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Sample records for 5f electronic structure

  1. Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J.; Beaux, Miles F.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S.; Bauer, Eric D.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Tobash, Paul H.; Richmond, Scott

    2012-05-03

    The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

  2. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ∼ 104 at 488 nm and ∼ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  3. Effects of 5f-elements on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of gold superatom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-08-01

    5f-elements encaged in a gold superatomic cluster are capable of giving rise to unique optical properties due to their hyperactive valence electrons and great radial components of 5f/6d orbitals. Herein, we review our first-principles studies on electronic structures and spectroscopic properties of a series of actinide-embedded gold superatomic clusters with different dimensions. The three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) superatom clusters possess the 18-electron configuration of 1S21P61D10 and 10-electron configuration of 1S21P41D4, respectively. Importantly, their electronic absorption spectra can also be effectively explained by the superatom orbitals. Specifically, the charge transfer (CT) transitions involved in surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectra for 3D and 2D structures are both from the filled 1D orbitals, providing the enhancement factors of the order of ˜ 104 at 488 nm and ˜ 105 at 456 nm, respectively. This work implies that the superatomic orbital transitions involved in 5f-elements can not only lead to a remarkable spectroscopic performance, but also a new direction for optical design in the future. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374004), the Science and Technology Development Program of Jilin Province, China (Grant No. 20150519021JH), the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142001), and the Support from the High Performance Computing Center (HPCC) of Jilin University, China.

  4. Electronic structure of a new layered bismuth oxyselenide superconductor: LaO0.5F0.5BiSe2.

    PubMed

    Xia, M; Jiang, J; Niu, X H; Liu, J Z; Wen, C H P; Lu, H Y; Lou, X; Pu, Y J; Huang, Z C; Zhu, Xiyu; Wen, H H; Xie, B P; Shen, D W; Feng, D L

    2015-07-22

    LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) is a new layered superconductor discovered recently, which shows the superconducting transition temperature of 3.5 K. With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we study the electronic structure of LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) comprehensively. Two electron-like bands are located around the X point of the Brillouin zone, and the outer pockets connect with each other and form large Fermi surface around Γ and M. These bands show negligible k(z) dispersion, indicating their two-dimensional nature. Based on the Luttinger theorem, the carrier concentration is about 0.53 e(-) per unit cell, close to its nominal value. Moreover, the photoemission data and the band structure calculations agree very well, and the renormalization factor is nearly 1.0, indicating the electron correlations in this material are rather weak. Our results suggest that LaO(0.5)F(0.5)BiSe(2) is a conventional BCS superconductor without strong electron correlations.

  5. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission study of UN and USb; Dual character of 5f electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, T.; Kumigashira, H.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Suzuki, T.

    2001-05-01

    We have performed high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy on UN and USb to study the electronic structure near the Fermi level ( EF) and the nature of U 5f electrons. We found that the pnictogen (N and Sb) p bands are fully occupied in contrast with Ce monopnictides and shows a good qualitative agreement with the band calculation by treating the U 5f states as bands. On the other hand, we have not observed dispersive U 5f bands near EF predicted by the band calculation, instead we found two non-dispersive bands near EF, which are assigned as the 5f 2-final-state multiplet indicative of localized U 5f states. The intensity of multiplet structure is stronger in USb than in UN. These results indicate the dual character of U 5f electrons and its difference between USb and UN.

  6. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  7. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-20

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ~ 7 eV) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν >/~ 400 eV) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of CeMIn5(M = Rh, Ir, and Co) and YbRh2Si2 with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant U5f compounds such as UFeGa5, their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all U5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized U5f compounds such as UPd3 and UO2 are essentially explained by the localized model that treats U5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion U-based compounds such as the hidden-order compound URu2Si2, their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures are generally well-explained by the band-structure calculation, whereas the states in the vicinity of EF show some deviations due to electron correlation effects. Furthermore, the electronic structures of URu2Si2 in the paramagnetic and hidden-order phases are

  8. Band structures of 4f and 5f materials studied by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi

    2016-04-01

    Recent remarkable progress in angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) has enabled the direct observation of the band structures of 4f and 5f materials. In particular, ARPES with various light sources such as lasers (hν ∼ 7~\\text{eV} ) or high-energy synchrotron radiations (hν ≳ 400~\\text{eV} ) has shed light on the bulk band structures of strongly correlated materials with energy scales of a few millielectronvolts to several electronvolts. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the behaviors of 4f and 5f band structures of various rare-earth and actinide materials observed by modern ARPES techniques, and understand how they can be described using various theoretical frameworks. For 4f-electron materials, ARPES studies of \\text{Ce}M\\text{I}{{\\text{n}}5} (M=\\text{Rh} , \\text{Ir} , and \\text{Co} ) and \\text{YbR}{{\\text{h}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} with various incident photon energies are summarized. We demonstrate that their 4f electronic structures are essentially described within the framework of the periodic Anderson model, and that the band-structure calculation based on the local density approximation cannot explain their low-energy electronic structures. Meanwhile, electronic structures of 5f materials exhibit wide varieties ranging from itinerant to localized states. For itinerant \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UFeG}{{\\text{a}}5} , their electronic structures can be well-described by the band-structure calculation assuming that all \\text{U}~5f electrons are itinerant. In contrast, the band structures of localized \\text{U}~5f compounds such as \\text{UP}{{\\text{d}}3} and \\text{U}{{\\text{O}}2} are essentially explained by the localized model that treats \\text{U}~5f electrons as localized core states. In regards to heavy fermion \\text{U} -based compounds such as the hidden-order compound \\text{UR}{{\\text{u}}2}\\text{S}{{\\text{i}}2} , their electronic structures exhibit complex behaviors. Their overall band structures

  9. 5f-electron localization in the actinide metals: thorides, actinides and the Mott transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    For the light actinides Ac-Cm, the numbers of localized and itinerant 5f-electrons are determined by comparing various estimates of the f-electron counts. At least one itinerant f-electron is found for each element, Pa-Cm. These results resolve certain disagreements among electron counts determined by different methods and are consistent with the Mott transition model and with the picture of the 5f-electrons' dual nature.

  10. Electron correlation and relativity of the 5f electrons in the U-Zr alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderlind, P.; Sadigh, B.; Lordi, V.; Landa, A.; Turchi, P. E. A.

    2014-01-01

    ] and VASP [4] codes. The Wien2K computations are set up with an APW + lo basis for the expansion of the wave functions within the muffin-tin spheres (with radius RMT = 2.5 a.u.) in partial waves with angular momenta up to l = 3, and an LAPW basis for all higher angular momenta up to l = 10. The plane-wave cutoff (Kmax) for the expansion of the wave functions in the interstitial region is chosen such that RMT × Kmax = 10. We apply the LSDA + U scheme proposed by Anisimov et al. [5] (Wien2K) and Dudarev et al. [6] (VASP) to the uranium f orbitals, which approximately corrects for their electron self interaction. An effective Ueff = U - J is chosen to be 2 eV (J = 0), which appears to be realistic for uranium systems [7]. The spin-orbit interaction is included using the second-variation method with scalar-relativistic orbitals as basis. This basis includes all Eigen states with energy less than 70 eV. For reason to improve the description of the relativistic orbitals, the p1/2 local orbitals are added to the basis set. For actinide metals, this technique for the spin-orbit coupling equals, with good approximation, that of the complete four-spinor Dirac formalism [8-10]. All calculations use a 12 × 12 × 12 Monkhorst-Pack k-point grid and a plane-wave cutoff of 23 Ry.In Table 1 we show our calculated equilibrium volumes (V) and bulk moduli (B) obtained with and without spin-orbit coupling (SOC) for bcc (γ) uranium metal using the Wien2K (VASP) codes. (The other component, Zr, is a light metal where relativistic effects are not important). The changes in V and B due to SOC are indeed quite small, consistent with results from previous studies [9,11], and within the scatter of the experimental data. The reason why the volume expands slightly is that the separation of the 5f5/2 and 5f7/2 states, due to spin-orbit coupling, weakens the cohesion of the bonding electrons. The separation is very small, as seen in Fig. 1[11] where we plot the total electronic density

  11. Electron attachment and detachment, and the electron affinities of C5F5N and C5HF4N.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, Jane M; Kerr, Donna M; Miller, Thomas M; Viggiano, A A

    2005-09-15

    Rate constants have been measured for electron attachment to C5F5N (297-433 K) and to 2, 3, 5, 6-C5HF4N (303 K) using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus (at a He gas pressure of 133 Pa). In both cases only the parent anion was formed in the attachment process. The attachment rate constants measured at room temperature are 1.8 +/- 0.5 X 10(-7) and 7 +/- 3 X 10(-10) cm(-3) s(-1), respectively. Rate constants were also measured for thermal electron detachment from the parent anions of these molecules. For C5F5N- detachment is negligible at room temperature, but increases to 2530 +/- 890 s(-1) at 433 K. For 2, 3, 5, 6-C5HF4N-, the detachment rate at 303 K was 520 +/- 180 s(-1). The attachment/detachment equilibrium yielded experimental electron affinities EA(C5F5N)=0.70 +/- 0.05 eV and EA(2, 3, 5, 6-C5HF4N)=0.40 +/- 0.08 eV. Electronic structure calculations were carried out for these molecules and related C5HxF5-xN using density-functional theory and the G3(MP2)//B3LYP compound method. The EAs are found to decrease by 0.25 eV, on average, with each F substitution by H. The calculated EAs are in good agreement with the present experimental results.

  12. Pump-probe reflectivity study of ultrafast dynamics of strongly correlated 5f electrons inUO2

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Yongqiang Q; Taylor, Antoinette J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Rodriguez, George

    2010-01-01

    5f electrons in the Mott insulator UO{sub 2} produce intriguing electronic states and dynamics, such as strong correlation and f-f excitations. We have performed femtosecond pump-probe reflectivity measurements on a single crystal UO{sub 2} at temperatures 5-300 K to study the ultrafast dynamics of photoexcited 5f electrons. The laser pulses at 400 nm pump 5 f electrons across the Mott gap, while those at 800 nm probe the pump-induced change of reflectivity. We find temperature-dependent excitation and relaxation processes and long-lived acoustic phonons, and extract picosecond risetimes and microsecond relaxation times at low temperatures. The observed slow relaxation is ascribed to the decay of Hubbard excitons formed by U{sup 3+}-U{sup 5+} pairs.

  13. The degree of 5f electron localization in URu2Si2: electron energy-loss spectroscopy and spin-orbit sum rule analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, J R; Moore, K T; Butch, N P; Maple, M B

    2010-05-19

    We examine the degree of 5f electron localization in URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} using spin-orbit sum rule analysis of the U N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f) edge. When compared to {alpha}-U metal, US, USe, and UTe, which have increasing localization of the 5f states, we find that the 5f states of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are more localized, although not entirely. Spin-orbit analysis shows that intermediate coupling is the correct angular momentum coupling mechanism for URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} when the 5f electron count is between 2.6 and 2.8. These results have direct ramifications for theoretical assessment of the hidden order state of URu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, where the degree of localization of the 5f electrons and their contribution to the Fermi surface are critical.

  14. Electron-phonon superconductivity in LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yanqing; Du, Yongping; Wan, Xiangang Wang, Bogen; Ding, Hang-Chen; Savrasov, Sergey Y.; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2014-06-21

    We report density functional calculations of the electronic structure, Fermi surface, phonon spectrum and electron–phonon coupling for the newly discovered superconductor LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiSe{sub 2}. It is confirmed that there is a strong Fermi surface nesting at (π,π,0), which results in unstable phonon branches. Combining the frozen phonon total energy calculations and an anharmonic oscillator model, we find that the quantum fluctuation prevents the appearance of static long–range order. The calculation shows that LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiSe{sub 2} is highly anisotropic, and same as its cousin LaO{sub 0.5}F{sub 0.5}BiS{sub 2}, this compound is also a conventional electron-phonon coupling induced superconductor.

  15. Structure of the parainfluenza virus 5 F protein in its metastable, prefusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Wen, Xiaolin; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    Enveloped viruses have evolved complex glycoprotein machinery that drives the fusion of viral and cellular membranes, permitting entry of the viral genome into the cell. For the paramyxoviruses, the fusion (F) protein catalyses this membrane merger and entry step, and it has been postulated that the F protein undergoes complex refolding during this process. Here we report the crystal structure of the parainfluenza virus 5 F protein in its prefusion conformation, stabilized by the addition of a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain. The structure of the F protein shows that there are profound conformational differences between the pre- and postfusion states, involving transformations in secondary and tertiary structure. The positions and structural transitions of key parts of the fusion machinery, including the hydrophobic fusion peptide and two helical heptad repeat regions, clarify the mechanism of membrane fusion mediated by the F protein.

  16. The Electronic States of U(4+) in U(PO4)Cl: An Example for Angular Overlap Modeling of 5f(n) Systems.

    PubMed

    Bronova, Anna; Bredow, Thomas; Glaum, Robert; Urland, Werner

    2016-07-18

    Detailed experimental data on UPO4Cl comprising single-crystal UV/vis/NIR spectra and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities form the basis for the investigation of the electronic structure of the U(4+) cation in UPO4Cl. For modeling of the observed physical properties the angular overlap model (AOM) was successfully employed. The computations were performed using the newly developed computer program BonnMag. The calculations show that all electronic transitions and the magnetic susceptibility as well as its temperature dependence are well-reproduced within the AOM framework. Using Judd-Ofelt theory BonnMag allows estimation of the relative absorption coefficients of the electronic transitions with reasonable accuracy. Ligand field splitting for states originating from f-electron configurations are determined. Slater-Condon-Shortley parameters and the spin-orbit coupling constant for U(4+) were taken from literature. The good transferability of AOM parameters for U(4+) is confirmed by calculations of the absorption spectra of UP2O7 and (U2O)(PO4)2. The effect of variation of the fit parameters is investigated. AOM parameters for U(4+) (5f) are compared to those of the rare-earth elements (4f) and transition metals (3d). PMID:27355276

  17. The Electronic States of U(4+) in U(PO4)Cl: An Example for Angular Overlap Modeling of 5f(n) Systems.

    PubMed

    Bronova, Anna; Bredow, Thomas; Glaum, Robert; Urland, Werner

    2016-07-18

    Detailed experimental data on UPO4Cl comprising single-crystal UV/vis/NIR spectra and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibilities form the basis for the investigation of the electronic structure of the U(4+) cation in UPO4Cl. For modeling of the observed physical properties the angular overlap model (AOM) was successfully employed. The computations were performed using the newly developed computer program BonnMag. The calculations show that all electronic transitions and the magnetic susceptibility as well as its temperature dependence are well-reproduced within the AOM framework. Using Judd-Ofelt theory BonnMag allows estimation of the relative absorption coefficients of the electronic transitions with reasonable accuracy. Ligand field splitting for states originating from f-electron configurations are determined. Slater-Condon-Shortley parameters and the spin-orbit coupling constant for U(4+) were taken from literature. The good transferability of AOM parameters for U(4+) is confirmed by calculations of the absorption spectra of UP2O7 and (U2O)(PO4)2. The effect of variation of the fit parameters is investigated. AOM parameters for U(4+) (5f) are compared to those of the rare-earth elements (4f) and transition metals (3d).

  18. Response to letter "Electron correlation and relativity of the 5f electrons in the Usbnd Zr alloy system"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Marianetti, Chris A.; Morgan, Dane

    2016-08-01

    In the Letter [Söderlind et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 444, 356 (2014)], Söderlind et al. state their interpretation that 1) we view electron correlation to be strong and including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) to be necessary for U metal and Usbnd Zr alloy in our article [Xiong et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 443, 331 (2013)]. Further, they argue that 2) density functional theory (DFT) without adding the Hubbard U potential, especially when solved using all electron methods, already models U and Usbnd Zr accurately, and 3) adding the Hubbard U potential to DFT in DFT + U models U and Usbnd Zr worse than DFT according to volume, bulk modulus, and magnetic moments predicted from their calculations of the γU phase of elemental U metal. With respect to Söderlind et al.'s interpretation 1), we clarify that our opinions are that U and Usbnd Zr are not strongly, but weakly to moderately correlated and that including SOC is beneficial but not necessary for modeling most ground state properties of U and Usbnd Zr. With respect to Söderlind et al.'s argument 2) we demonstrate that previously neglected and very recent experimental data suggest that DFT in Söderlind's full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital calculations [Söderlind, Phys. Rev. B 66, 085113 (2002)] in fact models the bulk modulus and elastic constants of αU with errors considerably larger than other related elements, e.g., most transition metals. With respect to Söderlind et al.'s argument 3) we argue that they have inappropriately focused on just one phase (the BCC γU phase of U metal), neglecting the other phases which represent the majority of our evidence, and made overgeneralizations based on results at only one Ueff value of 2 eV. We therefore maintain our original conclusion that the accuracy of DFT for modeling U and Usbnd Zr has room for improvement and DFT + U can be of value for this purpose on at least some ground state properties.

  19. Gas-phase reactions of doubly charged actinide cations with alkanes and alkenes--probing the chemical activity of 5f electrons from Th to Cm.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Gibson, John K

    2011-11-01

    Small alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (ethene, propene, 1-butene) were used to probe the gas-phase reactivity of doubly charged actinide cations, An(2+) (An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm), by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Different combinations of doubly and singly charged ions were observed as reaction products, comprising species formed via metal-ion induced eliminations of small molecules, simple adducts and ions resulting from electron, hydride or methide transfer channels. Th(2+), Pa(2+), U(2+) and Np(2+) preferentially yielded doubly charged products of hydrocarbon activation, while Pu(2+), Am(2+) and Cm(2+) reacted mainly through transfer channels. Cm(2+) was also capable of forming doubly charged products with some of the hydrocarbons whereas Pu(2+) and Am(2+) were not, these latter two ions conversely being the only for which adduct formation was observed. The product distributions and the reaction efficiencies are discussed in relation to the electronic configurations of the metal ions, the energetics of the reactions and similar studies previously performed with doubly charged lanthanide and transition metal cations. The conditions for hydrocarbon activation to occur as related to the accessibility of electronic configurations with one or two 5f and/or 6d unpaired electrons are examined and the possible chemical activity of the 5f electrons in these early actinide ions, particularly Pa(2+), is considered.

  20. DFT insights into the electronic and optical properties of fluorine-doped monoclinic niobium pentoxide (B-Nb2O5:F)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shazly, Tamer S.; Hassan, Walid M. I.; Rehim, Sayed S. Abdel; Allam, Nageh K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the effect of fluorine doping on the electronic structure and optical properties of monoclinic niobium pentoxide (B-Nb2O5) as revealed by the first principles calculations. Density functional theory (DFT) along with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) at the revised Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBEsol) exchange-correlation functional was used in this study. The band calculations revealed that the studied materials are indirect bandgap semiconductors, with bandgap energies of 2.67 and 2.28 eV for the undoped and F-doped B-Nb2O5, respectively. Upon doping B-Nb2O5, the Fermi level shifts towards the conduction band, allowing optical absorption in the visible region with enhanced transmittance in the wavelength range 400-1000 nm. The calculated static refractive index of the undoped B-Nb2O5 is in good agreement with the reported experimental value, which is enhanced upon F-incorporation resulting in cladding properties for the F-doped B-Nb2O5. Also, the effective mass of free charge carriers increased upon F-doping. The enhanced properties were attributed to the effect of the excessive valent electron of the incorporated F atom.

  1. Synthesis, structural characterization and theoretical approach of the tri(2-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) cobalt(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwei; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Dunru; Ma, Kuirong; Ni, Haiwei; Tang, Guodong

    2015-08-01

    The crystal structure of a new coordination compound tri(2-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline) Co(II) complex ([Co(dcpip)3]Cl2) was measured with X-ray diffraction measurements. The compound is crystallizes triclinic, Pī space group. The ligand, 2-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline(dcpip), binds to Co(II) ions with a bis-dentate mode, and each Co(II) ion with a distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The calculated interaction energies of Co(II) with coordination atoms N are between 101.7-206.5 kJ/mol and 115.3-230.9 kJ/mol for B3LYP/6-31+G(∗) and PBE1PBE/6-31+G(∗) theoretical methods, respectively. The experimental Fourier transform infrared spectrum was assigned. The calculated IR based on B3LYP/6-31+G(∗) and PBE1PBE/6-31+G(∗) methods were performed and compared with experimental results. The UV-Vis experimental spectrum of [Co(dcpip)3]Cl2 was measured in methanol solution. The calculated electronic spectrum was performed with TD/B3LYP and TD/PBE1PBE methods with 6-31+G(∗) basis set. The first and second order hyperpolarizability for the compound was calculated. The calculated values of γtot are -1.5551344 × 10(-33) esu for B3LYP method and -1.3323259 × 10(-33) esu for PBE1PBE method. The nature bond orbital analysis and temperature dependence of the thermodynamic properties were calculated with the same methods.

  2. Pressure-induced changes in the electronic structure of americium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P; Moore, K T; Landa, A; Bradley, J A

    2011-02-25

    We have conducted electronic-structure calculations for Am metal under pressure to investigate the behavior of the 5f-electron states. Density-functional theory (DFT) does not reproduce the experimental photoemission spectra for the ground-state phase where the 5f electrons are localized, but the theory is expected to be correct when 5f delocalization occurs under pressure. The DFT prediction is that peak structures of the 5f valence band will merge closer to the Fermi level during compression indicating presence of itinerant 5f electrons. Existence of such 5f bands is argued to be a prerequisite for the phase transitions, particularly to the primitive orthorhombic AmIV phase, but does not agree with modern dynamical-mean-field theory (DMFT) results. Our DFT model further suggests insignificant changes of the 5f valence under pressure in agreement with recent resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, but in contradiction to the DMFT predictions. The influence of pressure on the 5f valency in the actinides is discussed and is shown to depend in a non-trivial fashion on 5f band position and occupation relative to the spd valence bands.

  3. Soft X-ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W

    2008-02-07

    Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS, Figure 1) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. From these and related measurements, the following has been determined: (1) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large; (2) The number of Pu5f electrons is near 5; and (3) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itineracy. Significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy or Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies.

  4. Electronic structure of solid uranium tetrafluoride UF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, A. Yu.; Teterin, Yu. A.; Maslakov, K. I.; Panov, A. D.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Vukcevic, L.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and conversion electron spectra of the outer (0-15eV) and inner (15-40eV) valence electrons for UF4 were measured. Relativistic Xα discrete variation ( RXα DV) calculation data for the UF84-(C4v) cluster reflecting uranium close environment in solid UF4 were used for the quantitative interpretation of the fine spectral structure. Quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was established. The U5f electrons ( ≈1 U5f electron) were shown to participate directly in the chemical bond formation. This U 5 f electron was shown to be delocalized within the outer valence molecular orbitals (OVMO) range (1-15eV) . The other U5f electrons were shown to be localized and to participate weakly in the chemical bond formation. The XPS line associated with these electrons was observed at 3.8eV . The vacant U5f states are generally delocalized in the range of the low positive energies (0-7 eV). The contribution of the U6p electronic density to the molecular orbitals of UF4 was experimentally and theoretically evaluated. The U6p electrons were experimentally shown to participate significantly ( 0.6U6p electrons) in the formation of the OVMO beside the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals (IVMO). IVMO composition and sequence order in the binding energy range 15-40eV in UF4 were determined.

  5. 5f{sup N} configurations and x-ray spectra of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, N.A.

    1995-04-01

    The electronic structure of 5f{sup N} configurations and the characteristic X-ray radiation energies for an entire actinium series are calculated using the Hartree-Fock-Pauli approximation, and the variations obtained are analyzed. The electrostatic and magnetic parameters of these ions, as well as energies of their K and L lines, exhibit essentially nonlinear dependence on the nuclear charge and number of electrons. This fact evidences that simplified models of atomic structure are inapplicable to heavy ions.

  6. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  7. Crystal structure of a binuclear nickel(II) complex constructed of 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline and doubly deprotonated benzene-1,3,5-tri­carb­oxy­lic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Ying; Hao, Xiang-Rong

    2015-01-01

    The title complex, [Ni2(C9H4O6)2(C13H8N4)2(H2O)4]·2H2O, bis­(μ-5-carb­oxy­benzene-1,3-di­carboxyl­ato-κ2 O 1:O 1′)bis­[di­aqua(1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline-κ2 N 7,N 8)nickel(II)] di­hydrate, was obtained under solvothermal conditions by the reaction of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) with Ni(NO3)2 in the presence of 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (IP). The crystal has triclinic (P-1) symmetry with a centrosymmetric binuclear nickel(II) cluster. The NiII atom is coordinated by two N atoms from a chelating 1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline ligand, two carboxyl­ate O atoms from two 5-carb­oxy­benzene-1,3-di­carboxyl­ate ligands and two water mol­ecules in a slightly distorted octa­hedral geometry. Two carboxyl­ate groups bridge two NiII cations, forming the binuclear complex. Extensive N—H⋯O, O—H⋯O and O—H⋯N hydrogen bonding is present in the crystal structure, forming a three-dimensional supermolecular framework. Weak π–π stacking is observed between parallel HBTC2− and IP ring systems, the face-to-face separation being 3.695 (2) Å. PMID:26029419

  8. Fermi energy 5f spectral weight variation in uranium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, J.D.; Clack, J.; Allen, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    Uranium materials display a wide range of thermal, electrical and magnetic properties, often exotic. For more than a decade there have been efforts to use photoemission spectroscopy to develop a systematic and unified understanding of the 5f electron states giving rise to this behavior. These efforts have been hampered by a paucity of systems where changes in transport properties are accompanied by substantial spectral changes, so as to allow an attempt to correlate the two kinds of properties within some model. The authors have made resonant photoemission measurements to extract the 5f spectral weight in three systems which show varying degrees of promise of permitting such an attempt, Y{sub 1{minus}x}U{sub x}Pd{sub 3}, U(Pd{sub x}Pt{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 3} and U(Pd{sub x}Cu{sub 1{minus}x}){sub 5}. They have also measured U 4f core level spectra. The 4f spectra can be modeled with some success by the impurity Anderson model (IAM), and the 5f spectra are currently being analyzed in that framework. The IAM characterizes the 5f-electrons of a single site by an f binding energy {epsilon}{sub f}, an f Coulomb interaction and a hybridization V to conduction electrons. Latent in the model are the phenomena of 5f mixed valence and the Kondo effect.

  9. Fluorine insertion into the Ruddlesden-Popper phase La2BaFe2O7: the structure and magnetic properties of La2BaFe2O5F4.

    PubMed

    Gurusinghe, Nicola N M; Fones, Julia C; Marco, Jose F; Berry, Frank J; Greaves, Colin

    2014-02-01

    Fluorination of the n = 2 Ruddlesden-Popper phase La2BaFe2O7 occurs at ~300 °C in flowing 10% F2 in N2 to form La2BaFe2O5F4. This oxide fluoride contains 2F(-) ions in interstitial sites within the rocksalt regions and 2F(-) ions that have substituted for O(2-) ions in apical sites within the rocksalt layers. The fluorination results in an expansion along c of 7.6% to yield a tetragonal unit cell of dimensions a = 3.96237(7) Å, c = 22.3972(5) Å. The structure and magnetic properties have been examined by Mössbauer spectroscopy, neutron powder diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements. La2BaFe2O5F4 becomes antiferromagnetically ordered at temperatures below ~500 K, and the magnetic order shows a striking resemblance to that observed in La2BaFe2O7. The magnetic moments on Fe(3+) are perpendicular to [001] and aligned along ±{100} directions above 300 K, but at temperatures below 200 K, they rotate by 45° to lie along ±{110}. Mössbauer spectroscopy suggests the presence of Fe(3+) within the primary phase, but also indicates that fluorination results in some particle fragmentation to form a paramagnetic component of the fluorinated material.

  10. 5f band dispersion in epitaxial films of UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Jia, Quanxi; Roy, Lindsay E; Martin, Richard L; Joyce, John J

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-assisted deposition of epitaxial films utilizes lattice pinning to produce films of very high stability and properties identical with bulk crystal. Dispersion of the 5f band is shown for the first time in a actinide Mott insulator system, which suggestes hybridization as a leading process in establishing the electronic structure. Hybrid density functional is succesfully employed to calculate the electronic structure of UO{sub 2} in agreement with experiments. UO{sub 2} continues to be a mysterious and elusive compound in terms of understanding the physical properties of a material. Most actinide oxides, including UO{sub 2} are predicted to be metallic. However, UO{sub 2} is an antiferromagnetic insulator with a relatively large gap of about 2eV. The f orbital charater of the excitations across the gap places UO{sub 2} in a Mott insulator category, but no states at the gap center have ever been measured directly, in spite of intensive efforts. In this work we present the first results of the electronic structure investigation of a epitaxial film of UO{sub 2}, where we find even more unexpected properties, like the dispersive nature of 5f bands. We also demonstrate the unexpected, very high stability of the epitaxial film of UO{sub 2}. In the lattice-pinning scheme, the crystalline nature of the film is preserved all the way up to the topmost layers even after prolonged exposure to atmospheric conditions. Hybridized, dispersive bands are common in the itinerant uranium compounds. One usually finds hybridization of f-orbitals with conduction band to be quite common in f-electron systems at low temperatures. Such bands may reside in the vicinity of the Fermi level and participate in the construction of the Fermi surface. However, in the insulator like UO{sub 2}, one expects a more atomic band nature, where f-bands are relatively flat and shifted away from the Fermi level by the gap energy scale. Precise location of UO{sub 2} on the localization

  11. 5-F catheter in cerebral angiography

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, G.V.; Naheedy, M.H.; Colucci, V.M.; Hammerschlag, S.B.

    1981-11-01

    Although the 5-F catheter is reputed to cause less vascular trauma than larger catheters, subintimal injections of contrast material have occurred following intimal damage by the catheter tip. Microscopic studies of the tips of two widely used 5-F polyethylene catheters have revealed a difference in configuration resulting in one of the catheters becoming markedly damaged during angiography. The authors make recommendations for finishing and protecting the catheter tip.

  12. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  13. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, Jr., N.E.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L.

    2008-10-30

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  14. Electronic structure of delta-Pu and PuCoGa[sub 3] from photoemission and the mixed level model

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J. J.; Wills, J. M.; Durakiewicz, T.; Butterfield, M. T.; Guziewicz, E.; Sarrao, John L.,; Arko, A. J.; Moore, D. P.; Morales, L. A.; Eriksson, O.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structure of {delta}-phase Pu metal and the Pu-based superconductor PuCoGa{sub 5} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy and a novel theoretical scheme. Excellent agreement between calculation and experiment defines a path forward for understanding electronic structure aspects of Pu-based materials. The photoemission results show two separate regions of 5f electron spectral intensity, one at the Fermi energy and another centered 1.2 eV below the Fermi level. A comparison is made between the photoemission data and five computational schemes for {delta}-Pu. The results for {delta}-Pu and PuCoGa{sub 5} indicate 5f electron behavior on the threshold between localized and itinerant and a broader framework for understanding the fundamental electronic properties of the Pu 5f levels in general within two configurations, one localized and one itinerant.

  15. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  16. Rampant changes in 5f 5/2 and 5f 7/2 filling across the light and middle actinide metals

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K; der Lann, G v; Wall, M; Schwartz, A; Haire, R

    2007-04-03

    We examine the branching ratio of the N{sub 4,5} (4d {yields} 5f ) spectra of Th, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm metal using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), together with many-electron atomic spectral calculations and the spin-orbit sum rule. Our results show that: (1) The actinide metals Pu, Am, and Cm exhibit intermediate coupling. (2) The intermediate coupling values for the 5f states as calculated using a many-electron atomic model are correct for the actinides, this being proven by our new results for curium. (3) The EELS branching ratio is sensitive to the degree of 5f electron delocalization, which is illustrated by the transition from LS to intermediate coupling between U and Pu.

  17. Northrop F-5F shark nose development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, O. R.

    1978-01-01

    During spin susceptibility testing of the Northrop F-5F airplane, two erect spin entries were obtained from purely longitudinal control inputs at low speed. Post flight analysis of the data showed that the initial yaw departure occurred at zero sideslip, and review of wind tunnel data showed significant yawing moments present at angles of attack well above stall. Further analysis of this wind tunnel data indicated that the yawing moments were being generated by the long slender nose of the airplane. Redesign of the nose was accomplished, resulting in a nose configuration which completely alleviated the asymmetric yawing moments.

  18. Phase Diagram and Electronic Structure of Praseodymium and Plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanatà, Nicola; Yao, Yongxin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    We develop a new implementation of the Gutzwiller approximation in combination with the local density approximation, which enables us to study complex 4 f and 5 f systems beyond the reach of previous approaches. We calculate from first principles the zero-temperature phase diagram and electronic structure of Pr and Pu, finding good agreement with the experiments. Our study of Pr indicates that its pressure-induced volume-collapse transition would not occur without change of lattice structure—contrarily to Ce. Our study of Pu shows that the most important effect originating the differentiation between the equilibrium densities of its allotropes is the competition between the Peierls effect and the Madelung interaction and not the dependence of the electron correlations on the lattice structure.

  19. Density-functional electronic structure of PuCoGa5

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P

    2004-06-03

    Density-functional electronic-structure calculations for PuCoGa{sub 5} are performed to address the possibility of magnetic interactions in this high-temperature superconductor. Within an itinerant 5f-electron picture, cohesion and crystallographic parameters compares favorably with experiment, whereas only when spin and orbital interactions are accounted for the calculated electronic density of states agrees with photoemission spectra. This fact suggests that spin and orbital correlations are important for a correct description of the PuCoGa{sub 5} electronic structure and may play a role in an unconventional mechanism for superconductivity.

  20. Giant magnetoresistance effects in 5f-materials

    SciTech Connect

    Havela, L.; Sechovsky, V.; Prokes, K. |

    1995-09-01

    Very large magnetoresistance effects related to reorientation of magnetic moments were observed in a number of U-intermetallics. The resemblance to magnetic multilayers is a basis of discussion of possible mechanisms of these phenomena, in background of which is probably the strong hybridization of 5f- and conduction-electron states. A clear cut evidence of relative contributions of varied scattering rate on one side and carrier concentration on the other side can be presumably obtained from experiments on samples with controlled disorder.

  1. Multiconfigurational nature of 5f orbitals in uranium and plutonium and their intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Corwin

    2013-03-01

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of U and Pu elements and intermetallics remain poorly understood despite decades of effort, and currently represent an important scientific frontier toward understanding matter. The last decade has seen great progress both due to the discovery of superconductivity in PuCoGa5 and advances in theory that finally can explain fundamental ground state properties in elemental plutonium, such as the phonon dispersion curve, the non-magnetic ground state, and the volume difference between the α and δ phases. A new feature of the recent calculations is the presence not only of intermediate valence of the Pu 5f electrons, but of multiconfigurational ground states, where the different properties of the α and δ phases are primarily governed by the different relative weights of the 5f4, 5f5, and 5f6 electronic configurations. The usual method for measuring multiconfigurational states in the lanthanides is to measure the lanthanide LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), a method that is severely limited for the actinides because the spectroscopic features are not well enough separated. Advances in resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) have now allowed for spectra with sufficient resolution to resolve individual resonances associated with the various actinide valence states. Utilizing a new spectrometer at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), RXES data have been collected that show, for the first time, spectroscopic signatures of each of these configurations and their relative changes in various uranium and plutonium intermetallic compounds. In combination with conventional XANES spectra on related compounds, these data indicate such states may be ubiquitous in uranium and plutonium intermetallics, providing a new framework toward understanding properties ranging from heavy fermion behavior, superconductivity, and intermediate valence to mechanical and fundamental bonding behavior in

  2. A combined photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic ab initio studies of the electronic structures of UFO and UFO(-).

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumendra K; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V; Li, Wei-Li; Su, Jing; Bross, David H; Peterson, Kirk A; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Li, Jun

    2016-02-28

    The observation of the gaseous UFO(-) anion is reported, which is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativisitic ab initio calculations. Two strong photoelectron bands are observed at low binding energies due to electron detachment from the U-7sσ orbital. Numerous weak detachment bands are also observed due to the strongly correlated U-5f electrons. The electron affinity of UFO is measured to be 1.27(3) eV. High-level relativistic quantum chemical calculations have been carried out on the ground state and many low-lying excited states of UFO to help interpret the photoelectron spectra and understand the electronic structure of UFO. The ground state of UFO(-) is linear with an O-U-F structure and a (3)H4 spectral term derived from a U 7sσ(2)5fφ(1)5fδ(1) electron configuration, whereas the ground state of neutral UFO has a (4)H(7/2) spectral term with a U 7sσ(1)5fφ(1)5fδ(1) electron configuration. Strong electron correlation effects are found in both the anionic and neutral electronic configurations. In the UFO neutral, a high density of electronic states with strong configuration mixing is observed in most of the scalar relativistic and spin-orbit coupled states. The strong electron correlation, state mixing, and spin-orbit coupling of the electronic states make the excited states of UFO very challenging for accurate quantum chemical calculations. PMID:26931704

  3. A combined photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic ab initio studies of the electronic structures of UFO and UFO(-).

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumendra K; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V; Li, Wei-Li; Su, Jing; Bross, David H; Peterson, Kirk A; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Li, Jun

    2016-02-28

    The observation of the gaseous UFO(-) anion is reported, which is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativisitic ab initio calculations. Two strong photoelectron bands are observed at low binding energies due to electron detachment from the U-7sσ orbital. Numerous weak detachment bands are also observed due to the strongly correlated U-5f electrons. The electron affinity of UFO is measured to be 1.27(3) eV. High-level relativistic quantum chemical calculations have been carried out on the ground state and many low-lying excited states of UFO to help interpret the photoelectron spectra and understand the electronic structure of UFO. The ground state of UFO(-) is linear with an O-U-F structure and a (3)H4 spectral term derived from a U 7sσ(2)5fφ(1)5fδ(1) electron configuration, whereas the ground state of neutral UFO has a (4)H(7/2) spectral term with a U 7sσ(1)5fφ(1)5fδ(1) electron configuration. Strong electron correlation effects are found in both the anionic and neutral electronic configurations. In the UFO neutral, a high density of electronic states with strong configuration mixing is observed in most of the scalar relativistic and spin-orbit coupled states. The strong electron correlation, state mixing, and spin-orbit coupling of the electronic states make the excited states of UFO very challenging for accurate quantum chemical calculations.

  4. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  5. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  6. Electron Coherence in Mesoscopic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Alex; Glazman, Leonid

    2011-03-20

    The recent rapid progress in nanofabrication and experimental techniques made it possible to investigate a variety of meso-- and nano--scale systems, which were unavailable only a few years ago. Examples include fabrication of high-quality quantum wires in semiconductor heterostructures, of nanoscale hybrid superconductor--normal metal structures, and of a variety of novel (and much smaller) quantum dot and q-bit designs. These technological advances have led to formulation of a number of condensed matter theory problems which are equally important for applications and for the fundamental science. The present proposal aims at filling the exposed gaps in knowledge and at facilitating further development of experimental and theoretical physics of nanoscale structures. Specifically, the two PIs address the following issues: (i) The theory of interacting electrons in a quantum wire which accounts adequately for the non-linear dispersion relation of the electrons. The existing approaches rely on models with {\\em linearized} electron spectrum, which fall short of addressing a growing list of experimentally relevant phenomena. (ii) Dynamics of hybrid normal--superconducting systems. A reliable treatment of dissipative phenomena in such structures is not developed as of yet, while rapid progress in fabrication makes finding the proper theoretical treatment methods highly desirable. (iii)~The fundamental limits on relaxation times of a superconducting charge q-bit. The latter is one of the most advanced scalable realizations of a quantum computing device. (iv)~The dynamics and relaxation times of a spin of an electron in a small semiconductor quantum dot. Besides the fundamental importance, these structures are also valuable candidates for quantum computing applications.

  7. Electronic Structure of Few-Electron Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popsueva, V.; Hansen, J. P.; Caillat, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a study of strongly correlated few-electron quantum dots, exploring the spectra of various few-electron quantum dot molecules: a double (diatomic) structure a quadruple two-electron quantum dot, and a three-electron double dot. Electron energy spectra are computed for different values of dot separation. All spectra show clear band structures and can be understood from asymptotical properties of the system.

  8. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  9. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  10. Ground-state Electronic Structure of Actinide Monocarbides and Mononitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually increasing degree of f electron localization from U to Cm, with the tendency toward localization being slightly stronger in the (more ionic) nitrides compared to the (more covalent) carbides. The itinerant band picture is found to be adequate for UC and acceptable for UN, while a more complex manifold of competing localized and delocalized f-electron configurations underlies the ground states of NpC, PuC, AmC, NpN, and PuN. The fully localized 5f-electron configuration is realized in CmC (f{sup 7}), CmN (f{sup 7}), and AmN (f{sup 6}). The observed sudden increase in lattice parameter from PuN to AmN is found to be related to the localization transition. The calculated valence electron densities of states are in good agreement with photoemission data.

  11. Multiconfigurational nature of 5f orbitals in uranium and plutonium intermetallics

    PubMed Central

    Booth, C.H.; Jiang, Yu; Wang, D.L.; Mitchell, J.N.; Tobash, P.H.; Bauer, E.D.; Wall, M.A.; Allen, P.G.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Torrez, M.A.; Sarrao, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium and plutonium’s 5f electrons are tenuously poised between strongly bonding with ligand spd-states and residing close to the nucleus. The unusual properties of these elements and their compounds (e.g., the six different allotropes of elemental plutonium) are widely believed to depend on the related attributes of f-orbital occupancy and delocalization for which a quantitative measure is lacking. By employing resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and making comparisons to specific heat measurements, we demonstrate the presence of multiconfigurational f-orbital states in the actinide elements U and Pu and in a wide range of uranium and plutonium intermetallic compounds. These results provide a robust experimental basis for a new framework toward understanding the strongly-correlated behavior of actinide materials. PMID:22706643

  12. ARPES in strongly correlated 4f and 5f systems: Comparison to the Periodic Anderson Model

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Cox, L.E.

    1997-12-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow, nearly temperature independent bands (i.e., no spectral weight loss or transfer with temperature). A small dispersion of the f-bands above the Kondo temperature is easily measurable so that a Kondo resonance, as defined by NCA, is not evident. Preliminary results, however, indicate that the Periodic Anderson Model captures some of the essential physics. Angle-integrated resonant photoemission results on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow 5f feature at E{sub F}, similar in width to f-states in Ce and U compounds, but differing in that cross-section behavior of the near-E{sub F} feature suggests substantial 6D admixture.

