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Sample records for 5prime splice donor

  1. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  2. A novel point mutation (G[sup [minus]1] to T) in a 5[prime] splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Yoko; Nishio, Hisahide; Kitoh, Yoshihiko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Narita, Naoko; Wada, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Hajime; Matsuo, Masafumi )

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. The authors now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5[prime] splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5[prime] splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G[sup [minus]1]-to-T mutation at the 5[prime] splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection. 48 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Analysis by illegitimate transcription of a mutation in the 5{prime} splice site in exon 8 of the PAH gene

    SciTech Connect

    Desviat, L.R.; Perez, B.; Ugarte, M.

    1994-09-01

    Up to now, 12 splice defects have been described within the PAH gene. Using PCR-SSCP and sequence analysis we have found a point mutation involving the last nucleotide in exon 8 (CAG/CAA). The G to A substitution does not alter the amino acid (Q204Q), but it may cause a splice defect, as it is included in the 5{prime} splice donor site, and the G at this position is highly conserved (80%) in all eukaryotic genes. We have analyzed by illegitimate transcription the PAH mRNA in lymphocytes of a patient bearing the mutation in a heterozygous fashion. After RT-PCR we observed once the appearance of an extra larger band, which could be due to the use of a cryptic splice site instead of the mutated one. Furthermore, sequencing of 6 clones of the band of expected size in the patient revealed that all had the normal sequence, in spite of the G to A substitution being found in the genomic DNA. In view of these results, we believe that the larger extra band represents the allele with the mutation which causes a highly unstable mis-spliced RNA. This splice defect could be, therefore, the disease causing mutation in the patient.

  4. Insertion of part of an intron into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a Caenorhabditis elegans gene converts it into a trans-spliced gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, R.; Thomas, J.; Spieth, J.; Blumenthal, T. )

    1991-04-01

    In nematodes, the RNA products of some genes are trans-spliced to a 22-nucleotide spliced leader (SL), while the RNA products of other genes are not. In Caenorhabditis elegans, there are two SLs, Sl1 and SL2, donated by two distinct small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in a process functionally quite similar to nuclear intron removal. The authors demonstrate here that it is possible to convert a non-trans-spliced gene into a trans-spliced gene by placement of an intron missing only the 5[prime] splice site into the 5[prime] untranslated region. Stable transgenic strains were isolated expressing a gene in which 69 nucleotides of a vit-5 intron, including the 3[prime] splice site, were inserted into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene. The RNA product of this gene was examined by primer extension and PCR amplification. Although the vit-2/vit-6 transgene product is not normally trans-spliced, the majority of transcripts from this altered gene were trans-spliced to SL1. They termed the region of a trans-spliced mRNA precursor between the 5[prime] end and the first 3[prime] splice site an 'outrun'. The results suggest that if a transcript begins with intronlike sequence followed by a 3[prime] splice site, this alone may constitute an outrun and be sufficient to demarcate a transcript as a trans-splice acceptor. These findings leave open the possibility that specific sequences are required to increase the efficiency of trans-splicing.

  5. The human decorin gene: Intron-exon organization, discovery of two alternatively spliced exons in the 5[prime] untralsated region, and mapping of the gene to chromosome 12q23

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, K.G.; Fazzio, A.; Cohen, I.; Cannizzaro, L.A.; Eichstetter, I.; Iozzo, R.V. )

    1993-01-01

    Decorin is a chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan expressed by most vascular and avascular connective tissues and, because of its ability to interact with collagen and growth factors, has been implicated in the control of matrix assembly and cellular growth. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in regulating its tissue expression, we have isolated a number of genomic clones encoding the complete decorin gene. The human decorin gene spans over 38 kb of continuous DNA sequence and contains eight exons and very large introns, two of which are 5.4 and > 13.2 kb. We have discovered two alternatively spliced leader exons, exons Ia and Ib, in the 5[prime] untranslated region. These exons were identified by cloning and sequencing cDNAs obtained by polymerase chain reaction amplification of a fibroblast cDNA library. Using Northern blotting or reverse transcriptase PCR, we detected the two leader exons in a variety of mRNAs isolated from human cell lines and tissues. Interestingly, sequences highly (74-87%) homologous to exons Ia and lb are found in the 5[prime]untranslated region of avian and bovine decorin, respectively. This high degree of conservation among species suggests regulatory functions for these leader exons. In the 3' untranslated region there are several polyadenylation sites, and at least two of these sites could give rise to the transcripts of [approx]1.6 and [approx]1.9 kb, typically detected in a variety of tissues and cells. Using a genomic clone as the labeled probe and in situ hybridization of human metaphase chromosomes, we have mapped the decorin gene to the discrete region of human chromosome 12q23. This sturdy provides the molecular basis for discerning the transcriptional control of the decorin gene and offers the opportunity to investigate genetic disorders linked to this important human gene. 57 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Hypophosphatemic rickets caused by a novel splice donor site mutation and activation of two cryptic splice donor sites in the PHEX gene.

    PubMed

    Zou, Minjing; Buluş, Derya; Al-Rijjal, Roua A; Andıran, Nesibe; BinEssa, Huda; Kattan, Walaa E; Meyer, Brian; Shi, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) is the most common inherited form of rickets. XLH is caused by inactivating mutations in the PHEX gene and is transmitted as an X-linked dominant disorder. We investigated PHEX mutation in a sporadic Turkish girl with hypophosphatemic rickets. The patient was 2 years of age with a complaint of inability to walk. She had bowing of legs and growth retardation. Laboratory data showed normal calcium, low phosphate with markedly elevated ALP, and low phosphate renal tubular reabsorption. She was treated with Calcitriol 0.5 mg/kg/day and oral phosphate supplement with good response. The entire coding region of PHEX gene was sequenced from patient's peripheral leukocyte DNA and a novel 13 bp deletion at the donor splice site of exon5 was found (c.663+12del). Instead of using the donor splice site of intron 4 to splice out exon 5 and intron 5, the spliceosome utilized two nearby cryptic donor splice sites (5' splice site) to splice out intron 4, resulting in two smaller transcripts. Both of them could not translate into functional proteins due to frameshift. Her parents did not carry the mutation, indicating that this is a de novo PHEX mutation likely resulting from mutagenesis of X chromosome in paternal germ cells. We conclude that c.663+12del is a novel mutation that can activate nearby cryptic 5' splice sites. The selection of cryptic 5' splice sites adds the complexity of cell's splicing mechanisms. The current study extends the database of PHEX mutation and cryptic 5' splice sites.

  7. A donor splice mutation and a single-base deletion produce two carboxyl-terminal variants of human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, S.; Madison, J.; Davis, E.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Putnam, F.W. ); Galliano, M.; Minchiotti, L. )

    1991-07-15

    At least 35 allelic variants of human serum albumin have been sequenced at the protein level. All except two COOH-terminal variants, Catania and Venezia, are readily explainable as single-point substitutions. The two chain-termination variants are clustered in certain locations in Italy and are found in numerous unrelated individuals. In order to correlate the protein change in these variants with the corresponding DNA mutation, the two variant albumin genes have been cloned, sequenced, and compared to normal albumin genomic DNA. In the Catania variant, a single base deletion and subsequent frameshift leads to a shortened and altered COOH terminus. Albumin Venezia is caused by a mutation that alters the first consensus nucleotide of the 5{prime} donor splice junction of intron 14 and the 3{prime} end of exon 14, which is shortened from 68 to 43 base pairs. This change leads to an exon skipping event resulting in direct splicing of exon 13 to exon 15. The predicted Venezia albumin product has a truncated amino acid sequence (580 residues instead of 585), and the COOH-terminal sequence is altered after Glu-571. The variant COOH terminus ends with the dibasic sequence Arg-Lys that is apparently removed through stepwise cleavage by serum carboxypeptidase B to yield several forms of circulating albumin.

  8. Thermodynamic modeling of donor splice site recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Jeffrey A.; Aalberts, Daniel P.

