotypes Columbia-4 and Landsberg erecta, which typically differ in their compensation to apical meristem removal. We report that Landsberg erecta suffered reductions in the number of stems produced, maximum elongation rate, a delay in reaching this rate, lower average rosette quality throughout the growing period, and ultimately, less aboveground dry biomass and seed production when damaged compared to undamaged control plants. Columbia-4 had no reductions in any of these measures and maintained larger rosette area when clipped relative to when unclipped. Based on the apparent influence of the rosette on these genotypes' compensatory performances, we performed a rosette removal experiment, which confirmed that the rosette contributes to compensatory performance. This study provides a novel characterisation of regrowth patterns following apical damage, with insights into those measures having the largest effect on plant performance. PMID:26434737

  1. Daclatasvir plus Asunaprevir Treatment for Real-World HCV Genotype 1-Infected Patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Tatsuo; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Arai, Makoto; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Wu, Shuang; Nakamoto, Shingo; Imazeki, Fumio; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background. All-oral combination of direct-acting antivirals could lead to higher sustained virologic response (SVR) in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients. In the present study, we examined the efficacy and safety of the dual oral treatment with HCV nonstructural protein (NS) 5A inhibitor daclatasvir (DCV) plus HCV NS3/4A inhibitor asunaprevir (ASV) for 24 weeks in real-world HCV genotype 1-infected Japanese individuals. Methods. After screening for HCV NS5A resistance-associated variants (RAVs) by PCR invader assay, a total of 54 Japanese patients infected with HCV genotype 1 treated with DCV plus ASV were retrospectively analyzed. SVR12 was used for evaluation of the virologic response. Results. Of the total 54 patients, 46 patients (85.2%) were treated with DCV plus ASV for 24 weeks and achieved SVR12. The other 8 patients (14.8%) discontinued this treatment before 24 weeks due to adverse events. Of these 8 patients, 5 and 3 patients did and did not achieve SVR12, respectively. Finally, 51 of 54 (94.4%) patients achieved SVR12. Conclusion. Treatment with DCV and ASV after screening for HCV NS5A RAVs by PCR invader assay is effective and safe in the treatment of real-world HCV genotype 1-infected patients in Japan. PMID:27279790

  2. Atlas: a java-based tool for managing genotypes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Enciso, E; García-Bernal, P G; Pérez-Enciso, M

    2005-01-01

    With the exponential increase in genotyping capability, it is fundamental to check data consistency and improve genotype management. Atlas is a Java-based application for managing genotypes that also provides a series of tools useful in traceability, parentage testing, and identification, as well as pedigree and marker visualization. PMID:16135705

  3. Transmission and persistence of Ceratonova shasta genotypes in Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Charlene N; Wong, Peter; Hallett, Sascha L; Ray, R Adam; Bartholomew, Jerri L

    2014-12-01

    Ceratonova shasta is a myxozoan parasite of salmon and trout transmitted by waterborne actinospores. Based on DNA sequence data and host specificity, 4 distinct parasite genotypes are recognized. Genotypes I and II are common in the lower reaches of the Klamath River, Oregon-California, but only infection by genotype I causes mortality in Chinook salmon. We conducted sentinel fish exposures and determined genotype composition in river water during exposure, and in fish gills, intestine, and tank water post-exposure to determine whether: (1) transmission of parasites having different genotypes is host-specific and (2) all transmitted genotypes persist in the host through to release as waterborne stages. Initial parasite transmission to the fish host appears indiscriminant, since we detected both genotypes I and II in 83.6% of the fish gills sampled. However, only genotype I was detected in fish that succumbed to infection, while both genotypes persisted in fish that survived. Persistence was likely dependent on exposure dose, initial infection type (mixed or single) and infection outcome (mortality or survival). The transmission of both genotypes to a majority of Chinook salmon and the persistence of multiple genotypes raises questions about how infection with mixed genotypes could result in within-host interactions that affect disease severity. PMID:24945751

  4. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  5. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  6. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  7. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  8. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  9. Genomic Evaluations with Many More Genotypes and Phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliabilities of genomic evaluations increase when more genotypes are matched to more phenotypes. Options to expand genomic evaluation include genotyping more animals or markers; combining data sets across breed and geographical borders; using low cost, less dense marker subsets to obtain genotypes ...

  10. New description of Toxoplasma gondii genotypes from French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Yera, Hélène; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Lesle, Florence; Eyrolle-Guignot, Dominique; Besnard, Marianne; Baud, Alain; Georges, Amandine; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Dardé, Marie Laure

    2014-06-01

    We report here the first isolation and genotyping of two human Toxoplasma gondii strains from French Polynesia. The parasites had new and atypical genotypes, and were responsible for asymptomatic congenital toxoplasmosis. Both genotypes were divergent from the common strains isolated in Europe, North America, South America, Africa and China. PMID:24560965

  11. Genomic Evaluations With Many More Genotypes And Phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reliabilities of genomic evaluations increase when more genotypes are matched to more phenotypes. Options to expand genomic evaluation include genotyping more animals or markers; combining data sets across breed and geographical borders; using low cost, less dense marker subsets to obtain genotypes ...

  12. Identification and genotyping of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Wang, Zhaoxia; Su, Yan; Liang, Xiaoying; Sun, Xiaojing; Peng, Shuai; Lu, Huijun; Jiang, Ning; Yin, Jigang; Xiang, Mei; Chen, Qijun

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the prevalence of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in China was investigated. Twelve genotypes of E. bieneusi were identified, of which 10 were novel genotypes. Further, 41.6% of the genotypes were found in both humans and animals. This is the first report of E. bieneusi in China. PMID:21389159

  13. Genomic imputation and evaluation using 342 high density Holstein genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic evaluations for 73,749 Holsteins were computed using 636,967 of the 777,000 markers on the Illumina high density (HD) chip. Observed data included 342 animals with HD genotypes, 54,676 animals with 42,503 marker (50K) genotypes, 17,371 animals with 2,614 marker (3K) genotypes, and 1,360 nong...

  14. epsilon3epsilon4 genotype as risk factor of myocardial infarction in middle-aged people in Spain.

    PubMed

    Garcés, Carmen; Maicas, Carolina; Grande, Rosario; Benavente, Mercedes; Viturro, Enrique; Cano, Beatriz; López, Dolores; de Oya, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in lipid metabolism. Its epsilon4 allele has been consistently associated with lipoprotein disorders but its connection to myocardial infarction (MI) is controversial. Because epsilon4 frequency decreases with age we thought that the contradictory results in different studies could be due to the wide age range of the subjects included. To test our hypothesis, ApoE genotyping was performed in 474 MI cases and an analysis was performed by percentiles of age. The frequencies of epsilon3epsilon4 genotype and epsilon4 allele in the MI group as a whole (subjects aged 31 to 92) were not significantly different from those in our area general population. However, significant differences were observed when comparing by group of age. The frequencies decreased as age increased. The epsilon3epsilon4 and epsilon4 frequencies were significantly higher in MI subjects aged 31 to 56 than in subjects over 74. The epsilon3epsilon4 genotype prevalence in an age and sex matched control group of subjects aged 31 to 56 was significantly lower than in the 31-56 year-old MI group. In conclusion, our data shows different epsilon3epsilon4 and epsilon4 frequencies depending on the age range of the subjects with MI, being significantly higher in the middle-aged group. This finding may help explain the discrepancies between studies analyzing association between apoE genotype and MI, and emphasizes the idea of considering apoE genotype for prevention at early age. PMID:16276010

  15. Genotyping of the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene Isolated From Gastric Biopsies in Shiraz, Southern Iran: A PCR-RFLP and Sequence Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Moaddeb, Afsaneh; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Firouzi, Roya; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Farshad, Shohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. Objectives The aim of this study was to genotype the H. pylori cagA gene isolated from antral biopsies of patients with stomach symptoms, using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Patients and Methods A total of 161 gastric biopsies were collected from patients with stomach symptoms. After isolation of H. pylori from the biopsy culture, the cagA gene was assessed using PCR. The PCR products were then digested by the HinfI restriction endonuclease enzyme. A sample of each genotype was also subjected to direct sequencing for further analysis. Results From 161 antral biopsies, 61 (37.9%) were positive for H. pylori in culture. Overall, 24 cagA-positives were detected in the isolates. RFLP indicated three different genotypes (I, II, and III) of cagA with a frequency of 62.5%, 25%, and 12.5% among the isolates, respectively. Genotypes I and II of cagA were predominant in patients who had gastritis. However, genotype III was found in three patients with duodenitis and duodenal ulcers. Alignment of the nucleotide sequences of the three isolated genotypes, with H. pylori 26695 as a reference strain, revealed 12 inserted nucleotides in genotype III. When the sequence of genotype III was aligned with 15 additional H. pylori strains available in GenBank, the same inserted nucleotides were detected in six of them. Conclusions Using the PCR-RFLP method, three distinctive H. pylori cagA genotypes were detected in antral biopsies. Genotype I, which was predominant among the isolates, was significantly associated with gastritis. However, the data showed that cagA genotype III may play a role in duodenitis and duodenal ulcers in patients infected with H. pylori. PMID:27335631

  16. Determining hepatitis C virus genotype distribution among high-risk groups in Iran using real-time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Namayandeh, Mandana; Asaei, Sadaf; Aliabadi, Nasrin; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype patterns among high-risk Iranian groups, using real-time RT-PCR. METHODS: In this study, we evaluated the distribution of different HCV genotypes among injection drug users and other high-risk groups over a 4-year period (from 2009 to 2012) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sera from 888 HCV-infected patients residing in southern and southwest Iran were genotyped using real-time PCR with common primers and specific probes. These patients were grouped into distinct exposure categories. Illicit drug users constituted the primary group and were further evaluated for HCV genotype distribution and parameters such as age range. RESULTS: Of the examined HCV-infected patients, 62% were substance abusers, although the route of transmission could not be determined in approximately 30% of these patients. HCV genotyping revealed that Gt1 was the most prevalent genotype among the drug users as well as among patients with thalassemia, hemophilia, solid organ recipients and those on hemodialysis. Mixed infections were only seen in addict groups, where Gt2 genotype was also found. The highest frequencies in HCV-positive addict patients were observed in the 31-40 age group. Our research also showed that the addiction age has increased, whereas the addiction rate has dropped in this region. Most illicit drug users had more than one risk factor such as tattoo and/or a history of imprisonment. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that the most common HCV-infection route and HCV-genotype in southern and southwest Iran was illicit drug abuse and Gt1, respectively. PMID:24914351

  17. Association between Helicobacter pylori hopQI genotypes and human gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, E; Kahrizi, D; Moradi, M T; Sohrabi, M; Amini, S; Mousavi, S A R; Yari, K

    2016-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori use a number of mechanisms to survive in the stomach lumen and can lead to gastritis and reduction in stomach acid secretion. It has been found that the risk of developing gastric carcinoma is associated to heterogeneity of H. pylori virulence factors such as HopQ. The HopQ is one of the outer membrane proteins involved in bacterial adherence to gastric mucosa and has been suggested to also main role in the virulence of H. pylori. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the association between different H. pylori virulence hopQI (types I) genotyping and patients with gastroduodenal disorders. For this purpose 58 stomach biopsies of the patients with gastric cancer and 100 saliva samples from healthy and H. pylori infected individuals were collected and studied. Then genomic DNA was purified and PCR was done for desired gene via specific primers. The H. pylori infections were diagnosed using PCR for GlmM gene. Then frequencies of hopQI+ and hopQI- genotypes were determined in H. pylori infected cases. Statistical analysis showed that there were not significant differences between healthy and diseased ones for genotypes hopQI+ and hopQI-. Then the hopQI+ cannot be as a risk factor genotype for gastric cancer. PMID:26828979

  18. The metabochip, a custom genotyping array for genetic studies of metabolic, cardiovascular, and anthropometric traits.

    PubMed

    Voight, Benjamin F; Kang, Hyun Min; Ding, Jun; Palmer, Cameron D; Sidore, Carlo; Chines, Peter S; Burtt, Noël P; Fuchsberger, Christian; Li, Yanming; Erdmann, Jeanette; Frayling, Timothy M; Heid, Iris M; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Prokopenko, Inga; Randall, Joshua C; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Teslovich, Tanya M; Wheeler, Eleanor; Maguire, Jared; Parkin, Melissa; Potter, Simon; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil; Stirrups, Kathleen; Winckler, Wendy; Sanna, Serena; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Cucca, Francesco; Barroso, Inês; Deloukas, Panos; Loos, Ruth J F; Kathiresan, Sekar; Munroe, Patricia B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of loci for type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, as well as for related traits such as body mass index, glucose and insulin levels, lipid levels, and blood pressure. These studies also have pointed to thousands of loci with promising but not yet compelling association evidence. To establish association at additional loci and to characterize the genome-wide significant loci by fine-mapping, we designed the "Metabochip," a custom genotyping array that assays nearly 200,000 SNP markers. Here, we describe the Metabochip and its component SNP sets, evaluate its performance in capturing variation across the allele-frequency spectrum, describe solutions to methodological challenges commonly encountered in its analysis, and evaluate its performance as a platform for genotype imputation. The metabochip achieves dramatic cost efficiencies compared to designing single-trait follow-up reagents, and provides the opportunity to compare results across a range of related traits. The metabochip and similar custom genotyping arrays offer a powerful and cost-effective approach to follow-up large-scale genotyping and sequencing studies and advance our understanding of the genetic basis of complex human diseases and traits. PMID:22876189

  19. Genotype-environment associations support a mosaic hybrid zone between two tidal marsh birds.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer; Rowe, Rebecca J; Olsen, Brian J; Shriver, W Gregory; Kovach, Adrienne I

    2016-01-01

    Local environmental features can shape hybrid zone dynamics when hybrids are bounded by ecotones or when patchily distributed habitat types lead to a corresponding mosaic of genotypes. We investigated the role of marsh-level characteristics in shaping a hybrid zone between two recently diverged avian taxa - Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's (A. nelsoni) sparrows. These species occupy different niches where allopatric, with caudacutus restricted to coastal marshes and nelsoni found in a broader array of wetland and grassland habitats and co-occur in tidal marshes in sympatry. We determined the influence of habitat types on the distribution of pure and hybrid sparrows and assessed the degree of overlap in the ecological niche of each taxon. To do this, we sampled and genotyped 305 sparrows from 34 marshes across the hybrid zone and from adjacent regions. We used linear regression to test for associations between marsh characteristics and the distribution of pure and admixed sparrows. We found a positive correlation between genotype and environmental variables with a patchy distribution of genotypes and habitats across the hybrid zone. Ecological niche models suggest that the hybrid niche was more similar to that of A. nelsoni and habitat suitability was influenced strongly by distance from coastline. Our results support a mosaic model of hybrid zone maintenance, suggesting a role for local environmental features in shaping the distribution and frequency of pure species and hybrids across space. PMID:26811792

  20. The Influence of Genotype Polymorphism on Morphine Analgesic Effect for Postoperative Pain in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Geum; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Keun Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although opioids are the most commonly used medications to control postoperative pain in children, the analgesic effects could have a large inter-individual variability according to genotypes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the analgesic effect of morphine for postoperative pain in children. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 88 healthy children undergoing tonsillectomy, who received morphine during the operation. The postoperative pain score, frequency of rescue analgesics, and side effects of morphine were assessed in the post-anesthesia care unit. The children were genotyped for OPRM1 A118G, ABCB1 C3435T, and COMT Val158Met. Results Children with at least one G allele for OPRM1 (AG/GG) had higher postoperative pain scores compared with those with the AA genotype at the time of discharge from the post-anesthesia care unit (P = 0.025). Other recovery profiles were not significantly different between the two groups. There was no significant relationship between genotypes and postoperative pain scores in analysis of ABCB1 and COMT polymorphisms. Conclusions Genetic polymorphism at OPRM1 A118G, but not at ABCB1 C3435T and COMT Val158Met, influences the analgesic effect of morphine for immediate acute postoperative pain in children. PMID:26839669

  1. APOE genotype affects the pre-synaptic compartment of glutamatergic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Dumanis, Sonya B; DiBattista, Amanda M; Miessau, Matthew; Moussa, Charbel E H; Rebeck, G William

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype affects outcomes of Alzheimer's disease and other conditions of brain damage. Using APOE knock-in mice, we have previously shown that APOE-ε4 Targeted Replacement (TR) mice have fewer dendritic spines and reduced branching in cortical neurons. As dendritic spines are post-synaptic sites of excitatory neurotransmission, we used APOE TR mice to examine whether APOE genotype affected the various elements of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. We found that levels of glutamine synthetase and glutamate uptake transporters were unchanged among the APOE genotypes. However, compared with APOE-ε3 TR mice, APOE-ε4 TR mice had decreased glutaminase levels (18%, p < 0.05), suggesting decreased conversion of glutamine to glutamate. APOE-ε4 TR mice also had increased levels of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (20%, p < 0.05), suggesting that APOE genotype affects pre-synaptic terminal composition. To address whether these changes affected normal neurotransmission, we examined the production and metabolism of glutamate and glutamine at 4-5 months and 1 year. Using high-frequency (13)C/(1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we found that APOE-ε4 TR mice have decreased production of glutamate and increased levels of glutamine. These factors may contribute to the increased risk of neurodegeneration associated with APOE-ε4, and also act as surrogate markers for Alzheimer's disease risk. PMID:22862561

  2. The Metabochip, a Custom Genotyping Array for Genetic Studies of Metabolic, Cardiovascular, and Anthropometric Traits

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Palmer, Cameron D.; Sidore, Carlo; Chines, Peter S.; Burtt, Noël P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Li, Yanming; Erdmann, Jeanette; Frayling, Timothy M.; Heid, Iris M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Randall, Joshua C.; Saxena, Richa; Soranzo, Nicole; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Maguire, Jared; Parkin, Melissa; Potter, Simon; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil; Stirrups, Kathleen; Winckler, Wendy; Sanna, Serena; Mulas, Antonella; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Cucca, Francesco; Barroso, Inês; Deloukas, Panos; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Munroe, Patricia B.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schunkert, Heribert; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Boehnke, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified hundreds of loci for type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, as well as for related traits such as body mass index, glucose and insulin levels, lipid levels, and blood pressure. These studies also have pointed to thousands of loci with promising but not yet compelling association evidence. To establish association at additional loci and to characterize the genome-wide significant loci by fine-mapping, we designed the “Metabochip,” a custom genotyping array that assays nearly 200,000 SNP markers. Here, we describe the Metabochip and its component SNP sets, evaluate its performance in capturing variation across the allele-frequency spectrum, describe solutions to methodological challenges commonly encountered in its analysis, and evaluate its performance as a platform for genotype imputation. The metabochip achieves dramatic cost efficiencies compared to designing single-trait follow-up reagents, and provides the opportunity to compare results across a range of related traits. The metabochip and similar custom genotyping arrays offer a powerful and cost-effective approach to follow-up large-scale genotyping and sequencing studies and advance our understanding of the genetic basis of complex human diseases and traits. PMID:22876189

  3. Genotypic richness and phenotypic dissimilarity enhance population performance.

    PubMed

    Ellers, Jacintha; Rog, Stefanie; Braam, Ciska; Berg, Matty P

    2011-08-01

    Increases in biodiversity can result from an increase in species richness, as well as from a higher genetic diversity within species. Intraspecific genetic diversity, measured as the number of genotypes, can enhance plant primary productivity and have cascading effects at higher trophic levels, such as an increase in herbivore and predator richness. The positive effects of genotypic mixtures are not only determined by additive effects, but also by interactions among genotypes, such as facilitation or inhibition. However, so far there has been no effort to predict the extent of such effects. In this study, we address the question of whether the magnitude of the effect of genotype number on population performance can be explained by the extent of dissimilarity in key traits among genotypes in a mixture. We examine the relative contribution of genotype number and phenotypic dissimilarity among genotypes to population performance of the soil arthropod, Orchesella cincta. Nearly homogeneous genotypes were created from inbred isofemale lines. Phenotypic dissimilarity among genotypes was assessed in terms of three life-history traits that are associated with population growth rate, i.e., egg size, egg development time, and juvenile growth rate. A microcosm experiment with genotype mixtures consisting of one, two, four, and eight genotypes, showed that genotypic richness strongly increased population size and biomass production and was associated with greater net diversity effects. Most importantly, there was a positive log-linear relationship between phenotypic dissimilarity in a mixture and the net diversity effects for juvenile population size and total biomass. In other words, the degree of phenotypic dissimilarity among genotypes determined the magnitude of the genotypic richness effect, although this relationship leveled off at higher values of phenotypic dissimilarity. Although the exact mechanisms responsible for these effects are currently unknown, similar

  4. Genotype distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) and co-infections in cervical cytologic specimens from two outpatient gynecological clinics in a region of southeast Spain

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution and co-infection occurrence was studied in cervical cytologic specimens from Murcia Region, (southeast Spain), to obtain information regarding the possible effect of the ongoing vaccination campaign against HPV16 and HPV18. Methods A total of 458 cytologic specimens were obtained from two outpatient gynecological clinics. These included 288 normal benign (N/B) specimens, 56 atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASC-US), 75 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and 39 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). HPV genotyping was performed using PCR and tube array hybridization. Results The most frequent genotype found was HPV16 (14.9% in N/B; 17.9% in ASC-US; 29.3% in LSIL and 33.3% HSIL). Distribution of other genotypes was heavily dependent on the cytologic diagnoses. Co-infections were found in 15.3% of N/B, 10.7% of ASC-US, 48% of LSIL and 25.6% of HSIL cases (significantly different at p < 0.001). Strikingly, in N/B diagnoses, genotypes from A5 species were found as coinfecting in all cases. Genotypes from A7 or A9 species appeared in co-infections in 56.5% and 54% respectively whereas genotypes from A6 species appeared in 25.1% of cases. Conclusion HPV vaccination might prevent 34.6% and 35.8% of LSIL and HSIL, respectively. Co-infection rate is dependent on both cytologic diagnosis and HPV genotype. Moreover, genotypes belonging to A5, A7 and A9 species are more often found as co-infections than genotype pertaining to A6 species. This suggests that phylogenetically related genotypes might have in common similar grades of dependency for cervical epithelium colonization. PMID:19664248

  5. Liquid Biopsies: Genotyping Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Luis A.; Bardelli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Genotyping tumor tissue in search of somatic genetic alterations for actionable information has become routine practice in clinical oncology. Although these sequence alterations are highly informative, sampling tumor tissue has significant inherent limitations; tumor tissue is a single snapshot in time, is subject to selection bias resulting from tumor heterogeneity, and can be difficult to obtain. Cell-free fragments of DNA are shed into the bloodstream by cells undergoing apoptosis or necrosis, and the load of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) correlates with tumor staging and prognosis. Moreover, recent advances in the sensitivity and accuracy of DNA analysis have allowed for genotyping of cfDNA for somatic genomic alterations found in tumors. The ability to detect and quantify tumor mutations has proven effective in tracking tumor dynamics in real time as well as serving as a liquid biopsy that can be used for a variety of clinical and investigational applications not previously possible. PMID:24449238

  6. Genotyping-by-Sequencing in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Stéphane; Llaca, Victor; May, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technologies has led to the development of rapid genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) detection applications in various plant species. Recent improvements in sequencing throughput combined with an overall decrease in costs per gigabase of sequence is allowing NGS to be applied to not only the evaluation of small subsets of parental inbred lines, but also the mapping and characterization of traits of interest in much larger populations. Such an approach, where sequences are used simultaneously to detect and score SNPs, therefore bypassing the entire marker assay development stage, is known as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS). This review will summarize the current state of GBS in plants and the promises it holds as a genome-wide genotyping application. PMID:24832503

  7. Validation of genotyping protocols for diagnostic use.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This chapter contains some advice for first validating a new genotyping method and then continuing to ensure that it performs well when adopted for routine use. It should be applicable to most of the genotyping methods described in this volume; however, because the range of techniques is so wide and these recommendations have been written with PCR amplification in mind, the reader may need to adapt some of the recommendations for non-PCR based tests.It does not include any advice on how to handle unscreened human samples within the laboratory, and it assumes that the laboratory already has established good practice for DNA amplification and the avoidance of contamination. PMID:26024621

  8. An agent based model of genotype editing

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L. M.; Huang, C. F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents our investigation on an agent-based model of Genotype Editing. This model is based on several characteristics that are gleaned from the RNA editing system as observed in several organisms. The incorporation of editing mechanisms in an evolutionary agent-based model provides a means for evolving agents with heterogenous post-transcriptional processes. The study of this agent-based genotype-editing model has shed some light into the evolutionary implications of RNA editing as well as established an advantageous evolutionary computation algorithm for machine learning. We expect that our proposed model may both facilitate determining the evolutionary role of RNA editing in biology, and advance the current state of research in agent-based optimization.