  13. Circularly polarized luminescence of curium: a new characterization of the 5f actinide complexes.

    PubMed

    Law, Ga-Lai; Andolina, Christopher M; Xu, Jide; Luu, Vinh; Rutkowski, Philip X; Muller, Gilles; Shuh, David K; Gibson, John K; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-09-19

    A key distinction between the lanthanide (4f) and the actinide (5f) transition elements is the increased role of f-orbital covalent bonding in the latter. Circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) is an uncommon but powerful spectroscopy which probes the electronic structure of chiral, luminescent complexes or molecules. While there are many examples of CPL spectra for the lanthanides, this report is the first for an actinide. Two chiral, octadentate chelating ligands based on orthoamide phenol (IAM) were used to complex curium(III). While the radioactivity kept the amount of material limited to micromole amounts, spectra of the highly luminescent complexes showed significant emission peak shifts between the different complexes, consistent with ligand field effects previously observed in luminescence spectra.

  14. Structural and electronic properties of uranium-encapsulated Au₁₄ cage.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Dai, Xing; Kang, Seung-gu; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo Andres; Xin, Minsi; Meng, Yan; Han, Jie; Wang, Zhigang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-01-01

    The structural properties of the uranium-encapsulated nano-cage U@Au14 are predicted using density functional theory. The presence of the uranium atom makes the Au14 structure more stable than the empty Au14-cage, with a triplet ground electronic state for U@Au14. Analysis of the electronic structure shows that the two frontier single-occupied molecular orbital electrons of U@Au14 mainly originate from the 5f shell of the U atom after charge transfer. Meanwhile, the bonding orbitals and charge population indicate that the designed U@Au14 nano-cage structure is stabilized by ionocovalent interactions. The current findings provide theoretical basis for future syntheses and further study of actinide doped gold nanoclusters, which might subsequently facilitate applications of such structure in radio-labeling, nanodrug carrier and other biomedical applications. PMID:25069968

  15. Electronic Structures of Uranium Compounds Studied by Soft X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Okane, Tetsuo; Saitoh, Yuji; Fujimori, Atsushi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Haga, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2016-06-01

    The electronic structures of uranium-based compounds have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays has made it possible to directly observe their bulk band structures and Fermi surfaces. It has been shown that the band structures and Fermi surfaces of itinerant compounds such as UB2, UN, and UFeGa5 are quantitatively described by a band-structure calculation treating all U 5f electrons as itinerant. Furthermore, the overall electronic structures of heavy-fermion compounds such as UPd2Al3, UNi2Al3, and URu2Si2 are also explained by a band-structure calculation, although some disagreements exist, which might originate from the electron correlation effect. This suggests that the itinerant description of U 5f states is an appropriate starting point for the description of their electronic structures. The situation is similar for ferromagnetic superconductors such as UGe2, URhGe, UCoGe, and UIr, although the complications from their low-symmetry crystal structures make it more difficult to describe their detailed electronic structures. The local electronic structures of the uranium site have been probed by core-level photoelectron spectroscopy with soft X-rays. The comparisons of core-level spectra of heavy-fermion compounds with typical itinerant and localized compounds suggest that the local electronic structures of most itinerant and heavy-fermion compounds are close to the U 5f3 configuration except for UPd2Al3 and UPt3. The core-level spectrum of UPd2Al3 has similarities to those of both itinerant and localized compounds, suggesting that it is located at the boundary between the itinerant and localized states. Moreover, the spectrum of UPt3 is very close to that of the localized compound UPd3, suggesting that it is nearly localized, although there are narrow quasi-particle bands in the vicinity of EF.

  16. On the origin of POU5F1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pluripotency is a fundamental property of early mammalian development but it is currently unclear to what extent its cellular mechanisms are conserved in vertebrates or metazoans. POU5F1 and POU2 are the two principle members constituting the class V POU domain family of transcription factors, thought to have a conserved role in the regulation of pluripotency in vertebrates as well as germ cell maintenance and neural patterning. They have undergone a complex pattern of evolution which is poorly understood and controversial. Results By analyzing the sequences of POU5F1, POU2 and their flanking genes, we provide strong indirect evidence that POU5F1 originated at least as early as a common ancestor of gnathostomes but became extinct in a common ancestor of teleost fishes, while both POU5F1 and POU2 survived in the sarcopterygian lineage leading to tetrapods. Less divergent forms of POU5F1 and POU2 appear to have persisted among cartilaginous fishes. Conclusions Our study resolves the controversial evolutionary relationship between teleost pou2 and tetrapod POU2 and POU5F1, and shows that class V POU transcription factors have existed at least since the common ancestor of gnathostome vertebrates. It provides a framework for elucidating the basis for the lineage-specific extinctions of POU2 and POU5F1. PMID:23659605

  17. Energetics and electronic structure of UAl4 with point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniznik, L.; Alonso, P. R.; Gargano, P. H.; Rubiolo, G. H.

    2015-11-01

    UAl4 ideal and defect structures were studied within the framework of the Density Functional Theory. The structural and magnetic ordering of UAl4 in paramagnetic, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic states have been investigated, within the collinear and non-collinear spin approximation, using the GGA model, as embedded in the program package VASP. An antiferromagnetic (0 1 bar 1) layer structure with spins aligned to the [010] direction was found to be energetically preferred. The analysis of density of states and bonding charge density point out that the bonding mechanism consists primarily of band mixing between the U 5f and Al 3p states. Supercells were built from UAl4 unit cells with the established magnetic structure. For those supercells we calculated the energy of formation of vacancies and antisite defects taking into account the existence of three distinct aluminum sites. Point defect formation energies, local lattice relaxations, as well as the defect induced magnetic ordering and electronic density redistribution, are discussed. It is shown that antiferromagnetism is locally broken. Al antisites and U antisites in Al 4e Wyckoff positions are the constitutional point defects in Al-rich and U-rich oI20 UAl4, respectively. In this way we have presented here the first set of data which makes it possible to discuss and quantify the point defects concentrations in the experimental composition range for existence of this uranium aluminide.

  18. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  19. Electronic Structure of AC-Clusters and High-Resolution X-ray Spectra of Actinides in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kulagin, Nicolay Alex

    2007-07-01

    Ab initio calculations using SCF approach for and analysis of results of investigation of the electronic structure of the clusters RAn+:[L]k with rare earths or actinides were carried out for the clusters in solids and liquids. Theoretical results for the electronic structure, radial integrals and energy of X- ray lines are presented for AC ions with unoccupied 5f-shell in the clusters in oxides, chlorides and fluorides environment. Possibility of collapse of nf-shell for the separate clusters and identification of electronic state of ions with unstable nuclei, are discussed, too. (author)

  20. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  1. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  2. Electronic structures of endohedral fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Changming; Hettich, R.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Ying, Z.C.; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fullerenes with different elements trapped inside the cage have been the subject of active research both experimentally and theoretically ever since the initial discovery of C{sub 60}. La@C{sub n}, were the first endohedral fullerenes produced both in gas phase and in macroscopic quantities. Early electron spin resonance investigation of La@C{sub 82} by R.D. Johnson, et.al indicated that La transfer nearly all of the three valence electrons to the fullerene cage, forming a La{sup 3+}@C{sub 82}{sup 3-} complex. Theoretical calculations also have shown that La transfers its valence electrons to the fullerene cage in molecules of La@C{sub n}. Investigations with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy by L. Wang, et.al. indicated that attaching a potassium atom outside the C{sub 60} cage lowers the electron affinity (EA) while trapping Ca atom inside the C{sub 60} sphere increases the EA compared with parent C{sub 60} molecule. These results indicate that metallofullerenes appear to have substantially lower ionization potentials (IP) and higher EA than empty fullerenes.

  3. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  4. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian J.; Dennis, Robert V.; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-03-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  5. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Brian J; Dennis, Robert V; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-04-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  6. Nano-focused Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (nBIS) Determination of the Unoccupied Electronic Structure of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Butterfield, M; Teslich, N; Bliss, A; Chung, B; Gross, J; McMahan, A; Schwartz, A

    2006-12-20

    While chemically toxic and highly radioactive, Pu may be the most scientifically interesting element in the periodic table. It's properties include the following: six different phases, close to each other in energy and sensitive to variations of temperature, pressure and chemistry; the face-centered-cubic phase (delta) is the least dense; Pu expands when it solidifies from the melt; and it is clearly the nexus of the actinide binary phase diagrams of the actinides. In a sense, it is the boundary between the light (ostensibly delocalized 5f electrons) and heavy (ostensibly localized or correlated 5f electrons) actinide elements, but this is an over-simplification. The localized atomic 5f states are naturally correlated, but important regimes of correlated electron states are conceivable as extended states on the delocalized side of the possible Mott transition between conductive and insulating behavior. The proximity to this crossover may be the driving force behind all these exotic properties. Pu remains of immense scientific and technological importance and the advancement to a firm, scientific understanding of the electronic structure of Pu and its compounds, mixtures, alloys and solutions is a crucial issue. Moreover, while there are a number of ongoing experimental efforts directed at determining the occupied (valence band, below the Fermi Energy) electronic structure of Pu, there is essential no experimental data on the unoccupied (conduction band, above the Fermi Energy) electronic structure of Pu. Our objective is to determine the conduction band (unoccupied) electronic structure of Pu and other actinides (and possibly rare earths as well), in a phase specific fashion and emphasizing bulk contributions. This is world-class science directed at issue that is central to LLNL and DOE: Pu structure property relationships.

  7. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  8. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  9. Electronic structure and magnetic and transport properties of single-crystalline UN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsel-Czekała, M.; Talik, E.; de v. Du Plessis, P.; Troć, R.; Misiorek, H.; Sułkowski, C.

    2007-10-01

    The electronic structure (both valence band and 4f core level spectra) of the cubic monocompound UN in the paramagnetic state was studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with the results of calculations employing full-potential local-orbital minimum-basis full relativistic method with the spin-orbit coupling included implicitly. The molar susceptibility of a single crystal of antiferromagnetic UN (TN=51K) is reported along three main crystallographic directions between 1.9 and 300K . The observed magnetic characteristics are in agreement with previous studies. The observed small anisotropy in the ordered region is discussed. Results of electronic structure, magnetoresistivity, thermoelectric power, and thermal conductivity as studied on single-crystalline specimens are given and discussed from the viewpoint of dual and spin-density-wave-like character of the 5f electrons.

  10. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  11. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  12. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  13. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  14. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARATERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-01-20

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  15. Analysis Of The Tank 5F Final Characterization Samples-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2012-09-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  16. Structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of UN: Systematic density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yong; Wang, Bao-Tian; Li, Rong-Wu; Shi, Hongliang; Zhang, Ping

    2010-11-01

    A systematic first-principle study is performed to calculate the lattice parameters, electronic structure, and thermodynamic properties of UN using the local-density approximation (LDA)+ U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+ U formalisms. To properly describe the strong correlation in the U 5 f electrons, we optimized the U parameter in calculating the total energy, lattice parameters, and bulk modulus at the nonmagnetic (NM), ferromagnetic (FM), and antiferromagnetic (AFM) configurations. Our results show that by choosing the Hubbard U around 2 eV within the GGA+ U approach, it is promising to correctly and consistently describe the above mentioned properties of UN. The localization behavior of 5 f electrons is found to be stronger than that of UC and our electronic analysis indicates that the effective charge of UN can be represented as U 1.71+N 1.71-. As for the thermodynamic study, the phonon dispersion illustrates the stability of UN and we further predict the lattice vibration energy, thermal expansion, and specific heat by utilizing the quasiharmonic approximation. Our calculated specific heat is well consistent with experiments.

  17. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  18. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  19. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  20. Effect of spin-orbit and on-site Coulomb interactions on the electronic structure and lattice dynamics of uranium monocarbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowik, U. D.; Piekarz, P.; Legut, D.; Jagło, G.

    2016-08-01

    Uranium monocarbide, a potential fuel material for the generation IV reactors, is investigated within density functional theory. Its electronic, magnetic, elastic, and phonon properties are analyzed and discussed in terms of spin-orbit interaction and localized versus itinerant behavior of the 5 f electrons. The localization of the 5 f states is tuned by varying the local Coulomb repulsion interaction parameter. We demonstrate that the theoretical electronic structure, elastic constants, phonon dispersions, and their densities of states can reproduce accurately the results of x-ray photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat measurements as well as inelastic neutron scattering experiments only when the 5 f states experience the spin-orbit interaction and simultaneously remain partially localized. The partial localization of the 5 f electrons could be represented by a moderate value of the on-site Coulomb interaction parameter of about 2 eV. The results of the present studies indicate that both strong electron correlations and spin-orbit effects are crucial for realistic theoretical description of the ground-state properties of uranium carbide.

  1. Structural, electronic, and magnetic characteristics of Np2Co17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Hen, A.; Orion, I.; Colineau, E.; Eloirdi, R.; Griveau, J.-C.; Gaczyński, P.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.; Sanchez, J.-P.; Winterrose, M. L.; Magnani, N.; Shick, A. B.; Caciuffo, R.

    2012-01-01

    A previously unknown neptunium-transition-metal binary compound Np2Co17 has been synthesized and characterized by means of powder x-ray diffraction, 237Np Mössbauer spectroscopy, superconducting-quantum-interference-device magnetometry, and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The compound crystallizes in a Th2Ni17-type hexagonal structure with room-temperature lattice parameters a=8.3107(1) Å and c=8.1058(1) Å. Magnetization curves indicate the occurrence of ferromagnetic order below TC>350 K. Mössbauer spectra suggest a Np3+ oxidation state and give an ordered moment of μNp=1.57(4) μB and μNp=1.63(4) μB for the Np atoms located, respectively, at the 2b and 2d crystallographic positions of the P63/mmc space group. Combining these values with a sum-rule analysis of the XMCD spectra measured at the neptunium M4,5 absorption edges, one obtains the spin and orbital contributions to the site-averaged Np moment [μS=-1.88(9) μB, μL=3.48(9) μB]. The ratio between the expectation value of the magnetic-dipole moment and the spin magnetic moment (mmd/μS=+1.36) is positive as predicted for localized 5f electrons and lies between the values calculated in intermediate-coupling (IC) and jj approximations. The expectation value of the angular part of the spin-orbit-interaction operator is in excellent agreement with the IC estimate. The ordered moment averaged over the four inequivalent Co sites, as obtained from the saturation value of the magnetization, is μCo≃1.6 μB. The experimental results are discussed against the predictions of first-principles electronic-structure calculations based on the spin-polarized local-spin-density approximation plus the Hubbard interaction.

  2. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of PuMGa5 compounds within the LDA + U + SO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.; Dremov, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of PuMGa5 compounds (M = Co, Fe, Ni, Rh, Ir) have been calculated within the LDA + U + SO method taking into account the strong electron-electron correlations and the spin-orbit coupling in the 5 f shell of the actinide metal. The features of the electronic structure, coupling type, electron configuration, and magnetic state of the plutonium ion have been considered depending on the type of transition metal in PuMGa5. The estimates of the effective magnetic moment of the plutonium ion agree well with the known experimental values. It has been shown that the occupancy of d states of the transition metal correlates with the appearance of superconductivity in the compounds of this class, providing the optimum doping regime in the electronic subsystem.

  3. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  4. Electronic Structure and Magnetic Properties of Dioxo-Bridged Diuranium Complexes with Diamond-Core Structural Motifs: A Relativistic DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Teyar, Billel; Belkhiri, Lotfi; Costuas, Karine; Boucekkine, Abdou; Meyer, Karsten

    2016-03-21

    Electronic structures and magnetic properties of the binuclear bis(μ-oxo) U(IV)/U(IV) K2[{(((nP,Me)ArO)3tacn)U(IV)}2(μ-O)2] and U(V)/U(V) [{(((nP,Me)ArO)3tacn)U(V)}2(μ-O)2] (tacn = triazacyclononane, nP = neopentyl) complexes, exhibiting [U(μ-O)2U] diamond-core structural motifs, have been investigated computationally using scalar relativistic Density Functional Theory (DFT) combined with the Broken Symmetry (BS) approach for their magnetic properties. Using the B3LYP hybrid functional, the BS ground state of the pentavalent [U(V)(μ-O)2U(V)] 5f(1)-5f(1) complex has been found of lower energy than the high spin (HS) triplet state, thus confirming the antiferromagnetic character in agreement with experimental magnetic susceptibility measurements. The nonmagnetic character observed for the tetravalent K2[U(IV)(μ-O)2U(IV)] 5f(2)-5f(2) species is also predicted by our DFT calculations, which led practically to the same energy for the HS and BS states. As reported for related dioxo diuranium(V) systems, superexchange is likely to be responsible for the antiferromagnetic coupling through the π-network orbital pathway within the (μ-O)2 bridge, the dissymmetrical structure of the U2O2 core playing a determining role. In the case of the U(IV) species, our computations indicate that the K(+) counterions are likely to play a role for the observed magnetic property. Finally, the MO analysis, in conjunction with NPA and QTAIM analyses, clarify the electronic structures of the studied complexes. In particular, the fact that the experimentally attempted chemical oxidation of the U(V) species does not lead straightforwardly to binuclear complexes U(VI) is clarified by the MO analysis.

  5. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  6. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  7. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  8. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  9. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1990-01-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi2 and Si(111)/NiSi2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  10. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1989-11-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi 2 and Si(111)/NiSi 2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  11. Crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P. Avilov, A. S.; Lepeshov, G. G.

    2008-05-15

    A procedure of crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data is described. The electron diffraction data on polycrystalline films are processed taking into account possible overlap of reflections and two-beam interaction. The diffraction from individual single crystals in an electron microscope equipped with a precession attachment is described using the Bloch-wave method, which takes into account multibeam scattering, and a special approach taking into consideration the specific features of the diffraction geometry in the precession technique. Investigations were performed on LiF, NaF, CaF{sub 2}, and Si crystals. A method for reducing experimental data, which allows joint electron and X-ray diffraction study, is proposed.

  12. Electronic and crystallographic structure of apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderín, L.; Stott, M. J.; Rubio, A.

    2003-04-01

    An ab initio study of four different stoichiometric apatites (oxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, and chlorapatite) is presented. The calculations were performed using density-functional theory with the local-density approximation for exchange and correlation, and a full relaxation of the electronic structure, the atomic arrangement, and the unit cell. Hexagonal unit cells were obtained for all four apatites, and the calculated atomic arrangements are in close agreement with observation in those cases for which the structure is firmly established. A zero-temperature structure is predicted for oxyapatite, and two possible configurations were found for the Cl- ions in chlorapatite. The possibility of the monoclinic structure in hydroxyapatite and chlorapatite was also studied but no indication of greater stability with respect to the hexagonal structure was found. A relationship between the structure of the apatites and that of pure calcium is discussed.

  13. The roles of 4f- and 5f-orbitals in bonding: a magnetochemical, crystal field, density functional theory, and multi-reference wavefunction study.

    PubMed

    Lukens, W W; Speldrich, M; Yang, P; Duignan, T J; Autschbach, J; Kögerler, P

    2016-07-28

    The electronic structures of 4f(3)/5f(3) Cp''3M and Cp''3M·alkylisocyanide complexes, where Cp'' is 1,3-bis-(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadienyl, are explored with a focus on the splitting of the f-orbitals, which provides information about the strengths of the metal-ligand interactions. While the f-orbital splitting in many lanthanide complexes has been reported in detail, experimental determination of the f-orbital splitting in actinide complexes remains rare in systems other than halide and oxide compounds, since the experimental approach, crystal field analysis, is generally significantly more difficult for actinide complexes than for lanthanide complexes. In this study, a set of analogous neodymium(iii) and uranium(iii) tris-cyclopentadienyl complexes and their isocyanide adducts was characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility. The crystal field model was parameterized by combined fitting of EPR and susceptibility data, yielding an accurate description of f-orbital splitting. The isocyanide derivatives were also studied using density functional theory, resulting in f-orbital splitting that is consistent with crystal field fitting, and by multi-reference wavefunction calculations that support the electronic structure analysis derived from the crystal-field calculations. The results highlight that the 5f-orbitals, but not the 4f-orbitals, are significantly involved in bonding to the isocyanide ligands. The main interaction between isocyanide ligand and the metal center is a σ-bond, with additional 5f to π* donation for the uranium complexes. While interaction with the isocyanide π*-orbitals lowers the energies of the 5fxz(2) and 5fyz(2)-orbitals, spin-orbit coupling greatly reduces the population of 5fxz(2) and 5fyz(2) in the ground state. PMID:27349178

  14. High-resolution solid-state oxygen-17 NMR of actinide-bearing compounds: an insight into the 5f chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martel, Laura; Magnani, Nicola; Vigier, Jean-Francois; Boshoven, Jacobus; Selfslag, Chris; Farnan, Ian; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Somers, Joseph; Fanghänel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    A massive interest has been generated lately by the improvement of solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR methods for the study of a broad range of paramagnetic organic and inorganic materials. The open-shell cations at the origin of this paramagnetism can be metals, transition metals, or rare-earth elements. Actinide-bearing compounds and their 5f unpaired electrons remain elusive in this intensive research area due to their well-known high radiotoxicity. A dedicated effort enabling the handling of these highly radioactive materials now allows their analysis using high-resolution MAS NMR (>55 kHz). Here, the study of the local structure of a series of actinide dioxides, namely, ThO2, UO2, NpO2, PuO2, and AmO2, using solid-state (17)O MAS NMR is reported. An important increase of the spectral resolution is found due to the removal of the dipolar broadening proving the efficiency of this technique for structural analysis. The NMR parameters in these systems with numerous and unpaired 5f electrons were interpreted using an empirical approach. Single-ion model calculations were performed for the first time to determine the z component of electron spin on each of the actinide atoms, which is proportional to the shifts. A similar variation thereof was observed only for the heavier actinides of this study.

  15. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of dilute U impurities in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Cottenier, S.; Mishra, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic moment of dilute U impurity in metallic hosts have been calculated from first principles. The calculations have been performed within local density approximation of the density functional theory using Augmented plane wave+local orbital (APW+lo) technique, taking account of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb correlation through LDA+U approach. We present here our results for the local density of states, magnetic moment and hyperfine field calculated for an isolated U impurity embedded in hosts with sp-, d- and f-type conduction electrons. The results of our systematic study provide a comprehensive insight on the pressure dependence of 5f local magnetism in metallic systems. The unpolarized local density of states (LDOS), analyzed within the frame work of Stoner model suggest the occurrence of local moment for U in sp-elements, noble metals and f-block hosts like La, Ce, Lu and Th. In contrast, U is predicted to be nonmagnetic in most transition metal hosts except in Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, and Hf consistent with the results obtained from spin polarized calculation. The spin and orbital magnetic moments of U computed within the frame of LDA+U formalism show a scaling behavior with lattice compression. We have also computed the spin and orbital hyperfine fields and a detail analysis has been carried out. The host dependent trends for the magnetic moment, hyperfine field and 5f occupation reflect pressure induced change of electronic structure with U valency changing from 3+ to 4+ under lattice compression. In addition, we have made a detailed analysis of the impurity induced host spin polarization suggesting qualitatively different roles of f-band electrons on moment stability. The results presented in this work would be helpful towards understanding magnetism and spin fluctuation in U based alloys.

  16. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices.

  17. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Oxalate Mass Balance During Chemical Cleaning in Tank 5F

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 5F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate.

  19. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  20. Electronic structure calculations on helical conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Juan D; Serna, Andrei; Guerra, Doris; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2010-10-21

    We present a study of the electronic structure and derived properties of polyfurane (PFu), polypyrrol (PPy), and polythiophene (PTh). Two spatial arrangements are considered: trans chain (tc-PFu, tc-PPy, tc-PTh) and cis α-helical (α-PFu, α-PPy, α-PTh). Even at the small sizes considered here, helical conformations appear to be stable. Band gaps of pure, undoped oligomers fall into the semiconductor range. Density of states (DOS) analysis suggest dense valence and conduction bands. Bond length alternation analysis predicts almost complete delocalization of the π clouds in all spatial arrangements. Doping with electron donors or electron-withdrawing impurities reduces all band gaps close to the metallic regime in addition to increasing the DOS for the valence and conduction bands.

  1. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  2. Utilizing Nano-focussed Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (nBIS) to Determine the Unoccupied Electronic Structure of Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, M T; Tobin, J G; Teslich, N E; Bliss, R A; Wall, M A; McMahan, A K; Chung, B W; Schwartz, A J; Kutepov, A L

    2005-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of 5f electrons remains an unrealized ambition of condensed matter physics [1,2]. Recently, there has been a large amount of interest in the actinides, particularly plutonium, driven by the complex and intriguing behavior of Pu and several of its compounds [3-5]. This has prompted both theoretical and experimental investigations of 5f metals and compounds. Of the different allotropes of Pu, the d-phase is of particular interest because of the high symmetry crystal structure and the stability of the phase to low temperatures when alloyed with small amounts of trivalent elements. Consequently much of the recent experimental and theoretical work has focused on this allotrope. From an experimental point of view, the reactivity and radioactivity of Pu, and the complexity of the phase diagram, make it exceedingly complicated to collect high-quality data. Investigations of these complex behaviors all point back to being caused by the intriguing interplay of the various electron states and in particular the behavior of the 5f states. While there are a number of ongoing experimental efforts directed at determining the occupied electronic structure of Pu, there is essentially no experimental data on the unoccupied electronic structure of Pu. We aim to determine the conduction band (unoccupied) electronic structure of Pu and other actinides in a phase specific fashion and emphasizing bulk contributions by using Nano-focussed Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (nBIS). Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS) is the high-energy variant of inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES: electron in, photon out), which is essentially the time reversal of photoelectron spectroscopy (photon in, electron out). IPES can be used to follow the dispersion of electronic states in ordered samples. Owing to its low energies, IPES is usually very surface sensitive. However, by working at higher energies (>200 eV), we will sample preferentially for bulk properties

  3. Electronic structure studies of topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac fermions are a new class of topological quantum materials. In 3D Dirac semimetals, the conduction and valence bands touch each other at discrete points in the momentum space and show linear dispersions along all momentum directions, forming 3D Dirac cones which are protected by the crystal symmetry. Here I will present our recent studies of the electronic structures of novel materials which host 3D Dirac fermions by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  4. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  5. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  6. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, and ultrathin graphite films exhibit many exotic phenomena such as superconductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect. These findings have caused renewed interest in the electronic structure of ultrathin layers of graphene: a single honeycomb carbon layer that is the building block for these materials. There is a strong motivation to incorporate graphene multilayers into atomic-scale devices, spurred on by rapid progress in their fabrication and manipulation. We have synthesized bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and characterized their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands [1]. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic scale electronic devices. [1] T. Ohta, A. Bostwick, T. Seyller, K. Horn, E. Rotenberg, Science, 313, 951 (2006).

  7. Smart electronics and MEMS for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, smart electronics and MEMS are employed to sense and control the drag in aircraft structures. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer. They in turn are mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna (Patent field). The sensor are designed to measure both pressure and shear of the fluid flow on aerospace structures. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location either at the cockpit or elsewhere via the antennas in the sensors and an outside antenna. The integrated MEMS actuators which comprise of cantilever-, diaphram- and microbridge-based MEMS with suitable smart electronics etched onto the structure are controlled by the built-in antennas through feedback and feedforward control architecture. The integration of such materials and smart electronics into the skin of airfoil is ideal for sensing and controlling drag. The basic idea of this concept involves detection of the point of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and transmitting acoustical energy into the boundary layer so that the low energy fluid particles accelerate in the transverse direction and mix with the high energy flow outside of the boundary layer. 3D microriblets can be fabricated using stereo lithography and UV curable conducting polymers. The control of drag using these active microriblets are outlined.

  8. Probing the population of the spin-orbit split levels in the actinide 5f states.

    PubMed

    Moore, K T; van der Laan, G; Tobin, J G; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

    2006-03-01

    Spin-orbit interaction in the 5f states is believed to strongly influence exotic behaviors observed in actinide metals and compounds. Understanding these interactions and how they relate to the actinide series is of considerable importance. To address this issue, the branching ratio of the white-line peaks of the N4,5 edge for the light actinide metals, alpha-Th, alpha-U, and alpha-Pu were recorded using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Using the spin-orbit sum rule and the branching ratios from both experimental spectra and many-electron atomic spectral calculations, accurate values of the spin-orbit interaction, and thus the relative occupation of the j = 5/2 and 7/2 levels, are determined for the actinide 5f states. Results show that the spin-orbit sum rule works very well with both EELS and XAS spectra, needing little or no correction. This is important, since the high spatial resolution of a TEM can be used to overcome the problems of single-crystal growth often encountered with actinide metals, allowing acquisition of EELS spectra, and subsequent spin-orbit analysis, from nm-sized regions. The relative occupation numbers obtained by our method have been compared with recent theoretical results and they show a good agreement in their trend.

  9. ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM TANK 5F CHEMICAL CLEANING

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-03-07

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. The conclusions from this work are: (1) With the exception of iron, the dissolution of sludge components from Tank 5F agreed with results from the actual waste demonstration performed in 2007. The fraction of iron removed from Tank 5F by chemical cleaning was significantly less than the fraction removed in the SRNL demonstrations. The likely cause of this difference is the high pH following the first oxalic acid strike. (2) Most of the sludge mass remaining in the tank is iron and nickel. (3) The remaining sludge contains approximately 26 kg of barium, 37 kg of chromium, and 37 kg of mercury. (4) Most of the radioactivity remaining in the residual material is beta emitters and {sup 90}Sr. (5) The chemical cleaning removed more than {approx} 90% of the uranium isotopes and {sup 137}Cs. (6) The chemical cleaning removed {approx} 70% of the neptunium, {approx} 83% of the {sup 90}Sr, and {approx} 21% of the {sup 60}Co. (7) The chemical cleaning removed less than 10% of the plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes. (8) The chemical cleaning removed more than 90% of the aluminium, calcium, and sodium from the tank. (9) The cleaning operations removed 61% of lithium, 88% of non-radioactive strontium, and 65% of zirconium. The {sup 90}Sr and non-radioactive strontium were measured

  10. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  11. A combined photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic ab initio studies of the electronic structures of UFO and UFO-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Soumendra K.; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Li, Wei-Li; Su, Jing; Bross, David H.; Peterson, Kirk A.; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Li, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The observation of the gaseous UFO- anion is reported, which is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativisitic ab initio calculations. Two strong photoelectron bands are observed at low binding energies due to electron detachment from the U-7sσ orbital. Numerous weak detachment bands are also observed due to the strongly correlated U-5f electrons. The electron affinity of UFO is measured to be 1.27(3) eV. High-level relativistic quantum chemical calculations have been carried out on the ground state and many low-lying excited states of UFO to help interpret the photoelectron spectra and understand the electronic structure of UFO. The ground state of UFO- is linear with an O-U-F structure and a 3H4 spectral term derived from a U 7sσ25fφ15fδ1 electron configuration, whereas the ground state of neutral UFO has a 4H7/2 spectral term with a U 7sσ15fφ15fδ1 electron configuration. Strong electron correlation effects are found in both the anionic and neutral electronic configurations. In the UFO neutral, a high density of electronic states with strong configuration mixing is observed in most of the scalar relativistic and spin-orbit coupled states. The strong electron correlation, state mixing, and spin-orbit coupling of the electronic states make the excited states of UFO very challenging for accurate quantum chemical calculations.

  12. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  13. Structure, Properties, and Theoretical Electronic Structure of UCuOP and Np3S5.

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Daniel M.; Ringe, Emilie; Kaczorowski, D.; Gnida, D.; Andre, G.; Haire, Richard {Dick} G; Ellis, Donald E.; Ibers, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The compounds UCuOP and NpCuOP have been synthesized and their crystal structures were determined from low-temperature single-crystal X-ray data. These isostructural compounds crystallize with two formula units in space group P4/nmm of the tetragonal system. Each An atom (An = U or Np) is coordinated to four O and four P atoms in a distorted square antiprism; each Cu atom is coordinated to four P atoms in a distorted tetrahedron. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on crushed single crystals indicate that UCuOP orders antiferromagnetically at 224(2) K. Neutron diffraction experiments at 100 and 228 K show the magnetic structure of UCuOP to be type AFI ( - -) where ferromagnetically aligned sheets of U atoms in the (001) plane order antiferromagnetically along [001]. The electrical conductivity of UCuOP exhibits metallic character. Its electrical resistivity measured in the ordered region with the current flowing within the tetragonal plane is governed by the scattering of the conduction electrons on antiferromagnetic spin-wave excitations. The electrical resistivity of single-crystalline NpCuOP shows semimetallic character. It is dominated by a pronounced hump at low temperatures, which likely arises owing to long-range magnetic ordering below about 90 K. Density of state analyses using the local spin-density approximation show covalent overlap between AnO and CuP layers of the structure and dominant contributions from 5f-actinide orbitals at the Fermi level. Calculations on a 2 2 2 supercell of NpCuOP show ferromagnetic ordering within the Np sheets and complex coupling between these planes. Comparisons of the physical properties of these AnCuOP compounds are made with those of the family of related tetragonal uranium phosphide compounds.

  14. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  15. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  16. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  17. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  18. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  19. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTUAL WASTE TEST WITH TANK 5F SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. S.; Crapse, K. P.; Fink, S. D.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2007-08-30

    The initial phase of bulk waste removal operations was recently completed in Tank 5F. Video inspection of the tank indicates several mounds of sludge still remain in the tank. Additionally, a mound of white solids was observed under Riser 5. In support of chemical cleaning and heel removal programs, samples of the sludge and the mound of white solids were obtained from the tank for characterization and testing. A core sample of the sludge and Super Snapper sample of the white solids were characterized. A supernate dip sample from Tank 7F was also characterized. A portion of the sludge was used in two tank cleaning tests using oxalic acid at 50 C and 75 C. The filtered oxalic acid from the tank cleaning tests was subsequently neutralized by addition to a simulated Tank 7F supernate. Solids and liquid samples from the tank cleaning test and neutralization test were characterized. A separate report documents the results of the gas generation from the tank cleaning test using oxalic acid and Tank 5F sludge. The characterization results for the Tank 5F sludge sample (FTF-05-06-55) appear quite good with respect to the tight precision of the sample replicates, good results for the glass standards, and minimal contamination found in the blanks and glass standards. The aqua regia and sodium peroxide fusion data also show good agreement between the two dissolution methods. Iron dominates the sludge composition with other major contributors being uranium, manganese, nickel, sodium, aluminum, and silicon. The low sodium value for the sludge reflects the absence of supernate present in the sample due to the core sampler employed for obtaining the sample. The XRD and CSEM results for the Super Snapper salt sample (i.e., white solids) from Tank 5F (FTF-05-07-1) indicate the material contains hydrated sodium carbonate and bicarbonate salts along with some aluminum hydroxide. These compounds likely precipitated from the supernate in the tank. A solubility test showed the material

  1. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  2. First-principles study of structural, elastic, electronic, vibrational and thermodynamic properties of UN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhi-Gang; Stan, Marius; Pichler, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The structural, elastic, electronic, phonon and thermodynamic properties of UN are studied by density functional theory (DFT) within local-density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA), and GGA + U. The GGA calculations of the ground state structural and elastic properties of UN show an overall better agreement with experimental data compared to LDA or GGA + U. The melting temperature of UN (Tm) is estimated from the calculated elastic constant, with GGA predicting Tm = 2944 ± 300 K, in excellent agreement with experimental data. The calculated phonon dispersions of UN agree well with the low temperature measurements. Furthermore, the thermodynamic properties of UN are studied using quasiharmonic approximation by including both lattice vibrational and thermal electronic contributions. The predicted thermodynamic properties, such as enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs energy, heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient, agree well with experimental data. The derived thermodynamic functions of UN are useful to the thermodynamic modeling of phase stabilities in UN-based materials. This study shows that the thermal electronic energy and entropy due to U 5f electrons are important to describe the free energy of UN, due to the metallic character of UN. The calculated thermodynamic properties also suggest that the anharmonic effects are less important in UN even at high-temperature.

  3. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  4. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  5. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  6. Towards scalable electronic structure calculations for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W.A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmermann, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to calculating the properties of large systems within the local density approximation (LDA) that offers the promise of scalability on massively parallel supercomputers is outlined. The electronic structure problem is formulated in real space using multiple scattering theory. The standard LDA algorithm is divided into two parts. Firstly, finding the self-consistent field (SCF) electron density, Secondly, calculating the energy corresponding to the SCF density. We show, at least for metals and alloys, that the former problem is easily solved using real space methods. For the second we take advantage of the variational properties of a generalized Harris-Foulkes free energy functional, a new conduction band Fermi function, and a fictitious finite electron temperature that again allow us to use real-space methods. Using a compute-node {R_arrow} atom equivalence the new method is naturally highly parallel and leads to O(N) scaling where N is the number of atoms making up the system. We show scaling data gathered on the Intel XP/S 35 Paragon for systems up to 512-atoms/simulation cell. To demonstrate that we can achieve metallurgical-precision, we apply the new method to the calculation the energies of disordered CuO{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5} alloys using a large random sample.

  7. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  8. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  9. Pentacene Derivatives: Electronic Structure and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Ross; Ilie, Carolina; Kane, Thorin; Damkaci, Fehmi

    2013-03-01

    The variation in composition and structure of the substituent groups of pentacene compounds promises a broad range of electronic structures and behaviors and provides a vast and alluring field of inquiry with avenues of exploration. These include the development of synthetic schema, the process of design for novel derivatives and, in order to identify those hypothesized compounds which demonstrate the desired behavior, the identification and refinement of computational tools that make accurate predictions about the electronic behavior of theoretical compounds. Two computational techniques and six pentacene derivatives are here examined. One technique was used to predict the vibrational spectra of the compounds, in order to both acquire data about the optical conductivity of the compounds and to establish a pool of theoretical data against which experimental data will be compared. The molecular orbital energy level diagram of the same six compounds was derived using a second approach, with the same goals of discerning between valid and invalid predictive schema by comparison with pending experimental data and between hypothesized compounds which show promise and those which present little potential for use in organic semiconductor technology.

  10. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann`s criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site ``local`` chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  11. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann's criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site local'' chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  12. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  13. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  14. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  15. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  16. Study of electronic structures of solids with strongly interacting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yen-Sheng

    This work contains studies of two classes of perovskite transition metal oxides. The first class is the layered perovskite cuprates and the related nickelate. The second class is the three dimensional perovskite manganites. Both model and ab initio calculations are carried out for the two classes of systems. The dissertation is therefore divided into the following four parts. The first part is about the 3-band Hubbard model. The model is commonly used for describing the electronic properties of the important CuO2 layers in the crystals of high-Tc superconducting cuprates, such as doped La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O 7. The straightforward perturbation expansion on the model taking tpd/ɛpd (~0.36 for the cuprates) as the small parameter does not converge. In this work, I show that there exist canonical transformations on the model Hamiltonian such that the perturbation expansion based on the transformed Hamiltonians converges. In the second part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for La2NiO4 and La2CuO4. The results predict correctly that these two materials are antiferromagnetic insulators, in contrast to the wrong predictions made by the density functional calculations using the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin form factors of the materials are also calculated. The results agree with previous theoretical works using an embedded cluster model. The calculated spin form factor of La2CuO4 is consistent with the few experimental data currently available, while the results for La2NiO4 show a large discrepancy between theory and experiment. We question the accuracy of the experimental results of La2NiO4 and call for more experiments to settle the issue. In the third part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for LaMnO3. Our main focus is on the magnetic and orbital orderings, the effect of the crystal distortion from the cubic perovskite structure, and the analysis of the projected density of states. In addition, we also find

  17. Electronic structure of the Np MT 5 ( M = Fe, Co, Ni; T = Ga, In) series of neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Shorikov, A. O.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Evolution of the electronic structure of the Np MGa5 ( M = Fe, Co, Ni) series of neptunium compounds, whose crystal structure is similar to that of the known family of Pu115 superconductors, was studied by the LDA + U + SO method. The calculations took into account both the strong electron correlations and the spin‒orbit coupling in the 5 f shell of neptunium. For the first time, the electronic structure was calculated for a hypothetical series of compounds in which gallium is replaced with indium. Parameters of the crystal structure of the given series were obtained using the relationship between the parameters of the crystal structure of the earlier-studied compounds PuCoGa5 and PuCoIn5. The analysis of the electronic structure and characteristics of neptunium ions calculated in the framework of the LDA + U + SO method showed that the neptunium ions in Np MIn5 with M = Fe, Co, and Ni should have an electron configuration closer to f 4, but a spin and magnetic characteristics close to those in Np MGa5.

  18. Electronic and geometrical structure of dipole-bound anions formed by polar molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gutsev, G.L.; Adamowicz, L.

    1995-09-07

    The electronic and geometrical structures of fourteen polar molecules, which have sufficiently large dipole moments to form dipole-bound stationary states with an extra electron, are investigated with the Hartree-Fock (HF) method and second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. The molecules considered are as follow: formaldehyde, H{sub 2}CO; propanal, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHO; pivalaldehyde, (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}CCHO; butanal, CH{sub 3}-CH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}CHO; acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO; 2-butanone, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}COCH{sub 3}; trifluorobenzene, C{sub 7}H{sub 5}F{sub 3}; cyclohexanone, C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O; acetone; CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}; cyclopentanone, C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O; cyclobutanone, C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O; methylacrylonitrile, CH{sub 2}-CCH{sub 3}CN; acrylonitrile, CH{sub 2}CHCN; acetonitrile, CH{sub 3}CN. The electron affinities corresponding to the formation of the dipole-bound states of the anions are calculated. For all the molecules considered, except formaldehyde, the molecules are found to be able to support dipole-bound states. Almost direct proportionality is found between the dipole moment and the electron affinity (EA) in the series. 105 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Electronic Structure Calculations of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Steve; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    Exotic systems like Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) are attracting more attention based on their properties and possible interactions. Abundance of HCIs in the solar wind and their interaction with the upper atmosphere puts them in the attention of astro- and atmospheric physicists. Also, their unique properties originating in the high charge make them an excellent candidate for precision measurements and the next generation of atomic clocks. For a better understanding of the dynamics of processes involving HCIs a combined theoretical and experimental effort is needed to study their basic properties and interactions. Both theory and experiment need to be combined due to the extreme nature of these systems. We present preliminary insight into electronic structure of light HCIs, their interactions with neutral atoms and dynamics of charge transfer processes.