    2004-04-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 small nuclear RNA with the donor ( 5' ) splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our “finding with binding” method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  9. Thermodynamic Modeling of Donor Splice Site Recognition in pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalberts, Daniel P.; Garland, Jeffrey A.

    2004-03-01

    When eukaryotic genes are edited by the spliceosome, the first step in intron recognition is the binding of a U1 snRNA with the donor (5') splice site. We model this interaction thermodynamically to identify splice sites. Applied to a set of 65 annotated genes, our Finding with Binding method achieves a significant separation between real and false sites. Analyzing binding patterns allows us to discard a large number of decoy sites. Our results improve statistics-based methods for donor site recognition, demonstrating the promise of physical modeling to find functional elements in the genome.

  10. A computational approach for prediction of donor splice sites with improved accuracy.

    PubMed

    Meher, Prabina Kumar; Sahu, Tanmaya Kumar; Rao, A R; Wahi, S D

    2016-09-01

    Identification of splice sites is important due to their key role in predicting the exon-intron structure of protein coding genes. Though several approaches have been developed for the prediction of splice sites, further improvement in the prediction accuracy will help predict gene structure more accurately. This paper presents a computational approach for prediction of donor splice sites with higher accuracy. In this approach, true and false splice sites were first encoded into numeric vectors and then used as input in artificial neural network (ANN), support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF) for prediction. ANN and SVM were found to perform equally and better than RF, while tested on HS3D and NN269 datasets. Further, the performance of ANN, SVM and RF were analyzed by using an independent test set of 50 genes and found that the prediction accuracy of ANN was higher than that of SVM and RF. All the predictors achieved higher accuracy while compared with the existing methods like NNsplice, MEM, MDD, WMM, MM1, FSPLICE, GeneID and ASSP, using the independent test set. We have also developed an online prediction server (PreDOSS) available at http://cabgrid.res.in:8080/predoss, for prediction of donor splice sites using the proposed approach. PMID:27302911

  11. Noncanonical and canonical splice sites: a novel mutation at the rare noncanonical splice-donor cut site (IVS4+1A>G) of SEDL causes variable splicing isoforms in X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Feng; Gao, Jianjun; Li, Jun; Liu, Yun; Feng, Guoyin; Fang, Wenli; Chang, Hongfen; Xie, Jiang; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Tingyu; He, Lin

    2009-01-01

    X-linked spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda can be caused by mutations in the SEDL gene. This study describes an interesting novel mutation (IVS4+1A>G) located exactly at the rare noncanonical AT–AC consensus splicing donor point of SEDL, which regained the canonical GT–AG consensus splicing junction in addition to several other rarer noncanonical splice patterns. The mutation activated several cryptic splice sites and generated the production of seven erroneous splicing isoforms, which we confirmed by sequencing of RT-PCR products and resequencing of cDNA clones. All the practical splice donors/acceptors were further assessed using FSPLICE 1.0 and SPL(M) Platforms to predict potential splice sites in genomic DNA. Subsequently, the expression levels of SEDL among the affected patients, carriers and controls were estimated using real-time quantitative PCR. Expression analyses showed that the expression levels of SEDL in both patients and carriers were decreased. Taken together, these results illustrated how disruption of the AT donor site in a rare AT–AC intron, leading to a canonical GT donor site, resulted in a multitude of aberrant transcripts, thus impairing exon definition. The unexpected splicing patterns resulting from the special mutation provide additional challenges and opportunities for understanding splicing mechanisms and specificity. PMID:19002213

  12. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  13. A splice donor site mutation in HOXD13 underlies synpolydactyly with cortical bone thinning.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiuyan; Ji, Chunyan; Cao, Lihua; Wu, Yuhong; Shang, Yuyang; Wang, Wei; Luo, Yang

    2013-12-15

    Synpolydactyly 1(SPD1) is a dominantly inherited distal limb anomaly that is characterized by incomplete digit separation and increased number of digits. SPD1 is most commonly caused by polyalanine repeat expansions and mutations in the homeodomain of the HOXD13. We report a splice donor site mutation in HOXD13 associated in most cases with cortical bone thinning. In vitro study of transcripts and truncated protein analysis indicated that c.781+1G>A mutation results in truncated HOXD13 protein p.G190fsX4. Luciferase assay indicated that the truncated HOXD13 protein failed to bind to DNA. The mechanism for this phenotype was truncated protein loss of function.

  14. A Phylogenetic Survey on the Structure of the HIV-1 Leader RNA Domain That Encodes the Splice Donor Signal.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nancy; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    RNA splicing is a critical step in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle because it controls the expression of the complex viral proteome. The major 5' splice site (5'ss) that is positioned in the untranslated leader of the HIV-1 RNA transcript is of particular interest because it is used for the production of the more than 40 differentially spliced subgenomic mRNAs. HIV-1 splicing needs to be balanced tightly to ensure the proper levels of all viral proteins, including the Gag-Pol proteins that are translated from the unspliced RNA. We previously presented evidence that the major 5'ss is regulated by a repressive local RNA structure, the splice donor (SD) hairpin, that masks the 11 nucleotides (nts) of the 5'ss signal for recognition by U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) of the spliceosome machinery. A strikingly different multiple-hairpin RNA conformation was recently proposed for this part of the HIV-1 leader RNA. We therefore inspected the sequence of natural HIV-1 isolates in search for support, in the form of base pair (bp) co-variations, for the different RNA conformations. PMID:27455303

  15. A Phylogenetic Survey on the Structure of the HIV-1 Leader RNA Domain That Encodes the Splice Donor Signal

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Nancy; Das, Atze T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    RNA splicing is a critical step in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle because it controls the expression of the complex viral proteome. The major 5′ splice site (5′ss) that is positioned in the untranslated leader of the HIV-1 RNA transcript is of particular interest because it is used for the production of the more than 40 differentially spliced subgenomic mRNAs. HIV-1 splicing needs to be balanced tightly to ensure the proper levels of all viral proteins, including the Gag-Pol proteins that are translated from the unspliced RNA. We previously presented evidence that the major 5′ss is regulated by a repressive local RNA structure, the splice donor (SD) hairpin, that masks the 11 nucleotides (nts) of the 5′ss signal for recognition by U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) of the spliceosome machinery. A strikingly different multiple-hairpin RNA conformation was recently proposed for this part of the HIV-1 leader RNA. We therefore inspected the sequence of natural HIV-1 isolates in search for support, in the form of base pair (bp) co-variations, for the different RNA conformations. PMID:27455303

  16. A Phylogenetic Survey on the Structure of the HIV-1 Leader RNA Domain That Encodes the Splice Donor Signal.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nancy; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-07-21

    RNA splicing is a critical step in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle because it controls the expression of the complex viral proteome. The major 5' splice site (5'ss) that is positioned in the untranslated leader of the HIV-1 RNA transcript is of particular interest because it is used for the production of the more than 40 differentially spliced subgenomic mRNAs. HIV-1 splicing needs to be balanced tightly to ensure the proper levels of all viral proteins, including the Gag-Pol proteins that are translated from the unspliced RNA. We previously presented evidence that the major 5'ss is regulated by a repressive local RNA structure, the splice donor (SD) hairpin, that masks the 11 nucleotides (nts) of the 5'ss signal for recognition by U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) of the spliceosome machinery. A strikingly different multiple-hairpin RNA conformation was recently proposed for this part of the HIV-1 leader RNA. We therefore inspected the sequence of natural HIV-1 isolates in search for support, in the form of base pair (bp) co-variations, for the different RNA conformations.

  17. A novel splice donor site at nt 1534 is required for long-term maintenance of HPV31 genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Poppelreuther, Sven; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2008-01-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate as low copy number nuclear plasmids during the persistent phase. HPV only possess nine open reading frames but extend their coding capabilities by alternative RNA splicing. We have identified in cell lines with replicating HPV31 genomes viral transcripts that connect the novel splice donor (SD) sites at nt 1426 and 1534 within the E1 replication gene to known splice acceptors at nt 3295 or 3332 within the E2/E4 region. These transcripts are polyadenylated and are present at low amounts in the non-productive and productive phase of the viral life cycle. Mutation of the novel splice sites in the context of HPV31 genomes revealed that the inactivation of SD1534 had only minor effects in short-term replication assays but displayed a low copy number phenotype in long-term cultures which might be due to the expression of alternative E1 circumflex E4 or yet unknown viral proteins. This suggests a regulatory role for minor splice sites within E1 for papillomavirus replication.