  9. Coevolutionary interactions between host and parasite genotypes.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Louis; Fellous, Simon; Koella, Jacob C

    2006-01-01

    More than 20 years after Dawkins introduced the concept of "extended phenotype" (i.e. phenotypes of hosts and parasites result from interactions between the two genomes) and although this idea has now reached contemporary textbooks of evolutionary biology, most studies of the evolution of host-parasite systems still focus solely on either the host or the parasite, neglecting the role of the other partner. It is important to consider that host and parasite genotypes share control of the epidemiological parameters of their relationship. Moreover, not only the traits of the infection but also the genetic correlations among these and other traits that determine fitness might be controlled by interactions between host and parasite genotypes. PMID:16310412

  10. One year survey of human rotavirus strains suggests the emergence of genotype G12 in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ndze, Valentine N; Papp, Hajnalka; Achidi, Eric A; Gonsu, Kamga H; László, Brigitta; Farkas, Szilvia; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Béla; Esona, Mathew D; Bowen, Michael D; Bányai, K; Gentsch, Jon R; Odama, Abena M T

    2013-08-01

    In this study the emergence of rotavirus A genotype G12 in children <5 years of age is reported from Cameroon during 2010/2011. A total of 135 human stool samples were P and G genotyped by reverse transcriptase PCR. Six different rotavirus VP7 genotypes were detected, including G1, G2, G3, G8, G9, and G12 in combinations with P[4], P[6] and P[8] VP4 genotypes. Genotype G12 predominated in combination with P[8] (54.1%) and P[6] (10.4%) genotypes followed by G1P[6] (8.2%), G3P[6] (6.7%), G2P[4] (5.9%), G8P[6] (3.7%), G2P[6] (0.7%), G3P[8] (0.7%), and G9P[8] (0.7%). Genotype P[6] strains in combination with various G-types represented a substantial proportion (N=44, 32.6%) of the genotyped strains. Partially typed strains included G12P[NT] (2.2%); G3P[NT] (0.7%); G(NT)P[6] (1.5%); and G(NT)P[8] (0.7%). Mixed infections were found in five specimens (3.7%) in several combinations including G1+ G12P[6], G2+ G3P[6] + P[8], G3+ G8P[6], G3 + G12P[6] + P[8], and G12P[6] +P[8]. The approximately 10% relative frequency of G12P[6] strains detected in this study suggests that this strain is emerging in Cameroon and should be monitored carefully as rotavirus vaccine is implemented in this country, as it shares neither G- nor P-type specificity with strains in the RotaTeq® and Rotarix® vaccines. These findings are consistent with other recent reports of the global spread and increasing epidemiologic importance of G12 and P[6] strains. PMID:23765785

  11. Canine Hip Dysplasia is Predictable by Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Gang; Zhou, Zhengkui; Wang, Yachun; Zhao, Keyan; Zhu, Lan; Lust, George; Hunter, Linda; Friedenberg, Steven; Li, Junya; Zhang, Yuan; Harris, Stephen; Jones, Paul; Sandler, Jody; Krotscheck, Ursula; Todhunter, Rory; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective To establish a predictive method using whole genome genotyping for early intervention in canine hip dysplasia (CHD) risk management, for the prevention of the progression of secondary osteoarthritis (OA), and for selective breeding. Design Two sets of dogs (6 breeds) were genotyped with dense SNPs covering the entire canine genome. The first set contained 359 dogs upon which a predictive formula for genomic breeding value (GBV) was derived by using their estimated breeding value (EBV) of the Norberg angle (a measure of CHD) and their genotypes. To investigate how well the formula would work for an individual dog with genotype only (without using EBV or phenotype), a cross validation was performed by masking the EBV of one dog at a time. The genomic data and the EBV of the remaining dogs were used to predict the GBV for the single dog that was left out. The second set of dogs included 38 new Labrador retriever dogs, which had no pedigree relationship to the dogs in the first set. Results The cross validation showed a strong correlation (r>0.7) between the EBV and the GBV. The independent validation showed a strong correlation (r=0.5) between GBV for the Norberg angle and the observed Norberg angle (no EBV was available for the new 38 dogs). Sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive value of the genomic data were all above 70%. Conclusions Prediction of CHD from genomic data is feasible, and can be applied for risk management of CHD and early selection for genetic improvement to reduce the prevalence of CHD in breeding programs. The prediction can be implemented before maturity, at which age current radiographic screening programs are traditionally applied, and as soon as DNA is available. PMID:21215318

  12. Association studies including genotype by environment interactions: prospects and limits

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Association mapping studies offer great promise to identify polymorphisms associated with phenotypes and for understanding the genetic basis of quantitative trait variation. To date, almost all association mapping studies based on structured plant populations examined the main effects of genetic factors on the trait but did not deal with interactions between genetic factors and environment. In this paper, we propose a methodological prospect of mixed linear models to analyze genotype by environment interaction effects using association mapping designs. First, we simulated datasets to assess the power of linear mixed models to detect interaction effects. This simulation was based on two association panels composed of 90 inbreds (pearl millet) and 277 inbreds (maize). Results Based on the simulation approach, we reported the impact of effect size, environmental variation, allele frequency, trait heritability, and sample size on the power to detect the main effects of genetic loci and diverse effect of interactions implying these loci. Interaction effects specified in the model included SNP by environment interaction, ancestry by environment interaction, SNP by ancestry interaction and three way interactions. The method was finally used on real datasets from field experiments conducted on the two considered panels. We showed two types of interactions effects contributing to genotype by environment interactions in maize: SNP by environment interaction and ancestry by environment interaction. This last interaction suggests differential response at the population level in function of the environment. Conclusions Our results suggested the suitability of mixed models for the detection of diverse interaction effects. The need of samples larger than that commonly used in current plant association studies is strongly emphasized to ensure rigorous model selection and powerful interaction assessment. The use of ancestry interaction component brought valuable

  13. Genotype Imputation with Millions of Reference Samples.

    PubMed

    Browning, Brian L; Browning, Sharon R

    2016-01-01

    We present a genotype imputation method that scales to millions of reference samples. The imputation method, based on the Li and Stephens model and implemented in Beagle v.4.1, is parallelized and memory efficient, making it well suited to multi-core computer processors. It achieves fast, accurate, and memory-efficient genotype imputation by restricting the probability model to markers that are genotyped in the target samples and by performing linear interpolation to impute ungenotyped variants. We compare Beagle v.4.1 with Impute2 and Minimac3 by using 1000 Genomes Project data, UK10K Project data, and simulated data. All three methods have similar accuracy but different memory requirements and different computation times. When imputing 10 Mb of sequence data from 50,000 reference samples, Beagle's throughput was more than 100× greater than Impute2's throughput on our computer servers. When imputing 10 Mb of sequence data from 200,000 reference samples in VCF format, Minimac3 consumed 26× more memory per computational thread and 15× more CPU time than Beagle. We demonstrate that Beagle v.4.1 scales to much larger reference panels by performing imputation from a simulated reference panel having 5 million samples and a mean marker density of one marker per four base pairs. PMID:26748515

  14. [Rh system genotyping in amniotic fluid].

    PubMed

    Cotorruelo, C; Biondi, C; García Borrás, S; Di Mónaco, R; Martino, W; Racca, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the presence of the RHD gene in fetal cells obtained from amniotic fluid (AF). We studied 65 samples of AF, 11 from RhD- mothers sensitized with anti-D. The fetal origin of the DNA was confirmed with the analysis of 1 VNTR locus and 3 STR loci in DNA samples from AF and maternal blood. The RHD genotyping was performed in non contaminated samples (n = 62) using a multiplex PCR strategy that yields 3 amplification products from RhD+ phenotypes and 1 DNA fragment from RhD- phenotypes. We genotyped 54 RhD+ fetuses (8 from RhD- sensitized mothers) and 8 RhD- fetuses (3 from RhD- sensitized mothers). Fetal DNA genotyping allows the diagnosis, from a single amniocentesis, of fetuses at real risk of hemolytic disease of the newborn. When the fetus is determined to be RhD- all invasive procedures can be avoided. PMID:11265629

  15. Genotype Imputation with Millions of Reference Samples

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Brian L.; Browning, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a genotype imputation method that scales to millions of reference samples. The imputation method, based on the Li and Stephens model and implemented in Beagle v.4.1, is parallelized and memory efficient, making it well suited to multi-core computer processors. It achieves fast, accurate, and memory-efficient genotype imputation by restricting the probability model to markers that are genotyped in the target samples and by performing linear interpolation to impute ungenotyped variants. We compare Beagle v.4.1 with Impute2 and Minimac3 by using 1000 Genomes Project data, UK10K Project data, and simulated data. All three methods have similar accuracy but different memory requirements and different computation times. When imputing 10 Mb of sequence data from 50,000 reference samples, Beagle’s throughput was more than 100× greater than Impute2’s throughput on our computer servers. When imputing 10 Mb of sequence data from 200,000 reference samples in VCF format, Minimac3 consumed 26× more memory per computational thread and 15× more CPU time than Beagle. We demonstrate that Beagle v.4.1 scales to much larger reference panels by performing imputation from a simulated reference panel having 5 million samples and a mean marker density of one marker per four base pairs. PMID:26748515

  16. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization. PMID:22524158

  17. Preclinical characterization of GSK2336805, a novel inhibitor of hepatitis C virus replication that selects for resistance in NS5A.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jill; Crosby, Renae; Wang, Amy; Woldu, Ermias; Vamathevan, Jessica; Voitenleitner, Christian; You, Shihyun; Remlinger, Katja; Duan, Maoshang; Kazmierski, Wieslaw; Hamatake, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GSK2336805 is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with picomolar activity on the standard genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a subgenomic replicons and exhibits a modest serum shift. GSK2336805 was not active on 22 RNA and DNA viruses that were profiled. We have identified changes in the N-terminal region of NS5A that cause a decrease in the activity of GSK2336805. These mutations in the genotype 1b replicon showed modest shifts in compound activity (<13-fold), while mutations identified in the genotype 1a replicon had a more dramatic impact on potency. GSK2336805 retained activity on chimeric replicons containing NS5A patient sequences from genotype 1 and patient and consensus sequences for genotypes 4 and 5 and part of genotype 6. Combination and cross-resistance studies demonstrated that GSK2336805 could be used as a component of a multidrug HCV regimen either with the current standard of care or in combination with compounds with different mechanisms of action that are still progressing through clinical development. PMID:24126581

  18. Preclinical Characterization of GSK2336805, a Novel Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus Replication That Selects for Resistance in NS5A

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Renae; Wang, Amy; Woldu, Ermias; Vamathevan, Jessica; Voitenleitner, Christian; You, Shihyun; Remlinger, Katja; Duan, Maoshang; Kazmierski, Wieslaw; Hamatake, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GSK2336805 is an inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with picomolar activity on the standard genotype 1a, 1b, and 2a subgenomic replicons and exhibits a modest serum shift. GSK2336805 was not active on 22 RNA and DNA viruses that were profiled. We have identified changes in the N-terminal region of NS5A that cause a decrease in the activity of GSK2336805. These mutations in the genotype 1b replicon showed modest shifts in compound activity (<13-fold), while mutations identified in the genotype 1a replicon had a more dramatic impact on potency. GSK2336805 retained activity on chimeric replicons containing NS5A patient sequences from genotype 1 and patient and consensus sequences for genotypes 4 and 5 and part of genotype 6. Combination and cross-resistance studies demonstrated that GSK2336805 could be used as a component of a multidrug HCV regimen either with the current standard of care or in combination with compounds with different mechanisms of action that are still progressing through clinical development. PMID:24126581

  19. Genotyping of clinical varicella-zoster virus isolates collected from Yunnan in Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUNLONG; ZHU, BAOSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the α-herpesvirus family. Genetically, it is stable and is divided into several genotypes based upon the genetic variations. The genotypes of VZV are rarely studied in the Southwestern region of China. In the present study, the common genetic variations in the VZV genes were examined in 42 VZV isolates collected from the patients with herpes zoster in the Yunnan province (Southwestern China). The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of open reading frames (ORFs) 38, 54 and 62 in the VZV genes showed that all the collected VZV isolates were PstI, BglI and SmaI positive. The R5 variable-repeat region in these isolates was variable (R5A: 46.4%; R5B: 53.6%). The sequencing data of ORFs 1, 21, 22 and 54 indicated that 41 of the 42 collected VZV isolates could be grouped into genotype J or J1. Only one VZV isolate was identified as genotype A1 or M2. No new substitutions in the sequenced fragments were found in the collected VZV isolates. The results of the present study provided a preliminary genetic characterization of the VZV strains in the Yunnan province of Southwestern China. PMID:26893840

  20. Citrus tristeza virus: Evolution of Complex and Varied Genotypic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Harper, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the Closteroviridae, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is almost unique in possessing a number of distinct and characterized strains, isolates of which produce a wide range of phenotype combinations among its different hosts. There is little understanding to connect genotypes to phenotypes, and to complicate matters more, these genotypes are found throughout the world as members of mixed populations within a single host plant. There is essentially no understanding of how combinations of genotypes affect symptom expression and disease severity. We know little about the evolution of the genotypes that have been characterized to date, little about the biological role of their diversity and particularly, about the effects of recombination. Additionally, genotype grouping has not been standardized. In this study we utilized an extensive array of CTV genomic information to classify the major genotypes, and to determine the major evolutionary processes that led to their formation and subsequent retention. Our analyses suggest that three major processes act on these genotypes: (1) ancestral diversification of the major CTV lineages, followed by (2) conservation and co-evolution of the major functional domains within, though not between CTV genotypes, and (3) extensive recombination between lineages that have given rise to new genotypes that have subsequently been retained within the global population. The effects of genotype diversity and host-interaction are discussed, as is a proposal for standardizing the classification of existing and novel CTV genotypes. PMID:23630519

  1. Evidence for two koi herpesvirus (KHV) genotypes in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Jun; Kwon, Se Ryun

    2013-06-13

    The geographic distribution of koi herpesvirus (KHV) has recently been analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, based on the alleles of 3 domains) and sequence analysis using 3 regions of KHV genomic DNA (SphI-5, 9/5, and the thymidine kinase gene). In this study, samples from 6 carp showing symptoms of KHV infection in 2008 were examined for the presence of KHV by using PCR and cell culture isolation methods. KHV was detected in 2 (Pyeongtaek and Buan) of the samples. Sequence analysis revealed that the genotype of the KHV PT-08 isolate was Asia genotype variant 1 (A1), and the genotype of the KHV BA-08 isolate was European genotype variant 4 (E4). In addition, PCR patterns and sequence analysis based on the alleles of 3 domains of an alternate KHV classification system confirmed that the genotype of the KHV PT-08 isolate was CyHV3-J, and the genotype of the KHV BA-08 isolate was CyHV3-third genotype. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate the presence of 2 genotypes of KHV (genotype A1/CyHV3-J; genotype E4/CyHV3-third genotype) in South Korea. PMID:23759557

  2. Hepatitis B virus genotypes in Mongols and Australian Aborigines.

    PubMed

    Alestig, E; Hannoun, C; Horal, P; Lindh, M

    2001-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is spread worldwide. Seven genotypes, A-G, have been described, differing by more than 8% of the genome. In eastern Asia and Oceania genotypes B and C are predominant. However, little is known about genotypes in Mongolia and Australian aborigines. We analysed the preS and S regions of HBV from 9 Mongols and 5 Australian Aborigines. All Mongolian strains were of genotype D and were most similar to Central Asian sequences. All the Australian strains were genetically of serotype ayw3, and could not be reliably classified by the S region analysis, but placed on a separate branch. By preS analysis, they were however clearly of genotype C. The 6-7% nucleotide difference from published Asian genotype C sequences suggests that they diverged from Asian genotype C branch more than 1000 years ago. PMID:11811682

  3. Novel SLC5A2 mutation contributes to familial renal glucosuria: Abnormal expression in renal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Hou, Ping; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Familial renal glucosuria (FRG) is characterized by persistent glucosuria in the presence of normal serum glucose concentrations, while other impairments of tubular function are absent. Mutations in the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SLC5A2) gene have been found to be responsible for FRG. However, direct evidence for the presence of SLC5A2 mutant in renal tissues is very rare. In previous studies, a non-sense mutation (c.1320 G>A:p.W440X) that would cause premature termination of the protein was found. However, the effects in the renal tissues were not reported. In the current study, a patient with FRG and a urinary glucose excretion rate of 8.3 g/day is described, for whom a novel missense mutation (c.1319G>A:p.W440X) was revealed by sequencing. Furthermore, in the immunofluorescence examination of a renal biopsy specimen, SLC5A2 was detected in the apical side of the proximal convoluted tubule, discontinuously decreased in comparison with that in normal and disease controls. The results imply that both wild-type SLC5A2 and mutant SLC5A2 with abnormal distribution were expressed in the renal tissues, and that the reduction of SLC5A2 expression and function were due to the c.1319G>A:p.W440X mutation. The current study provides valuable clues regarding the SLC5A2 molecule from genotype to phenotype in families affected by FRG.

  4. Distribution of geriatric disease-related genotypes in the National Institute for Longevity Sciences, Longitudinal Study of Aging (NILS-LSA).

    PubMed

    Shimokata, H; Yamada, Y; Nakagawa, M; Okubo, R; Saido, T; Funakoshi, A; Miyasaka, K; Ohta, S; Tsujimoto, G; Tanaka, M; Ando, F; Niino, N

    2000-04-01

    Phenotypes of various genes related to geriatric diseases and the aging process were assessed in the National Institute for Longevity Sciences, Longitudinal Study of Aging (NILS-LSA). The subjects were 1,297 participants in the NILS-LSA. They were community-living males and females aged 40 to 79 years who were randomly selected from the area of the NILS. Genotypic and allelic frequencies of genes in the subjects were analyzed. Age and gender differences in the distribution of genotypes were also tested. The genotypic frequencies were as follows: (1) Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype was I/I 46.2%, I/D 38.3% and D/D 15.5%. (2) alpha 1-adrenoreceptor genotype was C/C 84.4%, C/T 12.7%, and T/T 3.0%. (3) Apolipoprotein E genotype was epsilon 2/epsilon 2 0%, epsilon 2/epsilon 3 7.9%, epsilon 3/epsilon 3 70.0%, epsilon 3/epsilon 4 20.8%, epsilon 2/epsilon 4 0%, and epsilon 4/epsilon 4 1.4%. (4) Cholecystokinin type-A receptor (CCKAR) nucleotide-81 (nt-81) genotype was A/A 59.1%, A/G 35.1%, and G/G 5.9%. The CCKAR nucleotide-128 genotype (nt-128) was G/G 74.3%, G/T 23.6%, and T/T 2.2%. The combination of nucleotide (nt-81, nt-128) was (A/A, G/G) 59.1%, (A/G, G/G) 14.1%, (G/G, G/G) 1.1%, (A/G, G/T) 21.0%, (G/G, G/T) 2.6%, and (G/G, T/T) 2.1%. There were no subjects with (A/A, G/T), (A/A, T/T) or (A/G, T/T) genotypic combinations. (5) beta 3-adrenoreceptor genotype was T/T 66.8%, T/A 28.5%, and A/A 4.7%. (6) Dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST) nucleotide 19117 genotype was A/A 25.1%, A/G 49.7%, and G/G 25.1%. The DLST nucleotide 19183 genotype was C/C 55.8%, C/T 38.2%, and T/T 5.9%. The combination of nucleotide (nt19117, nt19183) was (A/A, C/C) 6.7%, (A/G, C/C) 24.1%, (G/G, C/C) 25.1%, (A/G, C/T) 25.6%, (A/A, T/T) 5.9%, and (A/A, C/T) 12.6%. There were no subjects with (A/G, T/T), (G/G, T/T) or (G/G, T/C) genotypic combinations. (7) Transforming growth factor-beta 1 genotype T/T 35.2%, T/C 44.6%, and C/C 20.2%. (8) The platelet-activating factor

  5. PCR-based approach to distinguish group A human rotavirus genotype 1 vs. genotype 2 genes.

    PubMed

    McKell, Allison O; Nichols, Joshua C; McDonald, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are eleven-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of severe diarrhea in children. A full-genome classification system is readily used to describe the genetic makeup of individual RV strains. In this system, each viral gene is assigned a specific genotype based upon its nucleotide sequence and established percent identity cut-off values. However, a faster and more cost-effective approach to determine RV gene genotypes is to utilize specific oligonucleotide primer sets in RT-PCR/PCR. Such primer sets and PCR-based genotyping methods have already been developed for the VP7-, VP6-, VP4- and NSP4-coding gene segments. In this study, primers were developed for the remaining seven RV gene segments, which encode proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, and NSP5/6. Specifically, primers were designed to distinguish the two most common human RV genotypes (1 vs. 2) for these genes and were validated on several cell culture-adapted human and animal RV strains, as well as on human RVs from clinical fecal specimens. As such, primer sets now exist for all eleven genes of common human RVs, allowing for the identification of reassortant strains with mixed constellations of both genotype 1 and 2 genes using a rapid and economical RT-PCR/PCR method. PMID:24012969

  6. Treatment of chronic HCV genotype 1 coinfection.

    PubMed

    Boesecke, Christoph; Rockstroh, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Several all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) combination therapies including two fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) have been recently licensed for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection. Results of pivotal trials with these new compounds are now also available in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV-coinfected patients, highlighting that, in the DAA era, differences no longer do exist in efficacy between HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. This review will give an overview of the key DAA-containing studies in HIV/HCV genotype 1 coinfection and give guidance on how and when these should be used in clinical practice. Simplified DAA-based and potentially interferon-free HCV therapy regimens are characterized by smaller pill burden, better tolerability, shorter treatment durations, and higher cure rates. With first pilot studies in HCV treatment-naive and treatment-experienced persons with HCV/HIV coinfection demonstrating sustained virological response rates above 95 %, interferon (IFN)-free DAA combinations should be considered the new standard of care for chronic HCV. Per both European and US treatment guidelines, HCV treatment indications and DAA drug selection in HIV-coinfected patients are no longer different from HCV-monoinfected patients as cure rates in HCV-monoinfected and HCV-coinfected patients are superimposable. Drug-drug interactions with the new DAAs and concomitant antiretroviral therapy, however, have to be checked carefully prior to selecting DAAs due to commonly shared metabolization pathways. In countries with access to the new DAAs, interferon-free DAA combination therapy for HCV genotype 1 infection is strongly recommended. Agents should be selected based upon HCV genotype and according to current guidelines. Potential drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretrovirals and HCV therapy need to be checked, and if necessary, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has to be adapted to the respective HCV therapy

  7. Systemic inflammatory mediators and cystic fibrosis genotype.

    PubMed

    Augarten, A; Paret, G; Avneri, I; Akons, H; Aviram, M; Bentur, L; Blau, H; Efrati, O; Szeinberg, A; Barak, A; Kerem, E; Yahav, J

    2004-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients is mainly attributed to pulmonary infection and inflammation. Chemokines play a pivotal role in the inflammatory process. Although genotype-phenotype correlation in cystic fibrosis patients has been defined, a clear relationship between the defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene and pulmonary inflammation has not been established. The aim of this study was to assess whether serum chemokines levels in cystic fibrosis patients correlate with genotype and pulmonary function tests, as well as with other clinical characteristics. Serum levels of interleukin-8, RANTES, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were measured in 36 cystic fibrosis patients grouped according to their genotype. Group A included 25 patients who carried two mutations associated with a pathological sweat test and pancreatic insufficiency (deltaF508, W1282X, G542X, N1303K, S549R). Group B included 11 compound heterozygote patients who carried one mutation known to cause mild disease with borderline or normal sweat test and pancreatic sufficiency (3849+10kb C to T, 5T). Associations between chemokine levels, genotype, pulmonary function, Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization, age, sweat chloride level, and pancreatic and nutritional status were examined. Mean interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels were significantly higher in group A than group B (11.4 +/- 2.1 pg/ml vs. 5 +/- 0.9 pg/ml and 157 +/- 16 pg/ml vs. 88.8 +/- 16.4 pg/ml, respectively) (P < 0.01). No difference in RANTES levels were found between groups. interleukin-8 levels were inversely related to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = -0.37, P < 0.02), while there was no association between the latter and RANTES and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. The Pseudomonas colonization rate was higher among group A patients than group B (88% vs. 40%, P < 0.01). No relationship was found between measured chemokines and age, sweat chloride

  8. Lactase persistence in central Asia: phenotype, genotype, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Evelyne; Brazier, Lionel; Ségurel, Laure; Hegay, Tatiana; Austerlitz, Frédéric; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Georges, Myriam; Pasquet, Patrick; Veuille, Michel

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to document the evolution of the lactase persistence trait in Central Asia, a geographical area that is thought to have been a region of long-term pastoralism. Several ethnic groups co-exist in this area: Indo-Iranian speakers who are traditionally agriculturist (Tajik) and Turkic speakers who used to be nomadic herders (Kazakh, Karakalpak, Kyrgyz, Turkmen). It was recently demonstrated that horse milking practice existed in the Botai culture of Kazakhstan as early as 5,500 BP ( Outram et al. 2009 ). However, the frequency of the lactase persistence trait and its genetic basis in Central Asian populations remain largely unknown. We propose here the first genotype-phenotype study of lactase persistence in Central Asia based on 183 individuals, as well as the estimation of the time of expansion of the lactase-persistence associated polymorphism. Our results show a remarkable genetic-phenotypic correlation, with the causal polymorphism being the same than in Europe (-13.910C>T, rs4988235). The lactase persistence trait is at low frequency in these populations: between 25% and 32% in the Kazakh population (traditionally herders), according to phenotype used, and between 11% and 30% in the Tajiko-Uzbek population (agriculturalists). The difference in lactase persistence between populations, even if small, is significant when using individuals concordant for both excretion of breath hydrogen and the lactose tolerance blood glucose test phenotypes (P = 0.018, 25% for Kazakh vs. 11% for Tajiko-Uzbeks), and the difference in frequency of the -13.910*T allele is almost significant (P = 0.06, 30% for Kazakhs vs. 19% for Tajiko-Uzbeks). Using the surrounding haplotype, we estimate a date of expansion of the T allele around 6,000-12,000 yrs ago, which is consistent with archaeological records for the emergence of agropastoralism and pastoralism in Central Asia. PMID:21740154

  9. Occurrence and Genotyping of Coxiella burnetii in Ixodid Ticks in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kumsa, Bersissa; Socolovschi, Cristina; Almeras, Lionel; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted from September 2011 to March 2014 to address the occurrence and genotypes of Coxiella burnetii using molecular methods in ticks collected from domestic animals in Ethiopia. Ticks were tested for C. burnetii by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) targeting two different genes followed by multispacer sequence typing (MST). An overall prevalence of 6.4% (54/842) of C. burnetii was recorded. C. burnetii was detected in 28.6% (14/49) of Amblyomma gemma, 25% (31/124) of Rhipicephalus pulchellus, 7.1% (1/14) of Hyalomma marginatum rufipes, 3.2% (2/62) of Am. variegatum, 3.1% (4/128) of Am. cohaerens, 1.6% (1/63) of Rh. praetextatus, and 0.6% (1/153) of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus. Significantly higher overall frequencies of C. burnetii DNA were observed in Am. gemma and Rh. pulchellus than in other tick species (Mantel-Haenszel [MH], P < 0.0001). The overall frequency of C. burnetii was significantly higher (MH, P < 0.0001) in ticks from southeastern districts (Arero, Moyale, and Yabelo) than that from other districts. This study demonstrated the presence of C. burnetii genotype MST 18 in ticks in southeastern districts and genotype MST 20 in ticks in central districts. This study highlights the importance of ticks in the epidemiology of C. burnetii in Ethiopia. PMID:26392155

  10. Effects of CSN1S2 Genotypes on Economic Traits in Chinese Dairy Goats

    PubMed Central

    Yue, X. P.; Fang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Mao, C. C.; Lan, X. Y.; Chen, H.; Lei, C. Z.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate allele frequencies at the CSN1S2 locus in two Chinese dairy goat breeds and the effects of its variation on dairy goat economic traits. Seven hundred and eight goats from Xinong Saanen (XS, n = 268) and Guanzhong (GZ, N = 440) breeds were selected. The milk samples of 268 XS goats were collected during the middle of lactation, body size parameters (708 goats) and daily milk yield (202 goats) were registered. The RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) and SSCP (single strand conformation polymorphism) were used to detect the polymorphisms in CSN1S2. The Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium and the associations between body size, milk yield and composition and the genotypes were calculated. The results revealed that only A and F CSN1S2 alleles were found in the two Chinese dairy goat breeds. Allelic frequencies of A and F were 0.795, 0.205 and 0.739, 0.261 in Xinong Saanen and Guanzhong population respectively. Xinong Saanen breed was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, while Guanzhong breed deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (p<0.05). The association of polymorphism with economic traits indicated that the goats with FF genotype have higher milk fat and total solid concentration than those with AA and AF genotypes (p<0.05). PMID:25049867

  11. The Frequency of Some Thrombophilic Mutations in Eastern Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Bakan, Ebubekir; Gul, Mehmet Ali; Bakan, Nuri; Sebin, Engin; Kiziltunc, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, gene polymorphisms are closely associated with thrombophilia. Regional frequencies of these mutations may show a characteristic state. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Eastern Turkey. Materials and Methods: In 433 patients sent to the laboratory with the suspicion of thrombophilia, using whole blood samples, an automated Nucleic Acid Test was used for mutation determinations in Verigene System. The kit module was designed to detect the Factor V G1691A / Factor II G20210A / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene C677T single nucleotide polymorphisms. Results: In 433 patients, 8.7% for Factor V G1691A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, 3.9% for Factor II G20210A polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype, and 43.9% for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C>T polymorphisms were heterozygous genotype and 3.0% homozygous mutation genotype. Conclusion: Detection of these commonly seen Factor V / Factor II / Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase single nucleotide polymorphisms can help to identify patients in high risk group and to evaluate the interaction of genetic and acquired risk factors. Our findings suggest that commonly seen thrombophilic allele mutation frequency in our region is the same as the data reported in the literature. PMID:27026755

  12. Effects of allele frequency estimation on genomic predictions and inbreeding coefficients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic calculations often require estimating allele frequencies, which differ across time due to selection and drift. Data were 50,000 simulated markers and 39,985 actual markers for 2391 genotyped Holstein bulls. Gene content of relatives and gene frequencies in the base (founder) population were ...

