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Sample records for 5f electron localization

  1. Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J.; Beaux, Miles F.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S.; Bauer, Eric D.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Tobash, Paul H.; Richmond, Scott

    2012-05-03

    The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

  2. 5f-electron localization in the actinide metals: thorides, actinides and the Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    For the light actinides Ac-Cm, the numbers of localized and itinerant 5f-electrons are determined by comparing various estimates of the f-electron counts. At least one itinerant f-electron is found for each element, Pa-Cm. These results resolve certain disagreements among electron counts determined by different methods and are consistent with the Mott transition model and with the picture of the 5f-electrons' dual nature.

  3. The degree of 5f electron localization in URu2Si2: electron energy-loss spectroscopy and spin-orbit sum rule analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, J R; Moore, K T; Butch, N P; Maple, M B

    2010-05-19

    We examine the degree of 5f electron localization in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} using spin-orbit sum rule analysis of the U N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f) edge. When compared to {alpha}-U metal, US, USe, and UTe, which have increasing localization of the 5f states, we find that the 5f states of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are more localized, although not entirely. Spin-orbit analysis shows that intermediate coupling is the correct angular momentum coupling mechanism for URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} when the 5f electron count is between 2.6 and 2.8. These results have direct ramifications for theoretical assessment of the hidden order state of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, where the degree of localization of the 5f electrons and their contribution to the Fermi surface are critical.

  4. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study of UN and USb; Dual character of 5f electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Kumigashira, H.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Suzuki, T.

    2001-05-01

    We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on UN and USb to study the electronic structure near the Fermi level ( EF) and the nature of U 5f electrons. We found that the pnictogen (N and Sb) p bands are fully occupied in contrast with Ce monopnictides and shows a good qualitative agreement with the band calculation by treating the U 5f states as bands. On the other hand, we have not observed dispersive U 5f bands near EF predicted by the band calculation, instead we found two non-dispersive bands near EF, which are assigned as the 5f 2-final-state multiplet indicative of localized U 5f states. The intensity of multiplet structure is stronger in USb than in UN. These results indicate the dual character of U 5f electrons and its difference between USb and UN.

  5. Electron correlation and relativity of the 5f electrons in the U-Zr alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderlind, P.; Sadigh, B.; Lordi, V.; Landa, A.; Turchi, P. E. A.

    2014-01-01

    ] and VASP [4] codes. The Wien2K computations are set up with an APW + lo basis for the expansion of the wave functions within the muffin-tin spheres (with radius RMT = 2.5 a.u.) in partial waves with angular momenta up to l = 3, and an LAPW basis for all higher angular momenta up to l = 10. The plane-wave cutoff (Kmax) for the expansion of the wave functions in the interstitial region is chosen such that RMT × Kmax = 10. We apply the LSDA + U scheme proposed by Anisimov et al. [5] (Wien2K) and Dudarev et al. [6] (VASP) to the uranium f orbitals, which approximately corrects for their electron self interaction. An effective Ueff = U - J is chosen to be 2 eV (J = 0), which appears to be realistic for uranium systems [7]. The spin-orbit interaction is included using the second-variation method with scalar-relativistic orbitals as basis. This basis includes all Eigen states with energy less than 70 eV. For reason to improve the description of the relativistic orbitals, the p1/2 local orbitals are added to the basis set. For actinide metals, this technique for the spin-orbit coupling equals, with good approximation, that of the complete four-spinor Dirac formalism [8-10]. All calculations use a 12 × 12 × 12 Monkhorst-Pack k-point grid and a plane-wave cutoff of 23 Ry.In Table 1 we show our calculated equilibrium volumes (V) and bulk moduli (B) obtained with and without spin-orbit coupling (SOC) for bcc (γ) uranium metal using the Wien2K (VASP) codes. (The other component, Zr, is a light metal where relativistic effects are not important). The changes in V and B due to SOC are indeed quite small, consistent with results from previous studies [9,11], and within the scatter of the experimental data. The reason why the volume expands slightly is that the separation of the 5f5/2 and 5f7/2 states, due to spin-orbit coupling, weakens the cohesion of the bonding electrons. The separation is very small, as seen in Fig. 1[11] where we plot the total electronic density

  6. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ∼ 104 at 488 nm and ∼ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  7. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ˜ 104 at 488 nm and ˜ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  8. Pump-probe reflectivity study of ultrafast dynamics of strongly correlated 5f electrons inUO2

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Yongqiang Q; Taylor, Antoinette J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Rodriguez, George

    2010-01-01

    5f electrons in the Mott insulator UO{sub 2} produce intriguing electronic states and dynamics, such as strong correlation and f-f excitations. We have performed femtosecond pump-probe reflectivity measurements on a single crystal UO{sub 2} at temperatures 5-300 K to study the ultrafast dynamics of photoexcited 5f electrons. The laser pulses at 400 nm pump 5 f electrons across the Mott gap, while those at 800 nm probe the pump-induced change of reflectivity. We find temperature-dependent excitation and relaxation processes and long-lived acoustic phonons, and extract picosecond risetimes and microsecond relaxation times at low temperatures. The observed slow relaxation is ascribed to the decay of Hubbard excitons formed by U{sup 3+}-U{sup 5+} pairs.

  9. Electron attachment and detachment, and the electron affinities of C5F5N and C5HF4N.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, Jane M; Kerr, Donna M; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A

    2005-09-15

    Rate constants have been measured for electron attachment to C5F5N (297-433 K) and to 2, 3, 5, 6-C5HF4N (303 K) using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus (at a He gas pressure of 133 Pa). In both cases only the parent anion was formed in the attachment process. The attachment rate constants measured at room temperature are 1.8 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) and 7 +/- 3 X 10(-10) cm(-3) s(-1), respectively. Rate constants were also measured for thermal electron detachment from the parent anions of these molecules. For C5F5N- detachment is negligible at room temperature, but increases to 2530 +/- 890 s(-1) at 433 K. For 2, 3, 5, 6-C5HF4N-, the detachment rate at 303 K was 520 +/- 180 s(-1). The attachment/detachment equilibrium yielded experimental electron affinities EA(C5F5N)=0.70 +/- 0.05 eV and EA(2, 3, 5, 6-C5HF4N)=0.40 +/- 0.08 eV. Electronic structure calculations were carried out for these molecules and related C5HxF5-xN using density-functional theory and the G3(MP2)//B3LYP compound method. The EAs are found to decrease by 0.25 eV, on average, with each F substitution by H. The calculated EAs are in good agreement with the present experimental results.

  10. Feature mapping of the HLA class I region: Localization of the POU5F1 and TCF19 genes

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, B.R.; Chaplin, D.D.; Jamry, I.

    1995-11-01

    The class I region of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex located on chromosome 6p21.3 is gene dense. To define the gene content of the class I region, we are constructing genomic DNA feature maps. Here we report mapping of the POU5F1 and TCF19 genes to an {approximately}0.2-Mb region between the HLA-C and the S genes. Localization of these genes was facilitated by subcloning genomic DNA fragments from the 0.2-Mb region into a transposon {gamma}{delta}-based vector, selecting transposon-mediated deletions in vivo in Escherichia coli, and sequencing a nested subset chosen for their uniform distribution of deletion endpoints. The POU5F1 and TCF19 genes are located {approximately}130 kb telomeric of the HLA-C locus, approximately 0.6 kb apart from each other. Complete sequencing of a 5.5-kb EcoRI fragment containing the TCF19 gene revealed that it is composed of three exons, bounded by consensus splice signals. These experiments illustrate that the transposon-based nested deletion sequencing method provides an easy and efficient approach to feature mapping genomic fragments and to high-resolution analysis of selected subportions. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Electron-phonon superconductivity in LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yanqing; Du, Yongping; Wan, Xiangang Wang, Bogen; Ding, Hang-Chen; Savrasov, Sergey Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2014-06-21

    We report density functional calculations of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, phonon spectrum and electron–phonon coupling for the newly discovered superconductor LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiSe{sub 2}. It is confirmed that there is a strong Fermi surface nesting at (π,π,0), which results in unstable phonon branches. Combining the frozen phonon total energy calculations and an anharmonic oscillator model, we find that the quantum fluctuation prevents the appearance of static long–range order. The calculation shows that LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiSe{sub 2} is highly anisotropic, and same as its cousin LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiS{sub 2}, this compound is also a conventional electron-phonon coupling induced superconductor.

  12. Response to letter "Electron correlation and relativity of the 5f electrons in the Usbnd Zr alloy system"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Marianetti, Chris A.; Morgan, Dane

    2016-08-01

    In the Letter [Söderlind et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 444, 356 (2014)], Söderlind et al. state their interpretation that 1) we view electron correlation to be strong and including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) to be necessary for U metal and Usbnd Zr alloy in our article [Xiong et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 443, 331 (2013)]. Further, they argue that 2) density functional theory (DFT) without adding the Hubbard U potential, especially when solved using all electron methods, already models U and Usbnd Zr accurately, and 3) adding the Hubbard U potential to DFT in DFT + U models U and Usbnd Zr worse than DFT according to volume, bulk modulus, and magnetic moments predicted from their calculations of the γU phase of elemental U metal. With respect to Söderlind et al.'s interpretation 1), we clarify that our opinions are that U and Usbnd Zr are not strongly, but weakly to moderately correlated and that including SOC is beneficial but not necessary for modeling most ground state properties of U and Usbnd Zr. With respect to Söderlind et al.'s argument 2) we demonstrate that previously neglected and very recent experimental data suggest that DFT in Söderlind's full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital calculations [Söderlind, Phys. Rev. B 66, 085113 (2002)] in fact models the bulk modulus and elastic constants of αU with errors considerably larger than other related elements, e.g., most transition metals. With respect to Söderlind et al.'s argument 3) we argue that they have inappropriately focused on just one phase (the BCC γU phase of U metal), neglecting the other phases which represent the majority of our evidence, and made overgeneralizations based on results at only one Ueff value of 2 eV. We therefore maintain our original conclusion that the accuracy of DFT for modeling U and Usbnd Zr has room for improvement and DFT + U can be of value for this purpose on at least some ground state properties.

  13. Electronic structure of a new layered bismuth oxyselenide superconductor: LaO0.5F0.5BiSe2.

    PubMed

    Xia, M; Jiang, J; Niu, X H; Liu, J Z; Wen, C H P; Lu, H Y; Lou, X; Pu, Y J; Huang, Z C; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, H H; Xie, B P; Shen, D W; Feng, D L

    2015-07-22

    LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) is a new layered superconductor discovered recently, which shows the superconducting transition temperature of 3.5 K. With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we study the electronic structure of LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) comprehensively. Two electron-like bands are located around the X point of the Brillouin zone, and the outer pockets connect with each other and form large Fermi surface around Γ and M. These bands show negligible k(z) dispersion, indicating their two-dimensional nature. Based on the Luttinger theorem, the carrier concentration is about 0.53 e(-) per unit cell, close to its nominal value. Moreover, the photoemission data and the band structure calculations agree very well, and the renormalization factor is nearly 1.0, indicating the electron correlations in this material are rather weak. Our results suggest that LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) is a conventional BCS superconductor without strong electron correlations.

  14. Gas-phase reactions of doubly charged actinide cations with alkanes and alkenes--probing the chemical activity of 5f electrons from Th to Cm.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Gibson, John K

    2011-11-01

    Small alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) were used to probe the gas-phase reactivity of doubly charged actinide cations, An(2+) (An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Different combinations of doubly and singly charged ions were observed as reaction products, comprising species formed via metal-ion induced eliminations of small molecules, simple adducts and ions resulting from electron, hydride or methide transfer channels. Th(2+), Pa(2+), U(2+) and Np(2+) preferentially yielded doubly charged products of hydrocarbon activation, while Pu(2+), Am(2+) and Cm(2+) reacted mainly through transfer channels. Cm(2+) was also capable of forming doubly charged products with some of the hydrocarbons whereas Pu(2+) and Am(2+) were not, these latter two ions conversely being the only for which adduct formation was observed. The product distributions and the reaction efficiencies are discussed in relation to the electronic configurations of the metal ions, the energetics of the reactions and similar studies previously performed with doubly charged lanthanide and transition metal cations. The conditions for hydrocarbon activation to occur as related to the accessibility of electronic configurations with one or two 5f and/or 6d unpaired electrons are examined and the possible chemical activity of the 5f electrons in these early actinide ions, particularly Pa(2+), is considered.

  15. The Electronic States of U(4+) in U(PO4)Cl: An Example for Angular Overlap Modeling of 5f(n) Systems.

    PubMed

    Bronova, Anna; Bredow, Thomas; Glaum, Robert; Urland, Werner

    2016-07-18

    Detailed experimental data on UPO4Cl comprising single-crystal UV/vis/NIR spectra and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities form the basis for the investigation of the electronic structure of the U(4+) cation in UPO4Cl. For modeling of the observed physical properties the angular overlap model (AOM) was successfully employed. The computations were performed using the newly developed computer program BonnMag. The calculations show that all electronic transitions and the magnetic susceptibility as well as its temperature dependence are well-reproduced within the AOM framework. Using Judd-Ofelt theory BonnMag allows estimation of the relative absorption coefficients of the electronic transitions with reasonable accuracy. Ligand field splitting for states originating from f-electron configurations are determined. Slater-Condon-Shortley parameters and the spin-orbit coupling constant for U(4+) were taken from literature. The good transferability of AOM parameters for U(4+) is confirmed by calculations of the absorption spectra of UP2O7 and (U2O)(PO4)2. The effect of variation of the fit parameters is investigated. AOM parameters for U(4+) (5f) are compared to those of the rare-earth elements (4f) and transition metals (3d). PMID:27355276

  16. The Electronic States of U(4+) in U(PO4)Cl: An Example for Angular Overlap Modeling of 5f(n) Systems.

    PubMed

    Bronova, Anna; Bredow, Thomas; Glaum, Robert; Urland, Werner

    2016-07-18

    Detailed experimental data on UPO4Cl comprising single-crystal UV/vis/NIR spectra and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities form the basis for the investigation of the electronic structure of the U(4+) cation in UPO4Cl. For modeling of the observed physical properties the angular overlap model (AOM) was successfully employed. The computations were performed using the newly developed computer program BonnMag. The calculations show that all electronic transitions and the magnetic susceptibility as well as its temperature dependence are well-reproduced within the AOM framework. Using Judd-Ofelt theory BonnMag allows estimation of the relative absorption coefficients of the electronic transitions with reasonable accuracy. Ligand field splitting for states originating from f-electron configurations are determined. Slater-Condon-Shortley parameters and the spin-orbit coupling constant for U(4+) were taken from literature. The good transferability of AOM parameters for U(4+) is confirmed by calculations of the absorption spectra of UP2O7 and (U2O)(PO4)2. The effect of variation of the fit parameters is investigated. AOM parameters for U(4+) (5f) are compared to those of the rare-earth elements (4f) and transition metals (3d).

  17. Antitumour benzothiazoles. Part 32: DNA adducts and double strand breaks correlate with activity; synthesis of 5F203 hydrogels for local delivery.

    PubMed

    Stone, Erica L; Citossi, Francesca; Singh, Rajinder; Kaur, Balvinder; Gaskell, Margaret; Farmer, Peter B; Monks, Anne; Hose, Curtis; Stevens, Malcolm F G; Leong, Chee-Onn; Stocks, Michael; Kellam, Barrie; Marlow, Maria; Bradshaw, Tracey D

    2015-11-01

    Potent, selective antitumour AhR ligands 5F 203 and GW 610 are bioactivated by CYPs 1A1 and 2W1. Herein we reason that DNA adducts' generation resulting in lethal DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) underlies benzothiazoles' activity. Treatment of sensitive carcinoma cell lines with GW 610 generated co-eluting DNA adducts (R(2)>0.7). Time-dependent appearance of γ-H2AX foci revealed subsequent DNA double strand breaks. Propensity for systemic toxicity of benzothiazoles steered development of prodrugs' hydrogels for localised delivery. Clinical applications of targeted therapies include prevention or treatment of recurrent disease after surgical resection of solid tumours. In vitro evaluation of 5F 203 prodrugs' activity demonstrated nanomolar potency against MCF-7 breast and IGROV-1 ovarian carcinoma cell lines.

  18. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  19. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  20. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ∼ 7~\\text{eV} ) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν ≳ 400~\\text{eV} ) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of \\text{Ce}M\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}5} (M=\\text{Rh} , \\text{Ir} , and \\text{Co} ) and \\text{YbR}{{\\text{h}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UFeG}{{\\text{a}}5} , their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all \\text{U}~5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UP}{{\\text{d}}3} and \\text{U}{{\\text{O}}2} are essentially explained by the localized model that treats \\text{U}~5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion \\text{U} -based compounds such as the hidden-order compound \\text{UR}{{\\text{u}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} , their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures

  1. Localization of electrons and excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven

    2006-07-01

    Electrons, electron holes, or excitations in finite or infinite 'multimer systems' may be localized or delocalized. In the theory of Hush, localization depends on the ratio Δ/ λ ( Δ/2 = coupling; λ = reorganization energy). The latter theory has been extended to the infinite system [S. Larsson, A. Klimkāns, Mol. Cryst. Liq. Cryst. 355 (2000) 217]. The metal/insulator transition often takes place abruptly as a function of Δ/ λ. It is argued that localization in a system with un-filled bands cannot be determined on the basis of Mott-Hubbard U alone, but depends on the number of accessible valence states, reorganization energy λ and coupling Δ (=2t). In fact U = 0 does not necessarily imply delocalization. The analysis here shows that there are many different situations for an insulator to metal transition. Charge transfer in doped NiO is characterized by Ni 2+ - Ni 3+ exchange while charge transfer in pure NiO is characterized by a disproportionation 2Ni 2+ → Ni + + Ni 3+. In spite of the great differences between these two cases, U has been applied without discrimination to both. The relevant localization parameters appear to be Δ and λ in the first case, with only two oxidation states, and U, Δ and λ in the second case with three oxidation states. The analysis is extended to insulator-metal transitions, giant magnetic resistance (GMR) and high Tc superconductivity (SC). λ and Δ can be determined quite accurately in quantum mechanical calculations involving only one and two monomers, respectively.

  2. DFT insights into the electronic and optical properties of fluorine-doped monoclinic niobium pentoxide (B-Nb2O5:F)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shazly, Tamer S.; Hassan, Walid M. I.; Rehim, Sayed S. Abdel; Allam, Nageh K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the effect of fluorine doping on the electronic structure and optical properties of monoclinic niobium pentoxide (B-Nb2O5) as revealed by the first principles calculations. Density functional theory (DFT) along with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) at the revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBEsol) exchange-correlation functional was used in this study. The band calculations revealed that the studied materials are indirect bandgap semiconductors, with bandgap energies of 2.67 and 2.28 eV for the undoped and F-doped B-Nb2O5, respectively. Upon doping B-Nb2O5, the Fermi level shifts towards the conduction band, allowing optical absorption in the visible region with enhanced transmittance in the wavelength range 400-1000 nm. The calculated static refractive index of the undoped B-Nb2O5 is in good agreement with the reported experimental value, which is enhanced upon F-incorporation resulting in cladding properties for the F-doped B-Nb2O5. Also, the effective mass of free charge carriers increased upon F-doping. The enhanced properties were attributed to the effect of the excessive valent electron of the incorporated F atom.

  3. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect

    Minogin, V.G.

    2014-03-15

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: •Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. •Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. •Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  4. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context. PMID:21660323

  5. How do electron localization functions describe π-electron delocalization?

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Mo, Yirong; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2011-12-14

    Scalar fields provide an intuitive picture of chemical bonding. In particular, the electron localization function (ELF) has proven to be highly valuable in interpreting a broad range of bonding patterns. The discrimination between enhanced or reduced electron (de)localization within cyclic π-conjugated systems remains, however, challenging for ELF. In order to clearly distinguish between the local properties of ten highly and weakly π-(de)localized prototype systems, we compare the ELFs of both the canonical wave functions and electron-localized states (diabatic) with those of two closely related scalar fields: the electron localizability indicator (ELI-D) and the localized orbital locator (LOL). The simplest LOL function distinguishes enhanced from weak π-(de)localization in an insightful and reliable manner. LOL offers the finest contrast between annulenes with 4n/4n + 2 π electrons and their inorganic analogues as well as between hyperconjugated cyclopentadiene derivatives. LOL(π) also gives an appealing and intuitive picture of the π-bond. In contrast, the most popular ELF fails to capture subtle contrasting local electronic properties and suffers from the arbitrariness of the σ/π dissection. The orbital separation of the most recent ELI-D is clear-cut but the interpretations sometime less straightforward in the present context.

  6. Fermi energy 5f spectral weight variation in uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, J.D.; Clack, J.; Allen, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    Uranium materials display a wide range of thermal, electrical and magnetic properties, often exotic. For more than a decade there have been efforts to use photoemission spectroscopy to develop a systematic and unified understanding of the 5f electron states giving rise to this behavior. These efforts have been hampered by a paucity of systems where changes in transport properties are accompanied by substantial spectral changes, so as to allow an attempt to correlate the two kinds of properties within some model. The authors have made resonant photoemission measurements to extract the 5f spectral weight in three systems which show varying degrees of promise of permitting such an attempt, Y{sub 1{minus}x}U{sub x}Pd{sub 3}, U(Pd{sub x}Pt{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 3} and U(Pd{sub x}Cu{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 5}. They have also measured U 4f core level spectra. The 4f spectra can be modeled with some success by the impurity Anderson model (IAM), and the 5f spectra are currently being analyzed in that framework. The IAM characterizes the 5f-electrons of a single site by an f binding energy {epsilon}{sub f}, an f Coulomb interaction and a hybridization V to conduction electrons. Latent in the model are the phenomena of 5f mixed valence and the Kondo effect.

  7. 5f band dispersion in epitaxial films of UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Jia, Quanxi; Roy, Lindsay E; Martin, Richard L; Joyce, John J

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-assisted deposition of epitaxial films utilizes lattice pinning to produce films of very high stability and properties identical with bulk crystal. Dispersion of the 5f band is shown for the first time in a actinide Mott insulator system, which suggestes hybridization as a leading process in establishing the electronic structure. Hybrid density functional is succesfully employed to calculate the electronic structure of UO{sub 2} in agreement with experiments. UO{sub 2} continues to be a mysterious and elusive compound in terms of understanding the physical properties of a material. Most actinide oxides, including UO{sub 2} are predicted to be metallic. However, UO{sub 2} is an antiferromagnetic insulator with a relatively large gap of about 2eV. The f orbital charater of the excitations across the gap places UO{sub 2} in a Mott insulator category, but no states at the gap center have ever been measured directly, in spite of intensive efforts. In this work we present the first results of the electronic structure investigation of a epitaxial film of UO{sub 2}, where we find even more unexpected properties, like the dispersive nature of 5f bands. We also demonstrate the unexpected, very high stability of the epitaxial film of UO{sub 2}. In the lattice-pinning scheme, the crystalline nature of the film is preserved all the way up to the topmost layers even after prolonged exposure to atmospheric conditions. Hybridized, dispersive bands are common in the itinerant uranium compounds. One usually finds hybridization of f-orbitals with conduction band to be quite common in f-electron systems at low temperatures. Such bands may reside in the vicinity of the Fermi level and participate in the construction of the Fermi surface. However, in the insulator like UO{sub 2}, one expects a more atomic band nature, where f-bands are relatively flat and shifted away from the Fermi level by the gap energy scale. Precise location of UO{sub 2} on the localization

  8. Local orbitals in electron scattering calculations*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, Carl L.; McKoy, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We examine the use of local orbitals to improve the scaling of calculations that incorporate target polarization in a description of low-energy electron-molecule scattering. After discussing the improved scaling that results, we consider the results of a test calculation that treats scattering from a two-molecule system using both local and delocalized orbitals. Initial results are promising. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  9. 5-F catheter in cerebral angiography

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, G.V.; Naheedy, M.H.; Colucci, V.M.; Hammerschlag, S.B.

    1981-11-01

    Although the 5-F catheter is reputed to cause less vascular trauma than larger catheters, subintimal injections of contrast material have occurred following intimal damage by the catheter tip. Microscopic studies of the tips of two widely used 5-F polyethylene catheters have revealed a difference in configuration resulting in one of the catheters becoming markedly damaged during angiography. The authors make recommendations for finishing and protecting the catheter tip.

  10. Local electron heating in nanoscopic conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; Sai, Na; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    The electron current density in nanoscale junctions is typically several orders of magnitude larger than the corresponding one in bulk electrodes. Consequently, the electron-electron scattering rate increases substantially in the junction. This leads to local electron heating of the underlying Fermi sea [1] in analogy to the local ionic heating that is due to the increased electron-phonon scattering rates [2]. By using a novel hydrodynamic formulation of transport [3], we predict the bias dependence of local electron heating in quasi-ballistic nanoscale conductors [1], its effect on ionic heating [1], and the consequent observable changes in the inelastic conductance [4]. [1] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, accepted in Nano Letters (2006). [2] Y.-C. Chen, M. Zwolak, and M. Di Ventra, Nano Lett. 3, 1961 (2003); Nano Lett. 4, 1709 (2004); Nano Lett. 5, 621 (2005). M. J. Montgomery, T. N. Todorov, and A. P. Sutton, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 14, 5377 (2002). [3] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. in press. [4] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, in preparation.

  11. Excess Electron Localization in Solvated DNA Bases

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, Maeve; Kohanoff, Jorge

    2011-06-10

    We present a first-principles molecular dynamics study of an excess electron in condensed phase models of solvated DNA bases. Calculations on increasingly large microsolvated clusters taken from liquid phase simulations show that adiabatic electron affinities increase systematically upon solvation, as for optimized gas-phase geometries. Dynamical simulations after vertical attachment indicate that the excess electron, which is initially found delocalized, localizes around the nucleobases within a 15 fs time scale. This transition requires small rearrangements in the geometry of the bases.

  12. Laser cooling via excitation of localized electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emin, David

    2007-07-01

    Under appropriate conditions, absorption of light by a solid can initiate a process by which it is cooled. In particular, energy is extracted from a material when its absorption of a photon is followed by emission of a photon of higher energy. This up-conversion requires some of the solid’s electrons to garner energy from atomic vibrations. Here, two schemes for laser cooling via localized electronic states are addressed. The first scheme utilizes the ground state and an excited state of a localized center. In this two-level scheme, the cooling process is initiated with photon absorption in the extreme low-energy tail of a localized state’s vibrationally broadened absorption spectrum. The subsequent atomic relaxation transfers energy of especially large vibratory atomic strains into electrical energy that is then extracted via photon emission. The second scheme involves the ground state and two excited states of a localized center. Cooling is facilitated when (i) the photoexcitation of an electron from its ground state to the lower excited level is followed by (ii) electron-phonon-induced promotion to the uppermost level and the subsequent (iii) return of the electron to its ground state with emission of a photon of higher energy than that of the absorbed photon. However, competing relaxation processes contribute to heating. The net cooling power per unit volume is maximized for both schemes, thereby determining characteristics of localized electronic systems that foster optical cooling. The cooling power per unit volume is greatest at high temperatures and falls rapidly as the thermal energy is reduced below each system’s luminescence Stokes shift. Moreover, cooling via the three-level scheme is most effective when (i) the energy separation between excited states is smaller than the thermal energy and (ii) the degeneracy of the highest-lying excited state is much larger than that of the center’s middle level. These restrictive conditions appear to be

  13. Electron Transfer and Localization in Endohederal Metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Enge

    2008-03-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of noval materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution with the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For all large metallofullerenes (n>32), the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations, rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally belied. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of novel fullerene-based functional nanomaterials.

  14. Electron Transfer and Localization in Endohederal Metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2008-01-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of noval materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution with the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For all large metallofullerenes (n >32), the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations, rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally belied. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of novel fullerene-based functional nanomaterials. 1Supported by the DMSE program and grant no. DE-FG02-05ER46209 of USDOE, grant no. DMR-0606485 of USNSF, and NSF of China.

  15. Rampant changes in 5f 5/2 and 5f 7/2 filling across the light and middle actinide metals

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K; der Lann, G v; Wall, M; Schwartz, A; Haire, R

    2007-04-03

    We examine the branching ratio of the N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f ) spectra of Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm metal using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), together with many-electron atomic spectral calculations and the spin-orbit sum rule. Our results show that: (1) The actinide metals Pu, Am, and Cm exhibit intermediate coupling. (2) The intermediate coupling values for the 5f states as calculated using a many-electron atomic model are correct for the actinides, this being proven by our new results for curium. (3) The EELS branching ratio is sensitive to the degree of 5f electron delocalization, which is illustrated by the transition from LS to intermediate coupling between U and Pu.

  16. Northrop F-5F shark nose development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, O. R.

    1978-01-01

    During spin susceptibility testing of the Northrop F-5F airplane, two erect spin entries were obtained from purely longitudinal control inputs at low speed. Post flight analysis of the data showed that the initial yaw departure occurred at zero sideslip, and review of wind tunnel data showed significant yawing moments present at angles of attack well above stall. Further analysis of this wind tunnel data indicated that the yawing moments were being generated by the long slender nose of the airplane. Redesign of the nose was accomplished, resulting in a nose configuration which completely alleviated the asymmetric yawing moments.

  17. Giant magnetoresistance effects in 5f-materials

    SciTech Connect

    Havela, L.; Sechovsky, V.; Prokes, K. |

    1995-09-01

    Very large magnetoresistance effects related to reorientation of magnetic moments were observed in a number of U-intermetallics. The resemblance to magnetic multilayers is a basis of discussion of possible mechanisms of these phenomena, in background of which is probably the strong hybridization of 5f- and conduction-electron states. A clear cut evidence of relative contributions of varied scattering rate on one side and carrier concentration on the other side can be presumably obtained from experiments on samples with controlled disorder.

  18. Local electronic properties of organic semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Michael L.

    Understanding organic semiconductor interfaces is critical to developing organic photovoltaics (OPV). OPV interfaces are disordered due to weak intermolecular interactions, resulting in diverse charge transfer micro-environments. I present experimental data isolating high-order intermolecular interactions controlling interfacial energy level alignment and describe new instrumental capabilities providing access to the local electronic and kinetic landscape at organic semiconductor interfaces. Interface formation between vanadyl naphthalocyanine (VONc) and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is investigated. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) shows that the VONc binding energy (BE) decouples from the work function, shifting in an opposite direction and contradicting the standard interface dipole model. This effect is quantitatively described using an electrostatic depolarization model and confirmed by simulations which show an inhomogeneous potential at the interface. New data and literature values suggest orthogonality between polarizability and molecular dipole in polar porphyrazines. Their potential for interface engineering is discussed. The electron-rich Au(111)/VONc interface is investigated. The organic layer induces a large interface dipole in Au(111) which can be fit to a depolarization model. Ionization potential and depolarization data suggest that the second VONc layer on Au(111) adopts a tilted geometry. Electrostatic differences between Au(111)/VONc and HOPG/VONc are discussed, demonstrating that interface dipole contributions are not interchangeable. The surface states of the Au(111)/VONc interface are characterized by angle resolved 2-photon photoemission to determine the magnitude of the perturbation. The measured free-electron-like effective mass and BE destabilization of the Shockley state is attributed to step edges caused by lifting the Au(111) (22x 3 ) reconstruction. The Shockley state is accessible primarily through resonance

  19. Interference Effects of Strongly Localized Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ernesto Antonio

    We explore the possible role of quantum interference phenomena in conduction in the Variable Range Hopping, or deep insulating regime. The critical resistors in the Miller-Abrahams network are regarded as the phase coherent units. We consider a simple model of forward scattering paths (disregard backscattering) on a diagonal lattice. The hopping probability for non-resonant tunneling between two impurity sites, is computed numerically by evolving all directed Feynman paths in a disordered matrix of elastically scattering sites (intermediate impurities). The whole probability distribution for two dimensional samples is very broad, well fitted to a log-normal form. The average of the distribution increases linearly with the hopping length t, determining a global contribution to the localization length, coming from the interference part. The fluctuations grow with the hopping length as a non-trivial power law of t^{1over 3} . The system has a bound state which gives rise to the properties of the model. The exponents found are the same as those for directed polymers (DP) in a random media. Next we consider the effects of a magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the plane of the sample. The probability distribution for hopping is preserved in the field. We also find a positive magnetoconductance (MC) for small fields due to an increased localization length, in agreement with recent experiments. The features observed numerically are explained on the basis of the moment analysis, which suggests a single governing parameter for the interference effects. The effects of spin-orbit (SO) scattering are also studied (strong scattering limit). The interference contribution to the localization length is field independent in presence of SO. A small positive MC is found due to changes in the amplitude. Finally we investigate the problem of the universality of high moments in the strongly localized regime, by studying directed paths on a hierarchical lattice. We find non

  20. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrationsmore » respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability

  1. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport

  2. Electron Localization of Anions Probed by Nitrile Vibrations.

    PubMed

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C; Newton, Marshall D; Miller, John R

    2015-09-01

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as "molecular wires". This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics that govern electron transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles for conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semiempirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR line width in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Implications for the electron transport capability in molecular wires are discussed. PMID:26234163

  3. A New Electron Localization Function and Its Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    A new electron localization function is justified and compared with the laplacian of the electronic charge density. Some advantages of the new function and its novel predictions are discussed. Several slides and some video of visualizations using the new function in comparison to the laplacian will be shown.

  4. Think Locally: A Prudent Approach to Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson-Sundell, Nat

    2011-01-01

    A few articles have drawn some amount of attention specifically to the local causes of the success or failure of electronic resource management system (ERMS) implementations. In fact, it seems clear that local conditions will largely determine whether any given ERMS implementation will succeed or fail. This statement might seem obvious, but the…

  5. Weak localization and electron-electron interactions in few layer black phosphorus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanmeng; Gillgren, Nathaniel; Espiritu, Timothy; Tran, Son; Yang, Jiawei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takahashi; Lau, Chun Ning

    2016-09-01

    Few layer phosphorene (FLP) devices are extensively studied due to their unique electronic properties and potential applications on nano-electronics. Here we present magnetotransport studies which reveal electron-electron interactions as the dominant scattering mechanism in hexagonal boron nitride-encapsulated FLP devices. From weak localization measurements, we estimate the electron dephasing length to be 30 to 100 nm at low temperatures, which exhibits a strong dependence on carrier density n and a power-law dependence on temperature (˜T -0.4). These results establish that the dominant scattering mechanism in FLP is electron-electron interactions.

  6. On the origin of POU5F1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pluripotency is a fundamental property of early mammalian development but it is currently unclear to what extent its cellular mechanisms are conserved in vertebrates or metazoans. POU5F1 and POU2 are the two principle members constituting the class V POU domain family of transcription factors, thought to have a conserved role in the regulation of pluripotency in vertebrates as well as germ cell maintenance and neural patterning. They have undergone a complex pattern of evolution which is poorly understood and controversial. Results By analyzing the sequences of POU5F1, POU2 and their flanking genes, we provide strong indirect evidence that POU5F1 originated at least as early as a common ancestor of gnathostomes but became extinct in a common ancestor of teleost fishes, while both POU5F1 and POU2 survived in the sarcopterygian lineage leading to tetrapods. Less divergent forms of POU5F1 and POU2 appear to have persisted among cartilaginous fishes. Conclusions Our study resolves the controversial evolutionary relationship between teleost pou2 and tetrapod POU2 and POU5F1, and shows that class V POU transcription factors have existed at least since the common ancestor of gnathostome vertebrates. It provides a framework for elucidating the basis for the lineage-specific extinctions of POU2 and POU5F1. PMID:23659605

  7. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized, which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.

  8. Local representation of the electronic dielectric response function

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lu, Deyu; Ge, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-11

    We present a local representation of the electronic dielectric response function, based on a spatial partition of the dielectric response into contributions from each occupied Wannier orbital using a generalized density functional perturbation theory. This procedure is fully ab initio, and therefore allows us to rigorously define local metrics, such as “bond polarizability,” on Wannier centers. We show that the locality of the bare response function is determined by the locality of three quantities: Wannier functions of the occupied manifold, the density matrix, and the Hamiltonian matrix. Furthermore, in systems with a gap, the bare dielectric response is exponentially localized,more » which supports the physical picture of the dielectric response function as a collection of interacting local responses that can be captured by a tight-binding model.« less

  9. Program For Local-Area-Network Electronic Mail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    MailRoom is computer program for local-area network (LAN) electronic mail. Enables users of LAN to exchange electronically notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computers. Links all users of LAN into communication circle in which messages created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through series of menu-driven screens. Includes feature that enables users to determine whether messages sent have been read by receivers. Written in Microsoft QuickBasic.

  10. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  11. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  12. 5f{sup N} configurations and x-ray spectra of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, N.A.

    1995-04-01

    The electronic structure of 5f{sup N} configurations and the characteristic X-ray radiation energies for an entire actinium series are calculated using the Hartree-Fock-Pauli approximation, and the variations obtained are analyzed. The electrostatic and magnetic parameters of these ions, as well as energies of their K and L lines, exhibit essentially nonlinear dependence on the nuclear charge and number of electrons. This fact evidences that simplified models of atomic structure are inapplicable to heavy ions.

  13. Local temperature of out-of-equilibrium quantum electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meair, J.; Bergfield, J. P.; Stafford, C. A.; Jacquod, Ph.

    2014-07-01

    We show how the local temperature of out-of-equilibrium, quantum electron systems can be consistently defined with the help of an external voltage and temperature probe. We determine sufficient conditions under which the temperature measured by the probe (i) is independent of details of the system-probe coupling, (ii) is equal to the temperature obtained from an independent current-noise measurement, (iii) satisfies the transitivity condition expressed by the zeroth law of thermodynamics, and (iv) is consistent with Carnot's theorem. This local temperature therefore characterizes the system in the common sense of equilibrium thermodynamics, but remains well defined even in out-of-equilibrium situations with no local equilibrium.

  14. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  15. Imaging physical phenomena with local probes: From electrons to photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnell, Dawn A.; Basov, D. N.; Bode, Matthias; Diebold, Ulrike; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Madhavan, Vidya; Novotny, Lukas; Salmeron, Miquel; Schwarz, Udo D.; Weiss, Paul S.

    2012-07-01

    The invention of scanning tunneling and atomic force probes revolutionized our understanding of surfaces by providing real-space information about the geometric and electronic structure of surfaces at atomic spatial resolution. However, the junction of a nanometer-sized probe tip and a surface contains much more information than is intrinsic to conventional tunneling and atomic force measurements. This review summarizes recent advances that push the limits of the probing function at nanometer-scale spatial resolution in the context of important scientific problems. Issues such as molecular interface contact, superconductivity, electron spin, plasmon field focusing, surface diffusion, bond vibration, and phase transformations are highlighted as examples in which local probes elucidate complex function. The major classes of local probes are considered, including those of electromagnetic properties, electron correlations, surface structure and chemistry, optical interactions, and electromechanical coupling.

  16. General theory of electronic transport in molecular crystals. I. Local linear electron-phonon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbey, R.; Munn, R. W.

    1980-02-01

    An improved general theory of electronic transport in molecular crystals with local linear electron-phonon coupling is presented. It is valid for arbitrary electronic and phonon bandwidths and for arbitrary electron-phonon coupling strength, yielding small-polaron theory for narrow electronic bands and strong coupling, and semiconductor theory for wide electronic bands and weak coupling. Detailed results are derived for electronic excitations fully clothed with phonons and having a bandwidth no larger than the phonon frequency; the electronic and phonon densities of states are taken as Gaussian for simplicity. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on temperature and on the other parameters is analyzed thoroughly. The calculated behavior provides a rational interpretation of observed trends in the magnitude and temperature dependence of charge-carrier drift mobilities in molecular crystals.

  17. Radially Localized Measurements of Superthermal Electrons Using Obilique Ece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preische, Sherrie Anne

    1995-01-01

    In the effort to design a tokamak which will make a more compact and economically attractive fusion energy reactor, tokamak regimes are envisioned in which radial profiles of the density, temperature, and current are controlled. Lower Hybrid Current Drive is one of the most flexible and proven means of controlling the plasma current profile. In order to develop a better understanding of how, to what extent, and under what conditions LHCD can be used to tailor the current profile, the radial profile and velocity distribution of the fast current-carrying electrons and their time evolution must be known. Spacially localized information about the fast electron distribution function is difficult to obtain. The electron calcitrant resonance, through its sensitivity to the magnetic field as well as to the frequency and angle of observation, provides a means of probing the fast electron distribution function in detail. A new and unique diagnostic has been developed, installed, and operated on the PBX -M tokamak to measure the Electron Cyclotron Emission from these fast electrons. An oblique horizontal view of upshifted cyclotron emission in the midplane gives radial as well as velocity space information about the fast electrons by utilizing the sensitivity of the electron cyclotron resonance. Emission in extraordinary (X)-mode at frequencies refracted by the right-hand cutoff is radially localized. An experiment has been performed in which quasi-X mode emission in the range 60-90 GHz is observed through a focusing gaussian lens antenna at a 57^ circ angle to the toroidal magnetic field. Using the sensitivity of the resonance condition to small changes in frequency and field, radially localized moments. E_ parallel, T_ |, n_{sth}, of the fast electron distribution function are found by a Bayesian analysis method. The evolution of the current profile obtained from these measurements is examined in detail. After the LHCD is turned off, the dynamics are found to be

  18. DNA Electronic Fingerprints by Local Spectroscopy on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balatsky, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Working and scalable alternatives to the conventional chemical methods of DNA sequencing that are based on electronic/ionic signatures would revolutionize the field of sequencing. The approach of a single molecule imaging and spectroscopy with unprecedented resolution, achieved by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy (STS) and nanopore electronics could enable this revolution. We use the data from our group and others in applying this local scanning tunneling microscopy and illustrate possibilities of electronic sequencing of freeze dried deposits on graphene. We will present two types of calculated fingerprints: first in Local Density of States (LDOS) of DNA nucleotide bases (A,C,G,T) deposited on graphene. Significant base-dependent features in the LDOS in an energy range within few eV of the Fermi level were found in our calculations. These features can serve as electronic fingerprints for the identification of individual bases in STS. In the second approach we present calculated base dependent electronic transverse conductance as DNA translocates through the graphene nanopore. Thus we argue that the fingerprints of DNA-graphene hybrid structures may provide an alternative route to DNA sequencing using STS. Work supported by US DOE, NORDITA.

  19. Wave packet spreading and localization in electron-nuclear scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Paul E.; Markmann, Andreas; Morozov, Igor V.; Valuev, Ilya A.; Fichtl, Christopher A.; Richards, David F.; Batista, Victor S.; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    The wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) method provides a variational approximation to the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Its application in the field of high-temperature dense plasmas has yielded diverging electron width (spreading), which results in diminishing electron-nuclear interactions. Electron spreading has previously been ascribed to a shortcoming of the WPMD method and has been counteracted by various heuristic additions to the models used. We employ more accurate methods to determine if spreading continues to be predicted by them and how WPMD can be improved. A scattering process involving a single dynamic electron interacting with a periodic array of statically screened protons is used as a model problem for comparison. We compare the numerically exact split operator Fourier transform method, the Wigner trajectory method, and the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). Within the framework of the TDVP, we use the standard variational form of WPMD, the single Gaussian wave packet (WP), as well as a sum of Gaussian WPs, as in the split WP method. Wave packet spreading is predicted by all methods, so it is not the source of the unphysical diminishing of electron-nuclear interactions in WPMD at high temperatures. Instead, the Gaussian WP's inability to correctly reproduce breakup of the electron's probability density into localized density near the protons is responsible for the deviation from more accurate predictions. Extensions of WPMD must include a mechanism for breakup to occur in order to yield dynamics that lead to accurate electron densities.

  20. Correlated cryogenic photoactivated localization microscopy and cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Songye; Tocheva, Elitza I; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Löbach, Stephanie; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Jensen, Grant J

    2014-07-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) produces three-dimensional images of cells in a near-native state at macromolecular resolution, but identifying structures of interest can be challenging. Here we describe a correlated cryo-PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy)-CET method for localizing objects within cryo-tomograms to beyond the diffraction limit of the light microscope. Using cryo-PALM-CET, we identified multiple and new conformations of the dynamic type VI secretion system in the crowded interior of Myxococcus xanthus.

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARATERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-01-20

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  3. Analysis Of The Tank 5F Final Characterization Samples-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2012-09-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  4. Timescales for localized electron injections to become a thin shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemohn, Michael; Fok, Mei-Ching; Zheng, Qiuhua.; Xu, Shaosui

    Timescales for localized injections of electrons into the Earth's inner magnetosphere to spread into a thin shell are presented. The Radiation Belt Environment (RBE) model is used to numerically examine this topic, initializing the simulations with an MLT-confined Gaussian peak of electrons. Near the slot region, where the numerical experiments are conducted (L=3), the transition from a localized injection into a thin shell is driven by scattering with plasmaspheric hiss, shifting the energy and pitch angle of the particles, and ULF waves, shifting the radial location of the particles, all of which changes the drift speed. This mixing is energy dependent, taking much longer at the lower energies. It is shown that during static driving conditions it takes >3 hours for a narrow-MLT initial distribution of MeV-energy electrons to transform into a uniformly distributed ring, but takes more than 6 hours for < 300 keV electrons to achieve a thin shell state. During a magnetic storm interval, the timescale to reach a thin shell is somewhat shorter as the large-scale fluctuations of the magnetic field diffuse the particles in radial distance, enhancing the mixing. Interestingly, some parts of velocity space take longer with the magnetic fluctuations included, and the influence of the hiss scattering is modified as well. The implication is that localized injections, from the tail or from another source, do not become symmetric in local time for several hours, during which MLT-dependent interactions can play a significant role on the evolution and dynamics of the population.

  5. Local spin dynamics with the electron electric dipole moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Soga, Kota; Senami, Masato; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2016-01-01

    The local spin dynamics of the electron is studied from the viewpoint of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron in the framework of the quantum field theory. The improvements of the computational accuracy of the effective electric field (Eeff) for the EDM and the understanding of spin precession are important for the experimental determination of the upper bound of the EDM. Calculations of Eeff in YbF (2Σ1 /2 ), BaF (2Σ1 /2 ), ThO (3Δ1 ), and HF+ (2Π1 /2 ) are performed on the basis of the restricted active space configuration interaction approach by using the four-component relativistic electronic structure calculation. The spin precession is also discussed from the viewpoint of local spin torque dynamics. We show that a contribution to the torque density for the spin is brought into by the EDM. Distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and torque densities induced by external fields in the above molecules are calculated and a property related with large Eeff is discussed.

  6. Localized electron heating and density peaking in downstream helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Bora, D.

    2015-06-01

    Localized electron temperature and density peaking at different axial locations in the downstream helicon plasma have been observed in a linear helicon device with both geometrical and magnetic expansion. The discharge is produced with an m=+1 right helical antenna powered by a RF source operating at 13.56 MHz. Axial wave field measurement shows the presence of damped helicon waves with standing wave character folded into it even at low densities (˜ {{10}16} m-3 ). The measured helicon wavelength is just about twice the antenna length and the phase velocity ≤ft({{v}p}\\right) is almost the speed required for electron impact ionization. These experimental observations strongly advocate the Landau damping heating and density production by the helicon waves, particularly in low density plasma such as ours. The electron temperature maximizes at 35-45 cm away from the antenna center in our experiments indicating a local source of heating at those locations. Different mechanisms responsible for this additional heating at a particular spatial location have been discussed for their possible roles. Further downstream from the location of the maximum electron temperature, a density peak located 55-65 cm away from the antenna is observed. This downstream density peaking can be explained through pressure balance in the system.

  7. Dimensionality and Localization of Electron States in Conducting Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao Hui

    The electron localization and the dimensionality of conducting polymers are studied by a variety of transport and magnetic techniques. Two model conducting polymer systems, the emeraldine salt form of polyaniline (PAN-ES) and one of its derivatives (POT-ES), are employed in the studies. The electron localization is increased with increasing one-dimensionality of a quasi-one-dimensional disordered system (Quasi-1d-DS). This concept is tested by studying electron localization in polyaniline (PAN) and its methyl ring-substituted derivative poly(o-toluidine) (POT). The experimental results showed greater electron localization in the HCl salt of POT than that of PAN, reflected in much smaller sigma_{DC}, sigma_{MW} and epsilon, increased Curie susceptibility and decreased Pauli-like susceptibility. The localization is attributed to the reduced interchain diffusion rate caused by decreased interchain coherence and increased interchain separation, both of which result from the presence of CH_3 on the C_6 rings. The T-dependences of lnsigma ~ -T^{-1/2} and S(T) ~ S_0 + B/T are interpreted as quasi-1d variable range hopping (VRH) between the nearest neighboring chains. Within the model, electric field (F) dependence of sigma(F)~{cal K}F^{1/2} with { cal K}~ T^{-1/2} can be understood. Charging energy limited tunneling model for granular metals and three-dimensional VRH model with a Coulomb gap are not consistent with the experiment. Other possible mechanisms for electron localization and the general implications for control of dimensionality and conductivity are discussed. The interchain coupling may change the dimensionality of electron states of conducting polymers. It is an open question if "metallic" polymers have one dimensional or three dimensional conduction states. We investigate this issue by studying the oriented polyaniline system. The thermopower, microwave dielectric constant and EPR data suggest that the electrons are three-dimensionally delocalized while the

  8. Transport in nanoscale systems: hydrodynamics, turbulence, and local electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    Transport in nanoscale systems is usually described as an open-boundary scattering problem. This picture, however, says nothing about the dynamical onset of steady states, their microscopic nature, or their dependence on initial conditions [1]. In order to address these issues, I will first describe the dynamical many-particle state via an effective quantum hydrodynamic theory [2]. This approach allows us to predict a series of novel phenomena like turbulence of the electron liquid [2], local electron heating in nanostructures [3], and the effect of electron viscosity on resistance [4]. I will provide both analytical results and numerical examples of first-principles electron dynamics in nanostructures using the above approach. I will also discuss possible experimental tests of our predictions. Work supported in part by NSF and DOE. [1] N. Bushong, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Approach to steady-state transport in nanoscale systems'' Nano Letters, 5 2569 (2005); M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov, ``Transport in nanoscale systems: the microcanonical versus grand-canonical picture,'' J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004). [2] R. D'Agosta and M. Di Ventra, ``Hydrodynamic approach to transport and turbulence in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/05123326; J. Phys. Cond. Matt., in press. [3] R. D'Agosta, N. Sai and M. Di Ventra, ``Local electron heating in nanoscale conductors,'' cond-mat/0605312; Nano Letters, in press. [4] N. Sai, M. Zwolak, G. Vignale and M. Di Ventra, ``Dynamical corrections to the DFT-LDA electron conductance in nanoscale systems,'' Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186810 (2005).

  9. A Mapping of the Electron Localization Function for Earth Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David F.; Ross, Nancy; Crawford, T Daniel; Burt, Jason; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2005-06-01

    The electron localization function, ELF, generated for a number of geometry-optimized earth materials, provides a graphical representation of the spatial localization of the probability electron density distribution as embodied in domains ascribed to localized bond and lone pair electrons. The lone pair domains, displayed by the silica polymorphs quartz, coesite and cristobalite, are typically banana-shaped and oriented perpendicular to the plane of the SiOSi angle at ~0.60 Å from the O atom on the reflex side of the angle. With decreasing angle, the domains increase in magnitude, indicating an increase in the nucleophilic character of the O atom, rendering it more susceptible to potential electrophilic attack. The Laplacian isosurface maps of the experimental and theoretical electron density distribution for coesite substantiates the increase in the size of the domain with decreasing angle. Bond pair domains are displayed along each of the SiO bond vectors as discrete concave hemispherically-shaped domains at ~0.70 Å from the O atom. For more closed-shell ionic bonded interactions, the bond and lone pair domains are often coalesced, resulting in concave hemispherical toroidal-shaped domains with local maxima centered along the bond vectors. As the shared covalent character of the bonded interactions increases, the bond and lone pair domains are better developed as discrete domains. ELF isosurface maps generated for the earth materials tremolite, diopside, talc and dickite display banana-shaped lone pair domains associated with the bridging O atoms of SiOSi angles and concave hemispherical toroidal bond pair domains associated with the nonbridging ones. The lone pair domains in dickite and talc provide a basis for understanding the bonded interactions between the adjacent neutral layers. Maps were also generated for beryl, cordierite, quartz, low albite, forsterite, wadeite, åkermanite, pectolite, periclase, hurlbutite, thortveitite and vanthoffite. Strategies

  10. Local charge measurement using off-axis electron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beleggia, M.; Gontard, L. C.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    A model-independent approach based on Gauss’ theorem for measuring the local charge in a specimen from an electron-optical phase image recorded using off-axis electron holography was recently proposed. Here, we show that such a charge measurement is reliable when it is applied to determine the total charge enclosed within an object. However, the situation is more complicated for a partial charge measurement when the integration domain encloses only part of the object. We analyze in detail the effects on charge measurement of the mean inner potential of the object, of the presence of induced charges on nearby supports/electrodes and of noise. We perform calculations for spherical particles and highlight the differences when dealing with other object shapes. Our analysis is tested using numerical simulations and applied to the interpretation of an experimental dataset recorded from a sapphire particle.

  11. Electronic properties of polycrystalline graphene under large local strain

    SciTech Connect

    He, Xin; Tang, Ning E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn Duan, Junxi; Mei, Fuhong; Meng, Hu; Lu, Fangchao; Xu, Fujun; Yang, Xuelin; Gao, Li; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Ge, Weikun E-mail: geweikun@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-06-16

    To explore the transport properties of polycrystalline graphene under large tensile strain, a strain device has been fabricated using piezocrystal to load local strain onto graphene, up to 22.5%. Ionic liquid gate whose capability of tuning carrier density being much higher than that of a solid gate is used to survey the transfer characteristics of the deformed graphene. The conductance of the Dirac point and field effect mobility of electrons and holes is found to decrease with increasing strain, which is attributed to the scattering of the graphene grain boundaries, the strain induced change of band structure, and defects. However, the transport gap is still not opened. Our study is helpful to evaluate the application of graphene in stretchable electronics.

  12. Local regularization of tilt projections reduces artifacts in electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Maiorca, Mauro; Millet, Coralie; Hanssen, Eric; Abbey, Brian; Kazmierczak, Edmund; Tilley, Leann

    2014-04-01

    Electron tomography produces very high resolution 3D image volumes useful for investigating the structure and function of cellular components. Unfortunately, unavoidable discontinuities and physical constraints in the acquisition geometry lead to a range of artifacts that can affect the reconstructed image. In particular, highly electron dense regions, such as gold nanoparticles, can hide proximal biological structures and degrade the overall quality of the reconstructed tomograms. In this work we introduce a pre-reconstruction non-conservative non-linear isotropic diffusion (NID) filter that automatically identifies and reduces local irregularities in the tilt projections. We illustrate the improvement in quality obtained using this approach for reconstructed tomograms generated from samples of malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. A quantitative and qualitative evaluation for our approach on both simulated and real data is provided.

  13. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  14. Imaging Local Electronic Corrugations and Doped Regions in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    B Schultz; C Patridge; V Lee; C Jaye; P Lysaght; C Smith; J Barnett; D Fischer; D Prendergast; S Banerjee

    2011-12-31

    Electronic structure heterogeneities are ubiquitous in two-dimensional graphene and profoundly impact the transport properties of this material. Here we show the mapping of discrete electronic domains within a single graphene sheet using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy in conjunction with ab initio density functional theory calculations. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging provides a wealth of detail regarding the extent to which the unoccupied levels of graphene are modified by corrugation, doping and adventitious impurities, as a result of synthesis and processing. Local electronic corrugations, visualized as distortions of the {pi}*cloud, have been imaged alongside inhomogeneously doped regions characterized by distinctive spectral signatures of altered unoccupied density of states. The combination of density functional theory calculations, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy imaging, and in situ near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy experiments also provide resolution of a longstanding debate in the literature regarding the spectral assignments of pre-edge and interlayer states.