  18. Utilisation of a cryptic non-canonical donor splice site of the gene encoding PARAFIBROMIN is associated with familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K; Cavaco, B; Bowl, M; Harding, B; Young, A; Thakker, R

    2005-01-01

    More than 99% of all splice sites conform to consensus sequences that usually include the invariant dinucleotides gt and ag at the 5' and 3' ends of the introns, respectively. We report on the utilisation of a non-consensus (non-canonical) donor splice site within exon 1 of the HRPT2 gene in familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). HRPT2 mutations are more frequently associated with the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT). Patients with FIHP were identified to have a donor splice site mutation, IVS1+1 g→a, and the consequences of this for RNA processing were investigated. The mutant mRNA lacked 30 bp and DNA sequence analysis revealed this to result from utilisation of an alternative cryptic non-canonical donor splice site (gaatgt) in exon 1 together with the normally occurring acceptor splice site in intron 1. Translation of this mutant mRNA predicted the in-frame loss of 10 amino acids in the encoded protein, termed PARAFIBROMIN. Thus, these FIHP patients are utilising a ga-ag splice site pair, which until recently was considered to be incompatible with splicing but is now known to occur as a rare (<0.02%) normal splicing variant. PMID:16061557

  19. Late-onset spastic paraplegia: Aberrant SPG11 transcripts generated by a novel splice site donor mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Mori, Atsuko; Oki, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto-Miyashiro, Ai; Matsui, Naoko; Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-12-15

    We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site donor (SSD) of intron 30 (c.5866+1G>A) in consanguineous Japanese SPG11 siblings showing late-onset spastic paraplegia using the whole-exome sequencing. Phenotypic variability was observed, including age-at-onset, dysarthria and pes cavus. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that the mutation affected the recognition of the constitutive SSD of intron 30, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSD in exon 30. The use of constitutive splice sites of intron 29 was confirmed by sequencing. The mutant transcripts are mostly subject to degradation by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay system. SPG11 transcripts, escaping from the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, would generate a truncated protein (p.Tyr1900Phefs5X) containing the first 1899 amino acids and followed by 4 aberrant amino acids. This study showed a successful clinical application of whole-exome sequencing in spastic paraplegia and demonstrated a further evidence of allelic heterogeneity in SPG11. The confirmation of aberrant transcript by splice site mutation is a prerequisite for a more precise molecular diagnosis.

  20. Importance of RNA secondary structure information for yeast donor and acceptor splice site predictions by neural networks.

    PubMed

    Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Goodarzi, Hani; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Eslahchi, Changiz; Pezeshk, Hamid

    2006-02-01

    Previously, Patterson et al. showed that mRNA structure information aids splice site prediction in human genes [Patterson, D.J., Yasuhara, K., Ruzzo, W.L., 2002. Pre-mRNA secondary structure prediction aids splice site prediction. Pac. Symp. Biocomput. 7, 223-234]. Here, we have attempted to predict splice sites in selected genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the information obtained from the secondary structures of corresponding mRNAs. From Ares database, 154 genes were selected and their structures were predicted by Mfold. We selected a 20-nucleotide window around each site, each containing 4 nucleotides in the exon region. Based on whether the nucleotide is in a stem or not, the conventional four-letter nucleotide alphabet was translated into an eight-letter alphabet. Two different three-layer-based perceptron neural networks were devised to predict the 5' and 3' splice sites. In case of 5' site determination, a network with 3 neurons at the hidden layer was chosen, while in case of 3' site 20 neurons acted more efficiently. Both neural nets were trained applying Levenberg-Marquardt backpropagation method, using half of the available genes as training inputs and the other half for testing and cross-validations. Sequences with GUs and AGs non-sites were used as negative controls. The correlation coefficients in the predictions of 5' and 3' splice sites using eight-letter alphabet were 98.0% and 69.6%, respectively, while these values were 89.3% and 57.1% when four-letter alphabet is applied. Our results suggest that considering the secondary structure of mRNA molecules positively affects both donor and acceptor site predictions by increasing the capacity of neural networks in learning the patterns.

  1. Donor Splice-Site Mutation in CUL4B is Likely Cause of X-Linked Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Londin, Eric R.; Adijanto, Jeffrey; Philp, Nancy; Novelli, Antonio; Vitale, Emilia; Perria, Chiara; Serra, Gigliola; Alesi, Viola; Surrey, Saul; Fortina, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability is the most common form of cognitive disability in males. Syndromic intellectual disability encompasses cognitive deficits with other medical and behavioral manifestations. Recently, a large family with a novel form of syndromic X-linked intellectual disability was characterized. Eight of 24 members of the family are male and had cognitive dysfunction, short stature, aphasia, skeletal abnormalities, and minor anomalies. To identify the causative gene(s), we performed exome sequencing in three affected boys, both parents, and an unaffected sister. We identified a haplotype consisting of eight variants located in cis within the linkage region that segregated with affected members in the family. Of these variants, two were novel. The first was at the splice-donor site of intron 7 (c.974+1G>T) in the cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (E3) gene, CUL4B. This variant is predicted to result in failure to splice and remove intron 7 from the primary transcript. The second variant mapped to the 3′-UTR region of the KAISO gene (c.1127T>G). Sanger sequencing validated the variants in these relatives as well as in three affected males and five carriers. The KAISO gene variant was predicted to create a binding site for the microRNAs miR-4999 and miR-4774; however, luciferase expression assays failed to validate increased targeting of these miRNAs to the variant 3′-UTR. This SNP may affect 3′-UTR structure leading to decreased mRNA stability. Our results suggest that the intellectual disability phenotype in this family is caused by aberrant splicing and removal of intron 7 from CUL4B gene primary transcript. PMID:24898194

  2. Haemophilia B caused by a point mutation in a donor splice junction of the human factor IX gene.

    PubMed

    Rees, D J; Rizza, C R; Brownlee, G G

    Haemophilia B (Christmas disease) is an inherited, recessive, sex-linked, haemorrhagic condition caused by a defect in the intrinsic clotting factor IX. This disease occurs in males at a frequency of approximately 1 in 30,000. Patients differ in the severity of their clinical symptoms, and variation in the clotting activity and in the concentration of factor IX antigen in their plasma has been demonstrated. There is probably heterogeneity in the molecular defects of the factor IX gene causing the disease. Here we study a severely affected, antigen-negative patient, and show that the only significant sequence difference from the normal factor IX gene is a point mutation changing the obligatory GT to a TT within the donor splice junction of exon f. We infer that this change is the cause of the disease in this individual. In addition, we have used oligodeoxynucleotide probes specific for this mutation to demonstrate the feasibility of carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis for relatives of the patient.

  3. Monocyte function in a severe combined immunodeficient patient with a donor splice site mutation in the Jak3 gene.

    PubMed

    Villa, A; Sironi, M; Macchi, P; Matteucci, C; Notarangelo, L D; Vezzoni, P; Mantovani, A

    1996-08-01

    Janus kinase-3 (Jak3) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase functionally coupled to cytokine receptors which share a "common" gamma chain (gamma c). Mutations in gamma c and Jak3 genes have been identified in X-linked and autosomal severe combined immuno deficiency (SCID), respectively. Jak3 is expressed and activated in myelomonocytic cells. The present study was designed to define the structural alteration responsible for lack of Jak3 in a patient with autosomal SCID and to characterize monocyte function in the absence of this signal transduction element, as well as to establish the whole exon-intron structure. Polymerase chain reaction analysis, performed with primers designed on exon sequences, identified 20 exons spanning approximately 15 kb. These primers, or others designed on the flanking sequences provided in the present report, can be used to amplify the whole gene, allowing the definition of the molecular defects in all cases, including prenatal diagnosis, in which transcript analysis is not possible. On this basis, the deletion transcript found at the homozygous state in patient CM, with both his consanguineous parents being heterozygous for the deletion, was associated with mutation (T to C) of a splice donor site of intron 16 that was also detected in his mother's DNA. Monocytes from Jak3-SCID showed normal cytokine production in response to interleukin-4 (IL-4) (release of IL-1 receptor antagonist) and IL-2 (release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8). Lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production was also normal and was blocked by IL-4 in Jak3- SCID monocytes. Interferon-gamma induced augmented expression of major histocompatibility class II in Jak3-SCID monocytes. These data indicate that Jak3, expressed and activated in myelomonocytic cells, is dispensable for monocyte differentiation and responsiveness to cytokines that interact with gamma c receptors as well as to other regulatory signals.