  13. Comparison of structural architecture of HCV NS3 genotype 1 versus Pakistani genotype 3a.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Kaneez; Azhar, Esam; Mathew, Shilu; Damanhouri, Ghazi; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2014-01-01

    This study described the structural characterization of Pakistani HCV NS3 GT3a in parallel with genotypes 1a and 1b NS3. We investigated the role of amino acids and their interaction patterns in different HCV genotypes by crystallographic modeling. Different softwares were used to study the interaction pattern, for example, CLCBIO sequence viewer, MODELLER, NMRCLUST, ERRAT score, and MODELLER. Sixty models were produced and clustered into groups and the best model of PK-NCVI/Pk3a NS3 was selected and studied further to check the variability with other HCV NS3 genotypes. This study will help in future to understand the structural architecture of HCV genome variability and to further define the conserved targets for antiviral agents. PMID:25401105

  14. Comparison of Structural Architecture of HCV NS3 Genotype 1 versus Pakistani Genotype 3a

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Damanhouri, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    This study described the structural characterization of Pakistani HCV NS3 GT3a in parallel with genotypes 1a and 1b NS3. We investigated the role of amino acids and their interaction patterns in different HCV genotypes by crystallographic modeling. Different softwares were used to study the interaction pattern, for example, CLCBIO sequence viewer, MODELLER, NMRCLUST, ERRAT score, and MODELLER. Sixty models were produced and clustered into groups and the best model of PK-NCVI/Pk3a NS3 was selected and studied further to check the variability with other HCV NS3 genotypes. This study will help in future to understand the structural architecture of HCV genome variability and to further define the conserved targets for antiviral agents. PMID:25401105

  15. Zeolite 5A Catalyzed Etherification of Diphenylmethanol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Jason; Henderson, Eric J.; Lightbody, Owen C.

    2009-01-01

    An experiment for the synthetic undergraduate laboratory is described in which zeolite 5A catalyzes the room temperature dehydration of diphenylmethanol, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOH, producing 1,1,1',1'-tetraphenyldimethyl ether, (C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]CHOCH(C[subscript 6]H[subscript 5])[subscript 2]. The…

  16. MTHFR (C677T) CT genotype and CT-apoE3/3 genotypic combination predisposes the risk of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Murali; Chinniah, Rathika; Ravi, Padma Malini; Sivanadham, Ramgopal; Mosses Joseph, Arun Kumar; Vellaiappan, Neethi Arasu; Krishnan, Jeyaram Illiayaraja; Karuppiah, Balakrishnan

    2016-10-15

    The predisposition to ischemic stroke (IS) might involve interactions of several genes and environmental factors. The present study was aimed to evaluate the influence of polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR-C677T) and apolipoprotein-E (apo-E) as risk factors for IS patients in south Indian population. 200 IS patients and 193 age and sex matched controls were genotyped for MTHFR-C677T and apoE by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Statistically significant association was observed for MTHFR CT genotype (IS-Pooled: OR=4.29; p=5.01×10(-5); IS-Males: OR=4.13; p=0.001; IS-Females: OR=8.62; p=0.027; IS-Large Vessel Disease (LVD)- Pooled: OR=4.14; p=0.0002) and T allele (IS-Pooled: OR=4.82; p=1.49×10(-5); IS-Males: OR=4.33; p=0.0002; IS-Females: OR=7.99; p=0.031; IS-LVD-Pooled: OR=4.13; p=0.0001). Further, reduced frequencies of CC genotype (IS-Pooled: OR=0.20; p=9.80×10(-6); IS-Males: OR=0.25; p=0.001; IS-Females: OR=0.12; p=0.027; IS-LVD-Pooled: OR=0.23; p=0.0001) and C allele (IS-Pooled: OR=0.21; p=1.49×10(-5); IS-Males: OR=0.23; p=0.0002; IS-Females: OR=0.13; p=0.031; IS-LVD-Pooled: OR=0.24; p=0.0001) were observed in IS patients than the controls. No association was observed for apoE genotypes/alleles in IS/LVD cases. Our study demonstrated the presence of risk for MTHFR CT genotype/T allele and 'CT-3/3' (n=33 vs. 5; OR=7.42; p=0.001) genotypic combination in the development of IS in south India. Further, follow-up study of these stroke cases i.e., in later stages of the disease whether they are developing the neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) is needed to draw a fruitful conclusion in connection between neurological disorders and with these two polymorphisms, before translating it into clinical practice. PMID:27378745

  17. Genotyping of Coxiella burnetii from domestic ruminants in northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on the genotypic diversity of Coxiella burnetii isolates from infected domestic ruminants in Spain is limited. The aim of this study was to identify the C. burnetii genotypes infecting livestock in Northern Spain and compare them to other European genotypes. A commercial real-time PCR targeting the IS1111a insertion element was used to detect the presence of C. burnetii DNA in domestic ruminants from Spain. Genotypes were determined by a 6-loci Multiple Locus Variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) panel and Multispacer Sequence Typing (MST). Results A total of 45 samples from 4 goat herds (placentas, N = 4), 12 dairy cattle herds (vaginal mucus, individual milk, bulk tank milk, aerosols, N = 20) and 5 sheep flocks (placenta, vaginal swabs, faeces, air samples, dust, N = 21) were included in the study. Samples from goats and sheep were obtained from herds which had suffered abortions suspected to be caused by C. burnetii, whereas cattle samples were obtained from animals with reproductive problems compatible with C. burnetii infection, or consisted of bulk tank milk (BTM) samples from a Q fever surveillance programme. C. burnetii genotypes identified in ruminants from Spain were compared to those detected in other countries. Three MLVA genotypes were found in 4 goat farms, 7 MLVA genotypes were identified in 12 cattle herds and 4 MLVA genotypes were identified in 5 sheep flocks. Clustering of the MLVA genotypes using the minimum spanning tree method showed a high degree of genetic similarity between most MLVA genotypes. Overall 11 different MLVA genotypes were obtained corresponding to 4 different MST genotypes: MST genotype 13, identified in goat, sheep and cattle from Spain; MST genotype 18, only identified in goats; and, MST genotypes 8 and 20, identified in small ruminants and cattle, respectively. All these genotypes had been previously identified in animal and human clinical samples from several European countries, but

  18. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum. PMID:23546253

  19. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas. PMID:7637022

  20. Toxoplasma gondii in free-ranging wild small felids from Brazil: molecular detection and genotypic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cañón-Franco, W A; Araújo, F A P; López-Orozco, N; Jardim, M M A; Keid, L B; Dalla-Rosa, C; Cabral, A D; Pena, H F J; Gennari, S M

    2013-11-01

    Brazil harbors the largest number of wild Neotropical felid species, with ten of the twelve species recorded in the American continent. Although these animals are considered to be definitive hosts for Toxoplasma gondii, there are few descriptions of the parasite in these species. Here, we performed a molecular detection of T. gondii by amplification of the marker ITS-1 from tissue samples obtained from 90 free-ranging wild small Neotropical felids from Rio Grande do Sul - Brazil. Of the sampled animals, 34.4% (n=31) were positive including the species Puma yagouaroundi - jaguarondi (9/22), Leopardus geoffroyi - Geoffroy's cat (6/22), Leopardus tigrinus - oncilla (8/28), Leopardus wiedii - margay (6/10), Leopardus pardalis - ocelot (1/1) and Leopardus colocolo - Pampas cat (1/7). Toxoplasma DNA was detected with a frequency of 14.6% (63/433) in primary samples of tongue (16/56), brain (8/43), skeletal muscle (15/83), heart (7/63), diaphragm (3/56), vitreous humor (2/44), eye muscle (6/44) and eyeball (6/44). Multilocus PCR-RFLP genotyping of eleven small Neotropical felids using the molecular markers SAG1, 5'3'SAG2, alt. SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, Apico and CS3 allowed the partial characterization of eight genotypes. We fully characterized two new genotypes that have not been described previously in Brazil (Lw#31Tn from L. wiedii and Py#21Sm from P. yagouaroundi) and one genotype Py#56Br from P. yagouaroundi that has been described previously in isolates from cats, dogs and capybaras from São Paulo state. This study constitutes the first detection and genotypic characterization of T. gondii in free-ranging felids in Brazil, demonstrating the occurrence of the parasite in wild populations and suggesting its potential transmissibility to humans and other domestic and wild animals. PMID:23932730

  1. Comparative analysis of Paenibacillus larvae genotypes isolated in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Dingman, Douglas W

    2015-08-01

    Ninety-six strains of Paenibacillus larvae, causative agent of American foulbrood in honey bee (Apis mellifera) larvae, collected from Connecticut, USA (CT), honey bees, and 12 P. larvae strains not from CT, were genotyped via ERIC-PCR and XbaI-RFLP analysis. All CT-isolates, five strains isolated in South America, three strains from North America (not CT), and one strain isolated in Australia grouped into the ERIC I genotype. Three P. larvae formerly subsp. pulvifaciens strains grouped into ERIC III and IV genotypes. XbaI-RFLP genotyping showed three genotypes within the CT-isolates, and two were identified as XbaI-RFLP Type I and III. The third XbaI-RFLP genotype (Type Ib) represented one of four new XbaI-RFLP genotypes identified. Comparison of genotype results for the P. larvae strains tested was used to develop a correlation between ERIC-PCR genotyping and XbaI-RFLP genotyping. Sixteen CT-isolates were tetracycline-resistant and demonstrated PCR amplification using oligonucleotide primers for tetL. All 16 isolates grouped within XbaI-RFLP Type Ib, suggesting limited introduction of a tetracycline-resistant strain into CT. PMID:25929327

  2. Plant genotypic diversity reduces the rate of consumer resource utilization

    PubMed Central

    McArt, Scott H.; Thaler, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    While plant species diversity can reduce herbivore densities and herbivory, little is known regarding how plant genotypic diversity alters resource utilization by herbivores. Here, we show that an invasive folivore—the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica)—increases 28 per cent in abundance, but consumes 24 per cent less foliage in genotypic polycultures compared with monocultures of the common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis). We found strong complementarity for reduced herbivore damage among plant genotypes growing in polycultures and a weak dominance effect of particularly resistant genotypes. Sequential feeding by P. japonica on different genotypes from polycultures resulted in reduced consumption compared with feeding on different plants of the same genotype from monocultures. Thus, diet mixing among plant genotypes reduced herbivore consumption efficiency. Despite positive complementarity driving an increase in fruit production in polycultures, we observed a trade-off between complementarity for increased plant productivity and resistance to herbivory, suggesting costs in the complementary use of resources by plant genotypes may manifest across trophic levels. These results elucidate mechanisms for how plant genotypic diversity simultaneously alters resource utilization by both producers and consumers, and show that population genotypic diversity can increase the resistance of a native plant to an invasive herbivore. PMID:23658201

  3. Genetic diversity in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Degewione, A; Alamerew, S

    2013-11-01

    Wheat is one most important cereal crops grown in Ethiopia. Yet, keeping in view insufficient information on exotic bread wheat genotypes is limiting the access to useful traits present among the genotypes in the Somali region of Ethiopia. The aim of the study was to assess the extent of genetic diversity among bread wheat genotypes. Twenty six bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes obtained from ICARDA-CIMMYT were tested at Gode and Kelafo research sites at three cropping seasons (2009/10, 2010/11 and 2011/12) under irrigation. The experiment was conducted in randomized complete block design with three replications. Ten agronomic traits were included in the study. The mean values, ranges and the coefficient of variation of the 10 characters indicated the existence of sufficient variability among genotypes. Multivariate techniques were used to classify 26 bread wheat genotypes. Principal component analysis showed that the first six principal components explained about 91.87% of the total variation. D2 analysis showed the 26 bread wheat genotypes grouped into six clusters. This made to become moderate diversity among the genotypes. The crosses between genotypes selected from cluster-III with cluster-VI and cluster V with cluster VI are expected to produce better genetic recombination and segregation in their progenies. Therefore, these bread wheat genotypes need to be crossed and selected to develop high yielding pure line variety. PMID:24511742

  4. Genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in two cities of Turkey: Description of a new family of genotypes that is phylogeographically specific for Asia Minor

    PubMed Central

    Zozio, Thierry; Allix, Caroline; Gunal, Selami; Saribas, Zeynep; Alp, Alpaslan; Durmaz, Riza; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse; Rastogi, Nalin; Sola, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    Background Population-based bacterial genetics using repeated DNA loci is an efficient approach to study the biodiversity and phylogeographical structure of human pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of tuberculosis. Indeed large genetic diversity databases are available for this pathogen and are regularly updated. No population-based polymorphism data were yet available for M. tuberculosis in Turkey, at the crossroads of Eurasia. Results A total of 245 DNAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from tuberculosis patients residing in Turkey (Malatya n = 147 or Ankara n = 98) were genotyped by spoligotyping, a high-throughput genotyping method based on the polymorphism of the Direct Repeat locus. Thirty-three spoligotyping-defined clusters including 206 patients and 39 unique patterns were found. The ST41 cluster, as designated according to the international SpolDB3 database project, represented one fourth and when gathered to three genotypes, ST53, ST50 and ST284, one half of all the isolates. Out of 34 clinical isolates harboring ST41 which were further genotyped by IS6110 and by MIRU-VNTR typing, a typical 2-copy IS6110-RFLP pattern and a "215125113322" MIRU-VNTR pattern were observed among 21 clinical isolates. Further search in various databases confirms the likely Turkish-phylogeographical specificity of this clonal complex. Conclusion We described a new phylogeographically-specific clone of M. tuberculosis, designated LAM7-TUR. Further investigations to assess its frequency within all regions of Turkey and its phylogeographical origin and phylogenetic position within the global M. tuberculosis phylogenetic tree will shed new light on its endemicity in Asia Minor. PMID:16045794

  5. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS): a novel, efficient and cost-effective genotyping method for cattle using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    De Donato, Marcos; Peters, Sunday O; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hussain, Tanveer; Imumorin, Ikhide G

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput genotyping methods have increased the analytical power to study complex traits but high cost has remained a barrier for large scale use in animal improvement. We have adapted genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) used in plants for genotyping 47 animals representing 7 taurine and indicine breeds of cattle from the US and Africa. Genomic DNA was digested with different enzymes, ligated to adapters containing one of 48 unique bar codes and sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq 2000. PstI was the best enzyme producing 1.4 million unique reads per animal and initially identifying a total of 63,697 SNPs. After removal of SNPs with call rates of less than 70%, 51,414 SNPs were detected throughout all autosomes with an average distance of 48.1 kb, and 1,143 SNPs on the X chromosome at an average distance of 130.3 kb, as well as 191 on unmapped contigs. If we consider only the SNPs with call rates of 90% and over, we identified 39,751 on autosomes, 850 on the X chromosome and 124 on unmapped contigs. Of these SNPs, 28,843 were not tightly linked to other SNPs. Average marker density per autosome was highly correlated with chromosome size (coefficient of correlation = -0.798, r(2) = 0.637) with higher density in smaller chromosomes. Average SNP call rate was 86.5% for all loci, with 53.0% of the loci having call rates >90% and the average minor allele frequency being 0.212. Average observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.046-0.294 among individuals, and from 0.064-0.197 among breeds, with Brangus showing the highest diversity as expected. GBS technique is novel, flexible, sufficiently high-throughput, and capable of providing acceptable marker density for genomic selection or genome-wide association studies at roughly one third of the cost of currently available genotyping technologies. PMID:23690931

  6. Genotype-specific mutations in the polymerase gene of hepatitis B virus potentially associated with resistance to oral antiviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Silvia; Sebastiani, Giada; Rossi, Cristina; Velo, Emanuela; Erne, Elke Maria; Vario, Alessandro; Tempesta, Diego; Romualdi, Chiara; Campagnolo, Davide; Alberti, Alfredo

    2012-12-01

    The evolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the role of different variants during antiviral therapy may be influenced by HBV genotype. We have therefore analysed substitutions potentially related to nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) resistance at 42 positions within RT-region in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis B in relation to HBV-genotype. RT mutations analysis was performed by direct sequencing in 200 NAs-naïve patients and in 64 LAM or LAM+ADV experienced patients with NAs resistance, infected mainly by HBV-genotypes D and A. 27 polymorphic-sites were identified among the 42 positions analysed and 64 novel mutations were detected in 23 positions. Genotype-D displayed the highest mutation frequency (6.4%) among all HBV-genotypes analysed. Single or multiple mutations were detected in 80% of naïve patients. Overall, the most frequent single mutations were at residues rt54, rt53 and rt91 which may associate with significantly lower HBV-DNA levels (p=0.001). Comparison with sequencing data of patients failing LMV or LAM+ADV therapy revealed an higher frequency of novel genotype-specific mutations if compared with naïve patients: 3 mutations under LAM monotherapy in HBV-D (rtS85F; rtL91I; rtC256G) and 3 mutations under ADV therapy in HBV-A (rtI53V; rtW153R; rtF221Y). In HBV-D treated patients the dominant resistance mutation was rtL80V (31.4%) and rtM204I (60%) in LAM+ADV group while LAM-treated patients showed a preference of rtM204V (51.9%). Interestingly, none of HBV-A patients had mutation rtM204I under ADV add-on treatment but all of them had the "V" AA substitution. These results suggested that in patients with CHB, HBV-genotype might be relevant in the evolution and development of drug resistance showing also different mutation patterns in the YMDD motif between HBV genotype D and A. PMID:23026293

  7. SBE primer : multiplexing minisequencing-based genotyping

    SciTech Connect

    Kaderali, L.; Deshpande, A.; Uribe-Romeo, F. J.; Schliep, A.; Torney, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis is a powerful tool for mapping and diagnosing disease-related alleles. Most of the known genetic diseases are caused by point mutations, and a growing number of SNPs will be routinely analyzed to diagnose genetic disorders. Mutation analysis by polymerase mediated single-base primer extension (minisequencing) can be massively parallelized using for example DNA microchips or flow cytometry with microspheres as solid support. By adding a unique oligonucleotide tag to the 5-inch end of the minisequencing primer and attaching the complementary anti-tag to the array or bead surface, the assay can be 'demultiplexed'. However, such high-throughput scoring of SNPs requires a high level of primer multiplexing in order to analyze multiple loci in one assay, thus enabling inexpensive and fast polymorphism scoring. Primers can be chosen from either the plus or the minus strand, and primers used in the same experiment must not bind to one another. To genotype a given number of polymorphic sites, the question is which primer to use for each SNP, and which primers to group into the same experiment. Furthermore, a crosshybridization-free tag/anti-tag code is required in order to sort the extended primers to the corresponding microspheres or chip spots. These problems pose challenging algorithmic questions. We present a computer program lo automate the design process for the assay. Oligonucleotide primers for the reaction are automatically selected by the software, a unique DNA tag/anti-tag system is generated, and the pairing of primers and DNA-Tags is automatically done in a way to avoid any crossreactivity. We report first results on a 45-plex genotyping assay, indicating that minisequencing can be adapted to be a powerful tool for high-throughput, massively parallel genotyping.

  8. Potential increase in mating frequency of queens in feral colonies of Bombus terrestris introduced into Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Maki N.; Saito, Fuki; Tsuchida, Koji; Goka, Koichi

    2012-10-01

    With the exception of several species, bumblebees are monandrous. We examined mating frequency in feral colonies of the introduced bumblebee Bombus terrestris in Japan . Using microsatellite markers, genotyping of sperm DNA stored in the spermatheca of nine queens detected multiple insemination paternities in one queen; the others were singly mated. The average effective paternity frequency estimated from the genotypes of queens and workers was 1.23; that estimated from the workers' genotype alone was 2.12. These values were greater than those of laboratory-reared colonies in the native ranges of B. terrestris. The genotypes of one or two workers did not match those of their queens or showed paternities different from those of their nestmates; this may have arisen from either queen takeover or drifting of workers. These alien workers were responsible for the heterogeneous genotype distribution within each B. terrestris colony, resulting in higher estimates of paternity frequency than of insemination frequency. The high mating frequency of introduced B. terrestris may have occurred by artificial selection through mass breeding for commercialization. Moreover, polyandrous queens may be selectively advantageous, because reproduction by such queens is less likely to be disturbed by interspecific mating than that by monandrous queens.

  9. The Development of Quality Control Genotyping Approaches: A Case Study Using Elite Maize Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiafa; Zavala, Cristian; Ortega, Noemi; Petroli, Cesar; Franco, Jorge; Burgueño, Juan; Costich, Denise E.; Hearne, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Quality control (QC) of germplasm identity and purity is a critical component of breeding and conservation activities. SNP genotyping technologies and increased availability of markers provide the opportunity to employ genotyping as a low-cost and robust component of this QC. In the public sector available low-cost SNP QC genotyping methods have been developed from a very limited panel of markers of 1,000 to 1,500 markers without broad selection of the most informative SNPs. Selection of optimal SNPs and definition of appropriate germplasm sampling in addition to platform section impact on logistical and resource-use considerations for breeding and conservation applications when mainstreaming QC. In order to address these issues, we evaluated the selection and use of SNPs for QC applications from large DArTSeq data sets generated from CIMMYT maize inbred lines (CMLs). Two QC genotyping strategies were developed, the first is a “rapid QC”, employing a small number of SNPs to identify potential mislabeling of seed packages or plots, the second is a “broad QC”, employing a larger number of SNP, used to identify each germplasm entry and to measure heterogeneity. The optimal marker selection strategies combined the selection of markers with high minor allele frequency, sampling of clustered SNP in proportion to marker cluster distance and selecting markers that maintain a uniform genomic distribution. The rapid and broad QC SNP panels selected using this approach were further validated using blind test assessments of related re-generation samples. The influence of sampling within each line was evaluated. Sampling 192 individuals would result in close to 100% possibility of detecting a 5% contamination in the entry, and approximately a 98% probability to detect a 2% contamination of the line. These results provide a framework for the establishment of QC genotyping. A comparison of financial and time costs for use of these approaches across different platforms is

  10. The Development of Quality Control Genotyping Approaches: A Case Study Using Elite Maize Lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiafa; Zavala, Cristian; Ortega, Noemi; Petroli, Cesar; Franco, Jorge; Burgueño, Juan; Costich, Denise E; Hearne, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Quality control (QC) of germplasm identity and purity is a critical component of breeding and conservation activities. SNP genotyping technologies and increased availability of markers provide the opportunity to employ genotyping as a low-cost and robust component of this QC. In the public sector available low-cost SNP QC genotyping methods have been developed from a very limited panel of markers of 1,000 to 1,500 markers without broad selection of the most informative SNPs. Selection of optimal SNPs and definition of appropriate germplasm sampling in addition to platform section impact on logistical and resource-use considerations for breeding and conservation applications when mainstreaming QC. In order to address these issues, we evaluated the selection and use of SNPs for QC applications from large DArTSeq data sets generated from CIMMYT maize inbred lines (CMLs). Two QC genotyping strategies were developed, the first is a "rapid QC", employing a small number of SNPs to identify potential mislabeling of seed packages or plots, the second is a "broad QC", employing a larger number of SNP, used to identify each germplasm entry and to measure heterogeneity. The optimal marker selection strategies combined the selection of markers with high minor allele frequency, sampling of clustered SNP in proportion to marker cluster distance and selecting markers that maintain a uniform genomic distribution. The rapid and broad QC SNP panels selected using this approach were further validated using blind test assessments of related re-generation samples. The influence of sampling within each line was evaluated. Sampling 192 individuals would result in close to 100% possibility of detecting a 5% contamination in the entry, and approximately a 98% probability to detect a 2% contamination of the line. These results provide a framework for the establishment of QC genotyping. A comparison of financial and time costs for use of these approaches across different platforms is

  11. Enhanced Diabetes Susceptibility in Community Dwelling Han Elders Carrying the Apolipoprotein E 3/3 Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Zhu, Min-jie; Wang, Jing-hua; Zhang, Zhen-lian; Wang, Zhe; Su, Ning; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Shi, Yan-chen; Xiao, Shi-fu; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Despite Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) being one of the main apolipoproteins in the blood, the association between its genotype and the high cholesterol or blood glucose levels commonly seen in clinical practice is inconclusive. Such research is also lacking in the Han population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between APOE genotype, diabetes, and plasma glucose and lipid levels. We included 243 community-dwelling elderly residents in this study. Participant APOE genotypes were assessed and were simultaneously tested for weight, height, blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and high- and low-density lipoprotein. In addition, gender, age, years of education, cognitive function, and medical history was recorded. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on APOE genotype: APOE ε2 group (ε2/ε2 and ε2/ε3), APOE ε3 group (ε3/ε3), and APOE ε4 group (ε2/ε4, ε3/ε4 and ε4/ε4). Comparisons between groups were conducted for the incidence of diabetes, high blood pressure, and dementia, as well as for differences in body-mass index, fasting plasma glucose, and blood lipids. The APOE ε3/ε3 genotype exhibited the highest frequency (70.4%) among the subjects. Participants in the APOE ε3 group demonstrated significantly higher levels of fasting plasma glucose than those in the APOE ε2 and APOE ε4 groups (P<0.05). The APOE ε3 group had slightly higher abnormal fasting plasma glucose values than did the APOE ε2 group (P = 0.065). Furthermore, the APOE3 genotype was significantly correlated with both fasting plasma glucose level and glucose abnormality (P< 0.05) and trended toward statistically significant correlation with diabetes (P = 0.082). The correlation between APOE2 and low low-density lipoprotein levels also approached statistical significance (P = 0.052). Thus, elderly community dwelling residents of Han ethnicity carrying the APOE ε3/ε3 genotype might have higher plasma glucose levels and a higher occurrence of diabetes. PMID