  20. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  1. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2014-02-01

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  2. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  3. Electronic Structure of Ethynyl Substituted Cyclobutadienes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Frank Lee Emmert, III; Thompson, Stephanie J.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the effects of ethynyl substitution on the electronic structure of cyclobutadiene. These species are involved in Bergman Cyclization reactionsand are possible intermediates in the formation of fullerenes and graphite sheets. Prediction of the electronic energy of cyclobutadiene is challenging for single-reference ab initio methods such as HF, MP2 or DFT because of Jahn-Teller distortions and the diradical character of the singlet state. We determined the vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings, the natural charges and spin densities in substituted cyclobutadienes, using the equations of motion spin flip coupled cluster with single and double excitations (EOM-SF-CCSD) method that accurately describes diradical states. The adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps decrease upon substituent addition, but the singlet state is always lower in energy. However, we found that the results are affected by spin-contamination of the reference state and deteriorate when an unrestricted HF reference is employed. O. L. Chapman, C. L. McIntosh, J. Pacansky, "Cyclobutadiene" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1973, 95, (2), 614-617. N. S. Goroff, "Mechanism of Fullerene Formation." Acc. Chem. Res. 1996, 29, (2), 77-83. L.V. Slipchenko and A.I. Krylov, "Singlet-triplet gaps in diradicals by the Spin-Flip approach: A benchmark study", J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 117, 4694-4708.

  4. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  5. Silicene oxides: formation, structures and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Pi, Xiaodong; Ni, Zhenyi; Liu, Yong; Lin, Shisheng; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Deren

    2013-12-16

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been critical to the success of all types of silicon materials, which are the cornerstones of modern silicon technologies. For the recent experimentally obtained two-dimensional silicene, oxidation should also be addressed to enable the development of silicene-based devices. Here we focus on silicene oxides (SOs) that result from the partial or full oxidation of silicene in the framework of density functional theory. It is found that the formation of SOs greatly depends on oxidation conditions, which concern the oxidizing agents of oxygen and hydroxyl. The honeycomb lattice of silicene may be preserved, distorted or destroyed after oxidation. The charge state of Si in partially oxidized silicene ranges from +1 to +3, while that in fully oxidized silicene is +4. Metals, semimetals, semiconductors and insulators can all be found among the SOs, which show a wide spectrum of electronic structures. Our work indicates that the oxidation of silicene should be exquisitely controlled to obtain specific SOs with desired electronic properties.

  6. Photophysical properties of ESIPT inspired fluorescent 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methylimidazo[4,5-f]isoindole-5,7(1H,6H)-dione and its derivative: Experimental and DFT based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Mininath S.; Sekar, Nagaiyan

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state intramolecular proton transfer chromophores 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methylimidazo[4,5-f]isoindole-5,7(1H,6H)-dione and 2-(4-(diethylamino)-2-hydroxyphenyl)-6-methylimidazo[4,5-f]isoindole-5,7(1H,6H)-dione are synthesized from 4,5-diamino-N-methylphthalimide. The photophysical behavior of the synthesized chromophores was studied using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy in the polar and non-polar solvents. The synthesized o-hydroxyphenyl benzimidazole derivatives are fluorescent and very sensitive to the solvent polarity. These dyes are thermally stable up to 317 °C. Density Functional Theory computations have been used to understand the structural, molecular, electronic and photophysical properties of the chromophores. The experimental absorption and emission wavelengths are in good agreement with the computed vertical excitation and theoretical emission obtained by Density Functional Theory and Time Dependant Density Functional Theory.

  7. Bis(imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline)dinitratolead(II)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Xiang; Zha, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Chun-Bo; Li, Xiu-Ying; Che, Guang-Bo

    2009-01-01

    In the title compound, [Pb(NO3)2(C13H8N4)2], the PbII atom (site symmetry 2) is hexa­coordinated by four N atoms from two N,N′-bidentate imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline (L) ligands and two O atoms from two weakly coordinated nitrate ions [Pb—O = 2.872 (5) Å] in an irregular arrangement, which may be ascribed to the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons on the metal ion. In the crystal, inter­molecular bifurcated N—H⋯(O,O) hydrogen bonds connect the mol­ecules into chains propagating along [100]. Adjacent chains inter­act by strong aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions, with a centroid–centroid distance of 3.483 (2) Å. PMID:21581524

  8. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  9. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ``Nonlinear Materials`` seminar series and international conferences including ``Fracture, Friction and Deformation,`` ``Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,`` and ``Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology``; invited talks at international conference on ``Synthetic Metals,`` ``Quantum Phase Transitions,`` ``1996 CECAM Euroconference,`` and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors.

  10. 5f state interaction with inner coordination sphere ligands: einsteinium 3+ ion fluorescence in aqueous and organic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.V.; Wester, D.W.; Williams, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between 5f electron states of einsteinium 3+ ion and coordinated ligands in solution has been probed using laser-induced fluorescence. Aquo einsteinium 3+ ion was observed to fluoresce from its first excited J = 5 state in a broad-band peaking at 9260 wavenumbers. The observed fluorescence lifetimes were 1.05 microseconds and 2.78 microseconds in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O (99+ % D atom), respectively. The non-radiative decay rates derived from the lifetime data are compared with previously reported data for Cm, Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy aquo 3+ ions. The 5f actinide states exhibit substantially greater non-radiative decay rates than do lanthanide 4f states of similar energy gap. This provides evidence that actinide 5f electrons interact more strongly with their inner coordination sphere than do lanthanide ion 4f electrons. The fluorescence lifetime of einsteinium 3+ ion complexed with 1 formal di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid in h-heptane was 2.34 microseconds. 3 figures, 1 table.

  11. The electronic structure of hard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarski, Robert Paul

    This research dissertation involves an experimental as well as a theoretical examination of the electronic structure of hard materials. The materials that are presented in this dissertation cover a wide class of materials, consisting of transition metal borides, irradiated polymer films, theoretically predicted superhard semiconductors, doped intermetallic alloys, and transition metal carbides. The borides are traditionally used in high temperature, hard coating applications, such as rocket nozzle linings, extreme wear surfaces, and corrosion coatings. Measurements of the borides appear to show that the bonding in these hard materials is primarily between the boron atoms in these systems. Also of note are the remarkably short interatomic distances between the boron atoms and between the boron and metal atoms in these materials. Irradiated polymer films are being developed for electronic applications, in the hopes that circuits can be developed that can benefit from the high thermal stability, dielectric properties, and mechanical properties provided by these materials. C3N4 is a theoretically predicted superhard material, and some of the first soft x-ray emission measurements of well-characterized samples of this compound are discussed in this work. Intermetallic alloys, in particular Ni3Al, are rather hard, but brittle metallic alloys. It has been found that the addition of boron atoms, in rather low concentrations, can increase the ductility of these alloys, allowing them to be utilized in a wider variety of applications. Measurements of this system have examined a question regarding the positioning of the boron atoms in the structures of this alloy. Finally, the transition metal carbides are used extensively as coatings in industrial applications such as cutting and grinding tools, and polishing compounds. Measurements of these materials suggest that the high degree of covalency between the metal and carbon atoms is primarily responsible for the hardness of

  12. Fluorinated Peptide Nucleic Acids with Fluoroacetyl Side Chain Bearing 5-(F/CF3)-Uracil: Synthesis and Cell Uptake Studies.

    PubMed

    Ellipilli, Satheesh; Palvai, Sandeep; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2016-08-01

    Fluorine incorporation into organic molecules imparts favorable physicochemical properties such as lipophilicity, solubility and metabolic stability necessary for drug action. Toward such applications using peptide nucleic acids (PNA), we herein report the chemical synthesis of fluorinated PNA monomers and biophysical studies of derived PNA oligomers containing fluorine in in the acetyl side chain (-CHF-CO-) bearing nucleobase uracil (5-F/5-CF3-U). The crystal structures of fluorinated racemic PNA monomers reveal interesting base pairing of enantiomers and packing arrangements directed by the chiral F substituent. Reverse phase HPLC show higher hydrophobicity of fluorinated PNA oligomers, dependent on the number and site of the fluorine substitution: fluorine on carbon adjacent to the carbonyl group induces higher lipophilicity than fluorine on nucleobase or in the backbone. The PNA oligomers containing fluorinated bases form hybrids with cDNA/RNA with slightly lower stability compared to that of unmodified aeg PNA, perhaps due to electronic effects. The uptake of fluorinated homooligomeric PNAs by HeLa cells was as facile as that of nonfluorinated PNA. In conjunction with our previous work on PNAs fluorinated in backbone and at N-terminus, it is evident that the fluorinated PNAs have potential to emerge as a new class of PNA analogues for applications in functional inhibition of RNA. PMID:27391099

  13. Ectopic POU5F1 in the male germ lineage disrupts differentiation and spermatogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Phillips, LeAnna J; Hartman, Rachel; An, Junhui; Dann, Christina T

    2016-10-01

    Expression levels of the pluripotency determinant, POU5F1, are tightly regulated to ensure appropriate differentiation during early embryogenesis. POU5F1 is also present in the spermatogonial stem cell/progenitor cell population in mice and it is downregulated as spermatogenesis progresses. To test if POU5F1 downregulation is required for SSCs to differentiate, we produced transgenic mice that ubiquitously express POU5F1 in Cre-expressing lineages. Using a Vasa-Cre driver to produce ectopic POU5F1 in all postnatal germ cells, we found that POU5F1 downregulation was necessary for spermatogonial expansion during the first wave of spermatogenesis and for the production of differentiated spermatogonia capable of undergoing meiosis. In contrast, undifferentiated spermatogonia were maintained throughout adulthood, consistent with a normal presence of POU5F1 in these cells. The results suggest that POU5F1 downregulation in differentiating spermatogonia is a necessary step for the progression of spermatogenesis. Further, the creation of a transgenic mouse model for conditional ectopic expression of POU5F1 may be a useful resource for studies of POU5F1 in other cell lineages, during tumorogenesis and cell fate reprogramming. PMID:27486267

  14. Pharmacology of Valinate and tert-Leucinate Synthetic Cannabinoids 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and Their Analogues.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Longworth, Mitchell; Kevin, Richard; Sachdev, Shivani; Santiago, Marina; Stuart, Jordyn; Mack, James B C; Glass, Michelle; McGregor, Iain S; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Indole and indazole synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) featuring l-valinate or l-tert-leucinate pendant group have recently emerged as prevalent recreational drugs, and their use has been associated with serious adverse health effects. Due to the limited pharmacological data available for these compounds, 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and their analogues were synthesized and assessed for cannabimimetic activity in vitro and in vivo. All SCs acted as potent, highly efficacious agonists at CB1 (EC50 = 0.45-36 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 4.6-128 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with a general preference for CB1 activation. The cannabimimetic properties of two prevalent compounds with confirmed toxicity in humans, 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, were demonstrated in vivo using biotelemetry in rats. Bradycardia and hypothermia were induced by 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg (and 3 mg/kg for 5F-AMB), with MDMB-FUBINACA showing the most dramatic hypothermic response recorded in our laboratory for any SC (>3 °C at 0.3 mg/kg). Reversal of hypothermia by pretreatment with a CB1, but not CB2, antagonist was demonstrated for 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, consistent with CB1-mediated effects in vivo. The in vitro and in vivo data indicate that these SCs act as highly efficacious CB receptor agonists with greater potency than Δ(9)-THC and earlier generations of SCs. PMID:27421060

  15. Pharmacology of Valinate and tert-Leucinate Synthetic Cannabinoids 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and Their Analogues.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Longworth, Mitchell; Kevin, Richard; Sachdev, Shivani; Santiago, Marina; Stuart, Jordyn; Mack, James B C; Glass, Michelle; McGregor, Iain S; Connor, Mark; Kassiou, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Indole and indazole synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) featuring l-valinate or l-tert-leucinate pendant group have recently emerged as prevalent recreational drugs, and their use has been associated with serious adverse health effects. Due to the limited pharmacological data available for these compounds, 5F-AMBICA, 5F-AMB, 5F-ADB, AMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-FUBINACA, MDMB-CHMICA, and their analogues were synthesized and assessed for cannabimimetic activity in vitro and in vivo. All SCs acted as potent, highly efficacious agonists at CB1 (EC50 = 0.45-36 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 4.6-128 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with a general preference for CB1 activation. The cannabimimetic properties of two prevalent compounds with confirmed toxicity in humans, 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, were demonstrated in vivo using biotelemetry in rats. Bradycardia and hypothermia were induced by 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg (and 3 mg/kg for 5F-AMB), with MDMB-FUBINACA showing the most dramatic hypothermic response recorded in our laboratory for any SC (>3 °C at 0.3 mg/kg). Reversal of hypothermia by pretreatment with a CB1, but not CB2, antagonist was demonstrated for 5F-AMB and MDMB-FUBINACA, consistent with CB1-mediated effects in vivo. The in vitro and in vivo data indicate that these SCs act as highly efficacious CB receptor agonists with greater potency than Δ(9)-THC and earlier generations of SCs.

  16. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Nitrosyl Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, W. Robert; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Pavlik, Jeffrey W.; Silvernail, Nathan J.; Sage, J. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    fully successful at capturing the interaction between the axial NO and imidazole ligands. This supports previous conclusions that hemeNO complexes exhibit an unusual degree of variability with respect to computational method, and we speculate that this variability hints at a genuine electronic instability that a protein can exploit to tune reactivity. We anticipate that ongoing characterization of heme-NO complexes will deepen our understanding of their structure, dynamics, and reactivity. PMID:20666384

  17. Electronic structure of Mg: From monolayers to bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, F.; Laubschat, C.; Heber, M.; Servedio, V.D.P.

    2004-09-15

    The structure of thin Mg films epitaxially grown onto a W(110) crystal was analyzed by low energy electron and Auger electron diffraction verifying a growth of bulk Mg. Normal-emission angle-resolved photoemission spectra of the growing films reveal quantum well states on both sides of a surface state. These states result from electron confinement in the Mg layer and are used to derive the electronic structure perpendicular to the surface. Off-normal, the electronic structure is dominated by the parabolic dispersion of surface states forming circles around the {gamma}-points and ellipses around the M-points in the Fermi surface cuts.

  18. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; Chung, Brandon W.; Tobin, James G.

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  19. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27334148

  20. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  1. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs.

  2. Spatial and electron structure of substituted gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarzhemsky, V. G.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Dyakov, Y. A.; Kosheleva, O. K.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of intermetallic clusters Au12M (M=Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os) and features of their interaction with electron donors and acceptor atoms, i.e. H and F, were investigated making use computer calculation based of density functional theory. In was found that metal clusters with effective electron number equal to 18 have more symmetrical shape then that with a number of electrons differing from 18. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with silica was modeled by attachment of SiO4H groups and the connection of the electronic structure with electronic transitions in spaser is discussed.

  3. [Transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to malignant hematopoietic cells of different origins].

    PubMed

    Wabg, Kai; Peng, Jian-Qinag; Yuan, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Bin

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to hematopoietic malignant cells lines of various origins and AD5/F35 cytotoxicity. The hematologic malignant cell lines of various origins were transfected by AD5/F35-EGFP at different multiple of infection (MOI) and AD5-EGFP was used as control; the proportion of fluorescence positive cells was detected by flow cytometry; the killing effect of virus on infective target cells was assayed by MTT and observed by fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector to cell line of myeloid origin was > 99% at MOI = 30, the transfective efficiency of AD5 vector was 26.4% at MOI = 1,000; the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector and AD5 vector to cell line of B cell origin were 11.7% and 5.7%, respectively, at MOI = 1,000. AD5/F35 and AD5 vectors could not effectively transfect cells of T cell origin, no fluorescence positive cells were detected at MOI = 1,000; no significant killing effect of AD5/F35 vector on infective target cells was observed at MOI = 1,000. It is concluded that AD5/F35 vector infection has definite selectivity to hematologic malignant cells of various origin, the infection ability of AD5/F35 vector to cells of myeloid origin is stronger than that to cells of B cell origin, the cytotoxicity of AD5/F35 vector to infective target cells is small. The AD5/F35 vector is preferable to AD5 vector in respect of infection ability and offers good prospects of application in gene therapy for myeloid leukemia cells as target cells.

  4. Electronic structure of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Ruffieux, Pascal; Cai, Jinming; Plumb, Nicholas C; Patthey, Luc; Prezzi, Deborah; Ferretti, Andrea; Molinari, Elisa; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Fasel, Roman

    2012-08-28

    Some of the most intriguing properties of graphene are predicted for specifically designed nanostructures such as nanoribbons. Functionalities far beyond those known from extended graphene systems include electronic band gap variations related to quantum confinement and edge effects, as well as localized spin-polarized edge states for specific edge geometries. The inability to produce graphene nanostructures with the needed precision, however, has so far hampered the verification of the predicted electronic properties. Here, we report on the electronic band gap and dispersion of the occupied electronic bands of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons fabricated via on-surface synthesis. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy data from armchair graphene nanoribbons of width N = 7 supported on Au(111) reveal a band gap of 2.3 eV, an effective mass of 0.21 m(0) at the top of the valence band, and an energy-dependent charge carrier velocity reaching 8.2 × 10(5) m/s in the linear part of the valence band. These results are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions that include image charge corrections accounting for screening by the metal substrate and confirm the importance of electron-electron interactions in graphene nanoribbons.

  5. QWalk: A quantum Monte Carlo program for electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Lucas K. Bajdich, Michal Mitas, Lubos

    2009-05-20

    We describe QWalk, a new computational package capable of performing quantum Monte Carlo electronic structure calculations for molecules and solids with many electrons. We describe the structure of the program and its implementation of quantum Monte Carlo methods. It is open-source, licensed under the GPL, and available at the web site (http://www.qwalk.org)

  6. Pharmacology of Indole and Indazole Synthetic Cannabinoid Designer Drugs AB-FUBINACA, ADB-FUBINACA, AB-PINACA, ADB-PINACA, 5F-AB-PINACA, 5F-ADB-PINACA, ADBICA, and 5F-ADBICA.

    PubMed

    Banister, Samuel D; Moir, Michael; Stuart, Jordyn; Kevin, Richard C; Wood, Katie E; Longworth, Mitchell; Wilkinson, Shane M; Beinat, Corinne; Buchanan, Alexandra S; Glass, Michelle; Connor, Mark; McGregor, Iain S; Kassiou, Michael

    2015-09-16

    Synthetic cannabinoid (SC) designer drugs based on indole and indazole scaffolds and featuring l-valinamide or l-tert-leucinamide side chains are encountered with increasing frequency by forensic researchers and law enforcement agencies and are associated with serious adverse health effects. However, many of these novel SCs are unprecedented in the scientific literature at the time of their discovery, and little is known of their pharmacology. Here, we report the synthesis and pharmacological characterization of AB-FUBINACA, ADB-FUBINACA, AB-PINACA, ADB-PINACA, 5F-AB-PINACA, 5F-ADB-PINACA, ADBICA, 5F-ADBICA, and several analogues. All synthesized SCs acted as high potency agonists of CB1 (EC50 = 0.24-21 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 0.88-15 nM) receptors in a fluorometric assay of membrane potential, with 5F-ADB-PINACA showing the greatest potency at CB1 receptors. The cannabimimetic activities of AB-FUBINACA and AB-PINACA in vivo were evaluated in rats using biotelemetry. AB-FUBINACA and AB-PINACA dose-dependently induced hypothermia and bradycardia at doses of 0.3-3 mg/kg, and hypothermia was reversed by pretreatment with a CB1 (but not CB2) antagonist, indicating that these SCs are cannabimimetic in vivo, consistent with anecdotal reports of psychoactivity in humans. PMID:26134475

  7. 26 CFR 5f.103-3 - Information reporting requirements for certain bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Information reporting requirements for certain bonds. 5f.103-3 Section 5f.103-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) TEMPORARY INCOME TAX REGULATIONS UNDER THE TAX EQUITY AND...

  8. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological structures.

    PubMed

    Colliex, C; Mory, C

    1994-01-01

    The design of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been conceived to optimize its detection efficiency of the different elastic and inelastic signals resulting from the interaction of the high energy primary electrons with the specimen. Its potential use to visualize and measure biological objects was recognized from the first studies by Crewe and coworkers in the seventies. Later the real applications have not followed the initial hopes. The purpose of the present paper is to describe how the instrument has practically evolved and recently begun to demonstrate all its potentialities for quantitative electron microscopy of a wide range of biological specimens, from freeze-dried isolated macromolecules to unstained cryosections. Emphasis will be put on the mass-mapping, multi-signal and elemental mapping modes which are unique features of the STEM instruments.

  9. Precession electron diffraction and its utility for structural fingerprinting in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeck, Peter; Rouvimov, Sergei; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2009-09-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed in order to illustrate its utility for structural fingerprinting of nanocrystals. While individual nanocrystals may be fingerprinted structurally from PED spot patterns, ensembles of nanocrystals may be fingerprinted from powder PED ring patterns.

  10. Resolving the Pu Electronic Structure Enigma: Past Lessons and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D

    2008-05-30

    The nature of the 5f electronic structure of plutonium (Pu) remains unclear. [1] Despite many recent attempts to resolve the issue, a plethora of important unanswered questions remain. While many theoretical approaches to the problem have been promulgated, the real source of the difficulty is the absence of sufficient experimental benchmarking. This paucity of impact on the part of experimental results is driven in part by the difficulties of working with Pu: it is highly radioactive, biologically toxic, chemically reactive and restricted in its distribution and permitted access to user facilities. The results of these liabilities include the following: (1) it is very difficult, if not impossible, to get large single crystals of single phase samples and; (2) many state of the art experiments can not be done because general user facilities are not available for use with Pu samples. Additionally, there is the apparently bizarre nature of Pu, which seems to defeat the efforts to analyze it. A wonderful example of this is the absence of detailed and variant fine structure in many of the spectroscopic investigations of Pu.

  11. Electron crystallography for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are important research targets for basic biological sciences and drug design, but studies of their structure and function are considered difficult to perform. Studies of membrane structures have been greatly facilitated by technological and instrumental advancements in electron microscopy together with methodological advancements in biology. Electron crystallography is especially useful in studying the structure and function of membrane proteins. Electron crystallography is now an established method of analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which resembles their natural biological environment. To better understand the neural system function from a structural point of view, we developed the cryo-electron microscope with a helium-cooled specimen stage, which allows for analysis of the structures of membrane proteins at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review introduces recent instrumental advances in cryo-electron microscopy and presents some examples of structure analyses of membrane proteins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, water channels and gap junction channels. This review has two objectives: first, to provide a personal historical background to describe how we came to develop the cryo-electron microscope and second, to discuss some of the technology required for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy.

  12. The change of the electronic structure of alkali halide films on W(110) under electron bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckhoff, S.; Maus-Friedrichs, W.; Kempter, V.

    1992-03-01

    NaCl and Csl films of up to four layers were deposited onto W(110) surfaces and investigated by metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), UPS and AES. The electronic structure of the films under electron bombardment was then studied by MIES/UPS. The results are compared with the corresponding ones obtained by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). An interpretation of the results is attempted on the basis of existing theories for desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of alkali halides.

  13. Cellulose Acetate Membranes: Electron Microscopy of Structure.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Gardner, J O; Merten, U

    1964-02-21

    Electron photomicrographs of cellulose acetate membranes used in the reverse osmosis processof water desalination reveal a dense surface layer with a porous substructure. The high rate oftransmission for water can be correlated with the thickness of the dense layer on the air-driedsurface of the membrane.

  14. Electronic transmission in quasiperiodic serial stub structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Samar; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2004-01-01

    We present exact results on the electronic transmission through quantum stub waveguides arranged in a Fibonacci quasiperiodic pattern. Discretizing the Schrödinger equation, we map the problem into an equivalent tight binding form and study the transmission spectrum using the transfer matrix method. We emphasize the effect of local positional correlations in a Fibonacci quantum stub array that may lead to resonant eigenstates. Using the real space renormalization group ideas we unravel various local clusters of stubs responsible for resonance. Extended eigenstates have been shown to exist and we find that, under some special circumstances, the electronic charge density exhibits a totally periodic character in such a non-periodic sequence. Our method is completely general and can be applied to any arbitrary sequence of stubs: periodic, quasiperiodic or random. This may lead to a possible experimental verification of the role of positional correlations in the transport behaviour of a class of mesoscopic devices.

  15. Electron Precipitation Associated with Small-Scale Auroral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Hampton, D. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Ground-to-Rocket Electrons Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket mission, where we combined high-resolution ground-based auroral imaging with high time-resolution precipitating electron measurements. The GREECE payload successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km. The narrow field-of-view auroral imaging was taken from Venetie, AK, which is directly under apogee. This enabled the small-scale auroral features at the magnetic footpoint of the rocket payload to be imaged in detail. The electron precipitation was measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) onboard the payload. Features in the electron data are matched up with their corresponding auroral structures and boundaries, enabling measurement of the exact electron distributions responsible for the specific small-scale auroral features. These electron distributions will then be used to infer what the potential electron acceleration processes were.

  16. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  17. Structural phase transition and electronic properties of NdBi

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ashvini K.; Patiya, Jagdish; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and electronic properties of NdBi from an electronic structure calculation have been presented. The calculation is performed using self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It is found that this compound shows metallic behavior under ambient condition and undergoes a structural phase transition from the NaCl structure to the CsCl structure at the pressure 20.1 GPa. The electronic structures of NdBi under pressure are investigated. It is found that NdBi have metallization and the hybridizations of atoms in NdBi under pressure become stronger.

  18. Electronic structure and stability of some silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kovač, Branka

    2010-05-01

    The electronic structures of N,1,3-tris(1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclodisilazan-2-amine ( I) and 2,3,5,5-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene ( II) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss the influence of substituent effects on their electronic structure and thermodynamic stability. Our study shows that trimethylsilyl substituents have strong influence on the electronic structure of cyclopentadiene via inductive effect. Their influence on thermodynamic stability is also pronounced. In substituted cyclodisilazanes hyperconjugative influence of alkylsilyl groups was shown to cause relative thermodynamic stabilization of the cyclodisilazane system.

  19. Quasi-relativistic SCF X. cap alpha. study of octahedral 5f/sup 1/ complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, G.; Roesch, N.; Edelstein, N.

    1980-05-01

    Quasi-relativistic SCF X..cap alpha.. calculations have been carried out for the octahedral 5f/sup 1/ complexes Pa/sup IV/X/sub 6//sup 2 -/, U/sup V/X/sub 6//sup -/(X = F, Cl, Br, I), and Np/sup VI/F/sub 6/. The 5f ..-->.. 5f excitation energies calculated by using the transition-state method agree well with the available absorption spectra. Ionic effects appear to dominate the trends observed in the f-orbital ligand field splitting.

  20. Structural and electronic properties of endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Takeshi; Lu, Xing

    2012-04-01

    This account presents an overview of our achievements in structural and chemical understanding of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs), a new class of metal-carbon hybrid materials formed by encapsulation of metals inside fullerene cavities. Structural determination of EMFs is of fundamental importance for understanding their intrinsic properties and the formation mechanism, and for broadening their applications. We have developed an effective method for determining the structures of paramagnetic EMFs, and also succeeded in observing the motion of cluster in a di-metal EMF for the first time. Recently, we unambiguously established the structures of some carbide EMFs which had been wrongly assumed as conventional EMFs previously. More importantly, we have obtained some insoluble EMF species which had never been explored or even expected before. Meanwhile, the chemical properties of various EMFs with different cage structures or different metallic cores have been systematically investigated by means of both covalent and supramolecular considerations, yielding many fascinating results relating to the dictating effect of internal metals. It is noteworthy that all these achievements are based on unambiguous X-ray results of pristine or functionalized EMFs.

  1. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position.

  2. Electronic structure of xDNA.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Zhao, Xiongce; Kent, P R C; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2007-08-01

    xDNA is an artificial duplex made of natural and benzo-homologated bases. The latter can be seen as a fusion between benzene and a natural base. We have used two different ab initio techniques, one based on B3LYP and a Gaussian expansion of the wave functions, and the other on GGA and plane-waves, to investigate the electronic properties of an xDNA duplex and a natural one with an analogous sequence. The calculations were performed in dry conditions, i.e., H atoms were used to neutralize the charge. It is found that the HOMO-LUMO gap of xDNA is about 0.5 eV smaller than that of B-DNA, independent of the technique used. The pi-pi* gap of xDNA is 1.3 or 1.0 eV smaller than that of B-DNA, depending on whether one uses B3LYP/6-31G or GGA/plane-waves, respectively. An analysis of how saturation changes the electronic properties of the nucleotide pairs that make up these duplexes suggests that different saturation schemes significantly affect the HOMO-LUMO gap value of xDNA and B-DNA. The same is not true for the pi-pi* gap. That xDNA has a smaller pi-pi* gap than B-DNA suggests that xDNA could be a plausible candidate for molecular-wire applications.

  3. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  4. Linear Scaling Electronic Structure Methods with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavo E. Scuseria

    2008-02-08

    The methodological development and computational implementation of linear scaling quantum chemistry methods for the accurate calculation of electronic structure and properties of periodic systems (solids, surfaces, and polymers) and their application to chemical problems of DOE relevance.

  5. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  6. Electronic structure and properties of d- and f-shell-metal compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Walter A.; Straub, Galen K.

    1987-08-01

    Bonding in rock-salt-structure compounds is described. For NaCl, the bonding is in terms of electrons occupying chlorine p bands, lowered in energy by interaction with the sodium s states, and an overlap repulsion arises from nonorthogonality of states on neighboring ions. For transition-metal compounds d-like states are added, with their coupling with the nonmetallic p states. This coupling is taken to be of the form ηpdmħ2(rpr3d)1/2/(md4), with rp and rd tabulated for each element. An additional overlap repulsion, proportional to ħ2rpr3d/(md6) and to the number of electrons occupying the corresponding bands, also arises from this interaction. The simplest systems, such as KF, CaO, ScN, and TiC, contain eight valence electrons per atom pair and all but TiC are insulating. The extra energy from the covalent pd coupling is calculated; it decreases the lattice distance and increases the cohesion and bulk modulus. With a total valence of 9-12, the excess electrons occupy nonbonding bands making the compound metallic, but not significantly modifying the bonding properties. A total valence of 13-18 would require electrons in antibonding bands and such compounds appear not to occur in the rock-salt structure unless intra-atomic Coulomb interactions are strong enough (as in the heavy-3d-metal compounds) to produce a correlated state, insulating, magnetic, and with suppressed covalent interactions. The form of the condition for the formation of a correlated state is written. This same general theory is applied also to f-shell compounds, those of the rare earths and actinides, with pf coupling proportional to ħ2(rpr5f)1/2/(md5) replacing the pd coupling of the transition-metal compounds. The theory suggests that a correlated state of the f electrons may be expected except for cerium compounds and compounds of the light actinides. The phosphides of the actinides are predicted to, and found to, have minimum spacing at the uranium phosphide which occurs as the metal f

  7. Launch mission summary: Intelsat 5 (F3) Atlas/Centaur-55

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Intelsat 5 (F3) spacecraft, launch vehicle, and mission are described. Information relative to launch windows, flight plan, radar and telemetry coverage, selected trajectory information, and a brief sequence of flight events is provided.

  8. Crystal and electronic structures of neptunium nitrides synthesized using a fluoride route.

    PubMed

    Silva, G W Chinthaka; Weck, Philippe F; Kim, Eunja; Yeamans, Charles B; Cerefice, Gary S; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Kenneth R

    2012-02-15

    A low-temperature fluoride route was utilized to synthesize neptunium mononitride, NpN. Through the development of this process, two new neptunium nitride species, NpN(2) and Np(2)N(3), were identified. The NpN(2) and Np(2)N(3) have crystal structures isomorphous to those of UN(2) and U(2)N(3), respectively. NpN(2) crystallizes in a face-centered cubic CaF(2)-type structure with a space group of Fm3m and a refined lattice parameter of 5.3236(1) Å. The Np(2)N(3) adopts the body-centered cubic Mn(2)O(3)-type structure with a space group of Ia3. Its refined lattice parameter is 10.6513(4) Å. The NpN synthesis at temperatures ≤900 °C using the fluoride route discussed here was also demonstrated. Previous computational studies of the neptunium nitride system have focused exclusively on the NpN phase because no evidence was reported experimentally on the presence of NpN(x) systems. Here, the crystal structures of NpN(2) and Np(2)N(3) are discussed for the first time, confirming the experimental results by density functional calculations (DFT). These DFT calculations were performed within the local-density approximation (LDA+U) and the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA+U) corrected with an effective Hubbard parameter to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion between Np 5f electrons. The effects of the spin-orbit coupling in the GGA+U calculations have also been investigated for NpN(2) and NpN.

  9. Crystal and Electronic Structures of Neptunium Nitrides Synthesized Using a Fluoride Route

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Weck, Dr. Phil F.; Eunja, Dr. Kim; Yeamans, Dr. Charles B.; Cerefice, Gary S.; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Czerwinski, Ken R.

    2012-01-01

    A low-temperature fluoride route was utilized to synthesize neptunium mononitride, NpN. Through the development of this process, two new neptunium nitride species, NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3}, were identified. The NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} have crystal structures isomorphous to those of UN{sub 2} and U{sub 2}N{sub 3}, respectively. NpN{sub 2} crystallizes in a face-centered cubic CaF{sub 2}-type structure with a space group of Fm3m and a refined lattice parameter of 5.3236(1) {angstrom}. The Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} adopts the body-centered cubic Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-type structure with a space group of Ia{bar 3}. Its refined lattice parameter is 10.6513(4) {angstrom}. The NpN synthesis at temperatures {le} 900 C using the fluoride route discussed here was also demonstrated. Previous computational studies of the neptunium nitride system have focused exclusively on the NpN phase because no evidence was reported experimentally on the presence of NpN{sub x} systems. Here, the crystal structures of NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} are discussed for the first time, confirming the experimental results by density functional calculations (DFT). These DFT calculations were performed within the local-density approximation (LDA+U) and the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA+U) corrected with an effective Hubbard parameter to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion between Np 5f electrons. The effects of the spin-orbit coupling in the GGA+U calculations have also been investigated for NpN{sub 2} and NpN.

  10. Electronic structure calculations of ESR parameters of melanin units.

    PubMed

    Batagin-Neto, Augusto; Bronze-Uhle, Erika Soares; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira

    2015-03-21

    Melanins represent an important class of natural pigments present in plants and animals that are currently considered to be promising materials for applications in optic and electronic devices. Despite their interesting properties, some of the basic features of melanins are not satisfactorily understood, including the origin of their intrinsic paramagnetism. A number of experiments have been performed to investigate the electron spin resonance (ESR) response of melanin derivatives, but until now, there has been no consensus regarding the real structure of the paramagnetic centers involved. In this work, we have employed electronic structure calculations to evaluate the ESR parameters of distinct melanin monomers and dimers in order to identify the possible structures associated with unpaired spins in this biopolymer. The g-factors and hyperfine constants of the cationic, anionic and radicalar structures were investigated. The results confirm the existence of at least two distinct paramagnetic centers in melanin structure, identifying the chemical species associated with them and their roles in electrical conductivity.

  11. Electronic structure control of single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization.

    PubMed

    Strano, Michael S; Dyke, Christopher A; Usrey, Monica L; Barone, Paul W; Allen, Mathew J; Shan, Hongwei; Kittrell, Carter; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M; Smalley, Richard E

    2003-09-12

    Diazonium reagents functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in aqueous solution with high selectivity and enable manipulation according to electronic structure. For example, metallic species are shown to react to the near exclusion of semiconducting nanotubes under controlled conditions. Selectivity is dictated by the availability of electrons near the Fermi level to stabilize a charge-transfer transition state preceding bond formation. The chemistry can be reversed by using a thermal treatment that restores the pristine electronic structure of the nanotube. PMID:12970561

  12. Electronic structure of EuFe2As2.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Sahadev, Nishaina; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Bindu, R; Kumar, Neeraj; Thamizhavel, A; Dhar, S K; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2013-06-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of EuFe2As2, a unique pnictide, where antiferromagnetism of the Eu layer survives within the superconducting phase due to 'FeAs' layers, achieved via substitution and/or pressure. High energy and angle resolution helped to reveal the signature of peak-dip features, having significant p orbital character and spin density wave transition induced band folding in the electronic structure. A significant spectral weight redistribution is observed below 20 K manifesting the influence of antiferromagnetic order on the conduction electrons.

  13. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  14. Electronic structure and magnetism of ThFeAsN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangtao; Shi, Xianbiao

    2016-03-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of ThFeAsN, a newly discovered superconductor, are investigated by means of first-principles calculations. ThFeAsN shares electronic structure and magnetic properties similar to those of LaOFeAs. Its calculated ground state is the stripe antiferromagnetic state. The hole-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) along the Γ\\text-Z line largely overlap with the electron-like FS along the M\\text-A line with the vector q= (π, π, 0) . Such significant FS nesting induces a peak of the bare susceptibility χ0(q ) at the M-point.

  15. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  16. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  17. Thermal-structural analysis of electron gun with control grid.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lieming; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Hailong; Huang, Tao; Li, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Steady state thermal-structural analysis of electron guns is essential due to the requirement of high reliability in beam performance. Temperatures and displacements for all the components of an electron gun with a control grid are computed. Steady-state thermal analysis has been carried out for various cathode temperatures and various intercepted powers on the control grid to determine the temperature of the control grid. These results are verified experimentally based on measured results from an assembled electron gun. Structural analysis of the electron gun is used to evaluate the deformation of the inner electrodes under the hot condition. The results show that the thermal stress slightly changes the characteristics of the gun. The obtained thermal deformation data can be helpful to modify the design dimensions and assembly of an electron gun.

  18. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  19. Structure and electronic properties of azadirachtin.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Elton A S; de Oliveira, Daniel A B; Farias, Sergio A S; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L

    2014-02-01

    We performed a combined DFT and Monte Carlo (13)C NMR chemical-shift study of azadirachtin A, a triterpenoid that acts as a natural insect antifeedant. A conformational search using a Monte Carlo technique based on the RM1 semiempirical method was carried out in order to establish its preferred structure. The B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p), M06/6-311++G(d,p), M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), and CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to predict NMR chemical shifts. A Monte Carlo population-weighted average spectrum was produced based on the predicted Boltzmann contributions. In general, good agreement between experimental and theoretical data was obtained using both methods, and the (13)C NMR chemical shifts were predicted highly accurately. The geometry was optimized at the semiempirical level and used to calculate the NMR chemical shifts at the DFT level, and these shifts showed only minor deviations from those obtained following structural optimization at the DFT level, and incurred a much lower computational cost. The theoretical ultraviolet spectrum showed a maximum absorption peak that was mainly contributed by the tiglate group. PMID:24509732

  20. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  1. Materials Data on PRu5C16(O5F)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Al6B5(O5F)3 (SG:176) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Ba3In2O5F2 (SG:139) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on C4O5F6 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on BaSb2Xe5F22 (SG:69) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on CaP2Xe5F22 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on CdP2Xe5F22 (SG:33) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on LiV2O5F (SG:18) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  10. Electronic band structure of surface-doped black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Sohn, Yeongsup; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    There are rapidly growing interests in the study of few-layer black phosphorus owing to its promising device characteristics that may impact our future electronics technology. The low-energy band structure of black phosphorus has been widely predicted to be controllable by external perturbations, such as strain and doping. In this work, we attempt to control the electronic band structure of black phosphorous by in-situ surface deposition of alkali-metal atoms. We found that surface doping induces steep band bending towards the bulk, leading to the emergence of new 2D electronic states that are confined within only few phosphorene layers of black phosphorus. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we directly measured the electronic band structure and its evolution as a function of dopant density. Supported by IBS.

  11. Electronic correlation in magnetic contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    For interacting electrons the density of transitions [see http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288] replaces the density of states in calculations of structural energies. Extending previous work on paramagnetic metals, this approach is applied to correlation effects on the structural stability of magnetic transition metals. Supported by the H. V. Snyder Gift to the University of Oregon.

  12. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Christopher T. Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  13. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  14. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  15. Goeppert-Mayer Award Recipient: Electron Scattering and Nucleon Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beise, Elizabeth

    1998-04-01

    Electron scattering from hydrogen and light nuclear targets has long been recognized as one of the best tools for understanding the electromagnetic structure of protons, neutrons and few-nucleon systems. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the field through advances in polarized beams and polarized targets. Improvements in polarized electron sources has made it feasible to also study the structure of the nucleon through parity-violating electron scattering, where the nucleon's neutral weak structure is probed. In this talk, a summary of the present experimental status of the nucleon's electroweak structure will be presented, with an emphasis on recent results from the MIT-Bates and Jefferson Laboratories.

  16. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  17. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  18. Vertical Electron Transport through PbS-EuS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotek, S.; Dybko, K.; Morawski, A.; Makosa, A.; Wosinski, T.; Figielski, T.; Tkaczyk, Z.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu

    2003-01-01

    Temperature dependence of current-voltage I-V characteristics and resistivity is studied in ferromagnetic PbS-EuS semiconductor tunnel structures grown on n-PbS (100) substrates. For the structures with a single (2-4 nm thick) ferromagnetic EuS electron barrier we observe strongly non-linear I-V characteristics with an effective tunneling barrier height of 0.3-0.7 eV. The experimentally observed non-monotonic temperature dependence of the (normal to the plane of the structure) electrical resistance of these structures is discussed in terms of the electron tunneling mechanism taking into account the temperature dependent shift of the band offsets at the EuS-PbS heterointerface as well as the exchange splitting of the electronic states at the bottom of the conduction band of EuS.

  19. Spectroscopic investigations of the electronic structure of neptunyl ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, M. P.; Berg, J. M.; Dewey, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular electronic structures are innately sensitive to the geometric and chemical environments around the metal center of coordination compounds . However, the interrelationships between the electronic structures and molecular geometries of actinide species, which often contain more than one electron in the Sf valence shell, are quite complex due to the large numbers of possible electronic states and high densities of vibronically enabled transitions .1'2 Investigations of the optical signatures of simple, well-defined molecular systems should provide the most straightforward approach for unharnessing these fundamental relationships, and in particular, systems with a single electron in the valence Sf shell, such as the neptunyl ion (Np0 22+), should provide the most viable means for characte rizing actinide electronic structure. Furthermore, Sf orbital-occupied actinide systems exhibit not only visible and ultraviolet ligand-to-metal charge-transfer spectral bands, but also near-infrared Sf-Sf transitions resulting from promotion of a Sf electron to an orbital of primarily Sf character .