  4. Activation of c-myb by 5' retrovirus promoter insertion in myeloid neoplasms is dependent upon an intact alternative splice donor site (SD') in gag

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, Jean Marie; Houzet, Laurent; Koller, Richard; Bies, Juraj; Wolff, Linda; Mougel, Marylene . E-mail: mmougel@univ-montp1.fr

    2004-12-20

    Alternative splicing in Mo-MuLV recruits a splice donor site, SD', within the gag that is required for optimal replication in vitro. Remarkably, this SD' site was also found to be utilized for production of oncogenic gag-myb fusion RNA in 100% of murine-induced myeloid leukemia (MML) in pristane-treated BALB/c mice. Therefore, we investigated the influence of silent mutations of SD' in this model. Although there was no decrease in the overall incidence of disease, there was a decrease in the incidence of myeloid leukemia with a concomitant increase in lymphoid leukemia. Importantly, there was a complete lack of myeloid tumors associated with 5' insertional mutagenic activation of c-myb, suggesting the specific requirement of the SD' site in this mechanism.

  5. Isolation of an insulin-like growth factor II cDNA with a unique 5 prime untranslated region from human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Shujane; Daimon, Makoto; Wang, Chunyeh; Ilan, J. ); Jansen, M. )

    1988-03-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) cDNA from a placental library was isolated and sequenced. The 5{prime} untranslated region (5{prime}-UTR) sequence of this cDNA differs completely from that of adult human liver and has considerable base sequence identity to the same region of an IGF-II cDNA of a rat liver cell line, BRL-3A. Human placental poly(A){sup +} RNA was probed with either the 5{prime}-UTR of the isolated human placental IGF-II cDNA or the 5{prime}-UTR of the IGF-II cDNA obtained from adult human liver. No transcripts were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the adult liver IGF-II as the probe. In contrast, three transcripts of 6.0, 3.2, and 2.2 kilobases were detected by using the 5{prime}-UTR of the placental IGF-II cDNA as the probe or the probe from the coding sequence. A fourth IGF-II transcript of 4.9 kilobases presumably containing a 5{prime}-UTR consisting of a base sequence dissimilar to that of either IGF-II 5{prime}-UTR was apparent. Therefore, IGF-II transcripts detected may be products of alternative splicing as their 5{prime}-UTR sequence is contained within the human IGF-II gene or they may be a consequence of alternative promoter utilization in placenta.

  6. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-02-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment.

  7. Factor IXMadrid 2: a deletion/insertion in factor IX gene which abolishes the sequence of the donor junction at the exon IV-intron d splice site.

    PubMed Central

    Solera, J; Magallón, M; Martin-Villar, J; Coloma, A

    1992-01-01

    DNA from a patient with severe hemophilia B was evaluated by RFLP analysis, producing results which suggested the existence of a partial deletion within the factor IX gene. The deletion was further localized and characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing. The altered allele has a 4,442-bp deletion which removes both the donor splice site located at the 5' end of intron d and the two last coding nucleotides located at the 3' end of exon IV in the normal factor IX gene; this fragment has been replaced by a 47-bp sequence from the normal factor IX gene, although this fragment has been inserted in inverted orientation. Two homologous sequences have been discovered at the ends of the deleted DNA fragment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1346483

  8. Escape variants of the XPR1 gammaretrovirus receptor are rare due to reliance on a splice donor site and a short hypervariable loop

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyu; Martin, Carrie; Bouchard, Christelle; Kozak, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    Entry determinants in the XPR1 receptor for the xenotropic/polytropic mouse leukemia viruses (XP-MLVs) lie in its third and fourth putative extracellular loops (ECLs). The critical ECL3 receptor determinant overlies a splice donor and is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrate XPR1 genes; 2 of the 3 rare replacement mutations at this site destroy this receptor determinant. The 13 residue ECL4 is hypervariable, and replacement mutations carrying an intact ECL3 site alter but do not abolish receptor activity, including replacement of the entire loop with that of a jellyfish (Cnidaria) XPR1. Because ECL4 deletions are found in all X-MLV-infected Mus subspecies, we deleted each ECL4 residue to determine if deletion-associated restriction is residue-specific or is effected by loop size. All deletions influence receptor function, although different deletions affect different XP-MLVs. Thus, receptor usage of a constrained splice site and a loop that tolerates mutations severely limits the likelihood of host escape mutations. PMID:25151060

  9. Tissue-specific splicing mutation in acute intermittent porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Grandchamp, B.; Picat, C. ); Mignotte, V.; Romeo, P.H.; Goossens, M. ); Wilson, J.H.P.; Sandkuyl, L. ); Te Velde, K. ); Nordmann, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    An inherited deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase in humans is responsible for the autosomal dominant disease acute intermittent porphyria. Different classes of mutations have been described at the protein level suggesting that this is a heterogeneous disease. It was previously demonstrated that porphobilinogen deaminase is encoded by two distinct mRNA species expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Analysis of the genomic sequences indicated that these two mRNAs are transcribed from two promoters and only differ in their first exon. The first mutation identified in the human porphobilinogen deaminase gene is a single-base substitution (G {yields} A) in the canonical 5{prime} splice donor site of intron 1. This mutation leads to a particular subtype of acute intermittent porphyria characterized by the restriction of the enzymatic defect to nonerythropoietic tissues. Hybridization analysis using olignonucleotide probes after in vitro amplification of genomic DNA offers another possibility of detecting asymptomatic carriers of the mutation in affected families.

  10. A novel point mutation (G-1 to T) in a 5' splice donor site of intron 13 of the dystrophin gene results in exon skipping and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Y; Nishio, H; Kitoh, Y; Takeshima, Y; Narita, N; Wada, H; Yokoyama, M; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M

    1994-01-01

    The mutations in one-third of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy patients remain unknown, as they do not involve gross rearrangements of the dystrophin gene. We now report a defect in the splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA), resulting from a maternally inherited mutation of the dystrophin gene in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. This defect results from a G-to-T transversion at the terminal nucleotide of exon 13, within the 5' splice site of intron 13, and causes complete skipping of exon 13 during processing of dystrophin pre-mRNA. The predicted polypeptide encoded by the aberrant mRNA is a truncated dystrophin lacking 40 amino acids from the amino-proximal end of the rod domain. This is the first report of an intraexon point mutation that completely inactivates a 5' splice donor site in dystrophin pre-mRNA. Analysis of the genomic context of the G-1-to-T mutation at the 5' splice site supports the exon-definition model of pre-mRNA splicing and contributes to the understanding of splice-site selection.

  11. Oligomerizations of deoxyadenosine bis-phosphates and of their 3-prime-5-prime, 3-prime-3-prime, and 5-prime-5-prime dimers - Effects of a pyrophosphate-linked, poly(T) analog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, J.; Bakker, C. G.; Schwartz, Alan W.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of a 3-prime-5-prime pyrophosphate-linked oligomer of pTp on oligomerizations of pdAp and of its 3-prime-5-prime, 3-prime-3-prime, and 5-prime-5-prime dimers was investigated, using HPLC to separate the reaction mixtures; peak detection was by absorbance monitoring at 254 nm. It was expected that the dimers would form stable complexes with the template, with the degree of stability depending upon the internal linkage of each dimer. It was found that, although the isomers differ substantially in their oligomerization behavior in the absence of template, the analog-template catalyzes the oligomerization to about the same extent in all three cases.