  12. Enhanced Diabetes Susceptibility in Community Dwelling Han Elders Carrying the Apolipoprotein E 3/3 Genotype.

    PubMed

    Ban, Chun-Xia; Zhong, Li; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Min-Jie; Wang, Jing-Hua; Zhang, Zhen-Lian; Wang, Zhe; Su, Ning; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Shi, Yan-Chen; Xiao, Shi-Fu; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Despite Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) being one of the main apolipoproteins in the blood, the association between its genotype and the high cholesterol or blood glucose levels commonly seen in clinical practice is inconclusive. Such research is also lacking in the Han population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between APOE genotype, diabetes, and plasma glucose and lipid levels. We included 243 community-dwelling elderly residents in this study. Participant APOE genotypes were assessed and were simultaneously tested for weight, height, blood glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, and high- and low-density lipoprotein. In addition, gender, age, years of education, cognitive function, and medical history was recorded. Subjects were divided into 3 groups based on APOE genotype: APOE ε2 group (ε2/ε2 and ε2/ε3), APOE ε3 group (ε3/ε3), and APOE ε4 group (ε2/ε4, ε3/ε4 and ε4/ε4). Comparisons between groups were conducted for the incidence of diabetes, high blood pressure, and dementia, as well as for differences in body-mass index, fasting plasma glucose, and blood lipids. The APOE ε3/ε3 genotype exhibited the highest frequency (70.4%) among the subjects. Participants in the APOE ε3 group demonstrated significantly higher levels of fasting plasma glucose than those in the APOE ε2 and APOE ε4 groups (P<0.05). The APOE ε3 group had slightly higher abnormal fasting plasma glucose values than did the APOE ε2 group (P = 0.065). Furthermore, the APOE3 genotype was significantly correlated with both fasting plasma glucose level and glucose abnormality (P< 0.05) and trended toward statistically significant correlation with diabetes (P = 0.082). The correlation between APOE2 and low low-density lipoprotein levels also approached statistical significance (P = 0.052). Thus, elderly community dwelling residents of Han ethnicity carrying the APOE ε3/ε3 genotype might have higher plasma glucose levels and a higher occurrence of diabetes. PMID

  13. In Vitro Activity and Resistance Profile of Samatasvir, a Novel NS5A Replication Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lallos, L. B.; McCarville, J. F.; La Colla, M.; Serra, I.; Chapron, C.; Gillum, J. M.; Pierra, C.; Standring, D. N.; Seifer, M.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein is a clinically validated target for drugs designed to treat chronic HCV infection. This study evaluated the in vitro activity, selectivity, and resistance profile of a novel anti-HCV compound, samatasvir (IDX719), alone and in combination with other antiviral agents. Samatasvir was effective and selective against infectious HCV and replicons, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) falling within a tight range of 2 to 24 pM in genotype 1 through 5 replicons and with a 10-fold EC50 shift in the presence of 40% human serum in the genotype 1b replicon. The EC90/EC50 ratio was low (2.6). A 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) of >100 μM provided a selectivity index of >5 × 107. Resistance selection experiments (with genotype 1a replicons) and testing against replicons bearing site-directed mutations (with genotype 1a and 1b replicons) identified NS5A amino acids 28, 30, 31, 32, and 93 as potential resistance loci, suggesting that samatasvir affects NS5A function. Samatasvir demonstrated an overall additive effect when combined with interferon alfa (IFN-α), ribavirin, representative HCV protease, and nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitors or the nucleotide prodrug IDX184. Samatasvir retained full activity in the presence of HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) antivirals and was not cross-resistant with HCV protease, nucleotide, and nonnucleoside polymerase inhibitor classes. Thus, samatasvir is a selective low-picomolar inhibitor of HCV replication in vitro and is a promising candidate for future combination therapies with other direct-acting antiviral drugs in HCV-infected patients. PMID:24867983

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and SCN5A Variants

    PubMed Central

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Darbar, Dawood

    2014-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF) is clinically and genetically a highly heterogeneous disease, recent studies suggest that the arrhythmia may arise because of interactions between genetic and acquired risk factors – the so called “double-hit” hypothesis. Genome-wide association studies have identified common AF susceptibility loci, and linkage analysis and candidate gene approaches have identified mutations in genes that encode for cardiac ion channels and signaling proteins; however, most of the heritability of AF still remains unexplained. The voltage-dependent cardiac sodium channel, encoded by SCN5A, conducts the main cardiac inward sodium current (INa) and is responsible for the upstroke of the atrial action potential. Mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the α-subunit of the NaV1.5 channel, have been linked with increased susceptibility to not only AF but also ventricular arrhythmias (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome), progressive cardiac conduction disease, and overlap syndromes with mixed arrhythmia phenotypes. Over the last decade, functional characterization of SCN5A mutations by expressing the channel in heterologous expression systems and applying cellular electrophysiological techniques has not only advanced our understanding of molecular mechanisms of AF but also potentially identified a mechanism-based approach to treating this common and morbid condition. PMID:25484998

  15. Multilocus genotypes spanning estrogen metabolism associated with breast cancer and fibroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Corder, Elizabeth H; Hefler, Lukas A

    2006-01-01

    We investigated inherited polymorphic variation in genes spanning estrogen metabolism (10 SNPs [single nucleotide polymorphism]) to distinguish multilocus genotypes associated with breast cancer (n = 393), benign breast lesions (n = 154), and low risk (n = 1936). Three latent classification GoM extreme type groups represented the data: (a) fibroadenoma, and infrequent SRD5A2 and VDR alleles; (b) postmenopausal breast cancer, and infrequent CYP1A1-1 and CYP1A1-2 alleles (both over-represented infrequent alleles for CYP17, CYP19-3, and COMT); and (c) women at intrinsically low risk. Carriage of the respective multilocus genotypes increased risk 25-fold. We conclude that GoM latent classification may be useful to identify genetic risk sets and estimate risk for individuals. PMID:16608396

  16. A novel multiplex pyrosequencing assay for genotyping functionally relevant CTLA-4 polymorphisms: potential applications in autoimmunity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Banelli, Barbara; Morabito, Anna; Laurent, Stefania; Piccioli, Patrizia; Dozin, Beatrice; Ghio, Massimo; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Monteghirfo, Stefano; Marasco, Antonella; Ottaviano, Vincenzo; Queirolo, Paola; Romani, Massimo; Pistillo, Maria Pia

    2014-08-01

    CTLA-4 expression/function can be affected by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CTLA-4 gene, which have been widely associated with susceptibility or progression to autoimmune diseases and cancer development. In this study, we analyzed six CTLA-4 SNPs (-1661A>G, -1577G>A, -658C>T, -319C>T, +49A>G, CT60G>A) in 197 DNA samples from 43 B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs), 40 systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, 14 pre-analyzed melanoma patients and 100 Italian healthy subjects. Genotyping of -1661A>G, -1577G>A, -658C>T and CT60G>A was performed by newly developed multiplex pyrosequencing (PSQ) assays, whereas -319C>T and +49A>G by T-ARMS PCR and direct sequencing. Genotype/allele frequency were analyzed using χ(2) or Fisher exact test. Our study provides the first multiplex PSQ method that allows simultaneous genotyping of two CTLA-4 SNP pairs (i.e. -1661A>G/-658C>T and -1577G>A/CT60G>A) by two multiplex PSQ reactions. Herein, we show the CTLA-4 genotype distribution in the B-LCLs providing the first and best characterized cell line panel typed for functionally relevant CTLA-4 SNPs. We also report the significant association of the -1661A/G genotype, -1661 & -319 AC-GT diplotype and -319 & CT60 TG haplotype with susceptibility to SSc without Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurrence. Furthermore, we confirmed previous genotyping data referred to melanoma patients and provided new genotyping data for Italian healthy subjects. PMID:24801647

  17. Trichothecene Genotypes of the Fusarium graminearum Species Complex Isolated from Brazilian Wheat Grains by Conventional and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tralamazza, Sabina M.; Braghini, Raquel; Corrêa, Benedito

    2016-01-01

    We compared two well-established methods, fungal isolation followed by conventional PCR and DNA analysis by quantitative PCR (qPCR), to define trichothecene genotypes in Brazilian wheat grains from different locations. For this purpose, after fungal isolation from 75 wheat samples, 100 isolates of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) were genotyped by PCR to establish their trichothecene profile. For profiling by qPCR, DNA was extracted from the wheat samples and analyzed. The methods provided similar and divergent results. The FGSC isolates were classified as NIV (55%), 15-ADON (43%), and 3-ADON (2%). Analysis by qPCR showed 100% contamination with 15-ADON strains in all wheat samples, 80% contamination with the NIV genotype, and only 33.3% contamination with 3-ADON strains. Further analysis revealed that 96% of all quantified DNA was attributed to the 15-ADON profile, while 3.4% was attributed to NIV and only 0.06% to 3-ADON. A positive correlation was observed between 15-ADON genotype DNA concentration and deoxynivalenol (DON) content in the wheat samples. The high frequency of fungi, DNA levels and positive correlation with DON strongly indicate that 15-ADON producers are the main trichothecene genotype in Brazilian wheat grains. Surprisingly, although many isolates (55%) carried the NIV genotype and this genotype was identified in 80% of the wheat samples, only 3.4% of fungal DNA was in fact from NIV producers. Although, our findings showed that each method provided a different perspective about the trichothecene profile, DNA analysis by qPCR gave us new insight about fungal contamination levels in Brazilian wheat grains. Nevertheless, both techniques should be used to obtain more robust results. PMID:26973624

  18. Trichothecene Genotypes of the Fusarium graminearum Species Complex Isolated from Brazilian Wheat Grains by Conventional and Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Tralamazza, Sabina M; Braghini, Raquel; Corrêa, Benedito

    2016-01-01

    We compared two well-established methods, fungal isolation followed by conventional PCR and DNA analysis by quantitative PCR (qPCR), to define trichothecene genotypes in Brazilian wheat grains from different locations. For this purpose, after fungal isolation from 75 wheat samples, 100 isolates of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) were genotyped by PCR to establish their trichothecene profile. For profiling by qPCR, DNA was extracted from the wheat samples and analyzed. The methods provided similar and divergent results. The FGSC isolates were classified as NIV (55%), 15-ADON (43%), and 3-ADON (2%). Analysis by qPCR showed 100% contamination with 15-ADON strains in all wheat samples, 80% contamination with the NIV genotype, and only 33.3% contamination with 3-ADON strains. Further analysis revealed that 96% of all quantified DNA was attributed to the 15-ADON profile, while 3.4% was attributed to NIV and only 0.06% to 3-ADON. A positive correlation was observed between 15-ADON genotype DNA concentration and deoxynivalenol (DON) content in the wheat samples. The high frequency of fungi, DNA levels and positive correlation with DON strongly indicate that 15-ADON producers are the main trichothecene genotype in Brazilian wheat grains. Surprisingly, although many isolates (55%) carried the NIV genotype and this genotype was identified in 80% of the wheat samples, only 3.4% of fungal DNA was in fact from NIV producers. Although, our findings showed that each method provided a different perspective about the trichothecene profile, DNA analysis by qPCR gave us new insight about fungal contamination levels in Brazilian wheat grains. Nevertheless, both techniques should be used to obtain more robust results. PMID:26973624

  19. 5 A, version modifée

    PubMed Central

    Vallis, Michael; Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Sharma, Arya M.; Freedhoff, Yoni

    2013-01-01

    Objectif Adapter le modèle 5 A pour offrir aux professionnels des soins primaires un cadre de counseling sur l'obésité. Sources des données Une recension systématique des ouvrages spécialisés a été effectuée dans MEDLINE à l'aide des expressions de recherche 5 A's (49 articles recensés, tous pertinents) et 5 A's et primary care (8 articles recensés, tous redondants). On a aussi fait une recherche dans les sites web du National Institute of Health et de l'Organisation mondiale de la Santé. Message principal L'approche 5 A (autorisation, analyse, avis, accord et aide ou ask, assess, advise, agree et assist en anglais), élaborée pour la cessation du tabagisme, peut être adaptée au counseling sur l'obésité. Demander l'autorisation de discuter du poids; ne pas porter de jugement et explorer la volonté du patient de changer. Analyser l'indice de masse corporelle, la circonférence de la taille et le stade de l'obésité; explorer les déclencheurs et les complications de l'excès de poids. Donner son avis sur les risques de l'obésité pour la santé, les bienfaits d'une modeste perte de poids, la nécessité d'une stratégie à long terme et les options de traitements. Se mettre d'accord sur des attentes, des objectifs et des changements comportementaux réalistes pour perdre du poids et sur les détails précis du plan de traitement. Assister dans l'identifcation et l'atténuation des obstacles; offrir des ressources, aider à trouver et à consulter les services appropriés et organiser un suivi périodique. Conclusion Les 5 A représentent une stratégie d'intervention comportementale fondée sur des données probantes qui a le potentiel d'améliorer le taux de réussite de la gestion du poids en soins primaires.

  20. Endogenous Histamine and Cortisol Levels in Subjects with Different Histamine N-Methyltransferase C314T Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Yuen Yi; Jusko, William J.; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Chen, Guo-Lin; Guo, Dong; Zhou, Gan; Spratlin, Vicky E.; Jann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) catalyzes the methylation of histamine and plays an important role in histamine biotransformation in bronchial epithelium. Enzymatic activity of HNMT has been shown to be regulated by genetic factors, including polymorphisms in the HNMT gene. In this pilot study we determined endogenous levels of histamine and Cortisol in plasma and whole blood samples from subjects with different genotypes for the HNMT C314T polymorphism, and investigated whether these parameters differed between individuals with the HNMT CC genotype and those with the CT genotype. Methods Blood samples were collected from 48 unrelated volunteers (36 males, 12 females), aged 21-40 years, who participated in the study. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to determine HNMTC314T genotypes. Erythrocyte HNMT activity was determined as well as plasma and whole blood levels of histamine and Cortisol. Two-group comparisons of the various parameters were analyzed by Blocked Wilcoxon test and Wilcoxon Rank Sum test as appropriate. Results Thirty-seven subjects (24 Caucasians, three African Americans, one Middle Eastern, five Indians, three Chinese, and one Filipino) were found to have the homozygous CC genotype. Ten subjects (eight Caucasians, one Middle Eastern, and one Chinese) were heterozygous and one individual (Pakistani) was homozygous for the variant 314T allele. The frequency of HNMT CT heterozygotes in the small Caucasian cohort was 0.125. Median enzyme activity was significantly lower in subjects with the heterozygous CT genotype than in those with the homozygous CC genotype (485 vs 631 U/mL of red blood cells; p = 0.023). A broad range of histamine levels in plasma and whole blood was observed for all subjects. Whereas the median plasma histamine level was found to be higher in heterozygotes for the wild-type 314C allele than homozygotes (3.32 vs 2.30 nmol/L; p = 0.021), there was no difference between the two groups in

  1. Neppiness in an Introgressed Population of Cotton: Genotypic Variation and Genotypic Correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neps and seed coat fragments are two types of impurities in ginned fibers causing severe problems in textile processing during spinning and dyeing. The study was designed to investigate the genotypic variation for neps and seed coat fragments remaining in ginned fibers in an introgressed population ...

  2. Realizing the potential of plasma genotyping in an age of genotype-directed therapies.

    PubMed

    Luke, Jason J; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Paweletz, Cloud P; Camidge, D Ross; Heymach, John V; Solit, David B; Johnson, Bruce E

    2014-08-01

    The identification of oncogenic driver mutations in cancer has led to the rapid rise of genotype-directed treatments such as EGFR and BRAF kinase inhibitors. Standard tumor biopsy remains a cumbersome and morbid procedure for patients, leading to a growing interest in noninvasive plasma genotyping approaches. Circulating tumor cells are of interest; however, the processing of specimens is complicated and time consuming. By comparison, cell-free DNA (cfDNA) genotyping has the potential to be convenient and relatively simple to process in a short time period. Several technologies are under development for cfDNA analysis, such as allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), coamplification at Lower Denaturation temperatures (COLD) PCR, emulsion PCR, and massively parallel sequencing. Broad clinical validity will need to be established for different assays, and clinical utility will need to be evaluated within prospective trials to determine which assays will best predict the efficacy of therapy and patient outcomes. In addition, assay standardization will be critical prior to widespread use in routine clinical practice. The Cell Free DNA Working Group, under the sponsorship of Transgenomic, was convened to evaluate the molecular assays in development and provide recommendations for application and interpretation of these tests in the context of future clinical research. The consensus commentary of the Cell Free DNA Working Group for the use of cfDNA plasma genotyping assays is presented here, including future steps in the development of these technologies. PMID:25106647

  3. Interferon-γ and Interleukin-10 Gene Polymorphisms are not Predictors of Chronic Hepatitis C (Genotype-4) Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Bahgat, Nermine Ahmed; Kamal, Manal Mohamed; Abdelaziz, Ashraf Omar; Mohye, Mohamed Ahmed; Shousha, Hend Ibrahim; ahmed, Mae Mohamed; Elbaz, Tamer Mahmoud; Nabil, Mohamed Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Immunoregulatory cytokines have an influence on hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection outcome. This study aimed to determine whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in IFN- γ and IL-10 genes are associated with susceptibility and/or are markers of prognosis regarding chronic hepatitis C outcomes. IFN γ (+874T/A) and IL-10 (-1082G/A) genotypes were determined in 75 HCV genotype 4 patients with different disease severities (chronic hepatitis, n=25, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on top of liver cirrhosis, n=50) and 25 healthy participants using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction. No statistical differences in allele or genotype distributions of IFN γ and IL-10 genes were detected between patients and controls or between patientgroups. No significant difference in the frequency of IL-10 SNP at position -1082 or IFN-γ at position +874T/A was found between chronic HCV genotype 4 and with progression of disease severity in liver cirrhosis or HCC. In conclusion; interferon-γ and interleukin-10 gene polymorphisms are not predictors of disease progression in patients with chronic hepatitis C (Genotype-4). PMID:26163635

  4. Assessment of genotype imputation performance using 1000 Genomes in African American studies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Dana B; Levy, Joshua L; Gaddis, Nathan C; Bierut, Laura J; Saccone, Nancy L; Page, Grier P; Johnson, Eric O

    2012-01-01

    Genotype imputation, used in genome-wide association studies to expand coverage of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), has performed poorly in African Americans compared to less admixed populations. Overall, imputation has typically relied on HapMap reference haplotype panels from Africans (YRI), European Americans (CEU), and Asians (CHB/JPT). The 1000 Genomes project offers a wider range of reference populations, such as African Americans (ASW), but their imputation performance has had limited evaluation. Using 595 African Americans genotyped on Illumina's HumanHap550v3 BeadChip, we compared imputation results from four software programs (IMPUTE2, BEAGLE, MaCH, and MaCH-Admix) and three reference panels consisting of different combinations of 1000 Genomes populations (February 2012 release): (1) 3 specifically selected populations (YRI, CEU, and ASW); (2) 8 populations of diverse African (AFR) or European (AFR) descent; and (3) all 14 available populations (ALL). Based on chromosome 22, we calculated three performance metrics: (1) concordance (percentage of masked genotyped SNPs with imputed and true genotype agreement); (2) imputation quality score (IQS; concordance adjusted for chance agreement, which is particularly informative for low minor allele frequency [MAF] SNPs); and (3) average r2hat (estimated correlation between the imputed and true genotypes, for all imputed SNPs). Across the reference panels, IMPUTE2 and MaCH had the highest concordance (91%-93%), but IMPUTE2 had the highest IQS (81%-83%) and average r2hat (0.68 using YRI+ASW+CEU, 0.62 using AFR+EUR, and 0.55 using ALL). Imputation quality for most programs was reduced by the addition of more distantly related reference populations, due entirely to the introduction of low frequency SNPs (MAF≤2%) that are monomorphic in the more closely related panels. While imputation was optimized by using IMPUTE2 with reference to the ALL panel (average r2hat = 0.86 for SNPs with MAF>2%), use of the ALL

  5. Noninvasive fetal RhD genotyping.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Frederik Banch; Damkjær, Merete Berthu; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2014-04-01

    Immunization against RhD is the major cause of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), which causes fetal or neonatal death. The introduction of postnatal immune prophylaxis in the 1960s drastically reduced immunization incidents in pregnant, D-negative women. In several countries, antenatal prophylaxis is combined with postnatal prophylaxis to further minimize the immunization risk. Due to lack of knowledge of the fetal RhD type, antenatal prophylaxis is given to all D-negative women. In the European population, approximately 40% of pregnant women carry a D-negative fetus and are thus at no risk of immunization. Noninvasive fetal RhD genotyping enables antenatal prophylaxis to be targeted to only those women carrying a D-positive fetus to avoid unnecessary treatment. Based on an analysis of cell-free fetal DNA from the plasma of pregnant women, this approach has recently undergone technical improvements and rapid clinical implementation. As a screening assay, the sensitivity is >99.3% from a gestational age of approximately 10-11 weeks. In addition, fetal RhD genotyping is widely used to assess the risk of HDFN in anti-D immunized women. PMID:24642067

  6. Molecular genotyping of HCV infection in seropositive blood donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarin, Siti Noraziah Abu; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    This study is to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in seropositive blood donor. RNA was extracted from 32 positive samples in National Blood Centre and Melaka Hospital. The core and NS5B sequences were obtained from 23 samples. Genotype 3a is most prevalent in this study followed by genotype 1a. Evidence of mixed-genotypes (3a and 1b) infections was found in 5 subjects.

  7. Efficient genotype compression and analysis of large genetic variation datasets

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Ryan M.; Kindlon, Neil; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Quinlan, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    Genotype Query Tools (GQT) is a new indexing strategy that expedites analyses of genome variation datasets in VCF format based on sample genotypes, phenotypes and relationships. GQT’s compressed genotype index minimizes decompression for analysis, and performance relative to existing methods improves with cohort size. We show substantial (up to 443 fold) performance gains over existing methods and demonstrate GQT’s utility for exploring massive datasets involving thousands to millions of genomes. PMID:26550772

  8. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant.

    PubMed

    Evans, Suzanna M; Sinclair, Elizabeth A; Poore, Alistair G B; Bain, Keryn F; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  9. Genotypic richness predicts phenotypic variation in an endangered clonal plant

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Elizabeth A.; Poore, Alistair G.B.; Bain, Keryn F.; Vergés, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Declines in genetic diversity within a species can affect the stability and functioning of populations. The conservation of genetic diversity is thus a priority, especially for threatened or endangered species. The importance of genetic variation, however, is dependent on the degree to which it translates into phenotypic variation for traits that affect individual performance and ecological processes. This is especially important for predominantly clonal species, as no single clone is likely to maximise all aspects of performance. Here we show that intraspecific genotypic diversity as measured using microsatellites is a strong predictor of phenotypic variation in morphological traits and shoot productivity of the threatened, predominantly clonal seagrass Posidonia australis, on the east coast of Australia. Biomass and surface area variation was most strongly predicted by genotypic richness, while variation in leaf chemistry (phenolics and nitrogen) was unrelated to genotypic richness. Genotypic richness did not predict tissue loss to herbivores or epiphyte load, however we did find that increased herbivore damage was positively correlated with allelic richness. Although there was no clear relationship between higher primary productivity and genotypic richness, variation in shoot productivity within a meadow was significantly greater in more genotypically diverse meadows. The proportion of phenotypic variation explained by environmental conditions varied among different genotypes, and there was generally no variation in phenotypic traits among genotypes present in the same meadows. Our results show that genotypic richness as measured through the use of presumably neutral DNA markers does covary with phenotypic variation in functionally relevant traits such as leaf morphology and shoot productivity. The remarkably long lifespan of individual Posidonia plants suggests that plasticity within genotypes has played an important role in the longevity of the species

  10. Distribution pattern of HCV genotypes & its association with viral load

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Anita; Dogra, Gaurav; Verma, Vikas; Srivastava, Amit Parkash

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as a leading cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Genotyping and assessment of the viral load in HCV patients is important for designing the therapeutic strategies. Thus the present study was designed to determine the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes in chronic hepatitis patients and their association with the viral load and biochemical profiles. Methods: Seventy one HCV RNA positive patients were included in the study. HCV genotyping was carried out by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) followed by the direct sequencing of the core region. Viral load estimation was carried out by Taqman real time PCR system. Results: Sixty three per cent (45/71) of cases were infected with genotype 3 followed by genotype 1 in 30.98 per cent (22/71) and genotype 2 in 5.63 per cent (4/71) of cases. Genotype 1 was associated with a significantly (P<0.001) higher viral load as compared to genotypes 3 and 2. There was no significant difference seen in the biochemical profile between the three groups of genotypes except in the levels of SGOT. The commonest mode of transmission was parenteral which accounted for 68 per cent of all the infected cases. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study revealed that HCV genotype 3 and 1 accounted for approximately 95 per cent of the HCV infection in Delhi and surrounding areas. Also two atypical subtypes like 3i and 3f were identified. Genotype 1 was associated with more severity of liver disease as compared to genotypes 3 and 2 as assessed by viral load. PMID:21441689

  11. Enterocytozoon bieneusi in sika deer (Cervus nippon) and red deer (Cervus elaphus): deer specificity and zoonotic potential of ITS genotypes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Weizhe; Wang, Rongjun; Liu, Weishi; Liu, Aiqin; Yang, Dong; Yang, Fengkun; Karim, Md Robiul; Zhang, Longxian

    2014-11-01

    As the most common cause of the human microsporidiosis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi has been found in a wide variety of animal hosts. Deers are the ruminant mammals living in a variety of biomes, and the distribution of deer species differ by geography. To understand the prevalence of natural infection of E. bieneusi in deer and to assess their epidemiological role in the transmission of microsporidiosis caused by E. bieneusi, 91 fecal specimens were collected from 86 sika deers and five red deers in the northeast of China. By PCR and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of E. bieneusi, an average infection rate of 31.9% (29/91) was observed in deer, with 32.6% (28/86) for sika deer, and 20% (1/5) for red deer. Six ITS genotypes were identified: one known genotype BEB6 (n = 20) and five novel genotypes HLJD-I to HLJD-IV (one each) and HLJD-V (n = 5). A phylogenetic analysis based on a neighbor-joining tree of the ITS gene sequences of E. bieneusi indicated that genotypes HLJD-II and HLJD-III fell into group 1 of zoonotic potential, while the other genotypes (BEB6, HLJD-I, HLJD-IV, HLJD-V) were clustered into so-called bovine-specific group 2. This is the first report of E. bieneusi in deer in China. The observation of genotype BEB6 in humans previously and in deer here and also the findings of the two novel genotypes (HLJD-II to HLJ-III) belonging to potential zoonotic group 1 suggested the possibility of deer in the transmission of E. bieneusi to humans. PMID:25185666

  12. Genotyping of hepatitis C virus isolates from Basque Country, Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Cilla, G.; García-Bengoechea, M.; Perez-Trallero, E.; Montalvo, I.; Vicente, D.; Arenas, J. I.