  15. Wave packet spreading and localization in electron-nuclear scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markmann, Andreas; Grabowski*, P. E.; Morozov, I. V.; Valuev, I. A.; Fichtl, C. A.; Batista, V. S.; Graziani, F. R.; Murillo, M. S.; Cimarron Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The wave packet molecular dynamics (WPMD) method solves the time-dependent Schrödinger equation via a variational approximation. Application to high-temperature dense plasmas has yielded diverging electron width (spreading) with diminished electron-nuclear interaction. This was previously ascribed to a shortcoming of WPMD and has been counteracted by heuristic additions to the model. We employ various methods to determine if spreading continues to be predicted. Single electron scattering on a periodic array of statically screened protons is used as a model problem for comparison via the numerically exact split operator Fourier transform method, the Wigner trajectory method, and the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). Within the TDVP, we use as ansätze the standard form of WPMD, a single Gaussian wave packet (WP), as well as the split WP method, a linear combination of Gaussian WPs. Spreading is predicted by all methods, so is not the cause of unphysical diminishing interactions in WPMD. Instead, the Gaussian WP's inability to reproduce breakup of the density into fragments localized near ions is responsible for the deviation between methods. Hence, extensions of WPMD must include a mechanism for breakup. Authors contributed equally.

  16. Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnell, Dawn A.

    2015-02-23

    Final Report to the Department of Energy for period 6/1/2000 to 11/30/2014 for Grant # DE-FG02-00ER45813-A000 to the University of Pennsylvania Local Electronic And Dielectric Properties at Nanosized Interfaces PI: Dawn Bonnell The behavior of grain boundaries and interfaces has been a focus of fundamental research for decades because variations of structure and composition at interfaces dictate mechanical, electrical, optical and dielectric properties in solids. Similarly, the consequence of atomic and electronic structures of surfaces to chemical and physical interactions are critical due to their implications to catalysis and device fabrication. Increasing fundamental understanding of surfaces and interfaces has materially advanced technologies that directly bear on energy considerations. Currently, exciting developments in materials processing are enabling creative new electrical, optical and chemical device configurations. Controlled synthesis of nanoparticles, semiconducting nanowires and nanorods, optical quantum dots, etc. along with a range of strategies for assembling and patterning nanostructures portend the viability of new devices that have the potential to significantly impact the energy landscape. As devices become smaller the impact of interfaces and surfaces grows geometrically. As with other nanoscale phenomena, small interfaces do not exhibit the same properties as do large interfaces. The size dependence of interface properties had not been explored and understanding at the most fundamental level is necessary to the advancement of nanostructured devices. An equally important factor in the behavior of interfaces in devices is the ability to examine the interfaces under realistic conditions. For example, interfaces and boundaries dictate the behavior of oxide fuel cells which operate at extremely high temperatures in dynamic high pressure chemical environments. These conditions preclude the characterization of local properties during fuel cell

  17. High-resolution solid-state oxygen-17 NMR of actinide-bearing compounds: an insight into the 5f chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martel, Laura; Magnani, Nicola; Vigier, Jean-Francois; Boshoven, Jacobus; Selfslag, Chris; Farnan, Ian; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Somers, Joseph; Fanghänel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    A massive interest has been generated lately by the improvement of solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR methods for the study of a broad range of paramagnetic organic and inorganic materials. The open-shell cations at the origin of this paramagnetism can be metals, transition metals, or rare-earth elements. Actinide-bearing compounds and their 5f unpaired electrons remain elusive in this intensive research area due to their well-known high radiotoxicity. A dedicated effort enabling the handling of these highly radioactive materials now allows their analysis using high-resolution MAS NMR (>55 kHz). Here, the study of the local structure of a series of actinide dioxides, namely, ThO2, UO2, NpO2, PuO2, and AmO2, using solid-state (17)O MAS NMR is reported. An important increase of the spectral resolution is found due to the removal of the dipolar broadening proving the efficiency of this technique for structural analysis. The NMR parameters in these systems with numerous and unpaired 5f electrons were interpreted using an empirical approach. Single-ion model calculations were performed for the first time to determine the z component of electron spin on each of the actinide atoms, which is proportional to the shifts. A similar variation thereof was observed only for the heavier actinides of this study.

  18. How localized is ``local?'' Efficiency vs. accuracy of O(N) domain decomposition in local orbital based all-electron electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havu, Vile; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2007-03-01

    Numeric atom-centered local orbitals (NAO) are efficient basis sets for all-electron electronic structure theory. The locality of NAO's can be exploited to render (in principle) all operations of the self-consistency cycle O(N). This is straightforward for 3D integrals using domain decomposition into spatially close subsets of integration points, enabling critical computational savings that are effective from ˜tens of atoms (no significant overhead for smaller systems) and make large systems (100s of atoms) computationally feasible. Using a new all-electron NAO-based code,^1 we investigate the quantitative impact of exploiting this locality on two distinct classes of systems: Large light-element molecules [Alanine-based polypeptide chains (Ala)n], and compact transition metal clusters. Strict NAO locality is achieved by imposing a cutoff potential with an onset radius rc, and exploited by appropriately shaped integration domains (subsets of integration points). Conventional tight rc<= 3å have no measurable accuracy impact in (Ala)n, but introduce inaccuracies of 20-30 meV/atom in Cun. The domain shape impacts the computational effort by only 10-20 % for reasonable rc. ^1 V. Blum, R. Gehrke, P. Havu, V. Havu, M. Scheffler, The FHI Ab Initio Molecular Simulations (aims) Project, Fritz-Haber-Institut, Berlin (2006).

  19. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation.

    PubMed

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:26879249

  20. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation

    PubMed Central

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV. PMID:26879249

  1. [Localization of the apical foramen using the newest electronic instruments: stereomicroscopy and SEM (scanning electron microscopy)].

    PubMed

    Pagavino, G; Diamante, D; Marri, M; Pace, R

    1995-11-01

    Introduction of double impedence as new parameter in root canal length electronic measurement allowed first and second generation electronic apical localizers main problems overcoming: precision failure in presence of conducting fluids. Our study's purpose was an in vitro evaluation of two third generation instruments (Apit-Osada and Root ZX-Morita Corp.) ability in apical foramen localization using sodium hypoclorite as irrigating solution. 40 human monorooted teeth with immature apex were studied. 20 samples were measured by Apit and 20 by Root ZX; measurements were recorded when apical foramen was reached. Samples were fixed for stereomicroscope observation before and after apical 3 mm worn and prepared for SEM observation. Evaluations about each system's precision were made by calculating difference between foramen position determined by electronic localizer and its real anatomical position determined by a computed image analizing system linked to SEM. All measurements were included between a minimum value of -0.45 mm and a maximum value of 0.26 mm. Mann Whithney U test was performed to compare average values of the two sample groups but his was not meaningful (p = 0.18) showing that there is no valuable difference in accuracy between Apit and Root ZX. According to most researchers, who consider a +/- 0.5 mm error range clinically acceptable, and considering that in vitro measurements never exceded this limit value we conclude confirming both instruments' safety.

  2. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guangtong

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  3. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  4. MAILROOM- A LOCAL AREA NETWORK ELECTRONIC MAIL PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Mailroom program is a Local Area Network (LAN) electronic mail program. It allows LAN users to electronically exchange notes, letters, reminders, or any sort of communication via their computer. The Mailroom program links all LAN users into a communication circle where messages can be created, sent, copied, printed, downloaded, uploaded, and deleted through a series of menu-driven screens. Mailroom includes a feature which allows users to determine if a message they have sent has been read by the receiver. Each user must be separately installed and removed from Mailroom as they join or leave the network. Mailroom comes with a program that accomplishes this with minimum of effort on the part of the Network Administrator/Manager. There is also a program that allows the Network Administrator/Manager to install Mailroom on each user's workstation so that on execution of Mailroom the user's station may be identified and the configurations settings activated. It will create its own configuration and data/supporting files during the setup and installation process. The Mailroom program is written in Microsoft QuickBasic. It was developed to run on networked IBM XT/ATs or compatibles and requires that all participating workstations share a common drive. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2 and has a memory requirement of 71K. Mailroom was developed in 1988.

  5. Oxalate Mass Balance During Chemical Cleaning in Tank 5F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 5F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate.

  6. Excitation of local magnetic moments by tunneling electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauyacq, Jean-Pierre; Lorente, Nicolás; Novaes, Frederico Dutilh

    2012-05-01

    The advent of milli-kelvin scanning tunneling microscopes (STM) with inbuilt magnetic fields has opened access to the study of magnetic phenomena with atomic resolution at surfaces. In the case of single atoms adsorbed on a surface, the existence of different magnetic energy levels localized on the adsorbate is due to the breaking of the rotational invariance of the adsorbate spin by the interaction with its environment, leading to energy terms in the meV range. These structures were revealed by STM experiments in IBM Almaden in the early 2000s for atomic adsorbates on CuN surfaces. The experiments consisted in the study of the changes in conductance caused by inelastic tunneling of electrons (IETS, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy). Manganese and Iron adatoms were shown to have different magnetic anisotropies induced by the substrate. More experiments by other groups followed up, showing that magnetic excitations could be detected in a variety of systems: e.g. complex organic molecules showed that their magnetic anisotropy was dependent on the molecular environment, piles of magnetic molecules showed that they interact via intermolecular exchange interaction, spin waves were excited on ferromagnetic surfaces and in Mn chains, and magnetic impurities have been analyzed on semiconductors. These experiments brought up some intriguing questions: the efficiency of magnetic excitations was very high, the excitations could or could not involve spin flip of the exciting electron and singular-like behavior was sometimes found at the excitation thresholds. These facts called for extended theoretical analysis; perturbation theories, sudden-approximation approaches and a strong coupling scheme successfully explained most of the magnetic inelastic processes. In addition, many-body approaches were also used to decipher the interplay between inelastic processes and the Kondo effect. Spin torque transfer has been shown to be effective in changing spin orientations of an

  7. Pressure-induced changes in the electronic structure of americium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P; Moore, K T; Landa, A; Bradley, J A

    2011-02-25

    We have conducted electronic-structure calculations for Am metal under pressure to investigate the behavior of the 5f-electron states. Density-functional theory (DFT) does not reproduce the experimental photoemission spectra for the ground-state phase where the 5f electrons are localized, but the theory is expected to be correct when 5f delocalization occurs under pressure. The DFT prediction is that peak structures of the 5f valence band will merge closer to the Fermi level during compression indicating presence of itinerant 5f electrons. Existence of such 5f bands is argued to be a prerequisite for the phase transitions, particularly to the primitive orthorhombic AmIV phase, but does not agree with modern dynamical-mean-field theory (DMFT) results. Our DFT model further suggests insignificant changes of the 5f valence under pressure in agreement with recent resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, but in contradiction to the DMFT predictions. The influence of pressure on the 5f valency in the actinides is discussed and is shown to depend in a non-trivial fashion on 5f band position and occupation relative to the spd valence bands.

  8. Probing the population of the spin-orbit split levels in the actinide 5f states.

    PubMed

    Moore, K T; van der Laan, G; Tobin, J G; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

    2006-03-01

    Spin-orbit interaction in the 5f states is believed to strongly influence exotic behaviors observed in actinide metals and compounds. Understanding these interactions and how they relate to the actinide series is of considerable importance. To address this issue, the branching ratio of the white-line peaks of the N4,5 edge for the light actinide metals, alpha-Th, alpha-U, and alpha-Pu were recorded using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Using the spin-orbit sum rule and the branching ratios from both experimental spectra and many-electron atomic spectral calculations, accurate values of the spin-orbit interaction, and thus the relative occupation of the j = 5/2 and 7/2 levels, are determined for the actinide 5f states. Results show that the spin-orbit sum rule works very well with both EELS and XAS spectra, needing little or no correction. This is important, since the high spatial resolution of a TEM can be used to overcome the problems of single-crystal growth often encountered with actinide metals, allowing acquisition of EELS spectra, and subsequent spin-orbit analysis, from nm-sized regions. The relative occupation numbers obtained by our method have been compared with recent theoretical results and they show a good agreement in their trend.

  9. ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM TANK 5F CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-03-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. The conclusions from this work are: (1) With the exception of iron, the dissolution of sludge components from Tank 5F agreed with results from the actual waste demonstration performed in 2007. The fraction of iron removed from Tank 5F by chemical cleaning was significantly less than the fraction removed in the SRNL demonstrations. The likely cause of this difference is the high pH following the first oxalic acid strike. (2) Most of the sludge mass remaining in the tank is iron and nickel. (3) The remaining sludge contains approximately 26 kg of barium, 37 kg of chromium, and 37 kg of mercury. (4) Most of the radioactivity remaining in the residual material is beta emitters and {sup 90}Sr. (5) The chemical cleaning removed more than {approx} 90% of the uranium isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. (6) The chemical cleaning removed {approx} 70% of the neptunium, {approx} 83% of the {sup 90}Sr, and {approx} 21% of the {sup 60}Co. (7) The chemical cleaning removed less than 10% of the plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes. (8) The chemical cleaning removed more than 90% of the aluminium, calcium, and sodium from the tank. (9) The cleaning operations removed 61% of lithium, 88% of non-radioactive strontium, and 65% of zirconium. The {sup 90}Sr and non-radioactive strontium were measured

  10. Very Local Interstellar Spectra for Galactic Electrons, Protons and Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, Marius

    2014-10-01

    The local interstellar spectra (LIS) for cosmic rays at energies below ˜30 GeV/nuc are increasingly obscured from view at Earth by solar modulation, the lower the energy becomes. These charged particles encounter significant changes in the heliosphere, over an 11-year cycle, which include processes such as convection, diffusion, adiabatic energy losses and gradient, curvature and current sheet drifts. Particle drifts cause charge-sign-dependent modulation and a 22-year cycle, adding complexity to determining the respective very LIS from observations only at Earth. However, with measurements now made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft in the vicinity of the heliopause, it is possible to determine a very LIS for galactic electrons between ˜5 and ˜120 MeV. At these low energies, also galactic protons observed in the outer heliosphere had been completely obscured by the so-called anomalous component which is accelerated inside the heliosheath. Since August 2012, these anomalous cosmic rays are substantially depleted at Voyager 1 so that for cosmic ray ions, it is now possible to obtain a lower limit to their very LIS. Combining numerical modelling of solar modulation with the accurate measurements by the PAMELA mission and with Voyager observations, the lower limit of the very LIS for electrons, protons and helium and other ions can be determined from ˜5 MeV and above. These spectra are called heliopause spectra which is considered to be the lowest possible very LIS. Also, from an astrophysics point of view, the determination of what can be called a very LIS, not just an averaged galactic spectrum, is encouraging. The mentioned aspects are discussed, focusing on a comparison of recent heliospheric observations and corresponding solar modulation modelling.

  11. Multiconfigurational nature of 5f orbitals in uranium and plutonium and their intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Corwin

    2013-03-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of U and Pu elements and intermetallics remain poorly understood despite decades of effort, and currently represent an important scientific frontier toward understanding matter. The last decade has seen great progress both due to the discovery of superconductivity in PuCoGa5 and advances in theory that finally can explain fundamental ground state properties in elemental plutonium, such as the phonon dispersion curve, the non-magnetic ground state, and the volume difference between the α and δ phases. A new feature of the recent calculations is the presence not only of intermediate valence of the Pu 5f electrons, but of multiconfigurational ground states, where the different properties of the α and δ phases are primarily governed by the different relative weights of the 5f4, 5f5, and 5f6 electronic configurations. The usual method for measuring multiconfigurational states in the lanthanides is to measure the lanthanide LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), a method that is severely limited for the actinides because the spectroscopic features are not well enough separated. Advances in resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) have now allowed for spectra with sufficient resolution to resolve individual resonances associated with the various actinide valence states. Utilizing a new spectrometer at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), RXES data have been collected that show, for the first time, spectroscopic signatures of each of these configurations and their relative changes in various uranium and plutonium intermetallic compounds. In combination with conventional XANES spectra on related compounds, these data indicate such states may be ubiquitous in uranium and plutonium intermetallics, providing a new framework toward understanding properties ranging from heavy fermion behavior, superconductivity, and intermediate valence to mechanical and fundamental bonding behavior in

  12. Weak localization and electron-electron interactions in indium-doped ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard S; Li, Dongdong; Witte, Christopher M; Lu, Jia G

    2009-12-01

    Single crystal ZnO nanowires doped with indium are synthesized via the laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition method. The conductivity of the nanowires is measured at low temperatures in magnetic fields with directions both perpendicular and parallel to the wire axes. A quantitative fit of our data is obtained, consistent with the theory of a quasi-one-dimensional metallic system with quantum corrections due to weak localization and electron-electron interactions. The anisotropy of the magneto-conductivity agrees with theory. The two quantum corrections are of approximately equal magnitude with respective temperature dependences of T(-1/3)and T(-1/2). The alternative model of quasi-two-dimensional surface conductivity is excluded by the absence of oscillations in the magneto-conductivity in parallel magnetic fields. PMID:19831413

  13. CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTUAL WASTE TEST WITH TANK 5F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; Crapse, K. P.; Fink, S. D.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2007-08-30

    The initial phase of bulk waste removal operations was recently completed in Tank 5F. Video inspection of the tank indicates several mounds of sludge still remain in the tank. Additionally, a mound of white solids was observed under Riser 5. In support of chemical cleaning and heel removal programs, samples of the sludge and the mound of white solids were obtained from the tank for characterization and testing. A core sample of the sludge and Super Snapper sample of the white solids were characterized. A supernate dip sample from Tank 7F was also characterized. A portion of the sludge was used in two tank cleaning tests using oxalic acid at 50 C and 75 C. The filtered oxalic acid from the tank cleaning tests was subsequently neutralized by addition to a simulated Tank 7F supernate. Solids and liquid samples from the tank cleaning test and neutralization test were characterized. A separate report documents the results of the gas generation from the tank cleaning test using oxalic acid and Tank 5F sludge. The characterization results for the Tank 5F sludge sample (FTF-05-06-55) appear quite good with respect to the tight precision of the sample replicates, good results for the glass standards, and minimal contamination found in the blanks and glass standards. The aqua regia and sodium peroxide fusion data also show good agreement between the two dissolution methods. Iron dominates the sludge composition with other major contributors being uranium, manganese, nickel, sodium, aluminum, and silicon. The low sodium value for the sludge reflects the absence of supernate present in the sample due to the core sampler employed for obtaining the sample. The XRD and CSEM results for the Super Snapper salt sample (i.e., white solids) from Tank 5F (FTF-05-07-1) indicate the material contains hydrated sodium carbonate and bicarbonate salts along with some aluminum hydroxide. These compounds likely precipitated from the supernate in the tank. A solubility test showed the material

  14. Localized electron heating during magnetic reconnection in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.; Tanabe, H.; Watanabe, T. G.; Hayashi, Y.; Imazawa, R.; Inomoto, M.; Ono, Y.; Gryaznevich, M.; Scannell, R.; Michael, C.; The MAST Team

    2016-10-01

    Significant increase in the plasma temperature above 1 keV was measured during the kilogauss magnetic field reconnection of two merging toroidal plasmas under the high-guide field and collision-less conditions. The electron temperature was observed to peak significantly at the X-point inside the current sheet, indicating Joule heating caused by the toroidal electric field along the X-line. This peaked temperature increases significantly with the guide field, in agreement with the electron mean-free path calculation. The slow electron heating in the downstream suggests energy conversion from ions to electrons through ion-electron collisions in the bulk plasma as the second electron heating mechanism in the bulk plasma. The electron density profile clearly reveals the electron density pile-up / fast shock structures in the downstream of reconnection, suggesting energy conversion from ion flow energy to ion thermal energy as well as significant ion heating by reconnection outflow.

  15. Electronic Document Imaging and Optical Storage Systems for Local Governments: An Introduction. Local Government Records Technical Information Series. Number 21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Stanley F.

    This publication introduces electronic document imaging systems and provides guidance for local governments in New York in deciding whether such systems should be adopted for their own records and information management purposes. It advises local governments on how to develop plans for using such technology by discussing its advantages and…

  16. Negative local resistance due to viscous electron backflow in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandurin, Denis

    Theoretical and experimental studies of systems in which particles undergo frequent mutual collisions date back to more than two centuries ago. Transport in such systems is described by hydrodynamic theory that was found very successful in explaining the response of classical liquids and gases to external fields. It has been argued for a long time that collective behavior of charge carriers in solids can be also described by hydrodynamic approach. However, there has been almost no direct evidence to hydrodynamic electron transport so far. This is because the conditions at which the hydrodynamic effects become observable are very strict: the electron-electron scattering length should provide the shortest spatial scale in the problem. First of all, this requires ultra clean systems where the scattering at impurities is diminished. Second, the electron-phonon scattering rate should be smaller than that of electron-electron scattering. Due to weak electron-phonon coupling high mobility graphene devices offer an ideal system to study electron hydrodynamics. To amplify the hydrodynamic effects we employed a special measurement geometry. The idea is that in case of hydrodynamic electron flow, vortices emerge in the spatial electric current distribution near the current injection contact. That results in a development of a negative voltage drop at the nearby contacts. We were able to detect such negative signal over the range of temperatures when the electronic system is in a hydrodynamic regime. Finally, we performed a rheological study of electron liquid in graphene. The electron viscosity was found to be an order of magnitude larger than that of honey which is in good agreement with many-body calculation.

  17. Local electron spectrum above 100 MeV derived from gamma-ray emissivity spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two new determinations of the local gamma-ray emmissivity spectrum are in good accord and were used to derive constraints on the local electron spectrum. The requirement for an electron intensity above 1 GeV larger than previously believed is confirmed and no low energy upturn is then needed.

  18. Characterizing Localized Surface Plasmons Using Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherqui, Charles; Thakkar, Niket; Li, Guoliang; Camden, Jon P.; Masiello, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) offers a window to view nanoscale properties and processes. When performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope, EELS can simultaneously render images of nanoscale objects with subnanometer spatial resolution and correlate them with spectroscopic information at a spectral resolution of ˜10-100 meV. Consequently, EELS is a near-perfect tool for understanding the optical and electronic properties of individual plasmonic metal nanoparticles and few-nanoparticle assemblies, which are significant in a wide range of fields. This review presents an overview of basic plasmonics and EELS theory and highlights several recent noteworthy experiments involving the interrogation of plasmonic metal nanoparticle systems using electron beams.

  19. Kinetics of vertical transport and localization of electrons in strained semiconductor supperlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Gerchikov, L. G. Mamaev, Yu. A.; Yashin, Yu. P.

    2015-08-15

    The kinetics of vertical electron transport in a semiconductor superlattice is considered taking into account partial localization of electrons. The time dependences of photoemission currents from samples based on a strained semiconductor superlattice calculated by numerically solving the kinetic equation are in good agreement with experimental data. Comparison of the theory with experiment makes it possible to determine the characteristic electron localization and thermoactivation times, the diffusion length, and losses of photoelectrons in the superlattice.

  20. Multiconfigurational nature of 5f orbitals in uranium and plutonium intermetallics

    PubMed Central

    Booth, C.H.; Jiang, Yu; Wang, D.L.; Mitchell, J.N.; Tobash, P.H.; Bauer, E.D.; Wall, M.A.; Allen, P.G.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Torrez, M.A.; Sarrao, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium and plutonium’s 5f electrons are tenuously poised between strongly bonding with ligand spd-states and residing close to the nucleus. The unusual properties of these elements and their compounds (e.g., the six different allotropes of elemental plutonium) are widely believed to depend on the related attributes of f-orbital occupancy and delocalization for which a quantitative measure is lacking. By employing resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and making comparisons to specific heat measurements, we demonstrate the presence of multiconfigurational f-orbital states in the actinide elements U and Pu and in a wide range of uranium and plutonium intermetallic compounds. These results provide a robust experimental basis for a new framework toward understanding the strongly-correlated behavior of actinide materials. PMID:22706643

  1. ARPES in strongly correlated 4f and 5f systems: Comparison to the Periodic Anderson Model

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Cox, L.E.

    1997-12-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow, nearly temperature independent bands (i.e., no spectral weight loss or transfer with temperature). A small dispersion of the f-bands above the Kondo temperature is easily measurable so that a Kondo resonance, as defined by NCA, is not evident. Preliminary results, however, indicate that the Periodic Anderson Model captures some of the essential physics. Angle-integrated resonant photoemission results on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow 5f feature at E{sub F}, similar in width to f-states in Ce and U compounds, but differing in that cross-section behavior of the near-E{sub F} feature suggests substantial 6D admixture.

  2. Circularly polarized luminescence of curium: a new characterization of the 5f actinide complexes.

    PubMed

    Law, Ga-Lai; Andolina, Christopher M; Xu, Jide; Luu, Vinh; Rutkowski, Philip X; Muller, Gilles; Shuh, David K; Gibson, John K; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-09-19

    A key distinction between the lanthanide (4f) and the actinide (5f) transition elements is the increased role of f-orbital covalent bonding in the latter. Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) is an uncommon but powerful spectroscopy which probes the electronic structure of chiral, luminescent complexes or molecules. While there are many examples of CPL spectra for the lanthanides, this report is the first for an actinide. Two chiral, octadentate chelating ligands based on orthoamide phenol (IAM) were used to complex curium(III). While the radioactivity kept the amount of material limited to micromole amounts, spectra of the highly luminescent complexes showed significant emission peak shifts between the different complexes, consistent with ligand field effects previously observed in luminescence spectra.

  3. Bis(imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline)dinitratolead(II)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Xiang; Zha, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Chun-Bo; Li, Xiu-Ying; Che, Guang-Bo

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Pb(NO3)2(C13H8N4)2], the PbII atom (site symmetry 2) is hexa­coordinated by four N atoms from two N,N′-bidentate imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (L) ligands and two O atoms from two weakly coordinated nitrate ions [Pb—O = 2.872 (5) Å] in an irregular arrangement, which may be ascribed to the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons on the metal ion. In the crystal, inter­molecular bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds connect the mol­ecules into chains propagating along [100]. Adjacent chains inter­act by strong aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.483 (2) Å. PMID:21581524

  4. 5f state interaction with inner coordination sphere ligands: einsteinium 3+ ion fluorescence in aqueous and organic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Wester, D.W.; Williams, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between 5f electron states of einsteinium 3+ ion and coordinated ligands in solution has been probed using laser-induced fluorescence. Aquo einsteinium 3+ ion was observed to fluoresce from its first excited J = 5 state in a broad-band peaking at 9260 wavenumbers. The observed fluorescence lifetimes were 1.05 microseconds and 2.78 microseconds in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O (99+ % D atom), respectively. The non-radiative decay rates derived from the lifetime data are compared with previously reported data for Cm, Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy aquo 3+ ions. The 5f actinide states exhibit substantially greater non-radiative decay rates than do lanthanide 4f states of similar energy gap. This provides evidence that actinide 5f electrons interact more strongly with their inner coordination sphere than do lanthanide ion 4f electrons. The fluorescence lifetime of einsteinium 3+ ion complexed with 1 formal di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid in h-heptane was 2.34 microseconds. 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, Andres S.; Torres, F. Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (Nσ), the quantity χ = (Nσ - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions.

  6. The electron localization as the information content of the conditional pair density.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Andres S; Torres, F Javier; Rincon, Luis

    2016-06-28

    In the present work, the information gained by an electron for "knowing" about the position of another electron with the same spin is calculated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence (DKL) between the same-spin conditional pair probability density and the marginal probability. DKL is proposed as an electron localization measurement, based on the observation that regions of the space with high information gain can be associated with strong correlated localized electrons. Taking into consideration the scaling of DKL with the number of σ-spin electrons of a system (N(σ)), the quantity χ = (N(σ) - 1) DKLfcut is introduced as a general descriptor that allows the quantification of the electron localization in the space. fcut is defined such that it goes smoothly to zero for negligible densities. χ is computed for a selection of atomic and molecular systems in order to test its capability to determine the region in space where electrons are localized. As a general conclusion, χ is able to explain the electron structure of molecules on the basis of chemical grounds with a high degree of success and to produce a clear differentiation of the localization of electrons that can be traced to the fluctuation in the average number of electrons in these regions. PMID:27369494

  7. Ectopic POU5F1 in the male germ lineage disrupts differentiation and spermatogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Phillips, LeAnna J; Hartman, Rachel; An, Junhui; Dann, Christina T

    2016-10-01

    Expression levels of the pluripotency determinant, POU5F1, are tightly regulated to ensure appropriate differentiation during early embryogenesis. POU5F1 is also present in the spermatogonial stem cell/progenitor cell population in mice and it is downregulated as spermatogenesis progresses. To test if POU5F1 downregulation is required for SSCs to differentiate, we produced transgenic mice that ubiquitously express POU5F1 in Cre-expressing lineages. Using a Vasa-Cre driver to produce ectopic POU5F1 in all postnatal germ cells, we found that POU5F1 downregulation was necessary for spermatogonial expansion during the first wave of spermatogenesis and for the production of differentiated spermatogonia capable of undergoing meiosis. In contrast, undifferentiated spermatogonia were maintained throughout adulthood, consistent with a normal presence of POU5F1 in these cells. The results suggest that POU5F1 downregulation in differentiating spermatogonia is a necessary step for the progression of spermatogenesis. Further, the creation of a transgenic mouse model for conditional ectopic expression of POU5F1 may be a useful resource for studies of POU5F1 in other cell lineages, during tumorogenesis and cell fate reprogramming. PMID:27486267

  8. Pharmacology of Valinate and tert-Leucinate Synthetic Cannabinoids 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and Their Analogues.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Longworth, Mitchell; Kevin, Richard; Sachdev, Shivani; Santiago, Marina; Stuart, Jordyn; Mack, James B C; Glass, Michelle; McGregor, Iain S; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Indole and indazole synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) featuring l-valinate or l-tert-leucinate pendant group have recently emerged as prevalent recreational drugs, and their use has been associated with serious adverse health effects. Due to the limited pharmacological data available for these compounds, 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and their analogues were synthesized and assessed for cannabimimetic activity in vitro and in vivo. All SCs acted as potent, highly efficacious agonists at CB1 (EC50 = 0.45-36 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 4.6-128 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with a general preference for CB1 activation. The cannabimimetic properties of two prevalent compounds with confirmed toxicity in humans, 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, were demonstrated in vivo using biotelemetry in rats. Bradycardia and hypothermia were induced by 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg (and 3 mg/kg for 5F-AMB), with MDMB-FUBINACA showing the most dramatic hypothermic response recorded in our laboratory for any SC (>3 °C at 0.3 mg/kg). Reversal of hypothermia by pretreatment with a CB1, but not CB2, antagonist was demonstrated for 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, consistent with CB1-mediated effects in vivo. The in vitro and in vivo data indicate that these SCs act as highly efficacious CB receptor agonists with greater potency than Δ(9)-THC and earlier generations of SCs. PMID:27421060

  9. Pharmacology of Valinate and tert-Leucinate Synthetic Cannabinoids 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and Their Analogues.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Longworth, Mitchell; Kevin, Richard; Sachdev, Shivani; Santiago, Marina; Stuart, Jordyn; Mack, James B C; Glass, Michelle; McGregor, Iain S; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Indole and indazole synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) featuring l-valinate or l-tert-leucinate pendant group have recently emerged as prevalent recreational drugs, and their use has been associated with serious adverse health effects. Due to the limited pharmacological data available for these compounds, 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and their analogues were synthesized and assessed for cannabimimetic activity in vitro and in vivo. All SCs acted as potent, highly efficacious agonists at CB1 (EC50 = 0.45-36 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 4.6-128 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with a general preference for CB1 activation. The cannabimimetic properties of two prevalent compounds with confirmed toxicity in humans, 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, were demonstrated in vivo using biotelemetry in rats. Bradycardia and hypothermia were induced by 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg (and 3 mg/kg for 5F-AMB), with MDMB-FUBINACA showing the most dramatic hypothermic response recorded in our laboratory for any SC (>3 °C at 0.3 mg/kg). Reversal of hypothermia by pretreatment with a CB1, but not CB2, antagonist was demonstrated for 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, consistent with CB1-mediated effects in vivo. The in vitro and in vivo data indicate that these SCs act as highly efficacious CB receptor agonists with greater potency than Δ(9)-THC and earlier generations of SCs.

  10. Using the electron localization function to correct for confinement physics in semi-local density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Feng Mattsson, Ann E.; Armiento, Rickard

    2014-05-14

    We have previously proposed that further improved functionals for density functional theory can be constructed based on the Armiento-Mattsson subsystem functional scheme if, in addition to the uniform electron gas and surface models used in the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 functional, a model for the strongly confined electron gas is also added. However, of central importance for this scheme is an index that identifies regions in space where the correction provided by the confined electron gas should be applied. The electron localization function (ELF) is a well-known indicator of strongly localized electrons. We use a model of a confined electron gas based on the harmonic oscillator to show that regions with high ELF directly coincide with regions where common exchange energy functionals have large errors. This suggests that the harmonic oscillator model together with an index based on the ELF provides the crucial ingredients for future improved semi-local functionals. For a practical illustration of how the proposed scheme is intended to work for a physical system we discuss monoclinic cupric oxide, CuO. A thorough discussion of this system leads us to promote the cell geometry of CuO as a useful benchmark for future semi-local functionals. Very high ELF values are found in a shell around the O ions, and take its maximum value along the Cu–O directions. An estimate of the exchange functional error from the effect of electron confinement in these regions suggests a magnitude and sign that could account for the error in cell geometry.

  11. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-09-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures.

  12. Fast probe of local electronic states in nanostructures utilizing a single-lead quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Amaha, Shinichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Sugawara, Retsu; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Transport measurements are powerful tools to probe electronic properties of solid-state materials. To access properties of local electronic states in nanostructures, such as local density of states, electronic distribution and so on, micro-probes utilizing artificial nanostructures have been invented to perform measurements in addition to those with conventional macroscopic electronic reservoirs. Here we demonstrate a new kind of micro-probe: a fast single-lead quantum dot probe, which utilizes a quantum dot coupled only to the target structure through a tunneling barrier and fast charge readout by RF reflectometry. The probe can directly access the local electronic states with wide bandwidth. The probe can also access more electronic states, not just those around the Fermi level, and the operations are robust against bias voltages and temperatures. PMID:26416582

  13. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  14. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  15. Electron density power spectrum in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.; Rickett, B. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar scintillation (ISS), fluctuations in the amplitude and phase of radio waves caused by scattering in the interstellar medium, is important as a diagnostic of interstellar plasma turbulence. ISS is also of interest because it is noise for other radio astronomical observations. The unifying concern is the power spectrum of the interstellar electron density. Here we use ISS observations through the nearby (less than or approximately =1 kpc) (ISM) to estimate the spectrum. From measurements of angular broadening of pulsars and extragalactic sources, decorrelation bandwidth of pulsars, refractive steering of features in pulsar dynamic spectra, dispersion measured fluctuations of pulsars, and refractive scintillation index measurements, we construct a composite structure function that is approximately power law over 2 x 10(exp 6) m less than scale less than 10(exp 13) m. The data are consistent with the structure function having a logarithmic slope versus baseline less than 2; thus there is a meaningful connection between scales in the radiowave fluctuation field and the scales in the electron density field causing the scattering. The data give an upper limit to the inner scale, l(sub o) less than or approximately 10(exp 8) m and are consistent with much smaller values. We construct a composite electron density spectrum that is approximately power law over at least the approximately = 5 decade wavenumber range 10(exp -13)/m less than wavenumber less than 10(exp -8)/m and that may extend to higher wavenumbers. The average spectral index of electron density over this wavenumber range is approximately = 3.7, very close to the value expected for a Kolmogorov process. The outer scale size, L(sub o), must be greater than or approximately = 10(exp 13) m (determined from dispersion measure fluctuations). When the ISS data are combined with measurements of differential Faraday rotation angle, and gradients in the average electron density, constraints can be put on the

  16. The imprint of Gould's belt on the local cosmic ray electron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, M.; Perrot, C.; Grenier, I.

    2001-08-01

    In a recent paper Pohl and Esposito (1998) demonstrated that if the sources of cosmic-rays are discrete, as are Supernova Remnants (SNR), then the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons largely vary with location and time and the locally measured electron spectrum may not be representative of the electron spectra elsewhere in the Galaxy, which could be substantially harder than the local one. They have shown that the observed excess of γ-ray emission above 1 GeV can in fact be partially explained as a correspondingly hard inverse Compton component, provided the bulk of cosmic-ray electrons is produced in SNR. As part of a program to model the Galactic γ-ray foreground we have continued the earlier studies by investigating the impact of the star forming region Gould's Belt on the local electron spectrum. If the electron sources in Gould's Belt were continous, the local electron spectrum would be slightly hardened. If the electron sources are discrete, which is the more probable case, the variation in the local electron spectrum found by Pohl & Esposito persists. 1 The local cosmic-ray electron spectrum The recent detections of non-thermal X-ray synchrotron radiation from the supernova remnants SN1006 (Koyama et al., 1995), RX J1713.7-3946 (Koyama et al., 1997), IC443 (Keohane et al., 1997; Slane et al., 1999), Cas A (Allen et al., 1997), and RCW86 (Borkowski et al., 2001) and the subsequent detections of SN1006 (Tanimori et al., 1998), RX J1713.7-3946 (Muraishi et al., 2000), and Cas A (Aharonian et al., 2001) at TeV energies support the hypothesis that at least Galactic cosmic-ray electrons are accelerated predominantly in SNR. The Galactic distribution and spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons are intimately linked to the distribution and nature of their sources. Supernovae and hence their remnants are tran-

  17. Electron spin resonance (ESR) probe for interventional MRI instrument localization.

    PubMed

    Ehnholm, G J; Vahala, E T; Kinnunen, J; Nieminen, J E; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C; Uusitalo, M A

    1999-08-01

    This article presents a miniaturized electron spin resonance (ESR) probe for deducing the position of a surgical instrument on an MR image. The ESR probe constructed was small enough to fit inside a 14-G biopsy needle sheath, and position information of the sheath could be acquired using a simple gradient sequence. The position accuracy was estimated from needle trajectories as inferred from the needle artifact, the actual physical trajectory, and measured coordinates. The probe was able to track the tip of a biopsy needle quickly (10 samples/sec) and precisely with accuracy better than +/-2 mm. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:216-219.

  18. European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (EXFEL): local implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    European X-Ray FEL - free electron laser is under construction in DESY Hamburg. It is scheduled to be operational at 2015/16 at a cost more than 1 billion Euro. The laser uses SASE method to generate x-ray light. It is propelled by an electron linac of 17,5GeV energy and more than 2km in length. The linac uses superconducting SRF TESLA technology working at 1,3 GHz in frequency. The prototype of EXFEL is FLASH Laser (200 m in length), where the "proof of principle" was checked, and from the technologies were transferred to the bigger machine. The project was stared in the nineties by building a TTF Laboratory -Tesla Test Facility. The EXFEL laser is a child of a much bigger teraelectronovolt collider project TESLA (now abandoned in Germany but undertaken by international community in a form the ILC). A number of experts and young researchers from Poland participate in the design, construction and research of the FLASH and EXFEL lasers.

  19. Isotope-induced partial localization of core electrons in the homonuclear molecule N2.

    PubMed

    Rolles, Daniel; Braune, Markus; Cvejanović, Slobodan; Gessner, Oliver; Hentges, Rainer; Korica, Sanja; Langer, Burkhard; Lischke, Toralf; Prümper, Georg; Reinköster, Axel; Viefhaus, Jens; Zimmermann, Björn; McKoy, Vincent; Becker, Uwe

    2005-09-29

    Because of inversion symmetry and particle exchange, all constituents of homonuclear diatomic molecules are in a quantum mechanically non-local coherent state; this includes the nuclei and deep-lying core electrons. Hence, the molecular photoemission can be regarded as a natural double-slit experiment: coherent electron emission originates from two identical sites, and should give rise to characteristic interference patterns. However, the quantum coherence is obscured if the two possible symmetry states of the electronic wavefunction ('gerade' and 'ungerade') are degenerate; the sum of the two exactly resembles the distinguishable, incoherent emission from two localized core sites. Here we observe the coherence of core electrons in N(2) through a direct measurement of the interference exhibited in their emission. We also explore the gradual transition to a symmetry-broken system of localized electrons by comparing different isotope-substituted species--a phenomenon analogous to the acquisition of partial 'which-way' information in macroscopic double-slit experiments.

  20. [Transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to malignant hematopoietic cells of different origins].

    PubMed

    Wabg, Kai; Peng, Jian-Qinag; Yuan, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Bin

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to hematopoietic malignant cells lines of various origins and AD5/F35 cytotoxicity. The hematologic malignant cell lines of various origins were transfected by AD5/F35-EGFP at different multiple of infection (MOI) and AD5-EGFP was used as control; the proportion of fluorescence positive cells was detected by flow cytometry; the killing effect of virus on infective target cells was assayed by MTT and observed by fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector to cell line of myeloid origin was > 99% at MOI = 30, the transfective efficiency of AD5 vector was 26.4% at MOI = 1,000; the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector and AD5 vector to cell line of B cell origin were 11.7% and 5.7%, respectively, at MOI = 1,000. AD5/F35 and AD5 vectors could not effectively transfect cells of T cell origin, no fluorescence positive cells were detected at MOI = 1,000; no significant killing effect of AD5/F35 vector on infective target cells was observed at MOI = 1,000. It is concluded that AD5/F35 vector infection has definite selectivity to hematologic malignant cells of various origin, the infection ability of AD5/F35 vector to cells of myeloid origin is stronger than that to cells of B cell origin, the cytotoxicity of AD5/F35 vector to infective target cells is small. The AD5/F35 vector is preferable to AD5 vector in respect of infection ability and offers good prospects of application in gene therapy for myeloid leukemia cells as target cells.

  1. Quantum transport through disordered 1D wires: Conductance via localized and delocalized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gopar, Víctor A.

    2014-01-14

    Coherent electronic transport through disordered systems, like quantum wires, is a topic of fundamental and practical interest. In particular, the exponential localization of electron wave functions-Anderson localization-due to the presence of disorder has been widely studied. In fact, Anderson localization, is not an phenomenon exclusive to electrons but it has been observed in microwave and acoustic experiments, photonic materials, cold atoms, etc. Nowadays, many properties of electronic transport of quantum wires have been successfully described within a scaling approach to Anderson localization. On the other hand, anomalous localization or delocalization is, in relation to the Anderson problem, a less studied phenomenon. Although one can find signatures of anomalous localization in very different systems in nature. In the problem of electronic transport, a source of delocalization may come from symmetries present in the system and particular disorder configurations, like the so-called Lévy-type disorder. We have developed a theoretical model to describe the statistical properties of transport when electron wave functions are delocalized. In particular, we show that only two physical parameters determine the complete conductance distribution.

  2. One- and many-electron self-interaction error in local and global hybrid functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Kümmel, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Electronic self-interaction poses a fundamental challenge in density-functional theory. It greatly limits, e.g., the physical interpretation of eigenvalues as electron removal energies. We here investigate whether local hybrid functionals that are designed to be free from one-electron self-interaction lead to occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues and orbitals that approximate photoemission observables well. We compare the local hybrid results to the ones from global hybrid functionals that only partially counteract the self-interaction, and to the results that are obtained with a Perdew-Zunger-type self-interaction correction. Furthermore, we check whether being nominally free from one-electron self-interaction translates into a reduced many-electron self-interaction error. Our findings show that this is not the case for the local hybrid functionals that we studied: In practice they are similar to global hybrids in many respects, despite being formally superior. This finding indicates that there is a conceptual difference between the Perdew-Zunger way and the local hybrid way of translating the one-electron condition to a many-electron system. We also point out and solve some difficulties that occur when using local hybrid functionals in combination with pseudopotentials.

  3. Weak localization and electron–electron interactions in few layer black phosphorus devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yanmeng; Gillgren, Nathaniel; Espiritu, Timothy; Tran, Son; Yang, Jiawei; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takahashi; Lau, Chun Ning

    2016-09-01

    Few layer phosphorene (FLP) devices are extensively studied due to their unique electronic properties and potential applications on nano-electronics. Here we present magnetotransport studies which reveal electron–electron interactions as the dominant scattering mechanism in hexagonal boron nitride-encapsulated FLP devices. From weak localization measurements, we estimate the electron dephasing length to be 30 to 100 nm at low temperatures, which exhibits a strong dependence on carrier density n and a power-law dependence on temperature (∼T ‑0.4). These results establish that the dominant scattering mechanism in FLP is electron–electron interactions.

  4. Pharmacology of Indole and Indazole Synthetic Cannabinoid Designer Drugs AB-FUBINACA, ADB-FUBINACA, AB-PINACA, ADB-PINACA, 5F-AB-PINACA, 5F-ADB-PINACA, ADBICA, and 5F-ADBICA.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Moir, Michael; Stuart, Jordyn; Kevin, Richard C; Wood, Katie E; Longworth, Mitchell; Wilkinson, Shane M; Beinat, Corinne; Buchanan, Alexandra S; Glass, Michelle; Connor, Mark; McGregor, Iain S; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-09-16

    Synthetic cannabinoid (SC) designer drugs based on indole and indazole scaffolds and featuring l-valinamide or l-tert-leucinamide side chains are encountered with increasing frequency by forensic researchers and law enforcement agencies and are associated with serious adverse health effects. However, many of these novel SCs are unprecedented in the scientific literature at the time of their discovery, and little is known of their pharmacology. Here, we report the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of AB-FUBINACA, ADB-FUBINACA, AB-PINACA, ADB-PINACA, 5F-AB-PINACA, 5F-ADB-PINACA, ADBICA, 5F-ADBICA, and several analogues. All synthesized SCs acted as high potency agonists of CB1 (EC50 = 0.24-21 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 0.88-15 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with 5F-ADB-PINACA showing the greatest potency at CB1 receptors. The cannabimimetic activities of AB-FUBINACA and AB-PINACA in vivo were evaluated in rats using biotelemetry. AB-FUBINACA and AB-PINACA dose-dependently induced hypothermia and bradycardia at doses of 0.3-3 mg/kg, and hypothermia was reversed by pretreatment with a CB1 (but not CB2) antagonist, indicating that these SCs are cannabimimetic in vivo, consistent with anecdotal reports of psychoactivity in humans. PMID:26134475

  5. Electronic Resources in a Next-Generation Catalog: The Case of WorldCat Local

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Steve

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007, the University of Washington Libraries debuted WorldCat Local (WCL), a localized version of the WorldCat database that interoperates with a library's integrated library system and fulfillment services to provide a single-search interface for a library's physical and electronic content. This brief will describe how WCL incorporates a…

  6. 26 CFR 5f.103-3 - Information reporting requirements for certain bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Information reporting requirements for certain bonds. 5f.103-3 Section 5f.103-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX EQUITY AND...

  7. Local spin torque induced by electron electric dipole moment in the YbF molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Masahiro; Senami, Masato; Ogiso, Yoji; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2014-10-06

    In this study, we show the modification of the equation of motion of the electronic spin, which is derived by the quantum electron spin vorticity principle, by the effect of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM). To investigate the new contribution to spin torque by EDM, using first principle calculations, we visualize distributions of the local spin angular momentum density and local spin torque density of the YbF molecule on which the static electric field and magnetic field are applied at t = 0.

  8. Current driven due to localized electron power deposition in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.; Sauter, O.; Smirnov, A.P.

    1999-05-01

    Due to spatial localization of electron cyclotron wave injection in DIII-D, electrons heated in an off-axis region must toroidally transit the tokamak 25--50 times before re-entering the heating region. This distance is of the order of the mean free path. The effect of such RF localization is simulated with a time-dependent Fokker-Planck code which is 2D-in-velocity, 1D-in-space-along-B, and periodic in space. An effective parallel electric field arises to maintain continuity of the driven current. Somewhat surprisingly, the localized current drive efficiency remains equal to that for a uniform medium.

  9. Creation of Electron Trap States in Silicon Dioxide By Local Electron Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Dustin; Williams, Clayton

    2012-02-01

    Over a decade ago, the Scanning Tunneling Microscope was shown capable of desorbing single hydrogen atoms from the surface of hydrogen terminated silicon.ootnotetextT.C. Shen et. al. Science 268, 1590 (1995). The resultant dangling bonds can act as atomic scale quantum dots.ootnotetextM. B Haider et. al. PRL 102, 046805 (2009). Electrons trapped in such dangling bond states at the surface of crystalline silicon have short retention times at room temperature, due to the proximity of the occupied state energy level to the conduction band. Here we report on a method for creating electron trap states at the surface of a silicon dioxide film by electron injection from a metalized Atomic Force Microscope probe tip. Single Electron Tunneling Force measurementsootnotetextE. Bussmann, et. al. Appl. Phys. Lett., 85, 13 (2004). are employed to examine the existence of trap states in the silicon dioxide surface before and after the electron injection. Evidence for electron trap state creation, without topographic modification of the silicon dioxide surface, will be presented. The trap states created by this process have electron retention times which are greater than one second at room temperature. The methodology for trap state creation and detection will be presented.

  10. Electron localization in self-assembled Si quantum dots grown on Ge(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepina, N. P.; Zinovieva, A. F.; Zinovyev, V. A.; Deryabin, A. S.; Kulik, L. V.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    Electron localization in a Si/Ge heterosystem with Si quantum dots (QDs) was studied by transport and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. For Si QD structures grown on Ge(111) substrates, the ESR signal with a g-factor g=2.0022+/- 0.0001 and ESR line width {{Δ }}H≈ 1.2 Oe was observed and attributed to the electrons localized in QDs. The g-factor value was explained taking into account the energy band modification due to both strain and quantum confinement. The transport behavior confirms the efficient electron localization in QDs for a Si/Ge(111) system. A strong Ge-Si intermixing in QD structures grown on Ge(001) is assumed to be the main reason for an unobserved ESR signal from the QDs.

  11. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Songkil; Henry, Mathias; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-30

    We report on a method for “direct-write” conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  12. Localized conductive patterning via focused electron beam reduction of graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Songkil; Kulkarni, Dhaval D.; Henry, Mathias; Zackowski, Paul; Jang, Seung Soon; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    2015-03-01

    We report on a method for "direct-write" conductive patterning via reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) of carbon. FEBID treatment of the intrinsically dielectric graphene oxide between two metal terminals opens up the conduction channel, thus enabling a unique capability for nanoscale conductive domain patterning in GO. An increase in FEBID electron dose results in a significant increase of the domain electrical conductivity with improving linearity of drain-source current vs. voltage dependence, indicative of a change of graphene oxide electronic properties from insulating to semiconducting. Density functional theory calculations suggest a possible mechanism underlying this experimentally observed phenomenon, as localized reduction of graphene oxide layers via interactions with highly reactive intermediates of electron-beam-assisted dissociation of surface-adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules. These findings establish an unusual route for using FEBID as nanoscale lithography and patterning technique for engineering carbon-based nanomaterials and devices with locally tailored electronic properties.

  13. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-21

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound. PMID:27208927

  14. Communication: Near-locality of exchange and correlation density functionals for 1- and 2-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John P.; Yang, Zenghui; Peng, Haowei

    2016-05-01

    The uniform electron gas and the hydrogen atom play fundamental roles in condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry. The former has an infinite number of electrons uniformly distributed over the neutralizing positively charged background, and the latter only one electron bound to the proton. The uniform electron gas was used to derive the local spin density approximation to the exchange-correlation functional that undergirds the development of the Kohn-Sham density functional theory. We show here that the ground-state exchange-correlation energies of the hydrogen atom and many other 1- and 2-electron systems are modeled surprisingly well by a different local spin density approximation (LSDA0). LSDA0 is constructed to satisfy exact constraints but agrees surprisingly well with the exact results for a uniform two-electron density in a finite, curved three-dimensional space. We also apply LSDA0 to excited or noded 1-electron densities, where it works less well. Furthermore, we show that the localization of the exact exchange hole for a 1- or 2-electron ground state can be measured by the ratio of the exact exchange energy to its optimal lower bound.

  15. Dynamic modulation of electronic properties of graphene by localized carbon doping using focused electron beam induced deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Russell, M.; Henry, M.; Kim, S. S.; Naik, R. R.; Voevodin, A. A.; Jang, S. S.; Tsukruk, V. V.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an ``n-p-n'' junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated from a low dose of high energy (25 keV) electron beam (1 × 1018 e- per cm2). Detailed AFM imaging provides direct evidence of the new mechanism responsible for dynamic evolution of the locally varying graphene doping. The FEBID carbon atoms, which are physisorbed and weakly bound to graphene, diffuse towards the middle of graphene conduction channel due to their surface chemical potential gradient, resulting in negative shift of Dirac voltage. Increasing a primary electron dose to 1 × 1019 e- per cm2 results in a significant increase of carbon deposition, such that it covers the entire graphene conduction channel at high surface density, leading to n-doping of graphene channel. Collectively, these findings establish a unique capability of FEBID technique to dynamically modulate the doping state of graphene, thus enabling a new route to resist-free, ``direct-write'' functional patterning of graphene-based electronic devices with potential for on-demand re-configurability.We report on the first demonstration of controllable carbon doping of graphene to engineer local electronic properties of a graphene conduction channel using focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Electrical measurements indicate that an ``n-p-n'' junction on graphene conduction channel is formed by partial carbon deposition near the source and drain metal contacts by low energy (<50 eV) secondary electrons due to inelastic collisions of long range backscattered primary electrons generated

  16. Presolvated Electron Reaction with Methylacetoacetate: Electron Localization, Proton-Deuteron Exchange, and H-atom Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Petrovici, Alex; Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-produced electrons initiate various reaction processes that are important to radiation damage to biomolecules. In this work, the site of attachment of the prehydrated electrons with methylacetoacetate (MAA, CH3-CO-CH2-CO-OCH3) at 77 K and subsequent reactions of the anion radical (CH3-CO•−-CH2-CO-OCH3) in the temperature range (77 to ca. 170 K) have been investigated in homogeneous H2O and D2O aqueous glasses by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. At 77 K, the prehydrated electron attaches to MAA forming the anion radical in which the electron is delocalized over the two carbonyl groups. This species readily protonates to produce the protonated electron adduct radical CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3. The ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in H2O shows line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of the methyl and methylene groups. Whereas, the ESR spectrum of CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 in D2O glass shows only the line components due to proton hyperfine couplings of CH3 group. This is expected since the methylen protons in MAA are readily exchangeable in D2O. On stepwise annealing to higher temperatures (ca. 150 to 170 K), CH3-C(•)OH-CH2-CO-OCH3 undergoes bimolecular H-atom abstraction from MAA to form the more stable radical, CH3-CO-CH•-CO-OCH3. Theoretical calculations using density functional theory (DFT) support the radical assignments. PMID:25255751

  17. Quasi-relativistic SCF X. cap alpha. study of octahedral 5f/sup 1/ complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, G.; Roesch, N.; Edelstein, N.

    1980-05-01

    Quasi-relativistic SCF X..cap alpha.. calculations have been carried out for the octahedral 5f/sup 1/ complexes Pa/sup IV/X/sub 6//sup 2 -/, U/sup V/X/sub 6//sup -/(X = F, Cl, Br, I), and Np/sup VI/F/sub 6/. The 5f ..-->.. 5f excitation energies calculated by using the transition-state method agree well with the available absorption spectra. Ionic effects appear to dominate the trends observed in the f-orbital ligand field splitting.

  18. Localized electronic states at grain boundaries on the surface of graphene and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luican-Mayer, Adina; Barrios-Vargas, Jose E.; Toft Falkenberg, Jesper; Autès, Gabriel; Cummings, Aron W.; Soriano, David; Li, Guohong; Brandbyge, Mads; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Roche, Stephan; Andrei, Eva Y.

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in large-scale synthesis of graphene and other 2D materials have underscored the importance of local defects such as dislocations and grain boundaries (GBs), and especially their tendency to alter the electronic properties of the material. Understanding how the polycrystalline morphology affects the electronic properties is crucial for the development of applications such as flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices or sensors. We here report on atomic scale characterization of several GBs and on the structural-dependence of the localized electronic states in their vicinity. Using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, together with tight binding and ab initio numerical simulations we explore GBs on the surface of graphite and elucidate the interconnection between the local density of states and their atomic structure. We show that the electronic fingerprints of these GBs consist of pronounced resonances which, depending on the relative orientation of the adjacent crystallites, appear either on the electron side of the spectrum or as an electron-hole symmetric doublet close to the charge neutrality point. These two types of spectral features will impact very differently the transport properties allowing, in the asymmetric case to introduce transport anisotropy which could be utilized to design novel growth and fabrication strategies to control device performance.