  12. A splice donor mutation in NAA10 results in the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signaling pathway and causes Lenz microphthalmia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Esmailpour, Taraneh; Riazifar, Hamidreza; Liu, Linan; Donkervoort, Sandra; Huang, Vincent H; Madaan, Shreshtha; Shoucri, Bassem M; Busch, Anke; Wu, Jie; Towbin, Alexander; Chadwick, Robert B; Sequeira, Adolfo; Vawter, Marquis P; Sun, Guoli; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G; Kawaguchi, Riki; Sun, Hui; Kimonis, Virginia; Huang, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is a genetically heterogeneous X-linked disorder characterised by microphthalmia/anophthalmia, skeletal abnormalities, genitourinary malformations, and anomalies of the digits, ears, and teeth. Intellectual disability and seizure disorders are seen in about 60% of affected males. To date, no gene has been identified for LMS in the microphthalmia syndrome 1 locus (MCOPS1). In this study, we aim to find the disease-causing gene for this condition. Methods and results Using exome sequencing in a family with three affected brothers, we identified a mutation in the intron 7 splice donor site (c.471+2T→A) of the N-acetyltransferase NAA10 gene. NAA10 has been previously shown to be mutated in patients with Ogden syndrome, which is clinically distinct from LMS. Linkage studies for this family mapped the disease locus to Xq27-Xq28, which was consistent with the locus of NAA10. The mutation co-segregated with the phenotype and cDNA analysis showed aberrant transcripts. Patient fibroblasts lacked expression of full length NAA10 protein and displayed cell proliferation defects. Expression array studies showed significant dysregulation of genes associated with genetic forms of anophthalmia such as BMP4, STRA6, and downstream targets of BCOR and the canonical WNT pathway. In particular, STRA6 is a retinol binding protein receptor that mediates cellular uptake of retinol/vitamin A and plays a major role in regulating the retinoic acid signalling pathway. A retinol uptake assay showed that retinol uptake was decreased in patient cells. Conclusions We conclude that the NAA10 mutation is the cause of LMS in this family, likely through the dysregulation of the retinoic acid signalling pathway. PMID:24431331

  13. Donor site competition is involved in the regulation of alternative splicing of the rat beta-tropomyosin pre-mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C D; Helfman, D M

    1999-01-01

    The rat beta-tropomyosin (beta-TM) gene encodes both skeletal muscle beta-TM mRNA and nonmuscle TM-1 mRNA via alternative RNA splicing. This gene contains eleven exons: exons 1-5, 8, and 9 are common to both mRNAs; exons 6 and 11 are used in fibroblasts as well as in smooth muscle, whereas exons 7 and 10 are used in skeletal muscle. Previously we demonstrated that utilization of the 3' splice site of exon 7 is blocked in nonmuscle cells. In this study, we use both in vitro and in vivo methods to investigate the regulation of the 5' splice site of exon 7 in nonmuscle cells. The 5' splice site of exon 7 is used efficiently in the absence of flanking sequences, but its utilization is suppressed almost completely when the upstream exon 6 and intron 6 are present. The suppression of the 5' splice site of exon 7 does not result from the sequences at the 3' end of intron 6 that block the use of the 3' splice site of exon 7. However, mutating two conserved nucleotides GU at the 5' splice site of exon 6 results in the efficient use of the 5' splice site of exon 7. In addition, a mutation that changes the 5' splice site of exon 7 to the consensus U1 snRNA binding site strongly stimulates the splicing of exon 7 to the downstream common exon 8. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that 5' splice site competition is responsible, in part, for the suppression of exon 7 usage in nonmuscle cells. PMID:10024180

  14. HPV-18 E2circumflexE4 chimera: 2 new spliced transcripts and proteins induced by keratinocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chye Ling; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lai, Deborah; Carthagena, Laetitia; Wang, Qian; Xue, Yue Zhen; Quek, Ling Shih; Doorbar, John; Bachelerie, Francoise; Thierry, Francoise; Bellanger, Sophie

    2012-07-20

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E4 is known to be synthesized as an E1circumflexE4 fusion resulting from splice donor and acceptor sites conserved across HPV types. Here we demonstrate the existence of 2 HPV-18 E2circumflexE4 transcripts resulting from 2 splice donor sites in the 5 Prime part of E2, while the splice acceptor site is the one used for E1circumflexE4. Both E2circumflexE4 transcripts are up-regulated by keratinocyte differentiation in vitro and can be detected in clinical samples containing low-grade HPV-18-positive cells from Pap smears. They give rise to two fusion proteins in vitro, E2circumflexE4-S and E2circumflexE4-L. Whereas we could not differentiate E2circumflexE4-S from E1circumflexE4 in vivo, E2circumflexE4-L could be formally identified as a 23 kDa protein in raft cultures in which the corresponding transcript was also found, and in a biopsy from a patient with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia stage I-II (CINI-II) associated with HPV-18, demonstrating the physiological relevance of E2circumflexE4 products.

  15. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  16. 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis using 3[prime]-photoremovable protecting group

    DOEpatents

    Pirrung, M.C.; Shuey, S.W.; Bradley, J.C.

    1999-06-01

    The present invention relates, in general, to a method of synthesizing a nucleic acid, and, in particular, to a method of effecting 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis. The method can be used to prepare arrays of oligomers bound to a support via their 5[prime] end. The invention also relates to a method of effecting mutation analysis using such arrays. The invention further relates to compounds and compositions suitable for use in such methods.

  17. Effect of cold exposure on thyroxine 5 prime -deiodinase activity in iron-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, D.E.; Beard, J.L. )

    1991-03-11

    When exposed to cold, severely anemic iron-deficient (ID) rats become hypothermic, fail to adequately increase metabolic rate, and have lower interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) thyroxine 5{prime}-deiodinase (5{prime}-DI) activity compared to control (CN) rats. Less severely anemic rats and CN rats were exposed to 4C for 6h. Rectal temperatures were measured hourly, and VO{sub 2} was measured both prior to and throughout the cold exposure period. IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity was measured in cold-exposed ID and CN rats and compared to ID and CN rats that were not cold exposed. During cold exposure, both ID and CN rats increased metabolic rate similarly. IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity also increased similarly in both groups after cold exposure. These results show that moderately anemic DI rats acutely increase metabolic rate and IBAT 5{prime}-DI activity in the cold. This suggests brown fat production of thyroid hormone is not limiting thermoregulatory performance.

  18. Effect of dietary selenium on the 5 prime -deiodinase activity of washed microsomes from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Vadhanavikit, S.; Ganther, H.E. )

    1991-03-11

    Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a Torula yeast-based diet containing 0.1 ppm Se as selenite (+Se) or the diet without selenium supplementation ({minus}Se). At 6 months, rats were sacrificed and liver microsomes and cytosol were prepared. Glutathione peroxidase activity of (+SE) and ({minus}Se) cytosol was 0.86 {plus minus} 0.07 and 0.02 {plus minus} 0.01 U/mg, respectively. Microsomal 5{prime}-deiodinase, Type I (5{prime}-DI) was assayed in the presence of 3 mM DTT using ({sup 125}I) reverse triiodothyronine (rT{sub 3}) as substrate and the released {sup 125}I{sup {minus}} was determined. 5{prime}-DI activity of (+Se) and ({minus}Se) microsomes was 3.99 {plus minus} 0.29 and 0.43 {plus minus} 0.12 U/mg, respectively. Mixing experiments showed that (a) cytosol from (+Se) animals had very little or no stimulating effect on 5{prime}-DI activity of ({minus}Se) microsomes, and (b) ({minus}Se) cytosol as well as ({minus}Se) microsomes had no inhibitory effect on (+Se) microsomes. It is concluded that 5{prime}-DI activity is greatly decreased in microsomes of Se-deficient rats, and is not restored to normal by the addition of cytosol from Se-adequate animals. These results confirm and extend the authors' previous report of reduced 5{prime}-DI activity in Se-deficient rats when measured as the conversion of thyroxine to T{sub 3} in whole homogenates.