  20. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  1. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  2. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  3. The Electronic Structure of Single-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, David Alan

    Single-layer graphene has been widely researched in recent years due to its perceived technological applicability and its scientific importance as a unique model system with relativistic Dirac Fermions. Because of its unique geometric and electronic structure, the properties of graphene can be tuned or manipulated in several ways. This tunability is important for technological applications in its own right, and it also allows us to study the fundamental properties of Dirac Fermions, including unique many-body interactions and the nature of the quasiparticles at half-filling. This thesis is a detailed examination of the electronic and structural properties of graphene, studied with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and other surface science techniques like low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction. This thesis is organized as follows. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to the electronic and structural properties of single-layer graphene. It provides a brief historical overview of major theoretical and experimental milestones and sets the stage for the important theoretical and experimental questions that this thesis addresses. Chapters 2 and 3 describe the experimental setup. Chapter 2 discusses the experimental techniques used in this thesis with particular focus on the mechanics of ARPES. Chapter 3 discusses the different graphene growth techniques that were used to create our sample with particular focus on our characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001). Chapters 4 and 5 form the meat of this thesis: they provide a thorough discussion of the electronic properties of graphene as studied by ARPES. Chapter 4 describes how various perturbations can result in the manipulation of the bare electronic band structure, including the deposition of atomic or molecular species on top of an epitaxial graphene sheet as well as the interactions between graphene and its substrate. Chapter 5 describes the many-body physics in single-layer graphene. It

  4. Evolution of Superconductivity in BiS2-Based Superconductor LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiroi, Takafumi; Kajitani, Joe; Omachi, Atsushi; Miura, Osuke; Mizuguchi, Yoshikazu

    2015-02-01

    We have systematically investigated the crystal structure, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical resistivity of the BiS2-based superconductor LaO0.5F0.5Bi(S1-xSex)2 (x = 0-0.7). With expanding lattice volume by Se substitution, bulk superconductivity was induced for x ≥ 0.2, and the highest Tc of 3.8 K was observed in x = 0.5 (LaO0.5F0.5BiSSe). Metallic conductivity was observed for x ≥ 0.3 in the resistivity measurement, whereas semiconducting-like behavior was observed for x ≤ 0.2. The induction of bulk superconductivity by the partial substitution of S by Se in the LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 superconductor should be positively linked to the enhancement of metallic conductivity.

  5. Electronic structure of the silicon vacancy color center in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Christian; Müller, Tina; Waselowski, Victor; Becker, Jonas N; Pingault, Benjamin; Sternschulte, Hadwig; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Gali, Adam; Maze, Jeronimo R; Atatüre, Mete; Becher, Christoph

    2014-01-24

    The negatively charged silicon vacancy (SiV) color center in diamond has recently proven its suitability for bright and stable single photon emission. However, its electronic structure so far has remained elusive. We here explore the electronic structure by exposing single SiV defects to a magnetic field where the Zeeman effect lifts the degeneracy of magnetic sublevels. The similar responses of single centers and a SiV ensemble in a low strain reference sample prove our ability to fabricate almost perfect single SiVs, revealing the true nature of the defect's electronic properties. We model the electronic states using a group-theoretical approach yielding a good agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts polarization measurements on single SiV centers and explains recently discovered spin selective excitation of SiV defects. PMID:24484153

  6. Electronic structure and photoelectron spectra of osmium and ruthenium tetraoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Topol', I.A.; Vovna, V.I.; Kazachek, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    The X/sub ..cap alpha../-SW method has been used in the nonrelativistic and quasirelativistic approximations to calculate the electronic structures of OsO/sub 4/, RuO/sub 4/, and FeO/sub 4/. When the 5d element is replaced by a 4d or 3d one, the electron-density redistribution is due mainly to the d electrons. All the d electrons in FeO/sub 4/ are localized on the iron atom, which markedly reduced the ionic and covalent bonding on the transition from RuO/sub 4/ to FeO/sub 4/, which explains the instability of FeO/sub 4/. The calculated spin-orbit splittings agree well with the structure of the PES bands, which enables one to establish the sequence of MO ionization energies unambiguously.

  7. Studying Atomic Structures by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Knut W.

    2008-07-01

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  8. Studying atomic structures by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Knut W

    2008-07-25

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy-loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli-electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations. PMID:18653874

  9. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references.

  10. Heterogeneous electron transfer at nanoscopic electrodes: importance of electronic structures and electric double layers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Liu, Yuwen; Chen, Junxiang

    2014-08-01

    Heterogeneous electron-transfer (ET) processes at solid electrodes play key roles in molecular electronics and electrochemical energy conversion and sensing. Electrode nanosization and/or nanostructurization are among the major current strategies for performance promotion in these fields. Besides, nano-sized/structured electrodes offer great opportunities to characterize electrochemical structures and processes with high spatial and temporal resolution. This review presents recent insights into the nanoscopic size and structure effects of electrodes and electrode materials on heterogeneous ET kinetics, by emphasizing the importance of the electric double-layer (EDL) at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the electronic structure of electrode materials. It is shown, by general conceptual analysis and recent example demonstrations of representative electrode systems including electrodes of nanometer sizes and gaps and of nanomaterials such as sp(2) hybridized nanocarbons and semiconductor quantum dots, how the heterogeneous ET kinetics, the electronic structures of electrodes, the EDL structures at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the nanoscopic electrode sizes and structures may be related.

  11. Multidomain decomposition approach to large scale electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Kalman

    2010-03-01

    A first-principles electronic structure calculation is presented using a domain decomposition technique. The domain decomposition leads to block tridiagonal Hamiltonian and overlap matrices. With the help of an LDL decomposition the block tridiagonal structure can be exploited and the Kohn-Sham states and/or the electron density can be calculated in an computationally efficient way. The electron density can be calculated from the Green's function or from the eigensolution obtained using subspace iteration. In both cases, the calculation of the density is divided into a series of independent computations that can be done in parallel. This approach allows us to determine tens of thousands of eigenstates with any desired accuracy. If the Kohn-Sham states are not required, the density can be calculated from the Green's function in a linearly scaling fashion. The linear scaling is achieved by using the special structure resulting from the domain decomposition and not by truncation or cutoff.

  12. Cellular structural biology as revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N; Martins, Bruno; Medalia, Ohad

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the function of cellular machines requires a thorough analysis of the structural elements that underline their function. Electron microscopy (EM) has been pivotal in providing information about cellular ultrastructure, as well as macromolecular organization. Biological materials can be physically fixed by vitrification and imaged with cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) in a close-to-native condition. Using this technique, one can acquire three-dimensional (3D) information about the macromolecular architecture of cells, depict unique cellular states and reconstruct molecular networks. Technical advances over the last few years, such as improved sample preparation and electron detection methods, have been instrumental in obtaining data with unprecedented structural details. This presents an exciting opportunity to explore the molecular architecture of both individual cells and multicellular organisms at nanometer to subnanometer resolution. In this Commentary, we focus on the recent developments and in situ applications of cryo-ET to cell and structural biology.

  13. Wiring of metallized microtubules by electron beam-induced structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Köhler, J. Michael; Böhm, Konrad J.; Unger, Eberhard; Wagner, Thomas; Kirsch, Remo; Mertig, Michael; Pompe, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    Molecular electronics emerge as a possibility to continue the miniaturization of electronic circuits down to the lower nanometre scale. One significant challenge is the electrical connection of molecular devices by nanowires. We present here the realization of a new approach for the wiring of nanostructures by linking metallized microtubules (MTs) to prestructured microelectrodes. MTs (tube-like protein structures) were metallized and deposited on microstructured substrates. Electron beam-induced deposition was used for structuring connecting gold lines as nanoelectrodes, which wire a single MT to microelectrodes created by photolithography. Initial electrical measurements confirmed the suitability of the set-up for linking nanometre-scale structures to a measurement device. A metallized MT yielded a resistance below 50 icons/Journals/Common/Omega" ALT="Omega" ALIGN="TOP"/> over the length of 1 µm.

  14. Electron crystallography--the waking beauty of structural biology.

    PubMed

    Pope, Christopher R; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2012-08-01

    Since its debut in the mid 1970s, electron crystallography has been a valuable alternative in the structure determination of biological macromolecules. Its reliance on single-layered or double-layered two-dimensionally ordered arrays and the ability to obtain structural information from small and disordered crystals make this approach particularly useful for the study of membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer environment. Despite its unique advantages, technological hurdles have kept electron crystallography from reaching its full potential. Addressing the issues, recent initiatives developed high-throughput pipelines for crystallization and screening. Adding progress in automating data collection, image analysis and phase extension methods, electron crystallography is poised to raise its profile and may lead the way in exploring the structural biology of macromolecular complexes.

  15. Structural and electronic properties of dense liquid and amorphous nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Boates, B; Bonev, S A

    2011-02-11

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural and electronic properties of liquid nitrogen in the pressure-temperature range of 0-200 GPa and 2000-6000 K. The molecular-polymerization and molecular-atomic liquid phase boundaries have been mapped over this region. We find the polymeric liquid to be metallic, similar to what has been reported for the higher-temperature atomic fluid. An explanation of the electronic properties is given based on the structure and bonding character of the transformed liquids. We discuss the structural and bonding differences between the polymeric liquid and insulating solid cubic-gauche nitrogen to explain the differences in their electronic properties. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism responsible for charge transport in polymeric nitrogen systems to explain the conductivity of the polymeric fluid and the semi-conducting nature of low-temperature amorphous nitrogen.

  16. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  17. Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

    2003-10-07

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  18. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  19. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  20. Advanced applications of reduced density matrices in electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Adam Eric

    This dissertation describes several applications of reduced density matrices (RDMs) in electronic structure theory. RDM methods are a valuable addition to the library of electronic structure theories because they reduce a many-electron problem to the space of just two electrons without approximation. New theoretical and computational avenues enabled by the two-electron RDM (2-RDM) have already shown substantial progress in calculating atomic and molecular energies and properties with an eye toward predictive chemistry. More than simply accurate calculations, RDM methods entail a paradigm shift in quantum chemistry. While one-electron approaches are conceptually easy to understand, the importance of the 2-RDM quantifies the centrality of a two-body framework. The 2-RDM facilitates a two-electron interpretation of quantum mechanics that will undoubtedly lead to a greater understanding of electron correlation. Two applications presented in the dissertation center around near-exact evaluation of the 2-RDM in chemical systems without the many-electron wave function, but approach the problem from different angles. The first applies variational 2-RDM theory to a model quantum dot; the second attempts non-variational determination of the 2-RDM in open-shell atomic and molecular systems using an extension of the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrodinger equation (ACSE). An example reaction is presented to demonstrate how energies computed with the 2-RDM can facilitate an understanding of chemical reactivity. A third application uses the one-electron RDM (1-RDM) as a tool for understanding molecular conductivity. In this case, the 1-RDM is valuable because it integrates out many extraneous degrees of freedom from metal baths, simplifying the electron transport problem but retaining enough information to predict the dependence of current on applied voltage. The results are competitive with other conductivity theories, including a dominant scattering-based understanding, but

  1. Chemistry and Electronic Structure of Iron-Based Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Safa-Sefat, Athena; Singh, David J

    2011-01-01

    The solid state provides a richly varied fabric for intertwining chemical bonding, electronic structure, and magnetism. The discovery of superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has revealed new aspects of this interplay, especially involving magnetism and superconductivity. Moreover, it has challenged prior thinking about high-temperature superconductivity by providing a set of materials that differ in many crucial aspects from the previously known cuprate superconductors. Here we review some of what is known about the superconductivity and its interplay with magnetism, chemistry, and electronic structure in Fe-based superconductors.

  2. Comparison of electronic structure between monolayer silicenes on Ag (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Liang, Lin; Ryuichi, Arafune; Maki, Kawai; Noriaki, Takagi

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structures of monolayer silicenes (4 × 4 and ) grown on Ag (111) surface are studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. While both phases have similar electronic structures around the Fermi level, significant differences are observed in the higher energy unoccupied states. The DFT calculations show that the contributions of Si 3pz orbitals to the unoccupied states are different because of their different buckled configurations. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 24241040 and 25110008) and the World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, Japan.

  3. Orientation-dependent C-60 electronic structures revealed byphotoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Choi, H.J.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L.; Goldoni, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.

    2008-01-17

    We observe, with angle-resolved photoemission, a dramaticchange in the electronic structure of two C60 monolayers, deposited,respectively, on Ag (111) and (100) substrates, and similarly doped withpotassium to half filling of the C60 lowest unoccupied molecular orbital.The Fermi surface symmetry, the bandwidth, and the curvature of thedispersion at gamma point are different. Orient ations of the C60molecules on the two substrates are known to be the main structuraldifference between the two monolayers, and we present new band-structurecalculations for some of these orientations. We conclude thatorientations play a key role in the electronic structure offullerides.

  4. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Shtel'makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-21

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  5. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  6. Electronic structure and electron correlation in weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, Peter Borgia Ndungu

    The electronic structure and electron correlations in weakly confining spherical quantum dots potentials are investigated. Following a common practice, the investigation starts with the restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. Then electron correlation is added in steps in a series of approximations based on the single particle Green's function approach: (i) Second-order Green function (GF) (ii) 2ph-Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and (iii) an extended version thereof (XTDA) which introduces ground-state correlation into the TDA. The study includes as well Hartree-Fock V (N-1) potential approximation in which framework the Hartree-Fock virtual orbitals are calculated in the field of the N-1 electrons as opposed to the regular but unphysical N-electron field Hartree-Fock calculation of virtual orbitals. For contrast and comparison, the same approximation techniques are applied to few-electron closed-shell atoms and few-electron negative ions for which pertinent data is readily available. The results for the weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials and the standard atomic systems exhibit fundamental similarities as well as significant differences. For the most part the results of these calculations are in favor of application of HF, GF, and TDA techniques in the modeling of three-dimensional weakly confining quantum dot potentials. The observed differences emphasize the significance of confinement and electronic features unique to quantum dots such as the increased binding of electrons with higher angular momentum and the modified shell filling sequences.

  7. Probing the chemistry, electronic structure and redox energetics in pentavalent organometallic actinide complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Christopher R; Vaughn, Anthony E; Morris, David E; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2008-01-01

    Complexes of the early actinides (Th-Pu) have gained considerable prominence in organometallic chemistry as they have been shown to undergo chemistries not observed with their transition- or lanthanide metal counterparts. Further, while bonding in f-element complexes has historically been considered to be ionic, the issue of covalence remains a subject of debate in the area of actinide science, and studies aimed at elucidating key bonding interactions with 5f-orbitals continue to garner attention. Towards this end, our interests have focused on the role that metal oxidation state plays in the structure, reactivity and spectral properties of organouranium complexes. We report our progress in the synthesis of substituted U{sup V}-imido complexes using various routes: (1) Direct oxidation of U{sup IV}-imido complexes with copper(I) salts; (2) Salt metathesis with U{sup V}-imido halides; (3) Protonolysis and insertion of an U{sup V}-imido alkyl or aryl complex with H-N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2} or N{triple_bond}C-Ph, respectively, to form a U{sup V}-imido ketimide complex. Further, we report and compare the crystallographic, electrochemical, spectroscopic and magnetic characterization of the pentavalent uranium (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}U({double_bond}N-Ar)(Y) series (Y = OTf, SPh, C{triple_bond}C-Ph, NPh{sub 2}, OPh, N{double_bond}CPh{sub 2}) to further interrogate the molecular, electronic, and magnetic structures of this new class of uranium complexes.

  8. Structural surface investigations with low-energy backscattered electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    The development of electron spectroscopies based on inelastic scattering fine structure is driven mainly by the need for structural methods which allow the investigation of the geometrical environment of different atomic species of the surface region of the sample. The EELFS (Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure) technique, using low-kinetic-energy electrons (1000-2000 eV) in reflection geometry, has been proven a useful tool for local structural investigation of clean surfaces, thin films and chemisorbed species. The main appeal of this technique, besides its experimental accessibility, is that the data analysis follows the procedure used for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy to obtain the atomic selectivity, the radial distribution function, the coordination number and the thermal and anisotropic effects. The near-edge energy-loss feature has been used to investigate the density of empty states close to EF and it appeeal particularly sensitive for following the structural changes and for discriminating among various phases and compound formations which occur in the surface region. In this work I review some recent developments, applications and theoretical considerations of the EELFS technique to give local structural parameters and to assess the basic mechanisms which dominate the low-energy electron-surface interaction.

  9. Electronic structure of scandium-doped MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, Omar; Agrestini, Stefano

    2005-03-01

    Recently has been reported the synthesis of a new superconducting alloy based on MgB2, where Mg is partially substituted with Sc. In order to analyze the effect of Sc doping on the structural and superconducting properties of Mg1-xScxB2, we have performed a detailed study of the electronic structure for this new diboride. The calculations have been done using the first-principles LAPW method, within the supercell approach for modeling the doping. In this work we report results for the electronic band structure, Fermi surface, and density of states. The effect of the Sc-d orbitals on the structural and electronic properties of Mg1-xScxB2 is analyzed. Increasing the Sc concentration (x) the σ-band is gradually filled, because Sc have one valence electron more than Mg. Interestingly, the analysis of the band structure shows that even for ScB2 the top of the σ-band remain above the Fermi level, nevertheless the σ-band presents high dispersion and has an important contribution of d states. In this way, in addition to the band filling effect, Sc doping gradually reduces the two-dimensional character of the σ- band in Mg1-xScxB2 as a result of increasing the sp(B)-d(Sc) hybridization. This research was partially supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnolog'ia (CONACYT, M'exico) under Grant. No. 43830-F

  10. Free electron laser-driven ultrafast rearrangement of the electronic structure in Ti

    PubMed Central

    Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Cucini, R.; Bencivenga, F.; Battistoni, A.; Gessini, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Saito, M.; Di Fonzo, S.; D'Amico, F.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Filipponi, A.; Giglia, A.; Nannarone, S.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy density extreme ultraviolet radiation delivered by the FERMI seeded free-electron laser has been used to create an exotic nonequilibrium state of matter in a titanium sample characterized by a highly excited electron subsystem at temperatures in excess of 10 eV and a cold solid-density ion lattice. The obtained transient state has been investigated through ultrafast absorption spectroscopy across the Ti M2,3-edge revealing a drastic rearrangement of the sample electronic structure around the Fermi level occurring on a time scale of about 100 fs. PMID:26798835

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron images for real sample structures in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Wang, H Y; Li, Y G; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for the study of electron beam interaction with solids have been mostly concerned with specimens of simple geometry. In this article, we propose a simulation algorithm for treating arbitrary complex structures in a real sample. The method is based on a finite element triangular mesh modeling of sample geometry and a space subdivision for accelerating simulation. Simulation of secondary electron image in scanning electron microscopy has been performed for gold particles on a carbon substrate. Comparison of the simulation result with an experiment image confirms that this method is effective to model complex morphology of a real sample.

  12. Chiral phosphorus nanotubes: structure, bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Quijano-Briones, J J; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-05-14

    The study of black phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs) had been devoted to zigzag and armchair structures, with no consideration of chiral structures to date. In this communication, we studied the structural and electronic (band structure) properties of chiral nanotubes using a periodic plane wave-pseudopotential approach. We found that some chiral nanotubes display similar bandgaps and binding energies per atom (BEA) as armchair PNTs and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations attest their thermal stability. Interestingly, we determined that the bandgap is tuned by varying the PNTs chirality and it is not related to their diameters. This feature can be exploited in optical and electronic applications wherein a direct and sizable bandgap is required. PMID:27094567

  13. Stacking-dependent electronic structure of bilayer silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Huixia; Zhang, Jin; Ding, Zijing; Li, Hui E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn; Meng, Sheng E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-03-31

    Bilayer silicene (BLS) is a class of material that possibly holds both topological and superconducting properties; however, its structure is not fully understood. By scanning stacking modes and lattice constants using first principles calculations, several meta-stable configurations are identified, including a slightly faulted-AA packing structure, named slide-2AA. Different from the metallic properties of conventional AA and AB stacking forms, band structure of slide-2AA bilayer presents a sizeable indirect energy gap of ∼1.16 eV. A metal-semiconductor phase transition along the sliding pathway with a small energy barrier is also observed, indicating its electronic properties can be easily tuned by applying small shear force along the BLS surface plane. Such unique quantitative relationship of structure and electronic properties has profound implications in nanoelectronics and electromechanical devices.

  14. Electron-Phonon Renormalization of Electronic Band Structures of C Allotropes and BN Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Marchbanks, Christopher; Wu, Zhigang

    The effect of lattice vibration on electronic band structures has been mostly neglected in first-principles calculations because the electron-phonon (e-ph) renormalization of quasi-particle energies is often small (< 100 meV). However, in certain materials, such as diamond, the electron-phonon coupling reduces the band gap by nearly 0.5 eV, which is comparable to the many-body corrections of the electronic band structures calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we compared two implementations of the Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the EPW code and the ABINIT package respectively. Our computations of Si and diamond demonstrate that the ABINIT implementation converges much faster. Using this method, the e-ph renormalizations of electronic structures of three C allotropes (diamond, graphite, graphene) and four BN polymorphs (zincblend, wurtzite, mono-layer, and layered-hexagonal) were calculated. Our results suggest that (1) all of the zero-point renormalizations of band gaps in these materials, except for graphene, are larger than 100 meV, and (2) there are large variations in e-ph renormalization of band gaps due to differences in crystal structure. This work was supported by a U.S. DOE Early Career Award (Grant No. DE-SC0006433). Computations were carried out at the Golden Energy Computing Organization at CSM and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  15. Two-vortex structure of electron, nonlocality and Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2012-02-01

    The dimensionless electromagnetic coupling constant α=e2/planckc may have three interpretations: as the well-known ratio between the electron charge radius e2/mc2 and the Compton wavelength of an electron λc=planck/mc, as the ratio of two angular momenta since the Planck constant has the dimension of angular momentum and as the ratio of two flux quanta e and hc/e . The anomalous part of the electron magnetic moment together with the unified picture of the three interpretations of α is suggested to have deep physical significance. The electric charge is proposed to be a new quantum of flux that leads to a new model of the electron envisaging a two-vortex structure. In analogy with quantum conditions, we postulate sub-quantum conditions applicable in a region of the order of λc replacing planck by a universal constant f=e2/2πc and we apply it to the Dirac equation in internal space that gives rise to the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron. The Dirac spinor and two-spinor representations for the vortex structure of an electron in the single-particle Dirac framework are discussed. The role of sub-quantum rules and internal variables in developing the present ideas is also discussed. A critical discussion of past attempts at giving fundamental importance to magnetism and flux quantum is presented in order to delineate the new ideas in the present work.

  16. Strain fields and electronic structure of CrN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Tomas; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    Chromium nitride (CrN) has a promising future for its resistance to corrosion and hardness, and very interesting magnetic and electronic properties. CrN presents a phase transition in which the crystal structure, magnetic ordering and electronic properties change at a (Néel) temperature ~ 280 K . Thin films from different labs exhibit different conductance behavior at low temperature. We study the unusual electronic and magnetic properties of thin layers. For that purpose we develop a tight binding Hamiltonian based on the Slater-Koster approach, and estimate the interaction between the Cr-3d and N-2p orbitals, by analyzing the band structure and comparing it with ab initio calculations performed using the LSDA+U method. These calculations show the system to behave as a semiconductor below the Néel temperature. Based on our model we calculate the effective masses and analyze the effect of strain fields in the electronic structure in order to understand the electronic behavior near the phase transition. Supported by NSF DMR-1508325.

  17. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  18. Putting structure into context: fitting of atomic models into electron microscopic and electron tomographic reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels

    2012-02-01

    A complete understanding of complex dynamic cellular processes such as cell migration or cell adhesion requires the integration of atomic level structural information into the larger cellular context. While direct atomic-level information at the cellular level remains inaccessible, electron microscopy, electron tomography and their associated computational image processing approaches have now matured to a point where sub-cellular structures can be imaged in three dimensions at the nanometer scale. Atomic-resolution information obtained by other means can be combined with this data to obtain three-dimensional models of large macromolecular assemblies in their cellular context. This article summarizes some recent advances in this field.

  19. On the versatility of electronic structures in polymethine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Simon; Haefele, Alexandre; Monnereau, Cyrille; Charaf-Eddin, Azzam; Jacquemin, Denis; Le Guennic, Boris; Maury, Olivier; Andraud, Chantal

    2014-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the photophysical behavior diversity of polymethine chromophores which are ubiquitous in biological imaging and material sciences. One major challenge in this class of chromophore is to correlate the chemical structure to the observed optical properties, especially when symmetry-breaking phenomena occur. With the constant concern for rationalization of their spectroscopy, we propose an extended classification of polymethine dyes based on their ground state electronic configuration using three limit forms namely: cyanine, dipole and bis-dipole. The chemical modifications of the dye and the influence of exogenous parameters can promote dramatic spectroscopic changes that can be correlated to significant electronic reorganization between the three-abovementioned forms. The deep understanding of such phenomena should allow to identify, predict and take advantage of the versatile electronic structure of polymethines.

  20. Electronic structure of the superconducting layered perovskite niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Izumi; Nishihara, Yoshikazu

    1998-07-01

    The electronic energy-band structure for RbLaNb2O7, which is closely related to the layered perovskite niobate superconducting KCa2Nb3O10 and metallic KLaNb2O7 with Li intercalation, has been calculated by using the scalar-relativistic full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method within the local-density approximation. The result of the calculation shows that this compound is a band insulator with a small gap, and its conduction band is a typical two-dimensional one and the valence band is rather three dimensional. We can conclude that the layered perovskite niobate KCa2Nb3O10 is a band insulator that can be superconducting with electron doping, and have the highly two-dimensional electronic structure.

  1. Electronic Structure and Properties of Organic Bulk-Heterojunction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Street, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and physical mechanisms of carrier generation and transport in the organic bulk heterojunction are reviewed. The electronic structure describes the bands and band-tail states, the band alignment at the bulk-heterojunction interface, and the overall density-of-states model. The different electronic character of excitons and mobile charge is discussed, the former being highly molecular and the latter more delocalized. Dissociation of the exciton via the charge-transfer (CT) states is attributed to weak binding of the CT state arising from charge delocalization. Carrier transport and charge collection is strongly influenced by the presence of localized band-tail states. Recombination is attributed primarily to transitions from mobile carriers to band-tail or deep trap states. PMID:26603977

  2. Controlling electron-phonon scattering with metamaterial plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Wu, Xueyuan; Kong, Jiantao; Broido, David

    Electron-plasmon scattering can be faster than electron-phonon scattering. While in metals plasmons occur in the UV range, phonons dominate behavior at much lower frequencies (far IR range), and this typically decouples these phenomena. In metamaterial plasmonic structures, however, plasma effects can be tuned down to the far IR range, allowing for their interference with phonons. It was recently shown, that such interference can protect hot electron energy induced in a solar cell, from dissipation into heat. In this work we explore the possibility of using such an effect to control the electron-phonon interaction and transport in semiconductors. We demonstrate, that this could lead to a novel path to enhancing the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermoelectric figure of merit.

  3. Electronic Structure of Crystalline 4He at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ho Kwang; Shirley, Eric L.; Ding, Yang; Eng, Peter; Cai, Yong Q.; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Jinfu Shu, A=Kao, Chi-Chang; Hemley, Russell J.; Kao, Chichang; Mao, Wendy L.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC

    2011-01-10

    Using inelastic X-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium crystal at 300 K which has the widest known electronic energy bandgap of all materials, that was previously inaccessible to measurements due to the extreme energy and pressure range. We observed rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cut-off edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  4. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications.

  5. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  6. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  7. Superconducting properties and electronic structure of NaBi.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, S K; Krizan, J W; Xiong, J; Klimczuk, T; Gibson, Q D; Liang, T; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-05-28

    Resistivity, dc magnetization, and heat capacity measurements are reported for superconducting NaBi. T(c), the electronic contribution to the specific heat γ, the ΔC(p)/γT(c) ratio, and the Debye temperature are found to be 2.15 K, 3.4 mJ mol(-1) K(-2), 0.78, and 140 K respectively. The calculated electron-phonon coupling constant (λ(ep) = 0.62) implies that NaBi is a moderately coupled superconductor. The upper critical field and coherence length are found to be 250 Oe and 115 nm, respectively. Electronic structure calculations show NaBi to be a good metal, in agreement with the experiments; the p(x) and p(y) orbitals of Bi dominate the electronic states at the Fermi Energy. PMID:24804822

  8. Superconducting properties and electronic structure of NaBi.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, S K; Krizan, J W; Xiong, J; Klimczuk, T; Gibson, Q D; Liang, T; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-05-28

    Resistivity, dc magnetization, and heat capacity measurements are reported for superconducting NaBi. T(c), the electronic contribution to the specific heat γ, the ΔC(p)/γT(c) ratio, and the Debye temperature are found to be 2.15 K, 3.4 mJ mol(-1) K(-2), 0.78, and 140 K respectively. The calculated electron-phonon coupling constant (λ(ep) = 0.62) implies that NaBi is a moderately coupled superconductor. The upper critical field and coherence length are found to be 250 Oe and 115 nm, respectively. Electronic structure calculations show NaBi to be a good metal, in agreement with the experiments; the p(x) and p(y) orbitals of Bi dominate the electronic states at the Fermi Energy.

  9. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications.

  10. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K{sub 1}RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K{sub 1}RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D{sub 2}-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C{sub 2h}-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D{sub 2}-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C{sub 2h}-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments

  11. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  12. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  13. Electronic Structure of Endohedral Metallofullerenes: Evidences of the Ionic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fortea, Antonio; Valencia, Ramón; Poblet, Josep M.

    2009-08-01

    The electronic structure of the metal nitride M3N and metal carbide M2C2 endohedral fullerenes is rationalized by means of the simple ionic model that assumes a charge transfer from the internal metal cluster to the carbon framework. Experimental evidences of such an ionic model are also presented.

  14. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  15. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  16. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  17. Flat pack interconnection structure simplifies modular electronic assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzin, L.

    1967-01-01

    Flat pack interconnection structure composed of stick modules simplifies modular electronic assemblies by allowing a single axis mother board. Two of the wiring planes are located in the stick module, which is the lower level of assembly, with the third wiring plane in the mother board.

  18. Small Scale Reconnection : Structure and Electron Jet Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, I.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of small scale processes on the formation and evolution of macroscopic inhomogeneous magnetic configurations and the resulting super-Alfvenic jets have been investigated in space and lab over many years. Various satellite measurements at the magneto-sheath crossings observe features with small spatial scale of the order of electron skin depth, indicating the importance of processes dominated by electron dynamics. The data show structures which are (a) spatially non-symmetric with densities and magnetic field differing substantially on both sides of the region, while (b) the inhomogeneous magnetic and electric field structures consist of narrow, three-dimensional electron diffusion regions, with (c) bifurcated current over electron skin depth or below and (d) ejection of energetic, super-Alfvenic, non-Gaussian electrons perpendicularly to the magnetic field, away from the X-line. At small scales the main Alfven mode which describes the MHD regime is replaced by a helicon/whistler. The eMHD model, which includes the full dynamics of the electrons and stationary ions, with density gradients and asymptotically different values of the magnetic field is implemented for the experimentally observed configurations. Over the small scales the electron fluid follows the lines of the generalized vorticity (GV) as it decouples from the magnetic field. The regions of a significant deviation of the GV from the magnetic field become the potential sites for non-adiabatic electron acceleration. Effects of geometry, compressibility and thermal effects on this deviation will be discussed. The non-thermal jet distribution is conjectured to form when the standard diffusion is replaced by a non Markovian with large jumps random walk process, describing its evolution through the fractional diffusion equation and resulting in a non-Gaussian distribution.

  19. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Slotman, G J; van Wijk, M M; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-30

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap. PMID:26565485

  20. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotman, G. J.; van Wijk, M. M.; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-01

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap.

  1. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Hyunjin

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  2. Analysis of the Tank 5F Feed and Bleed Residual Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.; Diprete, D.: Coleman, C.; Washington, A.

    2011-07-07

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. As part of Tank 5F Closure Mechanical Cleaning, SRR conducted a 'Feed and Bleed' process in Tank 5F. Following this 'Feed and Bleed' Mechanical Cleaning in Tank 5F, SRR collected two tank heel samples (referred to as sample 1 and sample 2) under Riser 5 to determine the composition of the material remaining in the tanks. This document describes sample analysis results. The conclusions from this analysis follow. (1) The anions measured all had a concentration less than 250 mg/kg, except for oxalate, which had a concentration of 2100-2400 mg/kg. (2) The measured cations with the highest concentration were iron (432,000-519,000 mg/kg), nickel (54,600-69,300 mg/kg), and manganese (35,200-42,100 mg/kg). All other cations measured less than 13,000 mg/kg. (3) The radionuclides present in the highest concentration are {sup 90}Sr (3.0 x 10{sup 10} dpm/g), {sup 137}Cs (6.8 x 10{sup 8} dpm/g), and {sup 241}Am (1.4 x 10{sup 8} - 1.8 x 10{sup 8} dpm/g). (4) The particle size analysis shows a large fraction of particles greater than 100 {micro}.

  3. 26 CFR 5f.103-2 - Public approval of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Public approval of industrial development bonds... RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-2 Public approval of industrial development bonds. (a) General rule. An industrial development bond (within the meaning of § 1.103-7(b)(1) issued after December 31, 1982, shall...

  4. 26 CFR 5f.103-2 - Public approval of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Public approval of industrial development bonds... RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-2 Public approval of industrial development bonds. (a) General rule. An industrial development bond (within the meaning of § 1.103-7(b)(1) issued after December 31, 1982, shall...

  5. 26 CFR 5f.103-2 - Public approval of industrial development bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public approval of industrial development bonds... RESPONSIBILITY ACT OF 1982 § 5f.103-2 Public approval of industrial development bonds. (a) General rule. An industrial development bond (within the meaning of § 1.103-7(b)(1) issued after December 31, 1982, shall...

  6. Four Postmortem Case Reports with Quantitative Detection of the Synthetic Cannabinoid, 5F-PB-22

    PubMed Central

    Behonick, George; Shanks, Kevin G.; Firchau, Dennis J.; Mathur, Gagan; Lynch, Charles F.; Nashelsky, Marcus; Jaskierny, David J.; Meroueh, Chady

    2014-01-01

    In January 2014, the US government temporarily designated 5F-PB-22, along with three other synthetic cannabinoids (AB-FUBINACA, ADB-PINACA and PB-22), into Schedule I. Over the course of a 4-month time period (July–October 2013), our laboratory quantitatively identified 5F-PB-22 in specimens obtained from four postmortem cases. We describe the four cases, to include pertinent autopsy findings and decedent histories, together with quantitative results for 5F-PB-22 determined in postmortem blood and antemortem serum. Samples were prepared via a liquid–liquid extraction at pH 10.2 into hexane : ethyl acetate. Instrumental analysis was achieved with liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Two ion transitions were monitored for the analyte of interest, and one ion transition was monitored for the internal standard. The observed concentration range of 5F-PB-22 is 1.1–1.5 ng/mL for three postmortem blood specimens and one antemortem serum specimen. Three of the decedents experienced abrupt, sudden death; however, one decedent expired after a rapidly deteriorating hospital course. PMID:24876364

  7. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  8. Four postmortem case reports with quantitative detection of the synthetic cannabinoid, 5F-PB-22.

    PubMed

    Behonick, George; Shanks, Kevin G; Firchau, Dennis J; Mathur, Gagan; Lynch, Charles F; Nashelsky, Marcus; Jaskierny, David J; Meroueh, Chady

    2014-10-01

    In January 2014, the US government temporarily designated 5F-PB-22, along with three other synthetic cannabinoids (AB-FUBINACA, ADB-PINACA and PB-22), into Schedule I. Over the course of a 4-month time period (July-October 2013), our laboratory quantitatively identified 5F-PB-22 in specimens obtained from four postmortem cases. We describe the four cases, to include pertinent autopsy findings and decedent histories, together with quantitative results for 5F-PB-22 determined in postmortem blood and antemortem serum. Samples were prepared via a liquid-liquid extraction at pH 10.2 into hexane : ethyl acetate. Instrumental analysis was achieved with liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry operating in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Two ion transitions were monitored for the analyte of interest, and one ion transition was monitored for the internal standard. The observed concentration range of 5F-PB-22 is 1.1-1.5 ng/mL for three postmortem blood specimens and one antemortem serum specimen. Three of the decedents experienced abrupt, sudden death; however, one decedent expired after a rapidly deteriorating hospital course. PMID:24876364

  9. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  10. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  11. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  12. 48 CFR 47.303-5 - F.o.b. origin, with differentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Administration prescribes commercial zones at Subpart B of 49 CFR part 372); and (2) Differentials for mode of... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false F.o.b. origin, with... CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.303-5 F.o.b. origin,...

  13. Structural electronic and phonon properties of some transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Bushra; Pandit, Premlata; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of some Transition metal Aluminides (TMAl) namely ruthenium aluminide (RuAl), nickel aluminide (NiAl) and cobalt aluminide (CoAl) have been studied using plane wave pseudopotential method (PWSCF) within the local density approximation (LDA). The three TMAl's crystallizes in the CsCl-type structure (B2 phase). From the analysis of band structure and density of state, we found that these TMAl's are metallic in nature. The vibrational properties in terms of phonon dispersion curves and density of state have also been reported for RuAl using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT).

  14. Nanographene and graphene edges: electronic structure and nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shintaro; Enoki, Toshiaki

    2013-10-15

    Graphene can be referred to as an infinite polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) consisting of an infinite number of benzene rings fused together. However, at the nanoscale, nanographene's properties lie in between those of bulk graphene and large PAH molecules, and its electronic properties depend on the influence of the edges, which disrupt the infinite π-electron system. The resulting modulation of the electronic states depends on whether the nanographene edge is the armchair or zigzag type, corresponding to the two fundamental crystal axes. In this Account, we report the results of fabricating both types of edges in the nanographene system and characterizing their electronic properties using a scanning probe microscope. We first introduce the theoretical background to understand the two types of finite size effects on the electronic states of nanographene (i) the standing wave state and (ii) the edge state which correspond to the armchair and zigzag edges, respectively. Most importantly, characterizing the standing wave and edge states could play a crucial role in understanding the chemical reactivity, thermodynamic stability and magnetism of nanosized graphene--important knowledge in the design and realization of promising functionalized nanocarbon materials. In the second part, we present scanning probe microscopic characterization of both edge types to experimentally characterize the two electronic states. As predicted, we find the armchair-edged nanographene to have an energetically stable electronic pattern. The zigzag-edged nanographene shows a nonbonding (π radical) pattern, which is the source of the material's electronic and magnetic properties and its chemical activity. Precise control of the edge geometry is a practical requirement to control the electronic structure. We show that we can fabricate the energetically unstable zigzag edges using scanning probe manipulation techniques, and we discuss challenges in using these techniques for that

  15. Biomechanics of DNA structures visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Ulrich J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for in situ visualization of the biomechanics of DNA structural networks using 4D electron microscopy. Vibrational oscillations of the DNA structure are excited mechanically through a short burst of substrate vibrations triggered by a laser pulse. Subsequently, the motion is probed with electron pulses to observe the impulse response of the specimen in space and time. From the frequency and amplitude of the observed oscillations, we determine the normal modes and eigenfrequencies of the structures involved. Moreover, by selective “nano-cutting” at a given point in the network, it was possible to obtain Young’s modulus, and hence the stiffness, of the DNA filament at that position. This experimental approach enables nanoscale mechanics studies of macromolecules and should find applications in other domains of biological networks such as origamis. PMID:23382239

  16. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael Nishi, Yoshio; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero

    2015-11-02

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. We measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  17. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-03

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands. Furthermore, we measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.

  18. Theoretical bioinorganic chemistry: the electronic structure makes a difference.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Barbara; Wennmohs, Frank; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank

    2007-04-01

    Theoretical bioinorganic and biomimetic chemistry involves the careful description of the electronic structure: for example, 'valence bond reading' of broken-symmetry density functional theory computations gives insight into the structure and bonding of metal-radical systems with complex electronic structures. Exploring the reactivities of such systems leads to the design of novel compounds with better reactivities. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM), where the QM part is a sophisticated ab initio method, aids in understanding nature's most complicated reaction mechanisms in atomic detail. First principles molecular dynamics simulations (Car-Parrinello simulations) open up exciting new avenues for studying transition metal centers and enable several questions to be addressed that cannot be resolved with either standard quantum chemical or traditional force-field methods. PMID:17349817

  19. Fabrication of graphitic nanowire structure by electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Kazuyuki; Enoki, Toshiaki

    2007-12-01

    The graphitic nanowire structure was fabricated by local graphitization induced by direct electron-beam irradiation or the annealing treatment of wire-shaped nano-sized pattern, where glassy carbon film was used as the precursor materials. The direct irradiation of the 50 keV electron beam hardly causes the local graphitization of the sample, while the annealing of nanowire-patterned glassy carbon with 50 nm width successfully gives graphitic nanowire structure. The electrical conductivity of the fabricated nanowire structure shows metallic temperature dependence. However, the graphitic domain size of the wire was found to be very small (ca. 5 nm) by using Raman spectroscopy and the magnetoresistance. Higher temperature annealing is expected to improve the crystallinity of the graphitic nanowire.

  20. Electronic structure of α-oligothiophenes with various substituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikramaditya, Talapunur; Saisudhakar, Mukka; Sumithra, Kanakamma

    2015-02-01

    Density functional theory is employed to investigate the effect of various substituents on the electronic structure of α-oligothiophenes. The effect of electron donating and withdrawing groups of oligothiophenes in the regio regular HT-HT form is studied. Depending on the type of substituent and the substitution pattern, large differences in the delocalization pattern are observed between the substituted and unsubstituted oligomers. It is found that the band gaps critically depend on the chemical structure and regioselectivity of the building blocks. For the 3-substitued systems, electron donating and electron withdrawing substituents are shown to decrease and increase band gaps respectively compared to unsubstituted systems. There are charge separation effects introduced as a result of lack of symmetry in some of the substituted oligothiophenes. A new strategy is explained to achieve low band gap materials by making use of the regioselective form with lesser symmetry. Push-pull substitution with an electron donor at one end of the conjugation and an acceptor the other end is also investigated. Comparisons of band gaps of the substituted oligothiophenes with the corresponding polymeric systems are also done.