    1996-01-01

    The genotype of HCV was determined in 161 chronic HCV-infected patients. The patients were classified into three groups on the basis of the origin of the HCV infection: 50 patients had a history of intravenous drug use (IVDU) but no HIV infection; 41 patients had received blood transfusions, and 70 patients had no known exposure. The distribution of HCV genotypes was associated with the origin of infection and age of patients: genotype 1b was predominant among patients who had received blood transfusions and those without evidence of parenteral exposure (84.6% and 67.7%, respectively), whereas genotype 3a was present in 65.3% of IVDUs. Patients with genotype 1b were older than those with genotypes 1a or 3a: 50.3 +/- 12 vs. 34.1 +/- 9.9 and 31 +/- 5.4 years, respectively. These findings suggest that the pattern of HCV genotypes in our region is changing and that genotype 1b may be substituted by 3a as the dominant genotype in the future. PMID:8972680

  13. Predicting genotype compositions in norovirus seasons in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Doan, Yen Hai; Kimura, Hirokazu; Shinomiya, Hiroto; Shirabe, Komei; Katayama, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Noroviruses cause acute gastroenteritis. Since multiple genotypes of norovirus co-circulate in humans, changing the genotype composition and eluding host immunity, development of a polyvalent vaccine against norovirus in which the genotypes of vaccine strains match the major strains in circulation in the target season is desirable. However, this would require prediction of changes in the genotype composition of circulating strains. A fitness model that predicts the proportion of a strain in the next season from that in the current season has been developed for influenza A virus. Here, such a fitness model that takes into account the fitness effect of herd immunity was used to predict genotype compositions in norovirus seasons in Japan. In the current study, a model that assumes a decline in the magnitude of cross immunity between norovirus strains according to an increase in the divergence of the major antigenic protein VP1 was found to be appropriate for predicting genotype composition. Although it is difficult to predict the proportions of genotypes accurately, the model is effective in predicting the direction of change in the proportions of genotypes. The model predicted that GII.3 and GII.4 may contract, whereas GII.17 may expand and predominate in the 2015-2016 season. The procedure of predicting genotype compositions in norovirus seasons described in the present study has been implemented in the norovirus forecasting system (NOROCAST). PMID:27168450

  14. Genomic Variants Revealed by Invariably Missing Genotypes in Nelore Cattle

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Joaquim Manoel; Giachetto, Poliana Fernanda; da Silva, Luiz Otávio Campos; Cintra, Leandro Carrijo; Paiva, Samuel Rezende; Caetano, Alexandre Rodrigues; Yamagishi, Michel Eduardo Beleza

    2015-01-01

    High density genotyping panels have been used in a wide range of applications. From population genetics to genome-wide association studies, this technology still offers the lowest cost and the most consistent solution for generating SNP data. However, in spite of the application, part of the generated data is always discarded from final datasets based on quality control criteria used to remove unreliable markers. Some discarded data consists of markers that failed to generate genotypes, labeled as missing genotypes. A subset of missing genotypes that occur in the whole population under study may be caused by technical issues but can also be explained by the presence of genomic variations that are in the vicinity of the assayed SNP and that prevent genotyping probes from annealing. The latter case may contain relevant information because these missing genotypes might be used to identify population-specific genomic variants. In order to assess which case is more prevalent, we used Illumina HD Bovine chip genotypes from 1,709 Nelore (Bos indicus) samples. We found 3,200 missing genotypes among the whole population. NGS re-sequencing data from 8 sires were used to verify the presence of genomic variations within their flanking regions in 81.56% of these missing genotypes. Furthermore, we discovered 3,300 novel SNPs/Indels, 31% of which are located in genes that may affect traits of importance for the genetic improvement of cattle production. PMID:26305794

  15. Discovery of thienoimidazole-based HCV NS5A inhibitors. Part 1: C2-symmetric inhibitors with diyne and biphenyl linkers.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon; Bilimoria, Darius; Cadilhac, Caroline; Cottrell, Kevin M; Denis, Francois; Dietrich, Evelyne; Ewing, Nigel; Henderson, James A; L'Heureux, Lucille; Mani, Nagraj; Morris, Mark; Nicolas, Olivier; Reddy, T Jagadeeswar; Selliah, Subajini; Shawgo, Rebecca S; Xu, Jinwang; Chauret, Nathalie; Berlioz-Seux, Francoise; Chan, Laval C; Das, Sanjoy K; Grillot, Anne-Laure; Bennani, Youssef L; Maxwell, John P

    2015-02-15

    The discovery of C2-symmetric bis-thienoimidazoles HCV NS5A inhibitors is herein reported. Two straightforward approaches to access the requisite diyne and biphenyl linker moieties are described. This study revealed the paramount importance of the aromatic character of the linker to achieve high genotype 1a potency. PMID:25595681

  16. Dysregulation Of Innate Immunity In HCV Genotype 1 IL28B Unfavorable Genotype Patients: Impaired Viral Kinetics And Therapeutic Response

    PubMed Central

    Naggie, Susanna; Osinusi, Anu; Katsounas, Antonios; Lempicki, Richard; Herrmann, Eva; Thompson, Alexander J; Clark, Paul J; Patel, Keyur; Muir, Andrew J; McHutchison, John G; Schlaak, Joerg F; Trippler, Martin; Shivakumar, Bhavana; Masur, Henry; Polis, Michael A.; Kottilil, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that a single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of the interleukin (IL)-28B gene plays a major role in predicting therapeutic response in HCV-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon-alpha (IFN)/ribavirin. We sought to investigate the mechanism of the IL28B polymorphism, specifically as it relates to early HCV viral kinetics (VK), IFN pharmacokinetics (PK), IFN pharmacodynamics (PD), and gene expression profiles. Two prospective cohorts (HIV/HCV co-infected and HCV mono-infected) completing treatment with IFN/ribavirin were enrolled. Patients (N=88; 44 HIV/HCV and 44 HCV) were genotyped at the polymorphic site rs12979860. In the HIV/HCV cohort frequent serum sampling was completed for HCV RNA and IFN-levels. DNA microarray of PBMCs and individual expression of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) were quantified on IFN-therapy. The IL28B favorable (CC) genotype was associated with improved therapeutic response compared to unfavorable (CT/TT) genotypes. Patients with favorable genotype had greater first and second phase VK (P=0.004 and P=0.036, respectively), IFN maximum anti-viral efficiency (P=0.007) and infected cell death loss (P=0.009) compared to unfavorable genotypes. Functional annotation analysis of DNA microarray data was consistent with depressed innate immune function, particularly of NK cells, from patients with unfavorable genotypes (P<0.004). Induction of innate immunity genes was also lower in unfavorable genotype. ISG expression at baseline and induction with IFN was independent of IL28B genotype. Conclusions Carriers of the IL28B favorable genotype were more likely to have superior innate immune response to IFN-therapy compared to unfavorable genotypes, this suggests the unfavorable genotype has aberrant baseline induction of innate immune response pathways resulting in impaired virologic response. IL28B genotype is associated with more rapid viral kinetics and improved treatment response outcomes independent of

  17. Belief propagation in genotype-phenotype networks.

    PubMed

    Moharil, Janhavi; May, Paul; Gaile, Daniel P; Blair, Rachael Hageman

    2016-03-01

    Graphical models have proven to be a valuable tool for connecting genotypes and phenotypes. Structural learning of phenotype-genotype networks has received considerable attention in the post-genome era. In recent years, a dozen different methods have emerged for network inference, which leverage natural variation that arises in certain genetic populations. The structure of the network itself can be used to form hypotheses based on the inferred direct and indirect network relationships, but represents a premature endpoint to the graphical analyses. In this work, we extend this endpoint. We examine the unexplored problem of perturbing a given network structure, and quantifying the system-wide effects on the network in a node-wise manner. The perturbation is achieved through the setting of values of phenotype node(s), which may reflect an inhibition or activation, and propagating this information through the entire network. We leverage belief propagation methods in Conditional Gaussian Bayesian Networks (CG-BNs), in order to absorb and propagate phenotypic evidence through the network. We show that the modeling assumptions adopted for genotype-phenotype networks represent an important sub-class of CG-BNs, which possess properties that ensure exact inference in the propagation scheme. The system-wide effects of the perturbation are quantified in a node-wise manner through the comparison of perturbed and unperturbed marginal distributions using a symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence. Applications to kidney and skin cancer expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data from different mus musculus populations are presented. System-wide effects in the network were predicted and visualized across a spectrum of evidence. Sub-pathways and regions of the network responded in concert, suggesting co-regulation and coordination throughout the network in response to phenotypic changes. We demonstrate how these predicted system-wide effects can be examined in connection with

  18. Profile of Participants and Genotype Distributions of 108 Polymorphisms in a Cross-Sectional Study of Associations of Genotypes With Lifestyle and Clinical Factors: A Project in the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, Kenji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Okada, Rieko; Naito, Mariko; Morita, Emi; Hishida, Asahi; Kawai, Sayo; Nishio, Kazuko; Yin, Guang; Asai, Yatami; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Ito, Hidemi; Watanabe, Miki; Kawase, Takakazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Tajima, Kazuo; Tanaka, Keitaro; Higaki, Yasuki; Hara, Megumi; Imaizumi, Takeshi; Taguchi, Naoto; Nakamura, Kazuyo; Nanri, Hinako; Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko; Horita, Mikako; Shinchi, Koichi; Kita, Yoshikuni; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Rumana, Nahid; Matsui, Kenji; Miura, Katsuyuki; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Takashima, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Sadao; Ando, Ryosuke; Hosono, Akihiro; Imaeda, Nahomi; Shibata, Kiyoshi; Goto, Chiho; Hattori, Nami; Fukatsu, Mitsuru; Yamada, Tamaki; Tokudome, Shinkan; Takezaki, Toshiro; Niimura, Hideshi; Hirasada, Kazuyo; Nakamura, Akihiko; Tatebo, Masaya; Ogawa, Shin; Tsunematsu, Noriko; Chiba, Shirabe; Mikami, Haruo; Kono, Suminori; Ohnaka, Keizo; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Etsuko; Shigeta, Masako; Kuriyama, Nagato; Yoshikawa, Aya; Matsui, Daisuke; Watanabe, Isao; Inoue, Kaoru; Ozasa, Kotaro; Mitani, Satoko; Arisawa, Kokichi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Hiyoshi, Mineyoshi; Takami, Hidenobu; Yamaguchi, Miwa; Nakamoto, Mariko; Takeda, Hideo; Kubo, Michiaki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    Background Most diseases are thought to arise from interactions between environmental factors and the host genotype. To detect gene–environment interactions in the development of lifestyle-related diseases, and especially cancer, the Japan Multi-institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC) Study was launched in 2005. Methods We initiated a cross-sectional study to examine associations of genotypes with lifestyle and clinical factors, as assessed by questionnaires and medical examinations. The 4519 subjects were selected from among participants in the J-MICC Study in 10 areas throughout Japan. In total, 108 polymorphisms were chosen and genotyped using the Invader assay. Results The study group comprised 2124 men and 2395 women with a mean age of 55.8 ± 8.9 years (range, 35–69 years) at baseline. Among the 108 polymorphisms examined, 4 were not polymorphic in our study population. Among the remaining 104 polymorphisms, most variations were common (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 for 96 polymorphisms). The allele frequencies in this population were comparable with those in the HapMap-JPT data set for 45 Japanese from Tokyo. Only 5 of 88 polymorphisms showed allele-frequency differences greater than 0.1. Of the 108 polymorphisms, 32 showed a highly significant difference in minor allele frequency among the study areas (P < 0.001). Conclusions This comprehensive data collection on lifestyle and clinical factors will be useful for elucidating gene–environment interactions. In addition, it is likely to be an informative reference tool, as free access to genotype data for a large Japanese population is not readily available. PMID:21467728

  19. Cucumis monosomic alien addition lines: morphological, cytological, and genotypic analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Feng; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Qian, Chun-Tao; Jahn, Molly M; Staub, Jack E; Zhuang, Fei-Yun; Lou, Qun-Feng; Ren, Gang

    2004-05-01

    Cucumis hystrix Chakr. (HH, 2n=24), a wild relative of the cultivated cucumber, possesses several potentially valuable disease-resistance and abiotic stress-tolerance traits for cucumber ( C. sativus L., CC, 2n=14) improvement. Numerous attempts have been made to transfer desirable traits since the successful interspecific hybridization between C. hystrix and C. sativus, one of which resulted in the production of an allotriploid (HCC, 2n=26: one genome of C. hystrix and two of C. sativus). When this genotype was treated with colchicine to induce polyploidy, two monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) (plant nos. 87 and 517: 14 CC+1 H, 2n=15) were recovered among 252 viable plants. Each of these plants was morphologically distinct from allotriploids and cultivated cucumbers. Cytogenetic and molecular marker analyses were performed to confirm the genetic constitution and further characterize these two MAALs. Chromosome counts made from at least 30 meristematic cells from each plant confirmed 15 nuclear chromosomes. In pollen mother cells of plant nos. 87 and 517, seven bivalents and one univalent were observed at diakinesis and metaphase I; the frequency of trivalent formation was low (about 4-5%). At anaphase I and II, stochastic and asymmetric division led to the formation of two gamete classes: n=7 and n=8; however, pollen fertility was relatively high. Pollen stainability in plant no. 87 was 86.7% and in plant no. 517 was 93.2%. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was performed using 100 random 10-base primers. Genotypes obtained with eight primers (A-9, A-11, AH-13, AI-19, AJ-18, AJ-20, E-19, and N-20) showed a band common to the two MAAL plants and C. hystrix that was absent in C. sativus, confirming that the alien chromosomes present in the MAALs were derived from C. hystrix. Morphological differences and differences in banding patterns were also observed between plant nos. 87 and 517 after amplification with primers AI-5, AJ-13, N-12, and N-20

  20. Frequency of the nivalenol mycotoxin genotype in Fusarium graminearum sampled from North Carolina wheat fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the U.S., Fusarium head blight (or scab) is caused primarily by F. graminearum. Fusarium mycotoxins in small grain heads can render the crop unsuitable for human or animal consumption. In livestock, scabby grain can lead to feed refusal and/or poor weight gain. Although this fungus produces var...

  1. Diversity of Human Clock Genotypes and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoying; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The molecular clock consists of a number of genes that form transcriptional and post-transcriptional feedback loops, which function together to generate circadian oscillations that give rise to circadian rhythms of our behavioral and physiological processes. Genetic variations in these clock genes have been shown to be associated with phenotypic effects in a repertoire of biological processes, such as diurnal preference, sleep, metabolism, mood regulation, addiction, and fertility. Consistently, rodent models carrying mutations in clock genes also demonstrate similar phenotypes. Taken together, these studies suggest that human clock-gene variants contribute to the phenotypic differences observed in various behavioral and physiological processes, although to validate this requires further characterization of the molecular consequences of these polymorphisms. Investigating the diversity of human genotypes and the phenotypic effects of these genetic variations shall advance our understanding of the function of the circadian clock and how we can employ the clock to improve our overall health. PMID:23899594

  2. A microsampling method for genotyping coral symbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, D. W.; Fitt, W. K.; Schmidt, G. W.

    2008-06-01

    Genotypic characterization of Symbiodinium symbionts in hard corals has routinely involved coring, or the removal of branches or a piece of the coral colony. These methods can potentially underestimate the complexity of the Symbiodinium community structure and may produce lesions. This study demonstrates that microscale sampling of individual coral polyps provided sufficient DNA for identifying zooxanthellae clades by RFLP analyses, and subclades through the use of PCR amplification of the ITS-2 region of rDNA and denaturing-gradient gel electrophoresis. Using this technique it was possible to detect distinct ITS-2 types of Symbiodinium from two or three adjacent coral polyps. These methods can be used to intensely sample coral-symbiont population/communities while causing minimal damage. The effectiveness and fine scale capabilities of these methods were demonstrated by sampling and identifying phylotypes of Symbiodinium clades A, B, and C that co-reside within a single Montastraea faveolata colony.

  3. A new genotype of Arthroderma benhamiae.

    PubMed

    Kano, Rui; Sano, Ayako; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi; Nishimura, Kazuko; Yamaguchi, Hideo; Hasegawa, Atuhiko

    2008-11-01

    Nucleotide sequence analysis of chitin synthase 1 (CHS1) indicated 90% sequence similarities among human and animal isolates of Arthroderma benhamiae. In particular, greater than 99% similarity was noted in the nucleotide sequence among Americano-European race isolates, African race isolates, and five isolates from four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris). The phylogenetic analysis indicated that the five isolates from hedgehogs were included in the same cluster and distinct from the Americano-European and the African race standard strains of A. benhamiae. These results were confirmed by ITS analysis. Therefore, it was proposed that genotypes could be established for the isolates of A. benhamiae in association with the mating behavior. PMID:18608884

  4. Sources of Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype theory.

    PubMed

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the historical background and early formation of Wilhelm Johannsen's distinction between genotype and phenotype. It is argued that contrary to a widely accepted interpretation (For instance, W. Provine, 1971. The Origins of Theoretical Population Genetics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press; Mayr, 1973; F. B. Churchill, 1974. Journal of the History of Biology 7: 5-30; E. Mayr, 1982. The Growth of Biological Thought, Cambridge: Harvard University Press; J. Sapp, 2003. Genesis. The Evolution of Biology. New York: Oxford University Press) his concepts referred primarily to properties of individual organisms and not to statistical averages. Johannsen's concept of genotype was derived from the idea of species in the tradition of biological systematics from Linnaeus to de Vries: An individual belonged to a group - species, subspecies, elementary species - by representing a certain underlying type (S. Müller-Wille and V. Orel, 2007. Annals of Science 64: 171-215). Johannsen sharpened this idea theoretically in the light of recent biological discoveries, not least those of cytology. He tested and confirmed it experimentally combining the methods of biometry, as developed by Francis Galton, with the individual selection method and pedigree analysis, as developed for instance by Louis Vilmorin. The term "genotype" was introduced in W. Johannsen's 1909 (Elemente der Exakten Erblichkeitslehre. Jena: Gustav Fischer) treatise, but the idea of a stable underlying biological "type" distinct from observable properties was the core idea of his classical bean selection experiment published 6 years earlier (W. Johannsen, 1903. Ueber Erblichkeit in Populationen und reinen Linien. Eine Beitrag zur Beleuchtung schwebender Selektionsfragen, Jena: Gustav Fischer, pp. 58-59). The individual ontological foundation of population analysis was a self-evident presupposition in Johannsen's studies of heredity in populations from their start in the early 1890s till his

  5. IL-10 and TNFα Genotypes in SLE

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; Gutiérrez, Carmen; Suárez, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The production of two regulators of the inflammatory response, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), has been found to be deeply deregulated in SLE patients, suggesting that these cytokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genetic polymorphisms at the promoter regions of IL-10 and TNFα genes have been associated with different constitutive and induced cytokine production. Given that individual steady-state levels of these molecules may deviate an initial immune response towards different forms of lymphocyte activation, functional genetic variants in their promoters could influence the development of SLE. The present review summarizes the information previously reported about the involvement of IL-10 and TNFα genetic variants on SLE appearance, clinical phenotype, and outcome. We show that, in spite of the heterogeneity of the populations studied, the existing knowledge points towards a relevant role of IL-10 and TNFα genotypes in SLE. PMID:20625422

  6. Targeted stock identification using multilocus genotype 'familyprinting'

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, B.H.; King, T.L.

    1999-01-01

    We present an approach to stock identification of small, targeted populations that uses multilocus microsatellite genotypes of individual mating adults to uniquely identify first- and second-generation offspring in a mixture. We call the approach 'familyprinting'; unlike DNA fingerprinting where tissue samples of individuals are matched, offspring from various families are assigned to pairs of parents or sets of four grandparents with known genotypes. The basic unit of identification is the family, but families can be nested within a variety of stock units ranging from naturally reproducing groups of fish in a small tributary or pond from which mating adults can be sampled to large or small collections of families produced in hatcheries and stocked in specific locations. We show that, with as few as seven alleles per locus using four loci without error, first-generation offspring can be uniquely assigned to the correct family. For second-generation applications in a hatchery more alleles per locus (10) and loci (10) are required for correct assignment of all offspring to the correct set of grandparents. Using microsatellite DNA variation from an Atlantic salmon (Salmo solar) restoration river (Connecticut River, USA), we also show that this population contains sufficient genetic diversity in sea-run returns for 100% correct first, generation assignment and 97% correct second-generation assignment using 14 loci. We are currently using first- and second-generation familyprinting in this population with the ultimate goal of identifying stocking tributary. In addition to within-river familyprinting, there also appears to be sufficient genetic diversity within and between Atlantic salmon populations for identification of 'familyprinted' fish in a mixture of multiple populations. We also suggest that second-generation familyprinting with multiple populations may also provide a tool for examining stock structure. Familyprinting with microsatellite DNA markers is a viable

  7. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. |

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  8. Dependence of deodorant usage on ABCC11 genotype: scope for personalized genetics in personal hygiene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Santiago; Steer, Colin D; Farrow, Alexandra; Golding, Jean; Day, Ian N M

    2013-07-01

    Earwax type and axillary odor are genetically determined by rs17822931, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in the ABCC11 gene. The literature has been concerned with the Mendelian trait of earwax, although axillary odor is also Mendelian. Ethnic diversity in rs17822931 exists, with higher frequency of allele A in east Asians. Influence on deodorant usage has not been investigated. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of the rs17822931 effect on deodorant usage in a large (N∼17,000 individuals) population cohort (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC)). We found strong evidence (P=3.7 × 10(-20)) indicating differential deodorant usage according to the rs17822931 genotype. AA homozygotes were almost 5-fold overrepresented in categories of never using deodorant or using it infrequently. However, 77.8% of white European genotypically nonodorous individuals still used deodorant, and 4.7% genotypically odorous individuals did not. We provide evidence of a behavioral effect associated with rs17822931. This effect has a biological basis that can result in a change in the family's environment if an aerosol deodorant is used. It also indicates potential cost saving to the nonodorous and scope for personalized genetics usage in personal hygiene choices, with consequent reduction of inappropriate chemical exposures for some. PMID:23325016

  9. Genotype distribution of cervical human papillomavirus DNA in women with cervical lesions in Bioko, Equatorial Guinea

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Nieto-Bona, Ma Paz; Rueda, Sonsoles; Silva-Sánchez, Luís Fernando; Piernas-Morales, Ma Concepción; Carro-Campos, Patricia; Cortés-Lambea, Luís; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Background The HVP vaccine is a useful tool for preventing cervical cancer. The purpose of this study is to determine the most frequent HPV genotypes in Equatorial Guinea in order to develop future vaccination strategies to apply in this country. Methods A campaign against cervical cancer was carried out in the area on a total of 1,680 women. 26 of the women, following cytological screening, were treated surgically with a loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). Cases were studied histologically and were genotyped from paraffin blocks by applying a commercial kit that recognized 35 HPV types. Results Cytological diagnoses included 17 HSIL, 1 LSIL, 5 ASC-H and 3 AGUS. Histological diagnosis resulted in 3 cases of microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma stage IA of FIGO, 9 CIN-3, 8 CIN-2, 2 CIN-1, 3 flat condylomas and mild dysplasia of the endocervical epithelium. Fifteen of twenty-five cases genotyped were positive for HPV (60%). HPV 16 and 33 were identified in four cases each, HPV 58 in two other cases, and HPV 18, 31, 52, and 82 in one case, with one HPV 16 and 58 coinfection. Conclusion The frequency of HPV types in the African area varies in comparison to other regions, particularly in Europe and USA. Vaccination against the five most common HPV types (16, 33, 58, 18, and 31) should be considered in the geographic region of West Africa and specifically in Equatorial Guinea. PMID:19740435

  10. Characterization of G6PD genotypes and phenotypes on the northwestern Thailand-Myanmar border.

    PubMed

    Bancone, Germana; Chu, Cindy S; Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Parker, Daniel M; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; White, Nicholas J; Nosten, François H

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene result in red blood cells with increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. Significant haemolysis can be caused by primaquine and other 8-aminoquinoline antimalarials used for the radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria. The distribution and phenotypes of mutations causing G6PD deficiency in the male population of migrants and refugees in a malaria endemic region on the Thailand-Myanmar border were characterized. Blood samples for G6PD fluorescent spot test (FST), G6PD genotyping, and malaria testing were taken from 504 unrelated males of Karen and Burman ethnicities presenting to the outpatient clinics. The overall frequency of G6PD deficiency by the FST was 13.7%. Among the deficient subjects, almost 90% had the Mahidol variant (487G>A) genotype. The remaining subjects had Chinese-4 (392G>T), Viangchan (871G>A), Açores (595A>G), Seattle (844G>C) and Mediterranean (563C>T) variants. Quantification of G6PD activity was performed using a modification of the standard spectrophotometric assay on a subset of 24 samples with Mahidol, Viangchan, Seattle and Chinese-4 mutations; all samples showed a residual enzymatic activity below 10% of normal and were diagnosed correctly by the FST. Further studies are needed to characterise the haemolytic risk of using 8-aminoquinolines in patients with these genotypes. PMID:25536053

  11. HFE genotyping in patients with elevated serum iron indices and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Andreia Silva; Nakhle, Maria Cristina; de Araújo, Thiago Ferreira; Abrantes-Lemos, Clarice Pires; Deguti, Marta Mitiko; Carrilho, Flair José; Cançado, Eduardo Luiz Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Iron abnormalities in chronic liver disease may be the result of genetic diseases or secondary factors. The present study aimed to identify subjects with HFE-HH in order to describe the frequency of clinical manifestations, identify risk factors for iron elevation, and compare the iron profile of HFE-HH to other genotypes in liver disease patients. A total of 108 individuals with hepatic disease, transferrin saturation (TS) > 45%, and serum ferritin (SF) > 350 ng/mL were tested for HFE mutations. Two groups were characterized: C282Y/C282Y or C282Y/H63D genotypes (n = 16) were the HFE hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE-HH) group; and C282Y and H63D single heterozygotes, the H63D/H63D genotype, and wild-type were considered group 2 (n = 92). Nonalcoholic liver disease, alcoholism, and chronic hepatitis C were detected more frequently in group 2, whereas arthropathy, hepatocarcinoma, diabetes, and osteoporosis rates were significantly higher in the HFE-HH group. TS > 82%, SF > 2685 ng/mL, and serum iron > 178 μg/dL were the cutoffs for diagnosis of HFE-HH in patients with liver disease. Thus, in non-Caucasian populations with chronic liver disease, HFE-HH diagnosis is more predictable in those with iron levels higher than those proposed in current guidelines for the general population. PMID:25654085