  19. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  20. Modulation of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase by environmental stress in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, H.C.; Wiens, M.; Mueller, W.E.G.; Kuusksalu, A.; Kelve, M.

    1997-07-01

    Recently the authors established the presence of relatively high amounts of 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylates (2{prime}-5{prime} A) and 2{prime}-5{prime} oligoadenylate synthetase (2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase) in the marine sponge Geodia cydonium. Here they determined by applying radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatographical methods that the concentration of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase change following exposure of G. cydonium tissue to environmental stress. The 2{prime}-5{prime} A content and the activity of 2{prime}-5{prime} A synthetase, present in crude sponge extract, increase by up to three-fold after treating sponge cubes for 2 h with natural stressors including heat shock (26 C), cold shock (6 C), pH shock (pH 6), and hypertonic shock and subsequent incubation for 18 h under ambient conditions (16 C). No response was observed after exposure of sponges to an alkaline (pH 10) or hypotonic environment. Similar changes have been found for the expression of heat shock protein HSP70 in G. cydonium. These results show that 2{prime}-5{prime} A in sponges may be useful as a novel biomarker for environmental monitoring.

  1. Characterization of Flavonoid 3[prime],5[prime]-Hydroxylase in Microsomal Membrane Fraction of Petunia hybrida Flowers.

    PubMed Central

    Menting, JGT.; Scopes, R. K.; Stevenson, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    We have detected a flavonoid 3[prime],5[prime]-hydroxylase (F3[prime],5[prime]H) in the microsomal fraction of Petunia hybrida flowers. Activity varied with the development of flowers, peaking immediately prior to and during anthesis, but was absent in mature flowers. F3[prime],5[prime]H activity in flower extracts from genetically defined floral color mutants correlated strictly with the genotypes Hf1 and Hf2. No activity was detected in flowers from mutants homozygous recessive for both alleles. F3[prime],5[prime]H activity was dependent on NADPH and molecular oxygen; there was only slight activity with NADH. The enzyme catalyzes the hydroxylation of 5,7,4[prime]-trihydroxyflavonone at the 3[prime] and 5[prime] positions, and of 5,7,3[prime],4[prime]-tetrahydroxyflavonone and dihydroquercetin at the 5[prime] position. Hydroxylase activity was inhibited by plant growth regulators (1-aminobenzotriazole and tetcyclacis) and by CO, N-ethylmaleimide, diethyldithiocarbamate, and cytochrome (Cyt) c. Activity was not affected by diethylpyrocarbonate or phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, but was enhanced by 2-mercaptoethanol. A polyclonal antibody that inhibits higher plant NADPH-Cyt P450 reductase inhibited the F3[prime],5[prime]H. The data are consistent with the suggestion that the P. hybrida F3[prime],5[prime]H is a monooxygenase consisting of a Cyt P450 and a NADPH-Cyt P-450 reductase. Cyts P450 were detected in microsomal membranes and in solubilized detergent extracts of these membranes. F3[prime],5[prime]H activity was sensitive to low concentrations of all detergents tested, and therefore solubilization of the active enzyme was not achieved. Reaction products other than flavanones were observed in F3[prime],5[prime]H assays and these may be formed by enzymic oxidation of flavanones. The possibility of a microsomal flavone synthase of a type that has not been described in P. hybrida is discussed. PMID:12232356

  2. A novel donor splice site in intron 11 of the CFTR gene, created by mutation 1811 + 1.6kbA {yields} G, produces a new exon: High frequency in spanish cystic fibrosis chromosomes and association with severe phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Chillon, M.; Casals, T.; Gimenez, J.; Ramos, D.; Nunes, V.; Estivill, X.; Doerk, T.; Will, K.; Fonknechten, N.

    1995-03-01

    mRNA analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in tissues of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has allowed us to detect a cryptic exon. The new exon involves 49 base pairs between exons 11 and 12 and is due to a point mutation (1811+1.6bA{yields}G) that creates a new donor splice site in intron 11. Semiquantitative mRNA analysis showed that 1811+1.6kbA{r_arrow}G-mRNA was 5-10-fold less abundant than {triangle}F508 mRNA. Mutations 1811+1.6kbA{yields}G was found in 21 Spanish and 1 German CF chromosome(s), making it the fourth-most-frequent mutation (2%) in the Spanish population. Individuals with genotype {triangle}F508/1811+1.6kbA{yields}G have only 1%-3% of normal CFTR mRNA. This loss of 97% of normal CFTR mRNA must be responsible for the pancreatic insufficiency and for the severe CF phenotype in these patients. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A novel donor splice site in intron 11 of the CFTR gene, created by mutation 1811+1.6kbA-->G, produces a new exon: high frequency in Spanish cystic fibrosis chromosomes and association with severe phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chillón, M; Dörk, T; Casals, T; Giménez, J; Fonknechten, N; Will, K; Ramos, D; Nunes, V; Estivill, X

    1995-03-01

    mRNA analysis of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene in tissues of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients has allowed us to detect a cryptic exon. The new exon involves 49 base pairs between exons 11 and 12 and is due to a point mutation (1811+1.6kbA-->G) that creates a new donor splice site in intron 11. Semiquantitative mRNA analysis showed that 1811+1.6kbA-->G-mRNA was 5-10-fold less abundant than delta F508 mRNA. Mutation 1811+1.6kbA-->G was found in 21 Spanish and 1 German CF chromosomes, making it the fourth-most-frequent mutation (2%) in the Spanish population. Individuals with genotype delta F508/1811+1.6kbA-->G have only 1%-3% of normal CFTR mRNA. This loss of 97% of normal CFTR mRNA must be responsible for the pancreatic insufficiency and for the severe CF phenotype in these patients.

  4. The allele-specific suppressor sup-39 alters use of cryptic splice sites in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Roller, A B; Hoffman, D C; Zahler, A M

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans sup-39 gene cause allele-specific suppression of the uncoordination defect of unc-73(e936). e936 is a point mutation that changes the canonical G at the 5' end of intron 16 to a U. This mutation activates three splice donors, two of which define introns beginning with the canonical GU. Use of these two cryptic splice sites causes loss of reading frame; interestingly these messages are not substrates for nonsense-mediated decay. The third splice donor, used in 10% of steady-state e936 messages, is the mutated splice donor at the wild-type position, which defines an intron beginning with UU. In the presence of a sup-39 mutation, these same three splice donors are used, but the ratio of messages produced by splicing at these sites changes. The percentage of unc-73(e936) messages containing the wild-type splice junction is increased to 33% with a corresponding increase in the level of UNC-73 protein. This sup-39-induced change was also observed when the e936 mutant intron region was inserted into a heterologous splicing reporter construct transfected into worms. Experiments with splicing reporter constructs showed that the degree of 5' splice site match to the splicing consensus sequence can strongly influence cryptic splice site choice. We propose that mutant SUP-39 is a new type of informational suppressor that alters the use of weak splice donors. PMID:10757761

  5. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. PMID:25720307

  6. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  7. An Interspecific Plant Hybrid Shows Novel Changes in Parental Splice Forms of Genes for Splicing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Scascitelli, Moira; Cognet, Marie; Adams, Keith L.