  1. Electronic structure and crystal phase stability of palladium hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Houari, Abdesalem; Matar, Samir F.; Eyert, Volker

    2014-11-07

    The results of electronic structure calculations for a variety of palladium hydrides are presented. The calculations are based on density functional theory and used different local and semilocal approximations. The thermodynamic stability of all structures as well as the electronic and chemical bonding properties are addressed. For the monohydride, taking into account the zero-point energy is important to identify the octahedral Pd-H arrangement with its larger voids and, hence, softer hydrogen vibrational modes as favorable over the tetrahedral arrangement as found in the zincblende and wurtzite structures. Stabilization of the rocksalt structure is due to strong bonding of the 4d and 1s orbitals, which form a characteristic split-off band separated from the main d-band group. Increased filling of the formerly pure d states of the metal causes strong reduction of the density of states at the Fermi energy, which undermines possible long-range ferromagnetic order otherwise favored by strong magnetovolume effects. For the dihydride, octahedral Pd-H arrangement as realized, e.g., in the pyrite structure turns out to be unstable against tetrahedral arrangement as found in the fluorite structure. Yet, from both heat of formation and chemical bonding considerations, the dihydride turns out to be less favorable than the monohydride. Finally, the vacancy ordered defect phase Pd{sub 3}H{sub 4} follows the general trend of favoring the octahedral arrangement of the rocksalt structure for Pd:H ratios less or equal to one.

  2. Toward the origin of exciton electronic structure in phycobiliproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womick, Jordan M.; Miller, Stephen A.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2010-07-01

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to examine the electronic structures of two proteins found in the phycobilisome antenna of cyanobacteria, allophycocyanin (APC) and C-phycocyanin (CPC). The wave function composition involving the pairs of phycocyanobilin pigments (i.e., dimers) found in both proteins is the primary focus of this investigation. Despite their similar geometries, earlier experimental studies conducted in our laboratory and elsewhere observe clear signatures of exciton electronic structure in APC but not CPC. This issue is further investigated here using new experiments. Transient grating (TG) experiments employing broadband quasicontinuum probe pulses find a redshift in the signal spectrum of APC, which is almost twice that of CPC. Dynamics in the TG signal spectra suggest that the sub-100 fs dynamics in APC and CPC are respectively dominated by internal conversion and nuclear relaxation. A specialized technique, intraband electronic coherence spectroscopy (IECS), photoexcites electronic and nuclear coherences with nearly full suppression of signals corresponding to electronic populations. The main conclusion drawn by IECS is that dephasing of intraband electronic coherences in APC occurs in less than 25 fs. This result rules out correlated pigment fluctuations as the mechanism enabling exciton formation in APC and leads us to propose that the large Franck-Condon factors of APC promote wave function delocalization in the vibronic basis. For illustration, we compute the Hamiltonian matrix elements involving the electronic origin of the α84 pigment and the first excited vibronic level of the β84 pigment associated with a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging mode at 800 cm-1. For this pair of vibronic states, the -51 cm-1 coupling is larger than the 40 cm-1 energy gap, thereby making wave function delocalization a feasible prospect. By contrast, CPC possesses no pair of vibronic levels for which the intermolecular coupling is larger than the energy

  3. Toward the origin of exciton electronic structure in phycobiliproteins.

    PubMed

    Womick, Jordan M; Miller, Stephen A; Moran, Andrew M

    2010-07-14

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to examine the electronic structures of two proteins found in the phycobilisome antenna of cyanobacteria, allophycocyanin (APC) and C-phycocyanin (CPC). The wave function composition involving the pairs of phycocyanobilin pigments (i.e., dimers) found in both proteins is the primary focus of this investigation. Despite their similar geometries, earlier experimental studies conducted in our laboratory and elsewhere observe clear signatures of exciton electronic structure in APC but not CPC. This issue is further investigated here using new experiments. Transient grating (TG) experiments employing broadband quasicontinuum probe pulses find a redshift in the signal spectrum of APC, which is almost twice that of CPC. Dynamics in the TG signal spectra suggest that the sub-100 fs dynamics in APC and CPC are respectively dominated by internal conversion and nuclear relaxation. A specialized technique, intraband electronic coherence spectroscopy (IECS), photoexcites electronic and nuclear coherences with nearly full suppression of signals corresponding to electronic populations. The main conclusion drawn by IECS is that dephasing of intraband electronic coherences in APC occurs in less than 25 fs. This result rules out correlated pigment fluctuations as the mechanism enabling exciton formation in APC and leads us to propose that the large Franck-Condon factors of APC promote wave function delocalization in the vibronic basis. For illustration, we compute the Hamiltonian matrix elements involving the electronic origin of the alpha84 pigment and the first excited vibronic level of the beta84 pigment associated with a hydrogen out-of-plane wagging mode at 800 cm(-1). For this pair of vibronic states, the -51 cm(-1) coupling is larger than the 40 cm(-1) energy gap, thereby making wave function delocalization a feasible prospect. By contrast, CPC possesses no pair of vibronic levels for which the intermolecular coupling is larger than

  4. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  5. The characteristic electronic structure needed for high-temperature superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyper, N. C.; Edwards, P. P.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the magnon mechanism proposed by Goddard and co-workers to explain high-temperature superconductivity in oxidized cuprates can also account for such superconductivity in both oxidized barium bismuthate and the electron superconductors based on neodynium cuprate. The specific and characteristic electronic structure required for the operation of the magnon mechanism naturally accounts for why only a small number of basic types of high-temperature superconductors are currently known. This mechanism can readily explain the effects of doping cuprate superconductors with both magnetic and non-magnetic ions.

  6. The surface electronic structure of silicon terminated (100) diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, A. K.; Tadich, A.; Sear, M. J.; Qi, D.; Wee, A. T. S.; Stacey, A.; Pakes, C. I.

    2016-07-01

    A combination of synchrotron-based x-ray spectroscopy and contact potential difference measurements have been used to examine the electronic structure of the (3 × 1) silicon terminated (100) diamond surface under ultra high vacuum conditions. An occupied surface state which sits 1.75 eV below the valence band maximum has been identified, and indications of mid-gap unoccupied surface states have been found. Additionally, the pristine silicon terminated surface is shown to possess a negative electron affinity of ‑0.86 ± 0.1 eV.

  7. Grid-based electronic structure calculations: The tensor decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhuba, M. V.; Oseledets, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully grid-based approach for solving Hartree-Fock and all-electron Kohn-Sham equations based on low-rank approximation of three-dimensional electron orbitals. Due to the low-rank structure the total complexity of the algorithm depends linearly with respect to the one-dimensional grid size. Linear complexity allows for the usage of fine grids, e.g. 81923 and, thus, cheap extrapolation procedure. We test the proposed approach on closed-shell atoms up to the argon, several molecules and clusters of hydrogen atoms. All tests show systematical convergence with the required accuracy.

  8. Dual-phase steel structure visualized by extremely slow electrons.

    PubMed

    Mikmeková, Šárka; Yamada, Katsumi; Noro, Hisato

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical properties of complex steels are affected by their multi-phase structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is routinely used for characterizing dual-phase (DP) steels, although the identification of steel constituents is not straightforward. In fact, there are several ways of enabling the ferrite-martensite segmentation by SEM, and a wide range of electron energies can be utilized. This study demonstrates the phase identification of DP steels at high, low and extremely low landing energies of the primary electrons from tens of keV to tens of eV. Visualization of the specimen surface at very low landing energies has been achieved by inserting an earthed detector between the pole piece and the negatively biased specimen. This 'cathode lens mode' enables the use of the full energy range up to the primary electron energies. It has been found that extremely slow electrons (<100 eV) are exceptionally suitable for separation of the martensite from the ferrite matrix due to high surface sensitivity, enabling visualization of very fine features. Moreover, the channelling contrast is significantly suppressed at the landing energy of tens of eV of the primary electrons, which enables separation of the phases clearly even in the images acquired at low magnification. The contrast between the phases at tens of eV can be explained by the different thickness of native oxide covering the martensite and the ferrite phase.

  9. Electronic and Thermal Properties of Graphene and Carbon Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Gilmore; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present the general properties of carbon structures. The research involves the study of carbon structures: Graphene, Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), and Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs). A review of electrical and thermal conduction phenomena of the structures will be discussed. Particularly carbon nanoribbons and CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Our research interests include the study of electronic structures, electrical and thermal transport properties of the carbon structures. Results are produced analytically as well as by simulation. The numerical simulations are conducted using various tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), NanoHub at Purdue University and the Beowulf Cluster at Ball State University.

  10. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Kundu, A. K.; Patel, R.; Solanki, G. K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ-Z, Γ-Y and Γ-T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ-Z direction, at a binding energy of -0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ-T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation-anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV-VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis.

  11. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  12. The Electronic Structure of Nonpolar Surfaces in Insulating Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the electronic and geometric structures of metal oxide surfaces has a key interest in many technological areas. A randomly chosen crystal surface has a high probability of being polar, unstable and containing in-gap states due to surface dangling bonds. As a result, the surface should be stabilized by passivation or reconstruction. However, do the nonpolar surfaces of ionic crystals of insulating metal oxides need the passivation or reconstruction similar to covalent crystals? We address this question by analyzing the nonpolar surfaces and their electronic structure for the common crystal structures of metal oxides. The study using periodic DFT calculations is performed for following representatives: Cu2O, ZnO, Al2O3, TiO2, V2O5, WO3, CaTiO3, Mg2SiO4. It has been shown that the nonpolar surface can be constructed out of dipole-free, charge-neutral and stoichiometric unit cells for each crystal. We demonstrate that all constructed and relaxed nonpolar surfaces of the metal oxides show a clear band gap. It should be emphasized that the constructed surfaces are neither reconstructed nor passivated. Additionally, we show a correlation between the electronic structure of the relaxed surfaces and Ewald energies calculated for the surface ions.

  13. Electronic Structure of II-Vi Semiconductors and Their Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Su-Huai

    The II-VI semiconductors ZnXVI, CdXVI, and HgXVI are known to have a metal d band inside the main valence band. Using all-electron self-consistent electronic structure techniques, we study their effects on valence properties. For II-VI semiconductors, we find that p-d repulsion and hybridization (i) lower the band gaps, (ii) alter the sign of the crystal-field splitting, (iii) reduce the spin-orbit splitting, (iv) change the valence band offset between common-anion semiconductors, and (v) increase the equilibrium lattice parameters, p-d repulsion is also shown to be responsible for the anomalously small band gaps in chalcopyrites, and for the negative exchange splitting in MnTe. We also study the electronic structure of ordered and random II-VI substitutional alloys and identify the mechanism for their band gap narrowing. The random {A_{1-x}^{II}B_{x}^{II}C^{VI}} alloys are represented by the "special quasirandom structures." We show how chemical and structural perturbations lead to (i) distinct A-like and B-like features in the density of states and (ii) different C-like features associated with fluctuations in the local environments around the common sublattice.

  14. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  15. Structural, optical and electronic structure studies of Al doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Vanita; Kumar, Manish; Shukla, D. K.; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.; Kumar, Ravindra; Joshi, B. C.

    2015-07-01

    Structural, optical and electronic structure of Al doped ZnO thin films grown using pulsed laser deposition on glass substrate are investigated. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that all the films are textured along the c-axis and have wurtzite structure. Al doping in ZnO films leads to increase in grain size due to relaxation in compressive stress. Enhancement in band gap of ZnO films with the Al doping is also noticed which can be ascribed to the Brustein-Moss shift. The changes in the electronic structure caused by Al in the doped thin film samples are understood through X-ray absorption measurements.

  16. Geometric, electronic, and magnetic structure of FexOy+ clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logemann, R.; de Wijs, G. A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Kirilyuk, A.

    2015-10-01

    Correlation between geometry, electronic structure, and magnetism of solids is both intriguing and elusive. This is particularly strongly manifested in small clusters, where a vast number of unusual structures appear. Here, we employ density functional theory in combination with a genetic search algorithm GGA +U and a hybrid functional to determine the structure of gas phase FexOy+/0 clusters. For FexOy+ cation clusters we also calculate the corresponding vibration spectra and compare them with experiments. We successfully identify Fe3O4+ , Fe4O5+ , Fe4O6+ , Fe5O7+ and propose structures for Fe6O8+ . Within the triangular geometric structure of Fe3O4+ , a noncollinear, ferrimagnetic, and ferromagnetic state are comparable in energy. Fe4O5+ and Fe4O6+ are ferrimagnetic with a residual magnetic moment of 1 μB due to ionization. Fe5O7+ is ferrimagnetic due to the odd number of Fe atoms. We compare the electronic structure with bulk magnetite and find Fe4O5+ , Fe4O6+ , Fe6O8+ to be mixed valence clusters. In contrast, in Fe3O4+ and Fe5O7+ , all Fe are found to be trivalent.

  17. Structural stability and electronic properties of small gold clusters induced by 3p electron atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Yang, Su-Bin; Feng, Xiao-Juan; Zhao, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Luo, You-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The geometries and electronic properties of gold clusters doped with atoms containing 3 p valence electrons (MAu n ; M = Al, Si, P, S, Cl; n = 2-8) have been systematically investigated using density functional theory (DFT) at the PBE/LANL2DZ level. A number of low-energy isomers are identified for neutral MAu n clusters. It is found that doping with different 3 p impurity atoms can drastically influence the geometrical structures, relative stabilities, electronic properties, and growth-pattern behaviors of gold clusters, which is very different from the case of 3 d transition-metal impurity doped Au n clusters. Partially filled 3 p electron impurities can stabilize Au clusters. In particular, SiAu4 cluster with T d symmetry have been found to have highly stable geometries and electronic structures with binding energies of 2.43 eV per atom (0.96 eV higher than pristine Au5 clusters), large HOMO-LUMO gaps (2.17 eV), and vertical ionization potentials of 8.68 eV. Using scalar relativistic molecular dynamics at T = 300 K, we show that the T d symmetry structure of SiAu4 is stable. The frontier molecular orbitals (HOMO and LUMO) and the partial densities of states (PDOS) show that strong hybridization occurs between the atomic orbitals of Si and Au atoms, resulting in strong Si-Au bonding. In addition, the vertical ionization potential, the vertical electron affinity, and charge transfers of MAu n clusters have also been analyzed. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  18. Electronic structure and electron energy-loss spectroscopy of ZrO2 zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, L. K.; Vast, Nathalie; Baranek, Philippe; Cheynet, Marie-Claude; Reining, Lucia

    2004-12-01

    The atomic and electronic structures of zirconia are calculated within density functional theory, and their evolution is analyzed as the crystal-field symmetry changes from tetrahedral [cubic (c-ZrO2) and tetragonal (t-ZrO2) phases] to octahedral (hypothetical rutile ZrO2 ), to a mixing of these symmetries (monoclinic phase, m-ZrO2 ). We find that the theoretical bulk modulus in c-ZrO2 is 30% larger than the experimental value, showing that the introduction of yttria in zirconia has a significant effect. Electronic structure fingerprints which characterize each phase from their electronic spectra are identified. We have carried out electron energy-loss spectroscopy experiments at low momentum transfer and compared these results to the theoretical spectra calculated within the random phase approximation. We show a dependence of the valence and 4p ( N2,3 edge) plasmons on the crystal structure, the dependence of the latter being brought into the spectra by local-field effects. Last, we attribute low energy excitations observed in EELS of m-ZrO2 to defect states 2eV above the top of the intrinsic valence band, and the EELS fundamental band gap value is reconciled with the 5.2 or 5.8eV gaps determined by vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy.

  19. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  20. Electronic Structure of Crystalline [superscript 4]He at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ho Kwang; Shirley, Eric L.; Ding, Yang; Eng, Peter; Cai, Yong Q.; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Shu, Jinfu; Hemley, Russell J.; Kao, Chichang; Mao, Wendy L.

    2010-11-12

    Using inelastic x-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium at 300 K. Helium has the widest known valence-conduction band gap of all materials a property whose high-pressure response has been inaccessible to direct measurements. We observed a rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cutoff edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined the electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  1. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications. PMID:23248746

  2. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-01-01

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions. PMID:27271852

  3. Spatially Resolved Electronic Structures of Atomically Precise Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Han; Wei, Dacheng; Sun, Jiatao; Wong, Swee Liang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Neto, A. H. Castro; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2012-12-01

    Graphene has attracted much interest in both academia and industry. The challenge of making it semiconducting is crucial for applications in electronic devices. A promising approach is to reduce its physical size down to the nanometer scale. Here, we present the surface-assisted bottom-up fabrication of atomically precise armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) with predefined widths, namely 7-, 14- and 21-AGNRs, on Ag(111) as well as their spatially resolved width-dependent electronic structures. STM/STS measurements reveal their associated electron scattering patterns and the energy gaps over 1 eV. The mechanism to form such AGNRs is addressed based on the observed intermediate products. Our results provide new insights into the local properties of AGNRs, and have implications for the understanding of their electrical properties and potential applications.

  4. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] withoutmore » Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.« less

  5. Electronic Structure of Crystalline 4He at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, H.K.; Cai, Y.; Shirley, E.L.; Ding, Y.; Eng, P.; Chow, P.; Xiao, Y.; Shu, J.; Hemley, R.J.; Kao, C.C.; Mao, W.L.

    2010-10-29

    Using inelastic x-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium at 300 K. Helium has the widest known valence-conduction band gap of all materials a property whose high-pressure response has been inaccessible to direct measurements. We observed a rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cutoff edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined the electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  6. Linear Multigrid Techniques in Self-consistent Electronic Structure Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fattebert, J-L

    2000-05-23

    Ab initio DFT electronic structure calculations involve an iterative process to solve the Kohn-Sham equations for an Hamiltonian depending on the electronic density. We discretize these equations on a grid by finite differences. Trial eigenfunctions are improved at each step of the algorithm using multigrid techniques to efficiently reduce the error at all length scale, until self-consistency is achieved. In this paper we focus on an iterative eigensolver based on the idea of inexact inverse iteration, using multigrid as a preconditioner. We also discuss how this technique can be used for electrons described by general non-orthogonal wave functions, and how that leads to a linear scaling with the system size for the computational cost of the most expensive parts of the algorithm.

  7. Electronic structure study of strongly correlated Mott-insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Quan

    Strongly correlated electronic systems have presented the most challenging problems to condensed matter theorists for many years and this continues to be the case. They are complicated materials with active d or f orbitals, whose valence electrons are in the intermediate region between itinerant (band-like) and highly localized (atomic-like) limits, which demand genuine many-body treatment. Although dealing with strongly correlated systems is a notorious problem, they have drawn broad interests of both theoretical and experimental condensed matter physicists, with intensive studies carried out in the past and present. This is due to the most exotic properties associated with strongly correlated materials, such as high-temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator transition, volume collapse, Kondo effect, colossal magnetoresistance, and many others. Although density functional theory (DFT) within local density approximation (LDA) is very successful in describing a wide range of materials, it encounters difficulty in predicting strongly correlated systems. Traditionally, they have been studied by model Hamiltonians with empirical parameters. The development of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) and its marriage to DFT have brought new hope for first-principle study of strongly correlated systems. In this work, electronic structures of select strongly correlated systems are studied using LDA+DMFT. As theoretical backgrounds, reviews of DFT and DMFT are given in the first few chapters, where we also introduce the philosophy and workflow of LDA+DMFT. In the following chapters, applications to transition metal oxides, undoped high-temperature superconductors and actinide oxides are presented, where electronic structures of these materials and other properties derived from electronic structures are calculated and compared with experiments where available. Generally good agreements have been found between theory and experiments.

  8. Structure and Process of Infrared Hot Electron Transistor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Richard

    2012-01-01

    An infrared hot-electron transistor (IHET) 5 × 8 array with a common base configuration that allows two-terminal readout integration was investigated and fabricated for the first time. The IHET structure provides a maximum factor of six in improvement in the photocurrent to dark current ratio compared to the basic quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), and hence it improved the array S/N ratio by the same factor. The study also showed for the first time that there is no electrical cross-talk among individual detectors, even though they share the same emitter and base contacts. Thus, the IHET structure is compatible with existing electronic readout circuits for photoconductors in producing sensitive focal plane arrays. PMID:22778655

  9. Electronic Structure and Geometries of Small Compound Metal Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-14

    During the tenure of the DOE grant DE-FG05-87EI145316 we have concentrated on equilibrium geometries, stability, and the electronic structure of transition metal-carbon clusters (met-cars), clusters designed to mimic the chemistry of atoms, and reactivity of homo-nuclear metal clusters and ions with various reactant molecules. It is difficult to describe all the research the authors have accomplished as they have published 38 papers. In this report, they outline briefly the salient features of their work on the following topics: (1) Designer Clusters: Building Blocks for a New Class of Solids; (2) Atomic Structure, Stability, and Electronic Properties of Metallo-Carbohedrenes; (3) Reactivity of Metal Clusters with H{sub 2} and NO; and (4) Anomalous Spectroscopy of Li{sub 4} Clusters.

  10. On the Electronic Structure of Cocaine and its Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, David A.; Dias Soeiro Cordeiro, Maria Natália; Mosquera, Ricardo A.

    2009-11-01

    This work aims at describing the electronic features of cocaine and how they are modified by the different substituents present in its metabolites. The QTAIM analysis of B3LYP and MP2 electron densities obtained with the 6-311++G** 6d basis set for cocaine and its principal metabolites indicates: (i) its positive charge is shared among the amino hydrogen, those of the methylamino group, and all of the hydrogens attached to the bicycle structure; (ii) the zwitterionic structure of benzoylecgonine can be described as two partial charges of 0.63 au, the negative one shared by the oxygens of the carboxylate group, whereas the positive charge is distributed among all the hydrogens that bear the positive charge in cocaine; (iii) its hydrogen bond is strengthened in the derivatives without benzoyloxy group and is also slightly strengthened as the size of the alkyl ester group at position 2 increases.

  11. Electronic structure of a metal-insulator interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordier, G.; Noguera, C.

    1991-07-01

    We present an analytical study of the electronic structure of a metal-insulator interface with special emphasis on the metal induced gap states (MIGS). It includes three steps: (i) a tight-binding approach of the dispersion relation and Green's function of insulators of NaCl or ZnS structure; (ii) a matching with free electron-like wavefunctions at the NaCl(100) or ZnS(110) surfaces, which yields the density and penetration depth of the MIGS as a function of the ionocovalent characteristics of the insulator and of the metal Fermi level; (iii) a self-consistent determination of the Fermi level position in a Thomas-Fermi approximation. The Schottky barrier height is derived under a simple analytic form and its dependence upon the metal work function is found in good agreement with experimental results.

  12. Observation of Electronic Structure Minima in High-Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Woerner, Hans Jakob; Villeneuve, D. M.; Niikura, Hiromichi; Bertrand, Julien B.; Corkum, P. B.

    2009-03-13

    We report detailed measurements of the high-harmonic spectra generated from argon atoms. The spectra exhibit a deep minimum that is shown to be independent of the laser intensity, and is thus a clear measure of the electronic structure of the atom. We show that exact field-free continuum wave functions reproduce the minimum, but plane wave and Coulomb wave functions do not. This remarkable observation suggests that electronic structure can be accurately determined in high-harmonic experiments despite the presence of the strong laser field. Our results clarify the relation between high-harmonic generation and photoelectron spectroscopy. The use of exact continuum functions also resolves the ambiguity associated with the choice of the dispersion relation.

  13. Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanowires Matrix from Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Monastyrskii, Liubomyr S; Boyko, Yaroslav V; Sokolovskii, Bogdan S; Potashnyk, Vasylyna Ya

    2016-12-01

    An investigation of the model of porous silicon in the form of periodic set of silicon nanowires has been carried out. The electronic energy structure was studied using a first-principle band method-the method of pseudopotentials (ultrasoft potentials in the basis of plane waves) and linearized mode of the method of combined pseudopotentials. Due to the use of hybrid exchange-correlation potentials (B3LYP), the quantitative agreement of the calculated value of band gap in the bulk material with experimental data is achieved. The obtained results show that passivation of dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms leads to substantial transformation of electronic energy structure. At complete passivation of the dangling silicon bonds by hydrogen atoms, the band gap value takes the magnitude which substantially exceeds that for bulk silicon. The incomplete passivation gives rise to opposite effect when the band gap value decreases down the semimetallic range.

  14. Electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Houjian; Yang, Mou; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2016-07-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene (monolayer of black phosphorus) under strain. Strain was found to be a powerful tool for the band structure engineering. The in-plane strain in armchair or zigzag direction changes the effective mass components along both directions, while the vertical strain only has significant effect on the effective mass in the armchair direction. The band gap is narrowed by compressive in-plane strain and tensile vertical strain. Under certain strain configurations, the gap is closed and the energy band evolves to the semi-Dirac type: the dispersion is linear in the armchair direction and is gapless quadratic in the zigzag direction. The band-edge optic absorption is completely polarized along the armchair direction, and the polarization rate is reduced when the photon energy increases. Strain not only changes the absorption edge (the smallest photon energy for electron transition), but also the absorption polarization.

  15. Electronic structures of two-dimensional metallic oxides and bronzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, H.; Motta, N.; Marcus, J.; Drouard, S.; Balaska, B.

    2001-06-01

    The electronic structures of some molybdenum and tungsten oxides or bronzes exhibiting Peierls transitions are investigated at room temperature. The detection of a weak conduction band, well separated from a large valence band, evidences the metallic character of each oxide. The distributions of the valences of the different transition metals are analyzed by XPS. In each oxide, the presence of atleast two contributive components to the main core levels reveals a mixed valence state of the transition metal. But the proportions of the different components do not reflect the distribution of the cationic valences, as expected from the crystallographic structures. To understand this disagreement, we suggest that two alternative ways, including or rejecting a screening effect generated by the conduction electrons contribute to the photoemission processes and alter the real distribution of the cationic charges.

  16. Electronic structure of self-assembled amorphous polyfluorenes.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana; Batista, Enrique R; Yang, Ping; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Martin, Richard L; Smith, Darryl L

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the role of conformational disorder and intermolecular interactions on the electronic structure of amorphous clusters of polyfluorenes. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine probable molecular geometries and chain packing, and first-principles density functional theory calculations are employed to determine electronic structure and orbital localization properties. Intramolecular and intermolecular effects are disentangled by contrasting results for densely packed oligomer clusters and for ensembles of isolated oligomers with the same intramolecular geometries. Our simulations show that intermolecular disorder allows for nearly planar configurations of interacting fluorenes compared to the isolated molecules. This rationalizes the experimentally detected formation of the planar crystalline morphologies that frequently accompany twisted glassy configurations in fluorene films. The energy gap (HOMO-LUMO gap) significantly decreases for planar configurations. The electron and hole orbital energies are strongly dependent on both torsional angles and intermolecular interactions. This leads to strong localization of electronic states in amorphous polymer aggregates, which is analyzed by examining the respective orbital participation ratios. Notably, the energies of unoccupied levels show stronger dependence on the conformational disorder, compared to that of occupied levels. This results in the more probable formation of trap states near the edge of the conduction band than near the valence band. PMID:19206305

  17. Structure of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus carboxysomes by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael F; Paredes, Angel M; Khant, Htet A; Soyer, Ferda; Aldrich, Henry C; Chiu, Wah; Shively, Jessup M

    2006-12-01

    Carboxysomes are polyhedral bodies consisting of a proteinaceous shell filled with ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). They are found in the cytoplasm of all cyanobacteria and some chemoautotrophic bacteria. Previous studies of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus and Nitrobacter agilis carboxysomes suggest that the structures are either icosahedral or dodecahedral. To determine the protein shell structure more definitively, purified H. neapolitanus carboxysomes were re-examined by cryo-electron tomography and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Due to the limited tilt angles in the electron microscope, the tomographic reconstructions are distorted. Corrections were made in the 3D orientation searching and averaging of the computationally extracted carboxysomes to minimize the missing data effects. It was found that H. neapolitanus carboxysomes vary widely in size and mass as shown by cryo-electron tomography and STEM mass measurements, respectively. We have aligned and averaged carboxysomes in several size classes from the 3D tomographic reconstruction by methods that are not model-biased. The averages reveal icosahedral symmetry of the shell, but not of the density inside it, for all the size classes.

  18. Fast electronic structure methods for strongly correlated molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Sodt, Alex; Jung, Yousung

    2005-01-01

    A short review is given of newly developed fast electronic structure methods that are designed to treat molecular systems with strong electron correlations, such as diradicaloid molecules, for which standard electronic structure methods such as density functional theory are inadequate. These new local correlation methods are based on coupled cluster theory within a perfect pairing active space, containing either a linear or quadratic number of pair correlation amplitudes, to yield the perfect pairing (PP) and imperfect pairing (IP) models. This reduces the scaling of the coupled cluster iterations to no worse than cubic, relative to the sixth power dependence of the usual (untruncated) coupled cluster doubles model. A second order perturbation correction, PP(2), to treat the neglected (weaker) correlations is formulated for the PP model. To ensure minimal prefactors, in addition to favorable size-scaling, highly efficient implementations of PP, IP and PP(2) have been completed, using auxiliary basis expansions. This yields speedups of almost an order of magnitude over the best alternatives using 4-center 2-electron integrals. A short discussion of the scope of accessible chemical applications is given.

  19. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

  20. The valence electronic structure and conformational flexibility of epichlorohydrin.

    PubMed

    Stranges, S; Alagia, M; Decleva, P; Stener, M; Fronzoni, G; Toffoli, D; Speranza, M; Catone, D; Turchini, S; Prosperi, T; Zema, N; Contini, G; Keheyan, Y

    2011-07-21

    The electronic structure of epichlorohydrin is investigated in the whole valence region by a combined experimental and theoretical study. The issue of controversial assignments of the molecular electronic structure is here addressed. Photoelectron spectra (PES) and Threshold Photoelectron spectra (TPES) of room temperature molecules in the gas phase are recorded. Geometries and energies of the stable conformers due to internal rotation of the C-C-C-Cl dihedral angle, gauche-II (g-II), gauche-I (g-I), and cis, are calculated, and the effect of the conformational flexibility on the photoionization energetics is studied by DFT and 2h-1p Configuration Interaction (CI) methods. Strong breakdown of the Koopmans Theorem (KT) is obtained for the four outermost ionizations, which are further investigated by higher level ab initio calculations. The full assignment of the spectrum is put on a firm basis by the combination of experimental and theoretical results. The orbital composition from correlated calculations is found closer to the DFT orbitals, which are then used to analyze the electronic structure of the molecule. The Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) and HOMO--2 are n(O)/n(Cl) mixed orbitals. The nature of each valence MO is generally preserved in all the conformers, although the magnitude of the n(O)/n(Cl) mixing in HOMO and HOMO--2 varies to some extent with the C-C-C-Cl dihedral angle. The low energy part of the HOMO PE band is predicted to be substantially affected by the conformational flexibility, as experimentally observed in the spectra. The rest of the spectrum is described in terms of the dominant conformer g-II, and a good agreement between experiment and theory is found. The inner-valence PE spectrum is characterized by satellite structures, due to electron correlation effects, which are interpreted by means of 2h-1p CI calculations.

  1. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films. PMID:25879999

  2. Electron spectra and structure of atomic and molecular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Patricia M.

    1980-01-01

    Changes in electronic structure that occur during the stepwise transition from gas phase monomers to large clusters which resemble the condensed phase were studied. This basic information on weakly bound clusters is critical to the understanding of such phenomena as nucleation, aerosol formation, catalysis, and gas-to-particle conversion, yet there exist almost no experimental data on neutral particle energy levels or binding energies as a function of cluster size. (GHT)

  3. Electronic and chemical structure of metal-silicon interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P. J.; Grunthaner, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews our current understanding of the near-noble metal silicides and the interfaces formed with Si(100). Using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, we compare the chemical composition and electronic structure of the room temperature metal-silicon and reacted silicide-silicon interfaces. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry and the Schottky barrier heights for this class of metals on silicon is explored.

  4. Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shiwei

    2015-02-26

    The 25th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods (ES2013) was successfully held at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg VA on June 11-14, 2013. The workshop website is at http://es13.wm.edu/ , which contains updated information on the workshop and a permanent archive of the scientific contents. DOE's continued support has been instrumental to the success of the workshop.

  5. DFTB Parameters for the Periodic Table: Part 1, Electronic Structure.

    PubMed

    Wahiduzzaman, Mohammad; Oliveira, Augusto F; Philipsen, Pier; Zhechkov, Lyuben; van Lenthe, Erik; Witek, Henryk A; Heine, Thomas

    2013-09-10

    A parametrization scheme for the electronic part of the density-functional based tight-binding (DFTB) method that covers the periodic table is presented. A semiautomatic parametrization scheme has been developed that uses Kohn-Sham energies and band structure curvatures of real and fictitious homoatomic crystal structures as reference data. A confinement potential is used to tighten the Kohn-Sham orbitals, which includes two free parameters that are used to optimize the performance of the method. The method is tested on more than 100 systems and shows excellent overall performance.

  6. Electronic structure of substitutionally disordered alloys: Direct configurational averaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolverton, C.; de Fontaine, D.; Dreysse, H.; Ceder, G.

    1992-04-01

    The method of direct configurational averaging (DCA) has been proposed to study the electronic structure of disordered alloys. Local density of states and band structure energies are obtained by averaging over a small number of configrations within a tight-binding Hamiltonian. Effective cluster interactions, the driving quantities for ordering in solids, are computed for various alloys using a tight-binding form of the linearized muffin-tin orbital method (TB-LMTO). The DCA calculations are used to determine various energetic and thermodynamic quantities for binary and ternasy alloys. (Pd, Rh, V).

  7. Electronic structure and luminescence center of blue luminescent carbon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jigang; Zhou, Xingtai; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang; Ding, Zhifeng; Cutler, Jeffrey; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2009-06-01

    The electronic structure and the origin of luminescence from blue luminescent carbon nanocrystals (CNC) have been investigated with X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) and X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL). XANES shows that nitrogen has been incorporated into the carbon nanocrystals matrix (dominated by sp 2 carbon). XEOL from CNC is compared with that from natural diamond and previously reported CVD nanodiamond containing N impurities. The results reveal that N doping is almost certainly responsible for the blue luminescence in carbon nanocrystals. The implication of the results is discussed.

  8. Electronic structure and shearing in nanolaminated ternary carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Sun, Zhimei; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied shearing in M 2AlC phases (M=Sc,Y,La,Ti,Zr,Hf,V,Nb,Ta,Cr,Mo,W) using ab initio calculations. We propose that these phases can be classified into two groups based on the valence electron concentration induced changes in C 44. One group comprises M=V B and VIB, where the C 44 values are approximately 170 GPa and independent of the corresponding MC. The other group includes M=IIIB and IVB, where the C 44 shows a linear dependency with the corresponding MC. This may be understood based on the electronic structure: shear resistant bands are filled in M 2AlC phases with M=V B and VIB, while they are not completely filled when M=IIIB and IVB. This notion is also consistent with our stress-strain analysis. These valence electron concentration induced changes in shear behaviour were compared to previously published valence electron concentration induced changes in compression behaviour [Z. Sun, D. Music, R. Ahuja, S. Li, J.M. Schneider, Phys. Rev. B 70 (2004) 092102]. These classification proposals exhibit identical critical valence electron concentration values for the group boundary. However, the physical mechanisms are not identical: the classification proposal for the bulk modulus is based on MC-A coupling, while shearing is based on MC-MC coupling.

  9. Phosphorene Nanoribbons: Electronic Structure and Electric Field Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanikahnoj, Sina; Knezevic, Irena

    Phosphorene, a newcomer among the 2D van der Waals materials, has attracted the attention of many scientists due to its promising electronic properties. Monolayer phosphorene has a direct band gap of 2 eV located at the Gamma point of the Brillouin zone. Increasing the number of layers reduces the bandgap due to the van der Waals interaction. The direct nature of the bandgap makes phosphorene particularly favorable for electronic transport and optoelectronic applications. While multilayer phosphorene sheets have been studied, the electronic properties of their 1D counterparts are still unexplored. An accurate tight-binding model was recently proposed for multilayer phosphorene nanoribbons. Employing this model along with the non-equilibrium Green's function method, we calculate the band structure and electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons. We show that, depending on the edge termination, phosphorene nanoribbons can be metallic or semiconducting. Our analysis also shows that the electronic properties of phosphorene nanoribbons are highly tunable by in-plane and out-of-plane electric fields. In metallic ribbons, the conductance can be switched off by a threshold electric field, similar to field effect devices. Support by the NSF through the University of Wisconsin MRSEC Seed (NSF Award DMR-1121288).

  10. Atomic structures and electronic properties of phosphorene grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu; Zhou, Si; Zhang, Junfeng; Bai, Yizhen; Zhao, Jijun

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is one main type of defects in two-dimensional (2D) crystals, and has significant impact on the physical properties of 2D materials. Phosphorene, a recently synthesized 2D semiconductor, possesses a puckered honeycomb lattice and outstanding electronic properties. It is very interesting to know the possible GBs present in this novel material, and how their properties differ from those in the other 2D materials. Based on first-principles calculations, we explore the atomic structure, thermodynamic stability, and electronic properties of phosphorene GBs. A total of 19 GBs are predicted and found to be energetically stable with formation energies much lower than those in graphene. These GBs do not severely affect the electronic properties of phosphorene: the band gap of perfect phosphorene is preserved, and the electron mobilities are only moderately reduced in these defective systems. Our theoretical results provide vital guidance for experimental tailoring the electronic properties of phosphorene as well as the device applications using phosphorene materials.

  11. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-01-01

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09066.001 PMID:26687009

  12. Stability, electronic structure and reactivity of the polymerized fullerite forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavin, V. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Tomanek, D.

    2000-12-01

    A study of band structure, stability and electron density distribution from selected crystal orbitals of polymerized C60 forms was carried out. Linear chain, tetragonal and hexagonal layers, and three-dimensional (3D) polymer with a simple cubic lattice were calculated using an empirical tight-binding method. The hopping parameters were chosen to fit a theoretical X-ray emission spectrum of C60 to the experimental one. Our results indicate that all calculated polymers are semiconductors with the smallest energy gap for hexagonal structure. Though the molecules C60 are linked by strong covalent bonds, the crystal orbitals characterized by the electron density localization on an individual carbon cage are separated in the electronic structure of polymers. The suggestions about reactivity of the 1D and 2D tetragonal polymers were made from the analyses of crystal orbitals accompanied with the highest occupied (HO) and lowest unoccupied (LU) bands. The polymerized C60 forms were found to be less stable than an icosahedral fullerene molecule.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  15. Structural basis of interprotein electron transfer in bacterial sulfite oxidation.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Aaron P; Laming, Elise L; Casas Garcia, G Patricia; Kvansakul, Marc; Guss, J Mitchell; Trewhella, Jill; Calmes, Benoit; Bernhardt, Paul V; Hanson, Graeme R; Kappler, Ulrike; Maher, Megan J

    2015-12-19

    Interprotein electron transfer underpins the essential processes of life and relies on the formation of specific, yet transient protein-protein interactions. In biological systems, the detoxification of sulfite is catalyzed by the sulfite-oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), which interact with an electron acceptor for catalytic turnover. Here, we report the structural and functional analyses of the SOE SorT from Sinorhizobium meliloti and its cognate electron acceptor SorU. Kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the SorT/SorU interaction show the complex is dynamic in solution, and that the proteins interact with Kd = 13.5 ± 0.8 μM. The crystal structures of the oxidized SorT and SorU, both in isolation and in complex, reveal the interface to be remarkably electrostatic, with an unusually large number of direct hydrogen bonding interactions. The assembly of the complex is accompanied by an adjustment in the structure of SorU, and conformational sampling provides a mechanism for dissociation of the SorT/SorU assembly.

  16. A Joint Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Study on the Electronic Structure of UCl 5 - and UCl 5

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Jing; Dau, Phuong Diem; Xu, Chao-Fei; Huang, Dao-Ling; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wei, Fan; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Li, Jun

    2013-07-12

    We report a combined photoelectron spectroscopic and relativistic quantum chemistry study on gaseous UCl5- and UCl5. The UCl5- anion is produced using electrospray ionization and found to be highly electronically stable with an adiabatic electron binding energy of 4.76±0.03 eV, which also represents the electron affinity of the neutral UCl5 molecule. Theoretical investigations reveal that the ground state of UCl5- has an open shell with two unpaired electrons occupying two primarily U 5f and 5fxyz based molecular orbitals. The structures of both UCl5- and UCl5 are theoretically optimized and confirmed to have C4v symmetry. The computational results are in good agreement with the photoelectron spectra, providing insights into the electronic structures and valence molecular orbitals of UCl5- and UCl5. We also performed systematic theoretical studies on all the uranium pentahalide complexes UX5- (X=F, Cl, Br, I). Chemical bonding analyses indicate that the UX interactions in UX5- are dominated by ionic bonding, with increasing covalent contributions for the heavier halogen complexes.

  17. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  18. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-06-20

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  19. Refractory metals in molten salts: Theory and simulation of geometry, electronic structure, and electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslowski, Thorsten

    2000-12-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical and numerical study of the microscopic and electronic structure of solutions of refractory metal halides in alkali halide melts, [NbCl5]x[KCl]1-x and [TaCl5]x[KCl]1-x with 0⩽x⩽0.5. The geometry of the melts is described by ensembles of charged hard spheres, the electronic structure is modeled by a tight-binding Hamiltonian, which is extended by a reaction field to describe the diabatic energy profile of the electronic self-exchange in many-orbital mixed-valence systems. Despite its simplicity, the model leads to the formation of distorted octahedral [NbCl6]- and [TaCl6]- clusters, as evident both from the inspection of the simulation geometries and from the analysis of the partial pair distribution functions. Even in the presence of the strong potential energy fluctuations characteristic of ionic liquids, the octahedral structure is manifest in the density of states in a t2g-eg splitting of the conduction band. The Hamiltonian that describes mixed-valence systems is solved self-consistently. Using an attractive Hubbard parameter of 1.5 eV, we show that the numerical results can be interpreted by Marcus' theory of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions with a reorganization energy of 2.2 eV, an electronic coupling parameter of 0.12 eV, and an activation energy of 0.42 eV. Both anion-d metal cation and intervalence charge transfer excitations contribute to the optical absorption spectrum, the latter leads to a pronounced polaron absorption peak. These findings are compared to recent experimental results.