  19. Local electronic structures and 2D topological phase transition of ultrathin Sb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Park, Joonbum; Kim, Jun Sung; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Yeom, Han Woong

    We investigate local electronic structures of ultrathin Sb islands and their edges grown on Bi2Te2Se by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The Sb islands of various thickness are grown with atomically well ordered edge structure over the 3 bilayers (BL). On the surfaces and edges of these islands, we clearly resolve edge-localized electronic states by STS measurements, which depend on the thickness. The DFT calculations identify that the strongly localized edge states of 4 and 5 BL films correspond to a quantum spin Hall (QSH) states while the edge states of 3 BL are trivial. Our experimental and theoretical results confirm the 2D topological phase transition of the ultrathin Sb films from trivial to QSH phase. Center for Artificial Low Dimensional Electronic Systems, Institute for Basic Science and Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea.

  20. Zigzag Phase Transition in Quantum Wires and Localization in the Inhomogeneous One-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Abhijit C.

    In this work, we study two important themes in the physics of the interacting one-dimensional (1D) electron gas: the transition from one-dimensional to higher dimensional behavior, and the role of inhomogeneity. The interplay between interactions, reduced dimensionality, and inhomogeneity drives a rich variety of phenomena in mesoscopic physics. In 1D, interactions fundamentally alter the nature of the electron gas, and the homogeneous 1D electron gas is described by Luttinger Liquid theory. We use Quantum Monte Carlo methods to study two situations that are beyond Luttinger Liquid theory---the quantum phase transition from a linear 1D electron system to a quasi-1D zigzag arrangement, and electron localization in quantum point contacts. Since the interacting electron gas has fundamentally different behavior in one dimension than in higher dimensions, the transition from 1D to higher dimensional behavior is of both practical and theoretical interest. We study the first stage in such a transition; the quantum phase transition from a 1D linear arrangement of electrons in a quantum wire to a quasi-1D zigzag configuration, and then to a liquid-like phase at higher densities. As the density increases from its lowest values, first, the electrons form a linear Wigner crystal; then, the symmetry about the axis of the wire is broken as the electrons order in a quasi-1D zigzag phase; and, finally, the electrons form a disordered liquid-like phase. We show that the linear to zigzag phase transition occurs even in narrow wires with strong quantum fluctuations, and that it has characteristics which are qualitatively different from the classical transition. Experiments in quantum point contacts (QPC's) show an unexplained feature in the conductance known as the "0.7 Effect''. The presence of the 0.7 effect is an indication of the rich physics present in inhomogeneous systems, and we study electron localization in quantum point contacts to evaluate several different proposed

  1. Local intelligent electronic device (IED) rendering templates over limited bandwidth communication link to manage remote IED

    DOEpatents

    Bradetich, Ryan; Dearien, Jason A; Grussling, Barry Jakob; Remaley, Gavin

    2013-11-05

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for remote device management. According to various embodiments, a local intelligent electronic device (IED) may be in communication with a remote IED via a limited bandwidth communication link, such as a serial link. The limited bandwidth communication link may not support traditional remote management interfaces. According to one embodiment, a local IED may present an operator with a management interface for a remote IED by rendering locally stored templates. The local IED may render the locally stored templates using sparse data obtained from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, the management interface may be a web client interface and/or an HTML interface. The bandwidth required to present a remote management interface may be significantly reduced by rendering locally stored templates rather than requesting an entire management interface from the remote IED. According to various embodiments, an IED may comprise an encryption transceiver.

  2. Localization of the valence electron of endohedrally confined hydrogen, lithium and sodium in fullerene cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuestas, Eloisa; Serra, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    The localization of the valence electron of H, Li and Na atoms enclosed by three different fullerene molecules is studied. The structure of the fullerene molecules is used to calculate the equilibrium position of the endohedrally atom as the minimum of the classical (N + 1)-body Lennard-Jones potential. Once the position of the guest atom is determined, the fullerene cavity is modeled by a short range attractive shell according to molecule symmetry, and the enclosed atom is modeled by an effective one-electron potential. In order to examine whether the endohedral compound is formed by a neutral atom inside a neutral fullerene molecule X@CN or if the valence electron of the encapsulated atom localizes in the fullerene giving rise to a state with the form X+@CN-, we analyze the electronic density, the projections onto free atomic states and the weights of partial angular waves.

  3. Interfacial valence electron localization and the corrosion resistance of Al-SiC nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Mosleh-Shirazi, Sareh; Hua, Guomin; Akhlaghi, Farshad; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural inhomogeneity generally deteriorates the corrosion resistance of materials due to the galvanic effect and interfacial issues. However, the situation may change for nanostructured materials. This article reports our studies on the corrosion behavior of SiC nanoparticle-reinforced Al6061 matrix composite. It was observed that the corrosion resistance of Al6061 increased when SiC nanoparticles were added. Overall electron work function (EWF) of the Al-SiC nanocomposite increased, along with an increase in the corrosion potential. The electron localization function of the Al-SiC nanocomposite was calculated and the results revealed that valence electrons were localized in the region of SiC-Al interface, resulting in an increase in the overall work function and thus building a higher barrier to hinder electrons in the nano-composite to participate in corrosion reactions. PMID:26667968

  4. Localization of the valence electron of endohedrally confined hydrogen, lithium and sodium in fullerene cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuestas, Eloisa; Serra, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    The localization of the valence electron of H, Li and Na atoms enclosed by three different fullerene molecules is studied. The structure of the fullerene molecules is used to calculate the equilibrium position of the endohedrally atom as the minimum of the classical (N + 1)-body Lennard-Jones potential. Once the position of the guest atom is determined, the fullerene cavity is modeled by a short range attractive shell according to molecule symmetry, and the enclosed atom is modeled by an effective one-electron potential. In order to examine whether the endohedral compound is formed by a neutral atom inside a neutral fullerene molecule X@CN or if the valence electron of the encapsulated atom localizes in the fullerene giving rise to a state with the form X+@CN‑, we analyze the electronic density, the projections onto free atomic states and the weights of partial angular waves.

  5. Role of Geometric Distortion and Polarization in Localizing Electronic Excitations in Conjugated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Iffat H; Batista, Enrique R; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Smith, Darryl L; Martin, Richard L

    2013-02-12

    Five different Density Functional Theory (DFT) models (ranging from pure GGA to long-range-corrected hybrid functionals) were used to study computationally the nature of the self-trapped electronic states in oligophenylene vinylenes. The electronic excitations in question include the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1(†)) excitons (calculated using Time Dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method), positive (P(+)) and negative (P(-)) polarons, and the lowest triplet (T1) states (computed with the Self-Consistent Field (SCF) scheme). The polaron formation (spatial localization of excitations) is observed only with the use of range-corrected hybrid DFT models including long-range electronic exchange interactions. The extent of localization for all studied excitations is found to be invariant with respect to the size of the oligomer chain in their corresponding optimal geometries. We have analyzed the interdependence between the extent of the geometrical distortion and the localization of the orbital and spin density, and have observed that the localization of the P(+) and P(-) charged species is quite sensitive to solvent polarization effects and the character of the DFT functional used, rather than the structural deformations. In contrast, the localization of neutral states, S1 and T1(†), is found to follow the structural distortions. Notably, T1 excitation obtained with the mean field SCF approach is always strongly localized in range-corrected hybrid DFT models. The molecular orbital energetics of these excitations was further investigated to identify the relationship between state localization and the corresponding orbital structure. A characteristic stabilization (destabilization) of occupied (virtual) orbitals is observed in hybrid DFT models, compared to tight-binding model-like orbital filling in semilocal GGA functionals. The molecular and natural orbital representation allows visualization of the spatial extent of the underlying electronic states. In terms of

  6. The Role of Localized Inductive Electric Fields in Electron Injections Around Dipolarizing Flux Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, C.; Harris, C.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study energetic electron injections using an analytical model that describes self-consistent electric and magnetic field perturbations of a transient, localized dipolarizing flux bundle (DFB). This simple model can reproduce most injection signatures at multiple locations simultaneously, reaffirming earlier findings that an earthward-traveling DFB can both transport and accelerate electrons to suprathermal energies, and can thus be considered as the primary driver of short-lived (~<10 min) injections. We find that energetic electron drift paths are greatly influenced by the sharp magnetic field gradients around the localized DFB. If the gradients are weak the energetic electrons initiating at reconnection will drift out of the flow channel such that the observed injection is comprised mostly of plasma sheet electrons. However, if the duskward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dawn flank are strong they can cause electrons to drift further earthward from the reconnection site than due to E x B alone. Similarly, strong dawnward magnetic field gradients on the DFB's dusk flank can extract energetic electrons from the inner magnetosphere out to the plasma sheet, where they can either be recirculated earthward or remain at higher L-shells. Therefore, the source of electrons observed during injection depends sensitively on the spacecraft location relative to the DFB and on the DFB's properties.

  7. Energy spectra of Penning electrons in non-local plasma at middle and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, M.; Pramatarov, P.; Kudryavtsev, A.; Peyeva, R.

    2014-05-01

    A recently-developed collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method enabled us to measure the energy spectra of groups of fast non-local electrons in a collisional mode at high pressures, where no collisional energy relaxation of electrons in the different groups takes place in the volume, and the different groups of electrons behave independently of each other. We recorded the energy spectra of groups of fast electrons created via Penning ionization of Ar and N2 impurities by metastable He atoms at He pressures of 30 and 200 Torr. The experiments were conducted in the non-local negative glow plasma of a short dc microdischarge. The Penning electrons' energy spectra were recorded by means of an additional electrode - a sensor located at the boundary of the discharge volume, in contrast with the classical Langmuir probe. The spectra are characterized by the appearance of maxima at characteristic energies corresponding to the energy of the electrons released via Penning reactions. Using the Penning electrons' energy spectra, one can detect and identify the presence of different atomic and molecular admixtures in He at high pressures.

  8. Launch mission summary: Intelsat 5 (F3) Atlas/Centaur-55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Intelsat 5 (F3) spacecraft, launch vehicle, and mission are described. Information relative to launch windows, flight plan, radar and telemetry coverage, selected trajectory information, and a brief sequence of flight events is provided.

  9. Detection of localized hot electrons in low-pressure large-area microwave discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebessy, Tibor; Kando, Masashi; Kudela, Jozef

    2000-10-01

    A localized hot-electron region was observed in low-pressure (<3 mTorr) large-area microwave discharges. The region appears in the vicinity of the waveguiding plasma-dielectric interface in the place of critical plasma density. The existence of localized hot electrons is explained on the basis of transit time heating in the resonantly enhanced electric field. The phenomenon provides experimental evidence that the plasma resonance region plays an active role in heating mechanism in low-pressure microwave discharges.

  10. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported.

  11. Long electron spin coherence in ion-implanted GaN: The role of localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buß, J. H.; Rudolph, J.; Shvarkov, S.; Hardtdegen, H.; Wieck, A. D.; Hägele, D.

    2013-05-01

    The impact of Ga and Au ion implantation on the electron spin dynamics in bulk wurtzite GaN is studied by time-resolved Kerr-rotation spectroscopy. The spin relaxation time increases strongly by up to a factor of 20 for increasing implantation doses. This drastic increase is caused by a transition from delocalized to localized electrons. We find a characteristic change in the magnetic field dependence of spin relaxation that can be used as a sensitive probe for the degree of localization.

  12. Density functionals not based on the electron gas: local-density approximation for a Luttinger liquid.

    PubMed

    Lima, N A; Silva, M F; Oliveira, L N; Capelle, K

    2003-04-11

    By shifting the reference system for the local-density approximation (LDA) from the electron gas to other model systems, one obtains a new class of density functionals, which by design account for the correlations present in the chosen reference system. This strategy is illustrated by constructing an explicit LDA for the one-dimensional Hubbard model. While the traditional ab initio LDA is based on a Fermi liquid (the three-dimensional interacting electron gas), this one is based on a Luttinger liquid. First applications to inhomogeneous Hubbard models, including one containing a localized impurity, are reported. PMID:12731934

  13. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed.

  14. Evidence of local power deposition and electron heating by a standing electromagnetic wave in electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma.

    PubMed

    Durocher-Jean, A; Stafford, L; Dap, S; Makasheva, K; Clergereaux, R

    2014-09-01

    Microwave plasmas excited at electron-cyclotron resonance were studied in the 0.5-15 mTorr pressure range. In contrast with low-limit pressure conditions where the plasma emission highlights a fairly homogeneous spatial structure, a periodic spatial modulation (period ∼6.2 cm) appeared as pressure increased. This feature is ascribed to a local power deposition (related to the electron density) due to the presence of a standing electromagnetic wave created by the feed electromagnetic field (2.45 GHz) in the cavity formed by the reactor walls. Analysis of the electron energy probability function by Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy further revealed the presence of a high-energy tail that showed strong periodic spatial modulation at higher pressure. The spatial evolution of the electron density and of the characteristic temperature of these high-energy electrons coincides with the nodes (maximum) and antinodes (minimum) of the standing wave. These spatially-modulated power deposition and electron heating mechanisms are then discussed. PMID:25314546

  15. Method for local temperature measurement in a nanoreactor for in situ high-resolution electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, S B; Kooyman, P J; Creemer, J F; Morana, B; Mele, L; Dona, P; Nelissen, B J; Helveg, S

    2013-10-01

    In situ high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of solids under reactive gas conditions can be facilitated by microelectromechanical system devices called nanoreactors. These nanoreactors are windowed cells containing nanoliter volumes of gas at ambient pressures and elevated temperatures. However, due to the high spatial confinement of the reaction environment, traditional methods for measuring process parameters, such as the local temperature, are difficult to apply. To address this issue, we devise an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) method that probes the local temperature of the reaction volume under inspection by the electron beam. The local gas density, as measured using quantitative EELS, is combined with the inherent relation between gas density and temperature, as described by the ideal gas law, to obtain the local temperature. Using this method we determined the temperature gradient in a nanoreactor in situ, while the average, global temperature was monitored by a traditional measurement of the electrical resistivity of the heater. The local gas temperatures had a maximum of 56 °C deviation from the global heater values under the applied conditions. The local temperatures, obtained with the proposed method, are in good agreement with predictions from an analytical model. PMID:23831940

  16. Validation of local hybrid functionals for TDDFT calculations of electronic excitation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Toni M.; Bahmann, Hilke; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The first systematic evaluation of local hybrid functionals for the calculation of electronic excitation energies within linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is reported. Using our recent efficient semi-numerical TDDFT implementation [T. M. Maier et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4226 (2015)], four simple, thermochemically optimized one-parameter local hybrid functionals based on local spin-density exchange are evaluated against a database of singlet and triplet valence excitations of organic molecules, and against a mixed database including also Rydberg, intramolecular charge-transfer (CT) and core excitations. The four local hybrids exhibit comparable performance to standard global or range-separated hybrid functionals for common singlet valence excitations, but several local hybrids outperform all other functionals tested for the triplet excitations of the first test set, as well as for relative energies of excited states. Evaluation for the combined second test set shows that local hybrids can also provide excellent Rydberg and core excitations, in the latter case rivaling specialized functionals optimized specifically for such excitations. This good performance of local hybrids for different excitation types could be traced to relatively large exact-exchange (EXX) admixtures in a spatial region intermediate between valence and asymptotics, as well as close to the nucleus, and lower EXX admixtures in the valence region. In contrast, the tested local hybrids cannot compete with the best range-separated hybrids for intra- and intermolecular CT excitation energies. Possible directions for improvement in the latter category are discussed. As the used efficient TDDFT implementation requires essentially the same computational effort for global and local hybrids, applications of local hybrid functionals to excited-state problems appear promising in a wide range of fields. Influences of current-density dependence of local kinetic

  17. Electronic structure of delta-Pu and PuCoGa[sub 3] from photoemission and the mixed level model

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J. J.; Wills, J. M.; Durakiewicz, T.; Butterfield, M. T.; Guziewicz, E.; Sarrao, John L.,; Arko, A. J.; Moore, D. P.; Morales, L. A.; Eriksson, O.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structure of {delta}-phase Pu metal and the Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy and a novel theoretical scheme. Excellent agreement between calculation and experiment defines a path forward for understanding electronic structure aspects of Pu-based materials. The photoemission results show two separate regions of 5f electron spectral intensity, one at the Fermi energy and another centered 1.2 eV below the Fermi level. A comparison is made between the photoemission data and five computational schemes for {delta}-Pu. The results for {delta}-Pu and PuCoGa{sub 5} indicate 5f electron behavior on the threshold between localized and itinerant and a broader framework for understanding the fundamental electronic properties of the Pu 5f levels in general within two configurations, one localized and one itinerant.

  18. A measure of localization properties of one-dimensional single electron lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Longyan; Li, Wenjia; Zhao, Shengmei; Cheng, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel quantity to measure the degree of localization properties of various types of one-dimension single electron states. The quantity includes information about the spatial variation of probability density of quantum states. Numerical results show that it can distinguish localized states from delocalized ones, so it can be used as a fruitful index to monitor the localization-delocalization transition. Comparing with existing measures, such as geometric average density of states, inverse participation ratio, and quantum information entropies, our proposed quantity has some advantages over them.

  19. Evidence of locally enhanced target heating due to instabilities of counter-streaming fast electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Petra; Cecchetti, Carlo A.; Booth, Nicola; Woolsey, Nigel; Chen, Hui; Evans, Roger G.; Gregori, Gianluca; Li, Bin; Mithen, James; Murphy, Christopher D.; Labate, Luca; Gizzi, Leonida A.; Levato, Tadzio; Makita, Mikako; Riley, David; Notley, Margaret; Pattathil, Rajeev

    2015-02-15

    The high-current fast electron beams generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions require the onset of a balancing return current in order to propagate in the target material. Such a system of counter-streaming electron currents is unstable to a variety of instabilities such as the current-filamentation instability and the two-stream instability. An experimental study aimed at investigating the role of instabilities in a system of symmetrical counter-propagating fast electron beams is presented here for the first time. The fast electron beams are generated by double-sided laser-irradiation of a layered target foil at laser intensities above 10{sup 19 }W/cm{sup 2}. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of the emission from the central Ti layer shows that locally enhanced energy deposition is indeed achieved in the case of counter-propagating fast electron beams.

  20. Electron transport in radiotherapy using local-to-global Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Svatos, M.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Siantar, C.L.H.; Rathkopf, J.A.; Ballinger, C.T.; Neuenschwander, H.; Mackie, T.R.; Reckwerdt, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    Local-to-Global (L-G) Monte Carlo methods are a way to make three-dimensional electron transport both fast and accurate relative to other Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by breaking the simulation into two stages: a local calculation done over small geometries having the size and shape of the ``steps`` to be taken through the mesh; and a global calculation which relies on a stepping code that samples the stored results of the local calculation. The increase in speed results from taking fewer steps in the global calculation than required by ordinary Monte Carlo codes and by speeding up the calculation per step. The potential for accuracy comes from the ability to use long runs of detailed codes to compile probability distribution functions (PDFs) in the local calculation. Specific examples of successful Local-to-Global algorithms are given.

  1. A comparison of classical and quantum analyses of electron localization sites in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motakabbir, Kazi A.; Schnitker, Jurgen; Rossky, Peter J.

    1992-08-01

    The results of an earlier study [Schnitker, Rossky, and Kenney-Wallace, J. Chem. Phys. 85, 2986 (1986)] in which likely sites for electron localization in pure liquid water were identified and characterized via a physically motivated purely classical analysis are statistically compared to a corresponding fully quantum mechanical treatment of the excess electronic ground state. It is shown that the most energetically favorable localization sites identified by the classical treatment correspond reasonably to the quantum mechanical result both energetically and spatially. It is found that the existence and location of a physically localized ground state can be determined from the classical results if both the minimum of the estimated absolute total electronic energy and the difference between this minimum and the alternative local minima identified within a solvent configuration are considered. Further, the results confirm that the concentration of such effective sites is relatively high in the liquid (˜0.01 M). Hence, the classical approach has merit as a qualitative tool for the analysis of the electronic states supported by the preexisting configurational order in a liquid.

  2. Sustainable Development and African Local Government: Can Electronic Training Help Build Capacities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Hazel; Thomas, Alan

    2007-01-01

    A recent study carried out by European and African organizations into the potential for electronic distance training (EDT) on sustainability in African local governments concluded that EDT was both "useful and feasible". This article reflects on some of the theoretical and practical implications of that study. It focuses on the connection between…

  3. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 2: Experimental support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    The microscopic characteristics of the Coulomb cross section show that there are three natural subpopulations for plasma electrons: the subthermals with local kinetic energy E kT sub c; the transthermals with kT sub c E 7 kT sub c and the extrathermals E 7 kT sub c. Data from three experimental groups on three different spacecraft in the interplanetary medium over a radial range are presented to support the five interrelations projected between solar wind electron properties and changes in the interplanetary medium: (1) subthermals respond primarily to local changes (compression and rarefactions) in stream dynamics; (2) the extrathermal fraction of the ambient electron density should be anti-correlated with the asymptotic bulk speed; (3) the extrathermal "temperature" should be anti-correlated with the local wind speed at 1 AU; (4) the heat flux carried by electrons should be anti-correlated with the local bulk speed; and (5) the extrathermal differential 'temperature' should be nearly independent of radius within 1 AU.

  4. On the robustness of the localized spatiotemporal structures in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, S.M.; Berezhiani, V.I. |; Miklaszewski, R.

    1998-04-01

    It is shown that, in an electron-positron plasma with a small fraction of ions, large-amplitude localized spatiotemporal structures (light bullets) can be readily generated and sustained. These light bullets are found to be exceptionally robust: they can emerge from a large variety of initial field distributions and are remarkably stable.

  5. Copper plasmonics and catalysis: role of electron-phonon interactions in dephasing localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qi-C.; Ding, Yuchen; Goodman, Samuel M.; H. Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-10-01

    Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain boundary scattering on the decay of localized surface plasmon waves. Using our quantitative analysis and different temperature dependent measurements, we show that electron-phonon interactions dominate over other scattering mechanisms in dephasing plasmon waves. While interband transitions in copper metal contributes substantially to plasmon losses, tuning surface plasmon modes to infrared frequencies leads to a five-fold enhancement in the quality factor. These findings demonstrate that conformal ALD coatings can improve the chemical stability for copper nanoparticles, even at high temperatures (>300 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and nanoscaled copper is a good alternative material for many potential applications in nanophotonics, plasmonics, catalysis and nanoscale electronics.Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain

  6. Investigation of S3-2 satellite data for local time variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbe, S.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Vampola, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precipitating electrons from the S3-2 satellite were investigated for local time variation at four L = 4 stations in the southern hemisphere. The equatorial pitch angles of electrons mirroring at 100 km, assumed to be the edge of the bounce loss cone, are calculated for L = 4 using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for the epoch of the S3-2 data, along with the variation in mirror altitude per degree of equatorial pitch angle. The largest obstacle to the investigation was uneven sampling in terms of local time for all of the stations. However, this situation was improved upon by the use of S3-2 measurements at the conjugate locations of the four stations which provided additional data on electrons in the southern hemisphere bounce loss cone. Evidence for an effect of the dawn-to-dusk geoelectric field was found at two of the stations, Halley Bay and Siple, in the form of a minimum in electron precipitation at dusk. However, the present study does not completely resolve the question of local time modulation of electron precipitation at L = 4 in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, while the average precipitation was lowest at the Kerguelen site, as would be expected on the basis of drift loss cone (DLC) theories, the intensity at that site exceeds the level that is expected on the basis of these DLC theories.

  7. Tunable interaction-induced localization of surface electrons in antidot nanostructured Bi2Te3 thin films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Chao; Lu, Hai-Zhou; He, Hong-Tao; Li, Baikui; Liu, Shi-Guang; He, Qing Lin; Wang, Gan; Sou, Iam Keong; Shen, Shun-Qing; Wang, Jiannong

    2014-09-23

    Recently, a logarithmic decrease of conductivity has been observed in topological insulators at low temperatures, implying a tendency of localization of surface electrons. Here, we report quantum transport experiments on the topological insulator Bi2Te3 thin films with arrayed antidot nanostructures. With increasing density of the antidots, a systematic decrease is observed in the slope of the logarithmic temperature-dependent conductivity curves, indicating the electron-electron interaction can be tuned by the antidots. Meanwhile, the weak antilocalization effect revealed in magnetoconductivity exhibits an enhanced dominance of electron-electron interaction among decoherence mechanisms. The observation can be understood from an antidot-induced reduction of the effective dielectric constant, which controls the interactions between the surface electrons. Our results clarify the indispensable role of the electron-electron interaction in the localization of surface electrons and indicate the localization of surface electrons in an interacting topological insulator.

  8. Modeling localized photoinduced electrons in rutile-TiO2 using periodic DFT+U methodology.

    PubMed

    Jedidi, Abdesslem; Markovits, Alexis; Minot, C; Bouzriba, Sarra; Abderraba, Manef

    2010-11-01

    We propose a theoretical model for photocatalytic processes on titanium dioxide, described by its most stable phase and surface, rutile-TiO(2)(110). The excitation induced by light promotes electrons from the valence band to the conduction band. In this context, one important requirement is having a correct value of the magnitude of the electronic gap. The use of GGA+U or LDA+U functional with an appropriate U value allows this. The U correction has little consequence on the adsorption strength itself on the TiO(2)(110) surface. For the ground state, it only yields a slight increase of the interaction strength of some test molecules; the surface basicity is somewhat enhanced. This is interpreted by the shift of TiO(2) vacant levels. Photoexcitation is taken into account by imposing two unpaired electrons per cell of the same spin. The size of the cell therefore determines the number of excitations per surface area; the larger the cell, the smaller the electron-hole surface concentration and the smaller the energy for electronic excitation. For the excited state, careful attention must be focused on the localization of the excited electron and of the hole which are crucial for the determination of the lowest electronic states and for the surface reactivity. We found that the excited electron is localized on a pentacoordinated surface titanium atom while the hole is shared by two surface oxygen atoms not too far from it. The electronic levels associated to the reduced titanium atoms are low in energy; the projected density of states is superposed onto the valence band.

  9. Rapid local acceleration of relativistic radiation-belt electrons by magnetospheric chorus.

    PubMed

    Thorne, R M; Li, W; Ni, B; Ma, Q; Bortnik, J; Chen, L; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Henderson, M G; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S; Hospodarsky, G B; Blake, J B; Fennell, J F; Claudepierre, S G; Kanekal, S G

    2013-12-19

    Recent analysis of satellite data obtained during the 9 October 2012 geomagnetic storm identified the development of peaks in electron phase space density, which are compelling evidence for local electron acceleration in the heart of the outer radiation belt, but are inconsistent with acceleration by inward radial diffusive transport. However, the precise physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration on 9 October was not identified. Previous modelling has indicated that a magnetospheric electromagnetic emission known as chorus could be a potential candidate for local electron acceleration, but a definitive resolution of the importance of chorus for radiation-belt acceleration was not possible because of limitations in the energy range and resolution of previous electron observations and the lack of a dynamic global wave model. Here we report high-resolution electron observations obtained during the 9 October storm and demonstrate, using a two-dimensional simulation performed with a recently developed time-varying data-driven model, that chorus scattering explains the temporal evolution of both the energy and angular distribution of the observed relativistic electron flux increase. Our detailed modelling demonstrates the remarkable efficiency of wave acceleration in the Earth's outer radiation belt, and the results presented have potential application to Jupiter, Saturn and other magnetized astrophysical objects. PMID:24352287

  10. Distinct local electronic structure and magnetism for Mn in amorphous Si and Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Li; Cao, J. X.; Helgren, E.; Karel, J.; Arenholz, E.; Ouyang, Lu; Smith, David J.; Wu, R. Q.; Hellman, F.

    2010-06-01

    Transition metals such as Mn generally have large local moments in covalent semiconductors due to their partially filled d shells. However, Mn magnetization in group-IV semiconductors is more complicated than often recognized. Here we report a striking crossover from a quenched Mn moment (<0.1 {mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Si (a-Si) to a large distinct local Mn moment ({ge}3{mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Ge (a-Ge) over a wide range of Mn concentrations (0.005-0.20). Corresponding differences are observed in d-shell electronic structure and the sign of the Hall effect. Density-functional-theory calculations show distinct local structures, consistent with different atomic density measured for a-Si and a-Ge, respectively, and the Mn coordination number N{sub c} is found to be the key factor. Despite the amorphous structure, Mn in a-Si is in a relatively well-defined high coordination interstitial type site with broadened d bands, low moment, and electron (n-type) carriers, while Mn in a-Ge is in a low coordination substitutional type site with large local moment and holes (p-type) carriers. Moreover, the correlation between N{sub c} and the magnitude of the local moment is essentially independent of the matrix; the local Mn moments approach zero when N{sub c} > 7 for both a-Si and a-Ge.

  11. Adenovirus 5 and chimeric adenovirus 5/F35 employ distinct B-lymphocyte intracellular trafficking routes that are independent of their cognate cell surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Mathieu; Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Jung, Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Gene transfer applications with adenovirus (Ad) type 5 are limited by its native tropism, hampering their use in several cell types. To address this limitation, several Ad vectors bearing chimeric fiber have been produced to take advantage of the different cellular receptors used by other subgroups of Ads. In this study, we have compared the transduction efficiency of Ad5 and the chimeric Ad5/F35 in primary human B lymphocytes and B-cell lines as a function of the developmental stage. We found that transduction efficiencies of the two Ads differ independently of their targeted cellular receptor but are related to the intracellular localization of the virus. In efficiently transduced cells, Ads were localized in early endosomes or cytosol, whereas in poorly transduced cells they were localized within late endosomes/lysosomes. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of cells with phosphatase inhibitors known to redirect endocytosis towards caveolae, increased Ad5/F35 transduction efficiency.

  12. Local electron heating in the Io plasma torus associated with Io: the HISAKI observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Kagitani, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Kasaba, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Yoshikawa, I.; Nozawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    Io-correlated brightness change in Io plasma torus (IPT) has been discovered by Voyager and show an evidence of local electron heating around Io. However, the amount of observation data is still limited to investigate its detail properties. In addition, the clear Io-correlated change has not been detected by EUVE and Cassini observations. Cause of the Io-correlated effect is still open issue. The HISAKI satellite was launched on Sep. 14, 2013 and started observation of IPT and Jovian aurora for more than two months since the end of Dec. 2013. EUV spectrograph onboard the HISAKI satellite covers wavelength range from 55 to 145 nm, a wide slit which had a field of view of 400 x 140 arc-second was chosen to measure radial distribution and time variation of IPT. Observation of IPT with HISAKI showed clear Io-correlated brightness change since the Voyager observation. The amplitude of the periodic variation associated with Io's orbital period was found. It also showed long-term variation during the HISAKI's observation period. Through the observation period, the amplitude was larger in the short wavelength than in long wavelength. The wavelength dependence suggests significant electron heating and/or hot electron production. The Io phase dependence shows that bright region is located just downstream of Io. These are evidence of local electron heating around/downstream of Io and consistent with the Voyager result. The brightness also depends on system-III longitude and has local maximum around 120 and 300 degrees. Based on an empirical model of IPT, electron density at Io also shows maxima around the same longitudes. This suggests that the electron heating process is related with plasma density at Io. Candidate mechanisms which are responsible for the electron heating will be discussed.

  13. Topological analysis of the electron density and of the electron localization function of pyrene and its radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; García-Cruz, Isidoro; Martínez-Magadán, José Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The topological properties of the charge distribution of pyrene and the three derived monoradicals in their ground state and of didehydrogenated pyrenes in the lowest singlet and triplet electronic states are discussed in detail by means of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (TAIM) and by the electron localization function (ELF). The non-equivalence of the fused aromatic rings of pyrene prevents one from anticipating the stability and reactivity of these species from the chemistry of didehydrogenated species derived from benzene only. Whereas some of these didehydrogenated molecules were found to display a diradical character in the singlet ground state, the topological analysis reveals that others correspond to normal closed shells. Using these theoretical tools, the energetic and geometric details of o-, m- and p-benzyne-like pyrene derivatives are explained.

  14. Role of electron carriers on local surface plasmon resonances in doped oxide semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki Tabata, Hitoshi; Furuta, Shinya

    2014-05-26

    Optical properties of carrier-dependent local surface plasmons (LSPs) were studied using dopant-controlled In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Sn nanocrystals (NCs). From a systematic correlation between LSP excitations and electron carriers, electron-impurity scattering contributed towards plasmon damping as one of a factor that is absent in metal NCs. A threshold electron density (n{sub e}) from a damping dominated regime to a quenched damping regime appeared at around 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. The validity of Mie theory failed in ITO NCs with high n{sub e} greater than 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} since the role of electron carriers could enhance LSPs with simultaneous damped plasmonic excitations, which is valuable information for optical applications.

  15. Sum rules and static local-field corrections of electron liquids in two and three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwamoto, N.

    1984-01-01

    The dielectric functions of electron liquids which take into account short-range electron-electron correlations via the static local-field corrections are examined in the light of the frequency-moment sum rules. The formation is given for degenerate as well as classical electron liquids in arbitrary (d) spatial dimensions, which is suitable for comparison between the two- and three-dimensional cases. By using the virial equations of state it is shown that such dielectric functions cannot satisfy the compressibility sum rule and the third-frequency-moment sum rule simultaneously. In the degenerate case, the plasmon, single-pair, and multipair contributions to the sum rules are analyzed, and the reason for this incompatibility is discussed.

  16. Tuning LDA+U for electron localization and structure at oxygen vacancies in ceria.

    PubMed

    Castleton, C W M; Kullgren, J; Hermansson, K

    2007-12-28

    We examine the real space structure and the electronic structure (particularly Ce4f electron localization) of oxygen vacancies in CeO(2) (ceria) as a function of U in density functional theory studies with the rotationally invariant forms of the LDA+U and GGA+U functionals. The four nearest neighbor Ce ions always relax outwards, with those not carrying localized Ce4f charge moving furthest. Several quantification schemes show that the charge starts to become localized at U approximately 3 eV and that the degree of localization reaches a maximum at approximately 6 eV for LDA+U or at approximately 5.5 eV for GGA+U. For higher U it decreases rapidly as charge is transferred onto second neighbor O ions and beyond. The localization is never into atomic corelike states; at maximum localization about 80-90% of the Ce4f charge is located on the two nearest neighboring Ce ions. However, if we look at the total atomic charge we find that the two ions only make a net gain of (0.2-0.4)e each, so localization is actually very incomplete, with localization of Ce4f electrons coming at the expense of moving other electrons off the Ce ions. We have also revisited some properties of defect-free ceria and find that with LDA+U the crystal structure is actually best described with U=3-4 eV, while the experimental band structure is obtained with U=7-8 eV. (For GGA+U the lattice parameters worsen for U>0 eV, but the band structure is similar to LDA+U.) The best overall choice is U approximately 6 eV with LDA+U and approximately 5.5 eV for GGA+U, since the localization is most important, but a consistent choice for both CeO(2) and Ce(2)O(3), with and without vacancies, is hard to find.

  17. Aromaticity of rings-in-molecules (RIMs) from electron localization-delocalization matrices (LDMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumar, Ismat; Cook, Ronald; Ayers, Paul W.; Matta, Chérif F.

    2016-01-01

    A new and powerful molecular descriptor termed the LDM (localization-delocalization matrix) has recently been proposed as a molecular fingerprinting tool and has been shown to yield robust quantitative-structure-to-activity/property-relationships (QSAR/QSPR). An LDM lists the average number of electrons localized within an atom in a molecule along its diagonal while the off-diagonal elements are the pair-wise average number of electrons shared between every pair of atoms in the molecule, bonded or not. Hence, the LDM is a representation of a fuzzy molecular graph that accounts for the whereabouts of all electron(s) in the molecule and can be expected to encode for several facets of its chemistry at once. We show that the LDM captures the aromatic character of a ring-in-a-molecule by comparing the aromaticity ranking based on the LDMs and their eigenvalues of 6-membered carbon rings within (polycyclic) benzenoid hydrocarbons with the ranking based on four well-established local aromaticity measures (harmonic oscillator model of aromaticity, acromatic fluctuation index, para delocalization index, and nucleus independent chemical shift(0)). This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Paul von Ragué Schleyer (1930-2014).

  18. Delocalized and localized states of eg electrons in half-doped manganites.

    PubMed

    Winkler, E L; Tovar, M; Causa, M T

    2013-07-24

    We have studied the magnetic behaviour of half-doped manganite Y0.5Ca0.5MnO3 in an extended range of temperatures by means of magnetic susceptibility, χ(T), and electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments. At high temperature the system crystallizes in an orthorhombic structure. The resistivity value, ρ ≃ 0.05 Ω cm at 500 K, indicates a metallic behaviour, while the Curie-Weiss dependence of χ(T) and the thermal evolution of the ESR parameters are very well described by a model that considers a system conformed by localized Mn(4+) cores, [Formula: see text], and itinerant, eg, electrons. The strong coupling between t2g and eg electrons results in an enhanced Curie constant and an FM Curie-Weiss temperature that overcomes the AFM interactions between the [Formula: see text] cores. A transition to a more distorted phase is observed at T ≈ 500 K and signatures of localization of the eg electrons appear in the χ(T) behaviour below 300 K. A new Curie-Weiss regime is observed, where the Curie-constant value is consistent with dimer formation. Based on mean-field calculations, the dimer formation is predicted as a function of the interaction strength between the t2g and eg electrons.

  19. Copper plasmonics and catalysis: role of electron-phonon interactions in dephasing localized surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-C; Ding, Yuchen; Goodman, Samuel M; Funke, Hans H; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-11-01

    Copper metal can provide an important alternative for the development of efficient, low-cost and low-loss plasmonic nanoparticles, and selective nanocatalysts. However, poor chemical stability and lack of insight into photophysics and plasmon decay mechanisms has impeded study. Here, we use smooth conformal ALD coating on copper nanoparticles to prevent surface oxidation, and study dephasing time for localized surface plasmons on different sized copper nanoparticles. Using dephasing time as a figure of merit, we elucidate the role of electron-electron, electron-phonon, impurity, surface and grain boundary scattering on the decay of localized surface plasmon waves. Using our quantitative analysis and different temperature dependent measurements, we show that electron-phonon interactions dominate over other scattering mechanisms in dephasing plasmon waves. While interband transitions in copper metal contributes substantially to plasmon losses, tuning surface plasmon modes to infrared frequencies leads to a five-fold enhancement in the quality factor. These findings demonstrate that conformal ALD coatings can improve the chemical stability for copper nanoparticles, even at high temperatures (>300 °C) in ambient atmosphere, and nanoscaled copper is a good alternative material for many potential applications in nanophotonics, plasmonics, catalysis and nanoscale electronics.

  20. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2015-02-28

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning, we reformulate the method in a computationally efficient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9 − ((1 − naphthyl) − methyl) − anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH{sub 2} − naphthyl groups as subsystems and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using configuration interaction singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst the excited electronic states.

  1. Electron affinities for rare gases and some actinides from local-spin-density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Wrinn, M.C.; Whitehead, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The negative ions of the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, and Rn) and some actinides (Pu, Am, Bk, Cf, and Es) have been calculated self-consistently by the generalized exchange local-spin-density-functional theory with self-interaction correction and correlation. The electron affinities were obtained as the differences between the statistical total energies of the negative ions and neutral atoms; the electron affinities were positive around several millirydbergs. Consequently, the negative ions are predicted stable for the rare gases and actinides.

  2. Second Line of Defense: Electronic Maintenance Reports, Local Maintenance Provider User Guide, Rev. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Richard J.

    2012-09-01

    The Electronic Maintenance Report forms allow Local Maintenance Providers (LMP) and other program staff to enter maintenance information into a simple and secure system. This document describes the features and information required to complete the Maintenance Report forms. It is expected that all Corrective Maintenance Reports from LMPs will be submitted electronically into the SLD Portal. As an exception (e.g., when access to the SLD Portal is unavailable), Maintenance Reports can be submitted via a secure Adobe PDF form available through the Sustainability Manager assigned to each country.

  3. First-principles Theory of the Momentum-dependent Local Ansatz for Correlated Electron System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Sumal; Kakehashi, Yoshiro

    The momentum-dependent local-ansatz (MLA) wavefunction describes well correlated electrons in solids in both the weak and strong interaction regimes. In order to apply the theory to the realistic system, we have extended the MLA to the first-principles version using the tight-binding LDA+U Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for the paramagnetic Fe that the first-principles MLA can describe a reasonable correlation energy gain and suppression of charge fluctuations due to electron correlations. Furthermore, we show that the MLA yields a distinct momentum dependence of the momentum distribution, and thus improves the Gutzwiller wavefunction.

  4. Measurement of Local Electron Temperature in an Overdense Plasma Based Upon Mode-Converted Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Taylor, G.; Jones, B.; Spaleta, J.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    1999-11-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot use standard ECE diagnostics to measure electron temperature (T_e). They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g. ω_p>>Ωc in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition, optical thickness, τ>2. The τ for EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large wavenumber. For NSTX τ ~ 3000 and for CDX-U τ ~ 300. The τ>2 condition can be reached with a plasma density > 10^11/cm^3 and Te > 1 eV. We report local electron temperature measurements made from mode converted EBW emission on CDX-U, where Te ~ 10 - 200 eV. The emission was absolutely calibrated and the inferred temperatures compared to other independent Te measurements. Using this technique, standard Te profiles have been constructed and local MHD has been observed. Initial results suggest Te measurements from EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts on plasmas where ω_p>>Ω_c.

  5. Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule II: nucleardynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complexpotential model

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2006-12-21

    We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to H{sub 2}O. The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential energy surfaces for the three ({sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}A{sub 1}, and {sup 2}B{sub 2}) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H{sub 2}O{sup -} undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} states, as well as the conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} states, into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multi-dimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

  6. Observation of the non-local electron transport effect by using phase zone plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, K.; Sakaiya, T.; Otani, K.; Watari, T.; Hosoda, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Azechi, H.; Shiraga, H.; Shigemori, K.; Mima, K.

    2008-05-01

    Non-local electron transport effect plays a significant role in inertial confinement fusion because it potentially preheats the fusion fuel and lowers the target density. Non-local electron transport effect is more pronounced for longer laser wave-length and higher intensity. We measured the density of the plastic target irradiated with 0.53 μm laser by using a phase zone plate (PZP) that has spatial resolution of about 2 μm. The target density predicted by the ILESTA-1D simulation with Spitzer-Härm thermal conduction is 1.5 times as large as that predicted with Fokker-Planck thermal conduction. The measured density profile is close to the density profile predicted by the simulation with Fokker-Planck thermal conduction.

  7. Electron transfer and localization in endohedral metallofullerenes: Ab initio density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shenyuan; Yoon, Mina; Hicke, Christian; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Enge

    2008-09-01

    Endohedral metallofullerenes constitute an appealing class of nanoscale building blocks for fabrication of a wide range of materials. One open question of fundamental importance is the precise nature of charge redistribution within the carbon cages (Cn) upon metal encapsulation. Using ab initio density functional theory, we systematically study the electronic structure of metallofullerenes, focusing on the spatial charge redistribution. For large metallofullerenes (n>32) , the valence electrons of the metal atoms are all transferred to the fullerene states. Surprisingly, the transferred charge is found to be highly localized inside the cage near the metal cations rather than uniformly distributed on the surfaces of the carbon cage as traditionally believed. This counterintuitive charge localization picture is attributed to the strong metal-cage interactions within the systems. These findings may prove to be instrumental in the design of fullerene-based functional nanomaterials.

  8. Localization and preparation of recombination-active extended defects for transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, M A; Schuhmann, H; Seibt, M; Radisch, V

    2010-06-01

    Recombination-active extended defects in semiconductors frequently occur at a low density which makes their structural and chemical analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques virtually impossible. Here an approach is described that uses in situ electron beam induced current (EBIC) in a focused ion beam machine to localize such defects for TEM lamella preparation. As an example, a defect complex occurring in block-cast multicrystalline silicon with a density of less than 10(4) cm(-3) has been prepared and analyzed by TEM. The chemical sensitivity of the technique is estimated to be about 10(13) atoms cm(-2) which is comparable to synchrotron-based x-ray techniques. The localization accuracy of the TEM lamella is shown to be better than 50 nm when low-energy EBIC is used.

  9. Exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the parametric two-electron reduced-density-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DePrince, A. Eugene; Mazziotti, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The parametric variational two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) method is applied to computing electronic correlation energies of medium-to-large molecular systems by exploiting the spatial locality of electron correlation within the framework of the cluster-in-molecule (CIM) approximation [S. Li et al., J. Comput. Chem. 23, 238 (2002); J. Chem. Phys. 125, 074109 (2006)]. The 2-RDMs of individual molecular fragments within a molecule are determined, and selected portions of these 2-RDMs are recombined to yield an accurate approximation to the correlation energy of the entire molecule. In addition to extending CIM to the parametric 2-RDM method, we (i) suggest a more systematic selection of atomic-orbital domains than that presented in previous CIM studies and (ii) generalize the CIM method for open-shell quantum systems. The resulting method is tested with a series of polyacetylene molecules, water clusters, and diazobenzene derivatives in minimal and nonminimal basis sets. Calculations show that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with system size. We also compute hydrogen-abstraction energies for a series of hydroxyurea derivatives. Abstraction of hydrogen from hydroxyurea is thought to be a key step in its treatment of sickle cell anemia; the design of hydroxyurea derivatives that oxidize more rapidly is one approach to devising more effective treatments.

  10. Electron density of local interstellar medium, based on the Voyager heliospheric-shock observations

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.B.

    1986-10-01

    Some implications of a model for the solar wind-local-interstellar-medium (LISM) interaction, comprising a bow shock and a heliospheric shock with a contact interface in between, are compared against the Voyager probe data. A fit can be achieved if the LISM electron density is somewhat higher than indicated by pulsar dispersion measurements. The theory is compatible with the hydrogen densities inferred from Copernicus and from the scattering solar L-alpha radiation. 14 references.

  11. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  12. Local Structure, Electronic Behavior, and Electrocatalytic Reactivity of CO-Reduced Platinum-Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Duchesne, Paul N.; Chen, Guangxu; Zheng, Nanfeng; Zhang, Peng

    2014-02-18

    A series of platinum–iron oxide nanoparticles was synthesized using a “clean” CO-reduction method that employed different ratios of Pt-Fe precursor salts in oleylamine at elevated temperatures. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) studies revealed that nearly monodisperse (i.e., with relative standard deviations of less than 15%) nanoparticles with mean diameters of 3.5–4.4 nm and varied elemental compositions (Pt54Fe46 Pt70Fe30, and Pt87Fe13) were obtained. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Pt L3- and Fe K-edges revealed that these nanoparticles all consisted of a Pt core with amorphous iron oxide on the surface. Furthermore, it was observed that the local structure (e.g., Pt–Pt bond distance and coordination number) and electronic behavior of the Pt–FeO nanoparticles (e.g., Pt d electron density and Fe valence state) are dependent on the Pt-Fe precursor ratios used in their synthesis. Quantum mechanical ab initio calculations were employed to interpret the results from X-ray spectroscopy and help elucidate the relationships between local structure and electronic properties in the nanoparticle samples. Finally, the surface reactivity of these nanoparticles in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was explored, demonstrating higher electrocatalytic activity for all three platinum–iron oxide samples in comparison with a commercial Pt catalyst. The surface reactivity was also found to be sensitive to the Pt-Fe ratios of the nanoparticles and could be correlated with their local structure and electronic behavior.

  13. Magnetic forces and localized resonances in electron transfer through quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poniedziałek, M. R.; Szafran, B.

    2010-11-01

    We study the current flow through semiconductor quantum rings. In high magnetic fields the current is usually injected into the arm of the ring preferred by classical magnetic forces. However, for narrow magnetic field intervals that appear periodically on the magnetic field scale the current is injected into the other arm of the ring. We indicate that the appearance of the anomalous—non-classical—current circulation results from Fano interference involving localized resonant states. The identification of the Fano interference is based on the comparison of the solution of the scattering problem with the results of the stabilization method. The latter employs the bound-state type calculations and allows us to extract both the energy of metastable states localized within the ring and the width of resonances by analysis of the energy spectrum of a finite size system as a function of its length. The Fano resonances involving states of anomalous current circulation become extremely narrow on both the magnetic field and energy scales. This is consistent with the orientation of the Lorentz force that tends to keep the electron within the ring and thus increases the lifetime of the electron localization within the ring. Absence of periodic Fano resonances in electron transfer probability through a quantum ring containing an elastic scatterer is also explained.

  14. Criticality of the electron-nucleus cusp condition to local effective potential-energy theories

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2003-01-01

    Local(multiplicative) effective potential energy-theories of electronic structure comprise the transformation of the Schroedinger equation for interacting Fermi systems to model noninteracting Fermi or Bose systems whereby the equivalent density and energy are obtained. By employing the integrated form of the Kato electron-nucleus cusp condition, we prove that the effective electron-interaction potential energy of these model fermions or bosons is finite at a nucleus. The proof is general and valid for arbitrary system whether it be atomic, molecular, or solid state, and for arbitrary state and symmetry. This then provides justification for all prior work in the literature based on the assumption of finiteness of this potential energy at a nucleus. We further demonstrate the criticality of the electron-nucleus cusp condition to such theories by an example of the hydrogen molecule. We show thereby that both model system effective electron-interaction potential energies, as determined from densities derived from accurate wave functions, will be singular at the nucleus unless the wave function satisfies the electron-nucleus cusp condition.

  15. Localization of the electronic excitations in single-walled carbon nanotubes with embedded line impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, P. G.; Cottam, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    A matrix operator formalism is used to study the excitations in long, single-walled carbon nanotubes with the dynamic electronic properties described by a tight-binding model where the interactions between atoms take place via nearest-neighbour hopping. Defects in the form of substitutional impurity atoms are introduced to study the localized electronic modes of the nanotube as well as the propagating modes of the pure (host) material. The impurities are assumed to have the form of one or more line defects parallel to the nanotube axis. Two geometric configurations are investigated corresponding to the longitudinal axis of the nanotube being parallel to either a zigzag or an armchair direction of the graphene lattice. A tridiagonal matrix technique is employed to solve the electronic operator equations that provide a description of the frequencies of the discrete modes of the system and their spatial amplitudes. Numerical examples are presented for different nanotube diameters and spatial configurations of the impurity lines.

  16. Time-dependent behavior of a localized electron at a heterojunction boundary of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min S.; Kim, Hyungjun; Atwater, Harry A.; Goddard, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method for simulating the dynamics of graphene electrons, denoted GraFDTD. We then use GraFDTD to study the temporal behavior of a single localized electron wave packet, showing that it exhibits optical-like dynamics including the Goos–Hänchen effect [F. Goos and H. Hänchen, Ann. Phys.436, 333 (1947)] at a heterojunction, but the behavior is quantitatively different than for electromagnetic waves. This suggests issues that must be addressed in designing graphene-based electronic devices analogous to optical devices. GraFDTD should be useful for studying such complex time-dependent behavior of a quasiparticle in graphene.

  17. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Santomauro, F. G.; Lübcke, A.; Rittmann, J.; Baldini, E.; Ferrer, A.; Silatani, M.; Zimmermann, P.; Grübel, S.; Johnson, J. A.; Mariager, S. O.; Beaud, P.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C.; Ingold, G.; Johnson, S.L.; Chergui, M.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter’s dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti3+ centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides. PMID:26437873

  18. Femtosecond X-ray absorption study of electron localization in photoexcited anatase TiO2.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, F G; Lübcke, A; Rittmann, J; Baldini, E; Ferrer, A; Silatani, M; Zimmermann, P; Grübel, S; Johnson, J A; Mariager, S O; Beaud, P; Grolimund, D; Borca, C; Ingold, G; Johnson, S L; Chergui, M

    2015-10-06

    Transition metal oxides are among the most promising solar materials, whose properties rely on the generation, transport and trapping of charge carriers (electrons and holes). Identifying the latter's dynamics at room temperature requires tools that combine elemental and structural sensitivity, with the atomic scale resolution of time (femtoseconds, fs). Here, we use fs Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) upon 3.49 eV (355 nm) excitation of aqueous colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles to probe the trapping dynamics of photogenerated electrons. We find that their localization at Titanium atoms occurs in <300 fs, forming Ti(3+) centres, in or near the unit cell where the electron is created. We conclude that electron localization is due to its trapping at pentacoordinated sites, mostly present in the surface shell region. The present demonstration of fs hard X-ray absorption capabilities opens the way to a detailed description of the charge carrier dynamics in transition metal oxides.

  19. Electron Localization in Fe3 O4 : an Ab Initio Wannier Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakkaris, Perry; Boekema, Carel

    2014-03-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4 , is an unusual ferrimagnetic oxide with emergent physical properties that are not yet fully understood. Among these are the metal-insulator transition at the Verwey Temperature TV (123K) and a spin-glass-like transition at about twice TV. The ``extra'' fully spin-polarized 3d electrons that span the t2 g bands of the B sublattice show strong electron correlation effects and are mainly responsible for conduction above TV. We perform a DFT+U calculation to obtain a set of Bloch orbitals describing the t2 g bands. We then use the gauge invariance of Wannier functions to transform the Bloch orbitals into a set of Maximally Localized Wannier Functions (MLWFs). The MLWFs are a real space description of the ``extra'' 3d electrons allowing us to describe their spatial localization and determine the mechanism of conduction above TV. Wannier studies of Fe3O4 may also allow us to determine the extent of electronic coupling to lattice vibrations, which may provide us substantial quantitative clues on the physical mechanism of the Verwey Transition. Research is supported by AFC San Jose.

  20. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. PMID:23261400

  1. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzel, Kati

    2016-01-01

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  2. Local conditions for the Pauli potential in order to yield self-consistent electron densities exhibiting proper atomic shell structure.

    PubMed

    Finzel, Kati

    2016-01-21

    The local conditions for the Pauli potential that are necessary in order to yield self-consistent electron densities from orbital-free calculations are investigated for approximations that are expressed with the help of a local position variable. It is shown that those local conditions also apply when the Pauli potential is given in terms of the electron density. An explicit formula for the Ne atom is given, preserving the local conditions during the iterative procedure. The resulting orbital-free electron density exhibits proper shell structure behavior and is in close agreement with the Kohn-Sham electron density. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain self-consistent orbital-free electron densities with proper atomic shell structure from simple one-point approximations for the Pauli potential at local density level.

  3. Scale-adaptive tensor algebra for local many-body methods of electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liakh, Dmitry I

    2014-01-01

    While the formalism of multiresolution analysis (MRA), based on wavelets and adaptive integral representations of operators, is actively progressing in electronic structure theory (mostly on the independent-particle level and, recently, second-order perturbation theory), the concepts of multiresolution and adaptivity can also be utilized within the traditional formulation of correlated (many-particle) theory which is based on second quantization and the corresponding (generally nonorthogonal) tensor algebra. In this paper, we present a formalism called scale-adaptive tensor algebra (SATA) which exploits an adaptive representation of tensors of many-body operators via the local adjustment of the basis set quality. Given a series of locally supported fragment bases of a progressively lower quality, we formulate the explicit rules for tensor algebra operations dealing with adaptively resolved tensor operands. The formalism suggested is expected to enhance the applicability and reliability of local correlated many-body methods of electronic structure theory, especially those directly based on atomic orbitals (or any other localized basis functions).

  4. Latitude and local time dependence of precipitated low energy electrons at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafsson, G.

    1972-01-01

    Data from particle detectors on board the satellite OGO-4 were used to study the precipitation of electrons in the energy range 0.7 to 24 keV. The latitude dependence of these particles in the local time region from midnight to dawn was investigated in detail. The analysis shows that the precipitation of particles of energies 2.3 to 24 keV is centered at an invariant latitude of about 68 deg at midnight with a clear shift in latitude with increasing local time and this shift is more pronounced for lower energies. The highest fluxes of particles in this energy interval are measured at midnight and they decrease rapidly with local time. The data in the energy range 2.3 to 24 keV support a theory where particles are injected in the midnight region from the tail gaining energy due to a betatron process and then drift eastwards in a combined electric and magnetic field. The main part of the electrons at 0.7 keV show a different behavior. They seem to undergo an acceleration process which is rather local, sometimes giving field aligned fluxes which may be super-imposed on the background precipitation.