    2010-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization plays an important role in plant adaptive evolution and speciation, and the process often results in phenotypic novelty. Hybrids can show changes in genome structure and gene expression compared with their parents including chromosomal rearrangments, changes in cytosine methylation, up- and downregulation of gene expression, and gene silencing. Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental aspect of the expression of many genes. However alternative splicing patterns have not been examined in multiple genes in an interspecific plant hybrid compared with its parents. Here we studied alternative splicing patterns in an interspecific Populus hybrid and its parents by assaying 40 genes using reverse transcription PCR. Most of the genes showed identical alternative splicing patterns between the parents and the hybrid. We found new alternative splicing variants present in the hybrid in two SR genes involved in the regulation of splicing and alternative splicing. The novel alternative splicing patterns included changes in donor and acceptor sites to create a new exon in one allele of PtRSZ22 in the hybrid and retention of an intron in both alleles of PtSR34a.1 in the hybrid, with effects on the function of the corresponding truncated proteins, if present. Our results suggest that novel alternative splicing patterns are present in a small percentage of genes in hybrids, but they could make a considerable impact on the expression of some genes. Changes in alternative splicing are likely to be an important component of the genetic changes that occur upon interspecific hybridization. PMID:20100939

  8. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  9. Phorbol esters, protein kinase C, and thyroxine 5 prime -deiodinase in brown adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Barge, R.M.; Mills, I.; Silva, J.E.; Larsen, P.R. )

    1988-03-01

    Protein kinase C activity has been identified in the rat brown adipocyte. About 60% of this activity is found in the cytosolic fraction under basal conditions, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) causes a rapid shift from the cytosol to the particulate fraction. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine causes a similar redistribution that can be blocked by prazosin but not by alprenolol. {alpha}{sub 1}-Adrenergic agonists cause three- to fivefold stimulation of type 2 iodothyronine 5{prime}-deiodinase activity in brown adipocytes. TPA has no effect on basal deiodinase activity and reduces the response of the enzyme to {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic agonists. These results suggest that the translocation of protein kinase C from cytosol to particulate fraction is not sufficient to increase deiodinase activity but can modulate the {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic agonist-mediated responses in these cells.

  10. Identification of a novel latency-specific splice donor signal within the herpes simplex virus type 1 2.0-kilobase latency-associated transcript (LAT): translation inhibition of LAT open reading frames by the intron within the 2.0-kilobase LAT.

    PubMed

    Spivack, J G; Woods, G M; Fraser, N W

    1991-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 establishes latent infection in trigeminal ganglia of mice infected via the eye. A family of three colinear viral transcripts (LATs), 2.0, 1.5, and 1.45 kb, is present in latently infected ganglia. To characterize these LATs, lambda gt10 cDNA libraries were constructed with RNAs isolated from the trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice. A series of recombinant bacteriophage were isolated containing cDNA inserts covering 1.7 kb of the 2.0-kb LAT. Splice junctions of the smaller LATs and the 3' end of the 2.0-kb LAT were identified by sequence analysis of RNA polymerase chain reaction products. No splice acceptor site, which does not support the hypotheses that the 2.0-kb LAT is an intron. However, the data are consistent with the possibility of a short leader sequence or multiple LAT transcription start sites. To generate the smaller 1.5- and 1.45-kb LATs, there is a 559-nucleotide intron spliced from the 2.0-kb LAT in strain F and a 556-nucleotide intron in strain 17+. The nucleotide sequences at the 5' and 3' ends of these introns are characteristic of spliced transcripts from eukaryotic protein-encoding genes, with one significant difference; i.e., the 5' end of the LAT intron is GC instead of the consensus sequence GT. This splice donor sequence is conserved in herpes simplex virus type 1 strains F, 17+, and KOS. Processing of the 2.0-kb LAT to form the spliced LATs preserves two open reading frames (ORFs) at the 3' end of the LATs; no new ORFs are created. Splicing of the LATs positions a 276-nucleotide leader sequence close to these ORFs and removes an intron that inhibits their translation in vitro. The novel 5' structure of the intron within the 2.0-kb LAT may be part of a control mechanism for transcription processing that results in splicing of the LATs only in sensory neurons during latent infection and reactivation but not during the viral replication cycle.

  11. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  13. Understanding splicing regulation through RNA splicing maps.

    PubMed

    Witten, Joshua T; Ule, Jernej

    2011-03-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process that greatly increases the proteome diversity and plays an important role in cellular differentiation and disease. Interactions between RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and pre-mRNA are the principle regulator of splicing decisions. Findings from recent genome-wide studies of protein-RNA interactions have been combined with assays of the global effects of RBPs on splicing to create RNA splicing maps. These maps integrate information from all pre-mRNAs regulated by single RBPs to identify the global positioning principles guiding splicing regulation. Recent studies using this approach have identified a set of positional principles that are shared between diverse RBPs. Here, we discuss how insights from RNA splicing maps of different RBPs inform the mechanistic models of splicing regulation.

  14. HIV-1 splicing is controlled by local RNA structure and binding of splicing regulatory proteins at the major 5' splice site.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nancy; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2015-07-01

    The 5' leader region of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA genome contains the major 5' splice site (ss) that is used in the production of the many spliced viral RNAs. This splice-donor (SD) region can fold into a stable stem-loop structure and the thermodynamic stability of this RNA hairpin influences splicing efficiency. In addition, splicing may be modulated by binding of splicing regulatory (SR) proteins, in particular SF2/ASF (SRSF1), SC35 (SRSF2), SRp40 (SRSF5) and SRp55 (SRSF6), to sequence elements in the SD region. The role of RNA structure and SR protein binding in splicing control was previously studied by functional analysis of mutant SD sequences. The interpretation of these studies was complicated by the fact that most mutations simultaneously affect both structure and sequence elements. We therefore tried to disentangle the contribution of these two variables by designing more precise SD region mutants with a single effect on either the sequence or the structure. The current analysis indicates that HIV-1 splicing at the major 5'ss is modulated by both the stability of the local RNA structure and the binding of splicing regulatory proteins. PMID:25779589

  15. RNA polymerase II pauses at the 5 prime end of the transcriptionally induced Drosophila hsp70 gene

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, T.; Lis, J.T. )

    1991-10-01

    An RNA polymerase II molecule is associated with the 5{prime} end of the Drosophila melanogaster hsp70 gene under non-heat shock conditions. This polymerase is engaged in transcription but has paused, or arrested, after synthesizing about 25 nucleotides. Resumption of elongation by this paused polymerase appears to be the rate-limiting step in hsp70 transcription in uninduced cells. Here the authors report results of nuclear run-on assays that measure the distribution of elongating and paused RNA polymerase molecules on the hsp70 gene in induced cells. Pausing of polymerase was detected at the 5{prime} end of hsp70 was transcribed approximately five times during the 25-min heat shock that they used. Therefore, once the hsp70 gene is induced to an intermediate level, initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II remains more rapid than the resumption of elongation by a paused polymerase molecule.

  16. Probabilistic simple splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2014-06-01

    A splicing system, one of the early theoretical models for DNA computing was introduced by Head in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings of DNA molecules at the specific recognition sites and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string, and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string, thus yielding the new strings. For a specific type of splicing systems, namely the simple splicing systems, the recognition sites are the same for both strings of DNA molecules. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered for splicing systems in order to increase their computational power. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic simple splicing systems are investigated. We prove that probabilistic simple splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the splicing languages generated.

  17. Binding of nickel /II/ to 5-prime-nucleoside monophosphates and related compounds. [role in origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orenberg, J. B.; Kjos, K. M.; Winkler, R.; Link, J.; Lawless, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    The interactions of Ni(II) cation with a representative suite of purine bases and the respective nucleosides and nucleotides have been studied by ultraviolet difference spectroscopy. Apparent association constants were determined for each system at pH 7.0, using computer linear regression coupled with an iteration technique. The specificity of binding of Ni(2+) for the purine nucleotides studied at pH 7.0 was 5-prime-GMP greater than 5-prime-AMP; a similar ordering was also found for the respective nucleosides and bases. In this study binding was not observed for the suite of pyramidines used, although an Ni(2+) -cytidine complex has been observed (Fiskin and Beer, 1965). It was also found that Ni(2+) bound more strongly to the purine 5-prime-nucleotides than to the respective nucleosides and bases. These trends are explained in terms of metal-ligand bonds and available bonding positions on the ligands. A role for metal-ion-nucleotide types of complexes is suggested in the processes that might have given rise to the origin of life.