  20. Characterization of the POU5F1 Homologue in Nile Tilapia: From Expression Pattern to Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Xiaohuan, Huang; Yang, Zhao; Linyan, Liu; Zhenhua, Fan; Linyan, Zhou; Zhijian, Wang; Ling, Wei; Deshou, Wang; Jing, Wei

    2016-09-15

    POU5F1 (OCT4) is a crucial transcription factor for induction and maintenance of cellular pluripotency, as well as survival of germ cells in mammals. However, the homologues of POU5F1 in teleost fish, including zebrafish and medaka, now named Pou5f3, exhibit considerable differences in expression pattern and pluripotency-maintaining activity. To what extent the POU5F1 homologues are conserved in vertebrates has been unclear. In this study, we report that the POU5F1 homologue from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), OnPou5f3, displays an expression pattern and biological activity somewhat different from those in zebrafish or medaka. The expression of Onpou5f3 at both mRNA and protein levels was abundant in early development embryos until blastula stages, barely detectable as proceeding, and then displayed a transiently strong expression domain in the brain region during neurula stages similar to zebrafish but not medaka. Afterward, OnPou5f3 appeared as germline-restricted (including primordial germ cells and female and male gonad germ cells) expression just like medaka. Notably, OnPou5f3 depletion through morpholino oligos caused blastula blockage or lethality and failure of survival and proliferation of blastula cell-derived cells. These findings indicate that equivalent POU5F1-like expression and activity of Pou5f3 might be conserved accompanying with species-specific expression pattern during evolution. Our study provides insight into the evolutionary conservation of the POU5F1 homologues across vertebrates. PMID:27473876

  1. Electronic structure of Vanadium pentoxide: An efficient hole injector for organic electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Jens; Zilberberg, K; Riedl, T.; Kahn, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    The electronic structure of Vanadium pentoxide (V₂O₅), a transition metal oxide with an exceedingly large work function of 7.0 eV, is studied via ultraviolet, inverse and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Very deep lying electronic states with electron affinity and ionization energy (IE) of 6.7 eV and 9.5 eV, respectively, are found. Contamination due to air exposure changes the electronic structure due to the partial reduction of vanadium to V⁺⁴ state. It is shown that V₂O₅ is a n-type material that can be used for efficient hole-injection into materials with an IE larger than 6 eV, such as 4,4'-Bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1'-bipheny (CBP). The formation of an interface dipole and band bending is found to lead to a very small energy barrier between the transport levels at the V₂O₅/CBP interface.

  2. A triphenylamine-grafted imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline ruthenium(II) complex: acid-base and photoelectric properties.

    PubMed

    Fan, Su-Hua; Zhang, An-Guo; Ju, Chuan-Chuan; Gao, Li-Hua; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2010-04-19

    A new heteroleptic ruthenium(II) complex of [Ru(Hipdpa)(Hdcbpy)(NCS)(2)](-).0.5H(+).0.5[N(C(4)H(9))(4)](+) Ru(Hipdpa) {where Hdcbpy = monodeprotonated 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine and Hipdpa = 4-(1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthrolin-2-yl)-N,N-diphenylaniline} was synthesized and characterized by elementary analysis, standard spectroscopy techniques, and cyclic voltammetry. The ground- and excited-state acid-base properties of Ru(Hipdpa) were studied by means of UV-vis absorption spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric titrations in 4:1(v/v) Britton-Robinson/dimethylformamide buffer solution. The four-step separate protonation/deprotonation processes were found in the ground states, and one of which taking place near the physiological pH range. The two observable excited-state protonation/deprotonation processes were found for the Ru(Hipdpa), constituting pH-induced "off-on-off" emission switches. The performance of the complexes as photosensitizers in nanocrystalline TiO(2)-based liquid solar cells containing an electrolyte solution (0.05 M I(2), 0.5 M LiI, and 0.5 M 4-tert-butylpyridine in 50% acetonitrile and 50% propylene carbonate) was investigated and found to achieve a much improved device performance (a short-circuit photocurrent density of 18.7 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit voltage of 630 mV, and an overall conversion efficiency of 6.85%) compared to a triphenylamine-free parent complex [Ru(Hpip)(Hdcbpy)(NCS)(2)](-).[N(C(4)H(9))(4)](+)-based device {Hpip = 2-phenyl-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} and a comparable performance to that of cis-bis(isothiocyanato)bis(2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid)ruthenium(II) (N3) under identical experimental conditions. A density functional theory calculation of the molecular structures and electronic properties of the complexes was also carried out in an effort to understand their effectiveness in TiO(2)-based solar cells.

  3. Transduced Tat-DJ-1 protein inhibits cytokines-induced pancreatic RINm5F cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyo Sang; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Cho, Su Bin; Park, Jung Hwan; Lee, Chi Hern; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-01-01

    Loss of pancreatic β-cells by oxidative stress or cytokines is associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). DJ-1 is known to as a multifunctional protein, which plays an important role in cell survival. We prepared cell permeable wild type (WT) and mutant type (M26I) Tat-DJ-1 proteins to investigate the effects of DJ-1 against combined cytokines (IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α)-induced RINm5F cell death. Both Tat-DJ-1 proteins were transduced into RINm5F cells. WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins significantly protected against cell death from cytokines by reducing intracellular toxicities. Also, WT Tat-DJ-1 proteins markedly regulated cytokines-induced pro- and anti-apoptosis proteins. However, M26I Tat-DJ-1 protein showed relatively low protective effects, as compared to WT Tat-DJ-1 protein. Our experiments demonstrated that WT Tat-DJ-1 protein protects against cytokine-induced RINm5F cell death by suppressing intracellular toxicities and regulating apoptosisrelated protein expression. Thus, WT Tat-DJ-1 protein could potentially serve as a therapeutic agent for DM and cytokine related diseases. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 297-302] PMID:26996344

  4. Impact of lattice distortion and electron doping on α-MoO3 electronic structure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng-Ru; He, Yao; Cao, Chao; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Band structure of transition metal oxides plays a critical role in many applications such as photo-catalysis, photovoltaics, and electroluminescent devices. In this work we report findings that the band structure of MoO3 can be significantly altered by a distortion in the octahedral coordination structure. We discovered that, in addition to epitaxial type of structural strain, chemical force such as hydrogen inclusion can also cause extended lattice distortion. The lattice distortion in hydrogenated MoO3 led to a significant reduction of the energy gap, overshadowing the Moss-Burstein effect of band filling. Charge doping simulations revealed that filling of conduction band drives the lattice distortion. This suggests that any charge transfer or n-type electron doping could lead to lattice distortion and consequentially a reduction in energy gap. PMID:25410814

  5. Electronic and structural transitions in dense liquid sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raty, Jean-Yves; Schwegler, Eric; Bonev, Stanimir A.

    2007-09-01

    At ambient conditions, the light alkali metals are free-electron-like crystals with a highly symmetric structure. However, they were found recently to exhibit unexpected complexity under pressure. It was predicted from theory-and later confirmed by experiment-that lithium and sodium undergo a sequence of symmetry-breaking transitions, driven by a Peierls mechanism, at high pressures. Measurements of the sodium melting curve have subsequently revealed an unprecedented (and still unexplained) pressure-induced drop in melting temperature from 1,000K at 30GPa down to room temperature at 120GPa. Here we report results from ab initio calculations that explain the unusual melting behaviour in dense sodium. We show that molten sodium undergoes a series of pressure-induced structural and electronic transitions, analogous to those observed in solid sodium but commencing at much lower pressure in the presence of liquid disorder. As pressure is increased, liquid sodium initially evolves by assuming a more compact local structure. However, a transition to a lower-coordinated liquid takes place at a pressure of around 65GPa, accompanied by a threefold drop in electrical conductivity. This transition is driven by the opening of a pseudogap, at the Fermi level, in the electronic density of states-an effect that has not hitherto been observed in a liquid metal. The lower-coordinated liquid emerges at high temperatures and above the stability region of a close-packed free-electron-like metal. We predict that similar exotic behaviour is possible in other materials as well.

  6. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid

    PubMed Central

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T.; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia–Thornton number–number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr–O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr–O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid. PMID:25520236

  7. Atomic and electronic structures of an extremely fragile liquid.

    PubMed

    Kohara, Shinji; Akola, Jaakko; Patrikeev, Leonid; Ropo, Matti; Ohara, Koji; Itou, Masayoshi; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yahiro, Jumpei; Okada, Junpei T; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Masuno, Atsunobu; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Usuki, Takeshi

    2014-12-18

    The structure of high-temperature liquids is an important topic for understanding the fragility of liquids. Here we report the structure of a high-temperature non-glass-forming oxide liquid, ZrO2, at an atomistic and electronic level. The Bhatia-Thornton number-number structure factor of ZrO2 does not show a first sharp diffraction peak. The atomic structure comprises ZrO5, ZrO6 and ZrO7 polyhedra with a significant contribution of edge sharing of oxygen in addition to corner sharing. The variety of large oxygen coordination and polyhedral connections with short Zr-O bond lifetimes, induced by the relatively large ionic radius of zirconium, disturbs the evolution of intermediate-range ordering, which leads to a reduced electronic band gap and increased delocalization in the ionic Zr-O bonding. The details of the chemical bonding explain the extremely low viscosity of the liquid and the absence of a first sharp diffraction peak, and indicate that liquid ZrO2 is an extremely fragile liquid.

  8. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    In addition to the record high superconducting transition temperature (T{sub c}), high temperature cuprate superconductors are characterized by their unusual superconducting properties below T{sub c}, and anomalous normal state properties above T{sub c}. In the superconducting state, although it has long been realized that superconductivity still involves Cooper pairs, as in the traditional BCS theory, the experimentally determined d-wave pairing is different from the usual s-wave pairing found in conventional superconductors. The identification of the pairing mechanism in cuprate superconductors remains an outstanding issue. The normal state properties, particularly in the underdoped region, have been found to be at odd with conventional metals which is usually described by Fermi liquid theory; instead, the normal state at optimal doping fits better with the marginal Fermi liquid phenomenology. Most notable is the observation of the pseudogap state in the underdoped region above T{sub c}. As in other strongly correlated electrons systems, these unusual properties stem from the interplay between electronic, magnetic, lattice and orbital degrees of freedom. Understanding the microscopic process involved in these materials and the interaction of electrons with other entities is essential to understand the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. Since the discovery of high-T{sub c} superconductivity in cuprates, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has provided key experimental insights in revealing the electronic structure of high temperature superconductors. These include, among others, the earliest identification of dispersion and a large Fermi surface, an anisotropic superconducting gap suggestive of a d-wave order parameter, and an observation of the pseudogap in underdoped samples. In the mean time, this technique itself has experienced a dramatic improvement in its energy and momentum resolutions, leading to a series of new discoveries not

  9. Software abstractions and computational issues in parallel structure adaptive mesh methods for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1997-05-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradient with FAC multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object- oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  10. High-energy spectroscopic study of the occupied and empty electronic levels in uranium metal and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Y.

    1980-10-01

    X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) have been used to investigate the occupied and empty density of states (DOS) of α-uranium and of the compounds UO 2, US, and UAs. At the photon energy (1486.6 eV) used in both methods, the l = 3 projected DOS is bringing the dominant contribution to the experimental spectra. In the pure metal, the total 5f DOS appears as a 4 eV wide band showing a splitting. A completely different situation is encountered in the insulator UO 2 which contains two localized 5f electrons. Discrete XPS (5f 1) and BIS (5f 3) final states are observed on each side of EF, allowing the first determination of the Coulomb correlation energy for 5f electrons. In the occupied part of the band the p states are clearly separated from the 5f peak. The XPS spectra of US and UAs show similarly separated p and f structures but the metallic character of these compounds is recognized by the high DOS at EF. Their BIS spectra are formed by a dominant peak followed by an intense tail extending far above EF. This feature is attributed to strong many-body effects, as demonstrated by the line shape of the U core levels in these compounds. Satellites involving discrete excitations to empty 5f states are observed in the spectra of UO 2 and Th metal.

  11. Effect of high-pressure annealing on the normal-state transport of LaO0.5F0.5BiS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallecchi, I.; Lamura, G.; Putti, M.; Kajitani, J.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Miura, O.; Demura, S.; Deguchi, K.; Takano, Y.

    2014-06-01

    We study normal state electrical, thermoelectrical, and thermal transport in polycrystalline BiS2-based compounds, which become superconducting by F doping on the O site. In particular, we explore undoped LaOBiS2 and doped LaO0.5F0.5BiS2 samples, prepared either with or without high-pressure annealing, in order to evidence the roles of doping and preparation conditions. The high-pressure annealed sample exhibits room temperature values of resistivity ρ around 5 mΩcm, Seebeck coefficient S around -20μV /K, and thermal conductivity κ around 1.5 W/Km, while the Hall resistance RH is negative at all temperatures and its value is -10-8 m3/C at low temperature. The sample prepared at ambient pressure exhibits RH positive in sign and five times larger in magnitude, and S negative in sign and slightly smaller in magnitude. These results reveal a complex multiband evolution brought about by high-pressure annealing. In particular, the sign inversion and magnitude suppression of RH, indicating increased electron-type carrier density in the high-pressure sample, may be closely related to previous findings about change in lattice parameters and enhancement of superconducting Tc by high-pressure annealing. As for the undoped sample, it exhibits 10 times larger resistivity, 10 times larger |S|, and 10 times larger |RH| than its doped counterpart, consistent with its insulating nature. Our results point out the dramatic effect of preparation conditions in affecting charge carrier density as well as structural, band, and electronic parameters in these systems.

  12. The structure and electronic properties of hexagonal Fe2Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chi Pui; Tam, Kuan Vai; Xiong, Shi Jie; Cao, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-06-01

    On the basis of first principle calculations, we show that a hexagonal structure of Fe2Si is a ferromagnetic crystal. The result of the phonon spectra indicates that it is a stable structure. Such material exhibits a spin-polarized and half-metal-like band structure. From the calculations of generalized gradient approximation, metallic and semiconducting behaviors are observed with a direct and nearly 0 eV band gap in various spin channels. The densities of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level is mainly contributed from the d-electrons of Fe. We calculate the reflection spectrum of Fe2Si, which has minima at 275nm and 3300nm with reflectance of 0.27 and 0.49, respectively. Such results may provide a reference for the search of hexagonal Fe2Si in experiments. With this band characteristic, the material may be applied in the field of novel spintronics devices.

  13. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  14. The Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Coated Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, David C.; Pederson, Mark R.; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    1998-03-01

    Clusters composed of fullerene molecules with an outer shell of transition metal atoms in the composition C_60M_62 (M being a transition metal) have been produced with laser vaporisation techniques(F. Tast, N. Malinowski, S. Frank, M. Heinebrodt, I.M.L. Billas, and T. P. Martin, Z. Phys D 40), 351 (1997).. We have studied several of these very large systems with a parallel version of the all-electron NRLMOL cluster code. Optimized geometries of the metal encased fullerenes C_60Ti_62 and C_60V_62 are presented along with their HOMO-LUMO gaps, electron affinities, ionization energies, and cohesive energies. We compare the stability of these clusters to relaxed met-car structures (e.g. Ti_8C_12) and to relaxed rocksalt metal-carbide fragments (TiC)n with n=8 and 32. In addition to metal-coated fullerenes we consider the possibility of a trilayered structure consisting of a small shell of metal atoms enclosed by a metal coated fullerene. The nature of bonding in these systems is analyzed by studying the electronic charge distributions.

  15. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  16. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    DOE PAGES

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particularmore » incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.« less

  17. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.

  18. Novel electronic structures of superlattice composed of graphene and silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.; Li, X.D.; Wu, S.Q.; Wen, Y.H.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, Z.Z.

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Graphene/silicene superlattices exhibit metallic electronic properties. • Dirac point of graphene is folded to the Γ-point in the superlattice system. • Significant changes in the transport properties of the graphene layers are expected. • Small amount of charge transfer from the graphene to the silicene layers is found. - Abstract: Superlattice is a major force in providing man-made materials with unique properties. Here we report a study of the structural and electronic properties of a superlattice made with alternate stacking of graphene and hexagonal silicene. Three possible stacking models, i.e., the top-, bridge- and hollow-stacking, are considered. The top-stacking is found to be the most stable pattern. Although both the free-standing graphene and silicene are semi-metals, our results suggest that the graphene and silicene layers in the superlattice both exhibit metallic electronic properties due to a small amount of charge transfer from the graphene to the silicene layers. More importantly, the Dirac point of graphene is folded to the Γ-point of the superlattice, instead of the K-point in the isolated graphene. Such a change in the Dirac point of graphene could lead to significant change in the transportation property of the graphene layer. Moreover, the band structure and the charge transfer indicate that the interaction between the stacking sheets in the graphene/silicene superlattice is more than just the van der Waals interaction.

  19. Silicane nanoribbons: electronic structure and electric field modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, D. Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S. L.

    2014-11-01

    We present electronic band structure, Gibbs free energy of formation, and electric field modulation calculations for silicane nanoribbons (NRs), i.e., completely hydrogenated or fluorinated silicene NRs, using density functional theory. We find that although the completely hydrogenated silicene (H-silicane) sheet in the chair-like configuration is an indirect-band-gap semiconductor, a direct band gap can be achieved in the zigzag H-silicane NRs by using Brillouin-zone folding. Compared to H-silicane NRs, the band gaps of completely fluorinated silicene (F-silicane) NRs reduce at least by half. For all silicane NRs considered here, the Gibbs free energy of formation is negative but shows different trends by changing the ribbon width for H-silicane NRs and F-silicane NRs. Furthermore, by analyzing the effect of transverse electric fields on the electronic properties of silicane NRs, we show that an external electric field can make the electrons and holes states spatially separated and even render silicane NRs self-doped. The tunable electronic properties of silicane NRs make them suitable for nanotechnology application.

  20. Structural phase transition and electronic properties in samarium chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Y. S.; Aynyas, Mahendra; Pataiya, J.; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and high pressure properties of samarium monochalcogenides SmS, SmSe and SmTe have been reported by using tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The total energy as a function of volume is evaluated. It is found that these monochalcogenides are stable in NaCl-type structure under ambient pressure. We predict a structural phase transition from NaCl-type (B1-phase) structure to CsCl-type (B2-type) structure for these compounds. Phase transition pressures were found to be 1.7, 4.4 and 6.6 GPa, for SmS, SmSe and SmTe respectively. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed that these compounds exhibit metallic character. The calculated values of equilibrium lattice parameter and phase transition pressure are in general good agreement with available data.

  1. Electron and hole dynamics in the electronic and structural phase transitions of VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard

    2015-03-01

    The ultrafast, optically induced insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) and the associated structural phase transition (SPT) in vanadium dioxide (VO2) have been studied for over a decade. However, only recently have effects due to the combined presence of electron-hole pairs and injected electrons been observed. Here we compare and contrast IMT dynamics when both hot electrons and optically excited electron-hole pairs are involved, in (1) thin films of VO2 overlaid by a thin gold foil, in which hot electrons are generated by 1.5 eV photons absorbed in the foil and accelerated through the VO2 by an applied electric field; (2) VO2 nanoparticles covered with a sparse mesh of gold nanoparticles averaging 20-30 nm in diameter in which hot electrons are generated by resonant excitation and decay of the localized surface plasmon; and (3) bare VO2 thin films excited by intense near-single-cycle THz pulses. In the first case, the IMT is driven by excitation of the bulk gold plasmon, and the SPT appears on a few-picosecond time scale. In the second case, density-functional calculations indicate that above a critical carrier density, the addition of a single electron to a 27-unit supercell drives the catastrophic collapse of the coherent phonon associated with, and leading to, the SPT. In the third case, sub-bandgap-energy photons (approximately 0.1 eV) initiate the IMT, but exhibit the same sub-100 femtosecond switching time and coherent phonon dynamics as observed when the IMT is initiated by 1.5 eV photons. This suggests that the underlying mechanism must be quite different, possibly THz-field induced interband tunneling of spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The implications of these findings for ultrafast switching in opto-electronic devices - such as hybrid VO2 silicon ring resonators - are briefly considered. Support from the National Science Foundation (DMR-1207407), the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-01ER45916) and the Defense Threat

  2. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: Metallicity and plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang Chaofan; Svensson, Svante; Maartensson, Nils; Bjoerneholm, Olle; Tchaplyguine, Maxim

    2012-05-28

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with {approx}3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  3. Electronic structure of Sc3N@C68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Shojun; Ogasawara, Naoko; Ohta, Tomona; Yagi, Hajime; Miyazaki, Takafumi; Nishi, Tatsuhiko; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of non-IPR endohedral fullerene Sc3N@C68 are measured. A simulated spectrum generated from a geometry optimized structure calculated by the density functional theory reproduces the UPS very well. XPS chemical shift of Sc2p3/2 level and electron population analysis of Sc3N@C68 suggest the electronic configuration of (Sc3N)6+@C686-. The Sc2p3/2 and N1s levels of Sc3N@C68, Sc3N@C78 and Sc3N@C80 move toward lower binding energy in accordance with cage size contraction.

  4. Electronic Structures of Clusters of Hydrogen Vacancies on Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bi-Ru; Yang, Chih-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen vacancies in graphane are products of incomplete hydrogenation of graphene. The missing H atoms can alter the electronic structure of graphane and therefore tune the electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of the composite. We systematically studied a variety of well-separated clusters of hydrogen vacancies in graphane, including the geometrical shapes of triangles, parallelograms, hexagons, and rectangles, by first-principles density functional calculation. The results indicate that energy levels caused by the missing H are generated in the broad band gap of pure graphane. All triangular clusters of H vacancies are magnetic, the larger the triangle the higher the magnetic moment. The defect levels introduced by the missing H in triangular and parallelogram clusters are spin-polarized and can find application in optical transition. Parallelograms and open-ended rectangles are antiferromagnetic and can be used for nanoscale registration of digital information. PMID:26468677

  5. Topological Signatures in the Electronic Structure of Graphene Spirals

    PubMed Central

    Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Koskinen, Pekka; Sevinçli, Haldun; Popov, Alexey A.; Rocha, Claudia G.

    2013-01-01

    Topology is familiar mostly from mathematics, but also natural sciences have found its concepts useful. Those concepts have been used to explain several natural phenomena in biology and physics, and they are particularly relevant for the electronic structure description of topological insulators and graphene systems. Here, we introduce topologically distinct graphene forms - graphene spirals - and employ density-functional theory to investigate their geometric and electronic properties. We found that the spiral topology gives rise to an intrinsic Rashba spin-orbit splitting. Through a Hamiltonian constrained by space curvature, graphene spirals have topologically protected states due to time-reversal symmetry. In addition, we argue that the synthesis of such graphene spirals is feasible and can be achieved through advanced bottom-up experimental routes that we indicate in this work. PMID:23568379

  6. Electronic structure basis for the extraordinary magnetoresistance in WTe2

    DOE PAGES

    Pletikosić, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-19

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. As a result, a change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior ofmore » the magnetoresistance in WTe₂ was identified.« less

  7. Cryo electron microscopy to determine the structure of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Carroni, Marta; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-02-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a structural molecular and cellular biology technique that has experienced major advances in recent years. Technological developments in image recording as well as in processing software make it possible to obtain three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecular assemblies at near-atomic resolution that were formerly obtained only by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy. In parallel, cryo-electron tomography has also benefitted from these technological advances, so that visualization of irregular complexes, organelles or whole cells with their molecular machines in situ has reached subnanometre resolution. Cryo-EM can therefore address a broad range of biological questions. The aim of this review is to provide a brief overview of the principles and current state of the cryo-EM field.

  8. Electronic structure of a linear C 60 polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Matsuura, Yukihito; Oshima, Yoshiaki; Yamabe, Tokio; Asai, Yoshihiro; Tokumoto, Madoka

    1995-01-01

    The electronic structure of a C 60-polymer chain was studied based on the tight-binding calculation including both σ and π electrons. The C 60-polymer turns out semiconducting with a finite band gap ( ca 1.1 eV) and its lowest unoccupied (LU) band is no more degenerate. The LU bandwidth of this polymer is generally smaller than that of A 3C 60 by more than one order of magnitude around the Fermi level assuring that C 60-1-polymer ( o-RbC 60) is a strongly correlated system ( {U}/{t ≫ 1}) and can have the antiferromagnetic ground state. Such reduction of t comes from the cut of π-conjugation on the surface of C 60 molecule by the bridging.

  9. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  10. Graphene gate electrode for MOS structure-based electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Kyung; Song, Seung Min; Mun, Jeong Hun; Cho, Byung Jin

    2011-12-14

    We demonstrate that the use of a monolayer graphene as a gate electrode on top of a high-κ gate dielectric eliminates mechanical-stress-induced-gate dielectric degradation, resulting in a quantum leap of gate dielectric reliability. The high work function of hole-doped graphene also helps reduce the quantum mechanical tunneling current from the gate electrode. This concept is applied to nonvolatile Flash memory devices, whose performance is critically affected by the quality of the gate dielectric. Charge-trap flash (CTF) memory with a graphene gate electrode shows superior data retention and program/erase performance that current CTF devices cannot achieve. The findings of this study can lead to new applications of graphene, not only for Flash memory devices but also for other high-performance and mass-producible electronic devices based on MOS structure which is the mainstream of the electronic device industry.

  11. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: metallicity and plasmons.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang, Chaofan; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Svensson, Svante; Mårtensson, Nils; Björneholm, Olle

    2012-05-28

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with ∼3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  12. The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters: Metallicity and plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Tomas; Zhang, Chaofan; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Svensson, Svante; Mârtensson, Nils; Björneholm, Olle

    2012-05-01

    The electronic structure of free aluminum clusters with ˜3-4 nm radius has been investigated using synchrotron radiation-based photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. A beam of free clusters has been produced using a gas-aggregation source. The 2p core level and the valence band have been probed. Photoelectron energy-loss features corresponding to both bulk and surface plasmon excitation following photoionization of the 2p level have been observed, and the excitation energies have been derived. In contrast to some expectations, the loss features have been detected at energies very close to those of the macroscopic solid. The results are discussed from the point of view of metallic properties in nanoparticles with a finite number of constituent atoms.

  13. Physics of small metal clusters: Topology, magnetism, and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, B. K.; Jena, P.

    1985-08-01

    The electronic structure of small clusters of lithium atoms has been calculated using the self-consistent-field, molecular-orbital method. The exchange interaction is treated at the unrestricted Hartree-Fock level whereas the correlation is treated perturbatively up to second order by including pair excitations. This is done in two steps, one involving only the valence electrons and the other including all the electrons. A configuration-interaction calculation has also been done with all possible pair excitations. The equilibrium geometries of both the neutral and ionized clusters have been obtained by starting from random configurations and using the Hellmann-Feynman forces to follow the path of steepest descent to a minimum of the energy surface. The clusters of Li atoms each containing one to five atoms are found to be planar. The equilibrium geometry of a cluster is found to be intimately related to its electronic structure. The preferred spin configuration of a cluster has been found by minimizing the total energy of the cluster with respect to various spin assignments. The planar clusters are found to be less magnetic than expected by Hund's-rule coupling. For three-dimensional clusters, however, the magnetism is governed by Hund's rule. The effect of correlation has been found to have decisive influence on the equilibrium topology and magnetism of the clusters. The binding energy per atom, the energy of dissociation, and the ionization potential of the clusters are compared with experiment and with previous calculations. The physical origin of the magic numbers and the effect of the basis functions on the calculated properties have also been investigated.

  14. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Tao; Hong, Jisang

    2015-08-07

    We investigated the electronic structure and magnetism of zigzag blue phosphorene nanoribbons (ZBPNRs) using first principles density functional theory calculations by changing the widths of ZBPNRs from 1.5 to 5 nm. In addition, the effect of H and O passivation was explored as well. The ZBPNRs displayed intra-edge antiferromagnetic ground state with a semiconducting band gap of ∼0.35 eV; and this was insensitive to the edge structure relaxation effect. However, the edge magnetism of ZBPNRs disappeared with H-passivation. Moreover, the band gap of H-passivated ZBPNRs was greatly enhanced because the calculated band gap was ∼1.77 eV, and this was almost the same as that of two-dimensional blue phosphorene layer. For O-passivated ZBPNRs, we also found an intra-edge antiferromagnetic state. Besides, both unpassivated and O-passivated ZBPNRs preserved almost the same band gap. We predict that the electronic band structure and magnetic properties can be controlled by means of passivation. Moreover, the edge magnetism can be also modulated by the strain. Nonetheless, the intrinsic physical properties are size independent. This feature can be an advantage for device applications because it may not be necessary to precisely control the width of the nanoribbon.

  15. Characterization of electronic structure of periodically strained graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Aslani, Marjan; Garner, C. Michael; Kumar, Suhas; Nordlund, Dennis; Pianetta, Piero; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-03

    We induced periodic biaxial tensile strain in polycrystalline graphene by wrapping it over a substrate with repeating pillar-like structures with a periodicity of 600 nm. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined to have introduced biaxial strains in graphene in the range of 0.4% to 0.7%. Its band structure was characterized using photoemission from valance bands, shifts in the secondary electron emission, and x-ray absorption from the carbon 1s levels to the unoccupied graphene conduction bands. It was observed that relative to unstrained graphene, strained graphene had a higher work function and higher density of states in the valence and conduction bands.more » Furthermore, we measured the conductivity of the strained and unstrained graphene in response to a gate voltage and correlated the changes in their behavior to the changes in the electronic structure. From these sets of data, we propose a simple band diagram representing graphene with periodic biaxial strain.« less

  16. Electronic Structure and Molecular Dynamics Calculations for KBH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios; Shabaev, Andrew; Hoang, Khang; Mehl, Michael; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    In the search for hydrogen storage materials, alkali borohydrides MBH4 (M=Li, Na, K) are especially interesting because of their light weight and the high number of hydrogen atoms per metal atom. Electronic structure calculations can give insights into the properties of these complex hydrides and provide understanding of the structural properties and of the bonding of hydrogen. We have performed first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) and tight-binding (TB) calculations for KBH4 in both the high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) phases to understand its electronic and structural properties. Our DFT calculations were carried out using the VASP code. The results were then used as a database to develop a tight-binding Hamiltonian using the NRL-TB method. This approach allowed for computationally efficient calculations of phonon frequencies and elastic constants using the static module of the NRL-TB, and also using the molecular dynamics module to calculate mean-square displacements and formation energies of hydrogen vacancies.

  17. Electronic Structure and Properties of Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Liu; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical framework based on Huckel tight-binding model has been formulated to analyze the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes under uniform deformation. The model successfully quantifies the dispersion relation, density of states and bandgap change of nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending. Our analysis shows that the shifting of the Fermi point away from the Brillouin zone vertices is the key reason for these changes. As a result of this shifting, the electronic structure of deformed carbon nanotubes varies dramatically depending on their chirality and deformation mode. Treating the Fermi point as a function of strain and tube chirality, the analytical solution preserves the concise form of undeformed carbon nanotubes. It predicts the shifting, merging and splitting of the Van Hove singularities in the density of states and the zigzag pattern of bandgap change under strains. Four orbital tight-binding simulations of carbon nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending have been performed to verify the analytical solution. Extension to more complex systems are being performed to relate this analytical solution to the spectroscopic characterization, device performance and proposed quantum structures induced by the deformation. The limitations of this model will also be discussed.

  18. Phase Diagram and Electronic Structure of Praseodymium and Plutonium systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yong-Xin; Nicola, Lanata; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Kotliar, Gabriel; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-03-01

    We apply a new implementation of LDA +Gutzwiller to calculate the zero-temperature phase diagram and electronic structure of Pr and Pu. Our study of Pr indicates that its pressure-induced volume-collapse transition would not occur without change of lattice structure -- contrarily to Ce. Our study of Pu shows that the most important effect originating the differentiation between the equilibrium densities of its allotropes is the competition between the Peierls effect and the Madelung interaction. However, the proper treatment of electron correlation effects is crucial to reach good agreement with experiment. A similar interplay between correlation effects and bands structure is also displayed in Pr, and might emerge in even greater generality. N.L. and G.K. supported by U.S. DOE BES under Grant No. DE-FG02- 99ER45761. Research at Ames Lab supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of BES, DMSE, Ames Laboratory is operated for the U.S. DOE by Iowa State University under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358.

  19. Amyloid structure and assembly: insights from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N; Steven, Alasdair C; Engel, Andreas; Wall, Joseph S; Aebi, Ueli; Müller, Shirley A

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  20. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  1. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Poncé, S. Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X.; Marini, A.; Verstraete, M.

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  2. DISSECTING STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRONIC EFFECTS IN INDUCIBLE NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Page, Richard C.; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Bolisetty, Karthik; Yu, Zhihao; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are haem-thiolate enzymes that catalyse the conversion of L-Arginine (LArg) into NO and citrulline. Inducible NOS (iNOS) is responsible for delivery of NO in response to stressors during inflammation. The catalytic performance of iNOS is proposed to rely mainly on the haem midpoint potential and the ability of the substrate L-Arg to provide an H-bond for oxygen activation (O-O scission). We present a comparative study of native iNOS versus iNOS-mesohaem, and investigate the formation of a low-spin ferric haem-aquo or -hydroxo species (P) in iNOS mutant W188H substituted with mesohaem. iNOS-mesohaem and W188H-mesohaem were stable and dimeric, and presented substrate-binding affinities comparable to their native counterparts. Single turnover reactions catalysed by iNOSoxy with LArg (first reaction step) or N-hydroxyarginine (second reaction step) showed that mesohaem substitution triggered faster rates of FeIIO2 conversion and altered other key kinetic parameters. We elucidated the first crystal structure of a NOS substituted with mesohaem and found essentially identical features compared to the structure of iNOS carrying native haem. This facilitated the dissection of structural and electronic effects. Mesohaem substitution substantially reduced the build-up of species P in W188H iNOS during catalysis, thus increasing its proficiency toward NO synthesis. The marked structural similarities of iNOSoxy containing native haem or mesohaem indicate that the kinetic behaviour observed in mesohaem-substituted iNOS is most heavily influenced by electronic effects rather than structural alterations. PMID:25608846

  3. Dissecting structural and electronic effects in inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Page, Richard C; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Bolisetty, Karthik; Yu, Zhihao; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-04-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are haem-thiolate enzymes that catalyse the conversion of L-arginine (L-Arg) into NO and citrulline. Inducible NOS (iNOS) is responsible for delivery of NO in response to stressors during inflammation. The catalytic performance of iNOS is proposed to rely mainly on the haem midpoint potential and the ability of the substrate L-Arg to provide a hydrogen bond for oxygen activation (O-O scission). We present a study of native iNOS compared with iNOS-mesohaem, and investigate the formation of a low-spin ferric haem-aquo or -hydroxo species (P) in iNOS mutant W188H substituted with mesohaem. iNOS-mesohaem and W188H-mesohaem were stable and dimeric, and presented substrate-binding affinities comparable to those of their native counterparts. Single turnover reactions catalysed by iNOSoxy with L-Arg (first reaction step) or N-hydroxy-L-arginine (second reaction step) showed that mesohaem substitution triggered higher rates of Fe(II)O₂ conversion and altered other key kinetic parameters. We elucidated the first crystal structure of a NOS substituted with mesohaem and found essentially identical features compared with the structure of iNOS carrying native haem. This facilitated the dissection of structural and electronic effects. Mesohaem substitution substantially reduced the build-up of species P in W188H iNOS during catalysis, thus increasing its proficiency towards NO synthesis. The marked structural similarities of iNOSoxy containing native haem or mesohaem indicate that the kinetic behaviour observed in mesohaem-substituted iNOS is most heavily influenced by electronic effects rather than structural alterations.

  4. Fine structure of subauroral electric field and electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, Roman A.; Bristow, W. A.

    2014-05-01

    Small-scale structure of the plasma convection and electron content within the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) is investigated. We present ionospheric observations during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm on 17 March 2013, during which a sequence of intense, highly localized, and fast-moving electric field (EF) structures within SAPS was observed by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network Christmas Valley West (CVW) radar. The CVW EF measurements at 60 s resolution are analyzed in context of coincident GPS measurements of the total electron content (TEC) at 30 s resolution. The strong and narrow feature of the subauroral ion drift (SAID) was observed poleward of the TEC trough, with a TEC enhancement (peak) seen in the SAPS (SAID) region. The SAPS wave activity commenced ~2 h (15 min) after first appearance of SAPS (SAID). The SAPS structures appeared near the poleward edge of the trough, propagated westward, and merged with SAID near TEC peak. The propagation velocity was comparable with convection velocity within each EF structure. The SAPS TEC exhibited a general decrease toward the end of the period. On a smaller time scale, TEC exhibited a small but appreciable decrease within EF structures. The wavelet spectra of EF and TEC showed similar variations, with wave period of ~5 min period near onset and increasing to 8-10 min toward the end of the period with significant wave activity. A scenario is discussed, in which the SAPS wave activity may modify the ionospheric conductance and TEC at small scales, with large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere feedback acting to continuously deplete TEC where/when such activity does not occur.

  5. Influence of Electron Correlation on the Electronic Structure and Magnetism of Transition-Metal Phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Brumboiu, Iulia Emilia; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Lüder, Johann; Eriksson, Olle; Herper, Heike C; Brena, Barbara; Sanyal, Biplab

    2016-04-12

    There exists an extensive literature on the electronic structure of transition-metal phthalocyanines (TMPcs), either as single molecules or adsorbed on surfaces, where explicit intra-atomic Coulomb interactions of the strongly correlated orbitals are included in the form of a Hubbard U term. The choice of U is, to a large extent, based solely on previous values reported in the literature for similar systems. Here, we provide a systematic analysis of the influence of electron correlation on the electronic structure and magnetism of several TMPcs (MnPc, FePc, CoPc, NiPc, and CuPc). By comparing calculated results to valence-band photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, and by determining the Hubbard term from linear response, we show that the choice of U is not as straightforward and can be different for each different TMPc. This, in turn, highlights the importance of individually estimating the value of U for each system before performing any further analysis and shows how this value can influence the final results.

  6. Electronic structure and electron-phonon coupling in TiH2.

    PubMed

    Shanavas, K V; Lindsay, L; Parker, D S

    2016-01-01

    Calculations using first principles methods and strong coupling theory are carried out to understand the electronic structure and superconductivity in cubic and tetragonal TiH2. A large electronic density of states at the Fermi level in the cubic phase arises from Ti-t2g states and leads to a structural instability towards tetragonal distortion at low temperatures. However, constraining the in-plane lattice constants diminishes the energy gain associated with the tetragonal distortion, allowing the cubic phase to be stable at low temperatures. Calculated phonon dispersions show decoupled acoustic and optic modes arising from Ti and H vibrations, respectively, and frequencies of optic modes to be rather high. The cubic phase has a large electron-phonon coupling parameter λ and critical temperature of several K. Contribution of the hydrogen sublattice to λ is found to be small in this material, which we understand from strong coupling theory to be due to the small H-s DOS at the Fermi level and high energy of hydrogen modes at the tetrahedral sites. PMID:27302645

  7. Electronic structure and electron-phonon coupling in TiH2

    PubMed Central

    Shanavas, K. V.; Lindsay, L.; Parker, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Calculations using first principles methods and strong coupling theory are carried out to understand the electronic structure and superconductivity in cubic and tetragonal TiH2. A large electronic density of states at the Fermi level in the cubic phase arises from Ti-t2g states and leads to a structural instability towards tetragonal distortion at low temperatures. However, constraining the in-plane lattice constants diminishes the energy gain associated with the tetragonal distortion, allowing the cubic phase to be stable at low temperatures. Calculated phonon dispersions show decoupled acoustic and optic modes arising from Ti and H vibrations, respectively, and frequencies of optic modes to be rather high. The cubic phase has a large electron-phonon coupling parameter λ and critical temperature of several K. Contribution of the hydrogen sublattice to λ is found to be small in this material, which we understand from strong coupling theory to be due to the small H-s DOS at the Fermi level and high energy of hydrogen modes at the tetrahedral sites. PMID:27302645

  8. Electronic structure and electron-phonon coupling in TiH$_2$

    DOE PAGES

    Shanavas, Kavungal Veedu; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Parker, David S.

    2016-06-15

    Calculations using first principles methods and strong coupling theory are carried out to understand the electronic structure and superconductivity in cubic and tetragonal TiHmore » $_2$. A large electronic density of states at the Fermi level in the cubic phase arises from Ti-$$t_{2g}$$ states and leads to a structural instability against tetragonal distortion at low temperatures. However, constraining the in-plane lattice constants diminishes the energy gain associated with the tetragonal distortion, allowing the cubic phase to be stable at low temperatures. Furthermore, calculated phonon dispersions show decoupled acoustic and optic modes arising from Ti and H vibrations, respectively and frequencies of optic modes to be rather high. The cubic phase has a large electron-phonon coupling parameter $$\\lambda$$ and critical temperature of several K. Contribution of the hydrogen sublattice to $$\\lambda$$ is found to be small in this material, which we understand from strong coupling theory to be due to the small H-$s$ DOS at the Fermi level and high energy of hydrogen modes at the tetrahedral sites.« less

  9. Electronic structure and electron-phonon coupling in TiH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanavas, K. V.; Lindsay, L.; Parker, D. S.

    2016-06-01

    Calculations using first principles methods and strong coupling theory are carried out to understand the electronic structure and superconductivity in cubic and tetragonal TiH2. A large electronic density of states at the Fermi level in the cubic phase arises from Ti-t2g states and leads to a structural instability towards tetragonal distortion at low temperatures. However, constraining the in-plane lattice constants diminishes the energy gain associated with the tetragonal distortion, allowing the cubic phase to be stable at low temperatures. Calculated phonon dispersions show decoupled acoustic and optic modes arising from Ti and H vibrations, respectively, and frequencies of optic modes to be rather high. The cubic phase has a large electron-phonon coupling parameter λ and critical temperature of several K. Contribution of the hydrogen sublattice to λ is found to be small in this material, which we understand from strong coupling theory to be due to the small H-s DOS at the Fermi level and high energy of hydrogen modes at the tetrahedral sites.

  10. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, K.S.

    2000-05-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  11. Structural, anisotropic and electronic properties of C96 under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Mengjiang; Li, Binhua; Yu, Zhengtao; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of the structural, elastic, electronic and anisotropic properties of C96 under high pressure has been calculated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, as implemented in the Cambridge Serial Total Energy Package code. At elevated pressures, the elastic constants and shear modulus, Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for C96 increase with pressure increasing. The anisotropy studies of Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, Zener anisotropy index, the universal elastic anisotropy index AU and hardness show that C96 exhibits a small anisotropy. The sound velocities, Debye temperature and band gap of C96 under high pressure are also calculated.

  12. Electronic structure study on 2D hydrogenated Icosagens nitride nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, S.; Marutheeswaran, S.; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Paul, Dolon Chapa

    2014-12-01

    Metal nitride nanosheets has attracted remarkable importance in surface catalysis due to its characteristic ionic nature. In this paper, using density functional theory, we investigate geometric stability and electronic properties of hydrogenated Icosagen nitride nanosheets. Binding energy of the sheets reveals hydrogenation is providing more stability. Band structure of the hydrogenated sheets is found to be n-type semiconductor. Partial density of states shows metals (B, Al, Ga and In) and its hydrogens dominating in the Fermi region. Mulliken charge analysis indications that hydrogenated nanosheets are partially hydridic surface nature except boron nitride.

  13. STRUCTURE FOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES OF ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Harris, C.C.