  5. Band gap bowing and electron localization of (GaxIn1-x)N

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-05-09

    The band gap bowing and the electron localization ofGaxIn1-xN are calculated using both the local density approximation (LDA)and screened-exchange local density functional (sX-LDA) methods. Thecalculated sX-LDA band gaps are in good agreement with the experimentallyobserved values, with errors of -0.26 and 0.09 eV for bulk GaN and InN,respectively. The LDA band gap errors are 1.33 and 0.81 eV for GaN andInN, in order. In contrast to the gap itself, the band gap bowingparameter is found to be very similar in sX-LDA and LDA. We identify thelocalization of hole states in GaxIn1-xN alloys along In-N-In chains. Thepredicted localizationis stronger in sX-LDA.

  6. Localized reconstruction of subunits from electron cryomicroscopy images of macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ilca, Serban L.; Kotecha, Abhay; Sun, Xiaoyu; Poranen, Minna M.; Stuart, David I.; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy can yield near-atomic resolution structures of highly ordered macromolecular complexes. Often however some subunits bind in a flexible manner, have different symmetry from the rest of the complex, or are present in sub-stoichiometric amounts, limiting the attainable resolution. Here we report a general method for the localized three-dimensional reconstruction of such subunits. After determining the particle orientations, local areas corresponding to the subunits can be extracted and treated as single particles. We demonstrate the method using three examples including a flexible assembly and complexes harbouring subunits with either partial occupancy or mismatched symmetry. Most notably, the method allows accurate fitting of the monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerase bound at the threefold axis of symmetry inside a viral capsid, revealing for the first time its exact orientation and interactions with the capsid proteins. Localized reconstruction is expected to provide novel biological insights in a range of challenging biological systems. PMID:26534841

  7. Electron-microscopic cytochemical localization of diamine and polyamine oxidases in pea and maize tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, R. D.; Furey MJ, 3. d.

    1991-01-01

    An electron-microscopic cytochemical method was used to localize diamine oxidase (DAO) in pea and polyamine oxidase (PAO) in maize (Zea mays L.). The method, based on the precipitation of amine-oxidase-generated H2O2 by CeCl3, was shown to be specific for DAO and PAO and permitted their localization in plant tissues with a high degree of resolution. Both enzymes are localized exclusively in the cell wall. Both DAO- and PAO-activity staining is most intense in the middle lamellar region of the wall and in cells exhibiting highly lignified walls. The oxidases could provide H2O2 for peroxidase-mediated cross-linking reactions in the cell wall and may, in this capacity, play a role in the regulation of plant growth.

  8. Analysis of the Tank 5F Feed and Bleed Residual Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Diprete, D.: Coleman, C.; Washington, A.

    2011-07-07

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. As part of Tank 5F Closure Mechanical Cleaning, SRR conducted a 'Feed and Bleed' process in Tank 5F. Following this 'Feed and Bleed' Mechanical Cleaning in Tank 5F, SRR collected two tank heel samples (referred to as sample 1 and sample 2) under Riser 5 to determine the composition of the material remaining in the tanks. This document describes sample analysis results. The conclusions from this analysis follow. (1) The anions measured all had a concentration less than 250 mg/kg, except for oxalate, which had a concentration of 2100-2400 mg/kg. (2) The measured cations with the highest concentration were iron (432,000-519,000 mg/kg), nickel (54,600-69,300 mg/kg), and manganese (35,200-42,100 mg/kg). All other cations measured less than 13,000 mg/kg. (3) The radionuclides present in the highest concentration are {sup 90}Sr (3.0 x 10{sup 10} dpm/g), {sup 137}Cs (6.8 x 10{sup 8} dpm/g), and {sup 241}Am (1.4 x 10{sup 8} - 1.8 x 10{sup 8} dpm/g). (4) The particle size analysis shows a large fraction of particles greater than 100 {micro}.

  9. 26 CFR 5f.103-2 - Public approval of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public approval of industrial development bonds... RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-2 Public approval of industrial development bonds. (a) General rule. An industrial development bond (within the meaning of § 1.103-7(b)(1) issued after December 31, 1982, shall...

  10. 26 CFR 5f.103-2 - Public approval of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Public approval of industrial development bonds... RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-2 Public approval of industrial development bonds. (a) General rule. An industrial development bond (within the meaning of § 1.103-7(b)(1) issued after December 31, 1982, shall...

  11. 26 CFR 5f.103-2 - Public approval of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public approval of industrial development bonds... RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-2 Public approval of industrial development bonds. (a) General rule. An industrial development bond (within the meaning of § 1.103-7(b)(1) issued after December 31, 1982, shall...

  12. Four Postmortem Case Reports with Quantitative Detection of the Synthetic Cannabinoid, 5F-PB-22

    PubMed Central

    Behonick, George; Shanks, Kevin G.; Firchau, Dennis J.; Mathur, Gagan; Lynch, Charles F.; Nashelsky, Marcus; Jaskierny, David J.; Meroueh, Chady

    2014-01-01

    In January 2014, the US government temporarily designated 5F-PB-22, along with three other synthetic cannabinoids (AB-FUBINACA, ADB-PINACA and PB-22), into Schedule I. Over the course of a 4-month time period (July–October 2013), our laboratory quantitatively identified 5F-PB-22 in specimens obtained from four postmortem cases. We describe the four cases, to include pertinent autopsy findings and decedent histories, together with quantitative results for 5F-PB-22 determined in postmortem blood and antemortem serum. Samples were prepared via a liquid–liquid extraction at pH 10.2 into hexane : ethyl acetate. Instrumental analysis was achieved with liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Two ion transitions were monitored for the analyte of interest, and one ion transition was monitored for the internal standard. The observed concentration range of 5F-PB-22 is 1.1–1.5 ng/mL for three postmortem blood specimens and one antemortem serum specimen. Three of the decedents experienced abrupt, sudden death; however, one decedent expired after a rapidly deteriorating hospital course. PMID:24876364

  13. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  14. Four postmortem case reports with quantitative detection of the synthetic cannabinoid, 5F-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Behonick, George; Shanks, Kevin G; Firchau, Dennis J; Mathur, Gagan; Lynch, Charles F; Nashelsky, Marcus; Jaskierny, David J; Meroueh, Chady

    2014-10-01

    In January 2014, the US government temporarily designated 5F-PB-22, along with three other synthetic cannabinoids (AB-FUBINACA, ADB-PINACA and PB-22), into Schedule I. Over the course of a 4-month time period (July-October 2013), our laboratory quantitatively identified 5F-PB-22 in specimens obtained from four postmortem cases. We describe the four cases, to include pertinent autopsy findings and decedent histories, together with quantitative results for 5F-PB-22 determined in postmortem blood and antemortem serum. Samples were prepared via a liquid-liquid extraction at pH 10.2 into hexane : ethyl acetate. Instrumental analysis was achieved with liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Two ion transitions were monitored for the analyte of interest, and one ion transition was monitored for the internal standard. The observed concentration range of 5F-PB-22 is 1.1-1.5 ng/mL for three postmortem blood specimens and one antemortem serum specimen. Three of the decedents experienced abrupt, sudden death; however, one decedent expired after a rapidly deteriorating hospital course. PMID:24876364

  15. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  16. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  17. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  18. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  19. High-energy spectroscopic study of the occupied and empty electronic levels in uranium metal and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Y.

    1980-10-01

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) have been used to investigate the occupied and empty density of states (DOS) of α-uranium and of the compounds UO 2, US, and UAs. At the photon energy (1486.6 eV) used in both methods, the l = 3 projected DOS is bringing the dominant contribution to the experimental spectra. In the pure metal, the total 5f DOS appears as a 4 eV wide band showing a splitting. A completely different situation is encountered in the insulator UO 2 which contains two localized 5f electrons. Discrete XPS (5f 1) and BIS (5f 3) final states are observed on each side of EF, allowing the first determination of the Coulomb correlation energy for 5f electrons. In the occupied part of the band the p states are clearly separated from the 5f peak. The XPS spectra of US and UAs show similarly separated p and f structures but the metallic character of these compounds is recognized by the high DOS at EF. Their BIS spectra are formed by a dominant peak followed by an intense tail extending far above EF. This feature is attributed to strong many-body effects, as demonstrated by the line shape of the U core levels in these compounds. Satellites involving discrete excitations to empty 5f states are observed in the spectra of UO 2 and Th metal.

  20. Direct observations of local electronic states in an Al-based quasicrystal by STEM-EELS.

    PubMed

    Seki, Takehito; Abe, Eiji

    2014-11-01

    Most quasicrystals (QCs) reveal pseudogaps in their density of states around Fermi level, and hence the stability of QCs have been discussed in terms of energetic gains in electron systems. In fact, many QCs have been discovered by tuning valence electron density based on Hume-Rothery rule. Therefore, understanding electronic structures in QCs may provide an important clue for their stabilization mechanism. Generally, it has been frequently discussed based on an interaction between Fermi surface and Brillouin zone boundary within the framework of nearly free electron model, which is believed to be an underlying physics of a Hume-Rothery's empirical criteria. However the hybridization effect also stabilize electron system, particularly in Al-transition metal system, in which a lot of quasicrystalline phases were discovered. Therefore, the electronic structures of QCs have not yet been fully understood, whereas their atomic structures have been studied well in terms of configuration entropy by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) [1]. In the present work, we investigate local electronic states in Al-based QCs using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combined with STEM, by which EELS spectra with sub-Å probe and atomic structure can be obtained simultaneously. We report STEM-EELS results on AlCuIr decagonal phases [2].jmicro;63/suppl_1/i17-a/DFU069F1F1DFU069F1Fig. 1.Core-loss edges obtained from cluster-centers and cluster-edges. Al L1 (left) Ir O23, Ir N67 (center) and Cu L23 (right). Principal components analysis clearly shows up the atomic-site dependence of plasmon loss spectra in a two-dimensional map. Qualitatively, there seems to be certain correlations between the plasmon peaks and the core-loss edges, Al L1, Ir O23, Ir N67 and Cu L23, all of which reveal different behaviors at the cluster centers and the edges (Fig. 1). All results indicate the cluster centers have metallic states and the cluster edges have covalent states in comparison

  1. [The influence of local anesthetics on corneal epithelium. A scanning electron microscopic study (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Brewitt, H; Honegger, H

    1978-09-01

    The effect of different local anesthetics (Cocain 4%, Lidocaine 2%, Proparacain) on the corneal epithelium in rabbits was examined under scanning electron microscope. The experiment was divided into three groups. Group 1 received one application of two drops of the given local anesthetic for a reaction time of 5 minutes. Group 2 received two drops of the given anesthetic after 0, 5 and 10 minutes. The cornea was excised after 15 minutes. Group 3 were measured after a single application of Proparacain using a Schiötz or hand applanation tonometer according to Draeger. After a single dose of a local anesthetic principally the same changes in the surface of the cornea were observed with all the preparations used: a distinct decrease in the number of microvilli and microplicae, disruption of the intercellular spaces and the prominence of the cell nuclei which under normal conditions are not visible. After several applications the greater toxicity of Cocain compared with the other preparations was clearly seen through the disruption of the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm. The damage effected several layers of cells. Tonometry when correctly performed causes no additional damage to the cell surface.- The effect of local anesthetics on the cell membrane can only take place after the disruption of the tear film. The results emphasize that local anesthetics should only be applied when absolutely essential.

  2. Electronic structure of solid uranium tetrafluoride UF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, A. Yu.; Teterin, Yu. A.; Maslakov, K. I.; Panov, A. D.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Vukcevic, L.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and conversion electron spectra of the outer (0-15eV) and inner (15-40eV) valence electrons for UF4 were measured. Relativistic Xα discrete variation ( RXα DV) calculation data for the UF84-(C4v) cluster reflecting uranium close environment in solid UF4 were used for the quantitative interpretation of the fine spectral structure. Quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was established. The U5f electrons ( ≈1 U5f electron) were shown to participate directly in the chemical bond formation. This U 5 f electron was shown to be delocalized within the outer valence molecular orbitals (OVMO) range (1-15eV) . The other U5f electrons were shown to be localized and to participate weakly in the chemical bond formation. The XPS line associated with these electrons was observed at 3.8eV . The vacant U5f states are generally delocalized in the range of the low positive energies (0-7 eV). The contribution of the U6p electronic density to the molecular orbitals of UF4 was experimentally and theoretically evaluated. The U6p electrons were experimentally shown to participate significantly ( 0.6U6p electrons) in the formation of the OVMO beside the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals (IVMO). IVMO composition and sequence order in the binding energy range 15-40eV in UF4 were determined.

  3. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: Li (x) Fe(7)Se(8).

    PubMed

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-02-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of Li x Fe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that Li x Fe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  4. Correlative infrared–electron nanoscopy reveals the local structure–conductivity relationship in zinc oxide nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Stiegler, J.M.; Tena-Zaera, R.; Idigoras, O.; Chuvilin, A.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution characterization methods play a key role in the development, analysis and optimization of nanoscale materials and devices. Because of the various material properties, only a combination of different characterization techniques provides a comprehensive understanding of complex functional materials. Here we introduce correlative infrared–electron nanoscopy, a novel method yielding transmission electron microscope and infrared near-field images of one and the same nanostructure. While transmission electron microscopy provides structural information up to the atomic level, infrared near-field imaging yields nanoscale maps of chemical composition and conductivity. We demonstrate the method's potential by studying the relation between conductivity and crystal structure in ZnO nanowire cross-sections. The combination of infrared conductivity maps and the local crystal structure reveals a radial free-carrier gradient, which inversely correlates to the density of extended crystalline defects. Our method opens new avenues for studying the local interplay between structure, conductivity and chemical composition in widely different material systems. PMID:23072801

  5. Anderson localization of electrons in single crystals: LixFe7Se8

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianping; Gu, Yueqiang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Xinbo; Jin, Shifeng; Zhao, Linlin; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Anderson (disorder-induced) localization, proposed more than half a century ago, has inspired numerous efforts to explore the absence of wave diffusions in disordered media. However, the proposed disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT), associated with the nonpropagative electron waves, has hardly been observed in three-dimensional (3D) crystalline materials, let alone single crystals. We report the observation of an MIT in centimeter-size single crystals of LixFe7Se8 induced by lattice disorder. Both specific heat and infrared reflectance measurements reveal the presence of considerable electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level when the MIT occurs, suggesting that the transition is not due to Coulomb repulsion mechanism. The 3D variable range hopping regime evidenced by electrical transport measurements at low temperatures indicates the localized nature of the electronic states on the Fermi level. Quantitative analyses of carrier concentration, carrier mobility, and simulated density of states (DOS) fully support that LixFe7Se8 is an Anderson insulator. On the basis of these results, we provide a unified DOS picture to explain all the experimental results, and a schematic diagram for finding other potential Anderson insulators. This material will thus serve as a rich playground for both theoretical and experimental investigations on MITs and disorder-induced phenomena. PMID:26989781

  6. Influence of petroleum deposit geometry on local gradient of electron acceptors and microbial catabolic potential.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gargi; Pruden, Amy; Widdowson, Mark A

    2012-06-01

    A field survey was conducted following the Deepwater Horizon blowout and it was noted that resulting coastal petroleum deposits possessed distinct geometries, ranging from small tar balls to expansive horizontal oil sheets. A subsequent laboratory study evaluated the effect of oil deposit geometry on localized gradients of electron acceptors and microbial community composition, factors that are critical to accurately estimating biodegradation rates. One-dimensional top-flow sand columns with 12-h simulated tidal cycles compared two contrasting geometries (isolated tar "balls" versus horizontal "sheets") relative to an oil-free control. Significant differences in the effluent dissolved oxygen and sulfate concentrations were noted among the columns, indicating presence of anaerobic zones in the oiled columns, particularly in the sheet condition. Furthermore, quantification of genetic markers of terminal electron acceptor and catabolic processes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction of dsrA (sulfate-reduction), mcrA (methanogenesis), and cat23 (oxygenation of aromatics) genes in column cores suggested more extensive anaerobic conditions induced by the sheet relative to the ball geometry. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis similarly revealed that distinct gradients of bacterial communities established in response to the different geometries. Thus, petroleum deposit geometry impacts local dominant electron acceptor conditions and may be a key factor for advancing attenuation models and prioritizing cleanup. PMID:22574781

  7. The First Very Local Interstellar Spectra for Galactic Protons, Helium and Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, M. S.; Vos, E. E.; Nndanganeni, R. R.

    2014-06-01

    Low-energy galactic electrons (1-300 MeV) are significantly modulated, almost extraordinary, in the heliosheath in contrast to the rest of the heliosphere, indicating that modulation conditions in the heliosheath are quite different for these particles. Low-energy protons and helium (1-100 MeV/nuc), on the other hand, are dominated by the anomalous component which originates inside the inner heliosheath so that the very local interstellar spectra for these particles had been properly concealed until recently. Basic mechanisms responsible for these effects are been studied with comprehensive numerical models for the transport of these particles, from the modulation boundary, through the heliosheath, across the solar wind termination shock, up to Earth. Together with measurements made by the two Voyager spacecraft, now with Voyager 1 beyond the heliopause, possibly entering the very local interstellar medium, it is possible to determine heliopause spectra at these low energies for the first time. Together with PAMELA spectra observed at Earth, these heliopause spectra can be determined accurately up to 50 GeV. Such spectra should be considered as the lowest possible very local interstellar spectra for galactic electrons, protons and helium, and of great relevance to solar modulation and galactic propagation studies.

  8. Structural and electronic properties of trans-polyacetylene under local strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketabi, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical study is presented to investigate the structural and electronic properties of trans-polyacetylene (trans-PA) molecule under local strain. The influence of a local bending or compression of the space between neighboring carbon atoms on the band gap of the molecule was studied. Making use of an effective difference equation based on tight-binding procedure the band structure of trans-PA has been calculated. Our results indicate that the energy gap of the strained molecule modified significantly which affects the electronic properties of the molecule. We found that the size of the molecular gap is proportional to the bending angle so that for the bending perpendicular to π-orbitals plane the band gap reduced drastically and for the parallel one the band gap gradually increased. Furthermore, the current-voltage characteristics of the strained trans-PA molecule are studied. We found that under the local strain the threshold voltage for the current flow through the bent molecule decreased (increased) depending on the bending is perpendicular (parallel) to the molecule plane.

  9. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2014-11-03

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called “virtual scanning tunneling microscopy” that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  10. Local imaging of high mobility two-dimensional electron systems with virtual scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccione, M.; Bartel, J.; Sciambi, A.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2014-11-01

    Correlated electron states in high mobility two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs), including charge density waves and microemulsion phases intermediate between a Fermi liquid and Wigner crystal, are predicted to exhibit complex local charge order. Existing experimental studies, however, have mainly probed these systems at micron to millimeter scales rather than directly mapping spatial organization. Scanning probes should be well-suited to study the spatial structure of these states, but high mobility 2DESs are found at buried semiconductor interfaces, beyond the reach of conventional scanning tunneling microscopy. Scanning techniques based on electrostatic coupling to the 2DES deliver important insights, but generally with resolution limited by the depth of the 2DES. In this letter, we present our progress in developing a technique called "virtual scanning tunneling microscopy" that allows local tunneling into a high mobility 2DES. Using a specially designed bilayer GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the tunnel coupling between two separate 2DESs is tunable via electrostatic gating, combined with a scanning gate, we show that the local tunneling can be controlled with sub-250 nm resolution.

  11. Asymptotic near-nucleus structure of the electron-interaction potential in local effective potential theories

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Zhixin; Sahni, Viraht

    2007-03-15

    In local effective potential theories of electronic structure, the electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, and correlation-kinetic effects, are all incorporated in the local electron-interaction potential v{sub ee}(r). In previous work, it has been shown that for spherically symmetric or sphericalized systems, the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of this potential is v{sub ee}(r)=v{sub ee}(0)+{beta}r+O(r{sup 2}), with v{sub ee}(0) being finite. By assuming that the Schroedinger and local effective potential theory wave functions are analytic near the nucleus of atoms, we prove the following via quantal density functional theory (QDFT): (i) Correlations due to the Pauli principle and Coulomb correlations do not contribute to the linear structure; (ii) these Pauli and Coulomb correlations contribute quadratically; (iii) the linear structure is solely due to correlation-kinetic effects, the contributions of these effects being determined analytically. We also derive by application of adiabatic coupling constant perturbation theory via QDFT (iv) the asymptotic near-nucleus expansion of the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham theory exchange v{sub x}(r) and correlation v{sub c}(r) potentials. These functions also approach the nucleus linearly with the linear term of v{sub x}(r) being solely due to the lowest-order correlation kinetic effects, and the linear term of v{sub c}(r) being due solely to the higher-order correlation kinetic contributions. The above conclusions are equally valid for systems of arbitrary symmetry, provided spherical averages of the properties are employed.

  12. Optical Evidence of Itinerant-Localized Crossover of 4f Electrons in Cerium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Shin-ichi; Kwon, Yong Seung; Matsumoto, Yuji; Aoki, Haruyoshi; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Cerium (Ce)-based heavy-fermion materials have a characteristic double-peak structure (mid-IR peak) in the optical conductivity [σ(ω)] spectra originating from the strong conduction (c)-f electron hybridization. To clarify the behavior of the mid-IR peak at a low c-f hybridization strength, we compared the σ(ω) spectra of the isostructural antiferromagnetic and heavy-fermion Ce compounds with the calculated unoccupied density of states and the spectra obtained from the impurity Anderson model. With decreasing c-f hybridization intensity, the mid-IR peak shifts to the low-energy side owing to the renormalization of the unoccupied 4f state, but suddenly shifts to the high-energy side owing to the f-f on-site Coulomb interaction at a slight localized side from the quantum critical point (QCP). This finding gives us information on the change in the electronic structure across QCP.

  13. Calculating interaction energies in transition metal complexes with local electron correlation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. Grant; Platts, James A.

    2008-10-01

    The results of density fitting and local approximations applied to the calculation of transition metal-ligand binding energies using second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory are reported. This procedure accurately reproduces counterpoise corrected binding energies from the canonical method for a range of test complexes. While counterpoise corrections for basis set superposition error are generally small, this procedure can be time consuming, and in some cases gives rise to unphysical dissociation of complexes. In circumventing this correction, a local treatment of electron correlation offers major efficiency savings with little loss of accuracy. The use of density fitting for the underlying Hartree-Fock calculations is also tested for sample Ru complexes, leading to further efficiency gains but essentially no loss in accuracy.

  14. Two dimensional electronic transport in bismuth tellurium sulfide in the weak and strong localization regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the theoretical framework necessary for the description and calculation of electronic transport characteristics in two dimensional Bismuth Tellurium Sulfide (BTS) is given. The processes for preparing and cooling one quintuple layer BTS samples to temperatures of approximately one Kelvin are described. BTS samples with a conductance greater than e[sup 2]/h are shown to demonstrate weak antilocalization effects and magnetoconductance that are dependent upon the sample temperature and the applied electric field. BTS samples with a conductance much less than e[sup 2]/h are shown to demonstrate strong localization and variable range hopping (VRH) effects and magnetoconductance that are dependent upon the sample temperature and the applied electric field in a manner similar to that in the weak localization regime. In both the weak and strong localization regimes it is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetoconductance can be suppressed by a strong electric field. The characteristic magnetic field values for the dominant scattering processes in both weak and strong localization regimes are found by fitting digamma functions to experimental data. The absence of h/e periodicity in VRH is observed. A dominant linear magnetic field dependence of the magnetoconductance for low applied magnetic fields in the VRH regime is shown. The mixing of weak and strong localization mechanisms in the moderately localized regime is reported. Evidence for the Coulomb blockade in tunneling processes for very high resistance BTS samples is presented. The Coulomb blockade is used to partially explain the inability to fit BTS magnetoconductance curves to the present theories for the dependence of the magnetoconductance on temperature and electric field.

  15. Thomson Scattering Observation of Non-Maxwellian EEDF and the Effect of Local Electron Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, A.; Funahashi, H.

    2001-10-01

    Laser Thomson scattering measurements were carried out to study electron energy distribution function (EEDF) of inductively coupled plasmas using C_4F_8/Ar and CF_4/Ar mixture gases. The plasma was produced using a one-turn coil antenna immersed in the plasma at a total pressure of 25 mTorr. A specially designed triple-grating spectrometer was used, which produces Thomson spectra on the output focal plane with the interfering Rayleigh and stray components highly suppressed; an ICCD camera operated in the photon-counting mode was used for multichannel detection of the spectrum. At a RF (13.56 MHz) input power of 300 W in the case of pure Ar plasma, EEDF was Maxwellian with an enectron density >10^12 cm-3. Upon mixing of C_4F8 as well as CF_4, decrease in the electron density and upward bend of the plot of the Thomson spectrum (energy vs. logarithmic scattering intensity) at energies around 5 eV was observed. The mechanism for producing this bend was studied via Monte-Carlo particle simulation. The results indicate that electron heating in a uniform electric field does not lead to upward bend; electrons should be heated locally near the antenna surface where the RF electric field is strong and cooled in other part of the plasma by inelastic collisions.

  16. Charge density stabilised local electron spin pair states in insulating polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, S.; Dissado, L. A.

    2014-12-14

    A model is presented that addresses the energy stability of localized electron states in insulating polymers with respect to delocalized free electron-like states at variable charge densities. The model was derived using an effective Hamiltonian for the total energy of electrons trapped in large polarons and spin-paired bipolarons, which includes the electrostatic interaction between charges that occurs when the charge density exceeds the infinite dilution limit. The phase diagram of the various electronic states with respect to the charge density is derived using parameters determined from experimental data for polyethylene, and it is found that a phase transition from excess charge in the form of stable polarons to a stable state of bipolarons with charge = 2 and spin number S = 0 is predicted for a charge density between 0.2 C/m{sup 3} and ∼2 C/m{sup 3}. This transition is consistent with a change from low mobility charge transport to charge transport in the form of pulses with a mobility orders of magnitude higher that has been observed in several insulating polymers.

  17. Analysis of local strain in aluminum interconnects by convergent beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Stephan; Mayer, Joachim

    1999-11-01

    Energy filtered convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) was used to investigate localized strain in aluminum interconnects. An analysis of the higher order Laue zone (HOLZ) line positions in CBED patterns makes it possible to measure the lattice strain with high accuracy (˜104) and high spatial resolution (10 to 100 nm). The strain development in a single grain was measured during thermal cycling between -170 °C and +100 °C. The grain showed reversible, elastic behavior over the whole temperature range building up large strains at low temperatures. By comparing with finite element simulations, a detailed understanding of the tri-axial strain state could be achieved.

  18. Kondo physics in a rare earth ion with well localized 4f electrons.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Jolanta; Evangelisti, Marco; Fisk, Zachary; Schlottmann, Pedro; Gor'kov, Lev P

    2012-06-22

    Dilute Nd in simple cubic LaB(6) shows electrical resistance and specific heat features at low temperature consistent with a Kondo scale of T(K) localized 4f(3) J = 9/2 Hund's rule configuration which is not anticipated to be Kondo coupled to the conduction electrons in LaB(6). We conjecture that the unexpected Kondo effect arises via participation of 4f quadrupolar degrees of freedom of the Nd crystal-field, ground-state quartet.

  19. Local electronic effects and irradiation resistance in high-entropy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Stocks, George Malcolm; Nicholson, Don; Khorgolkhuu, Od; Ojha, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    High-entropy alloys are multicomponent solid solutions in which various elements with different chemistries and sizes occupy the same crystallographic lattice sites. Thus, none of the atoms perfectly fit the lattice site, giving rise to considerable local lattice distortions and atomic-level stresses. These characteristics can be beneficial for performance under both radiation and in a high-temperature environment, making them attractive candidates as nuclear materials. We discuss electronic origin of the atomic-level stresses based upon first-principles calculations using a density functional theory approach.

  20. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-15

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  1. Improved non-local electron thermal transport model for two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Duc; Moses, Gregory; Delettrez, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    An implicit, non-local thermal conduction algorithm based on the algorithm developed by Schurtz, Nicolai, and Busquet (SNB) [Schurtz et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 4238 (2000)] for non-local electron transport is presented and has been implemented in the radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO. To study the model's effect on DRACO's predictive capability, simulations of shot 60 303 from OMEGA are completed using the iSNB model, and the computed shock speed vs. time is compared to experiment. Temperature outputs from the iSNB model are compared with the non-local transport model of Goncharov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 012702 (2006)]. Effects on adiabat are also examined in a polar drive surrogate simulation. Results show that the iSNB model is not only capable of flux-limitation but also preheat prediction while remaining numerically robust and sacrificing little computational speed. Additionally, the results provide strong incentive to further modify key parameters within the SNB theory, namely, the newly introduced non-local mean free path. This research was supported by the Laboratory for Laser Energetics of the University of Rochester.

  2. Electronic transport in graphene structure: from weak to strong localization regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lherbier, Aurelien

    2015-03-01

    Graphene, often named the wonder material for its many fascinating properties, has sparked out intense research activities over the last decade. Electronic transport in graphene became rapidly an important research field because of the early reported extremely high charge carrier mobility which triggered large expectations for nanoelectronic devices. Besides mobilities, graphene samples can exhibit particularly long electronic coherence lengths which allow for phase-related quantum transport phenomena such as the weak and strong localization transport regimes. This makes graphene a remarkable playground for fundamental studies of localization theory in low-dimensional systems. In this presentation, using tight-binding models enriched by first principle calculations, and a real-space Kubo-Greenwood method, multiscale simulations of the electronic transport in various graphene-based systems will be discussed. Such an approach allows for computing transport properties of systems containing millions of atoms reaching therefore the experimental sample size. In order to tailor graphene properties, chemical and/or structural modifications are widely used. However, such modifications act as scattering defects and usually deteriorate transport properties. Open a band gap while maintaining good mobility is a typical illustration of this dual problem. The influence of various chemical and structural defects will be analyzed. In particular, the consequences of unbalanced sublattice nitrogen doping in graphene and the case of highly defective graphene structures exhibiting strong Anderson insulator behaviors will be examined. Defects being even more detrimental for transport in 1D structures, a synthesis method that is free of defects is highly desirable. A solution is provided by a bottom-up chemistry approach where precursor monomers are self-assembled. The electronic transport and the potential for nanoelectronics of such defect-free carbon ribbons will also be discussed.

  3. Characterization of the POU5F1 Homologue in Nile Tilapia: From Expression Pattern to Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Xiaohuan, Huang; Yang, Zhao; Linyan, Liu; Zhenhua, Fan; Linyan, Zhou; Zhijian, Wang; Ling, Wei; Deshou, Wang; Jing, Wei

    2016-09-15

    POU5F1 (OCT4) is a crucial transcription factor for induction and maintenance of cellular pluripotency, as well as survival of germ cells in mammals. However, the homologues of POU5F1 in teleost fish, including zebrafish and medaka, now named Pou5f3, exhibit considerable differences in expression pattern and pluripotency-maintaining activity. To what extent the POU5F1 homologues are conserved in vertebrates has been unclear. In this study, we report that the POU5F1 homologue from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), OnPou5f3, displays an expression pattern and biological activity somewhat different from those in zebrafish or medaka. The expression of Onpou5f3 at both mRNA and protein levels was abundant in early development embryos until blastula stages, barely detectable as proceeding, and then displayed a transiently strong expression domain in the brain region during neurula stages similar to zebrafish but not medaka. Afterward, OnPou5f3 appeared as germline-restricted (including primordial germ cells and female and male gonad germ cells) expression just like medaka. Notably, OnPou5f3 depletion through morpholino oligos caused blastula blockage or lethality and failure of survival and proliferation of blastula cell-derived cells. These findings indicate that equivalent POU5F1-like expression and activity of Pou5f3 might be conserved accompanying with species-specific expression pattern during evolution. Our study provides insight into the evolutionary conservation of the POU5F1 homologues across vertebrates. PMID:27473876

  4. TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-11-19

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO₂ nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O₂ (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H₂ (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO₂ nanotube samplesmore » partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (~5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO₂ nanotubes regardless of their length. The annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H₂-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O₂-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H₂-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti3+ and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near-surface electronic and defect structure

  5. Transduced Tat-DJ-1 protein inhibits cytokines-induced pancreatic RINm5F cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Loss of pancreatic β-cells by oxidative stress or cytokines is associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). DJ-1 is known to as a multifunctional protein, which plays an important role in cell survival. We prepared cell permeable wild type (WT) and mutant type (M26I) Tat-DJ-1 proteins to investigate the effects of DJ-1 against combined cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α)-induced RINm5F cell death. Both Tat-DJ-1 proteins were transduced into RINm5F cells. WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins significantly protected against cell death from cytokines by reducing intracellular toxicities. Also, WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins markedly regulated cytokines-induced pro- and anti-apoptosis proteins. However, M26I Tat-DJ-1 protein showed relatively low protective effects, as compared to WT Tat-DJ-1 protein. Our experiments demonstrated that WT Tat-DJ-1 protein protects against cytokine-induced RINm5F cell death by suppressing intracellular toxicities and regulating apoptosisrelated protein expression. Thus, WT Tat-DJ-1 protein could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for DM and cytokine related diseases. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 297-302] PMID:26996344

  6. Local electron heating in the Io plasma torus associated with Io from HISAKI satellite observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kagitani, Masato; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Kimura, Tomoki; Murakami, Go; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Nozawa, Hiromasa; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Uemizu, Kazunori; Yoshikawa, Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Io-correlated brightness change in the Io plasma torus (IPT) was discovered by the Voyager spacecraft, showing evidence of local electron heating around Io. However, its detailed properties and the cause of electron heating are still open issues. The extreme ultraviolet spectrograph on board the HISAKI satellite continuously observed the IPT from the end of December 2013 to the middle of January 2014. The variation in the IPT brightness showed that clear periodicity associated with Io's orbital period (42 h) and that the bright region was located downstream of Io. The amplitude of the periodic variation was larger at short wavelengths than at long wavelengths. From spectral analyses, we found that Io-correlated brightening is caused by the increase in the hot electron population in the region downstream of Io. We also found that the brightness depends on the system III longitude and found primary and secondary peaks in the longitude ranges of 100-130° and 250-340°, respectively. Io's orbit crosses the center of the IPT around these longitudes. This longitude dependence suggests that the electron heating process is related to the plasma density around Io. The total radiated power from the IPT in January 2014 was estimated to be 1.4 TW in the wavelength range from 60 to 145 nm. The Io-correlated component produced 10% of this total radiated power. The interaction between Io and the IPT continuously produces a large amount of energy around Io, and 140 GW of that energy is immediately converted to hot electron production in the IPT.

  7. Laterally localizing potential as a tool for controlling the electron spin relaxation time in GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, A. V.; Il’in, A. I.

    2013-12-15

    The coherent spin dynamics of electrons localized in a plane of GaAs quantum wells is studied experimentally by the application of an electrically controlled potential. The localizing potential is produced with the use of a metal gate with submicrometer windows deposited onto the sample surface. The photoinduced spin Kerr effect is used to study the electron spin lifetime as a function of the temperature, applied bias, and magnetic field for gates with different sets of windows. It is shown that, with an electrically controlled laterally localizing potential, it is possible to gradually change the electron spin lifetime from several hundreds of picoseconds to several tens of nanoseconds. The dependence of the electron spin relaxation time on the sizes of the lateral localization region is in good qualitative agreement with theoretical prediction.

  8. Electronic structure and local magnetism of 3d-5d impurity substituted CeFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Rakesh; Das, G. P.; Srivastava, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    We present here a systematic first-principles study of electronic structure and local magnetic properties of Ce[Fe0.75M0.25]2 compounds, where M is a 3d, 4d or 5d transition or post-transition element, using the generalized gradient approximation of the density functional theory. The d-f band hybridizations existing in CeFe2 get modified by the impurity M in an orderly manner across a period for each impurity series: the hybridization is strongest for the Mn group impurity in the period and gets diminished on either side of it. The weakening of the d-f hybridization strength is also associated with a relative localization of the Ce 4f states with respect to the delocalized 4f states in CeFe2. The above effects are most prominent for 3d impurity series, while for 4d and 5d impurities, the hybridizations and relocalizations are relatively weak due primarily to the relatively extended nature of 4d and 5d wavefunctions. The Ce local moment is found to decrease from the CeFe2 value in proportion to the strength of relocalization, thus following almost the same orderly trend as obeyed by the d-f hybridization. Further, depending on the way the spin-up and spin-down densities of states of an impurity shift relative to the Fermi energy, the impurity local moments are highest for Mn or Fe group, reduce on either side, become zero for Ni to Ga, and are small but negative for V and Ti. The Ce hyperfine field is found to follow the M local moment in a linear fashion, and vice-versa.

  9. Patterns of Failure and Local Control After Intraoperative Electron Boost Radiotherapy to the Presacral Space in Combination with Total Mesorectal Excision in Patients with Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, Falk; Treiber, Martina; Oertel, Susanne; Dinkel, Julien; Timke, Carmen; Funk, Angela; Garcia-Huttenlocher, Helena; Bischof, Marc; Weitz, Juergen; Harms, Wolfgang; Hensley, Frank W.; Buchler, Markus W.; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert . E-mail: robert_krempien@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control and patterns of failure in patients treated with intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) after total mesorectal excision (TME), to appraise the effectiveness of intraoperative target definition. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the outcome of 243 patients with rectal cancer treated with IOERT (median dose, 10 Gy) after TME. Eighty-eight patients received neoadjuvant and 122 patients adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (median dose, 41.4 Gy), and in 88% simultaneous chemotherapy was applied. Median follow-up was 59 months. Results: Local failure was observed in 17 patients (7%), resulting in a 5-year local control rate of 92%. Only complete resection and absence of nodal involvement correlated positively with local control. Considering IOERT fields, seven infield recurrences were seen in the presacral space, resulting in a 5-year local control rate of 97%. The remaining local relapses were located as follows: retrovesical/retroprostatic (5), anastomotic site (2), promontorium (1), ileocecal (1), and perineal (1). Conclusion: Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy as part of a multimodal treatment approach including TME is a highly effective regimen to prevent local failure. The presacral space remains the site of highest risk for local failure, but IOERT can decrease the percentage of relapses in this area.

  10. Local lattice strain measurements in semiconductor devices by using convergent-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akio; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Ono, Haruhiko

    2000-03-01

    We examined the lattice strain distribution around local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) in a semiconductor device by using highly accurate (1.8×10 -4 standard deviation) convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) at a nanometer-scale spatial resolution (10 nm in diameter). The nanometer-scale measurement was done by reducing the elastic relaxation using a thick (about 600 nm) sample and by removing the inelastically scattered electrons by means of an electron energy filter. A highly accurate measurement was achieved through the analysis of higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) patterns using the least-squares fitting of HOLZ line intersection distances between the observations and calculations. Our examination showed that the LOCOS structure gave singularities in strain distributions at the field edge. That is, compressive strain exists in both the vertical and horizontal directions of the substrate, and the shear strain increased there. Most notably, two-dimensional measurements revealed that the singularity of the normal strain in the horizontal direction of the substrate generated at the field edge propagated into the substrate.

  11. Electronic viscosity in a quantum well: A test for the local-density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Vignale, Giovanni

    2007-07-01

    In the local-density approximation (LDA) for electronic time-dependent current-density-functional theory, many-body effects are described in terms of the viscoelastic constants of the homogeneous three-dimensional electron gas. In this paper, we critically examine the applicability of the three-dimensional LDA to the calculation of the viscous damping of one-dimensional collective oscillations of angular frequency ω in a quasi-two-dimensional quantum well. We calculate the effective viscosity ζ(ω) from perturbation theory in the screened Coulomb interaction and compare it with the commonly used three-dimensional LDA viscosity Y(ω) . Significant differences are found. At low frequency, Y(ω) is dominated by a shear term, which is absent in ζ(ω) . At high frequency, ζ(ω) and Y(ω) exhibit different power-law behaviors ( ω-3 and ω-5/2 , respectively), reflecting different spectral densities of electron-hole excitations in two and three dimensions. These findings demonstrate the need for better approximations for the exchange-correlation stress tensor in specific systems where the use of the three-dimensional functionals may lead to unphysical results.

  12. Self-localized states for electron transfer in nonlocal continuum deformable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros-Ake, Luis A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider the problem of electron transport in a deformable continuum medium subjected to an external harmonic substrate potential. We then consider the quasi-stationary state of the full problem to find a Gross-Pitaevskii type equation with a nonlocal external potential, which is solved by variational and numerical means (considered as the exact solution) to find the parameter conditions for the existence of self-localized solutions. The variational approach predicts a threshold on the on-site or nonlocality parameter where localized solutions cease to exist from the Non-Linear Schrödinger soliton limit. A numerical continuation of stationary state solutions in the corresponding discrete system is used to confirm the prediction of the turning value in the on-site term. We finally study the full stationary state and make use of an approximation, proposed by Briedis et al. [17], for the nonlocal term, corresponding to strong nonlocalities, to find analytic expressions for self-localized states in terms of the series solutions of a nonlinear modified Bessel equation.

  13. Effect of spin-orbit and on-site Coulomb interactions on the electronic structure and lattice dynamics of uranium monocarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowik, U. D.; Piekarz, P.; Legut, D.; Jagło, G.

    2016-08-01

    Uranium monocarbide, a potential fuel material for the generation IV reactors, is investigated within density functional theory. Its electronic, magnetic, elastic, and phonon properties are analyzed and discussed in terms of spin-orbit interaction and localized versus itinerant behavior of the 5 f electrons. The localization of the 5 f states is tuned by varying the local Coulomb repulsion interaction parameter. We demonstrate that the theoretical electronic structure, elastic constants, phonon dispersions, and their densities of states can reproduce accurately the results of x-ray photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat measurements as well as inelastic neutron scattering experiments only when the 5 f states experience the spin-orbit interaction and simultaneously remain partially localized. The partial localization of the 5 f electrons could be represented by a moderate value of the on-site Coulomb interaction parameter of about 2 eV. The results of the present studies indicate that both strong electron correlations and spin-orbit effects are crucial for realistic theoretical description of the ground-state properties of uranium carbide.

  14. A hierarchy of local electron correlation models based on atomic truncations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Michael S.; Maslen, Paul E.

    1999-11-01

    While wavefunction-based treatments of electron correlation have been very successful for the study of small molecules, they cannot be readily applied to large molecules because their computational cost rises too steeply with molecular size. For example, second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), the simplest such method, involves computational costs that asymptotically increase with the 5th power of molecular size. In this article we discuss the development of new local electron correlation models that ameliorate this problem, by truncating the number of substituted determinants that are included in the correlation treatment. Using atom-centered functions to span the occupied and virtual subspaces permits the truncations to be made by an atomic criterion, that satisfies all of the requirements of a well-defined theoretical model chemistry. The double substitutions that arise in MP2 theory generally involve promoting electrons from occupied orbitals on two atoms to unoccupied (virtual) orbitals on two other atoms, or tetra-atomics in molecules. The simplest restriction is to require one occupied and one virtual orbital to be on a common atom, leading to a triatomics in molecules (TRIM) model. A stronger approximation is to model double substitutions by the direct product of two such atomic excitations, which is a diatomics in molecules (DIM) model of electron correlation. The still more drastic approximation of forcing all double substitutions to be centered on single atoms, cannot describe dispersion interactions, and is not considered here. The theory of the DIM and TRIM models is outlined, and methods for obtaining the atom-centered functions spanning the occupied and virtual subspaces are discussed. Some numerical results are provided to compare the performance of the DIM and TRIM models against untruncated MP2 theory. Finally the outlook for the application of these methods to large molecules is discussed.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 5F VERTICAL COOLING COIL LEACHATES FOR SELECT RADIONUCLIDES 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.

    2001-08-17

    Two twenty-four inch samples of vertical sections of the cooling coils from Tank 5F, taken from Riser 1, were made available to SRNL by SRR for leaching and characterization of the leachates for select radionuclide trapped in the corrosion layer on the exterior of the cooling coils. One piece of cooling coil sample was obtained from a section of a vertical cooling coil located above the 45-inch elevation from the tank floor and the other also from a vertical section of a cooling coil located below the 45-inch elevation from the tank floor of Tank 5F. Analysis results from both cooling coils show that the predominant radionuclides contributing to the activity in both coils are strontium-90 and cesium-137. The activities for strontium-90 and cesium-137 in the Tank 5F vertical cooling coil located above the 45-inch elevation of the tank and designated as sample 5-R1-A45 averaged 1.34E-02 {+-} 1.12E-03 and 7.27E-04 {+-} 4.46E-05 Ci/ft{sup 2}, respectively, while the activities for the vertical cooling coil located below the 45-inch elevation of the tank and designated as sample 5-R1-B45 averaged 8.93E-03 {+-} 8.25E-04 for Sr-90 and 8.10E-04 {+-} 6.36E-05 Ci/ft{sup 2} for Cs-137. Other significant activity contributing radionuclides are americium-241 and europium-154/155. With the exception of the analysis result for Pu-241 in the 5-R1-A45 cooling coils samples, the target detection limits for the other radionuclides were met in both cooling coil samples. The detection limits for Pu-241 analyses result in coil sample 5-R1-A45 were not met consistently because of possible background changes during counting.

  16. Implications of Voyager 1 observations beyond the heliopause for the local interstellar electron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Bisschoff, D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2014-10-20

    Cosmic-ray observations made by the Voyager 1 spacecraft outside the dominant modulating influence of the heliosphere finally allow the comparison of computed galactic spectra with experimental data at lower energies. These computed spectra, based on galactic propagation models, can now be compared with observations at low energies by Voyager 1 and at high energies by the PAMELA space detector at Earth. This improves understanding of basic propagation effects and also provides solar modulation studies with reliable input spectra from 1 MeV to 100 GeV. We set out to reproduce the Voyager 1 electron observations in the energy range of 6-60 MeV, as well as the PAMELA electron spectrum above 10 GeV, using the GALPROP code. By varying the source spectrum and galactic diffusion parameters, specifically the rigidity dependence of spatial diffusion, we find local interstellar spectra that agree with both power-law spectra observed by Voyager 1 beyond the heliopause. The local interstellar spectrum between ∼1 MeV and 100 GeV indicates that it is the combination of two power laws, with E {sup –(1.45} {sup ±} {sup 0.15)} below ∼100 MeV and E {sup –(3.15} {sup ±} {sup 0.05)} above ∼100 MeV. A gradual turn in the spectral shape matching the power laws is found, between 2.0 ± 0.5) GeV and (100 ± 10) MeV. According to our simplified modeling, this transition is caused primarily by galactic propagation effects. We find that the intensity beyond the heliopause at 10 MeV is (350 ± 50) electrons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} MeV{sup –1}, decreasing to (50 ± 5) electrons m{sup –2} s{sup –1} sr{sup –1} MeV{sup –1} at 100 MeV.

  17. The Contribution of Millisecond Pulsars to the Local Electron / Positron Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, Christo; Buesching, Ingo; Harding, Alice; Kopp, Andreas; Gonthier, Peter

    The high energies of gamma-ray photons (as well as the presence of lower-energy photons) coupled with the intense magnetic fields characterizing younger pulsars enable formation of electron-positron pair cascades which fills the pulsar magnetosphere with plasma and also feeds an outflowing particle wind that may create a surrounding pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Although this scenario was originally thought to be unique to the younger pulsar population, Fermi LAT demonstrated that the light curves of millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are generally very similar to those of younger pulsars, requiring copious pair production even for this older class with much lower surface magnetic fields and spin-down power. These pair cascades may thus be a primary source of Galactic electrons and positrons, and may present an astrophysical explanation for the observed enhancement in positron flux in the high-energy band. We investigate Galactic MSPs contribution to the flux of local cosmic-ray electrons and positrons. We use a population synthesis code to predict the source properties (number, position, and power) of the present-day Galactic MSPs, taking into account the latest Fermi observations to calibrate the model output. Next, we simulate pair cascade spectra from these MSPs using a model that invokes an offset-dipole magnetic field, as this increases the pair production rate relative to a standard dipole field geometry. The model source pair spectra may extend to several TeV, depending on pulsar properties, neutron star equation of state, and magnetic polar cap offset. Since MSPs are not surrounded by PWNe or supernova shells, we can assume that the pairs escape from the pulsar environment without energy loss and undergo losses only in the intergalactic medium. We lastly compute the spectrum of the transported electrons and positrons at Earth, following their diffusion and energy loss through the Galaxy. We will compare our results with the observed local interstellar spectrum and

  18. Localized heating of electrons in ionization zones: Going beyond the Penning-Thornton paradigm in magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2014-12-07

    The fundamental question of how energy is supplied to a magnetron discharge is commonly answered by the Penning-Thornton paradigm invoking secondary electrons. Huo et al. (Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 22, 045005, (2013)) used a global discharge model to show that electron heating in the electric field of the magnetic presheath is dominant. In this contribution, this concept is applied locally taking into account the electric potential structure of ionization zones. Images of ionization zones can and should be interpreted as diagrams of the localization of electric potential and related electron energy, where certain collisions promote or dampen their formation.

  19. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  20. Curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms: from electron localization function (ELF) analysis to valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) inspired interpretation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Juan; Berski, Sławomir; Silvi, Bernard

    2016-07-01

    Probing the electron density transfers during a chemical reaction can provide important insights, making possible to understand and control chemical reactions. This aim has required extensions of the relationships between the traditional chemical concepts and the quantum mechanical ones. The present work examines the detailed chemical insights that have been generated through 100 years of work worldwide on G. N. Lewis's ground breaking paper on The Atom and the Molecule (Lewis, G. N. The Atom and the Molecule, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1916, 38, 762-785), with a focus on how the determination of reaction mechanisms can be reached applying the bonding evolution theory (BET), emphasizing how curly arrows meet electron density transfers in chemical reaction mechanisms and how the Lewis structure can be recovered. BET that combines the topological analysis of the electron localization function (ELF) and Thom's catastrophe theory (CT) provides a powerful tool providing insight into molecular mechanisms of chemical rearrangements. In agreement with physical laws and quantum theoretical insights, BET can be considered as an appropriate tool to tackle chemical reactivity with a wide range of possible applications. Likewise, the present approach retrieves the classical curly arrows used to describe the rearrangements of chemical bonds for a given reaction mechanism, providing detailed physical grounds for this type of representation. The ideas underlying the valence-shell-electron pair-repulsion (VSEPR) model applied to non-equilibrium geometries provide simple chemical explanations of density transfers. For a given geometry around a central atom, the arrangement of the electronic domain may comply or not with the VSEPR rules according with the valence shell population of the considered atom. A deformation yields arrangements which are either VSEPR defective (at least a domain is missing to match the VSEPR arrangement corresponding to the geometry of the ligands), VSEPR compliant

  1. Oxygen vacancy clustering and electron localization in oxygen-deficient SrTiO(3): LDA + U study.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Do Duc; Lee, Bora; Choi, Kyeong Mi; Ahn, Hyo-Shin; Han, Seungwu; Lee, Jaichan

    2007-03-16

    We find, using a local density approximation +Hubbard U method, that oxygen vacancies tend to cluster in a linear way in SrTiO(3), a prototypical perovskite oxide, accompanied by strong electron localization at the 3d state of the nearby Ti transition metal ion. The vacancy clustering and the associated electron localization lead to a profound impact on materials properties, e.g., the reduction in free-carrier densities, the appearance of characteristic optical spectra, and the decrease in vacancy mobility. The high stability against the vacancy migration also suggests the physical reality of the vacancy cluster.

  2. The impact of pedestal turbulence and electron inertia on edge-localized-mode crashes

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, P. W.; Xu, X. Q.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-05-15

    We demonstrate that the occurrence of Edge-Localized-Modes (ELM) crashes does not depend only on the linear peeling-ballooning threshold, but also relies on nonlinear processes. Wave-wave interaction constrains the growth time of a mode, thus inducing a shift in the criterion for triggering an ELM crash. An ELM crash requires the P-B growth rate to exceed a critical value γ>γ{sub c}, where γ{sub c} is set by 1/τ{sup ¯}{sub c}, and τ{sup ¯}{sub c} is the averaged mode phase coherence time. For 0<γ<γ{sub c}, P-B turbulence develops but drives enhanced turbulent transport. We also show that electron inertia dramatically changes the instability threshold when density is low. However, P-B turbulence alone cannot generate enough current transport to allow fast reconnection during an ELM crash.

  3. Localization of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 by electron cryomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Eri; Bohn, Stefan; Mihalache, Oana; Kiss, Petra; Beck, Florian; Nagy, Istvan; Nickell, Stephan; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-31

    Two canonical subunits of the 26S proteasome, Rpn10 and Rpn13, function as ubiquitin (Ub) receptors. The mutual arrangement of these subunits--and all other non-ATPase subunits--in the regulatory particle is unknown. Using electron cryomicroscopy, we calculated difference maps between wild-type 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion mutants (rpn10Δ, rpn13Δ, and rpn10Δrpn13Δ). These maps allowed us to localize the two Ub receptors unambiguously. Rpn10 and Rpn13 mapped to the apical part of the 26S proteasome, above the N-terminal coiled coils of the AAA-ATPase heterodimers Rpt4/Rpt5 and Rpt1/Rpt2, respectively. On the basis of the mutual positions of Rpn10 and Rpn13, we propose a model for polyubiquitin binding to the 26S proteasome.

  4. Localization of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptors Rpn10 and Rpn13 by electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Eri; Bohn, Stefan; Mihalache, Oana; Kiss, Petra; Beck, Florian; Nagy, Istvan; Nickell, Stephan; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Two canonical subunits of the 26S proteasome, Rpn10 and Rpn13, function as ubiquitin (Ub) receptors. The mutual arrangement of these subunits—and all other non-ATPase subunits—in the regulatory particle is unknown. Using electron cryomicroscopy, we calculated difference maps between wild-type 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion mutants (rpn10Δ, rpn13Δ, and rpn10Δrpn13Δ). These maps allowed us to localize the two Ub receptors unambiguously. Rpn10 and Rpn13 mapped to the apical part of the 26S proteasome, above the N-terminal coiled coils of the AAA-ATPase heterodimers Rpt4/Rpt5 and Rpt1/Rpt2, respectively. On the basis of the mutual positions of Rpn10 and Rpn13, we propose a model for polyubiquitin binding to the 26S proteasome. PMID:22215586

  5. Local electronic structure and magnetic properties of 3d transition metal doped GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, He; Duan, Haiming

    2008-05-01

    The local electronic structure and magnetic properties of GaAs doped with 3d transition metal (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni) were studied by using discrete variational method (DVM) based on density functional theory. The calculated result indicated that the magnetic moment of transition metal increases first and then decreases, and reaches the maximum value when Mn is doped into GaAs. In the case of Mn concentration of 1.4%, the magnetic moment of Mn is in good agreement with the experimental result. The coupling between impure atoms in the system with two impure atoms was found to have obvious variation. For different transition metal, the coupling between the impure atom and the nearest neighbor As also has different variation.

  6. Probing the local environment of a single OPE3 molecule using inelastic tunneling electron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary We study single-molecule oligo(phenylene ethynylene)dithiol junctions by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). The molecule is contacted with gold nano-electrodes formed with the mechanically controllable break junction technique. We record the IETS spectrum of the molecule from direct current measurements, both as a function of time and electrode separation. We find that for fixed electrode separation the molecule switches between various configurations, which are characterized by different IETS spectra. Similar variations in the IETS signal are observed during atomic rearrangements upon stretching of the molecular junction. Using quantum chemistry calculations, we identity some of the vibrational modes which constitute a chemical fingerprint of the molecule. In addition, changes can be attributed to rearrangements of the local molecular environment, in particular at the molecule–electrode interface. This study shows the importance of taking into account the interaction with the electrodes when describing inelastic contributions to transport through single-molecule junctions. PMID:26885460

  7. Electronic scattering of pseudo-magnetic field induced by local bump in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mou; Cui, Yan; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the electronic scattering properties of a local bump strain in graphene sheet in frame of Born approximation. The differential scattering cross section is a function of outgoing and incident angles and has the six-fold rotational symmetry with respect to both angles. The incident plane wave is scattered into two backward fan-waves in different directions in low energy limit and is split into two branches spanning the angle reversely proportional to the incident wavevector k in high energy limit. The total scattering cross section depends on incident wavevector by the form k5 in the former limit, while it is independent of k and sensitive to the incident orientation in the latter limit. We explained these features using the symmetry of the strain-induced pseudo-magnetic field.