  12. Isolation and Characterization of New Leptospira Genotypes from Patients in Mayotte (Indian Ocean)

    PubMed Central

    Bourhy, Pascale; Collet, Louis; Clément, Sabine; Huerre, Michel; Ave, Patrick; Giry, Claude; Pettinelli, François; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis has been implicated as a severe and fatal form of disease in Mayotte, a French-administrated territory located in the Comoros archipelago (southwestern Indian Ocean). To date, Leptospira isolates have never been isolated in this endemic region. Methods and Findings Leptospires were isolated from blood samples from 22 patients with febrile illness during a 17-month period after a PCR-based screening test was positive. Strains were typed using hyper-immune antisera raised against the major Leptospira serogroups: 20 of 22 clinical isolates were assigned to serogroup Mini; the other two strains belonged to serogroups Grippotyphosa and Pyrogenes, respectively. These isolates were further characterized using partial sequencing of 16S rRNA and ligB gene, Multi Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA), and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Of the 22 isolates, 14 were L. borgpetersenii strains, 7 L. kirschneri strains, and 1, belonging to serogoup Pyrogenes, was L. interrogans. Results of the genotyping methods were consistent. MLVA defined five genotypes, whereas PFGE allowed the recognition of additional subgroups within the genotypes. PFGE fingerprint patterns of clinical strains did not match any of the patterns in the reference strains belonging to the same serogroup, suggesting that the strains were novel serovars. Conclusions Preliminary PCR screening of blood specimen allowed a high isolation frequency of leptospires among patients with febrile illness. Typing of leptospiral isolates showed that causative agents of leptospirosis in Mayotte have unique molecular features. PMID:20582311

  13. Characterization of G6PD Genotypes and Phenotypes on the Northwestern Thailand-Myanmar Border

    PubMed Central

    Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Parker, Daniel M.; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, François H.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene result in red blood cells with increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. Significant haemolysis can be caused by primaquine and other 8-aminoquinoline antimalarials used for the radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria. The distribution and phenotypes of mutations causing G6PD deficiency in the male population of migrants and refugees in a malaria endemic region on the Thailand-Myanmar border were characterized. Blood samples for G6PD fluorescent spot test (FST), G6PD genotyping, and malaria testing were taken from 504 unrelated males of Karen and Burman ethnicities presenting to the outpatient clinics. The overall frequency of G6PD deficiency by the FST was 13.7%. Among the deficient subjects, almost 90% had the Mahidol variant (487G>A) genotype. The remaining subjects had Chinese-4 (392G>T), Viangchan (871G>A), Açores (595A>G), Seattle (844G>C) and Mediterranean (563C>T) variants. Quantification of G6PD activity was performed using a modification of the standard spectrophotometric assay on a subset of 24 samples with Mahidol, Viangchan, Seattle and Chinese-4 mutations; all samples showed a residual enzymatic activity below 10% of normal and were diagnosed correctly by the FST. Further studies are needed to characterise the haemolytic risk of using 8-aminoquinolines in patients with these genotypes. PMID:25536053

  14. Heritability of Recurrent Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in Standardbred and Thoroughbred Racehorses Derived From SNP Genotyping Data.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elaine M; Mickelson, James R; Binns, Matthew M; Blott, Sarah C; Caputo, Paul; Isgren, Cajsa M; McCoy, Annette M; Moore, Alison; Piercy, Richard J; Swinburne, June E; Vaudin, Mark; McCue, Molly E

    2016-11-01

    Recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis (RER) in Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses is characterized by episodes of muscle rigidity and cell damage that often recur upon strenuous exercise. The objective was to evaluate the importance of genetic factors in RER by obtaining an unbiased estimate of heritability in cohorts of unrelated Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses. Four hundred ninety-one Thoroughbred and 196 Standardbred racehorses were genotyped with the 54K or 74K SNP genotyping arrays. Heritability was calculated from genome-wide SNP data with a mixed linear and Bayesian model, utilizing the standard genetic relationship matrix (GRM). Both the mixed linear and Bayesian models estimated heritability of RER in Thoroughbreds to be approximately 0.34 and in Standardbred racehorses to be approximately 0.45 after adjusting for disease prevalence and sex. To account for potential differences in the genetic architecture of the underlying causal variants, heritability estimates were adjusted based on linkage disequilibrium weighted kinship matrix, minor allele frequency and variant effect size, yielding heritability estimates that ranged between 0.41-0.46 (Thoroughbreds) and 0.39-0.49 (Standardbreds). In conclusion, between 34-46% and 39-49% of the variance in RER susceptibility in Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses, respectively, can be explained by the SNPs present on these 2 genotyping arrays, indicating that RER is moderately heritable. These data provide further rationale for the investigation of genetic mutations associated with RER susceptibility. PMID:27489252

  15. CYP3A5 genotyping for assessing the efficacy of treatment with simvastatin and atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Genovefa; Kolovou, Vana; Ragia, Georgia; Mihas, Constantinos; Diakoumakou, Olga; Vasiliadis, Ioannis; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Vartela, Vassiliki; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we examined the impact of polymorphism in the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5 gene, CYP3A5*1 (6986A > G, rs 776746), on the reduction in the lipid levels caused by simvastatin and atorvastatin. We studied 350 hyperlipidemic patients who received 10-40 mg of atorvastatin (n = 175) or simvastatin (n = 175) daily. Genotyping for CYP3A5 was done by PCR-RFLP analysis. Differences in the lipid profile before and after treatment were expressed as the % difference. The frequency of CYP3A5polymorphism was 13.4% for heterozygotes and 86.6% for homozygotes. Comparison of the responses to same dose of each drug showed that the highest % difference was associated with total cholesterol (TC) in subjects receiving atorvastatin 40 mg compared with simvastatin 40 mg (p = 0.048). However, comparison of the responses to equivalent doses of atorvastatin vs. simvastatin revealed no difference in the % change in any of the lipid parameters examined. In individuals with the same CYP3A5 genotype, a head to head comparison of the efficacy of the same dose of simvastatin vs. atorvastatin revealed an advantage for atorvastatin. For equivalent doses of atorvastatin vs. simvastatin there was no difference in the % change in any of the lipid parameters examined. Within the same genotype there was a significant difference in the % change related to the drug treatment. PMID:26273214

  16. Ancestry of the Timorese: age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Margaux A; Magalhaes, Tiago R; Ramke, Jacqueline; Smith, Silvia E; Ennis, Sean; Simpson, Claire L; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ahn, Jeeyun; Dardenne, Caitlin; Mayne, Katie; Robinson, Rosann; Morgan, Denise J; Brian, Garry; Lee, Lucy; Woo, Se J; Zacharaki, Fani; Tsironi, Evangelia E; Miller, Joan W; Kim, Ivana K; Park, Kyu H; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Farrer, Lindsay A; Stambolian, Dwight; DeAngelis, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalog of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years), genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26) was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32) SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959). Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H), was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7 vs. ~40%, respectively). The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan) and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese). The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants) may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus. PMID:26217379

  17. Ancestry of the Timorese: age-related macular degeneration associated genotype and allele sharing among human populations from throughout the world

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Margaux A.; Magalhaes, Tiago R.; Ramke, Jacqueline; Smith, Silvia E.; Ennis, Sean; Simpson, Claire L.; Portas, Laura; Murgia, Federico; Ahn, Jeeyun; Dardenne, Caitlin; Mayne, Katie; Robinson, Rosann; Morgan, Denise J.; Brian, Garry; Lee, Lucy; Woo, Se J.; Zacharaki, Fani; Tsironi, Evangelia E.; Miller, Joan W.; Kim, Ivana K.; Park, Kyu H.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Stambolian, Dwight; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    We observed that the third leading cause of blindness in the world, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), occurs at a very low documented frequency in a population-based cohort from Timor-Leste. Thus, we determined a complete catalog of the ancestry of the Timorese by analysis of whole exome chip data and haplogroup analysis of SNP genotypes determined by sequencing the Hypervariable I and II regions of the mitochondrial genome and 17 genotyped YSTR markers obtained from 535 individuals. We genotyped 20 previously reported AMD-associated SNPs in the Timorese to examine their allele frequencies compared to and between previously documented AMD cohorts of varying ethnicities. For those without AMD (average age > 55 years), genotype and allele frequencies were similar for most SNPs with a few exceptions. The major risk allele of HTRA1 rs11200638 (10q26) was at a significantly higher frequency in the Timorese, as well as 3 of the 5 protective CFH (1q32) SNPs (rs800292, rs2284664, and rs12066959). Additionally, the most commonly associated AMD-risk SNP, CFH rs1061170 (Y402H), was also seen at a much lower frequency in the Korean and Timorese populations than in the assessed Caucasian populations (C ~7 vs. ~40%, respectively). The difference in allele frequencies between the Timorese population and the other genotyped populations, along with the haplogroup analysis, also highlight the genetic diversity of the Timorese. Specifically, the most common ancestry groupings were Oceanic (Melanesian and Papuan) and Eastern Asian (specifically Han Chinese). The low prevalence of AMD in the Timorese population (2 of 535 randomly selected participants) may be due to the enrichment of protective alleles in this population at the 1q32 locus. PMID:26217379

  18. [Genotype identification by kappa-casein and BLAD mutation using the polymerase chain reaction in cattle. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kirilenko, S D; Glazko, V I

    1995-01-01

    The investigation of BLAD mutation and genotypes for kappa-casein locus in groups of imported Holstein and Simmentals, as well as in Ukrainian Black-and-White cattle was carried out. The carriers of BLAD mutation were not detected. The frequencies of allelic B variant of kappa-casein (valuable trait associated with high the production of top quality cheese) were similar in both groups of imported cattle and substantially higher in Ukrainian cattle. PMID:8713837

  19. [Research progress on genotype and genotype-associated pathogenesis of Toxoplasma gondii].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Shen, Ji-Long

    2013-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, which is widely prevalent in animals and human throughout the world. It causes serious harm to human health and the development of animal husbandry. T. gondii isolates were considered a single species without geographical boundaries. However, high diversity has been revealed within and between T. gondii populations collected from around the world defined by the multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) or microsatellite analysis. Different strains of T. gondii may exhibit differences in virulence to mice. This paper summarizes the research progress on the genotypes from T. gondii isolates in different geographic regions around the world, and the relationship between genotype and virulence of T. gondii. PMID:24812887

  20. Caffeoylquinic Acids in Storage Roots of Sixteen Sweetpotato Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The contents of chlorogenic acid and the 3,4-, 3,5- and 4,5- isomers of dicaffeoylquinic acid (DCQA) in the storage root tissues of sixteen sweetpotato genotypes were determined. Averaged over genotypes, the contents of the four compounds were highest in the cortex, intermediate in the stele and lo...

  1. Genotyping-by-sequencing for plant breeding and genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid advances in post-Sanger sequencing technology have brought the $1000 human genome within reach while providing the raw sequencing output for researchers to revolutionize the way populations are genotyped. To capitalize on these advancements, genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) has been developed as...

  2. Properties of different density genotypes used in dairy cattle evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy cattle breeders have used a 50K chip since April 2008 and a less expensive, lower density (3K) chip since September 2010 in genomic selection. Evaluations from 3K are less reliable because genotype calls are less accurate and missing markers are imputed. After excluding genotypes with < 90% ca...

  3. SURVIVAL OF NORTH AMERICAN GENOTYPES OF TRICHINELLA IN FROZEN PORK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    North American genotypes of Trichinella (T. nativa (T-2), T. pseudospiralis (T-4), T. murrelli (T-5), and Trichinella (T-6)) were examined for susceptibility to freezing in pork using established parameters for control of T. spiralis. Pig infections with these Trichinella genotypes were established ...

  4. Regional selection of hybrid Nacional cacao genotypes in Coastal Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent international demand for “nacional” flavour cacao has increased the need for local cacao producers in Ecuador to use high-yielding “nacional” hybrid genotypes. The relative potential of cacao genotypes over various environments needs to be assessed prior to final selection of potential candid...

  5. Ant colony optimization as a method for strategic genotype sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simulation study was carried out to develop an alternative method of selecting animals to be genotyped and to compare the proposed method to other known procedures. The simulated pedigrees included 5,000 animals and were assigned genotypes for a bi-allelic gene based on assumed allelic frequencie...

  6. Screening of Wheat Genotypes for Boron Efficiency in Bangladesh

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of Bangladeshi wheat genotypes (varieties and advanced lines) have been tested for boron efficiency through sand culture experiments over two years (2007-08 & 2008-09) against two Thai check varieties ‘Fang 60’ (boron efficient) and ‘SW41’ (boron inefficient). Performances of the genotypes ...

  7. Reaction of Drought Tolerant Soybean Genotypes to Macrophomina phaseolina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina is a common disease of soybean, and resistant genotypes are not available. Level of soybean genotype resistance and susceptibility to M. phaseolina is most frequently measured by determining colony forming units of M. phaseolina/g root, but using this ...

  8. Clonal propagation of walnut rootstock genotypes for genetic improvement 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This year we produced more than 9700 liner-sized plantlets of 83 genotypes for use in greenhouse and field pest and disease resistance screening, growth in nurseries, and development of orchard trials. These included 6200 plants of 33 new Juglans microcarpa x ‘Serr’ paradox genotypes and 230 plants ...

  9. Characteristics of Streptococcus mutans genotypes and dental caries in children.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A; Wiener, Howard W; Whiddon, Jennifer; Momeni, Stephanie S; Ruby, John D; Cutter, Gary R; Childers, Noel K

    2013-06-01

    This longitudinal cohort study evaluated the diversity, commonality, and stability of Streptococcus mutans genotypes associated with dental caries history. Sixty-seven 5- and 6-yr-old children, considered as being at high caries risk, had plaque collected from baseline through 36 months for S. mutans isolation and genotyping using repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (4,392 total isolates). Decayed, missing, or filled surfaces (dmfs (primary teeth)/DMFS (secondary teeth)) for each child were recorded at baseline. At baseline, 18 distinct genotypes were found among 911 S. mutans isolates from 67 children (diversity), and 13 genotypes were shared by at least two children (commonality). The number of genotypes per individual was positively associated with the proportion of decayed surfaces (p-ds) at baseline. Twenty-four of the 39 children who were available at follow-up visits maintained a predominant genotype for the follow-up periods (stability) and this was negatively associated with the p-ds. The observed diversity, commonality, and stability of S. mutans genotypes represent a pattern of dental caries epidemiology in this high-caries-risk community, which suggests that fewer decayed surfaces are significantly associated with lower diversity and higher stability of S. mutans genotypes. PMID:23659236

  10. Spectral reflectance models for characterizing winter wheat genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimum wheat yield can be achieved by developing and growing the best genotype in the most suited environment. However, exhaustive field measurements are required to characterize plants in breeder plots for screening genotypes with desirable traits. Remote sensing tools have been shown to provide r...

  11. Haptoglobin genotype and its role in diabetic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Costacou, Tina; Levy, Andrew P

    2012-08-01

    Over the past decade, several longitudinal epidemiological studies have brought attention to the haptoglobin genotype and its importance in determining diabetic vascular disease risk. This manuscript presents an overview of the biology of the haptoglobin genotype and reviews the literature concerning its role in the development of cardiovascular disease among individuals with diabetes mellitus. PMID:22447230

  12. Genomic imputation and evaluation using high density Holstein genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic evaluations for 161,341 Holsteins were computed using 311,725 of the 777,962 markers on the Illumina high-density (HD) chip. Initial edits with 1,741 HD genotypes from 5 breeds revealed that 636,967 markers were usable but that half were redundant. Usable Holstein genotypes included 1,510 an...

  13. Sugarcane Genotype Selection for Sand Soils in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection of high yielding sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) genotypes for organic (muck) soils in Florida has been more successful than for sand soils. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of 31 sugarcane genotypes on sand soils with and without mill mud added at the rate of 1510 cubic...

  14. Paternity testing and delivering trait-predictive genotypic data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the RosBREED project, the Genotyping Team (Team Leader: Nahla Bassil) leads the effort to obtain DNA data needed to enable marker-assisted breeding for critical fruit quality traits. These data are obtained from reference genotypes of apple, peach, cherry and strawberry carefully chosen to repres...

  15. Response of Sweetpotato Genotypes to Southern Root-Knot Nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourteen sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] genotypes were characterized for resistance to Meloidogyne incognita in greenhouse tests. The following sweetpotato genotypes were evaluated: Beauregard, Sulfur, LSU 01-29, LSU 02-32, LSU 01-29, LSU 02-32, LSU 99-35, LSU 02-21, Bienville, Regal, Exce...

  16. Newcastle disease: Evolution of genotypes and the related diagnostic challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the discovery of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in 1926, nine genotypes of class I viruses and ten of class II, representing diverse and continually evolving viruses, have been described. The emergence of new virulent genotypes from global epizootics and the year-to-year changes observed in vi...

  17. Variation of meat quality traits among five genotypes of chicken.

    PubMed

    Tang, H; Gong, Y Z; Wu, C X; Jiang, J; Wang, Y; Li, K

    2009-10-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the diversity of meat quality traits among 5 chicken genotypes. The genotypes included 2 Chinese native breeds (Wenchang,WCH, and Xianju), 1 commercial broiler line (Avian, AV), 1 commercial layer line (Hy-Line Brown, HLB), and 1 Chinese commercial broiler line (Lingnanhuang, LNH) synthesized by exotic and native breeds, which were slaughtered at their market ages: 16, 7, 16, and 8 wk, respectively. The effects of genotype, muscle type, and sex on meat quality traits were examined. Birds from slow-growing genotypes (WCH, Xianju, and HLB) exhibited higher shear value, inosine-5'-monophosphate concentration, lower cook loss, and more fat than those from fast-growing genotypes (AV and LNH). Chickens from WCH possessed the lowest expressible moisture, cook loss, and the highest lipid (%) among the 3 slow-growing genotypes. The HLB birds were intermediate in expressible moisture and cook loss and lowest in lipid among all genotypes. The LNH cross birds were similar to AV broilers in most meat quality parameters, although they had a lower shear force value and higher fat content than AV broilers. Breast muscle had higher expressible moisture, shear force, protein (%), inosine-5'-monophosphate content, lower cook loss, and lipid (%) than leg muscle. Muscles from male chickens had higher expressible moisture than those from the females. Variability of meat quality characteristics is mainly related to genotype and muscle type differences. PMID:19762878

  18. Improved ancestry estimation for both genotyping and sequencing data using projection procrustes analysis and genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaolong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Liang, Liming; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Lin, Xihong

    2015-06-01

    Accurate estimation of individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies, especially when a large number of samples are collected from multiple sources. However, existing approaches developed for genome-wide SNP data do not work well with modest amounts of genetic data, such as in targeted sequencing or exome chip genotyping experiments. We propose a statistical framework to estimate individual ancestry in a principal component ancestry map generated by a reference set of individuals. This framework extends and improves upon our previous method for estimating ancestry using low-coverage sequence reads (LASER 1.0) to analyze either genotyping or sequencing data. In particular, we introduce a projection Procrustes analysis approach that uses high-dimensional principal components to estimate ancestry in a low-dimensional reference space. Using extensive simulations and empirical data examples, we show that our new method (LASER 2.0), combined with genotype imputation on the reference individuals, can substantially outperform LASER 1.0 in estimating fine-scale genetic ancestry. Specifically, LASER 2.0 can accurately estimate fine-scale ancestry within Europe using either exome chip genotypes or targeted sequencing data with off-target coverage as low as 0.05×. Under the framework of LASER 2.0, we can estimate individual ancestry in a shared reference space for samples assayed at different loci or by different techniques. Therefore, our ancestry estimation method will accelerate discovery in disease association studies not only by helping model ancestry within individual studies but also by facilitating combined analysis of genetic data from multiple sources. PMID:26027497

  19. Improved Ancestry Estimation for both Genotyping and Sequencing Data using Projection Procrustes Analysis and Genotype Imputation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chaolong; Zhan, Xiaowei; Liang, Liming; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lin, Xihong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of individual ancestry is important in genetic association studies, especially when a large number of samples are collected from multiple sources. However, existing approaches developed for genome-wide SNP data do not work well with modest amounts of genetic data, such as in targeted sequencing or exome chip genotyping experiments. We propose a statistical framework to estimate individual ancestry in a principal component ancestry map generated by a reference set of individuals. This framework extends and improves upon our previous method for estimating ancestry using low-coverage sequence reads (LASER 1.0) to analyze either genotyping or sequencing data. In particular, we introduce a projection Procrustes analysis approach that uses high-dimensional principal components to estimate ancestry in a low-dimensional reference space. Using extensive simulations and empirical data examples, we show that our new method (LASER 2.0), combined with genotype imputation on the reference individuals, can substantially outperform LASER 1.0 in estimating fine-scale genetic ancestry. Specifically, LASER 2.0 can accurately estimate fine-scale ancestry within Europe using either exome chip genotypes or targeted sequencing data with off-target coverage as low as 0.05×. Under the framework of LASER 2.0, we can estimate individual ancestry in a shared reference space for samples assayed at different loci or by different techniques. Therefore, our ancestry estimation method will accelerate discovery in disease association studies not only by helping model ancestry within individual studies but also by facilitating combined analysis of genetic data from multiple sources. PMID:26027497

  20. An IL28B Genotype-Based Clinical Prediction Model for Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Thomas R.; Everhart, James E.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Lok, Anna S.; Chung, Raymond T.; Shao, Yongwu; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Dotrang, Myhanh; Sninsky, John J.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic variation in IL28B and other factors are associated with sustained virological response (SVR) after pegylated-interferon/ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Using data from the HALT-C Trial, we developed a model to predict a patient's probability of SVR based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables. Methods HALT-C enrolled patients with advanced CHC who had failed previous interferon-based treatment. Subjects were re-treated with pegylated-interferon/ribavirin during trial lead-in. We used step-wise logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and create the predictive model. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to predict a priori probabilities of SVR and determine area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC). Results Among 646 HCV genotype 1-infected European American patients, 14.2% achieved SVR. IL28B rs12979860-CC genotype was the strongest predictor of SVR (aOR, 7.56; p<.0001); the model also included HCV RNA (log10 IU/ml), AST∶ALT ratio, Ishak fibrosis score and prior ribavirin treatment. For this model AUC was 78.5%, compared to 73.0% for a model restricted to the four clinical predictors and 60.0% for a model restricted to IL28B genotype (p<0.001). Subjects with a predicted probability of SVR <10% had an observed SVR rate of 3.8%; subjects with a predicted probability >10% (43.3% of subjects) had an SVR rate of 27.9% and accounted for 84.8% of subjects actually achieving SVR. To verify that consideration of both IL28B genotype and clinical variables is required for treatment decisions, we calculated AUC values from published data for the IDEAL Study. Conclusion A clinical prediction model based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables can yield useful individualized predictions of the probability of treatment success that could increase SVR rates and decrease the frequency of futile treatment among patients with CHC. PMID:21760886

  1. Distribution of Cytomegalovirus Genotypes among Neonates Born to Infected Mothers in Islamabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Mujtaba, Ghulam; Khurshid, Adnan; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Aamir, Uzma Bashir; Shaukat, Shahzad; Angez, Mehar; Rana, Muhammad Suleman; Umair, Massab; Shah, Aamer Ali; Zaidi, Syed Sohail Zahoor

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection contributes to considerable long-term sequelae in neonates and children all over the world. The association between viral genotypes and severity of clinical cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is yet to be defined. The objective of this study was to find the impact of active CMV infection during pregnancy and the clinical significance of genotypes in neonates with congenital cytomegalovirus infections in Pakistan. Methods A total of 409 blood samples from pregnant women seeking health care services at the two antenatal hospitals of Islamabad during January to December 2012 were tested by ELISA and nested-PCR. Pregnant women with active infection (detected as IgM positive, PCR positive or positive on both assays) were followed until delivery, to detect the outcome of overt cCMV infection in neonates. Genetic characterization of CMV strains was performed by sequence analysis of envelope glycoproteins: gB, gN and gH to detect the contributing CMV genotypes. Results The seroprevalence of anti-CMV IgG and IgM was 97.5% (399 out of 409) and 12.7% (52 out of 409), respectively, while 20% (82/409) pregnant women were found positive for CMV DNA by PCR. Logistic regression analysis showed a significant association of active infection with parity [OR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.82–2.62, p = 0.04], febrile illness [OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.76–3.65, p = 0.01] and jaundice [OR = 22.5, 95% CI = 4.53–85.02, p = 0.002]. We were able to isolate virus in 41 out of 70 neonates; 36.6% (15 out of 41) of them were symptomatic at birth while 63.4% (26 out of 41) were asymptomatic. The most prominent clinical feature observed in symptomatic neonates was hepatosplenomegaly (26.6%; 4 out of 15). All three genotypes gB, gN and gH were found with the highest frequency of gB1 genotype, found in 75% infants with hepatic damage. Phylogenetic analysis of Pakistani strains showed 96%-100% homology to their prototype strains. Conclusions Active CMV

  2. Optical detection of nanoparticle-enhanced human papillomavirus genotyping microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue Zhe; Kim, Sookyung; Cho, Wonhyung; Lee, Seung-Yop

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we propose a new detection method of nanoparticle-enhanced human papillomavirus genotyping microarrays using a DVD optical pick-up with a photodiode. The HPV genotyping DNA chip was labeled using Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, prepared on a treatment glass substrate. Then, the bio information of the HPV genotyping target DNA was detected by measuring the difference of the optical signals between the DNA spots and the background parts for cervical cancer diagnosis. Moreover the approximate linear relationship between the concentration of the HPV genotyping target DNA and the optical signal depending on the density of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles was obtained by performing a spot finding algorithm. It is shown that the nanoparticle-labeled HPV genotyping target DNA can be measured and quantified by collecting the low-cost photodiode signal on the treatment glass chip, replacing high-cost fluorescence microarray scanners using a photomultiplier tube. PMID:23413051

  3. National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network: Design and Methods

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Christopher R.; Schable, Barbara A.; Onorato, Ida M.