    1959-03-31

    Sub-assemblies for electronic systems, particularly a unit which is self- contained and which may be adapted for quick application to and detachment from a chassis or panel, are discussed. The disclosed structure serves the dual purpose of a cover or enclosure for a subassembly comprising a base plate and also acts as a clamp for retaining the base plate in position on a chassis. The clamping action is provided by flexible fingers projecting from the side walls of the cover and extending through grooves in the base plate to engage with the opposite side of the chassis.

  14. Bulk electronic structure of metals resolved with scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pascual, J I; Dick, A; Hansmann, M; Rust, H-P; Neugebauer, J; Horn, K

    2006-02-01

    We demonstrate that bulk band structure can have a strong influence in scanning tunneling microscopy measurements by resolving electronic interference patterns associated with scattering phenomena of bulk states at a metal surface and reconstructing the bulk band topology. Our data reveal that bulk information can be detected because states at the edge of the surface-projected bulk band have a predominant role on the scattering patterns. With the aid of density functional calculations, we associate this effect with an intrinsic increase in the projected density of states of edge states. This enhancement is characteristic of the three-dimensional bulk band curvature, a phenomenon analog to a van Hove singularity.

  15. Structural Preablation Dynamics of Graphite Observed by Ultrafast Electron Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Fabrizio; Baum, Peter; Zewail, Ahmed H.; Rudolf, Petra

    2008-01-25

    By means of time-resolved electron crystallography, we report direct observation of the structural dynamics of graphite, providing new insights into the processes involving coherent lattice motions and ultrafast graphene ablation. When graphite is excited by an ultrashort laser pulse, the excited carriers reach their equilibrium in less then one picosecond by transferring heat to a subset of strongly coupled optical phonons. The time-resolved diffraction data show that on such a time scale the crystal undergoes a contraction whose velocity depends on the excitation fluence. The contraction is followed by a large expansion which, at sufficiently high fluence, leads to the ablation of entire graphene layers, as recently predicted theoretically.

  16. Electronic Structure and Optical Properties of Twisted Bilayer Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ting; Li, Zhenglu; Qiu, Diana Y.; Louie, Steven G.

    Using first-principles calculations, we find that the electronic structure and optical properties of bilayer black phosphorus can be modified significantly through changing the interlayer twist angle. We demonstrate the origin of these twist angle dependent effects, and connect our predicted results to experimental measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR15-1508412, and the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's NERSC facility.

  17. Electronic structure and properties of layered gallium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, U. Sandhya; Gupta, Uttam; Narang, Deepa S.; Late, Dattatray J.; Waghmare, Umesh V.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2016-05-01

    Layer-dependent electronic structure and properties of gallium monochalcogenides, GaX where X = S, Se, Te, have been investigated using first-principles calculations based on various functionals, with a motivation to assess their use in photocatalytic water splitting. Since hydrogen evolution by water splitting using visible light provides a promising way for solar energy conversion, both theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out on the photochemical hydrogen evolution by GaTe. We also present the Raman spectra of GaTe examined by both theory and experiment.

  18. CIF2Cell: Generating geometries for electronic structure programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkman, Torbjörn

    2011-05-01

    The CIF2Cell program generates the geometrical setup for a number of electronic structure programs based on the crystallographic information in a Crystallographic Information Framework (CIF) file. The program will retrieve the space group number, Wyckoff positions and crystallographic parameters, make a sensible choice for Bravais lattice vectors (primitive or principal cell) and generate all atomic positions. Supercells can be generated and alloys are handled gracefully. The code currently has output interfaces to the electronic structure programs ABINIT, CASTEP, CPMD, Crystal, Elk, Exciting, EMTO, Fleur, RSPt, Siesta and VASP. Program summaryProgram title: CIF2Cell Catalogue identifier: AEIM_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIM_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 12 691 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 74 933 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Computer: Any computer that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Operating system: Any operating system that can run Python (versions 2.4-2.7) Classification: 7.3, 7.8, 8 External routines: PyCIFRW [1] Nature of problem: Generate the geometrical setup of a crystallographic cell for a variety of electronic structure programs from data contained in a CIF file. Solution method: The CIF file is parsed using routines contained in the library PyCIFRW [1], and crystallographic as well as bibliographic information is extracted. The program then generates the principal cell from symmetry information, crystal parameters, space group number and Wyckoff sites. Reduction to a primitive cell is then performed, and the resulting cell is output to suitably named files along with documentation of the information source generated from any bibliographic information contained in the CIF

  19. The effect of oxygen exposure on pentacene electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, A; Jurchescu, O D; Arfaoui, I; Salzmann, I; Palstra, T T M; Rudolf, P; Niemax, J; Pflaum, J; Rabe, J P; Koch, N

    2005-07-01

    We use ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the effect of oxygen and air exposure on the electronic structure of pentacene single crystals and thin films. It is found that O(2) and water do not react noticeably with pentacene, whereas singlet oxygen/ozone readily oxidize the organic compound. Also, we obtain no evidence for considerable p-type doping of pentacene by O(2) at low pressure. However, oxygen exposure lowers the hole injection barrier at the interface between Au and pentacene by 0.25 eV, presumably due to a modification of the Au surface properties. PMID:15968478

  20. Influence of defects on the electronic structures of bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Ken; Okada, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Based on first-principles total-energy calculation, we investigate the electronic structures of bilayer graphene, one of which layers possesses atomic or topological defects, to explore the possibility of band gap engineering of graphene by means of physisorption of defective graphene. Our calculations show that the pristine graphene layer possesses a finite energy gap between bonding and antibonding π states because of the potential undulation caused by the other graphene layers with defects. We also found that the gap values strongly depend on the defect species and their mutual arrangement with respect to the pristine layer.

  1. 8th international conference on electronic spectroscopy and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Art

    2000-10-16

    Gathering from 33 countries around the world, 408 registrants and a number of local drop-in participants descended on the Clark Kerr Campus of the University of California, Berkeley, from Monday, August 7 through Saturday, August 12, 2000 for the Eighth International Conference on Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy (ICESS8). At the conference, participants benefited from an extensive scientific program comprising more than 100 oral presentations (plenary lectures and invited and contributed talks) and 330 poster presentations, as well as ample time for socializing and a tour of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the nearby Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  2. Supersampling method for efficient grid-based electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seongok; Choi, Sunghwan; Hong, Kwangwoo; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-03-01

    The egg-box effect, the spurious variation of energy and force due to the discretization of continuous space, is an inherent vexing problem in grid-based electronic structure calculations. Its effective suppression allowing for large grid spacing is thus crucial for accurate and efficient computations. We here report that the supersampling method drastically alleviates it by eliminating the rapidly varying part of a target function along both radial and angular directions. In particular, the use of the sinc filtering function performs best because as an ideal low pass filter it clearly cuts out the high frequency region beyond allowed by a given grid spacing.

  3. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication of Titanium Alloy Gradient Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.; Newman, John A.; Bird, Richard Keith; Shenoy, Ravi N.; Baughman, James M.; Gupta, Vipul K.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the structural optimization of aerospace components has been done through geometric methods. A monolithic material is chosen based on the best compromise between the competing design limiting criteria. Then the structure is geometrically optimized to give the best overall performance using the single material chosen. Functionally graded materials offer the potential to further improve structural efficiency by allowing the material composition and/or microstructural features to spatially vary within a single structure. Thus, local properties could be tailored to the local design limiting criteria. Additive manufacturing techniques enable the fabrication of such graded materials and structures. This paper presents the results of a graded material study using two titanium alloys processed using electron beam freeform fabrication, an additive manufacturing process. The results show that the two alloys uniformly mix at various ratios and the resultant static tensile properties of the mixed alloys behave according to rule-of-mixtures. Additionally, the crack growth behavior across an abrupt change from one alloy to the other shows no discontinuity and the crack smoothly transitions from one crack growth regime into another.

  4. Comparing two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing through an atomic electronic structure computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man-Hong, Zhang

    2016-05-01

    By performing the electronic structure computation of a Si atom, we compare two iteration algorithms of Broyden electron density mixing in the literature. One was proposed by Johnson and implemented in the well-known VASP code. The other was given by Eyert. We solve the Kohn-Sham equation by using a conventional outward/inward integration of the differential equation and then connect two parts of solutions at the classical turning points, which is different from the method of the matrix eigenvalue solution as used in the VASP code. Compared to Johnson’s algorithm, the one proposed by Eyert needs fewer total iteration numbers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61176080).

  5. Electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal and rhombohedral graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taut, M.; Koepernik, K.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of the electronic structure of interfaces between hexagonal (A B ) and rhombohedral (A B C ) graphite based on density functional theory is presented. Both of the two simplest interface structures host (localized) interface bands, which are located around the K point in the Brillouin zone, and which give rise to strong peaks in the density of states at the Fermi level. All interface bands near the Fermi energy are localized at monomers (single atoms with dangling pz orbitals), whereas those around 0.5 eV belong to pz-bonded trimers, which are introduced by the interface and which are not found in the two adjacent bulk substances. There is also an interface band at the (A B ) side of the interface which resembles one of the interface states near a stacking fault in (A B ) graphite.

  6. Electronic structure calculations toward new potentially AChE inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, A. A. N.; Martins, J. B. L.; Gargano, R.; dos Santos, M. L.; Romeiro, L. A. S.

    2007-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was the use of natural non-isoprenoid phenolic lipid of cashew nut shell liquid from Anacardium occidentale as lead material for generating new potentially candidates of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Therefore, we studied the electronic structure of 15 molecules derivatives from the cardanol using the following groups: methyl, acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, N, N-diethylamine, piperidine, pyrrolidine, and N-benzylamine. The calculations were performed at RHF level using 6-31G, 6-31G(d), 6-31+G(d) and 6-311G(d,p) basis functions. Among the proposed compounds we found that the structures with substitution by acetyl, N, N-dimethylcarbamoyl, N, N-dimethylamine, and pyrrolidine groups were better correlated to rivastigmine indicating possible activity.

  7. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Colleoni, Davide Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-20

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As–O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ∼0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  8. Exchange coupling in transition metal monoxides: Electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Guntram; Daene, Markus W; Ernst, Arthur; Bruno, Patrick; Lueders, Martin; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Wolfam, Hergert

    2009-01-01

    An ab initio study of magnetic-exchange interactions in antiferromagnetic and strongly correlated 3d transition metal monoxides is presented. Their electronic structure is calculated using the local self-interaction correction approach, implemented within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker band-structure method, which is based on multiple scattering theory. The Heisenberg exchange constants are evaluated with the magnetic force theorem. Based on these the corresponding Neel temperatures TN and spin-wave dispersions are calculated. The Neel temperatures are obtained using mean-field approximation, random-phase approximation and Monte Carlo simulations. The pressure dependence of TN is investigated using exchange constants calculated for different lattice constants. All the calculated results are compared to experimental data.

  9. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite

    PubMed Central

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains. PMID:26876049

  10. Atomic and electronic structure of twin growth defects in magnetite.

    PubMed

    Gilks, Daniel; Nedelkoski, Zlatko; Lari, Leonardo; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Matsuzaki, Kosuke; Susaki, Tomofumi; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin; Evans, Richard; McKenna, Keith; Lazarov, Vlado K

    2016-02-15

    We report the existence of a stable twin defect in Fe3O4 thin films. By using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy the atomic structure of the twin boundary has been determined. The boundary is confined to the (111) growth plane and it is non-stoichiometric due to a missing Fe octahedral plane. By first principles calculations we show that the local atomic structural configuration of the twin boundary does not change the nature of the superexchange interactions between the two Fe sublattices across the twin grain boundary. Besides decreasing the half-metallic band gap at the boundary the altered atomic stacking at the boundary does not change the overall ferromagnetic (FM) coupling between the grains.

  11. Electronic structure of Si vacancy centers in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soykal, Oney; Dev, Pratibha; Economou, Sophia

    2015-03-01

    The spin state of silicon vacancies in SiC is a promising candidate for applications in solid state quantum information technologies due to its long coherence time at room temperature, its technological availability and wide range of polytypism. Until recently, the electronic structure of this vacancy was not well understood. We have developed a group theoretical model that correctly predicts the spin 3/2 structure seen in recent experiments for the 4H-SiC defect. We have included several different mechanisms involved in the mixing of its spin states, such as crystal field splitting, spin-orbit coupling, spin-spin coupling, strain and Jahn-Teller interactions. We have also carried out DFT calculations that support and complement our analytical results.

  12. An Extensive Database of Electronic Structure Calculations between Transition Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Shereef; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    Density Functional Theory and its derived application methods, such as the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method, have shown great success in predicting the fundamental properties of materials. In this work, we apply the APW method to explore the properties of diatomic pairs of transition metals in the CsCl structure, for all possible combinations. A total of 435 compounds have been studied. The predicted Density of States, and Band Structures are presented, along with predicted electron-phonon coupling and Stoner Criterion, in order to identify potential new superconducting or ferromagnetic materials. This work is performed to demonstrate the concept of ``high-throughput'' calculations at the crossing-point of ``Big Data'' and materials science. Us Dept of Energy.

  13. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As-O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ˜0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  14. Electronic structure and dynamics of elements at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2011-03-01

    Electronic structure and dynamics information of materials under high pressure has been very scarce due to the experimental difficulties. The standard electronic probes using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited to vacuum pressures. The optical probes that can reach high-pressure samples through the diamond windows, on the other hand, are limited by the energy accessibility (5 eV) andnear - zeromomentumtransfer , q = (4 π /λ0) sinθ . Theseproblemscanbeovercomebythenewlyadvanced , two - photon , inelastic , xray , scattering (IXS) spectroscopywhichuseshighenergyxrays (~ 10 4 eV) toprovidetheatomic - levelmomentumtransferandtoenter (withenergy E) andexit (withenergy E0) thepressurevessel . Theelectronicspectraarerevealedbyanalyzingthexrayenergylossbetweenthetwophotons , ω = E -E0 . UsingIXSfacilitiesatthird - generationsynchrotronsource , westudiedelectronicstructureanddynamicsoftwoelementsathighpressuresinadiamond - anvilcell : i . e . , He , thewidest - gapinsulator , andNa , thearchetypalfree - electronmetal . At 11.9 - 17.9 GPainasinglecrystal 4 He , weobservedrichelectronexcitationspectra , includingacut - offedgeabove 23 eV , asharpexcitonpeakshowinglinearvolumedependence , andaseriesofexcitationsandcontinuumat 26 to 45 eV . Wedeterminedelectronicdispersionalongthe 100 directionovertwoBrillouinzones , andprovidedaquantitativepictureoftheheliumexcitonbeyondthesimplifiedWannier - Frenkeldescription . At 1.6 - 4.39 GPainapolycrystallineNasample , weobservedthesharpplasmonpeakatlow q anditsdispersionbeyondthecritical q c . Theplasmonshiftstohigherenergyundercompressionanddrasticreductionof rs . Ab-initio theoretical calculations are conducted for interpretation of the experimental results. The speaker would like to acknowledge collaborating researchers: R. Ahuja, Y. Cai, P. Chow, Y. Ding, P. Eng, R.J. Hemley, C.C. Kao, S. Lebegue, W.L. Mao, E.L. Shirley, J. Shu, & Y. Xiao.

  15. Radiation from relativistic electron beams in periodic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Babzien, M.; Batchelor, K.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1995-12-31

    We present an experimental study of emission of radiation from relativistic electrons in a novel periodic structure. The MIT microwiggler is a pulsed ferromagnetic-core electromagnet consisting of 70 periods of 8.8 mm periodicity, generating an on-axis peak magnetic field of 4.2 kG. Each field pea in independently tunable. We employed a novel tuning scheme to reduce the RMS spread in the peak amplitudes to 0.08%, the lowest ever attained in a sub-cm magnetic field. A high brightness, 40 MeV pulsed electron beam produced by the LINAC at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory was injected into the short period wiggler and visible spontaneous emission was produced. Spectral density profiles were measured and the measured peak wavelength was shown to vary appropriately with beam energy. It is shown that the principal spectral broadening mechanisms are longitudinal energy spread in the electron beam and off-axis emission. Further work is planned at 50 MeV.

  16. Electronic Structure and Spectroscopy of HBr and HBr^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, Gabriel J.; Liebermann, H. P.; Lefebvre-Brion, H.

    2016-06-01

    We report preliminary ab initio electronic structure calculations of HBr and HBr^+. The computations were carried out employing the MRD-CI package, with a basis set of cc-pVQZ quality augmented with s--, p-- and d--type diffuse functions. In a first series of calculations, without inclusion of spin--orbit splitting, potential energy curves of about 20 doublet and quartet electronic states of HBr^+, and about 30 singlet and triplet (valence and Rydberg) states of HBr were computed. This exploratory step provides a perspective of the character, shape, leading configurations, energetics, and asymptotic behaviour of the electronic states. The calculations taking into account spin-orbit are currently being performed. Our study focuses mainly on the Rydberg states and their interactions with the repulsive valence states and with the bound valence ion-pair state. In particular, the current calculations seek to provide information that might be relevant to the interpretation of recent REMPI measurements which involve the interaction between the diabatic E^1Σ^+ Rydberg state and the diabatic V^1Σ^+ ion--pair state (which together constitute the adiabatic, double-well, B^1Σ^+ state). Several new states of both HBr and HBr^+ are reported. D. Zaouris, A. Kartakoullis, P. Glodic, P. C. Samartzis, H. R. Hródmarsson, Á. Kvaran, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17, 10468 (2015)

  17. Electronic structure and bonding in transuranics: comparison with lanthanides

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of the actinide metals, alloys, and compounds show interesting parallels and contrasts with the rare earths, beyond uranium. At first there is a transition region where the unique bonding properties of the early actinides become less prominent, due to progressive f-electron localization. Nevertheless, in contrast to the rare earths, f-electron energies remain close to the Fermi level, resulting in complex behavior as a function of temperature, pressure and structure. Particularly interesting in this region are the metallic hydrides, whose chemistry is clearly rare-earth like, but whose electronic properties are entirely different. At americium a major localization and f-band narrowing occurs, but the explanation of americium behavior is obscured by the occurrence of the unique f/sup 6/ non-magnetic solid-state configuration. Beyond americium, it would appear that real rare-earth-like behavior finally begins; this has been born out by recent studies on the thermodynamics and cohesive energies of curium, berkelium, californium and einsteinium metals. However, a new complication arises almost immediately, in the onset of incipient stabilization of the divalent state, which already appears in californium, whose physico-chemical properties are remarkably similar to samarium. Einsteinium appears to be fully divalent, thus heralding the beginning of a mini-series of truly divalent metals.

  18. Electronic structure and physicochemical properties of selected penicillins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano-Correa, Catalina; Ruiz, Juan F. Sánchez; Raya, A.; Esquivel, Rodolfo O.

    Traditionally, penicillins have been used as antibacterial agents due to their characteristics and widespread applications with few collateral effects, which have motivated several theoretical and experimental studies. Despite the latter, their mechanism of biological action has not been completely elucidated. We present a theoretical study at the Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (DFT) levels of theory of a selected group of penicillins such as the penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, dicloxacillin, and carbenicillin molecules, to systematically determine the electron structure of full ?-lactam antibiotics. Our results allow us to analyze the electronic properties of the pharmacophore group, the aminoacyl side-chain, and the influence of the substituents (R and X) attached to the aminoacyl side-chain at 6? (in contrast with previous studies focused at the 3? substituents), and to corroborate the results of previous studies performed at the semiempirical level, solely on the ?-lactam ring of penicillins. Besides, several density descriptors are determined with the purpose of analyzing their link to the antibacterial activity of these penicillin compounds. Our results for the atomic charges (fitted to the electrostatic potential), the bond orders, and several global reactivity descriptors, such as the dipole moments, ionization potential, hardness, and the electrophilicity index, led us to characterize: the active sites, the effect of the electron-attracting substituent properties and their physicochemical features, which altogether, might be important to understand the biological activity of these type of molecules.

  19. Electronic structure of graphene on single-crystal copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Andrew L.; Nie, Shu; Bostwick, Aaron; Kim, Keun Su; Moreschini, Luca; Chang, Young Jun; Innocenti, Davide; Horn, Karsten; McCarty, Kevin F.; Rotenberg, Eli

    2011-11-01

    The electronic structure of graphene on Cu(111) and Cu(100) single crystals is investigated using low-energy electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. On both substrates the graphene is rotationally disordered and interactions between the graphene and substrate lead to a shift in the Dirac crossing of ˜-0.3 eV and the opening of a ˜250 meV gap. Exposure of the samples to air resulted in intercalation of oxygen under the graphene on Cu(100), which formed a (2×22)R45o superstructure. The effect of this intercalation on the graphene π bands is to increase the offset of the Dirac crossing (˜-0.6 eV) and enlarge the gap (˜350 meV). No such effect is observed for the graphene on the Cu(111) sample, with the surface state at Γ not showing the gap associated with a surface superstructure. The graphene film is found to protect the surface state from air exposure, with no change in the effective mass observed, as for one monolayer of Ag on Cu(111).

  20. Dispersion-Corrected Mean-Field Electronic Structure Methods.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Hansen, Andreas; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bannwarth, Christoph

    2016-05-11

    Mean-field electronic structure methods like Hartree-Fock, semilocal density functional approximations, or semiempirical molecular orbital (MO) theories do not account for long-range electron correlation (London dispersion interaction). Inclusion of these effects is mandatory for realistic calculations on large or condensed chemical systems and for various intramolecular phenomena (thermochemistry). This Review describes the recent developments (including some historical aspects) of dispersion corrections with an emphasis on methods that can be employed routinely with reasonable accuracy in large-scale applications. The most prominent correction schemes are classified into three groups: (i) nonlocal, density-based functionals, (ii) semiclassical C6-based, and (iii) one-electron effective potentials. The properties as well as pros and cons of these methods are critically discussed, and typical examples and benchmarks on molecular complexes and crystals are provided. Although there are some areas for further improvement (robustness, many-body and short-range effects), the situation regarding the overall accuracy is clear. Various approaches yield long-range dispersion energies with a typical relative error of 5%. For many chemical problems, this accuracy is higher compared to that of the underlying mean-field method (i.e., a typical semilocal (hybrid) functional like B3LYP). PMID:27077966

  1. Electronic Structure Mediated Vibrational Coherence in Methyl Acetophenone Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim; Levine, Benjamin; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    The role of ground and excited state electronic structures in influencing the vibrational coherences in gas phase polyatomic molecules has been a hot topic for quite some time. Here we explore the time resolved dynamics of acetophenone and its methyl substituted isomer when excited by intense 800nm femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The parent ion yield show 500 fs modulations that die down within 3ps. Similar modulations having the same timescales in the parent ion yield are also observed for the p-methyl isomer. The o-methyl isomer however shows longer 1ps modulations. Interestingly enough no oscillations are observed for the meta isomer. Quantum chemical calculations at the CASSCF/6-311G level of theory predicts that upon excitation the neutral ground state is planar and the energy spacing between the levels is very small. Preliminary calculations also predict torsional motion coupled to electronic modulations on the D0 state and further calculations are being performed to ascertain the involvement of the D1 and D2 states. This could help us better understand the electronic effect of substitution on a benzene ring.

  2. Electronic Structure Mediated Vibrational Coherence in Methyl Acetophenone Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Levine, Benjamin; Lozovoy, Vadim; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-03-01

    The role of ground and excited state electronic structures in influencing the vibrational coherences in gas phase polyatomic molecules has been a hot topic for quite some time. Here we explore the time resolved dynamics of acetophenone and its methyl substituted isomer when excited by intense 800nm femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The parent ion yield show 500 fs modulations that die down within 3ps. Similar modulations having the same timescales in the parent ion yield are also observed for the p-methyl isomer. The o-methyl isomer however shows longer 1ps modulations. Interestingly enough no oscillations are observed for the meta isomer. Quantum chemical calculations at the CASSCF/6-311G level of theory predicts that upon excitation the neutral ground state is planar and the energy spacing between the levels is very small. Preliminary calculations also predict torsional motion coupled to electronic modulations on the D0 state and further calculations are being performed to ascertain the involvement of the D1 and D2 states. This could help us better understand the electronic effect of substitution on a benzene ring.

  3. Understanding electronic structure and transport properties in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.

    Understanding the electronic structure and the transport properties of nanoscale materials are pivotal for designing future nano-scale electronic devices. Nanoscale materials could be individual or groups of molecules, nanotubes, semiconducting quantum dots, and biomolecules. Among these several alternatives, organic molecules are very promising and the field of molecular electronics has progressed significantly over the past few decades. Despite these progresses, it has not yet been possible to achieve atomic level control at the metal-molecule interface during a conductance measurement, which hinders the progress in this field. The lack of atomic level information of the interface also makes it much harder for theorist to interpret the experimental results. To identify the junction configuration that possibly exists during the experimental measurement of conductance in molecular junction, we created an ensemble of Ruthanium-bis(terpyridine) molecular devices, and studied the transport behavior in these molecular junctions. This helps us identifying the junction geometry that yields the experimentally measured current-voltage characteristics. Today's electronic devices mostly ignore the spin effect of an electron. The inclusion of spin effect of an electron on solid-state transistor allows us to build more efficient electronic devices; this also alleviates the problem of huge heat dissipation in the nanoscale electronic devices. Different materials have been utilized to build three terminals spin transistor since its inception in 1950. In search of suitable candidates for the molecular spin transistor, we have recently designed a spin-valve transistor based on an organometallic molecule; a large amplification (320 %) in tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found to occur at an experimentally accessible gate field. This suggests that the organic molecules can be utilized for making the next generation three terminal spintronic devices. Similarly, we have designed a

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 5F VERTICAL COOLING COIL LEACHATES FOR SELECT RADIONUCLIDES 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.

    2001-08-17

    Two twenty-four inch samples of vertical sections of the cooling coils from Tank 5F, taken from Riser 1, were made available to SRNL by SRR for leaching and characterization of the leachates for select radionuclide trapped in the corrosion layer on the exterior of the cooling coils. One piece of cooling coil sample was obtained from a section of a vertical cooling coil located above the 45-inch elevation from the tank floor and the other also from a vertical section of a cooling coil located below the 45-inch elevation from the tank floor of Tank 5F. Analysis results from both cooling coils show that the predominant radionuclides contributing to the activity in both coils are strontium-90 and cesium-137. The activities for strontium-90 and cesium-137 in the Tank 5F vertical cooling coil located above the 45-inch elevation of the tank and designated as sample 5-R1-A45 averaged 1.34E-02 {+-} 1.12E-03 and 7.27E-04 {+-} 4.46E-05 Ci/ft{sup 2}, respectively, while the activities for the vertical cooling coil located below the 45-inch elevation of the tank and designated as sample 5-R1-B45 averaged 8.93E-03 {+-} 8.25E-04 for Sr-90 and 8.10E-04 {+-} 6.36E-05 Ci/ft{sup 2} for Cs-137. Other significant activity contributing radionuclides are americium-241 and europium-154/155. With the exception of the analysis result for Pu-241 in the 5-R1-A45 cooling coils samples, the target detection limits for the other radionuclides were met in both cooling coil samples. The detection limits for Pu-241 analyses result in coil sample 5-R1-A45 were not met consistently because of possible background changes during counting.

  5. Electronic structure imperfections and chemical bonding at graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian Joseph

    nanomaterial with lateral dimensions in the hundreds of microns if not larger, with a corresponding atomic vertical thickness poses significant difficulties. Graphene's unique structure is dominated by surface area or potentially hybridized interfaces; consequently, the true realization of this remarkable nanomaterial in device constructs relies on engineering graphene interfaces at the surface in order to controllably mold the electronic structure. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and the transmission mode analogue scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) are particularly useful tools to study the unoccupied states of graphene and graphene interfaces. In addition, polarized NEXAFS and STXM studies provide information on surface orientation, bond sterics, and the extent of substrate alignment before and after interfacial hybridization. The work presented in this dissertation is fundamentally informed by NEXAFS and STXM measurements on graphene/metal, graphene/dielectric, and graphene/organic interfaces. We start with a general review of the electronic structure of freestanding graphene and graphene interfaces in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, we investigate freestanding single-layer graphene via STXM and NEXAFS demonstrating that electronic structure heterogeneities from synthesis and processing are ubiquitous in 2-dimensional graphene. We show the mapping of discrete charge transfer regions as a result of doped impurities that decorate the surfaces of graphene and that transfer processing imparts local electronic corrugations or ripples. In corroboration with density functional theory, definitive assignments to the spectral features, global steric orientations of the localized domains, and quantitative charge transfer schemes are evidenced. In the following chapters, we deliberately (Chapter 3) incorporate substitutional nitrogen into reduced graphene oxide to induce C--N charge redistribution and improve global conductivity, (Chapter 4

  6. Efficient Execution of Electronic Structure Calculations on SMP Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ustemirov, Nurzhan

    2006-01-01

    Applications augmented with adaptive capabilities are becoming common in parallel computing environments. For large-scale scientific applications, dynamic adjustments to a computationally-intensive part may lead to a large pay-off in facilitating efficient execution of the entire application while aiming at avoiding resource contention. Application-specific knowledge, often best revealed during the run-time, is required to initiate and time these adjustments. In particular, General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System (GAMESS) is a program for ab initio quantum chemistry that places significant demands on the high-performance computing platforms. Certain electronic structure calculations are characterized by high consumption of a particular resource, such as CPU, main memory, or disk I/O. This may lead to resource contention among concurrent GAMESS jobs and other programs in the dynamically changing environment. Thus, it is desirable to improve GAMESS calculations by means of dynamic adaptations. In this thesis, we show how an application- or algorithm-specific knowledge may play a significant role in achieving this goal. The choice of implementation is facilitated by a module-driven middleware easily integrated with GAMESS that assesses resource consumption and invokes GAMESS adaptations to the system environment. We show that the throughput of GAMESS jobs may be improved greatly as a result of such adaptations.

  7. Oxidation of rubrene thin films: an electronic structure study.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sumona; Wang, C-H; Mukherjee, M; Mukherjee, T; Yang, Y-W

    2014-12-30

    The performances of organic semiconductor devices are crucially linked with their stability at the ambient atmosphere. The evolution of electronic structures of 20 nm thick rubrene films exposed to ambient environment with time has been studied by UV and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (UPS and XPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT). XPS, NEXAFS data, and DFT calculated values suggest the formation of rubrene-epoxide and rubrene-endoperoxide through reaction of tetracene backbone with oxygen of ambient environment. Angle dependent XPS measurement indicates that the entire probed depth of the films reacts with oxygen by spending only about 120 min in ambient environment. The HOMO peak of pristine rubrene films almost disappears by exposure of 120 min to ambient environment. The evolution of the valence band (occupied states) and NEXAFS (unoccupied states) spectra indicates that the films become more insulating with exposure as the HOMO-LUMO gap increases on oxidation. Oxygen induced chemical reaction completely destroys the delocalized nature of the electron distribution in the tetracene backbone of rubrene. The results are relevant to the performance and reliability of rubrene based devices in the environment. PMID:25383646

  8. Electronic Structure Study of Singlet Fission in Tetracene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Casanova, David

    2014-01-14

    A detailed theoretical study of the singlet fission process in tetracene and two of its derivatives, that is 5,12-diphenyltetracene (DPT) and rubrene, is presented. This work aims to unravel the intricacies and the differences of their singlet fission mechanism by means of electronic structure calculations using molecular and cluster models and a variety of computational tools. Although the electronic structure at the molecular level is very similar for the three compounds, their different crystal packing has important consequences in their ability to produce two triplet states from a single exciton. The results obtained indicate that the lowest singlet is found to delocalize at least over seven molecules. Computed relative energies rule out the presence of charge transfer (CT) states as intermediates in a two-step mechanism in all cases. On the other hand, CT states do play a role as mediators, specially in tetracene. They decisively participate in the coupling between single and multiexcitonic states through second-order contributions. Finally, the present study pinpoints that the transition from the optically allowed exciton to the dark multiexciton state might be facilitated by intramolecular motion toward the lowest excited singlet geometry. PMID:26579913

  9. Electronic fine structure in the electron-hole plasma in SrB6

    PubMed

    Rodriguez; Weht; Pickett

    2000-04-24

    Electron-hole mixing-induced fine structure in alkaline earth hexaborides leads to lower energy (temperature) scales, and thus a stronger tendency toward an excitonic instability than in their doped counterparts (viz. Ca1-xLaxB6, x approximately 0.005), which are high-Curie-temperature, small-moment ferromagnets. Comparison of Fermi surfaces and spectral distributions with de Haas-van Alphen, optical, transport, and tunneling data indicates that SrB6 remains a fermionic semimetal down to (at least) 5 K, rather than forming an excitonic condensate. For the doped system the Curie temperature is higher than the degeneracy temperature.

  10. Imaging doped silicon test structures using low energy electron microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Nakakura, Craig Yoshimi; Anderson, Meredith Lynn; Kellogg, Gary Lee

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final SAND Report for the LDRD Project 105877 - 'Novel Diagnostic for Advanced Measurements of Semiconductor Devices Exposed to Adverse Environments' - funded through the Nanoscience to Microsystems investment area. Along with the continuous decrease in the feature size of semiconductor device structures comes a growing need for inspection tools with high spatial resolution and high sample throughput. Ideally, such tools should be able to characterize both the surface morphology and local conductivity associated with the structures. The imaging capabilities and wide availability of scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) make them an obvious choice for imaging device structures. Dopant contrast from pn junctions using secondary electrons in the SEM was first reported in 1967 and more recently starting in the mid-1990s. However, the serial acquisition process associated with scanning techniques places limits on the sample throughput. Significantly improved throughput is possible with the use of a parallel imaging scheme such as that found in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) and low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). The application of PEEM and LEEM to device structures relies on contrast mechanisms that distinguish differences in dopant type and concentration. Interestingly, one of the first applications of PEEM was a study of the doping of semiconductors, which showed that the PEEM contrast was very sensitive to the doping level and that dopant concentrations as low as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} could be detected. More recent PEEM investigations of Schottky contacts were reported in the late 1990s by Giesen et al., followed by a series of papers in the early 2000s addressing doping contrast in PEEM by Ballarotto and co-workers and Frank and co-workers. In contrast to PEEM, comparatively little has been done to identify contrast mechanisms and assess the capabilities of LEEM for imaging semiconductor device strictures. The one exception is the

  11. Nanogap structures: combining enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electronic transport.

    PubMed

    Natelson, Douglas; Li, Yajing; Herzog, Joseph B

    2013-04-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an experimental tool for accessing vibrational and chemical information, down to the single molecule level. SERS typically relies on plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures to concentrate the incident radiation and to provide an enhanced photon density of states to couple emitted radiation to the far field. Many common SERS platforms involve metal nanoparticles to generate the required electromagnetic enhancements. Here we concentrate on an alternative approach, in which the relevant plasmon excitations are supported at a truly nanoscale gap between extended electrodes, rather than discrete subwavelength nanoparticles. The ability to fabricate precise gaps on demand, and in some cases to tune the gap size in situ, combined with the additional capability of simultaneous electronic transport measurements of the nanogap, provides access to information not previously available in standard SERS. We summarize the rich plasmonic physics at work in these extended systems and highlight the recent state of the art including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and the application of mechanical break junctions and electromigrated junctions. We describe in detail how we have performed in situ gap-enhanced Raman measurements of molecular-scale junctions while simultaneously subjecting these structures to electronic transport. These extended electrode structures allow us to study the pumping of vibrational modes by the flow of tunneling electrons, as well as the shifting of vibrational energies due to the applied bias. These experiments extend SERS into a tool for examining fundamental processes of dissipation, and provide insight into the mechanisms behind SERS spectral diffusion. We conclude with a brief discussion of future directions. PMID:23385304

  12. Scanning Probe Evaluation of Electronic, Mechanical and Structural Material Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virwani, Kumar

    2011-03-01

    We present atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of a range of properties from three different classes of materials: mixed ionic electronic conductors, low-k dielectrics, and polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles. (1) Mixed ionic electronic conductors are being investigated as novel diodes to drive phase-change memory elements. Their current-voltage characteristics are measured with direct-current and pulsed-mode conductive AFM (C-AFM). The challenges to reliability of the C-AFM method include the electrical integrity of the probe, the sample and the contacts, and the minimization of path capacitance. The role of C-AFM in the optimization of these electro-active materials will be presented. (2) Low dielectric constant (low-k) materials are used in microprocessors as interlayer insulators, a role directly affected by their mechanical performance. The mechanical properties of nanoporous silicate low-k thin films are investigated in a comparative study of nanomechanics measured by AFM and by traditional nanoindentation. Both methods are still undergoing refinement as reliable analytical tools for determining nanomechanical properties. We will focus on AFM, the faster of the two methods, and its developmental challenges of probe shape, cantilever force constant, machine compliance and calibration standards. (3) Magnetic nanoparticles are being explored for their use in patterned media for magnetic storage. Current methods for visualizing the core-shell structure of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles include dye-staining the polymer shell to provide contrast in transmission electron microscopy. AFM-based fast force-volume measurements provide direct visualization of the hard metal oxide core within the soft polymer shell based on structural property differences. In particular, the monitoring of adhesion and deformation between the AFM tip and the nanoparticle, particle-by-particle, provides a reliable qualitative tool to visualize core-shell contrast without the use

  13. Delocalization and occupancy effects of 5f orbitals in plutonium intermetallics using L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C. H.; Medling, S. A.; Jiang, Yu; Bauer, E. D.; Tobash, P. H.; Mitchell, J. N.; Veirs, D. K.; Wall, M. A.; Allen, P. G.; Kas, J. J.; Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T. -C.

    2014-06-24

    Although actinide (An) L3 -edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy has been very effective in determining An oxidation states in insulating, ionically bonded materials, such as in certain coordination compounds and mineral systems, the technique fails in systems featuring more delocalized 5f orbitals, especially in metals. Recently, actinide L3-edge resonant X-ray emission spec- troscopy (RXES) has been shown to be an effective alternative. This technique is further demonstrated here using a parameterized partial unoccupied density of states method to quantify both occupancy and delocalization of the 5f orbital in ?-Pu, ?-Pu, PuCoGa5 , PuCoIn5 , and PuSb2. These new results, supported by FEFF calculations, highlight the effects of strong correlations on RXES spectra and the technique?s ability to differentiate between f-orbital occupation and delocalization.

  14. Characterization of the B/Si surface electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, R.; Yang, X.; Pianetta, P.

    1992-11-01

    High resolution angle resolved core level and valence band photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to characterize the electronic structures of the B/Si(111)-({radical}3 x {radical}3) surfaces. The results have been compared with theoretic calculations and other group III metals and Si terminated Si(111) surfaces that share the same type of surface reconstruction. We have observed a structure evolution from B-T{sub 4} to B-S{sub 5} and finally to Si- T{sub 4} as deposited boron atoms diffuse into the substrate with increasing annealing temperature. The chemically shifted component appearing in the Si 2p core level spectrum is attributed to charge transfer from the top layer Si and Si adatoms to the sublayer B-S{sub 5} atoms. For the Si/Si(111)-({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) surface, a newly discovered chemically shifted component is associated with back bond formation between the Si adatoms and the underneath Si atoms. A new emission feature has been observed in the valence band spectra unique to the B/Si(111)-({radical}3 {times} {radical}3) surface with B-S{sub 5} configuration. Thin Ge layer growth on this structure has also been performed, and we found that no epitaxial growth could be achieved and the underneath structure was little disturbed.

  15. The electronic structure of tetragonal CuO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Simon; Moreschini, Luca; Innocenti, Davide; Chang, Young Jun; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Grioni, Marco

    2012-02-01

    The cupric oxide CuO exhibits an insulating ground state with a correlation-induced charge-transfer gap and antiferromagnetism. It is, in principle, the most straightforward parent compound of the doped cuprates, and therefore has been theoretically studied as a model material for high temperature superconductivity. Bulk CuO crystallizes in a low-symmetry monoclinic form, in contrast to the rocksalt structure typical of late 3d transition metal monoxides. It was recently synthesized by epitaxial growth on SrTiO3 substrates in a higher symmetry tetragonal structure with elongated c-axis (Siemons et al. PRB 79, 2009). Extrapolating the behavior of other 3d transition metal monoxides, this phase of CuO is predicted to have a much higher Neel temperature than its bulk counterpart. At beamline 7 of the Advanced Light Source, we have grown tetragonal CuO thin films by pulsed laser deposition and investigated their electronic structure by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). These measurements represent the first mapping of the band structure of this new material, not available in bulk phase, and will serve as a reference point for future doping experiments.

  16. Insight into the antiferromagnetic structure manipulated by electronic reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, B.; Li, F.; Song, C.; Peng, J. J.; Saleem, M. S.; Gu, Y. D.; Li, S. N.; Wang, K. L.; Pan, F.

    2016-10-01

    Antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials, with robust rigidity to magnetic field perturbations and ultrafast spin dynamics, show great advantages in information storage and have developed into a fast-emerging field of AFM spintronics. However, a direct characterization of spin alignments in AFM films has been challenging, and their manipulation by lattice distortion and magnetic proximity is inevitably accompanied by "ferromagnetic" features within the AFM matrix. Here we resolve the G -type AFM structure of SrCo O2.5 and find that the interfacial AFM structure could be modulated intrinsically from in plane to out of plane with a canted angle of 60∘ by the charge transfer and orbital reconstruction in SrCo O2.5/L a2 /3S r1 /3Mn O3 heterostructures both experimentally and theoretically. Such an interfacial AFM reconfiguration caused by electronic reconstruction does not cause the ferromagnetic feature and changes the magnetization switching process of L a2 /3S r1 /3Mn O3 from in plane to perpendicular to the plane, in turn. Our study not only reveals the coupling between charge, orbital, and AFM structure, but also provides a unique approach to manipulating AFM structure.