  8. New compact and efficient local oscillator optic system for the KSTAR electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. B.; Lee, D. J.; Lee, J.; Kim, C.; Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.

    2016-11-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic on Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research utilizes quasi-optical heterodyne-detection method to measure 2D (vertical and radial) Te fluctuations from two toroidally separated poloidal cross section of the plasma. A cylindrical lens local oscillator (LO) optics with optical path length (OPL) 2-2.5 m has been used in the current ECEI system to couple the LO source to the 24 vertically aligned array of ECE detectors. For efficient and compact LO optics employing the Powell lens is proposed so that the OPL of the LO source is significantly reduced from ˜2.0 m to 0.4 m with new optics. The coupling efficiency of the LO source is expected to be improved especially at the edge channels. Results from the optical simulation together with the laboratory test of the prototype optics will be discussed in this paper.

  9. Weak-localization approach to a 2D electron gas with a spectral node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, K.; Sinner, A.

    2015-07-01

    We study a weakly disordered 2D electron gas with two bands and a spectral node within the weak-localization approach and compare its results with those of Gaussian fluctuations around the self-consistent Born approximation. The appearance of diffusive modes depends on the type of disorder. In particular, we find for a random gap a diffusive mode only from ladder contributions, whereas for a random scalar potential the diffusive mode is created by ladder and by maximally crossed contributions. The ladder (maximally crossed) contributions correspond to fermionic (bosonic) Gaussian fluctuations. We calculate the conductivity corrections from the density-density Kubo formula and find a good agreement with the experimentally observed V-shape conductivity of graphene.

  10. Pressure-induced transition from localized electron toward band antiferromagnetism in LaMnO(3).

    PubMed

    Zhou, J-S; Goodenough, J B

    2002-08-19

    The temperature dependence of the ac susceptibility under pressure has been used to track the Néel temperature T(N) of the Mott insulators LaMnO3, CaMnO3, and YCrO3. Bloch's rule relating T(N) to volume V, viz., alpha=dlog(T(N)/dlog(V=-3.3, is obeyed in YCrO3 and CaMnO3; it fails in LaMnO3. This breakdown is interpreted to be due to a sharp increase in the factor [U(-1)+(2Delta)(-1)] entering the superexchange perturbation formula. A first-order change at 7 kbar indicates that the transition from localized-electron to band magnetism is not smooth.

  11. A statistical characterization of local mid-latitude total electron content

    SciTech Connect

    Gail, W.B.; Prag, A.B.; Coco, D.S.; Coker, C.

    1993-09-01

    The integrated line-of-slight electron density within the ionosphere, known as the total electron content (TEC), is commonly used to quantify ionospheric propagation effects. In order to extrapolate single-point measurements of TEC to other locations and times, some characterization of the TEC spatiotemporal variation must be available. Using a four-channel receiver tracking coded signals from the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System satellites, estimates of both the mean variation and correlation coefficient have been made for the approximately 1200-km or 1-hour local time radius ionospheric region within view of a mid-latitude station. Results were obtained for morning and midday over a 4-week period near the autumnal equinox in 1989. The derived mean variation was found to be well characterized by linear functions of the local time and latitude separation between the ground site and the ionospheric penetration point of the signal. The correlation coefficient during midday was found to decrease linearly with latitude, longitude, and time separation, with values of about 0.91 for a 1000-km separation and 0.98 for a 1-hour separation. During morning hours the longitude and time coefficients were similar to the midday values, but the latitude coefficient was found to have a nonlinear dependence, with values as small as 0.70. The combined results suggest that the decorrelation is due primarily to longer term TEC fluctuation, such as day-to-day variation in the TEC spatial dependence, rather than to transient effects such as traveling ionospheric disturbances. The analysis provides a spatiotemporal characterization of TEC that can be used to extrapolate TEC values from single-point measurements. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Localization of magnetic and electronic excitations in nanotubes with line defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, P. G.; Cottam, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    A matrix Green's function formalism is employed to study the excitations in long nanotubes where the dynamics are governed by nearest-neighbor interactions between atoms. Examples of the excitations, which can be characterized in terms of the tube circumference and a one-dimensional wave number along the length, include ferromagnetic spin waves in a Heisenberg exchange model and electronic modes in a tight-binding model with hopping. It is assumed that the system is a single-walled nanotube of negligible thickness and that the atoms are arranged on a simple square lattice. Defects in the form of substitutional impurity atoms are introduced to study localized modes as well as the propagating modes of the pure (host) material. The impurities have the form of one or more line defects parallel to the nanotube axis. The derived Green's functions provide a description of the frequencies of the discrete modes of the system and their spectral intensities. Numerical examples are presented for different mode types (magnetic and electronic), nanotube diameters and arrangements of impurity lines.

  13. Bonding in elemental boron: a view from electronic structure calculations using maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogitsu, Tadashi; Gygi, Francois; Reed, John; Schwegler, Eric; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    Boron exhibits the most complex structure of all elemental solids, with more than 300 atoms per unit cell arranged in interconnecting icosahedra, and some crystallographic positions occupied with a probability of less than one. The precise determination of the ground state geometry of boron---the so-called β-boron structure--has been elusive and its electronic and bonding properties have been difficult to rationalize. Using lattice model Monte Carlo optimization techniques and ab-initio simulations, we have shown that a defective, quasi-ordered β solid is the most stable structure at zero as well as finite T. In the absence of partially occupied sites (POS), the perfect β-boron crystal is unstable; the presence of POS lower its internal energy below that of an ordered α-phase, not mere an entropic effect. We present a picture of the intricate and unique bonding in boron based on maximally localized Wannier (MLWF) functions, which indicates that the presence of POS provides a subtle, yet essential spatial balance between electron deficient and fully saturated bonds. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/ LLNL under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  14. Electronic holographic device based on macro-pixel with local coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Woonchan; Kwon, Jaebeom; Kim, Hwi; Hahn, Joonku

    2015-09-01

    Holography has been regarded as one of the most ideal technique for three-dimensional (3D) display because it records and reconstructs both amplitude and phase of object wave simultaneously. Nevertheless, many people think that this technique is not suitable for commercialization due to some significant problems. In this paper, we propose an electronic holographic 3D display based on macro-pixel with local coherence. Here, the incident wave within each macro-pixel is coherent but the wave in one macro-pixel is not mutually coherent with the wave in the other macro-pixel. This concept provides amazing freedom in distribution of the pixels in modulator. The relative distance between two macro-pixels results in negligible change of interference pattern in observation space. Also it is possible to make the sub-pixels in a macro-pixel in order to enlarge the field of view (FOV). The idea has amazing effects to reduce the data capacity of the holographic display. Moreover, the dimension of the system is can be remarkably downsized by micro-optics. As a result, the holographic display will be designed to have full parallax with large FOV and screen size. We think that the macro-pixel idea is a practical solution in electronic holography since it can provide reasonable FOV and large screen size with relatively small amount of data.

  15. Electronic transport and localization in nitrogen-doped graphene devices using hyperthermal ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Adam L.; Cress, Cory D.; Schmucker, Scott W.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; van 't Erve, Olaf M. J.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperthermal ion implantation offers a controllable method of producing high-quality substitutionally doped graphene with nitrogen, an n -type dopant that has great potential for graphene electronics and spintronics applications where high carrier concentration, uniform doping, and minimal vacancy defect concentration is desired. Here we examine the transport properties of monolayer graphene sheets as a function of implantation beam energy and dose. We observe a transition from weak to strong localization that varies as a function of carrier concentration. For nominally equivalent doses, increased N ion energy results in an increasing magnetoresistance magnitude, reaching a value of approximately -5.5% at 5000 Oe, which we discuss in the context of dopant concentration and defect formation. We use a model for the temperature dependence of the conductivity that takes into account both temperature activation, due to the formation of a transport gap, and Mott variable-range hopping, due to the formation of defects, to further study the electronic properties of the doped films as a function of dose and N ion energy. We find that the temperature activation component dominates the behavior.

  16. Localized Hartree product treatment of multiple protons in the nuclear-electronic orbital framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Benjamin; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    An approximation for treating multiple quantum nuclei within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework for molecular systems is presented. In the approximation to NEO-Hartree-Fock, the nuclear wave function is represented by a Hartree product rather than a Slater determinant, corresponding to the neglect of the nuclear exchange interactions. In the approximation to NEO-density functional theory, the nuclear exchange-correlation functional is chosen to be the diagonal nuclear exchange interaction terms, thereby eliminating the nuclear self-interaction terms. To further enhance the simplicity and computational efficiency, the nuclear molecular orbitals or Kohn-Sham orbitals are expanded in terms of localized nuclear basis sets. These approximations are valid because of the inherent localization of the nuclear orbitals and the numerical insignificance of the nuclear exchange interactions in molecular systems. Moreover, these approximations lead to substantial computational savings due to the reduction in both the number of integrals that must be calculated and the size of the matrices that must be diagonalized. These nuclear Hartree product approximation (HPA) methods scale linearly with the number of quantum protons and are highly parallelizable. Applications to a water hexamer, glycine dimer, and 32-water cluster, where all hydrogen nuclei are treated quantum mechanically, illustrate the accuracy and computational efficiency of the nuclear HPA methods. These strategies will facilitate the implementation of explicitly correlated NEO methods for molecular systems with multiple quantum protons.

  17. Localized Tail States and Electron Mobility in Amorphous ZnON Thin Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia; Ye, Yan; Guo, Yuzheng; Robertson, John

    2015-01-01

    The density of localized tail states in amorphous ZnON (a-ZnON) thin film transistors (TFTs) is deduced from the measured current-voltage characteristics. The extracted values of tail state density at the conduction band minima (Ntc) and its characteristic energy (kTt) are about 2 × 1020 cm−3eV−1 and 29 meV, respectively, suggesting trap-limited conduction prevails at room temperature. Based on trap-limited conduction theory where these tail state parameters are considered, electron mobility is accurately retrieved using a self-consistent extraction method along with the scaling factor ‘1/(α + 1)’ associated with trapping events at the localized tail states. Additionally, it is found that defects, e.g. oxygen and/or nitrogen vacancies, can be ionized under illumination with hv ≫ Eg, leading to very mild persistent photoconductivity (PPC) in a-ZnON TFTs. PMID:26304606

  18. Metallothionein as a clonable tag for protein localization by electron microscopy of cells.

    PubMed

    Morphew, M K; O'Toole, E T; Page, C L; Pagratis, M; Meehl, J; Giddings, T; Gardner, J M; Ackerson, C; Jaspersen, S L; Winey, M; Hoenger, A; McIntosh, J R

    2015-10-01

    A benign, clonable tag for the localization of proteins by electron microscopy of cells would be valuable, especially if it provided labelling with high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial resolution. Here we explore the use of metallothionein as such a localization marker. We have achieved good success with desmin labelled in vitro and with a component of the yeast spindle pole body labelled in cells. Heavy metals added after fixation and embedding or during the process of freeze-substitution fixation provide readily visible signals with no concern that the heavy atoms are affecting the behaviour of the protein in its physiological environment. However, our methods did not work with protein components of the nuclear pore complex, suggesting that this approach is not yet universally applicable. We provide a full description of our optimal labelling conditions and other conditions tried, hoping that our work will allow others to label their own proteins of interest and/or improve on the methods we have defined.

  19. Local instability driving extreme events in a pair of coupled chaotic electronic circuits.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Gilson F; Di Lorenzo, Orlando; de Silans, Thierry Passerat; Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos; Cavalcante, Hugo L D de Souza

    2016-06-01

    For a long time, extreme events happening in complex systems, such as financial markets, earthquakes, and neurological networks, were thought to follow power-law size distributions. More recently, evidence suggests that in many systems the largest and rarest events differ from the other ones. They are dragon kings, outliers that make the distribution deviate from a power law in the tail. Understanding the processes of formation of extreme events and what circumstances lead to dragon kings or to a power-law distribution is an open question and it is a very important one to assess whether extreme events will occur too often in a specific system. In the particular system studied in this paper, we show that the rate of occurrence of dragon kings is controlled by the value of a parameter. The system under study here is composed of two nearly identical chaotic oscillators which fail to remain in a permanently synchronized state when coupled. We analyze the statistics of the desynchronization events in this specific example of two coupled chaotic electronic circuits and find that modifying a parameter associated to the local instability responsible for the loss of synchronization reduces the occurrence of dragon kings, while preserving the power-law distribution of small- to intermediate-size events with the same scaling exponent. Our results support the hypothesis that the dragon kings are caused by local instabilities in the phase space. PMID:27415257

  20. NMR study of localized electrons in conductive Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukada, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of nuclear spin lattice relaxation was performed on a conductive Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film based on a charge-transfer (CT) complex of bisethylenedioxytetrathiafulvalene (BO) and decyltetracyanoquinodimethane (C10TCNQ). The characteristic peak of the relaxation rate T-11 of 1H was observed at a low temperature (10 K). As in its pristine solid (BO-C10TCNQ complex), the behavior of the relaxation rate was explained by the theory of localization. From the quantitative analysis of the behavior, the detailed dynamics of the localized electrons in the LB film were successfully obtained. In addition, the outer-planar anisotropy of T-11 of 1H was observed in the LB film. This indicates that the observed echo mainly originated from 1H at the end ethylene groups of BO. The fact that the field dependence of this anisotropic T-11 is well fitted by the cosine curve provides detailed information of the hyperfine structures in the LB film. Considering these results in combination with those of the temperature dependence of T-11, it is concluded that the variance of each level of BO is small and that the nature of disorder in the LB film is that of a continuum.

  1. Metallothionein as a clonable tag for protein localization by electron microscopy of cells

    PubMed Central

    MORPHEW, M.K.; O’TOOLE, E.T.; PAGE, C.L.; PAGRATIS, M.; MEEHL, J.; GIDDINGS, T.; GARDNER, J.M.; ACKERSON, C.; JASPERSEN, S.L.; WINEY, M.; HOENGER, A.; MCINTOSH, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A benign, clonable tag for the localization of proteins by electron microscopy of cells would be valuable, especially if it provided labelling with high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial resolution. Here we explore the use of metallothionein as such a localization marker. We have achieved good success with desmin labelled in vitro and with a component of the yeast spindle pole body labelled in cells. Heavy metals added after fixation and embedding or during the process of freeze-substitution fixation provide readily visible signals with no concern that the heavy atoms are affecting the behaviour of the protein in its physiological environment. However, our methods did not work with protein components of the nuclear pore complex, suggesting that this approach is not yet universally applicable. We provide a full description of our optimal labelling conditions and other conditions tried, hoping that our work will allow others to label their own proteins of interest and/or improve on the methods we have defined. PMID:25974385

  2. Local instability driving extreme events in a pair of coupled chaotic electronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Gilson F.; Di Lorenzo, Orlando; de Silans, Thierry Passerat; Chevrollier, Martine; Oriá, Marcos; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de Souza

    2016-06-01

    For a long time, extreme events happening in complex systems, such as financial markets, earthquakes, and neurological networks, were thought to follow power-law size distributions. More recently, evidence suggests that in many systems the largest and rarest events differ from the other ones. They are dragon kings, outliers that make the distribution deviate from a power law in the tail. Understanding the processes of formation of extreme events and what circumstances lead to dragon kings or to a power-law distribution is an open question and it is a very important one to assess whether extreme events will occur too often in a specific system. In the particular system studied in this paper, we show that the rate of occurrence of dragon kings is controlled by the value of a parameter. The system under study here is composed of two nearly identical chaotic oscillators which fail to remain in a permanently synchronized state when coupled. We analyze the statistics of the desynchronization events in this specific example of two coupled chaotic electronic circuits and find that modifying a parameter associated to the local instability responsible for the loss of synchronization reduces the occurrence of dragon kings, while preserving the power-law distribution of small- to intermediate-size events with the same scaling exponent. Our results support the hypothesis that the dragon kings are caused by local instabilities in the phase space.

  3. Combined Modality Therapy Including Intraoperative Electron Irradiation for Locally Recurrent Colorectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Haddock, Michael G.; Miller, Robert C.; Nelson, Heidi; Pemberton, John H.; Dozois, Eric J.; Alberts, Steven R.; Gunderson, Leonard L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival, relapse patterns, and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer relapse treated with curative-intent therapy, including intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT). Methods and Materials: From April 1981 through January 2008, 607 patients with recurrent colorectal cancer received IOERT as a component of treatment. IOERT was preceded or followed by external radiation (median dose, 45.5 Gy) in 583 patients (96%). Resection was classified as R0 in 227 (37%), R1 in 224 (37%), and R2 in 156 (26%). The median IOERT dose was 15 Gy (range, 7.5-30 Gy). Results: Median overall survival was 36 months. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 30% and 16%, respectively. Survival estimates at 5 years were 46%, 27%, and 16% for R0, R1, and R2 resection, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that R0 resection, no prior chemotherapy, and more recent treatment (in the second half of the series) were associated with improved survival. The 3-year cumulative incidence of central, local, and distant relapse was 12%, 23%, and 49%, respectively. Central and local relapse were more common in previously irradiated patients and in those with subtotal resection. Toxicity Grade 3 or higher partially attributable to IOERT was observed in 66 patients (11%). Neuropathy was observed in 94 patients (15%) and was more common with IOERT doses exceeding 12.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survival and disease control was achievable in patients with locally recurrent colorectal cancer. Continued evaluation of curative-intent, combined-modality therapy that includes IOERT is warranted in this high-risk population.

  4. The roles of 4f- and 5f-orbitals in bonding: a magnetochemical, crystal field, density functional theory, and multi-reference wavefunction study.

    PubMed

    Lukens, W W; Speldrich, M; Yang, P; Duignan, T J; Autschbach, J; Kögerler, P

    2016-07-28

    The electronic structures of 4f(3)/5f(3) Cp''3M and Cp''3M·alkylisocyanide complexes, where Cp'' is 1,3-bis-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadienyl, are explored with a focus on the splitting of the f-orbitals, which provides information about the strengths of the metal-ligand interactions. While the f-orbital splitting in many lanthanide complexes has been reported in detail, experimental determination of the f-orbital splitting in actinide complexes remains rare in systems other than halide and oxide compounds, since the experimental approach, crystal field analysis, is generally significantly more difficult for actinide complexes than for lanthanide complexes. In this study, a set of analogous neodymium(iii) and uranium(iii) tris-cyclopentadienyl complexes and their isocyanide adducts was characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility. The crystal field model was parameterized by combined fitting of EPR and susceptibility data, yielding an accurate description of f-orbital splitting. The isocyanide derivatives were also studied using density functional theory, resulting in f-orbital splitting that is consistent with crystal field fitting, and by multi-reference wavefunction calculations that support the electronic structure analysis derived from the crystal-field calculations. The results highlight that the 5f-orbitals, but not the 4f-orbitals, are significantly involved in bonding to the isocyanide ligands. The main interaction between isocyanide ligand and the metal center is a σ-bond, with additional 5f to π* donation for the uranium complexes. While interaction with the isocyanide π*-orbitals lowers the energies of the 5fxz(2) and 5fyz(2)-orbitals, spin-orbit coupling greatly reduces the population of 5fxz(2) and 5fyz(2) in the ground state. PMID:27349178

  5. Electric Field Tuned Crossover from Classical to Weakly Localized Quantum Transport in Electron Doped SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Ngai, J.H.; Segal, Y.; Su, D.; Zhu, Y.; Walker, F.J.; Ismail-Beigi, S.; Le Hur, K.; Ahn, C.H.

    2010-06-21

    Electron gases created by modulating the charge density near interfaces and surfaces of insulating SrTiO{sub 3} offer a wide range of tunable behavior. Here, we utilize the nonlinear dielectric response of SrTiO{sub 3} to electrostatically manipulate the spatial confinement of an electron gas relative to an interface, where scattering is enhanced. Magnetotransport measurements reveal that the electron gas can be tuned from weakly localized to classical transport regimes. This crossover in transport demonstrates that elastic scattering can be electrostatically controlled, providing another degree of tunability for electron gases in SrTiO{sub 3}.

  6. Quantitative imaging reveals real-time Pou5f3–Nanog complexes driving dorsoventral mesendoderm patterning in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Camps, Mireia; Tian, Jing; Chng, Serene C; Sem, Kai Pin; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Teh, Cathleen; Wachsmuth, Malte; Korzh, Vladimir; Ahmed, Sohail; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the three embryonic germ layers is a fundamental developmental process that initiates differentiation. How the zebrafish pluripotency factor Pou5f3 (homologous to mammalian Oct4) drives lineage commitment is unclear. Here, we introduce fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the formation of Pou5f3 complexes with other transcription factors in real-time in gastrulating zebrafish embryos. We show, at single-cell resolution in vivo, that Pou5f3 complexes with Nanog to pattern mesendoderm differentiation at the blastula stage. Later, during gastrulation, Sox32 restricts Pou5f3–Nanog complexes to the ventrolateral mesendoderm by binding Pou5f3 or Nanog in prospective dorsal endoderm. In the ventrolateral endoderm, the Elabela / Aplnr pathway limits Sox32 levels, allowing the formation of Pou5f3–Nanog complexes and the activation of downstream BMP signaling. This quantitative model shows that a balance in the spatiotemporal distribution of Pou5f3–Nanog complexes, modulated by Sox32, regulates mesendoderm specification along the dorsoventral axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11475.001 PMID:27684073

  7. Efficient gene transfer into normal human B lymphocytes with the chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daniel; Néron, Sonia; Drouin, Mathieu; Jacques, Annie

    2005-09-01

    The failure to efficiently introduce genes into normal cells such as human B lymphocytes limits the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Recent studies have shown that a new adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 can efficiently transduce human haematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells. In this study, we compared the gene transfer efficiencies of the Ad5/F35 vector to that of the parental vector Ad5 in human B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells obtained from healthy individuals were cultured in vitro using CD40-CD154 system. Normal B lymphocytes were infected with replication-defectives Ad5 and Ad5/F35, both containing the GFP reporter gene, and transduction efficiencies were monitored by flow cytometry. Ad5 was highly ineffective, infecting only about 5% of human B lymphocytes. In contrast, Ad5/F35 transduced up to 60% of human B lymphocytes and GFP expression could be detected for up to 5 days post infection. Importantly, physiology of B lymphocytes such as proliferation, viability and antibodies secretion were unaffected following Ad5/F35 transduction. Finally, we observed that memory B lymphocytes were more susceptible to Ad5/F35 infection than naïve B lymphocytes. Thus, our results demonstrate that the adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 is an efficient tool for the functional characterization of genes in B lymphopoiesis.

  8. Fluorinated Peptide Nucleic Acids with Fluoroacetyl Side Chain Bearing 5-(F/CF3)-Uracil: Synthesis and Cell Uptake Studies.

    PubMed

    Ellipilli, Satheesh; Palvai, Sandeep; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2016-08-01

    Fluorine incorporation into organic molecules imparts favorable physicochemical properties such as lipophilicity, solubility and metabolic stability necessary for drug action. Toward such applications using peptide nucleic acids (PNA), we herein report the chemical synthesis of fluorinated PNA monomers and biophysical studies of derived PNA oligomers containing fluorine in in the acetyl side chain (-CHF-CO-) bearing nucleobase uracil (5-F/5-CF3-U). The crystal structures of fluorinated racemic PNA monomers reveal interesting base pairing of enantiomers and packing arrangements directed by the chiral F substituent. Reverse phase HPLC show higher hydrophobicity of fluorinated PNA oligomers, dependent on the number and site of the fluorine substitution: fluorine on carbon adjacent to the carbonyl group induces higher lipophilicity than fluorine on nucleobase or in the backbone. The PNA oligomers containing fluorinated bases form hybrids with cDNA/RNA with slightly lower stability compared to that of unmodified aeg PNA, perhaps due to electronic effects. The uptake of fluorinated homooligomeric PNAs by HeLa cells was as facile as that of nonfluorinated PNA. In conjunction with our previous work on PNAs fluorinated in backbone and at N-terminus, it is evident that the fluorinated PNAs have potential to emerge as a new class of PNA analogues for applications in functional inhibition of RNA. PMID:27391099

  9. Structure of the parainfluenza virus 5 F protein in its metastable, prefusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Wen, Xiaolin; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    Enveloped viruses have evolved complex glycoprotein machinery that drives the fusion of viral and cellular membranes, permitting entry of the viral genome into the cell. For the paramyxoviruses, the fusion (F) protein catalyses this membrane merger and entry step, and it has been postulated that the F protein undergoes complex refolding during this process. Here we report the crystal structure of the parainfluenza virus 5 F protein in its prefusion conformation, stabilized by the addition of a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain. The structure of the F protein shows that there are profound conformational differences between the pre- and postfusion states, involving transformations in secondary and tertiary structure. The positions and structural transitions of key parts of the fusion machinery, including the hydrophobic fusion peptide and two helical heptad repeat regions, clarify the mechanism of membrane fusion mediated by the F protein.

  10. Local Dynamic Stability Assessment of Motion Impaired Elderly Using Electronic Textile Pants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Lockhart, Thurmon E; Jones, Mark; Martin, Tom

    2008-10-01

    A clear association has been demonstrated between gait stability and falls in the elderly. Integration of wearable computing and human dynamic stability measures into home automation systems may help differentiate fall-prone individuals in a residential environment. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the capability of a pair of electronic textile (e-textile) pants system to assess local dynamic stability and to differentiate motion-impaired elderly from their healthy counterparts. A pair of e-textile pants comprised of numerous e-TAGs at locations corresponding to lower extremity joints was developed to collect acceleration, angular velocity and piezoelectric data. Four motion-impaired elderly together with nine healthy individuals (both young and old) participated in treadmill walking with a motion capture system simultaneously collecting kinematic data. Local dynamic stability, characterized by maximum Lyapunov exponent, was computed based on vertical acceleration and angular velocity at lower extremity joints for the measurements from both e-textile and motion capture systems. Results indicated that the motion-impaired elderly had significantly higher maximum Lyapunov exponents (computed from vertical acceleration data) than healthy individuals at the right ankle and hip joints. In addition, maximum Lyapunov exponents assessed by the motion capture system were found to be significantly higher than those assessed by the e-textile system. Despite the difference between these measurement techniques, attaching accelerometers at the ankle and hip joints was shown to be an effective sensor configuration. It was concluded that the e-textile pants system, via dynamic stability assessment, has the potential to identify motion-impaired elderly.

  11. Local measurement of the Eliashberg function of Pb islands: enhancement of electron-phonon coupling by quantum well states.

    PubMed

    Schackert, Michael; Märkl, Tobias; Jandke, Jasmin; Hölzer, Martin; Ostanin, Sergey; Gross, Eberhard K U; Ernst, Arthur; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2015-01-30

    Inelastic tunneling spectroscopy of Pb islands on Cu(111) obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy below 1 K provides a direct access to the local Eliashberg function of the islands with high energy resolution. The Eliashberg function describes the electron-phonon interaction causing conventional superconductivity. The measured Eliashberg function strongly depends on the local thickness of the Pb nanostructures and shows a sharp maximum when quantum well states of the Pb islands come close to the Fermi energy. Ab initio calculations reveal that this is related to enhanced electron-phonon coupling at these thicknesses. PMID:25679904

  12. Localized f electrons in CexLa1-xRhIn5: de Haas-van Alphen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, U.; Goodrich, R. G.; Harrison, N.; Hall, D. W.; Palm, E. C.; Murphy, T. P.; Tozer, S. W.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Moreno, N. O.; Sarrao, J. L.; Fisk, Z.

    2001-11-01

    Measurements of the de Haas-van Alphen effect in CexLa1-xRhIn5 reveal that the Ce 4f electrons remain localized for all x, with the mass enhancement and progressive loss of one spin from the de Haas-van Alphen signal resulting from spin fluctuation effects. This behavior may be typical of antiferromagnetic heavy fermion compounds, inspite of the fact that the 4f electron localization in CeRhIn5 is driven, in part, by a spin-density wave instability.

  13. Local Measurement of Electron Density and Temperature in High Temperature Laser Plasma Using the Ion-Acoustic Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Davis, P; Ross, S; Meezan, N; Divol, L; Price, D; Glenzer, S H; Rousseaux, C

    2005-09-20

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

  14. Precise In Situ Modulation of Local Liquid Chemistry via Electron Irradiation in Nanoreactors Based on Graphene Liquid Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Canhui; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    A controlled electron-water radiolysis process is used to generate predictable concentrations of radical and ionic species in graphene liquid cells, allowing the concept of a nanoscale chemical reactor. A differential scanning technique is used to generate the desired time- and space-varying electron dose rate. Precise control of the local concentration of H2 , the dominant radiolysis species, is demonstrated experimentally at the nanometer scale.

  15. Strain localization parameters of AlCu4MgSi processed by high-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lunev, A. G. Nadezhkin, M. V.; Konovalov, S. V.; Teresov, A. D.

    2015-10-27

    The influence of the electron beam surface treatment of AlCu4MgSi on the strain localization parameters and on the critical strain value of the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect has been considered. The strain localization parameters were measured using speckle imaging of the specimens subjected to the constant strain rate uniaxial tension at a room temperature. Impact of the surface treatment on the Portevin–Le Chatelier effect has been investigated.

  16. Electron beam induced local crystallization of HfO2 nanopores for biosensing applications

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jiwook; Rivera, Jose; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of single, locally crystallized nanopores in HfO2 membranes for biosensing applications. HfO2 is chosen for its isoelectric point of 7.0, mechanical and chemical stability in solution, and for its potential as a high-k material for nanopore ionic field effect transistor applications. The HfO2 membrane is deposited on a graphene layer suspended over a 300 nm FIB hole, where graphene is used as the mechanical support. Exposure of the membrane to a focused electron beam causes crystallization in the vicinity of the nanopore during pore formation. We investigate the effects of crystallization on the electrical and surface properties of HfO2 films. Our surface analysis of HfO2 reveals improved hydrophilicity of crystallized HfO2, a notable advantage over the hydrophobicity of as-deposited HfO2. We also demonstrate detection of dsDNA translocation through HfO2 nanopores under various applied bias levels. In addition, our device architecture also presents a promising first step toward the realization of high-k HfO2 nanopore transistors. PMID:23945603

  17. Electron beam induced local crystallization of HfO2 nanopores for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jiwook; Rivera, Jose A; Bashir, Rashid

    2013-11-21

    We report the development of single, locally crystallized nanopores in HfO2 membranes for biosensing applications. HfO2 is chosen for its isoelectric point of 7.0, mechanical and chemical stability in solution, and for its potential as a high-k material for nanopore ionic field effect transistor applications. The HfO2 membrane is deposited on a graphene layer suspended over a 300 nm FIB hole, where graphene is used as the mechanical support. Exposure of the membrane to a focused electron beam causes crystallization in the vicinity of the nanopore during pore formation. We investigate the effects of crystallization on the electrical and surface properties of HfO2 films. Our surface analysis of HfO2 reveals improved hydrophilicity of crystallized HfO2, a notable advantage over the hydrophobicity of as-deposited HfO2. We also demonstrate detection of dsDNA translocation through HfO2 nanopores under various applied bias levels. In addition, our device architecture also presents a promising first step toward the realization of high-k HfO2 nanopore transistors.

  18. Local sample thickness determination via scanning transmission electron microscopy defocus series.

    PubMed

    Beyer, A; Straubinger, R; Belz, J; Volz, K

    2016-05-01

    The usable aperture sizes in (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) have significantly increased in the past decade due to the introduction of aberration correction. In parallel with the consequent increase of convergence angle the depth of focus has decreased severely and optical sectioning in the STEM became feasible. Here we apply STEM defocus series to derive the local sample thickness of a TEM sample. To this end experimental as well as simulated defocus series of thin Si foils were acquired. The systematic blurring of high resolution high angle annular dark field images is quantified by evaluating the standard deviation of the image intensity for each image of a defocus series. The derived dependencies exhibit a pronounced maximum at the optimum defocus and drop to a background value for higher or lower values. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the curve is equal to the sample thickness above a minimum thickness given by the size of the used aperture and the chromatic aberration of the microscope. The thicknesses obtained from experimental defocus series applying the proposed method are in good agreement with the values derived from other established methods. The key advantages of this method compared to others are its high spatial resolution and that it does not involve any time consuming simulations.

  19. Local electronic structure and photoelectrochemical activity of partial chemically etched Ti-doped hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioult, Maxime; Belkhou, Rachid; Magnan, Hélène; Stanescu, Dana; Stanescu, Stefan; Maccherozzi, Francesco; Rountree, Cindy; Barbier, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The direct conversion of solar light into chemical energy or fuel through photoelectrochemical water splitting is promising as a clean hydrogen production solution. Ti-doped hematite (Ti:α-Fe2O3) is a potential key photoanode material, which despite its optimal band gap, excellent chemical stability, abundance, non-toxicity and low cost, still has to be improved. Here we give evidence of a drastic improvement of the water splitting performances of Ti-doped hematite photoanodes upon a HCl wet-etching. In addition to the topography investigation by atomic force microscopy, a detailed determination of the local electronic structure has been carried out in order to understand the phenomenon and to provide new insights in the understanding of solar water splitting. Using synchrotron radiation based spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM), we investigated the X-ray absorption spectral features at the L3 Fe edge of the as grown surface and of the wet-etched surface on the very same sample thanks to patterning. We show that HCl wet etching leads to substantial surface modifications of the oxide layer including increased roughness and chemical reduction (presence of Fe2 +) without changing the band gap. We demonstrate that these changes are profitable and correlated to the drastic changes of the photocatalytic activity.

  20. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  1. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand 5F 203 Induces Oxidative Stress That Triggers DNA Damage in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    McLean, Lancelot S; Watkins, Cheri N; Campbell, Petreena; Zylstra, Dain; Rowland, Leah; Amis, Louisa H; Scott, Lia; Babb, Crystal E; Livingston, W Joel; Darwanto, Agus; Davis, Willie L; Senthil, Maheswari; Sowers, Lawrence C; Brantley, Eileen

    2015-05-18

    Breast tumors often show profound sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Investigational agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated DNA damage in certain breast cancer cells. Since AhR agonists often elevate intracellular oxidative stress, we hypothesize that 5F 203 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce DNA damage, which thwarts breast cancer cell growth. We found that 5F 203 induced single-strand break formation. 5F 203 enhanced oxidative DNA damage that was specific to breast cancer cells sensitive to its cytotoxic actions, as it did not increase oxidative DNA damage or ROS formation in nontumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. In contrast, AhR agonist and procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and its metabolite, 1,6-benzo[a]pyrene quinone, induced oxidative DNA damage and ROS formation, respectively, in MCF-10A cells. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F 203 activated ROS-responsive kinases: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38). AhR antagonists (alpha-naphthoflavone, CH223191) or antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine, EUK-134) attenuated 5F 203-mediated JNK and p38 activation, depending on the cell type. Pharmacological inhibition of AhR, JNK, or p38 attenuated 5F 203-mediated increases in intracellular ROS, apoptosis, and single-strand break formation. 5F 203 induced the expression of cytoglobin, an oxidative stress-responsive gene and a putative tumor suppressor, which was diminished with AhR, JNK, or p38 inhibition. Additionally, 5F 203-mediated increases in ROS production and cytoglobin were suppressed in AHR100 cells (AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Our data demonstrate 5F 203 induces ROS-mediated DNA damage at least in part via AhR, JNK, or p38 activation and modulates the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes such as cytoglobin to confer its anticancer action.

  2. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand 5F 203 Induces Oxidative Stress That Triggers DNA Damage in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Lancelot S.; Watkins, Cheri N.; Campbell, Petreena; Zylstra, Dain; Rowland, Leah; Amis, Louisa H.; Scott, Lia; Babb, Crystal E.; Livingston, W. Joel; Darwanto, Agus; Davis, Willie L.; Senthil, Maheswari; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Brantley, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Breast tumors often show profound sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Investigational agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated DNA damage in certain breast cancer cells. Since AhR agonists often elevate intracellular oxidative stress, we hypothesize that 5F 203 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce DNA damage, which thwarts breast cancer cell growth. We found that 5F 203 induced single-strand break formation. 5F 203 enhanced oxidative DNA damage that was specific to breast cancer cells sensitive to its cytotoxic actions, as it did not increase oxidative DNA damage or ROS formation in nontumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. In contrast, AhR agonist and procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and its metabolite, 1,6-benzo[a]pyrene quinone, induced oxidative DNA damage and ROS formation, respectively, in MCF-10A cells. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F 203 activated ROS-responsive kinases: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38). AhR antagonists (alpha-naphthoflavone, CH223191) or antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine, EUK-134) attenuated 5F 203-mediated JNK and p38 activation, depending on the cell type. Pharmacological inhibition of AhR, JNK, or p38 attenuated 5F 203-mediated increases in intracellular ROS, apoptosis, and single-strand break formation. 5F 203 induced the expression of cytoglobin, an oxidative stress-responsive gene and a putative tumor suppressor, which was diminished with AhR, JNK, or p38 inhibition. Additionally, 5F 203-mediated increases in ROS production and cytoglobin were suppressed in AHR100 cells (AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Our data demonstrate 5F 203 induces ROS-mediated DNA damage at least in part via AhR, JNK, or p38 activation and modulates the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes such as cytoglobin to confer its anticancer action. PMID:25781201

  3. A 1.5 THz hot-electron bolometer mixer operated by a planar diode based local oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Y. E.; Meledin, D.; Blundell, R.; Erickson, N.; Mehdi, I.; Goltsman, G.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a 1.5 THz superconducting NbN Hot-Electron Bolometer mixer. It is oprated by an all-solid-state Local Oscillator comprising of a cascade of 4 planar doublers following an MMIC based W-band power amplifier.

  4. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Schirmer, M; Walz, M-M; Vollnhals, F; Lukasczyk, T; Sandmann, A; Chen, C; Steinrück, H-P; Marbach, H

    2011-02-25

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiO(x) nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures. PMID:21242619

  5. Electron-beam-induced deposition and post-treatment processes to locally generate clean titanium oxide nanostructures on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Vollnhals, F.; Lukasczyk, T.; Sandmann, A.; Chen, C.; Steinrück, H.-P.; Marbach, H.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the lithographic generation of TiOx nanostructures on Si(100) via electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and local Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). In addition, the fabricated nanostructures were also characterized ex situ via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions. In EBID, a highly focused electron beam is used to locally decompose precursor molecules and thereby to generate a deposit. A drawback of this nanofabrication technique is the unintended deposition of material in the vicinity of the impact position of the primary electron beam due to so-called proximity effects. Herein, we present a post-treatment procedure to deplete the unintended deposits by moderate sputtering after the deposition process. Moreover, we were able to observe the formation of pure titanium oxide nanocrystals (<100 nm) in situ upon heating the sample in a well-defined oxygen atmosphere. While the nanocrystal growth for the as-deposited structures also occurs in the surroundings of the irradiated area due to proximity effects, it is limited to the pre-defined regions, if the sample was sputtered before heating the sample under oxygen atmosphere. The described two-step post-treatment procedure after EBID presents a new pathway for the fabrication of clean localized nanostructures.

  6. Local atomic and electronic structure in LaMnO{sub 3} across the orbital ordering transition

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Raquel A.; Souza-Neto, Narcizo M.; Ramos, Aline Y.; Tolentino, Helio C.N.; Granado, Eduardo

    2004-12-01

    The local atomic disorder and electronic structure in the environment of manganese atoms in LaMnO{sub 3} has been studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a temperature range (300-870 K) covering the orbital ordering transition ({approx}710 K). The Mn-O distance splitting into short and long bonds (1.95 and 2.15 A) is kept across the transition temperature, so that the MnO{sub 6} octahedra remain locally Jahn-Teller distorted. Discontinuities in the Mn local structure are identified in the extended x-ray fine structure spectra at this temperature, associated with a reduction of the disorder in the superexchange angle and to the removal of the anisotropy in the radial disorder within the coordination shell. Subtle changes in the electronic local structure also take place at the Mn site at the transition temperature. The near-edge spectra show a small drop of the Mn 4p hole count and a small enhancement in the pre-edge structures at the transition temperature. These features are associated with an increase of the covalence of the Mn-O bonds. Our results shed light on the local electronic and structural phenomena in a model of order-disorder transition, where the cooperative distortion is overcome by the thermal disorder.

  7. Long-term results of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy for nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Huang, Huang; Zhao, Dongbing; Tian, Yantao; Li, Yexiong; Feng, Qinfu; Zhang, Zhihui; Jiang, Qinglong; Zhang, Shuisheng; Tang, Xiaolong; Huang, Xianghui; Chu, Yunmian; Zhang, Jianghu; Sun, Yuemin; Zhang, Yawei; Wang, Chengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To assess prognostic benefits of intraoperative electron beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and evaluate optimal adjuvant treatment after IOERT. A retrospective cohort study using prospectively collected data was conducted at the Cancer Hospital of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Cancer Center. Two hundred forty-seven consecutive patients with nonmetastatic LAPC who underwent IOERT between January 2008 and May 2015 were identified and included in the study. Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the day of IOERT. Prognostic factors were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40%, 14%, and 7.2%, respectively, with a median OS of 9.0 months. On multivariate analysis, an IOERT applicator diameter < 6 cm (hazards ratio [HR], 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47–0.97), no intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.32–0.66), and receipt of postoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy (HR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.25) were significantly associated with improved OS. Pain relief after IOERT was achieved in 111 of the 117 patients, with complete remission in 74 and partial remission in 37. Postoperative complications rate and mortality were 14.0% and 0.4%, respectively. Nonmetastatic LAPC patients with smaller size tumors could achieve positive long-term survival outcomes with a treatment strategy incorporating IOERT and postoperative adjuvant treatment. Chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy might be a recommended adjuvant treatment strategy for well-selected cases. Intraoperative interstitial sustained-release 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy should not be recommended for patients with nonmetastatic LAPC. PMID:27661028

  8. Station Based Polynomial Modeling of the local ionospheric Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) using Particle Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, Eren; Onur Karslioglu, Mahmut; Durmaz, Murat; Aghakarimi, Armin

    2014-05-01

    parameters, Ionospheric VTEC map covering the predefined region has been produced by interpolation. VTEC values at a grid node of the map have been computed based on the four closest ground stations by means of inverse distance squared weighted average. The GPS data which is acquired from ground based stations have been made available from the International GNSS Service (IGS) and the Reference Frame Sub-commission for Europe (EUREF). Raw GPS observations have been preprocessed to detect cycle slips and to form geometry-free linear combinations of observables for each continuous arc. Then the obtained pseudoranges have been smoothed with the carrier to code leveling method. Finally, the performance of the particle filter to investigate the local characteristics of the ionospheric Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) has been evaluated and the result has been compared with the result of a standard Kalman filter. Keywords: ionosphere, GPS , Particle filer, VTEC modeling

  9. Oxidative Stress Type Influences the Properties of Antioxidants Containing Polyphenols in RINm5F Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Auberval, Nathalie; Dal, Stéphanie; Bietiger, William; Seyfritz, Elodie; Peluso, Jean; Muller, Christian; Zhao, Minjie; Marchioni, Eric; Pinget, Michel; Jeandidier, Nathalie; Maillard, Elisa; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Sigrist, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro methods currently used to screen bioactive compounds focus on the use of a single model of oxidative stress. However, this simplistic view may lead to conflicting results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of two natural extracts (a mix of red wine polyphenols (RWPs) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)) with three models of oxidative stress induced with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a mixture of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO), or streptozotocin (STZ) in RINm5F beta cells. We employed multiple approaches to validate their potential as therapeutic treatment options, including cell viability, reactive oxygen species production, and antioxidant enzymes expression. All three oxidative stresses induced a decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis, whereas the level of ROS production was variable depending on the type of stress. The highest level of ROS was found for the HX/XO-induced stress, an increase that was reflected by higher expression antioxidant enzymes. Further, both antioxidant compounds presented beneficial effects during oxidative stress, but EGCG appeared to be a more efficient antioxidant. These data indicate that the efficiency of natural antioxidants is dependent on both the nature of the compound and the type of oxidative stress generated. PMID:26508986

  10. Cardiac damage induced by 2-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed Central

    Thorgeirsson, U P; Farb, A; Virmani, R; Adamson, R H

    1994-01-01

    The heterocyclic aromatic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ) is a potent hepatocarcinogen in cynomolgus and rhesus monkeys. The finding of high cardiac IQ-DNA adduct levels prompted a histopathological study of perfusion-fixed hearts from 10 tumor-bearing monkeys chronically dosed with IQ at 10 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg 5 days per week for 48-80 months. Two monkeys dosed only with the vehicle for IQ, hydroxypropylcellulose, served as controls. All the monkeys had normal heart weights, and no abnormalities were observed upon gross inspection of the hearts. Microscopically, focal myocardial lesions were observed in 8 of 10 monkeys dosed with IQ. Light microscopic abnormalities included myocyte necrosis with or without chronic inflammatory infiltrates, interstitial fibrosis with myocyte hypertrophy or atrophy, and vasculitis. Electron microscopic findings included disruption of the mitochondrial architecture (i.e., mitochondrial swelling and clearing of matrix densities), myofibrillar loss, disorganization of the normal alignment of sarcomeres, and occasional myocytes showing nuclear hypertrophy or peripheral clumping of the nuclear chromatin. There was some correlation between the cumulative dose of IQ and the extent of the myocardial abnormalities. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to IQ can lead to myocardial damage in monkeys. Although focal and not associated with clinical evidence of heart failure, these abnormalities may represent the initial stages of IQ-induced toxic cardiomyopathy. Images Figure 1. A Figure 1. B Figure 1. C Figure 1. D Figure 2. A Figure 2. B Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 3. D Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. B PMID:8033851

  11. Influence of cell physiological state on gene delivery to T lymphocytes by chimeric adenovirus Ad5F35.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-feng; Shao, Hong-wei; Wu, Feng-lin; Xie, Xin; Li, Zhu-ming; Bo, Hua-ben; Shen, Han; Wang, Teng; Huang, Shu-lin

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically-modified T cells is a promising approach for treatment of both human malignancies and viral infections. Due to its ability to efficiently infect lymphocytes, the chimeric adenovirus Ad5F35 is potentially useful as an immunotherapeutic for the genetic modification of T cells. In previous studies, it was found that the infection efficiency of Ad5F35 was significantly increased without enhanced expression of the viral receptor after T cell stimulation; however, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Nonetheless, cell physiology has long been thought to affect viral infection. Therefore, we aimed to uncover the physiologic changes responsible for the increased infection efficiency of Ad5F35 following T cell stimulation. Given the complexity of intracellular transport we analyzed viral binding, entry, and escape using a Jurkat T cell model and found that both cell membrane fluidity and endosomal escape of Ad5F35 were altered under different physiological states. This, in turn, resulted in differences in the amount of virus entering cells and reaching the cytoplasm. These results provide additional insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying Ad5F35 infection of T cells and consequently, will help further the clinical application of genetically-modified T cells for immunotherapy. PMID:26972139

  12. Influence of cell physiological state on gene delivery to T lymphocytes by chimeric adenovirus Ad5F35

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-feng; Shao, Hong-wei; Wu, Feng-lin; Xie, Xin; Li, Zhu-Ming; Bo, Hua-Ben; Shen, Han; Wang, Teng; Huang, Shu-lin

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically-modified T cells is a promising approach for treatment of both human malignancies and viral infections. Due to its ability to efficiently infect lymphocytes, the chimeric adenovirus Ad5F35 is potentially useful as an immunotherapeutic for the genetic modification of T cells. In previous studies, it was found that the infection efficiency of Ad5F35 was significantly increased without enhanced expression of the viral receptor after T cell stimulation; however, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Nonetheless, cell physiology has long been thought to affect viral infection. Therefore, we aimed to uncover the physiologic changes responsible for the increased infection efficiency of Ad5F35 following T cell stimulation. Given the complexity of intracellular transport we analyzed viral binding, entry, and escape using a Jurkat T cell model and found that both cell membrane fluidity and endosomal escape of Ad5F35 were altered under different physiological states. This, in turn, resulted in differences in the amount of virus entering cells and reaching the cytoplasm. These results provide additional insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying Ad5F35 infection of T cells and consequently, will help further the clinical application of genetically-modified T cells for immunotherapy. PMID:26972139

  13. Local electron tomography using angular variations of surface tangents: Stomo version 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, T. C.; Ringer, S. P.

    2012-03-01

    . Program summaryProgram title: STOMO version 2 Catalogue identifier: AEFS_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFS_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2854 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 23 559 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C/C++ Computer: PC Operating system: Windows XP RAM: Scales as the product of experimental image dimensions multiplied by the number of points chosen by the user in polynomial fitting. Typical runs require between 50 Mb and 100 Mb of RAM. Supplementary material: Sample output files, for the test run provided, are available. Classification: 7.4, 14 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEFS_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 676 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: A local electron tomography algorithm of specimens for which conventional back projection may fail and or data for which there is a limited angular range (which would otherwise cause significant 'missing-wedge' artefacts). The algorithm does not solve the tomography back projection problem but rather locally reconstructs the 3D morphology of surfaces defined by varied scattering densities. Solution method: Local reconstruction is effected using image-analysis edge and ridge detection computations on experimental tilt series to measure smooth angular variations of surface tangent-line intersections, which generate point clouds decorating the embedded and or external scattering surfaces of a specimen. Reasons for new version: The new version was coded to cater for rectangular images in experimental tilt-series, ensure smoother image rotations, provide ridge detection (suitable for sensing phase-contrast Fresnel fringes and other

  14. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realisticmore » high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.« less

  15. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes.

    PubMed

    Xu, X Q; Dudson, B; Snyder, P B; Umansky, M V; Wilson, H

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realistic high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5%-10% of the pedestal stored energy. This is consistent with many observations of large ELMs. PMID:21231055

  16. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realistic high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.

  17. Effect of strain, thickness, and local surface environment on electron transport properties of oxygen-terminated copper thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Soares, Alfonso; Jones, Sarah L. T.; Plombon, John J.; Kaushik, Ananth P.; Nagle, Roger E.; Clarke, James S.; Greer, James C.

    2016-10-01

    Electron transport is studied in surface oxidized single-crystal copper thin films with a thickness of up to 5.6 nm by applying density functional theory and density functional tight binding methods to determine electron transport properties within the ballistic regime. The variation of the electron transmission as a function of film thickness as well as the different contributions to the overall electron transmission as a function of depth into the the films is examined. Transmission at the oxidized copper film surfaces is found to be universally low. Films with thickness greater than 2.7 nm exhibit a similar behavior in local transmission per unit area with depth from the film surface; transmission per unit area initially increases rapidly and then plateaus at a depth of approximately 0.35-0.5 nm away from the surface, dependent on surface facet. Unstrained films tend to exhibit a higher transmission per unit area than corresponding films under tensile strain.

  18. The first very local interstellar spectra for galactic protons, helium, carbon and electrons below 50 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, Marius; Ngobeni, Mabedle Donald; Sibusiso Nkosi, Godfrey; Nndanganeni, Rendani; Vos, Etienne

    Low-energy galactic electrons (1-300 MeV) are significantly modulated, almost extraordinary, in the heliosheath in contrast to the rest of the heliosphere, indicating that modulation conditions in the heliosheath are quite different for these particles. In addition, Jovian electrons completely dominate galactic electrons at Earth below about 50 MeV. Low-energy protons and helium (1-100 MeV/nuc), on the other hand, are dominated by the anomalous component which originates inside the inner heliosheath so that the very local interstellar spectra for these particles had been properly concealed until recently. However, this is not the case for cosmic ray carbon. Basic mechanisms responsible for these effects are been studied with comprehensive numerical models for the transport of these particles, from the modulation boundary, through the inner heliosheath, across the solar wind termination shock, up to Earth. Together with measurements made by the two Voyager spacecraft, now with Voyager 1 beyond the heliopause and entering the very local interstellar medium, it is possible to determine heliopause spectra (HPS) at these low energies for the first time. Together with PAMELA spectra observed at Earth, these HPS can be determined accurately up to at least 50 GeV. Such spectra should be considered as the lowest possible very local interstellar spectra for galactic electrons, protons, helium and carbon, and are of great relevance to solar modulation and galactic propagation studies.

  19. Pou5f1/Oct4 Promotes Cell Survival via Direct Activation of mych Expression during Zebrafish Gastrulation

    PubMed Central

    Wendik, Björn; Polok, Bożena K.; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Onichtchouk, Daria; Driever, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myc proteins control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis, and play important roles in cancer as well in establishment of pluripotency. Here we investigated the control of myc gene expression by the Pou5f1/Oct4 pluripotency factor in the early zebrafish embryo. We analyzed the expression of all known zebrafish Myc family members, myca, mycb, mych, mycl1a, mycl1b, and mycn, by whole mount in situ hybridization during blastula and gastrula stages in wildtype and maternal plus zygotic pou5f1 mutant (MZspg) embryos, as well as by quantitative PCR and in time series microarray data. We found that the broad blastula and gastrula stage mych expression, as well as late gastrula stage mycl1b expression, both depend on Pou5f1 activity. We analyzed ChIP-Seq data and found that both Pou5f1 and Sox2 bind to mych and mycl1b control regions. The regulation of mych by Pou5f1 appears to be direct transcriptional activation, as overexpression of a Pou5f1 activator fusion protein in MZspg embryos induced strong mych expression even when translation of zygotically expressed mRNAs was suppressed. We further showed that MZspg embryos develop enhanced apoptosis already during early gastrula stages, when apoptosis was not be detected in wildtype embryos. However, Mych knockdown alone did not induce early apoptosis, suggesting potentially redundant action of several early expressed myc genes, or combination of several pathways affected in MZspg. Experimental mych overexpression in MZspg embryos did significantly, but not completely suppress the apoptosis phenotype. Similarly, p53 knockdown only partially suppressed apoptosis in MZspg gastrula embryos. However, combined knockdown of p53 and overexpression of Mych completely rescued the MZspg apoptosis phenotype. These results reveal that Mych has anti-apoptotic activity in the early zebrafish embryo, and that p53-dependent and Myc pathways are likely to act in parallel to control apoptosis at these stages. PMID:24643012

  20. Pou5f1/Oct4 promotes cell survival via direct activation of mych expression during zebrafish gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Kotkamp, Kay; Kur, Esther; Wendik, Björn; Polok, Bożena K; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Onichtchouk, Daria; Driever, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myc proteins control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis, and play important roles in cancer as well in establishment of pluripotency. Here we investigated the control of myc gene expression by the Pou5f1/Oct4 pluripotency factor in the early zebrafish embryo. We analyzed the expression of all known zebrafish Myc family members, myca, mycb, mych, mycl1a, mycl1b, and mycn, by whole mount in situ hybridization during blastula and gastrula stages in wildtype and maternal plus zygotic pou5f1 mutant (MZspg) embryos, as well as by quantitative PCR and in time series microarray data. We found that the broad blastula and gastrula stage mych expression, as well as late gastrula stage mycl1b expression, both depend on Pou5f1 activity. We analyzed ChIP-Seq data and found that both Pou5f1 and Sox2 bind to mych and mycl1b control regions. The regulation of mych by Pou5f1 appears to be direct transcriptional activation, as overexpression of a Pou5f1 activator fusion protein in MZspg embryos induced strong mych expression even when translation of zygotically expressed mRNAs was suppressed. We further showed that MZspg embryos develop enhanced apoptosis already during early gastrula stages, when apoptosis was not be detected in wildtype embryos. However, Mych knockdown alone did not induce early apoptosis, suggesting potentially redundant action of several early expressed myc genes, or combination of several pathways affected in MZspg. Experimental mych overexpression in MZspg embryos did significantly, but not completely suppress the apoptosis phenotype. Similarly, p53 knockdown only partially suppressed apoptosis in MZspg gastrula embryos. However, combined knockdown of p53 and overexpression of Mych completely rescued the MZspg apoptosis phenotype. These results reveal that Mych has anti-apoptotic activity in the early zebrafish embryo, and that p53-dependent and Myc pathways are likely to act in parallel to control apoptosis at these stages.