    2002-01-01

    The National Tuberculosis Genotyping and Surveillance Network was established in 1996 to perform a 5-year, prospective study of the usefulness of genotyping Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates to tuberculosis control programs. Seven sentinel sites identified all new cases of tuberculosis, collected information on patients and contacts, and obtained patient isolates. Seven genotyping laboratories performed DNA fingerprinting analysis by the international standard IS6110 method. BioImage Whole Band Analyzer software was used to analyze patterns, and distinct patterns were assigned unique designations. Isolates with six or fewer bands on IS6110 patterns were also spoligotyped. Patient data and genotyping designations were entered in a relational database and merged with selected variables from the national surveillance database. In two related databases, we compiled the results of routine contact investigations and the results of investigations of the relationships of patients who had isolates with matching genotypes. We describe the methods used in the study. PMID:12453342

  4. Leber Congenital Amaurosis: Genotypes and Retinal Structure Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Cideciyan, Artur V; Huang, Wei Chieh; Sumaroka, Alexander; Nam, Hyun Ju; Sheplock, Rebecca; Schwartz, Sharon B

    2016-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) patients of 10 known genotypes (n = 24; age range, 3-25 years) were studied clinically and by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Comparisons were made between OCT results across the horizontal meridian (central 60(o)) of the patients. Three patterns were identified. First, there were LCA genotypes with unusual and readily identifiable patterns, such as near normal outer nuclear layer (ONL) across the central retina or severely dysplastic retina. Second, there were genotypes with well-formed foveal architecture but only residual central islands of normal or reduced ONL thickness. Third, some genotypes showed central ONL losses or dysmorphology suggesting early macular disease or foveal maldevelopment. Objective in vivo morphological features could complement other phenotypic characteristics and help guide genetic testing of LCA patients or at least permit a differential diagnosis of genotypes to be made in the clinic. PMID:26427408

  5. Genetic relationships among some hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Kadir Ugurtan; Yanar, Makbule; Ercisli, Sezai; Sahiner, Hatice; Taskin, Tuncer; Zengin, Yasar

    2010-10-01

    The genus Crataegus is well distributed in Turkey as a wild plant, with numerous, inherently variable species and genotypes. RAPD markers were used to study 17 hawthorn genotypes belonging to Crataegus monogyna ssp. monogyna Jacq (2 genotypes), C. monogyna ssp. azarella Jacq (1), Crataegus pontica K.Koch (3), Crataegus orientalis var. orientalis Pallas Ex Bieb (3), Crataegus pseudoheterophylla Pojark (1), Crataegus aronia var. dentata Browicz (1), C. aronia var. aronia Browicz (4), and Crateagus x bornmuelleri Zabel (2). The 10 RAPD primers produced 72 polymorphic bands (88% polymorphism). A dendrogram based on Jaccard's index included four major groups and one outgroup according to taxa. The lowest genetic variability was observed within C. aronia var. aronia genotypes. The study demonstrated that RAPD analysis is efficient for genotyping wild-grown hawthorns. PMID:20640884

  6. High frequency of sex and equal frequencies of mating types in natural populations of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Doerder, F P; Gates, M A; Eberhardt, F P; Arslanyolu, M

    1995-01-01

    In ciliate protists, sex involves the temporary joining of two cells of compatible mating type, followed by meiosis and exchange of gametic nuclei between conjugants. Reproduction is by asexual binary fission following conjugation. For the many ciliates with fixed multiple mating types, frequency-dependent sex-ratio theory predicts equal frequencies of mating types, if sex is common in nature. Here, we report that in natural populations of Tetrahymena thermophila sexually immature cells, indicative of recent conjugation, are found from spring through fall. In addition, the seven mating types occur in approximately equal frequencies, and these frequencies appear to be maintained by interaction between complex, multiple mat alleles and environmental conditions during conjugation. Such genotype-environment interaction determining mating type frequency is rare among ciliates. PMID:7568003

  7. Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir Plus Dasabuvir: A Review in Chronic HCV Genotype 1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Deeks, Emma D

    2015-06-01

    A fixed-dose tablet comprising ombitasvir (an NS5A replication complex inhibitor), paritaprevir (an NS3/4A protease inhibitor) and ritonavir (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor) taken in combination with dasabuvir (an NS5B polymerase inhibitor) is indicated for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection in several countries, including the USA (copackaged as Viekira Pak(™)) and those of the EU (Viekirax(®) and Exviera(®)). In phase II and III trials, this interferon-free regimen, taken ± ribavirin, provided high rates of sustained virological response 12 weeks post-treatment in adults with chronic HCV genotype 1a or 1b infection, including those with compensated cirrhosis, liver transplants or HIV-1 co-infection. The regimen was generally well tolerated, with nausea, insomnia, asthenia, pruritus, other skin reactions and fatigue being among the most common tolerability issues. Thus, ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir plus dasabuvir is an effective interferon-free, direct-acting antiviral regimen for use ± ribavirin in a broad range of adults chronically infected with HCV genotype 1. PMID:26059288

  8. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) polymorphism frequency in Brazilian soccer players.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel Barbosa; Pimenta, Eduardo; Rosse, Izinara Cruz; Veneroso, Christiano; Pussieldi, Guilherme; Becker, Lenice Kapes; Carvalho, Maria-Raquel; Silami-Garcia, Emerson

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-I/D) allelic and genotypic frequencies in Brazilian soccer players of different ages. The study group comprised 353 players from first-division clubs in the under (U)-14, U-15, U-17, U-20, and professional categories. The allelic and genotypic frequencies did not differ significantly in any of the categories between the group of players and the control group. This was the first study of ACE-I/D polymorphism in Brazilian soccer players. PMID:27232187

  9. An increased diversity of HCV isolates were characterized among 393 patients with liver disease in China representing six genotypes, 12 subtypes, and two novel genotype 6 variants

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lin; Tong, Wangxia; Yuan, Manqiong; Lu, Teng; Li, Chunhua; Lu, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Background We have recently determined HCV isolates among volunteer blood donors and IDUs in southern China and revealed the genotype distribution patterns not only different between the two studied cohorts but also from what we have sampled in 2002. A changed pattern could have also occurred among patients with liver disease. Materials/Methods Both E1 and NS5B sequences of HCV were characterized among 393 patients with liver disease followed by phylogenetic analysis. Results Six HCV genotypes, 12 subtypes (1b: 65.9%, 6a: 17.1%, 2a: 7.4%, 3a: 3.6%, 3b: in 3.3%, 6e: 0.76%, and 1a, 1c, 2b, 2f, 4d, and 5a each 0.25%), and two novel genotype 6 variants were classified, showing the greatest complexity of HCV hitherto found in China. Although the predominance of 1b followed by 6a is largely consistent with what we have sampled in 2002, the identification of single isolates of 1c, 2f, 4d, 5a, and two novel HCV-6 variants were first reported. Excluding 4d from a European visitor, all the others were from Chinese patients. Since the 6a proportion (17.1%, 67/393) was unexpectedly lower than what we have recently detected among blood donors (34.8%, 82/236) and IDUs (51.5%, 70/136), further statistical analyses were conducted. Comparison of the mean ages showed that among the 393 patients, those infected with 1b were significantly (6.7 years) older than those with 6a, while the 393 patients as a whole were significantly older than the 236 blood donors (8.4 years) and 136 IDUs (12.6 years) we have recently reported. Explanations are that younger individuals had higher proportions of 6a infections while patients with liver disease could have acquired their infections earlier than volunteer blood donors and IDUs. Conclusion Among 393 patients with liver disease, a great diversity in HCV was detected, which reflects a constantly changing pattern of HCV genotypes in China over time. PMID:23706765

  10. DRD4 dopamine receptor genotype and CSF monoamine metabolites in Finnish alcoholics and controls

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M.D.; Dean, M.; Goldman, D.

    1995-06-19

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is thus far unique among neurotransmitter receptors in having a highly polymorphic gene structure that has been reported to produce altered receptor functioning. These allelic variations are caused by a 48-bp segment in exon III of the coding region which may be repeated from 2-10 times. Varying the numbers of repeated segments changes the length, structure, and, possibly, the functional efficiency of the receptor, which makes this gene an intriguing candidate for variations in dopamine-related behaviors, such as alcoholism and drug abuse. Thus far, these DRD4 alleles have been investigated for association with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson`s disease, and chronic alcoholism, and all have been largely negative for a direct association. We evaluated the DRD4 genotype in 226 Finish adult males, 113 of whom were alcoholics, many of the early onset type with features of impulsivity and antisocial traits. Genotype frequencies were compared to 113 Finnish controls who were free of alcohol abuse, substance abuse, and major mental illness. In 70 alcoholics and 20 controls, we measured CSF homovanillic acid (HVA), the major metabolite of dopamine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No association was found between a particular DRD4 dopamine receptor allele and alcoholism. CSF concentrations of the monoamine metabolites showed no significant difference among the DRD4 genotypes. This study of the DRD4 dopamine receptor in alcoholics is the first to be conducted in a clinically and ethnically homogeneous population and to relate the DRD4 genotype to CSF monoamine concentrations. The results indicate that there is no association of the DRD4 receptor with alcoholism. 52 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Vitis Phylogenomics: Hybridization Intensities from a SNP Array Outperform Genotype Calls

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Allison J.; Matasci, Naim; Schwaninger, Heidi; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K.; Prins, Bernard; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Simon, Charles; Buckler, Edward S.; Myles, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Understanding relationships among species is a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through next generation sequencing and related technologies enable phylogeny reconstruction by providing unprecedented numbers of characters for analysis. One approach to SNP-based phylogeny reconstruction is to identify SNPs in a subset of individuals, and then to compile SNPs on an array that can be used to genotype additional samples at hundreds or thousands of sites simultaneously. Although powerful and efficient, this method is subject to ascertainment bias because applying variation discovered in a representative subset to a larger sample favors identification of SNPs with high minor allele frequencies and introduces bias against rare alleles. Here, we demonstrate that the use of hybridization intensity data, rather than genotype calls, reduces the effects of ascertainment bias. Whereas traditional SNP calls assess known variants based on diversity housed in the discovery panel, hybridization intensity data survey variation in the broader sample pool, regardless of whether those variants are present in the initial SNP discovery process. We apply SNP genotype and hybridization intensity data derived from the Vitis9kSNP array developed for grape to show the effects of ascertainment bias and to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among Vitis species. We demonstrate that phylogenies constructed using hybridization intensities suffer less from the distorting effects of ascertainment bias, and are thus more accurate than phylogenies based on genotype calls. Moreover, we reconstruct the phylogeny of the genus Vitis using hybridization data, show that North American subgenus Vitis species are monophyletic, and resolve several previously poorly known relationships among North American species. This study builds on earlier work that applied the Vitis9kSNP array to evolutionary questions within Vitis vinifera and has general

  12. An association analysis between OXT genotype and milk yield and flow in Italian Mediterranean river buffalo.

    PubMed

    Pauciullo, Alfredo; Cosenza, Gianfranco; Steri, Roberto; Coletta, Angelo; Jemma, Lazzaro; Feligini, Maria; Di Berardino, Dino; Macciotta, Nicolò P P; Ramunno, Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate possible associations between three SNPs at the oxytocin locus (AM234538: g.28C>T; g.204A>G and g.1627G>T) and two productive traits, milk yield and milkability, in Italian Mediterranean river buffaloes. Effects of parity, calving season and month of production were also evaluated. A total of 41 980 test-day records belonging to 219 lactations of 163 buffalo cows were investigated. The allele call rate was 98·8% and the major allele frequency for all the investigated loci was 0·76. The OXT genotype was significantly associated with milk yield (P=0·029). The TT genotype showed an average daily milk yield approximately 1·7 kg higher than GT buffaloes. Such a difference represents about 23% more milk/d. A large dominance effect (-1·17±0·43 kg) was estimated, whereas the contribution of OXT genotype (r(2)(OXT)) to the total phenotypic variance in milk yield was equal to 0·06. The TT genotype showed higher values also for the milk flow, even though the estimated difference did not reach a level of statistical significance (P=0·07). Such an association, among the first reported for the oxytocin locus in ruminants, should be tested on a population scale and possible effects on milk composition traits should be evaluated in order to supply useful indications for the application of marker-assisted selection programmes in river buffaloes. PMID:22280971

  13. Development of a Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Barcode to Genotype Plasmodium vivax Infections

    PubMed Central

    Baniecki, Mary Lynn; Faust, Aubrey L.; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Park, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Kevin; Daniels, Rachel F.; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Karunaweera, Nadira D.; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A.; Sá, Juliana M.; Wellems, Thomas E.; Musset, Lise; Legrand, Eric; Melnikov, Alexandre; Neafsey, Daniel E.; Volkman, Sarah K.; Wirth, Dyann F.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax, one of the five species of Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria, is responsible for 25–40% of malaria cases worldwide. Malaria global elimination efforts will benefit from accurate and effective genotyping tools that will provide insight into the population genetics and diversity of this parasite. The recent sequencing of P. vivax isolates from South America, Africa, and Asia presents a new opportunity by uncovering thousands of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genotyping a selection of these SNPs provides a robust, low-cost method of identifying parasite infections through their unique genetic signature or barcode. Based on our experience in generating a SNP barcode for P. falciparum using High Resolution Melting (HRM), we have developed a similar tool for P. vivax. We selected globally polymorphic SNPs from available P. vivax genome sequence data that were located in putatively selectively neutral sites (i.e., intergenic, intronic, or 4-fold degenerate coding). From these candidate SNPs we defined a barcode consisting of 42 SNPs. We analyzed the performance of the 42-SNP barcode on 87 P. vivax clinical samples from parasite populations in South America (Brazil, French Guiana), Africa (Ethiopia) and Asia (Sri Lanka). We found that the P. vivax barcode is robust, as it requires only a small quantity of DNA (limit of detection 0.3 ng/μl) to yield reproducible genotype calls, and detects polymorphic genotypes with high sensitivity. The markers are informative across all clinical samples evaluated (average minor allele frequency > 0.1). Population genetic and statistical analyses show the barcode captures high degrees of population diversity and differentiates geographically distinct populations. Our 42-SNP barcode provides a robust, informative, and standardized genetic marker set that accurately identifies a genomic signature for P. vivax infections. PMID:25781890

  14. Development of a single nucleotide polymorphism barcode to genotype Plasmodium vivax infections.

    PubMed

    Baniecki, Mary Lynn; Faust, Aubrey L; Schaffner, Stephen F; Park, Daniel J; Galinsky, Kevin; Daniels, Rachel F; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Ferreira, Marcelo U; Karunaweera, Nadira D; Serre, David; Zimmerman, Peter A; Sá, Juliana M; Wellems, Thomas E; Musset, Lise; Legrand, Eric; Melnikov, Alexandre; Neafsey, Daniel E; Volkman, Sarah K; Wirth, Dyann F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-03-01

    Plasmodium vivax, one of the five species of Plasmodium parasites that cause human malaria, is responsible for 25-40% of malaria cases worldwide. Malaria global elimination efforts will benefit from accurate and effective genotyping tools that will provide insight into the population genetics and diversity of this parasite. The recent sequencing of P. vivax isolates from South America, Africa, and Asia presents a new opportunity by uncovering thousands of novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genotyping a selection of these SNPs provides a robust, low-cost method of identifying parasite infections through their unique genetic signature or barcode. Based on our experience in generating a SNP barcode for P. falciparum using High Resolution Melting (HRM), we have developed a similar tool for P. vivax. We selected globally polymorphic SNPs from available P. vivax genome sequence data that were located in putatively selectively neutral sites (i.e., intergenic, intronic, or 4-fold degenerate coding). From these candidate SNPs we defined a barcode consisting of 42 SNPs. We analyzed the performance of the 42-SNP barcode on 87 P. vivax clinical samples from parasite populations in South America (Brazil, French Guiana), Africa (Ethiopia) and Asia (Sri Lanka). We found that the P. vivax barcode is robust, as it requires only a small quantity of DNA (limit of detection 0.3 ng/μl) to yield reproducible genotype calls, and detects polymorphic genotypes with high sensitivity. The markers are informative across all clinical samples evaluated (average minor allele frequency > 0.1). Population genetic and statistical analyses show the barcode captures high degrees of population diversity and differentiates geographically distinct populations. Our 42-SNP barcode provides a robust, informative, and standardized genetic marker set that accurately identifies a genomic signature for P. vivax infections. PMID:25781890

  15. Multilocus genotyping of Giardia duodenalis (Lambl, 1859) from symptomatic human infections in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Soba, Barbara; Islamovic, Sabina; Skvarc, Miha; Caccio, Simone M

    2015-01-01

    Giardiasis is a common gastrointestinal infection of humans and animals with a worldwide distribution. Eight genetic groups (known as assemblages A to H) are currently recognised within the species complex of Giardia duodenalis (Lambl, 1859), of which assemblages A and B are responsible for infection of humans and other mammalian hosts. Genotyping data on giardiasis are not available from Slovenia. In this work, we have characterised isolates of G. duodenalis from 85 human symptomatic cases collected during 2002-2013. Genomic DNAs were first tested by a real-time (rt) PCR assay and then by conventional PCR at three loci (beta-giardin, bg; triose phosphate isomerase, tpi; and glutamate dehydrogenase, gdh). We found that the threshold cycle (Ct) values in rt-PCR testing were higher for samples collected during 2002-2005 and that this was paralleled by a low amplification rate in conventional PCR (6 of 32, i.e. 19%). In contrast, lower Ct values and higher amplification rate (45 of 53; 85%) were observed for samples collected during 2006-2013, suggesting an adverse effect of prolonged freezing of stools. Assemblages A and B were found with an almost identical frequency in the 51 genotyped samples. In agreement with previous studies, sequences from assemblage B isolates were characterised by larger genetic variability and by the presence of heterogeneous positions, which made assignment to specific genotypes difficult. Less variability was observed in sequences from assemblage A isolates, which belonged to the human-specific subassemblage AII. These data showed that the genotypes of G. duodenalis that circulate in humans in Slovenia are similar to those previously identified in Europe. PMID:26580803

  16. Single endemic genotype of measles virus continuously circulating in China for at least 16 years.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xu, Songtao; Wang, Huiling; Zhu, Zhen; Ji, Yixin; Liu, Chunyu; Zhang, Xiaojie; Sun, Liwei; Zhou, Jianhui; Lu, Peishan; Hu, Ying; Feng, Daxing; Zhang, Zhenying; Wang, Changyin; Fang, Xueqiang; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Sun, Xiaodong; Tang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yan; Gao, Hui; Tian, Hong; Ma, Jiangtao; Gu, Suyi; Wang, Shuang; Feng, Yan; Bo, Fang; Liu, Jianfeng; Si, Yuan; Zhou, Shujie; Ma, Yuyan; Wu, Shengwei; Zhou, Shunde; Li, Fangcai; Ding, Zhengrong; Yang, Zhaohui; Rota, Paul A; Featherstone, David; Jee, Youngmee; Bellini, William J; Xu, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of measles in China from 1991 to 2008 was reviewed, and the nucleotide sequences from 1507 measles viruses (MeV) isolated during 1993 to 2008 were phylogenetically analyzed. The results showed that measles epidemics peaked approximately every 3 to 5 years with the range of measles cases detected between 56,850 and 140,048 per year. The Chinese MeV strains represented three genotypes; 1501 H1, 1 H2 and 5 A. Genotype H1 was the predominant genotype throughout China continuously circulating for at least 16 years. Genotype H1 sequences could be divided into two distinct clusters, H1a and H1b. A 4.2% average nucleotide divergence was found between the H1a and H1b clusters, and the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid homologies of H1a viruses were 92.3%-100% and 84.7%-100%, H1b were 97.1%-100% and 95.3%-100%, respectively. Viruses from both clusters were distributed throughout China with no apparent geographic restriction and multiple co-circulating lineages were present in many provinces. Cluster H1a and H1b viruses were co-circulating during 1993 to 2005, while no H1b viruses were detected after 2005 and the transmission of that cluster has presumably been interrupted. Analysis of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid changes in the N proteins of H1a and H1b viruses showed no evidence of selective pressure. This study investigated the genotype and cluster distribution of MeV in China over a 16-year period to establish a genetic baseline before MeV elimination in Western Pacific Region (WPR). Continuous and extensive MeV surveillance and the ability to quickly identify imported cases of measles will become more critical as measles elimination goals are achieved in China in the near future. This is the first report that a single endemic genotype of measles virus has been found to be continuously circulating in one country for at least 16 years. PMID:22532829

  17. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  18. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  19. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA. We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing. The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003. We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals. PMID:26295294

  20. [Occurrence of Giardia species and genotypes in humans and animals in Wielkopolska region, Poland].

    PubMed

    Solarczyk, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Giardia is the most common intestinal protozoan parasite found in humans and animals worldwide. Although it has been known for three hundred years, the nomenclature, taxonomy, host specificity, and pathogenicity of Giardia still arouse numerous controversies and ambiguities. Giardia is classified into six species, that are characterised by various ranges of hosts. The most dubious species is G. intestinalis, which includes a dozen or so genotypes, and only two of them (genotype A and B) have wide ranges of hosts, including humans. Moreover, in some genotype assemblages of G. intestinalis certain subgenotypes were distinguished and it was proven that in the same host species various subgenotypes of this parasite may occur. Bearing in mind the significant genetic heterogeneity of G. intestinalis and the fact that various genotypes and subgenotypes of this parasite are characterised by the broad or narrow host specificity, the data concerning the frequency of giardiosis occurrence are insufficient. It is necessary to use molecular biology techniques in order to define the genotype and/or the subgenotype of G. intestinalis that are found in humans and in certain animal species. Furthermore, since more and more pieces of evidence connected with a possibility of the sexual recombination of Giardia are gathered, it is unknown if genotypes and subgenotypes of this parasite are stable in time. The aim of this thesis was to define the frequency of Giardia occurrence in humans and animals in Wielkopolska region, to identify species and genotypes of Giardia that occur in humans and animals, as well as to obtain an axenic culture of the chosen isolates of Giardia from animals and to compare the sequence of the beta-giardin gene fragment obtained from the DNA isolated from cysts and trophozoites in order to check if the axenisation of G. intestinalis leads to the selection of genotypes or if Giardia genotypes are stable in time. Altogether, 2183 faecal samples were examined for

  1. Newcastle Disease Virus in Madagascar: Identification of an Original Genotype Possibly Deriving from a Died Out Ancestor of Genotype IV

    PubMed Central

    Maminiaina, Olivier F.; Gil, Patricia; Briand, François-Xavier; Albina, Emmanuel; Keita, Djénéba; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina Rasamoelina; Chevalier, Véronique; Lancelot, Renaud; Martinez, Dominique; Rakotondravao, R.; Rajaonarison, Jean-Joseph; Koko, M.; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel A.; Jestin, Véronique; Servan de Almeida, Renata

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND) has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed. PMID:21085573

  2. Allocation of experimental resources to minimize the variance of genotype mean chip color and tuber composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeders select superior genotypes despite the environment affecting phenotypic variance. Minimal variance of genotype means facilitates the statistical identification of superior genotypes. The variance components calculated from three datasets describing tuber composition and fried chip color were...

  3. Mechanisms of Reproductive Thermotolerance in Gossypium hirsutum: The Effect of Genotype and Exogenous Calcium Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although genotypic mechanisms of photosynthetic thermotolerance have been investigated previously in cotton leaves, reports on the biochemical influence of the pistil in promoting genotypic fertilization thermostability are non-existent for cotton. To evaluate the effect of temperature, genotype, an...

  4. Genotyping as a tool for antibiotic resistance surveillance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in New Caledonia: evidence of a novel genotype associated with reduced penicillin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Vernel-Pauillac, Frédérique; Nandi, Sobhan; Nicholas, Robert A; Goarant, Cyrille

    2008-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae continues to be a major concern in public health. Resistance of N. gonorrhoeae bacteria to penicillin G is widespread in most developed countries, which has necessitated a change to newer drugs for treatment of gonococcal infections. Recent reports indicate that resistance to these newer drugs is increasing, highlighting the need for accurate therapeutic recommendations. In some countries or communities, however, N. gonorrhoeae isolates are still susceptible to penicillin, so the use of this antibiotic for single-dose treatments of medically under-resourced patients is beneficial. In order to evaluate the adequacy and sustainability of this treatment approach, we explored the presence and prevalence of chromosomally mediated resistance determinants in N. gonorrhoeae isolates collected from 2005 to 2007 in New Caledonia. We developed two new real-time PCR assays targeting the penB and mtrR determinants, to be used together with a previously described duplex assay targeting the penA and ponA determinants. The results of this study provided evidence that neither the most-common mtrR determinants nor the most-resistance-associated penB alleles are currently circulating in New Caledonia, suggesting that penicillin should still be considered a valuable treatment strategy. Additionally, using our genotyping assay, we observed an unexpected penB genotype at a relatively high frequency that was associated with a decreased susceptibility to penicillin (average MIC, 0.15 mug/ml). Sequencing revealed that this genotype corresponded to an A102S mutation in the penB gene. The molecular tools developed in this study can be used successfully for prospective epidemiological monitoring and surveillance of penicillin susceptibility. PMID:18591264

  5. Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq): A cost effective SNP genotyping method based on custom amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; Harmon, Stephanie A; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-07-01

    Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) is a method that uses next-generation sequencing of multiplexed PCR products to generate genotypes from relatively small panels (50-500) of targeted single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for thousands of individuals in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. This method uses only unlabelled oligos and PCR master mix in two thermal cycling steps for amplification of targeted SNP loci. During this process, sequencing adapters and dual barcode sequence tags are incorporated into the amplicons enabling thousands of individuals to be pooled into a single sequencing library. Post sequencing, reads from individual samples are split into individual files using their unique combination of barcode sequences. Genotyping is performed with a simple perl script which counts amplicon-specific sequences for each allele, and allele ratios are used to determine the genotypes. We demonstrate this technique by genotyping 2068 individual steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) samples with a set of 192 SNP markers in a single library sequenced in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. Genotype data were 99.9% concordant to previously collected TaqMan(™) genotypes at the same 192 loci, but call rates were slightly lower with GT-seq (96.4%) relative to Taqman (99.0%). Of the 192 SNPs, 187 were genotyped in ≥90% of the individual samples and only 3 SNPs were genotyped in <70% of samples. This study demonstrates amplicon sequencing with GT-seq greatly reduces the cost of genotyping hundreds of targeted SNPs relative to existing methods by utilizing a simple library preparation method and massive efficiency of scale. PMID:25476721

  6. Vinexin β Interacts with Hepatitis C Virus NS5A, Modulating Its Hyperphosphorylation To Regulate Viral Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Yang, Jie; Wang, Mingzhen; Wang, Hailong; Rao, Zhipeng; Zhong, Cheng; Xin, Xiu; Mo, Lin; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is essential for HCV genome replication and virion production and is involved in the regulation of multiple host signaling pathways. As a proline-rich protein, NS5A is capable of interacting with various host proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. Previous studies have suggested that vinexin, a member of the sorbin homology (SoHo) adaptor family, might be a potential binding partner of NS5A by yeast two-hybrid screening. However, firm evidence for this interaction is lacking, and the significance of vinexin in the HCV life cycle remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that endogenously and exogenously expressed vinexin β coimmunoprecipitated with NS5A derived from different HCV genotypes. Two residues, tryptophan (W307) and tyrosine (Y325), in the third SH3 domain of vinexin β and conserved Pro-X-X-Pro-X-Arg motifs at the C terminus of NS5A were indispensable for the vinexin-NS5A interaction. Furthermore, downregulation of endogenous vinexin β significantly suppressed NS5A hyperphosphorylation and decreased HCV replication, which could be rescued by expressing a vinexin β short hairpin RNA-resistant mutant. We also found that vinexin β modulated the hyperphosphorylation of NS5A in a casein kinase 1α-dependent on manner. Taken together, our findings suggest that vinexin β modulates NS5A phosphorylation via its interaction with NS5A, thereby regulating HCV replication, implicating vinexin β in the viral life cycle. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein NS5A is a phosphoprotein, and its phosphorylation states are usually modulated by host kinases and other viral nonstructural elements. Additionally, cellular factors containing Src homology 3 (SH3) domains have been reported to interact with proline-rich regions of NS5A. However, it is unclear whether there are any relationships between NS5A phosphorylation and the NS5A-SH3 interaction, and little is known