  17. The structure of the hydrated electron in bulk and at interfaces: Does the hydrated electron occupy a cavity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Jennifer Ryan

    Since its discovery over fifty years ago, the hydrated electron has been the subject of much interest. Hydrated electrons, which are free electrons in water, are found in fields ranging from biochemistry to radiation chemistry, so it is important that we understand the structure and dynamics of this species. Because of its high reactivity, the hydrated electron's structure has proven difficult to pin down, especially its molecular details. One-electron mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations have proven useful in helping elucidate the structure of the hydrated electron. The picture most commonly presented from these studies is one of the electron residing in a cavity, disrupting the local water structure much like an anion the size of bromide. Our group has recently proposed a completely different structure for the hydrated electron, which arose from rigorous calculations of a new electron-water potential. The picture that emerged was of an electron that does not occupy a cavity but instead draws water within itself; this non-cavity electron resides in a region of enhanced water density. The one-electron cavity and non-cavity models all predict similar experimental observables that probe the electronic structure of the hydrated electron, such as the optical absorption spectrum, which makes it difficult to determine which model most accurately describes the true structure of the hydrated electron. In this thesis, we work to calculate experimental observables for various simulated cavity and non-cavity models that are particularly sensitive to the local water structure near the electron, in an effort to distinguish the various models from each other. Two particular observables we are interested in are the resonance Raman spectrum and the temperature dependent optical absorption spectrum of the hydrated electron. We find that for both of these experiments, only the non-cavity model has qualitative agreement with experiment; the cavity models miss the

  18. Three-Electron Bond Valence-Bond Structures for the Ditetracyanoethylene Dianion.

    PubMed

    Harcourt, Richard D

    2015-05-12

    Using valence-bond structures of the types Ȧ · Ḃ and A∴B or A-̇B to represent diatomic three-electron bonds, two types of valence-bond structures are constructed for the cyclic 6-electron 4-center bonding unit that is present in the ditetracyanoethylene dianion. These latter valence-bond structures, which are obtained by singlet spin-pairing the antibonding electrons of two three-electron bonds, are examples of increased-valence structures. It is shown that increased-valence structures that use the Ȧ · Ḃ three-electron bond structure, which relate easily to their component Lewis structures, should be preferred to those that involve the A∴B or A-̇B three-electron bond structures. STO-6G weights are reported for the two 6-electron 4-center increased-valence structures for the [C2]2(2-) component of the ditetracyanoethylene dianion.

  19. Theoretical investigations into the electronic structures and electron transport properties of fluorine and carbonyl end-functionalized quarterthiophenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Duan, Yuai; Gao, Hong-Ze; Su, Zhong-Мin; Geng, Yun

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we concentrate on systematic investigation on the fluorination and carbonylation effect on electron transport properties of thiophene-based materials with the aim of seeking and designing electron transport materials. Some relative factors, namely, frontier molecular orbital (FMO), vertical electron affinity (VEA), electron reorganization energy (λele), electron transfer integral (tele), electron drift mobility (μele) and band structures have been calculated and discussed based on density functional theory. The results show that the introduction of fluorine atoms and carbonyl group especially for the latter could effectively increase EA and reduce λele, which is beneficial to the improvement of electron transport performance. Furthermore, these introductions could also affect the tele by changing molecular packing manner and distribution of FMO. Finally, according to our calculation, the 3d system is considered to be a promising electron transport material with small λele, high electron transport ability and good ambient stability.

  20. Theoretical investigations into the electronic structures and electron transport properties of fluorine and carbonyl end-functionalized quarterthiophenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Duan, Yuai; Gao, Hong-Ze; Su, Zhong-Мin; Geng, Yun

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we concentrate on systematic investigation on the fluorination and carbonylation effect on electron transport properties of thiophene-based materials with the aim of seeking and designing electron transport materials. Some relative factors, namely, frontier molecular orbital (FMO), vertical electron affinity (VEA), electron reorganization energy (λele), electron transfer integral (tele), electron drift mobility (μele) and band structures have been calculated and discussed based on density functional theory. The results show that the introduction of fluorine atoms and carbonyl group especially for the latter could effectively increase EA and reduce λele, which is beneficial to the improvement of electron transport performance. Furthermore, these introductions could also affect the tele by changing molecular packing manner and distribution of FMO. Finally, according to our calculation, the 3d system is considered to be a promising electron transport material with small λele, high electron transport ability and good ambient stability. PMID:25909689

  1. Electronic structure of ruthenium-doped iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Winiarski, M. J. Samsel-Czekała, M.; Ciechan, A.

    2014-12-14

    The structural and electronic properties of hypothetical Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Se and Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Te systems have been investigated from first principles within the density functional theory (DFT). Reasonable values of lattice parameters and chalcogen atomic positions in the tetragonal unit cell of iron chalcogenides have been obtained with the use of norm-conserving pseudopotentials. The well known discrepancies between experimental data and DFT-calculated results for structural parameters of iron chalcogenides are related to the semicore atomic states which were frozen in the used here approach. Such an approach yields valid results of the electronic structures of the investigated compounds. The Ru-based chalcogenides exhibit the same topology of the Fermi surface (FS) as that of FeSe, differing only in subtle FS nesting features. Our calculations predict that the ground states of RuSe and RuTe are nonmagnetic, whereas those of the solid solutions Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Se and Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Te become the single- and double-stripe antiferromagnetic, respectively. However, the calculated stabilization energy values are comparable for each system. The phase transitions between these magnetic arrangements may be induced by slight changes of the chalcogen atom positions and the lattice parameters a in the unit cell of iron selenides and tellurides. Since the superconductivity in iron chalcogenides is believed to be mediated by the spin fluctuations in single-stripe magnetic phase, the Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Se and Ru{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Te systems are good candidates for new superconducting iron-based materials.

  2. Electronic structure of ruthenium-doped iron chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiarski, M. J.; Samsel-Czekała, M.; Ciechan, A.

    2014-12-01

    The structural and electronic properties of hypothetical RuxFe1-xSe and RuxFe1-xTe systems have been investigated from first principles within the density functional theory (DFT). Reasonable values of lattice parameters and chalcogen atomic positions in the tetragonal unit cell of iron chalcogenides have been obtained with the use of norm-conserving pseudopotentials. The well known discrepancies between experimental data and DFT-calculated results for structural parameters of iron chalcogenides are related to the semicore atomic states which were frozen in the used here approach. Such an approach yields valid results of the electronic structures of the investigated compounds. The Ru-based chalcogenides exhibit the same topology of the Fermi surface (FS) as that of FeSe, differing only in subtle FS nesting features. Our calculations predict that the ground states of RuSe and RuTe are nonmagnetic, whereas those of the solid solutions RuxFe1-xSe and RuxFe1-xTe become the single- and double-stripe antiferromagnetic, respectively. However, the calculated stabilization energy values are comparable for each system. The phase transitions between these magnetic arrangements may be induced by slight changes of the chalcogen atom positions and the lattice parameters a in the unit cell of iron selenides and tellurides. Since the superconductivity in iron chalcogenides is believed to be mediated by the spin fluctuations in single-stripe magnetic phase, the RuxFe1-xSe and RuxFe1-xTe systems are good candidates for new superconducting iron-based materials.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo for electronic structure: Recent developments and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriquez, M. M.S.

    1995-04-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have been found to give excellent results when applied to chemical systems. The main goal of the present work is to use QMC to perform electronic structure calculations. In QMC, a Monte Carlo simulation is used to solve the Schroedinger equation, taking advantage of its analogy to a classical diffusion process with branching. In the present work the author focuses on how to extend the usefulness of QMC to more meaningful molecular systems. This study is aimed at questions concerning polyatomic and large atomic number systems. The accuracy of the solution obtained is determined by the accuracy of the trial wave function`s nodal structure. Efforts in the group have given great emphasis to finding optimized wave functions for the QMC calculations. Little work had been done by systematically looking at a family of systems to see how the best wave functions evolve with system size. In this work the author presents a study of trial wave functions for C, CH, C{sub 2}H and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The goal is to study how to build wave functions for larger systems by accumulating knowledge from the wave functions of its fragments as well as gaining some knowledge on the usefulness of multi-reference wave functions. In a MC calculation of a heavy atom, for reasonable time steps most moves for core electrons are rejected. For this reason true equilibration is rarely achieved. A method proposed by Batrouni and Reynolds modifies the way the simulation is performed without altering the final steady-state solution. It introduces an acceleration matrix chosen so that all coordinates (i.e., of core and valence electrons) propagate at comparable speeds. A study of the results obtained using their proposed matrix suggests that it may not be the optimum choice. In this work the author has found that the desired mixing of coordinates between core and valence electrons is not achieved when using this matrix. A bibliography of 175 references is included.

  4. Analysis of the electronic structure of crystals through band structure unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, A. B.; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we consider an alternative implementation of the band structure unfolding method within the framework of the density functional theory, which combines the advantages of the basis of localized functions and plane waves. This approach has been used to analyze the electronic structure of the ordered CuCl x Br1- x copper halide alloys and F 0 center in MgO that enables us to reveal qualitatively the features remaining hidden when using the standard supercell method, because of the complex band structure of systems with defects.

  5. Development and Applications of Advanced Electronic Structure Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Franziska

    This dissertation contributes to three different areas in electronic structure theory. The first part of this thesis advances the fundamentals of orbital active spaces. Orbital active spaces are not only essential in multi-reference approaches, but have also become of interest in single-reference methods as they allow otherwise intractably large systems to be studied. However, despite their great importance, the optimal choice and, more importantly, their physical significance are still not fully understood. In order to address this problem, we studied the higher-order singular value decomposition (HOSVD) in the context of electronic structure methods. We were able to gain a physical understanding of the resulting orbitals and proved a connection to unrelaxed natural orbitals in the case of Moller-Plesset perturbation theory to second order (MP2). In the quest to find the optimal choice of the active space, we proposed a HOSVD for energy-weighted integrals, which yielded the fastest convergence in MP2 correlation energy for small- to medium-sized active spaces to date, and is also potentially transferable to coupled-cluster theory. In the second part, we studied monomeric and dimeric glycerol radical cations and their photo-induced dissociation in collaboration with Prof. Leone and his group. Understanding the mechanistic details involved in these processes are essential for further studies on the combustion of glycerol and carbohydrates. To our surprise, we found that in most cases, the experimentally observed appearance energies arise from the separation of product fragments from one another rather than rearrangement to products. The final chapters of this work focus on the development, assessment, and application of the spin-flip method, which is a single-reference approach, but capable of describing multi-reference problems. Systems exhibiting multi-reference character, which arises from the (near-) degeneracy of orbital energies, are amongst the most

  6. Electronic structure calculations of group III nitride clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandalam, Anil Kumar

    2002-04-01

    Group III nitrides have become materials of choice in the manufacturing of devices used in opto-electronic and high-temperature high-power electronic industries. Hence, these materials received wide attention and have become the focus of several theoretical and experimental studies. Though these materials are studied in bulk and thin film forms, research at the cluster level is still lacking. Hence, a first principles calculation, based on the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA) to Density Functional Theory (DFT) was initiated to study the structural and electronic properties of AlnN n, GanNn, and InnNn, (n = 1--6) clusters. The calculated results show that the small polyatomic nitride clusters (monomer, triatomic and dimer) have a strong tendency to form N-N multiple bonds leading to the weakening of any existent metal-N or metal-metal bonds. In the absence of the N-N bonds, the metal-nitrogen bond dominates, forming short bond-lengths and large force constants. However, the strength of these heteronuclear bonds decreases in going from Al to Ga and In, whereas the weak metal-metal bond increases its strength from Al to Ga to In in the nitride clusters. Starting from the trimers M3N3, a distinct structural difference between the lowest energy configurations of AlnNn and that of GanNn, and In nNn, clusters has been observed. For AlnNn, clusters, the metal-nitrogen bond is found to dominate the lowest energy configurations. As the cluster size is increased from Al3N3 to Al 6N6, a transition from planar ring structures towards a bulk-like three dimensional configurations is seen. However, in GanN n, and InnNn clusters, no such trend is observed and the lowest energy configurations are dominated either by N2 or (N3)- sub-units. The segregation of N atoms within the stoichiometric clusters indicates the possibility of N2 and N3 based defects in the thin-film deposition process which may affect the quality of the thin-film devices based on Group III nitrides.

  7. Quantitative imaging reveals real-time Pou5f3–Nanog complexes driving dorsoventral mesendoderm patterning in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Camps, Mireia; Tian, Jing; Chng, Serene C; Sem, Kai Pin; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Teh, Cathleen; Wachsmuth, Malte; Korzh, Vladimir; Ahmed, Sohail; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the three embryonic germ layers is a fundamental developmental process that initiates differentiation. How the zebrafish pluripotency factor Pou5f3 (homologous to mammalian Oct4) drives lineage commitment is unclear. Here, we introduce fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to assess the formation of Pou5f3 complexes with other transcription factors in real-time in gastrulating zebrafish embryos. We show, at single-cell resolution in vivo, that Pou5f3 complexes with Nanog to pattern mesendoderm differentiation at the blastula stage. Later, during gastrulation, Sox32 restricts Pou5f3–Nanog complexes to the ventrolateral mesendoderm by binding Pou5f3 or Nanog in prospective dorsal endoderm. In the ventrolateral endoderm, the Elabela / Aplnr pathway limits Sox32 levels, allowing the formation of Pou5f3–Nanog complexes and the activation of downstream BMP signaling. This quantitative model shows that a balance in the spatiotemporal distribution of Pou5f3–Nanog complexes, modulated by Sox32, regulates mesendoderm specification along the dorsoventral axis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11475.001 PMID:27684073

  8. Efficient gene transfer into normal human B lymphocytes with the chimeric adenoviral vector Ad5/F35.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daniel; Néron, Sonia; Drouin, Mathieu; Jacques, Annie

    2005-09-01

    The failure to efficiently introduce genes into normal cells such as human B lymphocytes limits the characterization of their function on cellular growth, differentiation and survival. Recent studies have shown that a new adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 can efficiently transduce human haematopoietic CD34+ progenitor cells. In this study, we compared the gene transfer efficiencies of the Ad5/F35 vector to that of the parental vector Ad5 in human B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells obtained from healthy individuals were cultured in vitro using CD40-CD154 system. Normal B lymphocytes were infected with replication-defectives Ad5 and Ad5/F35, both containing the GFP reporter gene, and transduction efficiencies were monitored by flow cytometry. Ad5 was highly ineffective, infecting only about 5% of human B lymphocytes. In contrast, Ad5/F35 transduced up to 60% of human B lymphocytes and GFP expression could be detected for up to 5 days post infection. Importantly, physiology of B lymphocytes such as proliferation, viability and antibodies secretion were unaffected following Ad5/F35 transduction. Finally, we observed that memory B lymphocytes were more susceptible to Ad5/F35 infection than naïve B lymphocytes. Thus, our results demonstrate that the adenoviral vector Ad5/F35 is an efficient tool for the functional characterization of genes in B lymphopoiesis.

  9. Electronic structure of f{sup 1} actinide complexes. 1. Nonrelativistic and relativistic calculations of the optical transition energies of AnX{sub 6}{sup q{minus}} complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltsoyannis, N.; Bursten, B.E.

    1995-05-10

    The ground-state electronic structures of PaX{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} (X = F, Cl, Br, I), UX{sub 6}{sup {minus}} (X = F, Cl, Br), and NpF{sub 6} have been calculated, using both nonrelativistic implementations of the discrete-variational X{alpha} (DV-X{alpha}) method. A significant amount of metal-ligand covalent bonding is found, involving both 6d and 5f metal orbitals. The 5f contribution to the bonding levels increases significantly from PaX{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} to UX{sub 6}{sup {minus}} to NpF{sub 6} but remains approximately constant as the halogen is altered in PaX{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} and UX{sub 6}{sup {minus}}. In contrast, the 6d atomic orbital character of the halogen-based levels increases from UF{sub 6}{sup {minus}} to UBr{sub 6}{sup {minus}} and a similar, through less marked, trend is observed in PaX{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}. The electronic transition energies have been calculated using the transition state method. The relativistic calculations are far superior to the nonrelativistic ones in both qualitatively and quantitatively describing the electronic spectra. The stabilization of the metal 5f atomic orbitals with respect to the halogen np levels from protactinium to neptunium results in the more energetic f {yields} f transitions in NpF{sub 6} being masked by the onset of a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer band. In the remaining molecules, the f {yields} F transitions in NpF{sub 6} being masked by the onset of a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer band. In the remaining molecules, the f {yields} f transitions occur well removed from charge-transfer bands.

  10. Quasiparticle electronic structure of bismuth telluride in the GW approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Tiago, Murilo L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2010-12-01

    The quasiparticle band structure of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) , an important thermoelectric material that exhibits topologically insulating surface states, is calculated from first principles in the GW approximation. The quasiparticle energies are evaluated in fine detail in the first Brillouin zone using a Wannier-function interpolation method, allowing the accurate determination of the location of the band extrema (which is in the mirror plane) as well as the values of the quasiparticle band gap (0.17 eV) and effective-mass tensors. Spin-orbit interaction effects were included. The valence band exhibits two distinct maxima in the mirror plane that differ by just 1 meV, giving rise to one direct and one indirect band gap of very similar magnitude. The effective-mass tensors are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The Wannier interpolation coefficients can be used for the tight-binding parametrization of the band structure. Our work elucidates the electronic structure of Bi2Te3 and sheds light on its exceptional thermoelectric and topologically insulating properties.

  11. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Gámez-Corrales, R.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ˜2 nm, lengths of approximately 100-300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ˜0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH-MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH-MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  12. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A.; Gámez-Corrales, R.

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  13. Cryo-Electron Tomography for Structural Characterization of Macromolecular Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Julia; Heumann, John; Hoenger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging 3-D reconstruction technology that combines the principles of tomographic 3-D reconstruction with the unmatched structural preservation of biological material embedded in vitreous ice. Cryo-ET is particularly suited to investigating cell-biological samples and large macromolecular structures that are too polymorphic to be reconstructed by classical averaging-based 3-D reconstruction procedures. This unit aims to make cryo-ET accessible to newcomers and discusses the specialized equipment required, as well as the relevant advantages and hurdles associated with sample preparation by vitrification and cryo-ET. Protocols describe specimen preparation, data recording and 3-D data reconstruction for cryo-ET, with a special focus on macromolecular complexes. A step-by-step procedure for specimen vitrification by plunge freezing is provided, followed by the general practicalities of tilt-series acquisition for cryo-ET, including advice on how to select an area appropriate for acquiring a tilt series. A brief introduction to the underlying computational reconstruction principles applied in tomography is described, along with instructions for reconstructing a tomogram from cryo-tilt series data. Finally, a method is detailed for extracting small subvolumes containing identical macromolecular structures from tomograms for alignment and averaging as a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminate missing wedge effects inherent in tomographic reconstructions. PMID:21842467

  14. Cryo-electron tomography for structural characterization of macromolecular complexes.

    PubMed

    Cope, Julia; Heumann, John; Hoenger, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) is an emerging 3-D reconstruction technology that combines the principles of tomographic 3-D reconstruction with the unmatched structural preservation of biological matter embedded in vitreous ice. Cryo-ET is particularly suited to investigating cell-biological samples and large macromolecular structures that are too polymorphic to be reconstructed by classical averaging-based 3-D reconstruction procedures. This unit aims to make cryo-ET accessible to newcomers and discusses the specialized equipment required, as well as relevant advantages and hurdles associated with sample preparation by vitrification and cryo-ET. Protocols describe specimen preparation, data recording and 3-D data reconstruction for cryo-ET, with a special focus on macromolecular complexes. A step-by-step procedure for specimen vitrification by plunge freezing is provided, followed by the general practicalities of tilt-series acquisition for cryo-ET, including advice on how to select an area appropriate for acquiring a tilt series. A brief introduction to the underlying computational reconstruction principles applied in tomography is described, along with instructions for reconstructing a tomogram from cryo-tilt series data. Finally, a method is detailed for extracting small subvolumes containing identical macromolecular structures from tomograms for alignment and averaging as a means to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminate missing wedge effects inherent in tomographic reconstructions.

  15. Core-hole effect on XANES and electronic structure of minor actinide dioxides with fluorite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Chikashi; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Nakada, Masami; Akabori, Mitsuo; Hirata, Masaru; Kaji, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    The authors investigated theoretically core-hole effects on X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES) of Np and Am LIII in neptunium dioxide (NpO2) and americium dioxide (AmO2) with CaF2-type crystal lattices using the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FP-LAPW) method. The peak creation mechanism of XANES was shown by examining the electronic structures of these oxides, which indicated that core-hole screening was more marked for AmO2 than for NpO2 because of the difference in the charge transfer between these oxides. Furthermore, the results of charge density analysis suggested that the white line was assigned to the quasi-bound state composed of the localized Np d or Am d components and O components, and that the tail structure was created as a result of delocalized standing waves between the Np or Am atoms.

  16. Fine Structure in the Secondary Electron Emission Peak for Diamond Crystal with (100) Negative Electron Affinity Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asnin, V. M.; Krainsky, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    A fine structure was discovered in the low-energy peak of the secondary electron emission spectra of the diamond surface with negative electron affinity. We studied this structure for the (100) surface of the natural type-IIb diamond crystal. We have found that the low-energy peak consists of a total of four maxima. The relative energy positions of three of them could be related to the electron energy minima near the bottom of the conduction band. The fourth peak, having the lowest energy, was attributed to the breakup of the bulk exciton at the surface during the process of secondary electron emission.

  17. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. PMID:26656466

  18. Nuclear structure and depletion of nuclear isomers using electron linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J. J.; Litz, M. S.; Henriquez, S. L.; Burns, D. A.; Netherton, K. A.; Pereira, N. R.; Karamian, S. A.

    2013-04-19

    Long-lived nuclear excited states (isomers) have proven important to understanding nuclear structure. With some isomers having half-lives of decades or longer, and intrinsic energy densities reaching 10{sup 12} J/kg, they have also been suggested for a wide range of applications. The ability to effectively transfer a population of nuclei from an isomer to shorter-lived levels will determine the feasibility of any applications. Here is described a first demonstration of the induced depletion of a population of the 438 year isomer of {sup 108}Ag to its 2.38 min ground state, using 6 MeV bremsstrahlung from a modified medical electron linac. The experiment suggests refinements to be implemented in the future and how a similar approach might be applied to study induced depletion of the 1200 year isomer of {sup 166}Ho.

  19. Electronic structure of acceptor-donor complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoro, E.; Ohama, Y.; Hayafuji, Y.

    2003-10-01

    The electronic structure of trimer acceptor-donor complexes in silicon Si clusters is studied using the ab initio discrete variational-Xα molecular-orbital (MO) method. The trimer complexes In2D (D=phosphorus P, arsenic As, antimony Sb, or bismuth Bi) consist of two indium In acceptor elements and a centered donor element D from the group V elements. Calculations are performed under the assumption that the three atoms are arranged in the nearest neighbor substitutional trimer configuration. Results indicate that the trimer complexes act as shallower acceptors having smaller ionization activation energies than In acceptor. The potential of In2D as an acceptor in Si is then discussed and In2D is proposed as a promising acceptor for the formation of channels and source/drains in ultralarge scaled integration.

  20. Electronic structure of aluminum nitride: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Loughin, S.; French, R.H. ); Ching, W.Y.; Xu, Y.N. ); Slack, G.A. )

    1993-08-30

    We report the results of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) study of single crystal and polycrystalline AlN over the range 4--40 eV and compare these with theoretical optical properties calculated from first principles using an orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals in the local density approximation. The electronic structure of AlN has a two-dimensional (2D) character indicated by logarithmic divergences at 8.7 and 14 eV. These mark the centers of two sets of 2D critical points which are associated with N 2[ital p][r arrow]Al 3[ital s] transitions and Al=N[r arrow]Al 3[ital p] transitions, respectively. A third feature is centered at 33 eV and associated with N 2[ital s][r arrow]Al 3[ital d] transitions.

  1. Electronic structure calculations of hexaborides and boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ripplinger, H.; Schwarz, K.; Blaha, P.

    1997-10-01

    The electronic structures of several CaB{sub 6}-type hexaborides and boron carbide, B{sub 4}C, are studied by the full potential linearized-augmented plane-wave (LAPW) method within density functional theory. The hexaborides contain inter- and intra-octahedral boron-boron bonds, which under pressure decrease approximately linearly; however, the former shrinks more than the latter, consistent with Raman spectra and a simple spring constant model. The boron-boron dumbbell is stronger than the intraoctahedral bonds. For boron carbide several substitutions of the three-atom chain are simulated (BBC, BCB, CBC, CCB, and CCC). Trends in the charge distribution are analyzed and electric field gradient calculations compared to nuclear quadrupole coupling constant measurements show that B must be in the center position.

  2. Device structure for electronic transport through individual molecules using nanoelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subhasis; Halimun, Henny; Mahapatro, Ajit Kumar; Choi, Jaewon; Lodha, Saurabh; Janes, David

    2005-12-01

    We present a simple and reliable method for making electrical contacts to small organic molecules with thiol endgroups. Nanometer-scale gaps between metallic electrodes have been fabricated by passing a large current through a lithographically-patterned Au-line with appropriate thickness. Under appropriate conditions, the passage of current breaks the Au-line, creating two opposite facing electrodes separated by a gap comparable to the length of small organic molecules. Current-voltage characteristics have been measured both before and after deposition of short organic molecules. The resistance of single 1,4-benzenedithiol and 1,4-bezenedimethanedithiol molecules were found to be 9MΩ and 26MΩ, respectively. The experimental results indicate strong electronic coupling to the contacts and are discussed using a relatively simple model of mesoscopic transport. The use of electrodes formed on an insulating surface by lithography and electromigration provides a stable structure suitable for integrated circuit applications.

  3. Electron microscopy: essentials for viral structure, morphogenesis and rapid diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Hung, Tao; Song, Jingdong; He, Jinsheng

    2013-05-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) should be used in the front line for detection of agents in emergencies and bioterrorism, on accounts of its speed and accuracy. However, the number of EM diagnostic laboratories has decreased considerably and an increasing number of people encounter difficulties with EM results. Therefore, the research on viral structure and morphologyant in EM diagnostic practice. EM has several technological advantages, and should be a fundamental tool in clinical diagnosis of viruses, particularly when agents are unknown or unsuspected. In this article, we review the historical contribution of EM to virology, and its use in virus differentiation, localization of specific virus antigens, virus-cell interaction, and viral morphogenesis. It is essential that EM investigations are based on clinical and comprehensive pathogenesis data from light or confocal microscopy. Furthermore, avoidance of artifacts or false results is necessary to exploit fully the advantages while minimizing its limitations.

  4. Berry Phases and Curvatures in Electronic-Structure Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderbilt, David

    2006-03-01

    In the last fifteen years, Berry phases have been found to play an increasingly important role in electronic-structure theory. I will briefly review some of the important developments in which Berry phases have been involved, starting with the modern theory of polarization^1 and the closely related theory of Wannier functions and their Wannier centers.^2 Next, I will discuss the theory of insulators in finite electric fields,^3 in which the field is taken to couple linearly to the Berry-phase polarization. I will then conclude by discussing the role of Berry phases and Berry curvatures in systems in which time-reversal symmetry has been broken, and in particular, the theory of orbital magnetization^4 and the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets. *[[1

  5. Optical Properties and Electronic Structure of CaO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. V.; Merzlyakov, D. A.; Sobolev, V. Val.

    2016-09-01

    Spectra of 11 optical functions of CaO in the ranges 6.5-7.2 eV at 2 K and 0-60 eV at 77 K were determined. A total of 14 maxima and shoulders of excitons and interband transitions were found including two distinct exciton structures at 6.9 and 11.4 eV and volume and surface plasmon maxima at ~38.3 and 33.2 eV, respectively. Their principal features and general trends were established. Variable formation efficiencies of spectra of the dielectric permittivity and characteristic electron-energy losses in different spectral ranges were analyzed. The calculations used known experimental reflectance spectra and computer programs based on the Kramers-Kronig correlations and analytical formulae for the relationship between optical functions.

  6. Electron fractionalization in two-dimensional graphenelike structures.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Chamon, Claudio; Mudry, Christopher

    2007-05-01

    Electron fractionalization is intimately related to topology. In one-dimensional systems, fractionally charged states exist at domain walls between degenerate vacua. In two-dimensional systems, fractionalization exists in quantum Hall fluids, where time-reversal symmetry is broken by a large external magnetic field. Recently, there has been a tremendous effort in the search for examples of fractionalization in two-dimensional systems with time-reversal symmetry. In this Letter, we show that fractionally charged topological excitations exist on graphenelike structures, where quasiparticles are described by two flavors of Dirac fermions and time-reversal symmetry is respected. The topological zero modes are mathematically similar to fractional vortices in p-wave superconductors. They correspond to a twist in the phase in the mass of the Dirac fermions, akin to cosmic strings in particle physics. PMID:17501599

  7. Energetics and Electronic Structure of h-BN Nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We studied the energetics and electronic structure of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoribbons with hydrogenated and clean edges with respect to the detailed edge shapes using density functional theory. Our calculations showed that the stability of h-BN edges strongly depends on the edge termination. In the case of hydrogenated edges, the formation energy is constant for all edge angles ranging from armchair to zigzag, indicating that h-BN may exhibit rich variation in their edge atomic arrangements under static conditions. The hydrogenated h-BN nanoribbons are insulators with an energy gap of 4 eV irrespective of edge shape, in which the lowest branch of the conduction band exhibits nearly free electron states nature distributed in the vacuum region outside the ribbons. In contrast, the formation energy of h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges monotonically increases as the edge angle is changed from armchair to zigzag. Our analysis reveals that the increase of density of states at the Fermi level arising from dangling bond states leads to this monotonic increase of edge formation energy in h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges. PMID:27481626

  8. An Investigation of Magnetic, Electronic and Structural Properties of Metallofullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, S. Vincent; Qian, Meichun; Khanna, Shiv

    2008-03-01

    Gadolinium based endohedral metallofullerenes Gd3N@C80 functionalized with OH radicals have been found to enhance the relaxivity by orders of magnitude over conventional agents and are being sought as new contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using state of the art density functional theory (DFT) in the regime of the local density approximation with the on-site Coulomb interaction (LSDA+U), we have carried out theoretical studies to determine the electronic and magnetic properties of gadolinium-based and lutetium-based nitride fullerenes, namely Lu3-xGdxN@C80 (x = 1-2). While Gd3N@C80 has previously shown promising features as a contrast agent, the idea of replacing gadolinium atoms by lutetium has been proposed to result in a mixed-metal species for multi-modal imaging. Our results indicate that Lu2GdN@C80 is the most stable of all possible configurations with a binding energy 16.57 eV, can be considered for use as both an MRI contrast agent, due to gadolinium's high magnetic moment, and as a potential radioactive therapeutic or diagnostic agent, by neutron activation of a lutetium radioisotope. These results along with details of electronic structure will be presented.

  9. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc ~ 3 K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc ~ 2.5 K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excited topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. Our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials. PMID:26936229

  10. Electronic Structure of Helium Atom in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jayanta K.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2016-03-01

    Bound and resonance states of helium atom have been investigated inside a quantum dot by using explicitly correlated Hylleraas type basis set within the framework of stabilization method. To be specific, precise energy eigenvalues of bound 1sns (1Se) (n = 1-6) states and the resonance parameters i.e. positions and widths of 1Se states due to 2sns (n = 2-5) and 2pnp (n = 2-5) configurations of confined helium below N = 2 ionization threshold of He+ have been estimated. The two-parameter (Depth and Width) finite oscillator potential is used to represent the confining potential due to the quantum dot. It has been explicitly demonstrated that the electronic structural properties become sensitive functions of the dot size. It is observed from the calculations of ionization potential that the stability of an impurity ion within a quantum dot may be manipulated by varying the confinement parameters. A possibility of controlling the autoionization lifetime of doubly excited states of two-electron ions by tuning the width of the quantum cavity is also discussed here. TKM Gratefully Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. 37(3)/14/27/2014-BRNS from the Department of Atomic Energy, BRNS, Government of India. SB Acknowledges Financial Support under Grant No. PSW-160/14-15(ERO) from University Grants Commission, Government of India

  11. Electronic structure characterization and bandgap engineeringofsolar hydrogen materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2007-11-01

    Bandgap, band edge positions as well as the overall band structure of semiconductors are of crucial importance in photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic applications. The energy position of the band edge level can be controlled by the electronegativity of the dopants, the pH of the solution (flatband potential variation of 60 mV per pH unit), as well as by quantum confinement effects. Accordingly, band edges and bandgap can be tailored to achieve specific electronic, optical or photocatalytic properties. Synchrotron radiation with photon energy at or below 1 keV is giving new insight into such areas as condensed matter physics and extreme ultraviolet optics technology. In the soft x-ray region, the question tends to be, what are the electrons doing as they migrated between the atoms. In this paper, I will present a number of soft x-ray spectroscopic study of nanostructured 3d metal compounds Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZnO.

  12. Energetics and Electronic Structure of h-BN Nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2016-08-01

    We studied the energetics and electronic structure of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoribbons with hydrogenated and clean edges with respect to the detailed edge shapes using density functional theory. Our calculations showed that the stability of h-BN edges strongly depends on the edge termination. In the case of hydrogenated edges, the formation energy is constant for all edge angles ranging from armchair to zigzag, indicating that h-BN may exhibit rich variation in their edge atomic arrangements under static conditions. The hydrogenated h-BN nanoribbons are insulators with an energy gap of 4 eV irrespective of edge shape, in which the lowest branch of the conduction band exhibits nearly free electron states nature distributed in the vacuum region outside the ribbons. In contrast, the formation energy of h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges monotonically increases as the edge angle is changed from armchair to zigzag. Our analysis reveals that the increase of density of states at the Fermi level arising from dangling bond states leads to this monotonic increase of edge formation energy in h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges.

  13. Electronic Structure Engineering of Elpasolites for Brighter and Faster Scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Biswas, Koushik

    2013-03-01

    Utilization of scintillator materials is one of the primary methods for radiation detection. Elpasolites are a large family of quaternary halides that have attracted considerable interest for their potential applications as γ-ray and neutron scintillators. However, many elpasolite scintillator materials currently under development suffer from low light yield and long scintillation decay time. The low light yield is partially due to a large band gap while the long scintillation decay time is a result of slow carrier transport to Ce dopants, where electrons and holes recombine to emit photons. We suggest that these problems may be mitigated by optimizing the band gap and carrier mobility by selecting constituent elements of proper electronegativity. For example, cations with lower electronegativity may lower the conduction band and increase the conduction band dispersion simultaneously, resulting in higher light yield and faster scintillation. First-principles calculations of electronic structure, small polarons, and Ce dopants in Cs2LiYCl6 and Cs2AgYCl6 compounds show that the strategy of manipulating electronegativity can lead to brighter and faster elpasolite-based scintillators. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development NA22.

  14. Electronic structure and phase equilibria in ternary substitutional alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Traiber, A.J.S.; Allen, S.M.; Turchi, P.E.A.; Waterstrat, R.M.

    1996-04-26

    A reliable, consistent scheme to study phase equilibria in ternary substitutional alloys based on the tight-binding approximation is presented. With electronic parameters from linear muffin-tin orbital calculations, the computed density of states and band structures compare well with those from more accurate {ital ab}{ital initio} calculations. Disordered alloys are studied within the tight-binding coherent-potential approximation extended to alloys; energetics of ordered systems are obtained through effective pair interactions computed with the general perturbation method; and partially ordered alloys are studied with a novel simplification of the molecular coherent-potential approximation combined with the general perturbation method. The formalism is applied to bcc-based Zr-Ru-Pd alloys which are promising candidates for medical implant devices. Using energetics obtained from the above scheme, we apply the cluster- variation method to study phase equilibria for particular pseudo- binary alloys and show that results are consistent with observed behavior of electronic specific heat coefficient with composition for Zr{sub 0.5}(Ru, Pd){sub 0.5}.

  15. Electronic structure and relaxation dynamics in a superconducting topological material

    DOE PAGES

    Neupane, Madhab; Ishida, Yukiaki; Sankar, Raman; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M. Mofazzel; Shin, Shik; et al

    2016-03-03

    Topological superconductors host new states of quantum matter which show a pairing gap in the bulk and gapless surface states providing a platform to realize Majorana fermions. Recently, alkaline-earth metal Sr intercalated Bi2Se3 has been reported to show superconductivity with a Tc~3K and a large shielding fraction. Here we report systematic normal state electronic structure studies of Sr0.06Bi2Se3 (Tc~2.5K) by performing photoemission spectroscopy. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), we observe a quantum well confined two-dimensional (2D) state coexisting with a topological surface state in Sr0.06Bi2Se3. Furthermore, our time-resolved ARPES reveals the relaxation dynamics showing different decay mechanism between the excitedmore » topological surface states and the two-dimensional states. Our experimental observation is understood by considering the intra-band scattering for topological surface states and an additional electron phonon scattering for the 2D states, which is responsible for the superconductivity. Our first-principles calculations agree with the more effective scattering and a shorter lifetime of the 2D states. In conclusion, our results will be helpful in understanding low temperature superconducting states of these topological materials.« less

  16. Energetics and Electronic Structure of h-BN Nanoflakes

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    We studied the energetics and electronic structure of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) nanoribbons with hydrogenated and clean edges with respect to the detailed edge shapes using density functional theory. Our calculations showed that the stability of h-BN edges strongly depends on the edge termination. In the case of hydrogenated edges, the formation energy is constant for all edge angles ranging from armchair to zigzag, indicating that h-BN may exhibit rich variation in their edge atomic arrangements under static conditions. The hydrogenated h-BN nanoribbons are insulators with an energy gap of 4 eV irrespective of edge shape, in which the lowest branch of the conduction band exhibits nearly free electron states nature distributed in the vacuum region outside the ribbons. In contrast, the formation energy of h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges monotonically increases as the edge angle is changed from armchair to zigzag. Our analysis reveals that the increase of density of states at the Fermi level arising from dangling bond states leads to this monotonic increase of edge formation energy in h-BN nanoribbons with clean edges. PMID:27481626

  17. Electronic structure of BaO/W cathode surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    The local electronic structure of the emissive layer of barium dispenser thermionic cathodes is investigated theoretically using the relativistic scattered-wave approach. The interaction of Ba and O with W, Os, and W-Os alloy surfaces is studied with atomic clusters modeling different absorption environments representative of B- and M-type cathodes. Ba is found to be strongly oxidized, while O and the metal substrate are in a reduced chemical state. The presence of O enhances the surface dipole and Ba binding energy relative to Ba on W. Model results for W-Os alloy substrates show only relatively small changes in Ba and O for identical geometries, but very large charge redistributions inside the substrate, which are attributed to the electronegativity difference between Os and W. If Os is present in the surface layer, the charge transfer from Ba to the substrate and the Ba binding energy increase relative to W. Explanations are offered for the improved electron emission from alloy surfaces and the different emission enhancement for different alloy substrates.

  18. Electronic structure of Co-doped ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neffati, Ahmed; Souissi, Hajer; Kammoun, Souha

    2012-10-01

    The optical transmission spectra, the photoluminescence (PL), and the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods Zn1-xCoxO (x = 0.01, 0.10) were measured by Loan et al. [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42, 065412 (2009)] in the region 1.5-4 eV. These spectra exhibit a group of ultraviolet narrow lines in the region of 3.0-3.4 eV related to the near-band-edge emission of the host ZnO materials and a group of emission lines in the red region of 1.8-1.9 eV assigned to the radiative transitions within the tetrahedral Co2+ ions in the ZnO host crystal. The group of lines in the visible region provides important information about the electronic structure of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the visible lines associated to the Co2+ ion transition occupying a Td site symmetry in ZnO host crystal. A satisfactory correlations were obtained between experimental and calculated energy levels. The electronic structure was compared with the reported for cobalt transition ion doped in ZnO nanoparticles and bulk crystals [Volbers et al., Appl. Phys. A 88, 153 (2007) and H. J. Schulz and M. Thiede, Phys. Rev. B 35, 18 (1987)]. In order to explain the existence of excitation peaks observed near the band edge of the ZnO host, an energy transfer mechanism is proposed.

  19. Structure and Electronic Properties of Ionized PAH Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian L.; Sabbah, Hassan; Bonnamy, Anthony; Dontot, Leo; Rapacioli, Mathias; Simon, Aude; Spiegelman, Fernand; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Falvo, Cyril; Gamboa, Antonio; Brechignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been proposed as candidates for evaporating very small grains that are revealed by their mid-IR emission at the surface of UV-irradiated clouds in interstellar space. This suggestion is a motivation for further characterization of the properties of these clusters in particular when they are ionized. We have used a molecular beam coupled to the photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer DELICIOUS II/ III at the VUV beamline DESIRS of the synchrotron SOLEIL to characterize the electronic properties of cationic coronene (C24H12) and pyrene (C16H10) clusters up to the pentamer and heptamer, respectively. These experimental results are analysed in the light of electronic structure calculations. Simulations of the properties of ionized PAH clusters are faced with the difficulty of describing charge delocalization in these large systems. We will show that recent developments combining a Density Functional Tight Binding method with Configuration Interaction scheme is successful in simulating the ionization potential, which gives strong confidence into the predicted structures for these PAH clusters. We will also present current effort to study charge transfer states by performing complementary measurements with the PIRENEA ion trap set-up. Joint ANR project GASPARIM, ANR-10-BLAN-501 M. Rapacioli, C. Joblin and P. Boissel Astron. & Astrophys., 429 (2005), 193-204. G. Garcia, H. Soldi-Lose and L. Nahon Rev. Sci. Instrum., 80 (2009), 023102; G. Garcia, B. Cunha de Miranda, M. Tia, S. Daly, L. Nahon, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 84 (2013), 053112 M. Rapacioli, A. Simon, L. Dontot and F. Spiegelman Phys. Status Solidi B, 249 (2) (2012), 245-258; L. Dontot, M. Rapacioli and F. Spiegelman (2014) submitted

  20. Electronic Structure of Germanium Nanocrystal Films Probed with Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bostedt, C

    2002-05-01

    The fundamental structure--property relationship of semiconductor quantum dots has been investigated. For deposited germanium nanocrystals strong quantum confinement effects have been determined with synchrotron radiation based x-ray absorption and photoemission techniques. The nanocrystals are condensed out of the gas phase with a narrow size distribution and subsequently deposited in situ onto various substrates. The particles are crystalline in the cubic phase with a structurally disordered surface shell and the resulting film morphology depends strongly on the substrate material and condition. The disordered surface region has an impact on the overall electronic structure of the particles. In a size-dependent study, the conduction and valence band edge of germanium nanocrystals have been measured for the first time and compared to the bulk crystal. The band edges move to higher energies as the particle size is decreased, consistent with quantum confinement theory. To obtain a more accurate analysis of confinement effects in the empty states, a novel analysis method utilizing an effective particle size for the x-ray absorption experiment, which allows a deconvolution of absorption edge broadening effects, has been introduced. Comparison of the present study to earlier studies on silicon reveals that germanium exhibits stronger quantum confinement effects than silicon. Below a critical particle size of 2.3 {+-} 0.7 nm, the band gap of germanium becomes larger than that of silicon--even if it is the opposite for bulk materials. This result agrees phenomenologically with effective mass and tight binding theories but contradicts the findings of recent pseudopotential calculations. The discrepancy between theory and experiments is attributed to the differences in the theoretical models and experimental systems. The experimentally observed structural disorder of the particle surface has to be included in the theoretical models.