  1. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 14/C-labeled 3H-imidazo(4,5-f)quinoline-2-amines in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, K.

    1985-03-01

    The highly mutagenic heterocyclic amines, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), are formed during heating of protein-rich foods. In order to gain information about the distribution and fate of IQ and MeIQ in vivo, a whole-body autoradiographic study of i.v.-injected /sup 14/C-labeled IQ and MeIQ has been performed in male NMRI, pregnant NMRI, and female C3H mice. IQ and MeIQ showed similar distribution patterns. At short survival times, the autoradiograms were characterized by an accumulation of radioactivity in metabolic and excretory organs (liver, kidney, bile, urine, gastric and intestinal contents, salivary glands, nasal mucosa, and Harder's gland), as well as in lymphomyeloid tissues (bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lymph nodes) and in endocrine and reproductive tissues (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets, thyroid, hypophysis, testis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, ampulla, and prostate). The liver and kidney cortex were identified as sites of retention of nonextractable radioactivity. IQ and MeIQ showed a strong affinity for melanin. IQ and MeIQ passed the placenta, but no radioactivity was retained in fetal tissues. The results pinpoint the liver as a site of IQ- and MeIQ-mediated toxicity. Future studies of IQ and MeIQ may be guided by and clarify the role of other tissue localizations in the toxicity of IQ and MeIQ.

  2. Electron microscopy localization and characterization of functionalized composite organic-inorganic SERS nanoparticles on leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ai Leen; Shachaf, Catherine M; Elchuri, Sailaja; Nolan, Garry P; Sinclair, Robert

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate the use of electron microscopy as a powerful characterization tool to identify and locate antibody-conjugated composite organic-inorganic nanoparticle (COINs) surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles on cells. U937 leukemia cells labeled with antibody CD54-conjugated COINs were characterized in their native, hydrated state using wet scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in their dehydrated state using high-resolution SEM. In both cases, the backscattered electron (BSE) detector was used to detect and identify the silver constituents in COINs due to its high sensitivity to atomic number variations within a specimen. The imaging and analytical capabilities in the SEM were further complemented by higher resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) data to give reliable and high-resolution information about nanoparticles and their binding to cell surface antigens.

  3. Local atomic configuration and Auger Valence Electron Spectra in BiSrCaCuO single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Hirata, S.; Nishikubo, M.; Kobayashi, T. ); Nakayama, H.; Fujita, H. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (2212) and Ca-doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CuO{sub y} (2201) single crystals systematically investigated by Auger Valence Electron Spectroscopy (AVES). In AVES measurements on two kinds of crystals, a drastic difference was observed in the spectral shape of Ca(2p,3p,3p), reflecting a difference in spin-orbit splitting induced by local atomic configuration in the vicinity of Ca atoms. Furthermore, Ca(2p,3p,4s) spectrum appeared in both the crystals, which indicates that the real valency of Ca atoms is deviated from + 2 in the crystals. These results suggest that AVES is a promising probe for characterizing local atomic configuration and valence electron states of the constituent elements.

  4. Local versus global electronic properties of chalcopyrite alloys: X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento-Pérez, Rafael; Botti, Silvana; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Lauermann, Iver; Rubio, Angel; Johnson, Benjamin

    2014-09-07

    Element-specific unoccupied electronic states of Cu(In, Ga)S{sub 2} were studied as a function of the In/Ga ratio by combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory calculations. The S absorption edge shifts with changing In/Ga ratio as expected from the variation of the band gap. In contrast, the cation edge positions are largely independent of composition despite the changing band gap. This unexpected behavior is well reproduced by our calculations and originates from the dependence of the electronic states on the local atomic environment. The changing band gap arises from a changing spatial average of these localized states with changing alloy composition.

  5. Origin-independent sum over states simulations of magnetic and electronic circular dichroism spectra via the localized orbital/local origin method.

    PubMed

    Štěpánek, Petr; Bouř, Petr

    2015-04-15

    Although electronic and magnetic circular dichroism (ECD, MCD) spectra reveal valuable details about molecular geometry and electronic structure, quantum-chemical simulations significantly facilitate their interpretation. However, the simulated results may depend on the choice of coordinate origin. Previously (Štěpánek and Bouř, J. Comput. Chem. 2013, 34, 1531), the sum-over-states (SOS) methodology was found useful for efficient MCD computations. Approximate wave functions were "resolved" using time-dependent density functional theory, and the origin-dependence was avoided by placing the origin to the center of mass of the investigated molecule. In this study, a more elegant way is proposed, based on the localized orbital/local origin (LORG) formalism, and a similar approach is also applied to generate ECD intensities. The LORG-like approach yields fully origin-independent ECD and MCD spectra. The results thus indicate that the computationally relatively cheap SOS simulations open a new way of modeling molecular properties, including those involving the origin-dependent magnetic dipole moment operator. PMID:25662937

  6. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    1997-03-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  7. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    2008-12-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  8. Native CB1 receptor affinity, intrinsic activity and accumbens shell dopamine stimulant properties of third generation SPICE/K2 cannabinoids: BB-22, 5F-PB-22, 5F-AKB-48 and STS-135.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Maria Antonietta; Castelli, M Paola; Loi, Barbara; Porcu, Alessandra; Martorelli, Mariella; Miliano, Cristina; Kellett, Kathryn; Davidson, Colin; Stair, Jacqueline L; Schifano, Fabrizio; Di Chiara, Gaetano

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate the in vivo dopamine (DA) stimulant properties of selected 3rd generation Spice/K2 cannabinoids, BB-22, 5F-PB-22, 5F-AKB-48 and STS-135, their in vitro affinity and agonist potency at native rat and mice CB1 receptors was studied. The compounds bind with high affinity to CB1 receptors in rat cerebral cortex homogenates and stimulate CB1-induced [(35)S]GTPγS binding with high potency and efficacy. BB-22 and 5F-PB-22 showed the lowest Ki of binding to CB1 receptors (0.11 and 0.13 nM), i.e., 30 and 26 times lower respectively than that of JWH-018 (3.38 nM), and a potency (EC50, 2.9 and 3.7 nM, respectively) and efficacy (Emax, 217% and 203%, respectively) as CB1 agonists higher than JWH-018 (EC50, 20.2 nM; Emax, 163%). 5F-AKB-48 and STS-135 had higher Ki for CB1 binding, higher EC50 and lower Emax as CB1 agonists than BB-22 and 5F-PB-22 but still comparatively more favourable than JWH-018. The agonist properties of all the compounds were abolished or drastically reduced by the CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (0.1 μM). No activation of G-protein was observed in CB1-KO mice. BB-22 (0.003-0.01 mg/kg i.v.) increased dialysate DA in the accumbens shell but not in the core or in the medial prefrontal cortex, with a bell shaped dose-response curve and an effect at 0.01 mg/kg and a biphasic time-course. Systemic AM251 (1.0 mg/kg i.p.) completely prevented the stimulant effect of BB-22 on dialysate DA in the NAc shell. All the other compounds increased dialysate DA in the NAc shell at doses consistent with their in vitro affinity for CB1 receptors (5F-PB-22, 0.01 mg/kg; 5F-AKB-48, 0.1 mg/kg; STS-135, 0.15 mg/kg i.v.). 3rd generation cannabinoids can be even more potent and super-high CB1 receptor agonists compared to JWH-018. Future research will try to establish if these properties can explain the high toxicity and lethality associated with these compounds.

  9. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    SciTech Connect

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode- associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community.

  10. TiO2 nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.; Lewis, Laura H.

    2014-11-19

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO₂ nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O₂ (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H₂ (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO₂ nanotube samples partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (~5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO₂ nanotubes regardless of their length. The annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H₂-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O₂-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H₂-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti3+ and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near-surface electronic and defect structure

  11. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode-associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1–V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community. PMID:24478768

  12. Localized electron states and phase separation at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpathy, S.; Shanavas, K. V.

    2012-02-01

    Even though the 2D electron gas at the polar interfaces of LAO/STO has been studied extensively, an explanation for the observed magnetic centers or the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity is still lacking. Earlier density-functional calculations have indicated the presence of multi-bands and two types of electrons at the interface [1]. Here we propose that a combination of lattice disorder, octahedral rotations, and Jahn-Teller distortion can lead to some of these electrons to be localized near the interface and form lattice polarons. Evidence for this is presented from detailed density-functional calculations, which indicate that the energy gain associated with JT distortion and impurity or disorder induced local potentials can offset the kinetic energy cost of localization. Our model studies [2] also show the possible existence of a phase separation, thereby providing a natural explanation for the coexistence of magnetism and superconductivity [3].[4pt] [1] Z. S. Popovi'c, S. Satpathy and R. M. Martin Phys. Rev. Lett., 101, 256801 (2008)[0pt] [2] B. R. K. Nanda and S. Satpathy Phys. Rev B, 83, 195114 (2011)[0pt] [3] L. Li et. al. Nature Physics, 7, 762 (2011); J. A. Bert et. al. ibid, 767 (2011);

  13. The effect of electron measurements both inside and outside the heliosphere on the modelling of local interstellar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisschoff, Driaan; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    A local interstellar spectrum (LIS) for electrons can be calculated with Galactic propagation models to benefit both Galactic and heliospheric propagation studies by considering the improved measurements for cosmic rays (CRs) made over the last few years, such as by Voyager 1 and PAMELA. Cosmic ray measurements made by Voyager 1 outside the dominant influence of solar modulation uniquely allows the direct comparison of modelled Galactic spectra to experimental data. Recent improved analysis of the PAMELA electron spectra gives measurements for the exceptional solar minimum of 2009 which clearly depict ideal minimum modulation conditions for CRs in the heliosphere. Utilizing the GALPROP code, a LIS for electrons is computed to directly reproduce the electron spectra observed by Voyager 1. Using this LIS as input to a comprehensive solar modulation model enables the comparison with the PAMELA electron spectra. To accomplish reproducing the electron measurements of both CR experiments, we established a LIS with by varying the source spectrum and diffusion parameters in the GALPROP code. Inclusion of reacceleration in Galactic space improves the LIS to also match the lower energy PAMELA values after been modulated through a full 3D solar modulation model.

  14. Electron Correlation Microscopy: A New Technique for Studying Local Atom Dynamics Applied to a Supercooled Liquid.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Zhang, Pei; Besser, Matthew F; Kramer, Matthew Joseph; Voyles, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Electron correlation microscopy (ECM) is a new technique that utilizes time-resolved coherent electron nanodiffraction to study dynamic atomic rearrangements in materials. It is the electron scattering equivalent of photon correlation spectroscopy with the added advantage of nanometer-scale spatial resolution. We have applied ECM to a Pd40Ni40P20 metallic glass, heated inside a scanning transmission electron microscope into a supercooled liquid to measure the structural relaxation time τ between the glass transition temperature T g and the crystallization temperature, T x . τ determined from the mean diffraction intensity autocorrelation function g 2(t) decreases with temperature following an Arrhenius relationship between T g and T g +25 K, and then increases as temperature approaches T x . The distribution of τ determined from the g 2(t) of single speckles is broad and changes significantly with temperature.

  15. Highly Charged Ions from Laser-Cluster Interactions: Local-Field-Enhanced Impact Ionization and Frustrated Electron-Ion Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Thomas; Ramunno, Lora; Brabec, Thomas

    2007-12-07

    Our molecular dynamics analysis of Xe{sub 147-5083} clusters identifies two mechanisms that contribute to the yet unexplained observation of extremely highly charged ions in intense laser cluster experiments. First, electron impact ionization is enhanced by the local cluster electric field, increasing the highest charge states by up to 40%; a corresponding theoretical method is developed. Second, electron-ion recombination after the laser pulse is frustrated by acceleration electric fields typically used in ion detectors. This increases the highest charge states by up to 90%, as compared to the usual assumption of total recombination of all cluster-bound electrons. Both effects together augment the highest charge states by up to 120%, in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  16. Spin frustration and fermionic entanglement in an exactly solved hybrid diamond chain with localized Ising spins and mobile electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrico, J.; Rojas, M.; Pereira, M. S. S.; Strečka, J.; Lyra, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    The strongly correlated spin-electron system on a diamond chain containing localized Ising spins on its nodal lattice sites and mobile electrons on its interstitial sites is exactly solved in a magnetic field using the transfer-matrix method. We have investigated in detail all available ground states, the magnetization processes, the spin-spin correlation functions around an elementary plaquette, fermionic quantum concurrence, and spin frustration. It is shown that the fermionic entanglement between mobile electrons hopping on interstitial sites and the kinetically induced spin frustration are closely related yet independent phenomena. In the ground state, quantum entanglement only appears within a frustrated unsaturated paramagnetic phase, while thermal fluctuations can promote some degree of quantum entanglement above the nonfrustrated ground states with saturated paramagnetic or classical ferrimagnetic spin arrangements.

  17. Electron Kinetics Inferred from Observations of Microwave Bursts During Edge Localized Modes in the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S. J.; McClements, K. G.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Lai, W. N.; Pamela, S. J. P.; Shevchenko, V. F.; Vann, R. G. L.

    2015-03-01

    Recent measurements of microwave and x-ray emission during edge localized mode (ELM) activity in tokamak plasmas provide a fresh perspective on ELM physics. It is evident that electron kinetics, which are not incorporated in standard (fluid) models for the instability that drives ELMs, play a key role in the new observations. These effects should be included in future models for ELMs and the ELM cycle. The observed radiative effects paradoxically imply acceleration of electrons parallel to the magnetic field combined with rapid acquisition of perpendicular momentum. It is shown that this paradox can be resolved by the action of the anomalous Doppler instability which enables fast collective radiative relaxation, in the perpendicular direction, of electrons accelerated in the parallel direction by inductive electric fields generated by the initial ELM instability.

  18. Electron kinetics inferred from observations of microwave bursts during edge localized modes in the mega-amp spherical tokamak.

    PubMed

    Freethy, S J; McClements, K G; Chapman, S C; Dendy, R O; Lai, W N; Pamela, S J P; Shevchenko, V F; Vann, R G L

    2015-03-27

    Recent measurements of microwave and x-ray emission during edge localized mode (ELM) activity in tokamak plasmas provide a fresh perspective on ELM physics. It is evident that electron kinetics, which are not incorporated in standard (fluid) models for the instability that drives ELMs, play a key role in the new observations. These effects should be included in future models for ELMs and the ELM cycle. The observed radiative effects paradoxically imply acceleration of electrons parallel to the magnetic field combined with rapid acquisition of perpendicular momentum. It is shown that this paradox can be resolved by the action of the anomalous Doppler instability which enables fast collective radiative relaxation, in the perpendicular direction, of electrons accelerated in the parallel direction by inductive electric fields generated by the initial ELM instability.

  19. Cytochrome b 6 f function and localization, phosphorylation state of thylakoid membrane proteins and consequences on cyclic electron flow.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Louis; Chazaux, Marie; Peltier, Gilles; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Both the structure and the protein composition of thylakoid membranes have an impact on light harvesting and electron transfer in the photosynthetic chain. Thylakoid membranes form stacks and lamellae where photosystem II and photosystem I localize, respectively. Light-harvesting complexes II can be associated to either PSII or PSI depending on the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, and their distribution is governed by state transitions. Upon state transitions, the thylakoid ultrastructure and lateral distribution of proteins along the membrane are subject to significant rearrangements. In addition, quinone diffusion is limited to membrane microdomains and the cytochrome b 6 f complex localizes either to PSII-containing grana stacks or PSI-containing stroma lamellae. Here, we discuss possible similarities or differences between green algae and C3 plants on the functional consequences of such heterogeneities in the photosynthetic electron transport chain and propose a model in which quinones, accepting electrons either from PSII (linear flow) or NDH/PGR pathways (cyclic flow), represent a crucial control point. Our aim is to give an integrated description of these processes and discuss their potential roles in the balance between linear and cyclic electron flows. PMID:27534565

  20. Pre-embedding Method of Electron Microscopy for Glycan Localization in Mammalian Tissues and Cells Using Lectin Probes.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Takata, Kuniaki; Kawakami, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the study of glycans is progressing remarkably by the development of glycan analysis systems using mass spectrometry, glycan profiling systems using lectin microarrays, and glycoprotein analysis by the isotope-coded glycosylation site-specific tagging method. With these methodologies, glycan structures and biological functions are being elucidated. In the study of glycan function as well as disease diagnosis, it is important to examine the localization of glycans in tissues and cells. Histochemical methods using lectin probes can localize glycans in the tissues and cells. This chapter describes a pre-embedding electron microscopic method for glycan localization in which tissue sections and cells are incubated with lectin prior to embedding in resin. PMID:27515086

  1. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J. A.; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J.; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  2. Chromosomal localization of genes by scanning electron microscopy using in situ hybridization with biotinylated probes: Y chromosome repetitive sequences.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, D J; Burns, J; Harrison, D; Jonasson, J A; McGee, J O

    1986-05-01

    The feasibility of using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to identify the position of specific DNA sequences was examined using a Y chromosome 'specific' probe (pHY2.1). Tests were carried out on chromosome spreads hybridized in situ with biotinylated pHY2.1. Chromosomal sites of hybridization of the probe were localized by an indirect immunohistochemical procedure which resulted in a gold product which could be amplified by silver precipitation. In the SEM, the specific location of the probe was easily identified due to the enhanced signal produced by the gold-silver complex. The probe was localized both on the long arm of the Y chromosome and within interphase nuclei. It was found that SEM was more sensitive than light microscopy since the probe could be identified without silver amplification. With refinements to the technique, SEM could provide a useful method for high resolution localizing of unique DNA sequences (i.e. single copy genes). PMID:3528066

  3. Materials Data on PRu5C16(O5F)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Al6B5(O5F)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Ba3In2O5F2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on C4O5F6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on BaSb2Xe5F22 (SG:69) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on CaP2Xe5F22 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on CdP2Xe5F22 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on LiV2O5F (SG:18) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Potentially Functional Polymorphisms in POU5F1 Gene Are Associated with the Risk of Lung Cancer in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Rui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Zhu, Meng; Wen, Yifan; Sun, Jie; Shen, Wei; Cheng, Yang; Zhang, Jiahui; Jin, Guangfu; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Dai, Juncheng

    2015-01-01

    POU5F1 is a key regulator of self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic stem cells and may be associated with initiation, promotion, and progression in cancer. We hypothesized that functional polymorphisms in POU5F1 may play an important role in modifying the lung cancer risk. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study to explore the association between 17 potentially functional SNPs in POU5F1 gene and the lung cancer risk in 1,341 incident lung cancer cases and 1,982 healthy controls in a Chinese population. We found that variant alleles of rs887468 and rs3130457 were significantly associated with increased risk of lung cancer after multiple comparison (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.11–1.51, Pfdr = 0.017 for rs887468; OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.10–1.51, Pfdr = 0.034 for rs3130457, resp.). In addition, we detected a significant interaction between rs887468 genotypes and smoking status on lung cancer risk (P = 0.017). Combined analysis of these 2 SNPs showed a significant allele-dosage association between the number of risk alleles and increased risk of lung cancer (Ptrend < 0.001). These findings indicate that potentially functional polymorphisms in POU5F1 gene may contribute to lung cancer susceptibility in a Chinese population. PMID:26824036

  12. Characterization of NOBOX DNA binding specificity and its regulation of Gdf9 and Pou5f1 promoters.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngsok; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2006-11-24

    Nobox (newborn ovary homeobox gene) deficiency disrupts early folliculogenesis and the expression of oocyte-specific genes in mice. Here, we identified several cis-acting sites, TAATTG, TAGTTG, and TAATTA as NOBOX DNA binding elements (NBEs) using a library of randomly generated oligonucleotides by cyclic amplification of sequence target assay and mutation analyses. We show that NOBOX preferentially binds to the NOBOX binding elements with high affinity. In addition, we found that promoter regions of mouse Pou5f1 and Gdf9 contain one (-426) and three NOBOX binding elements (-786, -967, and -1259), respectively. NOBOX binds to these putative NOBOX binding elements with high affinity and augmented transcriptional activity of luciferase reporter driven by mouse Pou5f1 and Gdf9 promoters containing the NOBOX binding elements. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, DNA sequences from Pou5f1 and Gdf9 promoters co-precipitated with anti-NOBOX antibody. These results suggest that NOBOX directly regulates the transcription of Pou5f1 and Gdf9 in oocytes during early folliculogenesis.

  13. Gallic acid protects RINm5F beta-cells from glucolipotoxicity by its antiapoptotic and insulin-secretagogue actions.

    PubMed

    Sameermahmood, Zaheer; Raji, Lenin; Saravanan, Thangavel; Vaidya, Ashok; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid is claimed to possess antioxidant, antiinflammatory and cytoprotective effects. Since pancreatic islets from Type 2 diabetic patients have functional defects, it was hypothesized that glucolipotoxicity might induce apoptosis in beta-cells and gallic acid could offer protection. To test this, RINm5F beta-cells were exposed to high glucose (25 microM) or palmitate (500 microM) or a combination of both for 24 h in the presence and absence of gallic acid. Cells subjected to glucolipotoxicity in the absence and presence of gallic acid were assessed for DNA damage by comet assay. Apoptosis was inferred by caspase-3 protein expression and caspase-3 activity and changes in Bcl-2 mRNA. RT-PCR was used to analyse PDX-1, insulin and UCP-2 mRNA expression in RINm5F beta-cells and insulin levels were quantified from the cell culture supernatant. NFkappaB signal was studied by EMSA, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. While RINm5F beta-cells subjected to glucolipotoxicity exhibited increased DNA damage, apoptotic markers and NFkappaB signals, all these apoptotic perturbations were resisted by gallic acid. Gallic acid dose-dependently increased insulin secretion in RINm5F beta-cells and upregulated mRNA of PDX-1 and insulin. It is suggested that the insulin-secretagogue and transcriptional regulatory action of gallic acid is a newly identified mechanism in our study.

  14. Direct arylations for study of the air-stable P-heterocyclic biradical: from wide electronic tuning to characterization of the localized radicalic electrons.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shigekazu; Ueta, Yasuhiro; Ngo, Trang Thi Thu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hashizume, Daisuke; Nishida, Jun-ichi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Mikami, Koichi

    2013-11-20

    We have developed methods for installing aryl substituents directly on the phosphino groups of the 1,3-diphosphacyclobutane-2,4-diyl system. The aryl substituents tuned the electronic and structural characteristics of the biradical unit both in solution and in the solid state. 1-tert-butyl-2,4-bis(2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3-diphosphacyclobuten-4-yl anion, prepared from phosphaalkyne (Mes*C≡P; Mes* = 2,4,6-tBu3C6H2) and t-butyllithium, was allowed to react with an electron-deficient N-heterocyclic reagent. The corresponding N-heteroaryl-substituted P-heterocyclic biradicals were produced via SNAr reactions. Biradicals bearing perfluorinated pyridyl substituents exhibited photoabsorption properties comparable to those of previously reported derivatives because the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbit levels were reduced by a similar amount. In contrast, the triazine substituent reduced the band gap of the biradical unit, and the large red shift in the visible absorption and high oxidation potential were further tuned via subsequent SNAr and Negishi coupling reactions. The amino-substituted triazine structure provided a strongly electron-donating biradical chromophore, which produced unique p-type semiconducting behavior even though there was no obvious π-overlap in the crystalline state. The single-electron transfer reaction involving Mes*C≡P, phenyllithium, and iodine afforded 1,3-diphenyl-2,4-bis(2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3-diphosphacyclobutane-2,4-diyl via the intermediate P-heterocyclic monoradical. The tetraaryl-substituted symmetric biradical product was used to determine the electron density distribution from the X-ray diffraction data. The data show highly localized radicalic electrons around the skeletal carbon atoms, moderately polarized skeletal P-C bonds in the four-membered ring, and no covalent transannular interaction.

  15. Excess electron reactivity in amino acid aqueous solution revealed by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation: anion-centered localization and anion-relayed electron transfer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Gao, Liang; Liu, Jinxiang; Yang, Hongfang; Wang, Shoushan; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-10-28

    Studies on the structure, states, and reactivity of excess electrons (EEs) in biological media are of great significance. Although there is information about EE interaction with desolvated biological molecules, solution effects are hardly explored. In this work, we present an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study on the interaction and reactivity of an EE with glycine in solution. Our simulations reveal two striking results. Firstly, a pre-solvated EE partially localizes on the negatively charged -COO(-) group of the zwitterionic glycine and the remaining part delocalizes over solvent water molecules, forming an anion-centered quasi-localized structure, due to relative alignment of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels of potential sites for EE residence in the aqueous solution. Secondly, after a period of anion-centered localization of an EE, the zwitterionic glycine is induced to spontaneously fragment through the cleavage of the N-Cα bond, losing ammonia (deamination), and leaving a ˙CH2-COO(-) anion radical, in good agreement with experimental observations. Introduction of the same groups (-COO(-) or -NH3(+)) in the side chain (taking lysine and aspartic acid as examples) can affect EE localization, with the fragmentation of the backbone part of these amino acids dependent on the properties of the side chain groups. These findings provide insights into EE interaction mechanisms with the backbone parts of amino acids and low energy EE induced fragmentation of amino acids and even peptides and proteins.

  16. Density functional study of collective electron localization: detection by persistent current.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Marc; Hofmann, Markus; Pankratov, Oleg

    2009-04-15

    We apply the optimized effective potential (OEP) implementation of density functional theory (DFT) to the model system of interacting spinless electrons on a quantum ring. The ring encircles a magnetic flux that induces a persistent current. In a perfect rotationally invariant system the current does not depend on the electron-electron interaction (the latter is characterized by a standard dimensionless parameter r(S)) and hence is not sensitive to the microscopic structure of the electron correlated state. This changes, however, if a symmetry-breaking external potential is introduced or, in a realistic system, due to the crystal lattice potential (Hamer et al 1987 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 20 5677-93). In our model, we calculate the persistent current as a function of r(S) in the presence of a weak Gaussian-shaped 'impurity' potential. We find that while below a threshold value r(S)r(S)(c). This signals the formation of an electron Wigner crystal pinned by the impurity potential. The electron density, homogeneous below r(S)(c), indeed shows a periodic modulation at r(S)>r(S)(c). The modulation amplitude follows a (r(S)-r(S)(c))((1)/(2)) behaviour which is characteristic for a second-order phase transition, as expected in the mean-field-type DFT-OEP approach. Our calculation shows that the macroscopic current, which is a quantity directly accessible in DFT, can serve as an indicator of the formation of a correlated electron state.

  17. Comparison of local exchange potentials of electron-N2 scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, J. R., Jr.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1980-05-01

    Vibrationally and electronically elastic electron scattering by N2 at 2-30 eV impact energy is considered. Static, static-exchange, and static-exchange-plus-polarization potentials, Cade-Sales-Wahl and INDO/1s wave functions, and semiclassical exchange and Hara free-electron-gas exchange potentials are examined. It is shown that the semiclassical exchange approximation is too attractive at low energy for N2. It is also shown quantitatively by consideration of partial and total integral cross sections how the effects of approximations to exchange become smaller as the incident energy is increased until the differences are about 8% for the total integral cross section at 30 eV.

  18. Localization of electrons in dome-shaped GeSi/Si islands

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimov, A. I.; Kirienko, V. V.; Bloshkin, A. A.; Armbrister, V. A.; Kuchinskaya, P. A.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2015-01-19

    We report on intraband photocurrent spectroscopy of dome-shaped GeSi islands embedded in a Si matrix with n{sup +}-type bottom and top Si layers. An in-plane polarized photoresponse in the 85–160 meV energy region has been observed and ascribed to the optical excitation of electrons from states confined in the strained Si near the dome apexes to the continuum states of unstrained Si. The electron confinement is caused by a modification of the conduction band alignment induced by inhomogeneous tensile strain in Si around the buried GeSi quantum dots. Sensitivity of the device to the normal incidence radiation proves a zero-dimensional nature of confined electronic wave functions.

  19. Ion Streaming Instabilities in Pair Ion Plasma and Localized Structure with Non-Thermal Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir Khattak, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    Pair ion plasma with a fraction of non-thermal electrons is considered. We investigate the effects of the streaming motion of ions on linear and nonlinear properties of unmagnetized, collisionless plasma by using the fluid model. A dispersion relation is derived, and the growth rate of streaming instabilities with effect of streaming motion of ions and non-thermal electrons is calculated. A qausi-potential approach is adopted to study the characteristics of ion acoustic solitons. An energy integral equation involving Sagdeev potential is derived during this process. The presence of the streaming term in the energy integral equation affects the structure of the solitary waves significantly along with non-thermal electrons. Possible application of the work to the space and laboratory plasmas are highlighted.

  20. Impact of local oscillator frequency noise on coherent optical systems with electronic dispersion compensation.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aditya; Schatz, Richard; Pang, Xiaodan; Navarro, Jaime Rodrigo; Louchet, Hadrien; Ozolins, Oskars; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei

    2015-05-01

    A theoretical investigation of the equalization-enhanced phase noise (EEPN) and its mitigation is presented. We show with a frequency domain analysis that the EEPN results from the non-linear inter-mixing between the sidebands of the dispersed signal and the noise sidebands of the local oscillator. It is further shown and validated with system simulations that the transmission penalty is mainly due to the slow optical frequency fluctuations of the local oscillator. Hence, elimination of the frequency noise below a certain cut-off frequency significantly reduces the transmission penalty, even when frequency noise would otherwise cause an error floor. The required cut-off frequency increases linearly with the white frequency noise level and hence the linewidth of the local oscillator laser, but is virtually independent of the symbol rate and the accumulated dispersion.

  1. Importance of Time Scale and Local Environment in Electron-Driven Proton Transfer. The Anion of Acetoacetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Keolopile, Zibo G; Gutowski, Maciej; Buonaugurio, Angela; Collins, Evan; Zhang, Xinxing; Erb, Jeremy; Lectka, Thomas; Bowen, Kit H; Allan, Michael

    2015-11-18

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) probe different regions of the anionic potential energy surface. These complementary techniques provided information about anionic states of acetoacetic acid (AA). Electronic structure calculations facilitated the identification of the most stable tautomers and conformers for both neutral and anionic AA and determined their relative stabilities and excess electron binding energies. The most stable conformers of the neutral keto and enol tautomers differ by less than 1 kcal/mol in terms of electronic energies corrected for zero-point vibrations. Thermal effects favor these conformers of the keto tautomer, which do not support an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the keto and the carboxylic groups. The valence anion displays a distinct minimum which results from proton transfer from the carboxylic to the keto group; thus, we name it an ol structure. The minimum is characterized by a short intramolecular hydrogen bond, a significant electron vertical detachment energy of 2.38 eV, but a modest adiabatic electron affinity of 0.33 eV. The valence anion was identified in the anion PES experiments, and the measured electron vertical detachment energy of 2.30 eV is in good agreement with our computational prediction. We conclude that binding an excess electron in a π* valence orbital changes the localization of a proton in the fully relaxed structure of the AA(-) anion. The results of EELS experiments do not provide evidence for an ultrarapid proton transfer in the lowest π* resonance of AA(-), which would be capable of competing with electron autodetachment. This observation is consistent with our computational results, indicating that major gas-phase conformers and tautomers of neutral AA do not support the intramolecular hydrogen bond that would facilitate ultrarapid proton transfer and formation of the ol valence anion. This is confirmed by our vibrational EELS spectrum. Anions

  2. Performance of a local electron density trigger to select extensive air showers at sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, T.; Madani, J.; Ashton, F.

    1985-01-01

    Time coincident voltage pulses in the two closely space (1.6m) plastic scintillators were recorded. Most of the recorded events are expeted to be due to electrons in cosmic ray showers whose core fall at some distance from the detectors. This result is confirmed from a measurement of the frequency distribution of the recorded density ratios of the two scintillators.

  3. Second Line of Defense Help Desk: Electronic Maintenance Reports - Local Maintenance Provider User Guide Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, Richard J.

    2011-12-14

    The Electronic Maintenance Report forms present a uniform dataset for analysis of Sustainability metrics. These forms collect readily minable data while allowing the attachment of site-specific checklists or other supporting files for review by the Sustainability Manager and Program Management.

  4. Bringing Up Gopher: Access to Local & Remote Electronic Resources for University Library Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Melvin Marlo; And Others

    Some of the administrative and organizational issues in creating a gopher, specifically a library gopher for university libraries, are discussed. In 1993 the Electronic Collections Task Force of the New Mexico State University library administration began to develop a library-based gopher system that would enable users to have unlimited access to…

  5. Path integrals for electronic densities, reactivity indices, and localization functions in quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V

    2009-11-10

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr's quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions - all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems.

  6. Path Integrals for Electronic Densities, Reactivity Indices, and Localization Functions in Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2009-01-01

    The density matrix theory, the ancestor of density functional theory, provides the immediate framework for Path Integral (PI) development, allowing the canonical density be extended for the many-electronic systems through the density functional closure relationship. Yet, the use of path integral formalism for electronic density prescription presents several advantages: assures the inner quantum mechanical description of the system by parameterized paths; averages the quantum fluctuations; behaves as the propagator for time-space evolution of quantum information; resembles Schrödinger equation; allows quantum statistical description of the system through partition function computing. In this framework, four levels of path integral formalism were presented: the Feynman quantum mechanical, the semiclassical, the Feynman-Kleinert effective classical, and the Fokker-Planck non-equilibrium ones. In each case the density matrix or/and the canonical density were rigorously defined and presented. The practical specializations for quantum free and harmonic motions, for statistical high and low temperature limits, the smearing justification for the Bohr’s quantum stability postulate with the paradigmatic Hydrogen atomic excursion, along the quantum chemical calculation of semiclassical electronegativity and hardness, of chemical action and Mulliken electronegativity, as well as by the Markovian generalizations of Becke-Edgecombe electronic focalization functions – all advocate for the reliability of assuming PI formalism of quantum mechanics as a versatile one, suited for analytically and/or computationally modeling of a variety of fundamental physical and chemical reactivity concepts characterizing the (density driving) many-electronic systems. PMID:20087467

  7. Self-generated Local Heating Induced Nanojoining for Room Temperature Pressureless Flexible Electronic Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Hu, Anming; Gerlich, Adrian P.; Liu, Yangai; Zhou, Y. Norman

    2015-01-01

    Metallic bonding at an interface is determined by the application of heat and/or pressure. The means by which these are applied are the most critical for joining nanoscale structures. The present study considers the feasibility of room-temperature pressureless joining of copper wires using water-based silver nanowire paste. A novel mechanism of self-generated local heating within the silver nanowire paste and copper substrate system promotes the joining of silver-to-silver and silver-to-copper without any external energy input. The localized heat energy was delivered in-situ to the interfaces to promote atomic diffusion and metallic bond formation with the bulk component temperature stays near room-temperature. This local heating effect has been detected experimentally and confirmed by calculation. The joints formed at room-temperature without pressure achieve a tensile strength of 5.7 MPa and exhibit ultra-low resistivity in the range of 101.3 nOhm·m. The good conductivity of the joint is attributed to the removal of organic compounds in the paste and metallic bonding of silver-to-copper and silver-to-silver. The water-based silver nanowire paste filler material is successfully applied to various flexible substrates for room temperature bonding. The use of chemically generated local heating may become a potential method for energy in-situ delivery at micro/nanoscale. PMID:25788019

  8. Electron acceleration at localized wave structures in the solar corona (German Title: Elektronenbeschleunigung an lokalen Wellenstrukturen in der Sonnenkorona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, Rositsa Stoycheva

    2007-07-01

    Our dynamic Sun manifests its activity by different phenomena: from the 11-year cyclic sunspot pattern to the unpredictable and violent explosions in the case of solar flares. During flares, a huge amount of the stored magnetic energy is suddenly released and a substantial part of this energy is carried by the energetic electrons, considered to be the source of the nonthermal radio and X-ray radiation. One of the most important and still open question in solar physics is how the electrons are accelerated up to high energies within (the observed in the radio emission) short time scales. Because the acceleration site is extremely small in spatial extent as well (compared to the solar radius), the electron acceleration is regarded as a local process. The search for localized wave structures in the solar corona that are able to accelerate electrons together with the theoretical and numerical description of the conditions and requirements for this process, is the aim of the dissertation. Two models of electron acceleration in the solar corona are proposed in the dissertation: I. Electron acceleration due to the solar jet interaction with the background coronal plasma (the jet--plasma interaction) A jet is formed when the newly reconnected and highly curved magnetic field lines are relaxed by shooting plasma away from the reconnection site. Such jets, as observed in soft X-rays with the Yohkoh satellite, are spatially and temporally associated with beams of nonthermal electrons (in terms of the so-called type III metric radio bursts) propagating through the corona. A model that attempts to give an explanation for such observational facts is developed here. Initially, the interaction of such jets with the background plasma leads to an (ion-acoustic) instability associated with growing of electrostatic fluctuations in time for certain range of the jet initial velocity. During this process, any test electron that happen to feel this electrostatic wave field is drawn to co

  9. Three-Dimensional Imaging of the Local Structure of Materials at Atomic Resolution by Electron Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chun

    Electron tomography was originally developed in 1968, and has been primarily applied to determine the three-dimensional (3D) structure of biological systems. In the last decade, the application of electron tomography in materials science and nanoscience has revived due to the utilization of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in the high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) mode, and a highest resolution of ˜1 nm3 has been achieved. However, improving the resolution from ˜1 nm 3 to the atomic level remains a challenging task, which requires new tomographic reconstruction algorithms, better projection alignment methods, state-of-the-art STEM instruments, and more accurate data-acquisition procedures. In this thesis, important progress has been made in all these four areas. First, a novel tomographic method, termed equally sloped tomography (EST), was developed and allows the 3D image reconstruction of tilt series with a limited number projections and a "missing wedge" (i.e. specimens cannot usually be tilted beyond +/-70°). Second, an alignment method which can be used to align the projections of a tilt series at atomic-level resolution was developed based on center of mass. Finally, by using a Titan 80-300 STEM instrument at the California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA, more accurate data acquisition procedures were developed and a number of tomographic tilt series of atomic resolution projections from different nanoparticles have been obtained. With all these combinations, the 3D structure of a 10 nm gold nanoparticle was determined at 2.4 A resolution, the highest resolution ever achieved in any general tomography method. More recently, this novel electron tomography method has been applied to observe nearly all the atoms in a Pt nanoparticle, and imaged for the first time the 3D core structure of edge and screw dislocations at atomic resolution. Furthermore, through numerical simulations the feasibility of determining the 3D atomic structure of

  10. Distinct Effect of Cr Bulk and Surface Doping on the Local Environment and Electronic Structure of Bi2 Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Turgut; Pletikosic, Ivo; Valla, Tonica; Sinkovic, Boris

    We report on studies of Cr doping of Bi2Se3 by comparing surface doped with bulk doped Bi2Se3 films and their electronic and local structures studied by in-situ ARPES and core-level photoemission spectroscopies, respectively. In the case of surface doping we see the evidence for Cr substituting the Bi by observation of the extra feature in the Bi 5d photoemission spectra that increases with doping. On the other hand the Cr 3p spectra show two distinct chemical states indicating that there are two different Cr locations with different local electronic configuration. However, unlike theoretical expectations, the electronic structure measured at 15 K shows that surface states preserve gapless feature with well defined Dirac cone and presence of quantum well states, induced by doping. In contrast, the bulk Cr doped Bi2Se3 films show gapped surface states with gap energy as large as 100 meV even at room temperature, which is far above the reported ferromagnetic transition temperature. Yt and BS acknowledge support from University of Connecticut REP program.

  11. Local unitary transformation method toward practical electron correlation calculations with scalar relativistic effect in large-scale molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Junji; Nakai, Hiromi

    2013-07-01

    In order to perform practical electron correlation calculations, the local unitary transformation (LUT) scheme at the spin-free infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (IODKH) level [J. Seino and H. Nakai, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 244102 (2012), 10.1063/1.4729463; J. Seino and H. Nakai, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 144101 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4757263, which is based on the locality of relativistic effects, has been combined with the linear-scaling divide-and-conquer (DC)-based Hartree-Fock (HF) and electron correlation methods, such as the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) and the coupled cluster theories with single and double excitations (CCSD). Numerical applications in hydrogen halide molecules, (HX)n (X = F, Cl, Br, and I), coinage metal chain systems, Mn (M = Cu and Ag), and platinum-terminated polyynediyl chain, trans,trans-{(p-CH3C6H4)3P}2(C6H5)Pt(C≡C)4Pt(C6H5){(p-CH3C6H4)3P}2, clarified that the present methods, namely DC-HF, MP2, and CCSD with the LUT-IODKH Hamiltonian, reproduce the results obtained using conventional methods with small computational costs. The combination of both LUT and DC techniques could be the first approach that achieves overall quasi-linear-scaling with a small prefactor for relativistic electron correlation calculations.

  12. Electron localization effects on the low-temperature high-field magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional amorphous superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N.-C.; Tsuei, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    The electrical resistivity ρ of three-dimensional amorphous superconducting films a-Mo3Si and a-Nb3Ge is measured in magnetic fields μ0H up to 30 T. At low temperatures and at magnetic fields above the upper critical field Hc2, ρ is temperature independent and decreases as a function of magnetic field. This field dependence is consistent with localization theory in the high-field limit [μ0H>>ħ/(4eL2φ), where Lφ is the phase-coherence length]. Above the superconducting transition temperature Tc, the temperature dependence of the conductivity is consistent with inelastic scattering processes which are destructive to the phase coherence for electron localization, thereby allowing estimates for Lφ(T). The Hall effect data on a-Mo3Si, in conjunction with the resistivity data, allow the determination of the carrier concentration and mean free path. The upper critical field is comparable to (in a-Mo3Si) and significantly larger than (in a-Nb3Ge) the Clogston-Chandrasekhar paramagnetic limit. This phenomenon is discussed in the context of electron localization.

  13. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. I - The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions - Steady state theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    A kinetic theory for the velocity distribution of solar wind electrons which illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion is proposed. By means of the Boltzmann equation with the Krook collision operator accounting for Coulomb collisions, it is found that Coulomb collisions determine the population and shape of the electron distribution function in both the thermal and suprathermal energy regimes. For suprathermal electrons, the cumulative effects of Coulomb interactions are shown to take place on the scale of the heliosphere itself, whereas the Coulomb interactions of thermal electrons occur on a local scale near the point of observation (1 AU). The bifurcation of the electron distribution between thermal and suprathermal electrons is localized to the deep solar corona (1 to 10 solar radii).

  14. The relationship between diffuse auroral and plasma sheet electron distributions near local midnight

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, T.L. ); Gussenhoven, M.S. ); Hardy, D.A.; Carovillano, R.L.

    1989-08-01

    A study of the relationship between diffuse auroral and plasma sheet electron distributions in the energy range from 50 eV to 20 keV in the midnight region was conducted using data from the P78-1 and SCATHA satellites. From 1 1/2 years of data, 14 events were found where the polar-orbiting P78-1 satellite and the near-geosynchronous SCATHA satellite were approximately on the same magnetic field line simultaneously, with SCATHA in the plasma sheet and P78-1 in the diffuse auroral region. For all cases the spectra from the two satellites are in good quantitative agreement. For 13 of the 14 events the pitch angle distribution measured at P78-1 was isotropic for angles mapping into the loss cone at the SCATHA orbit. For one event the P78-1 electron flux decreased with pitch angle toward the field line direction. At SCATHA the distributions outside the loss cone were most commonly butterfly or pancake, although distributions peaked toward the field line were sometimes observed at energies below 1 keV. Electron distributions, as measured where there is isotropy within the loss cone but anisotropy outside the loss cone, are inconsistent with current theories for the scattering of cone for the distribution measured at SCATHA, the electron precipitation lifetimes were calculated for the 14 events. Because the distributions are anisotropic at pitch angles away from the loss cone, the calculated lifetimes significantly exceed the lifetimes in the limit when the flu is isotropic at all pitch angles. The computed precipitation lifetimes are found to be weakly dependent on magnetic activity. The average lifetimes exceed those for the case of isotropy at all pitch angles by a factor between 2 and 3 for {ital Kp}{le}2 and approximately 1.5 for {ital Kp}{gt}2. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  15. Measuring Localized Redox Enzyme Electron Transfer in a Live Cell with Conducting Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial systems are being extensively studied and modified for energy, sensors, and industrial chemistry; yet, their molecular scale structure and activity are poorly understood. Designing efficient bioengineered bacteria requires cellular understanding of enzyme expression and activity. An atomic force microscope (AFM) was modified to detect and analyze the activity of redox active enzymes expressed on the surface of E. coli. An insulated gold-coated metal microwire with only the tip conducting was used as an AFM cantilever and a working electrode in a three-electrode electrochemical cell. Bacteria were engineered such that alcohol dehydrogenase II (ADHII) was surface displayed. A quinone, an electron transfer mediator, was covalently attached site specifically to the displayed ADHII. The AFM probe was used to lift a single bacterium off the surface for electrochemical analysis in a redox-free buffer. An electrochemical comparison between two quinone containing mutants with different distances from the NAD+ binding site in alcohol dehydrogenase II was performed. Electron transfer in redox active proteins showed increased efficiency when mediators are present closer to the NAD+ binding site. This study suggests that an integrated conducting AFM used for single cell electrochemical analysis would allow detailed understanding of enzyme electron transfer processes to electrodes, the processes integral to creating efficiently engineered biosensors and biofuel cells. PMID:24979064

  16. Dynamic Localization of Electronic Excitation in Photosynthetic Complexes Revealed with Chiral Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging due to the small signal and large achiral background. Here, we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic state following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability due to the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  17. Enhanced epidermal dose caused by localized electron contamination from lead cutouts used in kilovoltage radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, J. E.; Butler, D. J.; Webb, D. V.

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate and quantify electron contamination from the lead cutouts used in kilovoltage x-ray radiotherapy. Methods: The lead cutouts were modeled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc user codes DOSXYZnrc and DOSRZnrc for x-ray beams ranging from 50 to 300 kV{sub p}. The results from the model were confirmed with Gafchromic film measurements. The model and measurements investigated the dose distribution with and without gladwrap shielding under the lead, and dose distributions with round, square, and serrated edge cutouts. Results: Large dose enhancement near the edges of the lead was observed due to electron contamination. At the epidermal/dermal border, there is double the dose at the edge of the lead compared to the central dose due to electron contamination for a 150 kV{sub p} beam and three times the dose for a 300 kV{sub p} beam. gladwrap shielding effectively removes the contaminant dose enhancement using ten and four layers for 300 and 150 kV{sub p} beams, respectively. Conclusions: The contaminant dose enhancement is undesirable as it could cause unnecessary erythema and hyperpigmentation at the border of the treated and untreated skin and lead to a poorer cosmetic outcome. The contamination is easily removed by gladwrap shielding placed under or around the lead cutout.

  18. Dynamic localization of electronic excitation in photosynthetic complexes revealed with chiral two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging because of the small signal and large achiral background. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic states following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability because of the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments. PMID:24504144

  19. Exciton Localization in Extended π-Electron Systems: Comparison of Linear and Cyclic Structures.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Alexander; Würsch, Dominik; Jester, Stefan-S; Aggarwal, A Vikas; Idelson, Alissa; Bange, Sebastian; Vogelsang, Jan; Höger, Sigurd; Lupton, John M

    2015-07-30

    We employ five π-conjugated model materials of different molecular shape-oligomers and cyclic structures-to investigate the extent of exciton self-trapping and torsional motion of the molecular framework following optical excitation. Our studies combine steady state and transient fluorescence spectroscopy in the ensemble with measurements of polarization anisotropy on single molecules, supported by Monte Carlo simulations. The dimer exhibits a significant spectral red shift within ∼100 ps after photoexcitation which is attributed to torsional relaxation. This relaxation mechanism is inhibited in the structurally rigid macrocyclic analogue. However, both systems show a high degree of exciton localization but with very different consequences: while, in the macrocycle, the exciton localizes randomly on different parts of the ring, scrambling polarization memory, in the dimer, localization leads to a deterministic exciton position with luminescence characteristics of a dipole. Monte Carlo simulations allow us to quantify the structural difference between the emitting and absorbing units of the π-conjugated system in terms of disorder parameters.

  20. Immunohistochemical distribution and electron microscopic subcellular localization of the proteasome in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Mengual, E; Arizti, P; Rodrigo, J; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Castaño, J G

    1996-10-15

    The proteasome multicatalytic proteinase (MCP) is a 20S complex that plays a major role in nonlysosomal pathways of intracellular protein degradation. A polyclonal antibody against rat liver MCP was used to investigate the distribution of MCP in the CNS of the rat and its subcellular localization within the neurons. As expected, MCP immunoreactivity (MCP-IR) was distributed ubiquitously in the rat CNS but not homogeneously. The most intensely stained neurons were the pyramidal cortical neurons of layer 5 and the motor neurons of the ventral horn in the spinal cord, which show an intense nuclear and cytoplasmatic MCP-IR and clearly stained processes. Additionally, some populations of large neurons in the mesencephalon and brainstem also displayed a moderate MCP-IR in their perikarya. The vast majority of neurons in the remaining structures did not show a strong cytoplasmatic MCP-IR, but their nuclei displayed an intense MCP-IR. The subcellular localization also was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. MCP-IR was intense in the neuronal nuclei, and significant staining also was found in the cytoplasm, dendritic, and axonic processes (including some myelinated axons) and in synaptic boutons, as illustrated in the cerebellar cortex. The distribution of MCP in the rat CNS and its subcellular localization are discussed in relation to (1) the distribution of calpain, the other major nonlysosomal cellular protease, and (2) the possible role of MCP in the degradation of regulatory proteins and key transcription factors that are essential in many neuronal responses.

  1. Finite-temperature electron correlations in the framework of a dynamic local-field correction

    SciTech Connect

    Schweng, H.K.; Boehm, H.M. )

    1993-07-15

    The quantum-mechanical version of the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjoelander (STLS) approximation is applied to finite temperatures. This approximation has two main advantages. First, it includes a dynamic local-field correction and second, it gives positive values for the pair-distribution function in the short-range region at zero temperature. This is even valid for rather low densities. After a description of the numerical difficulties arising with the use of a dynamic approximation, the results for the static-structure factor and the pair-distribution function are discussed thoroughly. Detailed work is performed on the static part of the local-field correction, with special emphasis put on the investigation of its structure. A peak is found at a wave vector [ital q][approx]2.8 (in units of the Fermi wave vector) for small temperatures, which tends towards higher values of [ital q] with increasing temperature. This peak causes an attractive particle-hole interaction in a certain [ital q] region and thus gives rise to the appearance of a charge-density wave. A parametric description is given for the static local-field correction in order to simplify further applications. Furthermore, the exchange-and-correlation free energy is considered. The results are compared with the STLS results and with the modified convolution approach.

  2. Effect of electron (de)localization and pairing in the electrochemistry of polyoxometalates: study of Wells-Dawson molybdotungstophosphate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Parent, Loïc; Aparicio, Pablo A; de Oliveira, Pedro; Teillout, Anne-Lucie; Poblet, Josep M; López, Xavier; Mbomekallé, Israël M

    2014-06-16

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are inorganic entities featuring extensive and sometimes unusual redox properties. In this work, several experimental techniques as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been applied to identify and assess the relevance of factors influencing the redox potentials of POMs. First, the position of the Mo substituent atom in the Wells-Dawson structure, α1- or α2-P2W17Mo, determines the potential of the first 1e(-) reduction wave. For P2W(18-x)Mox systems containing more than one Mo atom, reduction takes place at successively more positive potentials. We attribute this fact to the higher electron delocalization when some Mo oxidizing atoms are connected. After having analyzed the experimental and theoretical data for the monosubstituted α1- and α2-P2W17Mo anions, some relevant facts arise that may help to rationalize the redox behavior of POMs in general. Three aspects concern the stability of systems: (i) the favorable electron delocalization, (ii) the unfavorable e(-)-e(-) electrostatic repulsion, and (iii) the favorable electron pairing. They explain trends such as the second reduction wave occurring at more positive potentials in α1- than in α2-P2W17Mo, and also the third electron reduction taking place at a less negative potential in the case of α2, reversing the observed behavior for the first and the second waves. In P2W17V derivatives, the nature of the first "d" electron is more localized because of the stronger oxidant character of V(V). Thus, the reduction potentials as well as the computed reduction energies (REs) for the second reduction of either isomer are closer to each other than in Mo-substituted POMs. This may be explained by the lack of electron delocalization in monoreduced P2W17V(IV) systems. PMID:24892769

  3. Tissue and cellular localization of tannins in Tunisian dates (Phoenix dactylifera L.) by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Hédi; Alvarado, Camille; Bouchet, Brigitte; Kalthoum-Chérif, Jamila; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika; Guyot, Sylvain

    2014-07-16

    A histological approach including light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to provide accurate information on the localization of condensed tannins in the edible tissues and in the stone of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Light microscopy was carried out on fresh tissues after staining by 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (DMACA) for a specific detection of condensed tannins. Thus, whether under light microscopy or transmission electron microscopy (TEM), results showed that tannins are not located in the epidermis but more deeply in the mesocarp in the vacuole of very large cells. Regarding the stones, tannins are found in a specific cell layer located at 50 μm from the sclereid cells of the testa.

  4. Dynamics of electronic excitations relaxation in hydrophilic colloidal CdS quantum dots in gelatin with involvement of localized states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, M. S.; Buganov, O. V.; Shabunya-Klyachkovskaya, E. V.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Ovchinnikov, O. V.; Vitukhnovsky, A. G.; Perepelitsa, A. S.; Matsukovich, A. S.; Katsaba, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Dynamics of the 1Se-1S3/2 exciton in colloidal CdS quantum dots with diameter of 3.1 ÷ 4.5 nm in gelatin with involvement of localized states was studied by means of femtosecond photoinduced absorption spectroscopy (pump-probe), thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) observed under permanently excited luminescence. It was found that the bleaching band occurs in the energy region of exciton ground state under excitation by femtosecond laser pulses. The complex dynamics of bleaching recovery is caused by the capture of electron on localized states, found using TSL. The stochastic model describing the dynamics of bleaching recovery is discussed. It is shown that the low efficiency of exciton luminescence is caused by the rapid capture of holes by luminescence centers.

  5. Many-body local fields and Fermi-liquid parameters in a quasi-two-dimensional electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarlagadda, Sudhakar; Giuliani, Gabriele F.

    1994-05-01

    We present a quantitative theory of the quasiparticle properties in a Fermi liquid. Our approach uses as an input our previous result for the quasiparticle energy which incorporates the vertex corrections associated with charge and spin-density fluctuations through suitably defined many-body local fields. The method is explicitly applied to the case of the quasi-two-dimensional electron liquid occurring in silicon inversion layers. In particular, we discuss results for the effective mass m* and the modified Landé factor g* (Wilson ratio) that are in reasonable agreement with reported findings. Our calculations are performed by making use of a self-consistent static model for the many-body local fields and are consequently free of arbitrary parameters.

  6. Predicting Accurate Electronic Excitation Transfer Rates via Marcus Theory with Boys or Edmiston-Ruedenberg Localized Diabatization

    SciTech Connect

    Subotnik, Joseph E.; Vura-Weis, Josh; Sodt, Alex J.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-05-06

    We model the triplet-triplet energy-transfer experiments from the Closs group [Closs, G. L.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1988, 110, 2652.] using a combination of Marcus theory and either Boys or Edmiston-Ruedenberg localized diabatization, and we show that relative and absolute rates of electronic excitation transfer may be computed successfully. For the case where both the donor and acceptor occupy equatorial positions on a rigid cyclohexane bridge, we find βcalc = 2.8 per C-C bond, compared with the experimental value βexp = 2.6. This work highlights the power of using localized diabatization methods as a tool for modeling nonequilibrium processes.

  7. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R; Bischoff, Florian A; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-28

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4 (-) and Al2O3-6 (-) are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm(-1). Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6 (-) anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3 (-). Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm(-1). Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm(-1)) and lower energies (850-570 cm(-1)), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm(-1) represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring. PMID:27369513

  8. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R.; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R.; Bischoff, Florian A.; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4- and Al2O3-6- are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm-1. Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6- anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3-. Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm-1. Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm-1) and lower energies (850-570 cm-1), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm-1 represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring.