  7. Distribution of HPV genotypes in Shanghai women

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suman; Zhou, Qian; Yu, Yunyun; Xu, Xianghong; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhao, Junwei; Han, Lingfei; Wang, Kai; Sun, Jing; Li, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the Distribution of HPV genotypes in Shanghai women. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital affiliated with Tongji University. Population: Patients those attended in the cervical disease diagnosis and treatment center of Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital between January 2011 and December 2014. Methods: HPV GenoArray test kit (HybriBio Ltd) was used to perform HPV genotyping and was also used in DNA amplification and HybriBio’s proprietary flow-through hybridization technique. Results: In this study, total patients analyzed were 4585. Among 4585 sample the HPV positive patients were 1460 i.e. 31.84% in total. On the basis of pathological report normal were 1358, with inflammation 2441, with low grade lesion were 399, high grade lesion were 353, CIN were 19 and cervical carcinoma were 15. Among normal HPV positive were 215 (15.8%), among inflammation HPV positive were 735 (30.11%). HPV positive in low grade lesion were 353 i.e. 59.77%. In high grade lesion 211 were HPV positive among 272 (68.17%). The percentage of HPV positive was 73.68% i.e. 14 out of 19 patient in cervical carcinoma in situ. 13 patient out of 15 i.e. 86.67% of Cervical carcinoma were HPV positive. Among all percentage of HPV positive was high among cervical carcinoma then cervical carcinoma in situ then high grade lesion in decreasing fashion to low grade lesion and in normal. Highest prevalence i.e. 22.67% is of HPV 52 subtype and HPV 16 has second highest prevalence with 17.67% among HPV positive cases. Sensitivity of TCT detection is 71.6%. Specificity of TCT detection is 79.6%. Sensitivity of HPV-DNA detection is 65.2%. Specificity of HPV-DNA detection is 78.2%. Conclusion: HPV is one of major health concern in shanghai having high prevalence rate in comparison to other part of china and other part of world. This has implications for the future cervical cancer burden and the priority to be given to prevent cervical cancer in

  8. Assessment of tailor-made prevention of atherosclerosis with folic acid supplementation: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in each MTHFR C677T genotype.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Koichi; Murata, Mitsuru; Kikuchi, Haruhito; Takei, Izumi; Nakayama, Takeo; Watanabe, Kiyoaki; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effect of folic acid supplementation quantitatively in each MTHFR C677T genotype and considered the efficiency of tailor-made prevention of atherosclerosis. Study design was genotype-stratified, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. The setting was a Japanese company in the chemical industry. Subjects were 203 healthy men after exclusion of those who took folic acid or drugs known to effect folic acid metabolism. Intervention was folic acid 1 mg/day p.o. for 3 months. The primary endpoint was plasma total homocysteine level (tHcy). In all three genotypes, there were significant tHcy decreases. The greatest decrease was in the TT homozygote [6.61 (3.47-9.76) micromol/l] compared with other genotypes [CC: 2.59 (1.81-3.36), CT: 2.64 (2.16-3.13)], and there was a significant trend between the mutated allele number and the decrease. The tHcy were significantly lowered in all the genotypes, but the amount of the decrease differed significantly in each genotype, which was observed at both 1 and 3 months. Using these time-series data, the largest benefit obtained by the TT homozygote was appraised as 2.4 times compared with the CC homozygote. Taking into account the high allele frequency of this SNP, this quantitative assessment should be useful when considering tailor-made prevention of atherosclerosis with folic acid. PMID:15895286

  9. Encoding voice fundamental frequency into vibrotactile frequency.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, M; Molitor, R D

    1979-10-01

    Measured in this study was the ability of eight hearing and five deaf subjects to identify the stress pattern in a short sentence from the variation in voice fundamental frequency (F0), when presented aurally (for hearing subjects) and when transformed into vibrotactile pulse frequency. Various transformations from F0 to pulse frequency were tested in an attempt to determine an optimum transformation, the amount of F0 information that could be transmitted, and what the limitations in the tactile channel might be. The results indicated that a one- or two-octave reduction of F0 vibrotactile frequency (transmitting every second or third glottal pulse) might result in a significant ability to discriminate the intonation patterns associated with moderate-to-strong patterns of sentence stress in English. However, accurate reception of the details of the intonation pattern may require a slower than normal pronounciation because of an apparent temporal indeterminacy of about 200 ms in the perception of variations in vibrotactile frequency. A performance deficit noted for the two prelingually, profoundly deaf subjects with marginally discriminable encodings offers some support for our previous hypothesis that there is a natural association between auditory pitch and perceived vibrotactile frequency. PMID:159917

  10. Hepatitis C virus prevalence and genotype distribution in Pakistan: Comprehensive review of recent data

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is endemic in Pakistan and its burden is expected to increase in coming decades owing mainly to widespread use of unsafe medical procedures. The prevalence of HCV in Pakistan has previously been reviewed. However, the literature search conducted here revealed that at least 86 relevant studies have been produced since the publication of these systematic reviews. A revised updated analysis was therefore needed in order to integrate the fresh data. A systematic review of data published between 2010 and 2015 showed that HCV seroprevalence among the general adult Pakistani population is 6.8%, while active HCV infection was found in approximately 6% of the population. Studies included in this review have also shown extremely high HCV prevalence in rural and underdeveloped peri-urban areas (up to 25%), highlighting the need for an increased focus on this previously neglected socioeconomic stratum of the population. While a 2.45% seroprevalence among blood donors demands immediate measures to curtail the risk of transfusion transmitted HCV, a very high prevalence in patients attending hospitals with various non-liver disease related complaints (up to 30%) suggests a rise in the incidence of nosocomial HCV spread. HCV genotype 3a continues to be the most prevalent subtype infecting people in Pakistan (61.3%). However, recent years have witnessed an increase in the frequency of subtype 2a in certain geographical sub-regions within Pakistan. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Sindh provinces, 2a was the second most prevalent genotype (17.3% and 11.3% respectively). While the changing frequency distribution of various genotypes demands an increased emphasis on research for novel therapeutic regimens, evidence of high nosocomial transmission calls for immediate measures aimed at ensuring safe medical practices. PMID:26819533

  11. Genomic Profiles of Diversification and Genotype-Phenotype Association in Island Nematode Lineages.

    PubMed

    McGaughran, Angela; Rödelsperger, Christian; Grimm, Dominik G; Meyer, Jan M; Moreno, Eduardo; Morgan, Katy; Leaver, Mark; Serobyan, Vahan; Rakitsch, Barbara; Borgwardt, Karsten M; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how new species form requires investigation of evolutionary forces that cause phenotypic and genotypic changes among populations. However, the mechanisms underlying speciation vary and little is known about whether genomes diversify in the same ways in parallel at the incipient scale. We address this using the nematode, Pristionchus pacificus, which resides at an interesting point on the speciation continuum (distinct evolutionary lineages without reproductive isolation), and inhabits heterogeneous environments subject to divergent environmental pressures. Using whole genome re-sequencing of 264 strains, we estimate FST to identify outlier regions of extraordinary differentiation (∼1.725 Mb of the 172.5 Mb genome). We find evidence for shared divergent genomic regions occurring at a higher frequency than expected by chance among populations of the same evolutionary lineage. We use allele frequency spectra to find that, among lineages, 53% of divergent regions are consistent with adaptive selection, whereas 24% and 23% of such regions suggest background selection and restricted gene flow, respectively. In contrast, among populations from the same lineage, similar proportions (34-48%) of divergent regions correspond to adaptive selection and restricted gene flow, whereas 13-22% suggest background selection. Because speciation often involves phenotypic and genomic divergence, we also evaluate phenotypic variation, focusing on pH tolerance, which we find is diverging in a manner corresponding to environmental differences among populations. Taking a genome-wide association approach, we functionally validate a significant genotype-phenotype association for this trait. Our results are consistent with P. pacificus undergoing heterogeneous genotypic and phenotypic diversification related to both evolutionary and environmental processes. PMID:27189551

  12. Modeling Frequency Comb Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Yuan, Jinhui; Kang, Zhe; Li, Qian; Wai, P. K. A.

    2016-06-01

    Frequency comb sources have revolutionized metrology and spectroscopy and found applications in many fields. Stable, low-cost, high-quality frequency comb sources are important to these applications. Modeling of the frequency comb sources will help the understanding of the operation mechanism and optimization of the design of such sources. In this paper,we review the theoretical models used and recent progress of the modeling of frequency comb sources.

  13. Bayesian Gaussian Mixture Models for High-Density Genotyping Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Sabatti, Chiara; Lange, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Affymetrix's SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping chips have increased the scope and decreased the cost of gene-mapping studies. Because each SNP is queried by multiple DNA probes, the chips present interesting challenges in genotype calling. Traditional clustering methods distinguish the three genotypes of an SNP fairly well given a large enough sample of unrelated individuals or a training sample of known genotypes. This article describes our attempt to improve genotype calling by constructing Gaussian mixture models with empirically derived priors. The priors stabilize parameter estimation and borrow information collectively gathered on tens of thousands of SNPs. When data from related family members are available, our models capture the correlations in signals between relatives. With these advantages in mind, we apply the models to Affymetrix probe intensity data on 10,000 SNPs gathered on 63 genotyped individuals spread over eight pedigrees. We integrate the genotype-calling model with pedigree analysis and examine a sequence of symmetry hypotheses involving the correlated probe signals. The symmetry hypotheses raise novel mathematical issues of parameterization. Using the Bayesian information criterion, we select the best combination of symmetry assumptions. Compared to Affymetrix's software, our model leads to a reduction in no-calls with little sacrifice in overall calling accuracy. PMID:21572926

  14. Illumina human exome genotyping array clustering and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; He, Jing; Zhao, Shilin; Wu, Hui; Zhong, Xue; Sheng, Quanhu; Samuels, David C; Shyr, Yu; Long, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of high-throughput sequencing technology, traditional genotyping arrays are gradually being replaced by sequencing technology. Against this trend, Illumina has introduced an exome genotyping array that provides an alternative approach to sequencing, especially suited to large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWASs). the exome genotyping array targets the exome plus rare single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a feature that makes it substantially more challenging to process than previous genotyping arrays that targeted common SNPs. Researchers have struggled to generate a reliable protocol for processing exome genotyping array data. The Vanderbilt epidemiology center, in cooperation with Vanderbilt Technologies for Advanced Genomics Analysis and Research Design (VANGARD), has developed a thorough exome chip–processing protocol. The protocol was developed during the processing of several large exome genotyping array-based studies, which included over 60,000 participants combined. The protocol described herein contains detailed clustering techniques and robust quality control procedures, and it can benefit future exome genotyping array–based GWASs. PMID:25321409

  15. Reduced Expression of α-Synuclein in Alcoholic Brain: Influence of SNCA-Rep1 Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Janeczek, Paulina; MacKay, Rachel K.; Lea, Rodney A.; Dodd, Peter R.; Lewohl, Joanne M.

    2012-01-01

    α-Synuclein has recently been implicated in the pathophysiology of alcohol abuse due to its role in dopaminergic neurotransmission. In these studies, genetic variability in the α-synuclein gene influences its expression which may contribute to susceptibility to chronic alcohol abuse. Real-time PCR was used to quantify α-synuclein mRNA expression in autopsy samples of human dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Because of the association between length of the α-synuclein-repeat 1 microsatellite marker and expression levels of the gene, this marker was genotyped in a Caucasian sample of 126 controls and 117 alcoholics using capillary gel electrophoresis. The allele and genotype frequencies of α-synuclein-repeat 1 marker differed significantly between alcoholics and controls. Alcoholics had greater frequencies of the shortest allele found (267 bp). The shortest allele of the α-synuclein-repeat 1 marker was associated with decreased expression of α-synuclein in prefrontal cortex. Individuals with at least one copy of the 267 bp allele were more likely to exhibit an alcohol abuse phenotype. These results suggest that individuals with the 267 bp allele may be at increased risk of developing alcoholism and that genetic variation at the α-synuclein-repeat 1 locus may influence α-synuclein expression in the prefrontal cortex. PMID:22974310

  16. Frequency Response Tool

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could leadmore » to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.« less

  17. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  18. Frequency Response Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Etingov, Pavel; Chassin, PNNL David; Zhang, PNNL Yu; PNNL,

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could lead to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.

  19. Making Sense of Frequency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2002-01-01

    Responds to Ellis (2002), which focuses on frequency in language processing, language use, and language acquisition. Contextualizes the frequency factor in terms of the evolution of second language acquisition (SLA) research. Suggests that although relevant and important, the frequency factor requires greater definition and qualification.…

  20. In Vitro Antiviral Activity and Resistance Profile Characterization of the Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Inhibitor Ledipasvir

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yang; Doehle, Brian; Peng, Betty; Corsa, Amoreena; Lee, Yu-Jen; Gong, Ruoyu; Yu, Mei; Han, Bin; Xu, Simin; Dvory-Sobol, Hadas; Perron, Michel; Xu, Yili; Mo, Hongmei; Pagratis, Nikos; Link, John O.; Delaney, William

    2016-01-01

    Ledipasvir (LDV; GS-5885), a component of Harvoni (a fixed-dose combination of LDV with sofosbuvir [SOF]), is approved to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Here, we report key preclinical antiviral properties of LDV, including in vitro potency, in vitro resistance profile, and activity in combination with other anti-HCV agents. LDV has picomolar antiviral activity against genotype 1a and genotype 1b replicons with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values of 0.031 nM and 0.004 nM, respectively. LDV is also active against HCV genotypes 4a, 4d, 5a, and 6a with EC50 values of 0.11 to 1.1 nM. LDV has relatively less in vitro antiviral activity against genotypes 2a, 2b, 3a, and 6e, with EC50 values of 16 to 530 nM. In vitro resistance selection with LDV identified the single Y93H and Q30E resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in the NS5A gene; these RAVs were also observed in patients after a 3-day monotherapy treatment. In vitro antiviral combination studies indicate that LDV has additive to moderately synergistic antiviral activity when combined with other classes of HCV direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents, including NS3/4A protease inhibitors and the nucleotide NS5B polymerase inhibitor SOF. Furthermore, LDV is active against known NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase inhibitor RAVs with EC50 values equivalent to those for the wild type. PMID:26824950

  1. Production of viable male unreduced gametes in Brassica interspecific hybrids is genotype specific and stimulated by cold temperatures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unreduced gametes (gametes with the somatic chromosome number) may provide a pathway for evolutionary speciation via allopolyploid formation. We evaluated the effect of genotype and temperature on male unreduced gamete formation in Brassica allotetraploids and their interspecific hybrids. The frequency of unreduced gametes post-meiosis was estimated in sporads from the frequency of dyads or giant tetrads, and in pollen from the frequency of viable giant pollen compared with viable normal pollen. Giant tetrads were twice the volume of normal tetrads, and presumably resulted from pre-meiotic doubling of chromosome number. Giant pollen was defined as pollen with more than 1.5 × normal diameter, under the assumption that the doubling of DNA content in unreduced gametes would approximately double the pollen cell volume. The effect of genotype was assessed in five B. napus, two B. carinata and one B. juncea parents and in 13 interspecific hybrid combinations. The effect of temperature was assessed in a subset of genotypes in hot (day/night 30°C/20°C), warm (25°C/15°C), cool (18°C/13°C) and cold (10°C/5°C) treatments. Results Based on estimates at the sporad stage, some interspecific hybrid genotypes produced unreduced gametes (range 0.06 to 3.29%) at more than an order of magnitude higher frequency than in the parents (range 0.00% to 0.11%). In nine hybrids that produced viable mature pollen, the frequency of viable giant pollen (range 0.2% to 33.5%) was much greater than in the parents (range 0.0% to 0.4%). Giant pollen, most likely formed from unreduced gametes, was more viable than normal pollen in hybrids. Two B. napus × B. carinata hybrids produced 9% and 23% unreduced gametes based on post-meiotic sporad observations in the cold temperature treatment, which was more than two orders of magnitude higher than in the parents. Conclusions These results demonstrate that sources of unreduced gametes, required for the triploid bridge hypothesis of

  2. Plant genotype, microbial recruitment and nutritional security

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jai S.; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Harikesh B.; Sarma, Birinchi K.

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural food products with high nutritional value should always be preferred over food products with low nutritional value. Efforts are being made to increase nutritional value of food by incorporating dietary supplements to the food products. The same is more desirous if the nutritional value of food is increased under natural environmental conditions especially in agricultural farms. Fragmented researches have demonstrated possibilities in achieving the same. The rhizosphere is vital in this regard for not only health and nutritional status of plants but also for the microorganisms colonizing the rhizosphere. Remarkably robust composition of plant microbiome with respect to other soil environments clearly suggests the role of a plant host in discriminating its colonizers (Zancarini et al., 2012). A large number of biotic and abiotic factors are believed to manipulate the microbial communities in the rhizosphere. However, plant genotype has proven to be the key in giving the final shape of the rhizosphere microbiome (Berendsen et al., 2012; Marques et al., 2014). PMID:26300905

  3. Plant genotype, microbial recruitment and nutritional security.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jai S; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Harikesh B; Sarma, Birinchi K

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural food products with high nutritional value should always be preferred over food products with low nutritional value. Efforts are being made to increase nutritional value of food by incorporating dietary supplements to the food products. The same is more desirous if the nutritional value of food is increased under natural environmental conditions especially in agricultural farms. Fragmented researches have demonstrated possibilities in achieving the same. The rhizosphere is vital in this regard for not only health and nutritional status of plants but also for the microorganisms colonizing the rhizosphere. Remarkably robust composition of plant microbiome with respect to other soil environments clearly suggests the role of a plant host in discriminating its colonizers (Zancarini et al., 2012). A large number of biotic and abiotic factors are believed to manipulate the microbial communities in the rhizosphere. However, plant genotype has proven to be the key in giving the final shape of the rhizosphere microbiome (Berendsen et al., 2012; Marques et al., 2014). PMID:26300905

  4. GABRA2 Genotype, Impulsivity, and Body Mass

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Lance O.; Yang, Bao-Zhu; Houston, Rebecca J.; Kranzler, Henry R.; Gelernter, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to test a hypothesis associating impulsivity with an elevated body mass index (BMI). Methods To this end, we examined associations of BMI with putative genetic, neurophysiological, psychiatric, and psychological indicators of impulsivity in 78 women and 74 men formerly dependent on alcohol or drugs. A second analysis was designed to test the replicability of the genetic findings in an independent sample of 109 women and 111 men with a similar history of substance dependence. Results The results of the first analysis showed that BMI was positively correlated with Total and Nonplanning Scale Scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and the number of childhood symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in women. It was also positively correlated, in women, with a GABRA2 variant previously implicated as a risk factor for substance dependence and an objective electroencephalographic feature previously associated with GABRA2 and relapse risk. The second analysis confirmed that the correlation between BMI and the substance-dependence-associated GABRA2 genotype was reliable and sex-specific. Conclusions We conclude that an elevated BMI is associated with genetic, neurophysiological, psychiatric, and psychological indicators of impulsivity. The sex difference may be explained by greater opportunities to eat and overeat, a preference for higher calorie foods, a longer duration of alcohol/drug abstinence, or previous pregnancies in women. PMID:22882390

  5. Biological variation in Trichinella species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bolas-Fernández, F

    2003-06-01

    At present, the genus Trichinella comprises seven species of which five have encapsulated muscle larvae (T. spiralis, T. nativa, T. britovi, T. nelsoni and T. murrelli) and two do not (T. pseudospiralis and T. papuae) plus three genotypes of non-specific status (T6, T8 and T9). The diagnostic characteristics of these species are based on biological, biochemical and genetic criteria. Of biological significance is variation observed among species and isolates in parameters such as infectivity and immunogenicity. Infectivity of Trichinella species or isolates is determined, among other considerations, by the immune status of the host in response to species- or isolate-specific antigens. Common and particular antigens determine the extent of protective responses against homologous or heterologous challenge. The kinetics of isotype, cytokine and inflammatory responses against T. spiralis infections are isolate-dependent. Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis induce different dose-dependent T-cell polarizations in the early host response, with T. spiralis initially preferentially promoting Th1-type responses before switching to Th2 and T. pseudospiralis driving Th2-type responses from the outset. PMID:12756064

  6. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6*15 and *35 Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Riffel, Amanda K.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C.; Leeder, J. Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6*15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6*15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6*35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6*15 and *35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6*15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6*15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6*43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer and/or probe regions can impact

  7. CYP2D7 Sequence Variation Interferes with TaqMan CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Amanda K; Dehghani, Mehdi; Hartshorne, Toinette; Floyd, Kristen C; Leeder, J Steven; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Gaedigk, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    TaqMan™ genotyping assays are widely used to genotype CYP2D6, which encodes a major drug metabolizing enzyme. Assay design for CYP2D6 can be challenging owing to the presence of two pseudogenes, CYP2D7 and CYP2D8, structural and copy number variation and numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) some of which reflect the wild-type sequence of the CYP2D7 pseudogene. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism causing false-positive CYP2D6 (*) 15 calls and remediate those by redesigning and validating alternative TaqMan genotype assays. Among 13,866 DNA samples genotyped by the CompanionDx® lab on the OpenArray platform, 70 samples were identified as heterozygotes for 137Tins, the key SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 15. However, only 15 samples were confirmed when tested with the Luminex xTAG CYP2D6 Kit and sequencing of CYP2D6-specific long range (XL)-PCR products. Genotype and gene resequencing of CYP2D6 and CYP2D7-specific XL-PCR products revealed a CC>GT dinucleotide SNP in exon 1 of CYP2D7 that reverts the sequence to CYP2D6 and allows a TaqMan assay PCR primer to bind. Because CYP2D7 also carries a Tins, a false-positive mutation signal is generated. This CYP2D7 SNP was also responsible for generating false-positive signals for rs769258 (CYP2D6 (*) 35) which is also located in exon 1. Although alternative CYP2D6 (*) 15 and (*) 35 assays resolved the issue, we discovered a novel CYP2D6 (*) 15 subvariant in one sample that carries additional SNPs preventing detection with the alternate assay. The frequency of CYP2D6 (*) 15 was 0.1% in this ethnically diverse U.S. population sample. In addition, we also discovered linkage between the CYP2D7 CC>GT dinucleotide SNP and the 77G>A (rs28371696) SNP of CYP2D6 (*) 43. The frequency of this tentatively functional allele was 0.2%. Taken together, these findings emphasize that regardless of how careful genotyping assays are designed and evaluated before being commercially marketed, rare or unknown SNPs underneath primer

  8. Genotyping of Endosperms to Determine Seed Dormancy Genes Regulating Germination Through Embryonic, Endospermic, or Maternal Tissues in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xing-You; Zhang, Jinfeng; Ye, Heng; Zhang, Lihua; Feng, Jiuhuan

    2014-01-01

    Seed dormancy is imposed by one or more of the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissues that belong to two generations and represent two ploidy levels. Many quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been identified for seed dormancy as measured by gross effects on reduced germination rate or delayed germination in crop or model plants. This research developed an endosperm genotype−based genetic approach to determine specific tissues through which a mapped QTL regulates germination using rice as a model. This approach involves testing germination velocity for partially after-ripened seeds harvested from single plants heterozygous for a tested QTL and genotyping endosperms from individual germinated and nongerminated seeds with a codominant DNA marker located on the QTL peak region. Information collected about the QTL includes genotypic frequencies in germinated and/or nongerminated subpopulations; allelic frequency distributions during a germination period; endosperm or embryo genotypic differences in germination velocity; and genotypic frequencies for gametes involved in the double fertilization to form the sampled seeds. Using this approach, the seed dormancy loci SD12, SD1-2, and SD7-1 were determined to regulate germination through the embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissues, respectively; SD12 and SD1-2 acted additively on germination velocity in the offspring tissues; and SD12 also was associated with the preferential fertilization of male gametes in rice. This new genetic approach can be used to characterize mapped genes/QTL for tissue-specific functions in endospermic seeds and for marker-assisted selection of QTL alleles before or immediately after germination in crop breeding. PMID:25480961

  9. Multiplexed genotyping with sequence-tagged molecular inversion probes.

    PubMed

    Hardenbol, Paul; Banér, Johan; Jain, Maneesh; Nilsson, Mats; Namsaraev, Eugeni A; Karlin-Neumann, George A; Fakhrai-Rad, Hossein; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Willis, Thomas D; Landegren, Ulf; Davis, Ronald W

    2003-06-01

    We report on the development of molecular inversion probe (MIP) genotyping, an efficient technology for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. This technique uses MIPs to produce inverted sequences, which undergo a unimolecular rearrangement and are then amplified by PCR using common primers and analyzed using universal sequence tag DNA microarrays, resulting in highly specific genotyping. With this technology, multiplex analysis of more than 1,000 probes in a single tube can be done using standard laboratory equipment. Genotypes are generated with a high call rate (95%) and high accuracy (>99%) as determined by independent sequencing. PMID:12730666

  10. Inhibitors of HCV NS5A: From Iminothiazolidinones to Symmetrical Stilbenes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The iminothiazolidinone BMS-858 (2) was identified as a specific inhibitor of HCV replication in a genotype 1b replicon assay via a high-throughput screening campaign. A more potent analogue, BMS-824 (18), was used in resistance mapping studies, which revealed that inhibitory activity was related to disrupting the function of the HCV nonstructural protein 5A. Despite the development of coherent and interpretable SAR, it was subsequently discovered that in DMSO 18 underwent an oxidation and structural rearrangement to afford the thiohydantoin 47, a compound with reduced HCV inhibitory activity. However, HPLC bioassay fractionation studies performed after incubation of 18 in assay media led to the identification of fractions containing a dimeric species 48 that exhibited potent antiviral activity. Excision of the key elements hypothesized to be responsible for antiviral activity based on SAR observations reduced 48 to a simplified, symmetrical, pharmacophore realized most effectively with the stilbene 55, a compound that demonstrated potent inhibition of HCV in a genotype 1b replicon with an EC50 = 86 pM. PMID:24900306

  11. Frequency discriminator/phase detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    Circuit provides dual function of frequency discriminator/phase detector which reduces frequency acquisition time without adding to circuit complexity. Both frequency discriminators, in evaluated frequency discriminator/phase detector circuits, are e