  9. Spectroscopy and dynamics of 5f states of Es{sup 3+} in LaF{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.; Liu, G.K.

    1997-11-01

    Using time- and wavelength-resolved laser-induced fluorescence methods, the 5f state spectroscopy and photodynamics of {sup 253}Es{sup 3+} in LaF{sub 3} have been investigated. Based on an effective operator Hamiltonian model and approximating the metal ion site symmetry as C{sub 2V}, a set of crystal field parameters has been obtained that fit the 56 assigned levels associated with the 7 states of Es{sup 3+} that were observed. The {sup 5}F{sub 5} emitting state of Es{sup 3+} exhibited a decay rate that approached the expected purely radiative decay of the state. This suggests that the shorter lifetime previously found for this state of Es{sup 3+} in LaCl{sub 3} arose from radiation damage induced by alpha decay of {sup 253}Es.

  10. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S. Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S.; Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G.

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  11. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance. PMID:26254660

  12. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation.

    PubMed

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-01

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  13. Probing the structural and dynamical properties of liquid water with models including non-local electron correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ben, Mauro Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-08-07

    Water is a ubiquitous liquid that displays a wide range of anomalous properties and has a delicate structure that challenges experiment and simulation alike. The various intermolecular interactions that play an important role, such as repulsion, polarization, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals interactions, are often difficult to reproduce faithfully in atomistic models. Here, electronic structure theories including all these interactions at equal footing, which requires the inclusion of non-local electron correlation, are used to describe structure and dynamics of bulk liquid water. Isobaric-isothermal (NpT) ensemble simulations based on the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) yield excellent density (0.994 g/ml) and fair radial distribution functions, while various other density functional approximations produce scattered results (0.8-1.2 g/ml). Molecular dynamics simulation in the microcanonical (NVE) ensemble based on Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) yields dynamical properties in the condensed phase, namely, the infrared spectrum and diffusion constant. At the MP2 and RPA levels of theory, ice is correctly predicted to float on water, resolving one of the anomalies as resulting from a delicate balance between van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. For several properties, obtaining quantitative agreement with experiment requires correction for nuclear quantum effects (NQEs), highlighting their importance, for structure, dynamics, and electronic properties. A computed NQE shift of 0.6 eV for the band gap and absorption spectrum illustrates the latter. Giving access to both structure and dynamics of condensed phase systems, non-local electron correlation will increasingly be used to study systems where weak interactions are of paramount importance.

  14. Modeling Biophysical and Biological Properties From the Characteristics of the Molecular Electron Density, Electron Localization and Delocalization Matrices, and the Electrostatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Matta*, Chérif F

    2014-01-01

    The electron density and the electrostatic potential are fundamentally related to the molecular hamiltonian, and hence are the ultimate source of all properties in the ground- and excited-states. The advantages of using molecular descriptors derived from these fundamental scalar fields, both accessible from theory and from experiment, in the formulation of quantitative structure-to-activity and structure-to-property relationships, collectively abbreviated as QSAR, are discussed. A few such descriptors encode for a wide variety of properties including, for example, electronic transition energies, pKa's, rates of ester hydrolysis, NMR chemical shifts, DNA dimers binding energies, π-stacking energies, toxicological indices, cytotoxicities, hepatotoxicities, carcinogenicities, partial molar volumes, partition coefficients (log P), hydrogen bond donor capacities, enzyme–substrate complementarities, bioisosterism, and regularities in the genetic code. Electronic fingerprinting from the topological analysis of the electron density is shown to be comparable and possibly superior to Hammett constants and can be used in conjunction with traditional bulk and liposolubility descriptors to accurately predict biological activities. A new class of descriptors obtained from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) localization and delocalization indices and bond properties, cast in matrix format, is shown to quantify transferability and molecular similarity meaningfully. Properties such as “interacting quantum atoms (IQA)” energies which are expressible into an interaction matrix of two body terms (and diagonal one body “self” terms, as IQA energies) can be used in the same manner. The proposed QSAR-type studies based on similarity distances derived from such matrix representatives of molecular structure necessitate extensive investigation before their utility is unequivocally established. © 2014 The Author and the Journal of Computational Chemistry Published

  15. Modeling biophysical and biological properties from the characteristics of the molecular electron density, electron localization and delocalization matrices, and the electrostatic potential.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F

    2014-06-15

    The electron density and the electrostatic potential are fundamentally related to the molecular hamiltonian, and hence are the ultimate source of all properties in the ground- and excited-states. The advantages of using molecular descriptors derived from these fundamental scalar fields, both accessible from theory and from experiment, in the formulation of quantitative structure-to-activity and structure-to-property relationships, collectively abbreviated as QSAR, are discussed. A few such descriptors encode for a wide variety of properties including, for example, electronic transition energies, pK(a)'s, rates of ester hydrolysis, NMR chemical shifts, DNA dimers binding energies, π-stacking energies, toxicological indices, cytotoxicities, hepatotoxicities, carcinogenicities, partial molar volumes, partition coefficients (log P), hydrogen bond donor capacities, enzyme-substrate complementarities, bioisosterism, and regularities in the genetic code. Electronic fingerprinting from the topological analysis of the electron density is shown to be comparable and possibly superior to Hammett constants and can be used in conjunction with traditional bulk and liposolubility descriptors to accurately predict biological activities. A new class of descriptors obtained from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules' (QTAIM) localization and delocalization indices and bond properties, cast in matrix format, is shown to quantify transferability and molecular similarity meaningfully. Properties such as "interacting quantum atoms (IQA)" energies which are expressible into an interaction matrix of two body terms (and diagonal one body "self" terms, as IQA energies) can be used in the same manner. The proposed QSAR-type studies based on similarity distances derived from such matrix representatives of molecular structure necessitate extensive investigation before their utility is unequivocally established.

  16. TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays for photocatalysis: Effects of crystallinity, local order, and electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Hosseinpour, Pegah M.; Lewis, Laura H.; Luo, Si; Heiman, Don; Menon, Latika; Arena, Dario A.

    2015-03-15

    To furnish insight into correlations of electronic and local structure and photoactivity, arrays of short and long TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were synthesized by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil, followed by thermal treatment in O{sub 2} (oxidizing), Ar (inert), and H{sub 2} (reducing) environments. The physical and electronic structures of these nanotubes were probed with x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlated with their photocatalytic properties. The photocatalytic activity of the nanotubes was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange under UV-VIS light irradiation. Results show that upon annealing at 350 °C all as-anodized amorphous TiO{sub 2} nanotube samples partially transform to the anatase structure, with variations in the degree of crystallinity and in the concentration of local defects near the nanotubes' surface (∼5 nm) depending on the annealing conditions. Degradation of methyl orange was not detectable for the as-anodized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes regardless of their length. However, the annealed long nanotubes demonstrated detectable catalytic activity, which was more significant with the H{sub 2}-annealed nanotubes than with the Ar- and O{sub 2}-annealed nanotube samples. This enhanced photocatalytic response of the H{sub 2}-annealed long nanotubes relative to the other samples is positively correlated with the presence of a larger concentration of lattice defects (such as Ti{sup 3+} and anticipated oxygen vacancies) and a slightly lower degree of crystallinity near the nanotube surface. These physical and electronic structural attributes impact the efficacy of visible light absorption; moreover, the increased concentration of surface defects is postulated to promote the generation of hydroxyl radicals and thus accelerate the photodegradation of the methyl orange. The information obtained from this study provides unique insight into the role of the near

  17. Exploring the Electronic Landscape at Interfaces and Junctions in Semiconductor Nanowire Devices with Subsurface Local Probing of Carrier Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuckin, Terrence

    The solid state devices that are pervasive in our society, are based on building blocks composed of interfaces between materials and junctions that manipulate how charge carriers behave in a device. As the dimensions of these devices are reduced to the nanoscale, surfaces and interfaces play a larger role in the behavior of carriers in devices and must be thoroughly investigated to understand not only the material properties but how these materials interact. Separating the effects of these different building blocks is a challenge, as most testing methods measure the performance of the whole device. Semiconductor nanowires represent an excellent test system to explore the limits of size and novel device structures. The behavior of charge carriers in semiconductor nanowire devices under operational conditions is investigated using local probing technique electron beam induced current (EBIC). The behavior of locally excited carriers are driven by the forces of drift, from electric fields within a device at junctions, surfaces, contacts and, applied voltage bias, and diffusion. This thesis presents the results of directly measuring these effects spatially with nanometer resolution, using EBIC in Ge, Si, and complex heterostructure GaAs/AlGaAs nanowire devices. Advancements to the EBIC technique, have pushed the resolution from tens of nanometers down to 1 to 2 nanometers. Depth profiling and tuning of the interaction volume allows for the separating the signal originating from the surface and the interior of the nanowire. Radial junctions and variations in bands can now be analyzed including core/shell hetero-structures. This local carrier probing reveals a number of surprising behaviors; Most notably, directly imaging the evolution of surface traps filling with electrons causing bandbending at the surface of Ge nanowires that leads to an enhancement in the charge separation of electrons and holes, and extracting different characteristic lengths from GaAs and AlGaAs in

  18. High thermal sensitivity and the selectable upconversion color of Ln, Yb:Y6O5F8 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zaldo, Carlos; Cascales, Concepción

    2014-11-14

    Yb(3+)-sensitized, Ln(3+)(Er(3+), Pr(3+))-doped Y6O5F8 micron-sized bundles of highly crystalline individual nanotubes have been prepared through hydrothermal syntheses at 185 °C. The inhomogeneous broadening observed in their optical spectra is associated with the large distribution of crystal fields around Y(3+)(Ln(3+)) sites in the orthorhombic Pbcm Vernier-type Y6O5F8 host. Based on ratiometric analyses of the thermal evolution of intensities of near-infrared NIR (∼978 nm)-excited green upconversion emissions corresponding to (2)H11/2, (4)S3/2 → (4)I15/2 Er(3+) transitions, the temperature sensing behaviour of Er, Yb:Y6O5F8 was studied. This thermal sensor exhibits a very high sensitivity S = 0.0060 K(-1) at physiological temperatures (22-50 °C), which surpasses the S value found for Er, Yb:β-NaYF4 at these temperatures, and a maximum S = 0.0082 K(-1) at ∼225 °C. Also under NIR diode laser excitation, the color of the upconverted light from codoped Pr, Er, Yb:Y6O5F8 nanotubes can be selected by the control of the Pr(3+) concentration and by the excitation regime and power density. Samples with low Pr(3+) concentration emit green light, and the selection between bluish-green light and white light has been demonstrated with high Pr(3+) concentration (2 mol%), under pulsed or continuous wave excitation, respectively.

  19. High thermal sensitivity and the selectable upconversion color of Ln, Yb:Y6O5F8 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zaldo, Carlos; Cascales, Concepción

    2014-11-14

    Yb(3+)-sensitized, Ln(3+)(Er(3+), Pr(3+))-doped Y6O5F8 micron-sized bundles of highly crystalline individual nanotubes have been prepared through hydrothermal syntheses at 185 °C. The inhomogeneous broadening observed in their optical spectra is associated with the large distribution of crystal fields around Y(3+)(Ln(3+)) sites in the orthorhombic Pbcm Vernier-type Y6O5F8 host. Based on ratiometric analyses of the thermal evolution of intensities of near-infrared NIR (∼978 nm)-excited green upconversion emissions corresponding to (2)H11/2, (4)S3/2 → (4)I15/2 Er(3+) transitions, the temperature sensing behaviour of Er, Yb:Y6O5F8 was studied. This thermal sensor exhibits a very high sensitivity S = 0.0060 K(-1) at physiological temperatures (22-50 °C), which surpasses the S value found for Er, Yb:β-NaYF4 at these temperatures, and a maximum S = 0.0082 K(-1) at ∼225 °C. Also under NIR diode laser excitation, the color of the upconverted light from codoped Pr, Er, Yb:Y6O5F8 nanotubes can be selected by the control of the Pr(3+) concentration and by the excitation regime and power density. Samples with low Pr(3+) concentration emit green light, and the selection between bluish-green light and white light has been demonstrated with high Pr(3+) concentration (2 mol%), under pulsed or continuous wave excitation, respectively. PMID:25255864

  20. Photophysical properties of ESIPT inspired fluorescent 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methylimidazo[4,5-f]isoindole-5,7(1H,6H)-dione and its derivative: Experimental and DFT based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Mininath S.; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state intramolecular proton transfer chromophores 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methylimidazo[4,5-f]isoindole-5,7(1H,6H)-dione and 2-(4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methylimidazo[4,5-f]isoindole-5,7(1H,6H)-dione are synthesized from 4,5-diamino-N-methylphthalimide. The photophysical behavior of the synthesized chromophores was studied using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy in the polar and non-polar solvents. The synthesized o-hydroxyphenyl benzimidazole derivatives are fluorescent and very sensitive to the solvent polarity. These dyes are thermally stable up to 317 °C. Density Functional Theory computations have been used to understand the structural, molecular, electronic and photophysical properties of the chromophores. The experimental absorption and emission wavelengths are in good agreement with the computed vertical excitation and theoretical emission obtained by Density Functional Theory and Time Dependant Density Functional Theory.

  1. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-10-01

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%-5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10-6]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations.

  2. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; Da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-10-28

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%-5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10(-6)]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations.

  3. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; Da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-01-01

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%–5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10−6]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations. PMID:26507003

  4. The magnetic field induced phase separation in a model of a superconductor with local electron pairing.

    PubMed

    Kapcia, Konrad; Robaszkiewicz, Stanisław

    2013-02-13

    We have studied the extended Hubbard model with pair hopping in the atomic limit for arbitrary electron density and chemical potential and focus on paramagnetic effects of the external magnetic field. The Hamiltonian considered consists of (i) the effective on-site interaction U and (ii) the intersite charge exchange interactions I, determining the hopping of electron pairs between nearest-neighbour sites. The phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties of this model have been determined within the variational approach (VA), which treats the on-site interaction term exactly and the intersite interactions within the mean-field approximation. Our investigation of the general case shows that the system can exhibit not only the homogeneous phases-superconducting (SS) and non-ordered (NO)-but also the phase separated states (PS: SS-NO). Depending on the values of interaction parameters, the PS state can occur in higher fields than the SS phase (field induced PS). Some ground state results beyond the VA are also presented. PMID:23334285

  5. Photoemission electron microscopy of localized surface plasmons in silver nanostructures at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Mårsell, Erik; Larsen, Esben W.; Arnold, Cord L.; Xu, Hongxing; Mauritsson, Johan; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2015-02-28

    We image the field enhancement at Ag nanostructures using femtosecond laser pulses with a center wavelength of 1.55 μm. Imaging is based on non-linear photoemission observed in a photoemission electron microscope (PEEM). The images are directly compared to ultra violet PEEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging of the same structures. Further, we have carried out atomic scale scanning tunneling microscopy on the same type of Ag nanostructures and on the Au substrate. Measuring the photoelectron spectrum from individual Ag particles shows a larger contribution from higher order photoemission processes above the work function threshold than would be predicted by a fully perturbative model, consistent with recent results using shorter wavelengths. Investigating a wide selection of both Ag nanoparticles and nanowires, field enhancement is observed from 30% of the Ag nanoparticles and from none of the nanowires. No laser-induced damage is observed of the nanostructures neither during the PEEM experiments nor in subsequent SEM analysis. By direct comparison of SEM and PEEM images of the same nanostructures, we can conclude that the field enhancement is independent of the average nanostructure size and shape. Instead, we propose that the variations in observed field enhancement could originate from the wedge interface between the substrate and particles electrically connected to the substrate.

  6. Resolving local voltage variations in opto-electronic devices with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Elizabeth; Garrett, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy; Leite, Marina

    We employ illuminated Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to spatially resolve the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of optoelectronic devices with nanoscale spatial resolution, >5 orders of magnitude better than previous methods. In illuminated-KPFM, we measure the difference in work function between the sample surface and the probe, termed the contact potential difference (CPD). By grounding the bottom contact of the solar cell to the AFM probe, the difference between the illuminated and the dark signals is proportional to quasi-Fermi level splitting and, therefore, the Voc. We apply our scanning probe technique to a variety of solar cell materials, including polycrystalline CIGS, where we resolve local variations in Voc >150 mV. We use heterodyne-KPFM (where we map 1 μm2 in 16 seconds) to probe hybrid perovskites solar cells, and quantify in real-time the voltage changes upon material relaxation after illumination. This metrology yields new insights into the local electrical properties of solar cells, and can be expanded to any optoelectronic device.

  7. A Global SU(5) F-theory model with Wilson line breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsano, J.; Clemens, H.; Pantev, T.; Raby, S.; Tseng, H.-H.

    2013-01-01

    We engineer compact SU(5) Grand Unified Theories in F-theory in which GUT-breaking is achieved by a discrete Wilson line. Because the internal gauge field is flat, these models avoid the high scale threshold corrections associated with hypercharge flux. Along the way, we exemplify the `local-to-global' approach in F-theory model building and demonstrate how the Tate divisor formalism can be used to address several challenges of extending local models to global ones. These include in particular the construction of G-fluxes that extend non-inherited bundles and the engineering of U(1) symmetries. We go beyond chirality computations and determine the precise (charged) massless spectrum, finding exactly three families of quarks and leptons but excessive doublet and/or triplet pairs in the Higgs sector (depending on the example) and vector-like exotics descending from the adjoint of SU(5)GUT. Understanding why vector-like pairs persist in the Higgs sector without an obvious symmetry to protect them may shed light on new solutions to the μ problem in F-theory GUTs.

  8. Local tunneling spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy of the electron-doped cuprate Sm2-xCexCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmers, A.; Noat, Y.; Cren, T.; Sacks, W.; Roditchev, D.; Liang, B.; Greene, R. L.; Lobo, R. P. S. M.; Bontemps, N.

    2008-03-01

    We present infrared and local tunneling spectroscopy of the electron-doped cuprate Sm2-xCexCuO4. In STM, at optimal doping x=0.15, a clear signature of the superconducting gap is observed with an amplitude ranging from place to place and from sample to sample (δ˜ 3.5-6meV). Another spectroscopic feature is simultaneously observed at high energy above ±50meV. Its energy scale and temperature evolution is found to be compatible with previous photoemission and optical experiments. If interpreted as the signature of antiferromagnetic order in the samples, these results could suggest the coexistence on the local scale of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity on the electron-doped side of cuprate superconductors. Using optical spectroscopy, we analyzed the effects of the normal state gap opening (the higher energy gap seen in STM) and phonon structure as a function of temperature and doping from the underdoped to the metallic composition.

  9. Reversed Shear Alfv'en Eigenmode Stabilization by Localized Electron Cyclotron Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zeeland, M. A.; Lohr, J.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Nazikian, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kramer, G. J.; Austin, M. E.; Rhodes, T. L.; Holcomb, C.; Makowski, M. A.; McKee, G. R.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2007-11-01

    Reversed shear Alfv'en eigenmode (RSAE) activity in DIII-D is observed to be stabilized by electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the minimum of the safety factor (qmin) in neutral beam heated discharges with reversed magnetic shear. The degree of RSAE stabilization and the volume averaged neutron production (Sn) are highly dependent on ECH deposition location relative to qmin. Ideal MHD simulations predict RSAE existence during ECH, indicating that the mode disappearance is due to kinetic effects not taken into account by the ideal MHD model. While discharges with ECH stabilization of RSAEs have higher Sn than discharges with significant RSAE activity, neutron production remains strongly reduced (up to 60%), indicating the bulk of the deficit is not due to RSAEs alone.

  10. Nonlinear response of magnetic islands to localized electron cyclotron current injection

    SciTech Connect

    Borgogno, D.; Comisso, L.; Grasso, D.; Lazzaro, E.

    2014-06-15

    The magnetic island evolution under the action of a current generated externally by electron cyclotron wave beams is studied using a reduced resistive magnetohydrodynamics plasma model. The use of a two-dimensional reconnection model shows novel features of the actual nonlinear evolution as compared to the zero-dimensional model of the generalized Rutherford equation. When the radio frequency control is applied to a small magnetic island, the complete annihilation of the island width is followed by a spatial phase shift of the island, referred as “flip” instability. On the other hand, a current-drive injection in a large nonlinear island can be accompanied by the occurrence of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. These effects need to be taken into account in designing tearing mode control systems based on radio frequency current-drive.

  11. Fermi orbital self-interaction corrected electronic structure of molecules beyond local density approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Torsten; Liebing, Simon; Kortus, Jens; Pederson, Mark

    The correction of the self-interaction error that is inherent to all standard density functional theory (DFT) calculations is an object of increasing interest. We present our results on the application of the recently developed Fermi-orbital based approach for the self-interaction correction (FO-SIC) to a set of different molecular systems. Our study covers systems ranging from simple diatomic to large organic molecules. Our focus lies on the direct estimation of the ionization potential from orbital eigenvalues and on the ordering of electronic levels in metal-organic molecules. Further, we show that the Fermi orbital positions in structurally similar molecules appear to be transferable. Support by DFG FOR1154 is greatly acknowledged.

  12. Electron Localization in Dissociating H_{2}^{+} by Retroaction of a Photoelectron onto Its Source.

    PubMed

    Waitz, M; Aslitürk, D; Wechselberger, N; Gill, H K; Rist, J; Wiegandt, F; Goihl, C; Kastirke, G; Weller, M; Bauer, T; Metz, D; Sturm, F P; Voigtsberger, J; Zeller, S; Trinter, F; Schiwietz, G; Weber, T; Williams, J B; Schöffler, M S; Schmidt, L Ph H; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2016-01-29

    We investigate the dissociation of H_{2}^{+} into a proton and a H^{0} after single ionization with photons of an energy close to the threshold. We find that the p^{+} and the H^{0} do not emerge symmetrically in the case of the H_{2}^{+} dissociating along the 1sσ_{g} ground state. Instead, a preference for the ejection of the p^{+} in the direction of the escaping photoelectron can be observed. This symmetry breaking is strongest for very small electron energies. Our experiment is consistent with a recent prediction by Serov and Kheifets [Phys. Rev. A 89, 031402 (2014)]. In their model, which treats the photoelectron classically, the symmetry breaking is induced by the retroaction of the long-range Coulomb potential onto the dissociating H_{2}^{+}. PMID:26871325

  13. Localization of LHCP II in the Golgi of synchronized Euglena cells by immuno-electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Osafune, Tetsuaki ); Schiff, J.A. ); Hase, E. )

    1990-05-01

    We have previously localized LHCP II apoprotein in the Golgi thylakoids of Euglena gracilis (bacillaris Z strain) using specific antibody protein A-gold, during plastid development induction of LHCP II synthesis by increased light intensity. Using light/dark synchronized cells we now show that thylakoids are always immunoreactive. There is no reaction in the Golgi at 0 h. (beginning of light period), but immunoreaction appears in the Golgi soon thereafter, rises to a peak at 8 h. declines again to zero by 16 h. (2 h. into the dark period). The peak in immunoreaction in the Golgi immediately precedes the peak in {sup 14}C-labeling of cellular LHCP, supporting our suggestion that processing in the Golgi precedes deposition of LHCP II apoprotein in the thylakoids. Synchronized mutant Gr{sub 1} which lacks LHCP apoprotein fails to show immunoreaction in the Golgi or thylakoids at any stage.

  14. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 1: The origin of typical 1 AU velocity distribution functions: Steady state theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed first principle kinetic theory for electrons which is neither a classical fluid treatment nor an exospheric calculation is presented. This theory illustrates the global and local properties of the solar wind expansion that shape the observed features of the electron distribution function, such as its bifurcation, its skewness and the differential temperatures of the thermal and suprathermal subpopulations. Coulomb collisions are substantial mediators of the interplanetary electron velocity distribution function and they place a zone for a bifurcation of the electron distribution function deep in the corona. The local cause and effect precept which permeates the physics of denser media is modified for electrons in the solar wind. The local form of transport laws and equations of state which apply to collision dominated plasmas are replaced with global relations that explicitly depend on the relative position of the observer to the boundaries of the system.

  15. Local Health Departments' Partners and Challenges in Electronic Exchange of Health Information

    PubMed Central

    Vest, Joshua R.; Lovelace, Kay; McCullough, J. Mac

    2016-01-01

    Background: Unprecedented amounts of data are produced by the health care and other sectors, presenting opportunities for local health departments (LHDs) to access these data. LHDs will need to participate in health information exchange (HIE) with a number of partners in order to benefit from these data resources. LHDs' participation in HIEs with specific partners has not been studied. Objectives: To describe the level of and challenges in LHD participation in HIE with other partners, and variation by LHD population size and governance type. Data and Methods: This research uses data from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, with a target population of all LHDs in the United States. A representative sample of 650 LHDs was drawn using a stratified random sampling design. A total of 324 completed responses were received with a 50% response rate. Survey data were cleaned, and bivariate comparisons were conducted using χ2 and Somer's D. Results: Substantial variation existed in LHDs' participation in HIE by type of exchange partner. Although 71% participated in HIE with the state departments of health, only 12% with jail/correctional health, 14% with health or county-based purchasing plans, and 15% with home health agencies. Compared with large LHDs (jurisdiction populations of ≥500 000), smaller LHDs were more likely to participate in HIE with state departments of health, but less likely with other exchange partners. The challenges to HIE participation were technological, and organizational/interorganizational in nature and variation existed by LHDs' population size and governance structure with respect to state authority. Conclusions: Local public health agencies more commonly participate in HIE with some partners, but may need to improve HIE with many others. National strategies targeting an increase in HIE of LHDs may use our findings to focus those initiatives. PMID:27684617

  16. Observation of coexistence of itinerant electronic states and local moments in parents compound superconductor Sr4V2O6Fe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Won-Jun; Choi, Seokhwan; Ok, Jong Mok; Choi, Hyun Woo; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jung, Jin Oh; Son, Dong Hyun; Suh, Hwan Soo; Kim, Jun Sung; Semertzidis, Yannis K.; Lee, Jhinhwan

    Using variable temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and quasi-particle interference (QPI) analysis, we studied coexistence of itinerant electronic states and local moments in Sr4V2O6Fe2As2. Temperature dependent STS measurements showed Fano resonances resulting from the hybridization between local moments (V) and itinerant electrons (Fe) below 100 K, and the formation of Fano lattice implying collective spin excitations between local moments of V atoms below 50 K. QPI analysis showed replica bands and kink features in Fe-itinerant band, implying the existence of Bosonic modes between Sr2VO3 layers and FeAs layers. Our results show the collective behaviors of itinerant electrons and local moments, and the possibility of local moments contributing to superconductivity.

  17. Biomarkers of sensitivity to potent and selective antitumor 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F203) in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Callero, Mariana A; Luzzani, Gabriela A; De Dios, Diana O; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Perez, Andrea I Loaiza

    2013-10-01

    2-(4-Amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F203, NSC 703786) lysylamide belongs to a novel mechanistic class of antitumor agents. It elicits activity against ovarian, breast, kidney and colorectal cancer models. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F203 activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling. Herein, we evaluate the role of AhR in 5F203 activity in two ovarian cancer cell lines: IGROV-1 (sensitive to 5F203), SKOV-3 (resistant to this agent). In addition, cancer cells have been isolated from ascites fluid of ovarian cancer patients; sensitivity to 5F203 and concurrent AhR signal transduction has been examined in ascites-isolated ovarian cancer patients' cells. 5F203 induced enhanced CYP1A1 expression, AhR translocation and ROS formation in IGROV-1 cells and ascites-isolated ovarian cancer cells that were sensitive to 5F203. In IGROV-1 cells 5F203-induced ROS formation was accompanied by JNK, ERK and P38MAPK phosphorylation, DNA damage and cell cycle arrest prior to apoptosis. In contrast, 5F203 failed to induce CYP1A1 expression, AhR translocation or oxidative stress in 5F203-resistant SKOV-3 cells, or in ovarian cancer ascites cells inherently resistant to this agent. We propose that AhR may represent a new molecular target in the treatment of ovarian tumors and 5F203 may exemplify a potential novel treatment. Furthermore, putative biomarkers of sensitivity to this agent have been identified.

  18. Bioaccumulation and localization of exogenous cadmium in a teleost by electron microscopy (TEM) and its specific quantitation by electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA).

    PubMed

    Tayal, A K; Kaur, I; Mathur, R P

    2000-03-01

    A cadmium bioconcentration study was carried out in a fresh water teleost, Colisa fasciatus, to study the bioaccumulation kinetics and fate of exogenous cadmium (Cd) in biological tissues. Study shows that on exposure of the fish to a sublethal concentration of cadmium in test water, Cd uptake results in its bioconcentration in gills, liver and muscle tissues. To explore whether the accumulated Cd reaches the membranes or inside the cells, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the thin sections of tissues was done after histochemical localization of Cd in cells by modified SST method. TEM studies of sections of gills, liver and muscle tissues showed the deposits of exogenous Cd (visualized as dense clouds) in biological cells. This suggests the presence of free or loosely bound Cd on the membranes and inside the cells, which in the presence of Na2S is converted into insoluble metal sulfides. Electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) studies confirmed the presence of Cd on the membrane surface as well as inside the cells of bioindicator organs suggesting involvement of membrane transport of exogenous Cd inside the cells and its deposition as loosely bound insoluble metal complexes.

  19. Localized magnetoplasmons in quantum dots: Scrutinizing the eligibility of FIR, Raman, and electron energy-loss spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, M.

    We report on a one-component, quasi-zero dimensional, quantum plasma exposed to a parabolic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. If the size of such a system as can be realized in the semiconducting quantum dots is on the order of the de-Broglie wavelength, the electronic and optical properties become highly tunable. Then the quantum size effects challenge the observation of many-particle phenomena such as the magneto-optical absorption, Raman intensity, and electron-energy-loss spectrum. An exact analytical solution of the problem leads us to infer that these many-particle phenomena are, in fact, dictated by the generalized Kohn's theorem in the long-wavelength limit. Maneuvering the confinement and/or the magnetic field furnishes the resonance energy capable of being explored with the FIR, Raman, or electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. This implies that either of these probes should be competent in observing the localized magnetoplasmons in the system. A deeper insight into the physics of quantum dots is paving the way for their implementation in such diverse fields as quantum computing and medical imaging1. 1. M.S. Kushwaha, Unpublished.

  20. Non-local exchange correlation functionals impact on the structural, electronic and optical properties of III-V arsenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najwa Anua, N.; Ahmed, R.; Shaari, A.; Saeed, M. A.; Haq, Bakhtiar Ul; Goumri-Said, Souraya

    2013-10-01

    Exchange correlation (XC) energy functionals play a vital role in the efficiency of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, more soundly in the calculation of fundamental electronic energy bandgap. In the present DFT study of III-arsenides, we investigate the implications of XC-energy functional and corresponding potential on the structural, electronic and optical properties of XAs (X = B, Al, Ga, In). Firstly we report and discuss the optimized structural lattice parameters and the band gap calculations performed within different non-local XC functionals as implemented in the DFT-packages: WIEN2k, CASTEP and SIESTA. These packages are representative of the available code in ab initio studies. We employed the LDA, GGA-PBE, GGA-WC and mBJ-LDA using WIEN2k. In CASTEP, we employed the hybrid functional, sX-LDA. Furthermore LDA, GGA-PBE and meta-GGA were employed using SIESTA code. Our results point to GGA-WC as a more appropriate approximation for the calculations of structural parameters. However our electronic bandstructure calculations at the level of mBJ-LDA potential show considerable improvements over the other XC functionals, even the sX-LDA hybrid functional. We report also the optical properties within mBJ potential, which show a nice agreement with the experimental measurements in addition to other theoretical results.

  1. Evidence of f-electron localization at a heavy-fermion quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steglich, Frank

    2014-03-01

    The prototypical heavy-fermion compound YbRh2Si2 exhibits a magnetic-field (B) induced antiferromagnetic quantum critical point (QCP) at Bc (⊥c) ~ 60 mT. As inferred from transport and thermodynamic measurements a quantum-critical energy scale, kB T *(B) , indicating a crossover of the Fermi surface, has been established for this system. Upon extrapolating finite-temperature (T) data to T = 0, one concludes (i) a vanishing of T*(B) and (ii) an abrupt drop in the (normal) Hall coefficient RH(B) at B =Bc , verifying the proposal of a Kondo destroying QCP. The dynamical processes underlying this apparent break-up of the Kondo singlets have been explored by studying the Lorenz ratio L/L0 as a function of Tand B. Here, L = ρ / w is the ratio of the electrical (ρ) and thermal (w = L0 T / κ) resistivities, with κ being the thermal conductivity and L0 = (πkB)2 /3e2 Sommerfeld's constant. By properly taking care of bosonic (magnon/paramagnon) contributions to the heat current which exist at finite temperature only, extrapolation of the measured data to T = 0 yields a purely electronic Lorenz ratio L/L0 = 1 at B ≠Bc . At B = Bc, we extrapolate L/L0 ~ 0.9. Therefore, the Wiedemann Franz (WF) law holds at any value of the control parameter B, except for the field-induced QCP, as is also illustrated by a pronounced heating of the sample when measuring the low - T electrical resistivity in the vicinity of the critical magnetic field. This violation of the WF law is ascribed to scatterings of the electronic heat carriers from fermionic quantum-critical fluctuations, namely those of the Fermi surface. Work done in collaboration with H. Pfau, S. Lausberg, P. Sun, U. Stockert, M. Brando, S. Friedemann, C. Krellner, C. Geibel, S. Wirth, S. Kirchner, E. Abrahams and Q. Si.

  2. Localization-delocalization transition of electrons at the percolation threshold of semiconductor GaAs1–xNx alloys: The appearance of a mobility edge

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alberi, K.; Fluegel, B.; Beaton, D. A.; Ptak, A. J.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2012-07-09

    Electrons in semiconductor alloys have generally been described in terms of Bloch states that evolve from constructive interference of electron waves scattering from perfectly periodic potentials, despite the loss of structural periodicity that occurs on alloying. Using the semiconductor alloy GaAs₁₋xNx as a prototype, we demonstrate a localized to delocalized transition of the electronic states at a percolation threshold, the emergence of a mobility edge, and the onset of an abrupt perturbation to the host GaAs electronic structure, shedding light on the evolution of electronic structure in these abnormal alloys.

  3. Use of normal and electronic interferometric holography for defect localization and characterization of artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, Pierre M.; Markov, Vladimir B.

    1995-02-01

    Deterioration of natural stone, man-made building materials such as mortar, bricks and concrete, and other materials such as wood, paint, glass, metal, etc. has been of increasing concern in recent decades. More specifically, problems of lifetime and durability of reinforced concrete structures on the one hand and museum objects diagnostic on the other became more important due to different factors. Since the late seventies, all this had led to intensified research about the causes and the nature of degradation processes and to the development of general strategies for handling such situations. Environmental factors are often cited as major parameters, but the concept, design, and manufacture of the elements are also very important. Both from the civil engineering point of view, and from the restoration aspects, early detection of damage can save a lot of trouble, labor, and thus money. Holographic interferometry is in principle a method very well suited for this purpose, as it combines whole-field measurement and high sensitivity with non-contact and non-preparation of the materials studied. This paper describes some results obtained on real-size, real-life objects. Up to now, tests were conducted in the lab using continuous and pulsed lasers combined with silver-halide and electronic recording schemes. It is hoped that in a later phase, in-situ experiments will be effectuated; some preliminary concepts of that are discussed.

  4. Multiphoton-generated localized electron plasma for membrane permeability modification in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, T.; Leblanc, M.; McMillan, J.; Westwood, J.; Khodaparast, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    Successful incorporation of a specific macromolecule into a single cell would be ideal for characterizing trafficking dynamics through plasmodesmata or for studying intracellular localizations. Here, we demonstrate NIR femtosecond laser-mediated infiltration of a membrane impermeable dextran-conjugated dye into living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling stems. Based on the reactions of fluorescing vacuoles of transgenic cells and artificial cell walls comprised of nanocellulose, laser intensity and exposure time were adjusted to avoid deleterious effects. Using these plant-tailored laser parameters, cells were injected with the fluorophores and long-term dye retention was observed, all while preserving vital cell functions. This method is ideal for studies concerning cell-to-cell interactions and potentially paves the way for introducing transgenes to specific cells. This work was supported by NSF award IOS-0843372 to JHW, with additional support from and U.S. Department of Agriculture Hatch Project no. 135997, and by the Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) at Virginia Tech.

  5. A STUDY OF THE ULTRASTRUCTURAL LOCALIZATION OF HAIR KERATIN SYNTHESIS UTILIZING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC AUTORADIOGRAPHY IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    PubMed Central

    Nakai, Takashi

    1964-01-01

    The sites of the incorporation of labeled cystine into keratinizing structures were studied in electron microscopic autoradiographs. The tracer used was cystine labeled with S35 emitting long-range ionizing particles. During exposure for 1 to 2 months, according to our method of electron microscopic autoradiography, emulsion-coated specimens were exposed to a static magnetic field which appeared to result in a marked increase in the number of reacted silver grains. In young Swiss mice receiving intraperitoneal injections at 1, 3, and 6 hours before biopsy, conventional autoradiography demonstrated that S35-cystine was intensely localized in the keratogenous zone of anagen hair follicles, and that the radioactivity there increased in intensity progressively with time while the radioactivity in the hair bulb always remained very low. Our observations with electron microscopic autoradiography in a magnetic field appeared to indicate that at 3 and 6 hours after injection the S35-cystine was directly and specifically incorporated into tonofibrils in the hair cortex and into amorphous keratin granules of the hair cuticle layer, possibly without any particular concentration of this substance in the other cellular components. There seemed to be an appreciable concentration of cystine in tonofibrils of the cuticle of the inner root sheath. However, trichohyalin granules in the hair medulla and inner root sheath failed to show any evidence of cystine concentration. The improved sensitivity of the electron microscopic autoradiography with S35-cystine appeared to be partly due to the application of a static magnetic field. However, the reason for this could not be explained theoretically. PMID:14154496

  6. Crystallographic and Electron Microscopic Analyses of a Bacterial Phytochrome Reveal Local and Global Rearrangements during Photoconversion*

    PubMed Central

    Burgie, E. Sethe; Wang, Tong; Bussell, Adam N.; Walker, Joseph M.; Li, Huilin; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Phytochromes are multidomain photoswitches that drive light perception in plants and microorganisms by coupling photoreversible isomerization of their bilin chromophore to various signaling cascades. How changes in bilin conformation affect output by these photoreceptors remains poorly resolved and might include several species-specific routes. Here, we present detailed three-dimensional models of the photosensing module and a picture of an entire dimeric photoreceptor through structural analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans phytochrome BphP assembled with biliverdin (BV). A 1.16-Å resolution crystal structure of the bilin-binding pocket in the dark-adapted red light-absorbing state illuminated the intricate network of bilin/protein/water interactions and confirmed the protonation and ZZZssa conformation of BV. Structural and spectroscopic comparisons with the photochemically compromised D207A mutant revealed that substitutions of Asp-207 allow inclusion of cyclic porphyrins in addition to BV. A crystal structure of the entire photosensing module showed a head-to-head, twisted dimeric arrangement with bowed helical spines and a hairpin protrusion connecting the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA (GAF) and phytochrome-specific (PHY) domains. A key conserved hairpin feature is its anti-parallel, two β-strand stem, which we show by mutagenesis to be critical for BphP photochemistry. Comparisons of single particle electron microscopic images of the full-length BphP dimer in the red light-absorbing state and the photoactivated far-red light-absorbing state revealed a large scale reorientation of the PHY domain relative to the GAF domain, which alters the position of the downstream histidine kinase output module. Together, our data support a toggle model whereby bilin photoisomerization alters GAF/PHY domain interactions through conformational modification of the hairpin, which regulates signaling by impacting the relationship between sister output modules

  7. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the oxytocin receptor from a rat pancreatic cell line (RINm5F).

    PubMed

    Jeng, Y J; Lolait, S J; Strakova, Z; Chen, C; Copland, J A; Mellman, D; Hellmich, M R; Soloff, M S

    1996-12-01

    Oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) stimulate insulin and glucagon release from the pancreas, and evoke insulin secretion from the rat insulinoma cell line, RINm5F. To determine which AVP/OT receptor subtype is expressed in RINm5F cells, we used PCR with degenerate primers to two transmembrane domains of the AVP (V1a, V1b (or V3), V2) and OT receptors (OTRs). The single PCR fragment identified was used to obtain a full length cDNA from a RINm5F cDNA library. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of this clone with uterine OTR sequences from several species (human, sheep, bovine) and to the pig kidney epithelial cell (LLC-PK1) OTR reveals a very high degree of homology. After the RIN cell OTR cDNA was stably transfected into CHO cells (CHO-OTR), the cell membranes bound iodinated oxytocin antagonist with an apparent Kd comparable to that of RIN cell membranes and those from other OT target cells. Comparison of the ligand specificities of CHO-OTR and RIN cells membranes showed that the relative Ki values of a series of OT analogues were approximately equivalent in both preparations. The rank order of apparent Ki values also corresponded to published values for the rat myometrium, where OT elicits intracellular calcium transients, and increases inositol phosphate production. In uterin endometrium and amnion cells, OT stimulates prostaglandin release. Stimulation of CHO-OTR cells with OT caused an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration originating from both intracellular and extracellular sources, and a dose-dependent increase in inositol phosphate levels. Arachidonic acid release and PGE2 synthesis were also stimulated by OT. These findings (amino acid sequence homology, binding specificity, and signal transduction/second messenger production) suggest that OTRs from RINm5F cells are indistinguishable from OTRs that have been described in other tissues. The expression of OTR in pancreatic cells implies that OT plays a role in pancreatic function.

  8. Profile of Ventana ALK (D5F3) companion diagnostic assay for non-small-cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Conde, Esther; Hernandez, Susana; Prieto, Mario; Martinez, Rebeca; Lopez-Rios, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    The development of several ALK inhibitors means that the importance of accurately identifying ALK-positive lung cancer has never been greater. Therefore, it is crucial that ALK testing assays become more standardized. The aim of this review is to comment on the recently FDA-approved VENTANA ALK (D5F3) Companion Diagnostic (CDx) Assay. This kit provides high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of ALK rearrangements and seamless integration into the laboratory workflow, with a fully automated analytical phase and fast interpretation. The use of controls increases the sensitivity and specificity and a dichotomous scoring approach enhances reproducibility.

  9. Coordination-resolved local bond contraction and electron binding-energy entrapment of Si atomic clusters and solid skins

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Maolin; Huang, Yongli; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yan E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg; Zhang, Xi; Li, Can; Sun, Chang Q. E-mail: ecqsun@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-04-14

    Consistency between x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements and density-function theory calculations confirms our bond order-length-strength notation-incorporated tight-binding theory predictions on the quantum entrapment of Si solid skin and atomic clusters. It has been revealed that bond-order deficiency shortens and strengthens the Si-Si bond, which results in the local densification and quantum entrapment of the core and valence electrons. Unifying Si clusters and Si(001) and (111) skins, this mechanism has led to quantification of the 2p binding energy of 96.089 eV for an isolated Si atom, and their bulk shifts of 2.461 eV. Findings evidence the significance of atomic undercoordination that is of great importance to device performance.

  10. Individual electron and hole localization in submonolayer InN quantum sheets embedded in GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feix, F.; Flissikowski, T.; Chèze, C.; Calarco, R.; Grahn, H. T.; Brandt, O.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate sub-monolayer InN quantum sheets embedded in GaN(0001) by temperature-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy under both continuous-wave and pulsed excitation. Both the peak energy and the linewidth of the emission band associated with the quantum sheets exhibit an anomalous dependence on temperature indicative of carrier localization. Photoluminescence transients reveal a power law decay at low temperatures reflecting that the recombining electrons and holes occupy spatially separate, individual potential minima reminiscent of conventional (In,Ga)N(0001) quantum wells exhibiting the characteristic disorder of a random alloy. At elevated temperatures, carrier delocalization sets in and is accompanied by a thermally activated quenching of the emission. We ascribe the strong nonradiative recombination to extended states in the GaN barriers and confirm our assumption by a simple rate-equation model.

  11. Local structural distortion and electronic modifications in PrNiO3 across the metal-insulator transition

    SciTech Connect

    Piamonteze, C.; Tolentino, H.C.N.; Ramos, A.Y.; Massa, N. E.; Alonso, J.A.; Martinez-Lope, M.J.; Casais, M.T.

    2003-01-24

    Local electronic and structural properties of PrNiO3 perovskite were studied by means of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at Ni K and L edges. The EXAFS results at Ni K edge show a structural transition from three different Ni-O bond-lengths at the insulating phase to two Ni-O bond-lengths above TMI. These results were interpreted as being due to a transition from a structure with two different Ni sites at the insulating phase to one distorted Ni site at the metallic phase. The Ni L edge spectra show a remarkable difference between the spectra measured at the insulating and metallic phases that indicates a decreasing degree of hybridization between Ni3d and O2p bands from the metallic to the insulating phase.

  12. A Novel Pre-Processing Technique for Original Feature Matrix of Electronic Nose Based on Supervised Locality Preserving Projections

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Pengfei; Huang, Tailai; Wang, Li; Duan, Shukai; Yan, Jia; Wang, Lidan

    2016-01-01

    An electronic nose (E-nose) consisting of 14 metal oxide gas sensors and one electronic chemical gas sensor has been constructed to identify four different classes of wound infection. However, the classification results of the E-nose are not ideal if the original feature matrix containing the maximum steady-state response value of sensors is processed by the classifier directly, so a novel pre-processing technique based on supervised locality preserving projections (SLPP) is proposed in this paper to process the original feature matrix before it is put into the classifier to improve the performance of the E-nose. SLPP is good at finding and keeping the nonlinear structure of data; furthermore, it can provide an explicit mapping expression which is unreachable by the traditional manifold learning methods. Additionally, some effective optimization methods are found by us to optimize the parameters of SLPP and the classifier. Experimental results prove that the classification accuracy of support vector machine (SVM combined with the data pre-processed by SLPP outperforms other considered methods. All results make it clear that SLPP has a better performance in processing the original feature matrix of the E-nose. PMID:27376295

  13. Local Pathways in Coherent Electron Transport through Iron Porphyrin Complexes: A Challenge for First-Principles Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, C.; Solomon, G.C.; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-12-09

    We investigate the coherent electron transport properties of a selection of iron porphyrin complexes in their low-spin and high-spin states, binding the system to metallic electrodes with three different substitution patterns. We use a study of the local transmission through the complexes and their molecular orbitals to show the role of the various components of the molecular structure in mediating electron transport. While there are energies where the metal center and the axial ligands participate in transport, in the off-resonant energy range, these components simply form a scaffold, and the transport is dominated by transmission through the porphyrin macrocyle alone. This is still true when going from the low-spin to the high-spin state, except that now, an additional iron-centered MO contributes to transport in the formerly off-resonant region. It is found that while the choice of the exchange-correlation functional can strongly influence the quantitative results, our qualitative conclusions hold irrespective of the functional employed.

  14. Interplay of electron correlations and localization in disordered β-tantalum films: Evidence from dc transport and spectroscopic ellipsometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Chvostova, D.; Dejneka, A.; Bagdinov, A. V.; Petrova, M. G.; Demikhov, E. I.; Pudonin, F. A.

    2015-02-02

    We report the dc transport (5 K ≲ T ≲ 380 K) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV ≤ hν ≤ 8.5 eV, T ≃ 300 K) study of β-Ta films prepared by rf sputtering deposition as a function of their thickness in the range 2.5 nm ≲ d ≲ 200 nm. The dc transport of the β-Ta films with a thickness d ≳ 25 nm is characterized by negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) caused by localization effects peculiar of highly disordered metals. Their dielectric function spectra display non-metallic-like behavior due to the presence of the pronounced band at 2 eV. We found that with increasing TCR absolute value, specifying elevated degree disorder, the optical spectral weight (SW) of free charge carriers decreases. The associated SW is recovered in the range of Mott-Hubbard transitions, indicating the mechanism of localization enhancement by electronic correlations in disordered metals.

  15. The influence of time-dependent electric and magnetic fields on the dynamic localization of lattice electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, E.; Micu, C.; Aur, L.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we deal with the derivation of dynamic localization conditions for electrons on the one-dimensional (1D) lattice under the influence of ac electric and magnetic fields of the same frequency. We resort, for convenience, to a tight-binding single-band Hamiltonian. Our emphasis is on a more fundamental theoretical understanding by investigating interplays between such fields and the nearest-neighbor hopping interactions characterizing the Hamiltonian. In general, such conditions get expressed in terms of infinite sums of binary products of Bessel functions of the first kind. These sums are hardly tractable, but we found that selecting in a suitable manner the phases of time-dependent modulations leads to controllable frequency-mixing effects providing appreciable simplifications. Such mixings concern competitions between the number of flux quanta and the quotients of field amplitudes and field frequencies. More exactly, tuning one of the mixed frequencies to zero opens the way to establishing the simplified dynamic localization conditions. By resorting again to the zeros of the Bessel function of zeroth order. This results in quickly tractable relationships between the amplitudes of electric and magnetic fields, the field frequency, and the zeros referred to just above. Pure field limits and superpositions between uniform electric and time-dependent magnetic fields are also discussed. Comments concerning the role of disorder and of the Coulomb interaction are also made.

  16. The effects of transient, localized electric fields on equatorial electron acceleration and transport towards the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielse, C. E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.; Turner, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Motivated by recent observations of intense electric fields and elevated energetic particle fluxes within flow bursts beyond geosynchronous altitude [Runov et al., 2009; 2011], we apply modeling of particle guiding centers in prescribed but realistic electric fields to improve our understanding of energetic particle acceleration and transport towards the inner magnetosphere through model-data comparisons. Representing the vortical nature of an earthward traveling flow burst, a localized, westward-directed transient electric field flanked on either side by eastward fields related to tailward flow is superimposed on a nominal steady-state electric field. We simulate particle spectra observed at multiple THEMIS spacecraft located throughout the magnetotail and fit the modeled spectra to observations, thus constraining properties of the electric field model. We find that a simple potential electric field model is capable of explaining the presence and spectral properties of both geosynchronous altitude and "trans-geosynchronous" injections at L-shells greater than 6.6 RE in a manner consistent with the injections' observed inward penetration. In particular, despite the neglect of the magnetic field changes imparted by dipolarization and the inductive electric field associated with them, we demonstrate how the model adequately describes the physics of both dispersed injections and depletions ("dips") in energy flux in terms of convective fields associated with earthward flow channels and their return flow. We find that the westward electric field associated with flow bursts accelerates electrons as they grad-B drift dawnward across the flow channel, and that this electric field alters the Alfvén layers locally such that particles injected by the flow can populate the inner magnetosphere by penetrating deeper than they could under nominal fields. Meanwhile, the return (tailward) flow at the flanks of the flow burst is responsible for the dip in eflux often observed

  17. Understanding Local and Macroscopic Electron Mobilities in the Fullerene Network of Conjugated Polymer-based Solar Cells. Time-Resolved Microwave Conductivity and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Jordan C.; Arntsen, Christopher D.; Hernandez, Samuel; Huber, Rachel; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Halim, Merissa; Kilbride, Daniel; Rubin, Yves; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kopidakis, Nikos; Schwartz, Benjamin J.; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-09-23

    The efficiency of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaics is sensitive to the morphology of the fullerene network that transports electrons through the device. This sensitivity makes it difficult to distinguish the contrasting roles of local electron mobility (how easily electrons can transfer between neighboring fullerene molecules) and macroscopic electron mobility (how well-connected is the fullerene network on device length scales) in solar cell performance. In this work, a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, flash-photolysis time-resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) experiments, and space-charge-limit current (SCLC) mobility estimates are used to examine the roles of local and macroscopic electron mobility in conjugated polymer/fullerene BHJ photovoltaics. The local mobility of different pentaaryl fullerene derivatives (so-called ‘shuttlecock’ molecules) is similar, so that differences in solar cell efficiency and SCLC mobilities result directly from the different propensities of these molecules to self-assemble on macroscopic length scales. These experiments and calculations also demonstrate that the local mobility of phenyl-C60 butyl methyl ester (PCBM) is an order of magnitude higher than that of other fullerene derivatives, explaining why PCBM has been the acceptor of choice for conjugated polymer BHJ devices even though it does not form an optimal macroscopic network. The DFT calculations indicate that PCBM's superior local mobility comes from the near-spherical nature of its molecular orbitals, which allow strong electronic coupling between adjacent molecules. In combination, DFT and TRMC techniques provide a tool for screening new fullerene derivatives for good local mobility when designing new molecules that can improve on the macroscopic electron mobility offered by PCBM.

  18. Cloning and characterization of rabbit POU5F1, SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC and NANOG pluripotency-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Táncos, Zsuzsanna; Bock, István; Nemes, Csilla; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2015-07-25

    While the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is an important research model for aspects of human development and disease that cannot be studied in rodents, the lack of data on the genetic regulation of rabbit preimplantation development is a limitation. To assist in the understanding of this process, our aim was to isolate and characterize genes necessary for the induction and maintenance of cellular pluripotency. We are the first to report the isolation of complete coding regions of rabbit SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC and NANOG, which encode transcription factors that play crucial regulatory roles during early mammalian embryonic development. We determined the exon-intron boundaries and chromosomal localization of these genes using computational analysis. The sequences of mRNA and translated protein of the newly identified genes and those of POU5F1 were aligned to their mammalian orthologs to determine the degree of evolutionary conservation. Furthermore, the expression of these genes in embryonic and adult cells was studied at the mRNA and protein levels. We found the sequences and the expression pattern of these pluripotency-associated genes to be highly conserved between human and rabbit, indicating that the rabbit would be a valuable model for human preimplantation development. Implementing the newly identified genes either as biomarkers or as reprogramming factors might also pave the way towards the creation of stable pluripotent rabbit cell lines. PMID:25895477

  19. A triphenylamine-grafted imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline ruthenium(II) complex: acid-base and photoelectric properties.

    PubMed

    Fan, Su-Hua; Zhang, An-Guo; Ju, Chuan-Chuan; Gao, Li-Hua; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2010-04-19

    A new heteroleptic ruthenium(II) complex of [Ru(Hipdpa)(Hdcbpy)(NCS)(2)](-).0.5H(+).0.5[N(C(4)H(9))(4)](+) Ru(Hipdpa) {where Hdcbpy = monodeprotonated 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine and Hipdpa = 4-(1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolin-2-yl)-N,N-diphenylaniline} was synthesized and characterized by elementary analysis, standard spectroscopy techniques, and cyclic voltammetry. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of Ru(Hipdpa) were studied by means of UV-vis absorption spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric titrations in 4:1(v/v) Britton-Robinson/dimethylformamide buffer solution. The four-step separate protonation/deprotonation processes were found in the ground states, and one of which taking place near the physiological pH range. The two observable excited-state protonation/deprotonation processes were found for the Ru(Hipdpa), constituting pH-induced "off-on-off" emission switches. The performance of the complexes as photosensitizers in nanocrystalline TiO(2)-based liquid solar cells containing an electrolyte solution (0.05 M I(2), 0.5 M LiI, and 0.5 M 4-tert-butylpyridine in 50% acetonitrile and 50% propylene carbonate) was investigated and found to achieve a much improved device performance (a short-circuit photocurrent density of 18.7 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit voltage of 630 mV, and an overall conversion efficiency of 6.85%) compared to a triphenylamine-free parent complex [Ru(Hpip)(Hdcbpy)(NCS)(2)](-).[N(C(4)H(9))(4)](+)-based device {Hpip = 2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} and a comparable performance to that of cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid)ruthenium(II) (N3) under identical experimental conditions. A density functional theory calculation of the molecular structures and electronic properties of the complexes was also carried out in an effort to understand their effectiveness in TiO(2)-based solar cells.

  20. Local variations of HER2 dimerization in breast cancer cells discovered by correlative fluorescence and liquid electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peckys, Diana B.; Korf, Ulrike; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The formation of HER2 homodimers plays an important role in breast cancer aggressiveness and progression; however, little is known about its localization. We have studied the intra- and intercellular variation of HER2 at the single-molecule level in intact SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Whole cells were visualized in hydrated state with correlative fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The locations of individual HER2 receptors were detected using an anti-HER2 affibody in combination with a quantum dot (QD), a fluorescent nanoparticle. Fluorescence microscopy revealed considerable differences of HER2 membrane expression between individual cells and between different membrane regions of the same cell (that is, membrane ruffles and flat areas). Subsequent ESEM of the corresponding cellular regions provided images of individually labeled HER2 receptors. The high spatial resolution of 3 nm and the close proximity between the QD and the receptor allowed quantifying the stoichiometry of HER2 complexes, distinguishing between monomers, dimers, and higher-order clusters. Downstream data analysis based on calculating the pair correlation function from receptor positions showed that cellular regions exhibiting membrane ruffles contained a substantial fraction of HER2 in homodimeric state. Larger-order clusters were also present. Membrane areas with homogeneous membrane topography, on the contrary, displayed HER2 in random distribution. Second, HER2 homodimers appeared to be absent from a small subpopulation of cells exhibiting a flat membrane topography, possibly resting cells. Local differences in homodimer presence may point toward functional differences with possible relevance for studying metastasis and drug response. PMID:26601217

  1. Local variations of HER2 dimerization in breast cancer cells discovered by correlative fluorescence and liquid electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Korf, Ulrike; de Jonge, Niels

    2015-07-01

    The formation of HER2 homodimers plays an important role in breast cancer aggressiveness and progression; however, little is known about its localization. We have studied the intra- and intercellular variation of HER2 at the single-molecule level in intact SKBR3 breast cancer cells. Whole cells were visualized in hydrated state with correlative fluorescence microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The locations of individual HER2 receptors were detected using an anti-HER2 affibody in combination with a quantum dot (QD), a fluorescent nanoparticle. Fluorescence microscopy revealed considerable differences of HER2 membrane expression between individual cells and between different membrane regions of the same cell (that is, membrane ruffles and flat areas). Subsequent ESEM of the corresponding cellular regions provided images of individually labeled HER2 receptors. The high spatial resolution of 3 nm and the close proximity between the QD and the receptor allowed quantifying the stoichiometry of HER2 complexes, distinguishing between monomers, dimers, and higher-order clusters. Downstream data analysis based on calculating the pair correlation function from receptor positions showed that cellular regions exhibiting membrane ruffles contained a substantial fraction of HER2 in homodimeric state. Larger-order clusters were also present. Membrane areas with homogeneous membrane topography, on the contrary, displayed HER2 in random distribution. Second, HER2 homodimers appeared to be absent from a small subpopulation of cells exhibiting a flat membrane topography, possibly resting cells. Local differences in homodimer presence may point toward functional differences with possible relevance for studying metastasis and drug response.

  2. Control of Electron Excitation and Localization in the Dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} and Its Isotopes Using Two Sequential Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    He Feng; Ruiz, Camilo; Becker, Andreas

    2007-08-24

    We study the control of dissociation of the hydrogen molecular ion and its isotopes exposed to two ultrashort laser pulses by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. While the first ultraviolet pulse is used to excite the electron wave packet on the dissociative 2p{sigma}{sub u} state, a second time-delayed near-infrared pulse steers the electron between the nuclei. Our results show that by adjusting the time delay between the pulses and the carrier-envelope phase of the near-infrared pulse, a high degree of control over the electron localization on one of the dissociating nuclei can be achieved (in about 85% of all fragmentation events). The results demonstrate that current (sub-)femtosecond technology can provide a control over both electron excitation and localization in the fragmentation of molecules.

  3. 26 CFR 5f.168(f)(8)-1 - Questions and answers concerning transitional rules and related matters regarding certain safe...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX EQUITY AND FISCAL RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.168(f)(8)-1... certain safe harbor leases under section 208(d) of the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act of...

  4. [Theoretical Investigation of the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Parameters and Local Structures for Zinc Phosphate Glass Doped with VO2+].

    PubMed

    Li, Chao-ying; Yuang, Xian-Kai; Tu, Qiu; Wang, Wei-yang; Zheng, Xue-mei

    2015-07-01

    As an important model system, 3d(1) ions (VO2+, V4+ et al) have been extensively investigated by means of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and many experimental results of EPR parameters were also measured. The optical absorption and EPR parameters (g factors g||, g⊥ and hyperfine structure constants A||, A⊥) of a tetragonal V4+ center in zinc phosphate glass are theoretically investigated, using the perturbation formulas for a 3d(1) ion in tetragonally compressed octahedra. Since the spin-orbit coupling parameter r (150 cm(-1)) of ligand O2- is close to that ξp(0) (≈248 cm(-1)) of the central 3d(1) ion in zinc phosphate glass doped VO2+, the effect of the spin-orbit coupling parameter ξp(0) on the EPR spectra and optical absorption spectra should be taken into account. In this work, the relationship between the EPR parameters as well as the optical absorption spectra and the local structure of the impurity center are established based on the superposition model. By fitting the calculated EPR parameters and optical absorption spectra for V4+ center in zinc phosphate glass to the experimental data, the local structure parameters of [VO6](8-) cluster are obtained. According to the investigation, the magnitudes of the metal-ligand distances parallel and perpendicular to the C4-axis of [VO6](8-) cluster are, respectively, R|| ≈ 0.175 nm and R⊥ ≈ 0.197 nm, the local structure around the V4+ ions possesses a compressed tetragonal distortion along C4 axis. Theoretical results of EPR parameters and optical absorption spectra are in good agreement with experimental data, the validity of the calculated results has also been discussed. Thus, perturbation method is effective to the studies the EPR parameters and optical spectra of transition-metal 3d ions in crystals. In addition, based on the studies of the hyperfine structure constants (All and A1), one can found that the large value of kappa indicates a large contribution to the hyperfine constant by the

  5. Effect of high-pressure annealing on the normal-state transport of LaO0.5F0.5BiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallecchi, I.; Lamura, G.; Putti, M.; Kajitani, J.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Miura, O.; Demura, S.; Deguchi, K.; Takano, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We study normal state electrical, thermoelectrical, and thermal transport in polycrystalline BiS2-based compounds, which become superconducting by F doping on the O site. In particular, we explore undoped LaOBiS2 and doped LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 samples, prepared either with or without high-pressure annealing, in order to evidence the roles of doping and preparation conditions. The high-pressure annealed sample exhibits room temperature values of resistivity ρ around 5 mΩcm, Seebeck coefficient S around -20μV /K, and thermal conductivity κ around 1.5 W/Km, while the Hall resistance RH is negative at all temperatures and its value is -10-8 m3/C at low temperature. The sample prepared at ambient pressure exhibits RH positive in sign and five times larger in magnitude, and S negative in sign and slightly smaller in magnitude. These results reveal a complex multiband evolution brought about by high-pressure annealing. In particular, the sign inversion and magnitude suppression of RH, indicating increased electron-type carrier density in the high-pressure sample, may be closely related to previous findings about change in lattice parameters and enhancement of superconducting Tc by high-pressure annealing. As for the undoped sample, it exhibits 10 times larger resistivity, 10 times larger |S|, and 10 times larger |RH| than its doped counterpart, consistent with its insulating nature. Our results point out the dramatic effect of preparation conditions in affecting charge carrier density as well as structural, band, and electronic parameters in these systems.

  6. Ground-state Electronic Structure of Actinide Monocarbides and Mononitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually increasing degree of f electron localization from U to Cm, with the tendency toward localization being slightly stronger in the (more ionic) nitrides compared to the (more covalent) carbides. The itinerant band picture is found to be adequate for UC and acceptable for UN, while a more complex manifold of competing localized and delocalized f-electron configurations underlies the ground states of NpC, PuC, AmC, NpN, and PuN. The fully localized 5f-electron configuration is realized in CmC (f{sup 7}), CmN (f{sup 7}), and AmN (f{sup 6}). The observed sudden increase in lattice parameter from PuN to AmN is found to be related to the localization transition. The calculated valence electron densities of states are in good agreement with photoemission data.

  7. pH, redox potential and local biofilm potential microenvironments within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms and their roles in electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-10-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the microelectrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm.

  8. pH, Redox Potential and Local Biofilm Potential Microenvironments Within Geobacter sulfurreducens Biofilms and Their Roles in Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D.; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the micro-electrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. PMID:22549331

  9. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    PubMed Central

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models. PMID:27246145

  10. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of the electronic local density of states of graphite surfaces near monoatomic step edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Y.; Matsui, T.; Kambara, H.; Tagami, K.; Tsukada, M.; Fukuyama, Hiroshi

    2006-02-01

    We measured the electronic local density of states (LDOS) of graphite surfaces near monoatomic step edges, which consist of either the zigzag or armchair edge, with the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) techniques. The STM data reveal that the (3×3)R30° and honeycomb superstructures coexist over a length scale of 3-4nm from both the edges. By comparing with density-functional derived nonorthogonal tight-binding calculations, we show that the coexistence is due to a slight admixing of the two types of edges at the graphite surfaces. In the STS measurements, a clear peak in the LDOS at negative bias voltages from -100 to -20mV was observed near the zigzag edges, while such a peak was not observed near the armchair edges. We concluded that this peak corresponds to the graphite “edge state” theoretically predicted by Fujita [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 65, 1920 (1996)] with a tight-binding model for graphene ribbons. The existence of the edge state only at the zigzag type edge was also confirmed by our first-principles calculations with different edge terminations.

  11. A scanning electron-microscopic study of the local degeneration of cilia during sexual reproduction in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T

    1978-08-01

    The location and extent of local degeneration of cilia during sexual reproduction of Paramecium was studied using scanning electron microscopy to examine cells undergoing conjugation and autogamy. At some time during the mating reaction, but prior to conjugant pair formation, ciliary degeneration begins at the antero-ventral tip of cells and proceeds posteriorly along the suture. In the anterior part of the cell, degeneration occurs on both sides of the suture, but in the posterior part it is restricted to the right side of the suture. In 5 species of Paramecium examined, degeneration occurred in nearly the same region. No degeneration of cilia is observed in natural autogamy of P. tetraurelia, whereas in chemically induced autogamy of P. caudatum degeneration occurs as in ordinary conjugation. Conjugant pairs never expose any deciliated cell surface except at the postero-ventral tip. The maximum extent of ciliary degeneration is best seen in the chemically induced autogamous cells: 7 kinetics (rows of unit teritories) at the anterior-left, 4 kinetics at the anterior-right, 10 or more kinetics at the posterior-right and the right wall of the vestibule of the mouth. Before complete disappearance of the cilia, many short cilia are observed. This suggests that ciliary degeneration is due to resorption. Degeneration extends more rapidly in cells with stronger mating reactivity. The relations between mating reactivity, ciliary degeneration and nuclear activation are discussed. PMID:701405

  12. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models.

  13. Probing local and electronic structure in Warm Dense Matter: single pulse synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy on shocked Fe.

    PubMed

    Torchio, Raffaella; Occelli, Florent; Mathon, Olivier; Sollier, Arnaud; Lescoute, Emilien; Videau, Laurent; Vinci, Tommaso; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Headspith, Jon; Helsby, William; Bland, Simon; Eakins, Daniel; Chapman, David; Pascarelli, Sakura; Loubeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Understanding Warm Dense Matter (WDM), the state of planetary interiors, is a new frontier in scientific research. There exists very little experimental data probing WDM states at the atomic level to test current models and those performed up to now are limited in quality. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experiment that makes microscopic investigations of materials under dynamic compression easily accessible to users and with data quality close to that achievable at ambient. Using a single 100 ps synchrotron x-ray pulse, we have measured, by K-edge absorption spectroscopy, ns-lived equilibrium states of WDM Fe. Structural and electronic changes in Fe are clearly observed for the first time at such extreme conditions. The amplitude of the EXAFS oscillations persists up to 500 GPa and 17000 K, suggesting an enduring local order. Moreover, a discrepancy exists with respect to theoretical calculations in the value of the energy shift of the absorption onset and so this comparison should help to refine the approximations used in models. PMID:27246145

  14. Orbital localization criterion as a complementary tool in the bonding analysis by means of electron localization function: study of the Si(n)(BH)(5-n)(2-) (n = 0-5) clusters.

    PubMed

    Oña, Ofelia B; Alcoba, Diego R; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Torres-Vega, Juan J; Tiznado, William

    2013-12-01

    A recently proposed molecular orbital localization procedure, based on the electron localization function (ELF) technique, has been used to describe chemical bonding in the cluster series Sin(BH)(5-n)(2-) (n = 0-5). The method combines the chemically intuitive information obtained from the traditional ELF analysis with the flexibility and generality of canonical molecular orbital theory. This procedure attempts to localize the molecular orbitals in regions that have the highest probability for finding a pair of electrons, providing a chemical bonding description according to the classical Lewis theory. The results confirm that conservation of the structures upon isoelectronic replacement of a B-H group by a Si atom, allowing evolution from B5H5(2-) to Si5(2-), is in total agreement with the preservation of the chemical bonding pattern. PMID:24229348

  15. The relations among Shannon information entropy, quantum discord, concurrence and localization properties of one-dimensional single-electron wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Longyan; Zheng, Yongcui; Wang, Haihong; Cheng, Weiwen; Zhao, Shengmei

    2014-09-01

    Shannon information entropy (SE), concurrence (CC), quantum discord (QD) and localization properties for various one-dimensional one-electron wave functions are intensively studied, respectively. They include Gaussian functions, power-law functions, and functions in the Anderson model and the Harper ones. For all these wave functions, we find that SE, CC and QD increase as the localization length of a wave function increases, respectively. There are linear or quadratic relationships between two of them. Therefore, we can confirm for the analyzed models that SE, CC and QD are statistically equivalent quantities to reflect the localization properties of wave functions though they are different measures of quantum information.

  16. [application of the analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques for detection, identification and visualization of localization of nanoparticles of titanium and cerium oxides in mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Shebanova, A S; Bogdanov, A G; Ismagulova, T T; Feofanov, A V; Semenyuk, P I; Muronets, V I; Erokhina, M V; Onishchenko, G E; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V

    2014-01-01

    This work represents the results of the study on applicability of the modern methods of analytical transmission electron microscopy for detection, identification and visualization of localization of nanoparticles of titanium and cerium oxides in A549 cell, human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. A comparative analysis of images of the nanoparticles in the cells obtained in the bright field mode of transmission electron microscopy, under dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron was performed. For identification of nanoparticles in the cells the analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, were compared when used in the mode of obtaining energy spectrum from different particles and element mapping. It was shown that the method for electron tomography is applicable to confirm that nanoparticles are localized in the sample but not coated by contamination. The possibilities and fields of utilizing different techniques for analytical transmission electron microscopy for detection, visualization and identification of nanoparticles in the biological samples are discussed.

  17. Localization properties of electronic states in a polaron model of poly(dG)-poly(dC) and poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA polymers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Starikov, E B; Hennig, D; Archilla, J F R

    2005-06-01

    We numerically investigate localization properties of electronic states in a static model of poly(dG)-poly(dC) and poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA polymers with realistic parameters obtained by quantum-chemical calculation. The randomness in the on-site energies caused by the electron-phonon coupling is completely correlated to the off-diagonal parts. In the single electron model, the effect of the hydrogen-bond stretchings, the twist angles between the base pairs and the finite system size effects on the energy dependence of the localization length and on the Lyapunov exponent are given. The localization length is reduced by the influence of the fluctuations in the hydrogen bond stretchings. It is also shown that the helical twist angle affects the localization length in the poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA polymer more strongly than in the poly(dA)-poly(dT) one. Furthermore, we show resonance structures in the energy dependence of the localization length when the system size is relatively small. PMID:15906117

  18. New Theoretical Developments in Exploring Electronically Excited States: Including Localized Configuration Interaction Singles and Application to Large Helium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closser, Kristina Danielle

    This thesis presents new developments in excited state electronic structure theory. Contrasted with the ground state, the electronically excited states of atoms and molecules often are unstable and have short lifetimes, exhibit a greater diversity of character and are generally less well understood. The very unusual excited states of helium clusters motivated much of this work. These clusters consist of large numbers of atoms (experimentally 103--109 atoms) and bands of nearly degenerate excited states. For an isolated atom the lowest energy excitation energies are from 1s → 2s and 1s → 2 p transitions, and in clusters describing the lowest energy band minimally requires four states per atom. In the ground state the clusters are weakly bound by van der Waals interactions, however in the excited state they can form well-defined covalent bonds. The computational cost of quantum chemical calculations rapidly becomes prohibitive as the size of the systems increase. Standard excited-state methods such as configuration interaction singles (CIS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) can be used with ≈100 atoms, and are optimized to treat only a few states. Thus, one of our primary aims is to develop a method which can treat these large systems with large numbers of nearly degenerate excited states. Additionally, excited states are generally formed far from their equilibrium structures. Vertical excitations from the ground state induce dynamics in the excited states. Thus, another focus of this work is to explore the results of these forces and the fate of the excited states. Very little was known about helium cluster excited states when this work began, thus we first investigated the excitations in small helium clusters consisting of 7 or 25 atoms using CIS. The character of these excited states was determined using attachment/detachment density analysis and we found that in the n = 2 manifold the excitations could generally be interpreted as

  19. Expression analysis of Cdx2 and Pou5f1 in a marsupial, the stripe-faced dunnart, during early development.

    PubMed

    Familari, Mary; Au, Phil Chi Khang; de Iongh, Robb U; Cruz, Yolanda; Selwood, Lynne

    2016-02-01

    The first lineage allocation during mouse development forms the trophectoderm and inner cell mass, in which Cdx2 and Pou5f1 display reciprocal expression. Yet Cdx2 is not required for trophectoderm specification in other mammals, such as the human, cow, pig, or in two marsupials, the tammar and opossum. The role of Cdx2 and Pou5f1 in the first lineage allocation of Sminthopsis macroura, the stripe-faced dunnart, is unknown. In this study, expression of Cdx2 and Pou5f1 during oogenesis, development from cleavage to blastocyst stages, and in the allocation of the first three lineages was analyzed for this dunnart. Cdx2 mRNA was present in late antral-stage oocytes, but not present again until Day 5.5. Pou5f1 mRNA was present from primary follicles to zygotes, and then expression resumed starting at the early unilaminar blastocyst stage. All cleavage stages and the pluriblast and trophoblast cells co-expressed CDX2 and POU5F1 proteins, which persisted until early stages of hypoblast formation. Hypoblast cells also show co-localisation of POU5F1 and CDX2 once they were allocated, and this persisted during their division and migration. Our studies suggest that CDX2, and possibly POU5F1, are maternal proteins, and that the first lineage to differentiate is the trophoblast, which differentiates to trophectoderm after shell loss one day before implantation. In the stripe-faced dunnart, cleavage cells, as well as trophoblast and pluriblast cells, are polarized, suggesting the continued presence of CDX2 in both lineages until late blastocyst stages may play a role in the formation and maintenance of polarity. PMID:26613191

  20. Chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35-mediated APE1 siRNA enhances sensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells to radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiang, D-B; Chen, Z-T; Wang, D; Li, M-X; Xie, J-Y; Zhang, Y-S; Qing, Y; Li, Z-P; Xie, J

    2008-10-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), a bifunctional AP endonuclease/redox factor, is important in DNA repair and redox signaling, may be associated with radioresistance. Here we investigate whether targeted inhibition of APE1 can sensitize tumor cells to irradiation in vitro and in vivo. We first constructed chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 carrying human APE1 siRNA (Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA). The infectivity of chimeric Ad5/F35 to LOVO colon cancer cells was greater than that of Ad5. APE1 was strongly expressed and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), a downstream molecule of APE1, known as a radioresistance factor, was constitutively active in LOVO cells. Infection of LOVO cells with Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of APE1 protein and AP endonuclease activity in vitro. Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA significantly enhanced sensitivity of LOVO cells to irradiation in clonogenic survival assays, associated with increased cell apoptosis. The APE1 expression in LOVO cells was induced by irradiation in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied with the enhancement of DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB and Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA effectively inhibited constitutive and irradiation-induced APE1 expression and NF-kappaB activation. In a subcutaneous nude mouse colon cancer model, Ad5/F35-APE1 siRNA (5 x 10(8) IU, intratumoral injection) inhibited the expression of APE1 protein in LOVO xenografts, and significantly enhanced inhibition of tumor growth by irradiation. In conclusion, APE1 may be involved as one of the radioresistance factors, and targeted inhibition of APE1 shows an effective means of enhancing tumor sensitivity to radiotherapy.

  1. Electronic transitions, crystal field effects and phonons in UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenes, J.

    1980-08-01

    An extensive optical study of the 5f magnetic semiconductor UO 2 is presented. The experimental data include near normal incidence reflectivity measurements from 0.0025 to 13 eV, absorption and Faraday rotation measurements as function of temperature and of magnetic fields up to 100 kOe and photoemission results. From the data in the fundamental absorption region an energy level scheme is derived. This level scheme differs markedly from an earlier model but it is quantitatively supported by a calculation using the thermochemical Haber-Born process and also by cluster calculations. The localized nature of the 5f electrons is demonstrated. The absorption edge at 2 eV shows an abrupt shift to lower energies at the first order phase transition of UO 2 to the antiferromagnetic state. This shift is shown to be larger than expected from the lattice contraction indicating a magnetic order induced contribution to the total red shift. Below the absorption edge, intra-5f transitions and multiphonon excitations are reported, showing striking order induced effects at and below TN = 30.8 K. New results are presented for ε st, ε opt, ω TO and ω LO which fulfill the Lyddane-Sachs-Teller relation.

  2. Localization and chemical forms of cadmium in plant samples by combining analytical electron microscopy and X-ray spectromicroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Fayard, Barbara; Sarret, Géraldine; Pairis, Sébastien; Bourguignon, Jacques

    2006-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a metal of high toxicity for plants. Resolving its distribution and speciation in plants is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance, trafficking and accumulation. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was exposed to cadmium under controlled conditions. Elemental distributions in the roots and in the leaves were determined using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX), and synchrotron-based micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), which offers a better sensitivity. The chemical form(s) of cadmium was investigated using Cd L III-edge (3538 eV) micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy. Plant μ-XANES spectra were fitted by linear combination of Cd reference spectra. Biological sample preparation and conditioning is a critical point because of possible artifacts. In this work we compared freeze-dried samples analyzed at ambient temperature and frozen hydrated samples analyzed at -170 °C. Our results suggest that in the roots Cd is localized in vascular bundles, and coordinated to S ligands. In the leaves, trichomes (epidermal hairs) represent the main compartment of Cd accumulation. In these specialized cells, μ-XANES results show that the majority of Cd is bound to O/N ligands likely provided by the cell wall, and a minor fraction could be bound to S-containing ligands. No significant difference in Cd speciation was observed between freeze-dried and frozen hydrated samples. This work illustrates the interest and the sensitivity of Cd L III-edge XANES spectroscopy, which is applied here for the first time to plant samples. Combining μ-XRF and Cd L III-edge μ-XANES spectroscopy offers promising tools to study Cd storage and trafficking mechanisms in plants and other biological samples.

  3. Electronic Health Records and Meaningful Use in Local Health Departments: Updates From the 2015 NACCHO Informatics Assessment Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gulzar H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electronic health records (EHRs) are evolving the scope of operations, practices, and outcomes of population health in the United States. Local health departments (LHDs) need adequate health informatics capacities to handle the quantity and quality of population health data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to gain an updated view using the most recent data to identify the primary storage of clinical data, status of data for meaningful use, and characteristics associated with the implementation of EHRs in LHDs. Methods: Data were drawn from the 2015 Informatics Capacity and Needs Assessment Survey, which used a stratified random sampling design of LHD populations. Oversampling of larger LHDs was conducted and sampling weights were applied. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression in SPSS. Results: Forty-two percent of LHDs indicated the use of an EHR system compared with 58% that use a non-EHR system for the storage of primary health data. Seventy-one percent of LHDs had reviewed some or all of the current systems to determine whether they needed to be improved or replaced, whereas only 6% formally conducted a readiness assessment for health information exchange. Twenty-seven percent of the LHDs had conducted informatics training within the past 12 months. LHD characteristics statistically associated with having an EHR system were having state or centralized governance, not having created a strategic plan related to informatics within the past 2 years throughout LHDs, provided informatics training in the past 12 months, and various levels of control over decisions regarding hardware allocation or acquisition, software selection, software support, and information technology budget allocation. Conclusion: A focus on EHR implementation in public health is pertinent to examining the impact of public health programming and interventions for the positive change in population health. PMID:27684614

  4. Noncontact dipole effects on channel permeation. IV. Kinetic model of 5F-Trp(13) gramicidin A currents.

    PubMed

    Thompson, N; Thompson, G; Cole, C D; Cotten, M; Cross, T A; Busath, D D

    2001-09-01

    Nonlinear least squares fitting was used to assign rate constants for the three-barrier, two-site, double-occupancy, single-filing kinetic model for previously reported current-voltage relations of (5F-Indole)Trp(13) gramicidin A and gramicidin A channels (, 75:2830-2844). By judicious coupling of parameters, it was possible to reduce the parameter space from 64 parameters to 24, and a reasonable fit consistent with other experimental data was obtained. The main features of the fit were that fluorination increased the rate constant for translocation by a factor of 2.33, consistent with a free energy change in the translocation barrier of -0.50 kcal/mol, and increased first-ion binding affinity by a factor of 1.13, primarily by decreasing the first-ion exit rate constant. The translocation rate constant was 5.62 times slower in diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) bilayers than in monoolein (GMO) bilayers (coupled for the four combinations of peptide and salt), suggesting a 44.2-mV difference in the projection of the interfacial dipole into the channel. Thus fluorination caused increased currents in DPhPC bilayers, where a high interfacial dipole potential makes translocation more rate limiting because the translocation barrier was reduced, and decreased currents in GMO bilayers, where ion exit or entry is rate limiting because these barriers were increased.

  5. Stabilization of Tetravalent 4f (Ce), 5d (Hf), or 5f (Th, U) Clusters by the [α-SiW9O34](10-) Polyoxometalate.

    PubMed

    Duval, Sylvain; Béghin, Sébastien; Falaise, Clément; Trivelli, Xavier; Rabu, Pierre; Loiseau, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    The reaction of Na10[α-SiW9O34] with tetravalent metallic cations such as 4f ((NH4)2Ce(NO3)6), 5d (HfCl4), or 5f (UCl4 and Th(NO3)4) in a pH 4.7 sodium acetate buffer solution leads to the formation of four sandwich-type polyoxometalates [Ce4(μ(3)-O)2(SiW9O34)2(CH3COO)2](10-) (1), [U4(μ(3)-O)2(SiW9O34)2(CH3COO)2](10-) (2), [Th3(μ(3)-O)(μ(2)-OH)3(SiW9O34)2](13-) (3), and [Hf3(μ(2)-OH)3(SiW9O34)2](11-) (4). All four compounds consist of a polynuclear cluster fragment stabilized by two [α-SiW9O34](10-) polyanions. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural with a tetranuclear core (Ce4, U4), while compound 3 presents a trinuclear Th3 core bearing a μ(3)-O-centered bridge. It is an unprecedented configuration in the case of the thorium(IV) cluster. Compound 4 also possesses a trinuclear Hf3 core but with the absence of the μ(3)-O bridge. The molecules have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, (183)W and (29)Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) analysis.

  6. Electronic Structures of Uranium Compounds Studied by Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of uranium-based compounds have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays has made it possible to directly observe their bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces. It has been shown that the band structures and Fermi surfaces of itinerant compounds such as UB2, UN, and UFeGa5 are quantitatively described by a band-structure calculation treating all U 5f electrons as itinerant. Furthermore, the overall electronic structures of heavy-fermion compounds such as UPd2Al3, UNi2Al3, and URu2Si2 are also explained by a band-structure calculation, although some disagreements exist, which might originate from the electron correlation effect. This suggests that the itinerant description of U 5f states is an appropriate starting point for the description of their electronic structures. The situation is similar for ferromagnetic superconductors such as UGe2, URhGe, UCoGe, and UIr, although the complications from their low-symmetry crystal structures make it more difficult to describe their detailed electronic structures. The local electronic structures of the uranium site have been probed by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays. The comparisons of core-level spectra of heavy-fermion compounds with typical itinerant and localized compounds suggest that the local electronic structures of most itinerant and heavy-fermion compounds are close to the U 5f3 configuration except for UPd2Al3 and UPt3. The core-level spectrum of UPd2Al3 has similarities to those of both itinerant and localized compounds, suggesting that it is located at the boundary between the itinerant and localized states. Moreover, the spectrum of UPt3 is very close to that of the localized compound UPd3, suggesting that it is nearly localized, although there are narrow quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of EF.

  7. Aloe-Emodin Protects RIN-5F (Pancreatic β-cell) Cell from Glucotoxicity via Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine and Downregulation of Bax and Caspase 3

    PubMed Central

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Subash-Babu, P.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the protective effect of aloe-emodin (AE) from high glucose induced toxicity in RIN-5F (pancreatic β-cell) cell and restoration of its function was analyzed. RIN-5F cells have been cultured in high glucose (25 mM glucose) condition, with and without AE treatment. RIN-5F cells cultured in high glucose decreased cell viability and increased ROS levels after 48 hr compared with standard medium (5.5 mM glucose). Glucotoxicity was confirmed by significantly increased ROS production, increased pro-inflammatory (IFN-γ, IL-1β,) & decreased anti-inflammatory (IL-6&IL-10) cytokine levels, increased DNA fragmentation. In addition, we found increased Bax, caspase 3, Fadd, and Fas and significantly reduced Bcl-2 expression after 48 hr. RIN-5F treated with both high glucose and AE (20 μM) decreased ROS generation and prevent RIN-5F cell from glucotoxicity. In addition, AE treated cells cultured in high glucose were transferred to standard medium, normal responsiveness to glucose was restored within 8hr and normal basal insulin release within 24 hr was achieved when compared to high glucose. PMID:26759701

  8. Evolution of Superconductivity in BiS2-Based Superconductor LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Takafumi; Kajitani, Joe; Omachi, Atsushi; Miura, Osuke; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu

    2015-02-01

    We have systematically investigated the crystal structure, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical resistivity of the BiS2-based superconductor LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2 (x = 0-0.7). With expanding lattice volume by Se substitution, bulk superconductivity was induced for x ≥ 0.2, and the highest Tc of 3.8 K was observed in x = 0.5 (LaO0.5F0.5BiSSe). Metallic conductivity was observed for x ≥ 0.3 in the resistivity measurement, whereas semiconducting-like behavior was observed for x ≤ 0.2. The induction of bulk superconductivity by the partial substitution of S by Se in the LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 superconductor should be positively linked to the enhancement of metallic conductivity.

  9. The effectiveness of the oncolytic activity induced by Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector is dependent on the cumulative cellular conditions of survival and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Y; Kang, Sujin; Song, Jae J; Kim, Joo-Hang

    2013-04-01

    To overcome the poor tumor transduction efficiency of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) observed in several types of cancer, the fiber region of Ad5, apart from its tail, was replaced by adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35). The chimeric Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector did not exhibit any significant enhancement of transduction efficiency. CD46, a receptor for Ad35, was expressed in relatively small amounts in most of the cancer cells examined. Therefore, we investigated the pivotal factor(s) that render cancer cells susceptible to transduction. We discovered that the tumor transduction efficiency of Ad5/F35 was enhanced in the presence of rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, in some cancer cells. Analysis of survival potential and cell proliferation rates revealed that Ad5/F35 exerted a more pronounced oncolytic effect in cancer cells with higher survival potential in the presence of rapamycin.

  10. A Local-Density Band Theory for the Fermi Surface of the Heavy-Electron Compound CeRu2Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagami, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Akira

    1993-02-01

    On the basis of the itinerant-electron model for the 4f electrons, the energy band structure and the Fermi surface are calculated for the metamagnetic heavy-electron compound CeRu2Si2 having the low-temperature electronic specific heat coefficient γ of 350 mJ/K2 mol. by a self-consistent symmetrized relativistic APW method with the exchange and correlation potential in a local-density approximation. The main Fermi surface consists of a large closed hole sheet and a complicated electron sheet like a jungle gym. The Fermi surface topology is consistent with the experimental result for the high-field magneto-resistance. By comparison with the electronic structure of LaRu2Si2, effects of the 4f bands on the Bloch states on the Fermi surface in CeRu2Si2 are investigated in detail. Strong evidences for existence of the electron sheet are found in available experimental de Haas-van Alphen frequencies. The enhancement factor for γ is estimated as 38.

  11. Nano-focused Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (nBIS) Determination of the Unoccupied Electronic Structure of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Butterfield, M; Teslich, N; Bliss, A; Chung, B; Gross, J; McMahan, A; Schwartz, A

    2006-12-20

    While chemically toxic and highly radioactive, Pu may be the most scientifically interesting element in the periodic table. It's properties include the following: six different phases, close to each other in energy and sensitive to variations of temperature, pressure and chemistry; the face-centered-cubic phase (delta) is the least dense; Pu expands when it solidifies from the melt; and it is clearly the nexus of the actinide binary phase diagrams of the actinides. In a sense, it is the boundary between the light (ostensibly delocalized 5f electrons) and heavy (ostensibly localized or correlated 5f electrons) actinide elements, but this is an over-simplification. The localized atomic 5f states are naturally correlated, but important regimes of correlated electron states are conceivable as extended states on the delocalized side of the possible Mott transition between conductive and insulating behavior. The proximity to this crossover may be the driving force behind all these exotic properties. Pu remains of immense scientific and technological importance and the advancement to a firm, scientific understanding of the electronic structure of Pu and its compounds, mixtures, alloys and solutions is a crucial issue. Moreover, while there are a number of ongoing experimental efforts directed at determining the occupied (valence band, below the Fermi Energy) electronic structure of Pu, there is essential no experimental data on the unoccupied (conduction band, above the Fermi Energy) electronic structure of Pu. Our objective is to determine the conduction band (unoccupied) electronic structure of Pu and other actinides (and possibly rare earths as well), in a phase specific fashion and emphasizing bulk contributions. This is world-class science directed at issue that is central to LLNL and DOE: Pu structure property relationships.

  12. Localization of Post-Translational Modifications in Peptide Mixtures via High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Followed by Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Matthew A.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-09-01

    Precise localization of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on proteins and peptides is an outstanding challenge in proteomics. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has dramatically advanced PTM analyses, mixtures of localization variants that commonly coexist in cells often require prior separation. Although differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) achieves broad variant resolution, the need for standards to identify the features has limited the utility of approach. Here we demonstrate full a priori characterization of variant mixtures by high-resolution FAIMS coupled to ETD and the procedures to systematically extract the FAIMS spectra for all variants from such data.

  13. Local electrical properties of n-AlInAs/i-GaInAs electron channel structures characterized by the probe-electron-beam-induced current technique.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Nokuo, Takeshi; Chen, Jun; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    We developed a probe-electron-beam-induced current (probe-EBIC) technique to investigate the electrical properties of n-Al(0.48)In(0.52)As/i-Ga(0.30)In(0.70)As electron channel structures for a high-electron-mobility transistor, grown on a lattice-matched InP substrate and lattice-mismatched GaAs (001) and Si (001) substrates. EBIC imaging of planar surfaces at low magnifications revealed misfit dislocations originating from the AlInAs-graded buffer layer. The cross-sections of GaInAs channel structures on an InP substrate were studied by high-magnification EBIC imaging as well as cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. EBIC imaging showed that the structure is nearly defect-free and the carrier depletion zone extends from the channel toward the i-AlInAs buffer layer.

  14. First observation of intra-5f fluorescence from an actinyl center: Np(VI) near-IR emission in Cs[sub 2]U(Np)O[sub 2]CI[sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, M. P.; Berg, J. M.; Dewey, H. J.; Hopkins, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    We have identified the first example of 5f-5f luminescence by an actinyl ion. NpO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup 2-} luminesces with reasonable intensity at both liquid nitrogen temperature, and more notably, it luminesces strongly at room temperature. Relaxation pathways from the second excited state is competitive with radiationless deactivation pathways to a large number of vibronic states accessible at room temperature. Excitation spectra show correlation with absorption spectra. We plan to investigate 5f-5f luminescence from other more complex (5f{sup n}, N > 1) actinyl molecular species.

  15. Anomalous Hall effect in ZnxFe3-xO4: Universal scaling law and electron localization below the Verwey transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrecy, N.; Hamieh, M.; Hebert, C.; Escudier, M.; Becerra, L.; Perriere, J.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the well-established universal scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx1.6 between anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities in the low conductivity regime (σxx < 104 Ω-1 cm-1) transforms into the scaling σxyAHE ˜ σxx2 at the onset of strong electron localization. The crossover between the two relations is observed in magnetite-derived ZnxFe3-xO4 thin films where an insulating/hopping regime follows a bad metal/hopping regime below the Verwey transition temperature Tv. Our results demonstrate that electron localization effects come into play in the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) modifying significantly the scaling exponent. In addition, the thermal evolution of the anomalous Hall resistivity suggests the existence of spin polarons whose size would decrease below Tv.

  16. Local tunneling spectroscopy of the electron-doped cuprate superconductor Sm1.85Ce0.15CuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmers, A.; Noat, Y.; Cren, T.; Sacks, W.; Roditchev, D.; Liang, B.; Greene, R. L.

    2007-10-01

    We present local tunneling spectroscopy in the optimally electron-doped cuprate Sm2-xCexCuO4 , x=0.15 . A clear signature of the superconducting gap is observed with an amplitude ranging from place to place and from sample to sample ( Δ˜3.5 6meV) . Another spectroscopic feature is simultaneously observed at high energy with an amplitude ranging from ±60 to ±80meV . Its energy scale and temperature evolution are found to be compatible with previous photoemission and optical experiments. If interpreted as the signature of antiferromagnetic order in the samples, these results could suggest the coexistence on the local scale of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity on the electron-doped side of cuprate superconductors.

  17. Localized surface plasmon induced enhancement of electron-hole generation with silver metal island at n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu{sub 2}O heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gurpreet Yadav, K. L.; Mitra, Anirban

    2015-08-03

    Localized surface plasmon induced generation of electron-hole pairs with inclusion of metal islands of noble metal like Ag can enhance the photocurrent. A heterostructure of n-Al:ZnO/p-Cu{sub 2}O with inclusion of Ag metalislands at the junction has been fabricated. I-V characteristic curve of these heterostructures shows a significant enhancement of photocurrent under the illumination (1.5 AMU). This enhancement of photocurrent is attributed to the supply of hot electrons generated in silver metal nanoislands. It has also been shown that inclusion of metal islands increases the absorption of solar spectrum in visible region at 500 nm. Enhancement of photocurrent may also be due to the direct resonance energy transfer from Localized Surface Plasmons of metal islands to Cu{sub 2}O.

  18. Nonlinear local parallel acceleration of electrons through Landau trapping by oblique whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Artemyev, Anton; Mourenas, Didier; Mozer, Forrest; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Simultaneous observations of electron velocity distributions and chorus waves by the Van Allen Probe B are analyzed to identify long-lasting (more than 6 h) signatures of electron Landau resonant interactions with oblique chorus waves in the outer radiation belt. Such Landau resonant interactions result in the trapping of ˜1-10 keV electrons and their acceleration up to 100-300 keV. This kind of process becomes important for oblique whistler mode waves having a significant electric field component along the background magnetic field. In the inhomogeneous geomagnetic field, such resonant interactions then lead to the formation of a plateau in the parallel (with respect to the geomagnetic field) velocity distribution due to trapping of electrons into the wave effective potential. We demonstrate that the electron energy corresponding to the observed plateau remains in very good agreement with the energy required for Landau resonant interaction with the simultaneously measured oblique chorus waves over 6 h and a wide range of L shells (from 4 to 6) in the outer belt. The efficient parallel acceleration modifies electron pitch angle distributions at energies ˜50-200 keV, allowing us to distinguish the energized population. The observed energy range and the density of accelerated electrons are in reasonable agreement with test particle numerical simulations.

  19. Temperature dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1-xSrxMnO3

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Mannella, N.; Booth, C.H.; Rosenhahn, A.; Sell, B.C.; Nambu, A.; Marchesini, S.; Mun, B. S.; Yang, S.-H.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.; Guo, J.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2007-12-06

    We have studied the temperature-dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x= 0.3-0.4) with core and valence level photoemission (PE), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetometry. As the temperature is varied across the Curie temperature T{sub c}, our PE experiments reveal a dramatic change of the electronic structure involving an increase in the Mn spin moment from {approx} 3 {micro}B to {approx} 4 {micro}B, and a modification of the local chemical environment of the other constituent atoms indicative of electron localization on the Mn atom. These effects are reversible and exhibit a slow-timescale {approx}200 K-wide hysteresis centered at T{sub c}. Based upon the probing depths accessed in our PE measurements, these effects seem to survive for at least 35-50 {angstrom} inward from the surface, while other consistent signatures for this modification of the electronic structure are revealed by more bulk sensitive spectroscopies like XAS and XES/RIXS. We interpret these effects as spectroscopic fingerprints for polaron formation, consistent with the presence of local Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO{sub 6} octahedra around the Mn atom, as revealed by the EXAFS data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in addition show typical signatures of ferro-magnetic clusters formation well above the Curie temperature.

  20. The local skin dose conversion coefficients of electrons, protons and alpha particles calculated using the Geant4 code.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bintuan; Dang, Bingrong; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Li, Wenjian

    2013-10-01

    The skin tissue-equivalent slab reported in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 116 to calculate the localised skin dose conversion coefficients (LSDCCs) was adopted into the Monte Carlo transport code Geant4. The Geant4 code was then utilised for computation of LSDCCs due to a circular parallel beam of monoenergetic electrons, protons and alpha particles <10 MeV. The computed LSDCCs for both electrons and alpha particles are found to be in good agreement with the results using the MCNPX code of ICRP 116 data. The present work thus validates the LSDCC values for both electrons and alpha particles using the Geant4 code.

  1. Electronic structure, local magnetism, and spin-orbit effects of Ir(IV)-, Ir(V)-, and Ir(VI)-based compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Kayser, P.; Alonso, J. A.; Martínez-Lope, M. J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Choi, Y.; Haskel, D.

    2015-06-01

    Element- and orbital-selective x-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism measurements are carried out to probe the electronic structure and magnetism of Ir 5 d electronic states in double perovskite Sr2MIrO 6 (M = Mg , Ca, Sc, Ti, Ni, Fe, Zn, In) and La2NiIrO6 compounds. All the studied systems present a significant influence of spin-orbit interactions in the electronic ground state. In addition, we find that the Ir 5 d local magnetic moment shows different character depending on the oxidation state despite the net magnetization being similar for all the compounds. Ir carries an orbital contribution comparable to the spin contribution for Ir4 + (5 d5) and Ir5 + (5 d4) oxides, whereas the orbital contribution is quenched for Ir6 + (5 d3) samples. Incorporation of a magnetic 3 d atom allows getting insight into the magnetic coupling between 5 d and 3 d transition metals. Together with previous susceptibility and neutron diffraction measurements, the results indicate that Ir carries a significant local magnetic moment even in samples without a 3 d metal. The size of the (small) net magnetization of these compounds is a result of predominant antiferromagnetic interactions between local moments coupled with structural details of each perovskite structure.

  2. On the possibility that local mechanical forcing permits directionally-controlled long-range electron transfer along DNA-like molecular wires with no need of an external electric field. Mechanical control of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chetverikov, Alexander P.; Ebeling, Werner; Lakhno, Viktor D.; Shigaev, Alexey S.; Velarde, Manuel G.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that in DNA-like molecules containing added, excess charges, such as electrons and holes (cation-radicals), it is possible by highly energetic, local, mechanical excitation at definite places of the chain to control the creation of breathers/bubbles and hence to control the long-range transfer of charges moving along the chain in a definite given direction with no external electric field needed.

  3. The challenge of localizing vehicle backup alarms: effects of passive and electronic hearing protectors, ambient noise level, and backup alarm spectral content.

    PubMed

    Alali, Khaled A; Casali, John G

    2011-01-01

    A human factors experiment employed a hemi-anechoic sound field in which listeners were required to localize a vehicular backup alarm warning signal (both a standard and a frequency-augmented alarm) in 360-degrees azimuth in pink noise of 60 dBA and 90 dBA. Measures of localization performance included: (1) percentage correct localization, (2) percentage of right--left localization errors, (3) percentage of front-rear localization errors, and (4) localization absolute deviation in degrees from the alarm's actual location. In summary, the data demonstrated that, with some exceptions, normal hearing listeners' ability to localize the backup alarm in 360-degrees azimuth did not improve when wearing augmented hearing protectors (including dichotic sound transmission earmuffs, flat attenuation earplugs, and level-dependent earplugs) as compared to when wearing conventional passive earmuffs or earplugs of the foam or flanged types. Exceptions were that in the 90 dBA pink noise, the flat attenuation earplug yielded significantly better accuracy than the polyurethane foam earplug and both the dichotic and the custom-made diotic electronic sound transmission earmuffs. However, the flat attenuation earplug showed no benefit over the standard pre-molded earplug, the arc earplug, and the passive earmuff. Confusions of front-rear alarm directions were most significant in the 90 dBA noise condition, wherein two types of triple-flanged earplugs exhibited significantly fewer front-rear confusions than either of the electronic muffs. On all measures, the diotic sound transmission earmuff resulted in the poorest localization of any of the protectors due to the fact that its single-microphone design did not enable interaural cues to be heard. Localization was consistently more degraded in the 90 dBA pink noise as compared with the relatively quiet condition of the 60 dBA pink noise. A frequency-augmented backup alarm, which incorporated 400 Hz and 4000 Hz components to exploit the

  4. Influence of localized surface plasmon resonance and free electrons on the optical properties of ultrathin Au films: a study of the aggregation effect.

    PubMed

    Li, X D; Chen, T P; Liu, Y; Leong, K C

    2014-03-10

    The contributions of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and Drude (free electrons) absorption to the complex dielectric function of ultrathin Au films were investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. When the Au film thickness is thinner than ~10 nm, Au nanoparticles (NPs) are formed as a result of the discontinuity in the films, leading to the emergence of LSPR of Au NPs; and the LSPR exhibits a splitting when the films thinner than ~8 nm, which could be attributed to the near-field coupling of the Au NPs and/or the inhomogeneous polarizations of the Au NPs. On the other hand, the delocalization of electrons in Au NPs due to the aggregation of Au NPs in a thicker film leads to an increase in the free-electron absorption and a suppression of the LSPR. PMID:24663852

  5. Electronic structure localization and spin-state transition in Cu-substituted FeSe: Fe1-xCuxSe

    SciTech Connect

    Chadov, Stanislav; Scharf, Daniel; Fecher, Gerhard H; Felser, Claudia; Zhang, Lijun; Singh, David J

    2010-01-01

    We report density-functional studies of the Fe{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}Se alloy done using supercell and coherent-potential approximation methods. Magnetic behavior was investigated using the disordered local moment approach. We find that Cu occurs in a nominal d{sup 10} configuration and is highly disruptive to the electronic structure of the Fe sheets. This would be consistent with a metal-insulator transition due to Anderson localization. We further find a strong crossover from a weak moment itinerant system to a local moment magnet at x{approx}0.12. We associate this with the experimentally observed jump near this concentration. our results are consistent with the characterization of this concentration-dependent jump as a transition to a spin glass.

  6. Correlative Microscopy for Localization of Proteins In Situ: Pre-embedding Immuno-Electron Microscopy Using FluoroNanogold, Gold Enhancement, and Low-Temperature Resin.

    PubMed

    Boassa, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Immuno-electron microscopy (immuno-EM) is a technique that has been used widely to determine subcellular localization of proteins. Different approaches are available for immuno-EM: pre-embedding method, post-embedding, and cryosectioning (Tokuyasu "style"). Here we describe a pre-embedding technique that allows the labeling of a target protein in situ, retention of fluorescence signal in plastic, and its localization at the EM level in a given cellular context. The procedure can be technically challenging and labor intensive: it requires optimization of fixation protocols to better preserve the cellular morphology and screening of compatible antibodies. Nevertheless, immuno-EM can be a powerful localization tool. PMID:26160575

  7. Materials Data on KNaMg2Si4(O5F)2 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Na15S5Cl(O5F)4 (SG:157) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Te5As2Br4O5F26 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on KLi2AlSi4(O5F)2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Na3Ca3Zr2Si4(O5F)3 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on ReH12C4O5F (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-11

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Sb4IrC5ClO5F22 (SG:4) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2016-02-04

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on MoH8N2O5F2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of UN: Systematic density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Bao-Tian; Li, Rong-Wu; Shi, Hongliang; Zhang, Ping

    2010-11-01

    A systematic first-principle study is performed to calculate the lattice parameters, electronic structure, and thermodynamic properties of UN using the local-density approximation (LDA)+ U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+ U formalisms. To properly describe the strong correlation in the U 5 f electrons, we optimized the U parameter in calculating the total energy, lattice parameters, and bulk modulus at the nonmagnetic (NM), ferromagnetic (FM), and antiferromagnetic (AFM) configurations. Our results show that by choosing the Hubbard U around 2 eV within the GGA+ U approach, it is promising to correctly and consistently describe the above mentioned properties of UN. The localization behavior of 5 f electrons is found to be stronger than that of UC and our electronic analysis indicates that the effective charge of UN can be represented as U 1.71+N 1.71-. As for the thermodynamic study, the phonon dispersion illustrates the stability of UN and we further predict the lattice vibration energy, thermal expansion, and specific heat by utilizing the quasiharmonic approximation. Our calculated specific heat is well consistent with experiments.

  16. Suppression of protein phosphatase 2A activity enhances Ad5/F35 adenovirus transduction efficiency in normal human B lymphocytes and in Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Cayer, Marie-Pierre; Samson, Mélanie; Bertrand, Claudia; Dumont, Nellie; Drouin, Mathieu; Jung, Daniel

    2012-02-28

    Investigation of the molecular processes which control the development and function of lymphocytes is essential for our understanding of humoral immunity, as well as lymphocyte associated pathogenesis. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer provided a powerful tool to investigate these processes. We have previously demonstrated that adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 transduces plasma cell lines at a higher efficiency than primary B cells, owing to differences in intracellular trafficking. Given that phosphatases are effectors of intracellular trafficking, here we have analyzed the effects of a panel of phosphatase inhibitors on Ad5/F35 transduction efficiency in B lymphocytes in the present study. FACS analysis was conducted to determine Ad5/F35-EYFP transduction efficiency in lymphoid cells, including human primary B cells, following serine/threonine phosphatase (PSP) inhibitor treatment. We further used confocal microscopy to analyze intracellular trafficking and fate of CY3 labeled Ad5/F35 vectors, in PSP treated lymphoid cell. Finally, we analyzed the MAPK pathway by Western blot in PSP treated cells. Adenoviral transduction efficiency was unresponsive to inhibition of PP1 whereas inhibition of PP2A by cantharidic acid, or PP1 and PP2A by okadaic acid, substantially increased transduction efficiency. Importantly, confocal microscopy analyses revealed that inhibition of PP2A shut down adenovirus recycling. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A resulted in increased phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and MEK1/2. Taken together, these results suggest that Ad5/F35 is more efficiently transduced in cells following PP2A inhibition. Our results are in agreement with reports indicating that PP2A is involved in the formation of recycling vesicles and might be of interest for gene therapy applications.

  17. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of dilute U impurities in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Cottenier, S.; Mishra, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic moment of dilute U impurity in metallic hosts have been calculated from first principles. The calculations have been performed within local density approximation of the density functional theory using Augmented plane wave+local orbital (APW+lo) technique, taking account of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb correlation through LDA+U approach. We present here our results for the local density of states, magnetic moment and hyperfine field calculated for an isolated U impurity embedded in hosts with sp-, d- and f-type conduction electrons. The results of our systematic study provide a comprehensive insight on the pressure dependence of 5f local magnetism in metallic systems. The unpolarized local density of states (LDOS), analyzed within the frame work of Stoner model suggest the occurrence of local moment for U in sp-elements, noble metals and f-block hosts like La, Ce, Lu and Th. In contrast, U is predicted to be nonmagnetic in most transition metal hosts except in Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, and Hf consistent with the results obtained from spin polarized calculation. The spin and orbital magnetic moments of U computed within the frame of LDA+U formalism show a scaling behavior with lattice compression. We have also computed the spin and orbital hyperfine fields and a detail analysis has been carried out. The host dependent trends for the magnetic moment, hyperfine field and 5f occupation reflect pressure induced change of electronic structure with U valency changing from 3+ to 4+ under lattice compression. In addition, we have made a detailed analysis of the impurity induced host spin polarization suggesting qualitatively different roles of f-band electrons on moment stability. The results presented in this work would be helpful towards understanding magnetism and spin fluctuation in U based alloys.

  18. Long-term results of intraoperative presacral electron boost radiotherapy (IOERT) in combination with total mesorectal excision (TME) and chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krempien, Robert . E-mail: robert_krempien@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Roeder, Falk; Oertel, Susanne; Roebel, Marianne; Weitz, Juergen; Hensley, Frank W.; Timke, Carmen; Funk, Angela; Bischof, Marc; Zabel-Du Bois, Angelika; Niethammer, Andreas G.; Eble, Michael J.; Buchler, Markus W.; Treiber, Martina; Debus, Juergen

    2006-11-15

    Background: We analyzed the long-term results of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer using a multimodal approach consisting of total mesorectal excision (TME), intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT), and pre- or postoperative chemoradiation (CRT). Patients and Methods: Between 1991 and 2003, 210 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (65 International Union Against Cancer [UICC] Stage II, 116 UICC Stage III, and 29 UICC Stage IV cancers) were treated with TME, IOERT, and preoperative or postoperative CHT. A total of 122 patients were treated postoperatively; 88 patients preoperatively. Preoperative or postoperative fluoropyrimidine-based CRT was applied in 93% of these patients. Results: Median age was 61 years (range, 26-81). Median follow-up was 61 months. The 5-year actuarial overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local control rate (LC), and distant relapse free survival (DRS) of all patients was 69%, 66%, 93%, and 67%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that UICC stage and resection status were the most important independent prognostic factors for OS, DFS, and DRS. The resection status was the only significant factor for local control. T-stage, tumor localization, type of resection, and type of chemotherapy had no significant impact on OS, DFS, DRS, and LC. Acute and late complications {>=}Grade 3 were seen in 17% and 13% of patients, respectively. Conclusion: Multimodality treatment with TME and IOERT boost in combination with moderate dose pre- or postoperative CRT is feasible and results in excellent long-term local control rates in patients with intermediate to high-risk locally advanced rectal cancer.

  19. Large-scale real-space density-functional calculations: Moiré-induced electron localization in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Oshiyama, Atsushi Iwata, Jun-Ichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Matsushita, Yu-Ichiro

    2015-03-21

    We show that our real-space finite-difference scheme allows us to perform density-functional calculations for nanometer-scale targets containing more than 100 000 atoms. This real-space scheme is applied to twisted bilayer graphene, clarifying that Moiré pattern induced in the slightly twisted bilayer graphene drastically modifies the atomic and electronic structures.

  20. Photo-induced reactions from efficient molecular dynamics with electronic transitions using the FIREBALL local-orbital density functional theory formalism.

    PubMed

    Zobač, Vladimír; Lewis, James P; Abad, Enrique; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Hapala, Prokop; Jelínek, Pavel; Ortega, José

    2015-05-01

    The computational simulation of photo-induced processes in large molecular systems is a very challenging problem. Firstly, to properly simulate photo-induced reactions the potential energy surfaces corresponding to excited states must be appropriately accessed; secondly, understanding the mechanisms of these processes requires the exploration of complex configurational spaces and the localization of conical intersections; finally, photo-induced reactions are probability events, that require the simulation of hundreds of trajectories to obtain the statistical information for the analysis of the reaction profiles. Here, we present a detailed description of our implementation of a molecular dynamics with electronic transitions algorithm within the local-orbital density functional theory code FIREBALL, suitable for the computational study of these problems. As an example of the application of this approach, we also report results on the [2 + 2] cycloaddition of ethylene with maleic anhydride and on the [2 + 2] photo-induced polymerization reaction of two C60 molecules. We identify different deactivation channels of the initial electron excitation, depending on the time of the electronic transition from LUMO to HOMO, and the character of the HOMO after the transition.