  18. A splice site mutant of maize activates cryptic splice sites, elicits intron inclusion and exon exclusion, and permits branch point elucidation.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Choi, J H; Shaw, J R; Hannah, L C

    1999-10-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the bt2-7503 mutant allele of the maize brittle-2 gene revealed a point mutation in the 5' terminal sequence of intron 3 changing GT to AT. This lesion completely abolishes use of this splice site, activates two cryptic splice sites, and alters the splicing pattern from extant splice sites. One activated donor site, located nine nt 5' to the normal splice donor site, begins with the dinucleotide GC. While non-consensus, this sequence still permits both trans-esterification reactions of pre-mRNA splicing. A second cryptic site located 23 nt 5' to the normal splice site and beginning with GA, undergoes the first trans-esterification reaction leading to lariat formation, but lacks the ability to participate in the second reaction. Accumulation of this splicing intermediate and use of an innovative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique (J. Vogel, R.H. Wolfgang, T. Borner [1997] Nucleic Acids Res 25: 2030-2031) led to the identification of 3' intron sequences needed for lariat formation. In most splicing reactions, neither cryptic site is recognized. Most mature transcripts include intron 3, while the second most frequent class lacks exon 3. Traditionally, the former class of transcripts is taken as evidence for the intron definition of splicing, while the latter class has given credence to the exon definition of splicing. PMID:10517832

  19. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    PubMed Central

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  20. The evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Harrison, Neale; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette; Müller, Berndt

    2010-08-01

    Spliced leader trans-splicing occurs in many primitive eukaryotes including nematodes. Most of our knowledge of trans-splicing in nematodes stems from the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and relatives, and from work with Ascaris. Our investigation of spliced leader trans-splicing in distantly related Dorylaimia nematodes indicates that spliced-leader trans-splicing arose before the nematode phylum and suggests that the spliced leader RNA gene complements in extant nematodes have evolved from a common ancestor with a diverse set of spliced leader RNA genes.

  1. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  2. Splicing defects in the ataxia-telangiectasia gene, ATM: underlying mutations and consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, S N; Telatar, M; Becker-Catania, S; Liang, T; Onengüt, S; Tolun, A; Chessa, L; Sanal, O; Bernatowska, E; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    1999-01-01

    Mutations resulting in defective splicing constitute a significant proportion (30/62 [48%]) of a new series of mutations in the ATM gene in patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) that were detected by the protein-truncation assay followed by sequence analysis of genomic DNA. Fewer than half of the splicing mutations involved the canonical AG splice-acceptor site or GT splice-donor site. A higher percentage of mutations occurred at less stringently conserved sites, including silent mutations of the last nucleotide of exons, mutations in nucleotides other than the conserved AG and GT in the consensus splice sites, and creation of splice-acceptor or splice-donor sites in either introns or exons. These splicing mutations led to a variety of consequences, including exon skipping and, to a lesser degree, intron retention, activation of cryptic splice sites, or creation of new splice sites. In addition, 5 of 12 nonsense mutations and 1 missense mutation were associated with deletion in the cDNA of the exons in which the mutations occurred. No ATM protein was detected by western blotting in any AT cell line in which splicing mutations were identified. Several cases of exon skipping in both normal controls and patients for whom no underlying defect could be found in genomic DNA were also observed, suggesting caution in the interpretation of exon deletions observed in ATM cDNA when there is no accompanying identification of genomic mutations. PMID:10330348

  3. Linkage disequilibrium in the insulin gene region: Size variation at the 5{prime} flanking polymorphism and bimodality among {open_quotes}Class I{close_quotes} alleles

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, R.E.; Spielman, R.S.

    1994-09-01

    The 5{prime} flanking polymorphism (5{prime}FP), a hypervariable region at the 5{prime} end of the insulin gene, has {open_quotes}class 1{close_quotes} alleles (650-900 bp long) that are in positive linkage disequilibrium with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The authors report that precise sizing of the 5{prime}FP yields a bimodal frequency distribution of class 1 allele lengths. Class 1 alleles belonging to the lower component (650-750 bp) of the bimodal distribution were somewhat more highly associated with IDDM than were alleles from the upper component (760-900 bp), but the difference was not statistically significant. They also examined 5{prime}FP length variation in relation to allelic variation at nearby polymorphisms. At biallelic RFLPs on both sides of the 5{prime}FP, they found that one allele exhibits near-total association with the upper component of the 5FP class 1 distribution. Such associations represent a little-known but potentially wide-spread form of linkage disequilibrium. In this type of disequilibrium, a flanking allele has near-complete association with a single mode of VNTR alleles whose lengths represent consecutive numbers of tandem repeats (CNTR). Such extreme disequilibrium between a CNTR mode and flanking alleles may originate and persist because length mutations at some VNTR loci usually add or delete only one or two repeat units. 22 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Analysis of the 5{prime} junctions of R2 insertions with the 28S gene: Implications for non-LTR retrotransposition

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.A.; Burke, W.D.; Eickbush, T.H.

    1996-03-01

    R2 elements are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposable elements that insert into 28S rRNA genes of most insect species. The single open reading frame of R2 encodes a protein with both endonuclease activity, which cleaves the target site, and reverse transcriptase activity, which uses this cleavage to prime reverse transcription. This target-primed reverse transcription mechanism is also used by group II introns. Little is known of the mechanism by which the 5{prime} end of R2 is integrated after reverse transcription. We have determined the 5{prime} junction sequence of 94 R2 elements from 14 different species of Drosophila. Only 37% of the full-length elements contained precise 5{prime} junctions; the remainder contained deletions of the 28S gene and/or insertions of additional sequences. Because the 5{prime} junctions of truncated copies were similar to full-length elements, no sequences at the 5{prime} end of R2 appear to be required for element integration. A model in which the R2 reverse transcriptase is capable of switching templates from the R2 RNA transcript to the upstream 28S gene can best explain the observed 5{prime} junction sequences. This template jumping is analogous to the template switching of retroviral reverse transcriptases during formation of the double-stranded integration products. 44 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Introduction to cotranscriptional RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Merkhofer, Evan C; Hu, Peter; Johnson, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that many intron-containing genes can be cotranscriptionally spliced has led to an increased understanding of how splicing and transcription are intricately intertwined. Cotranscriptional splicing has been demonstrated in a number of different organisms and has been shown to play roles in coordinating both constitutive and alternative splicing. The nature of cotranscriptional splicing suggests that changes in transcription can dramatically affect splicing, and new evidence suggests that splicing can, in turn, influence transcription. In this chapter, we discuss the mechanisms and consequences of cotranscriptional splicing and introduce some of the tools used to measure this process.

  6. A five prime splice-region G yields C mutation in exon 1 of the human. beta. -globin gene inhibits pre-mRNA splicing: A mechanism for. beta. sup + -thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Vidaud, M.; Vidaud, D.; Amselem, S.; Rosa, J.; Goossens, M. ); Gattoni, R.; Stevenin, J. ); Chibani, J. )

    1989-02-01

    The authors have characterized a Mediterranean {beta}-thalassemia allele containing a sequence change at codon 30 that alters both {beta}-globin pre-mRNA splicing and the structure of the homoglobin product. Presumably, this G {yields} C transversion at position {minus}1 of intron 1 reduces severely the utilization of the normal 5{prime} splice site since the level of the Arg {yields} Thr mutant hemoglobin (designated hemoglobin Kairouan) found in the erythrocytes of the patient is very low (2% of total hemoglobin). Since no natural mutations of the guanine located at position {minus}1 of the CAG/GTAAGT consensus sequence had been isolated previously. They investigated the role of this nucleotide in the constitution of an active 5{prime} splice site by studying the splicing of the pre-mRNA in cell-free extracts. They demonstrate that correct splicing of the mutant pre-mRNA is 98% inhibited. Their results provide further insights into the mechanisms of pre-mRNA maturation by revealing that the last residue of the exon plays a role at least equivalent to that of the intron residue at position +5.

  7. Functional Dissection of an Alternatively Spliced Herpesvirus Gene by Splice Site Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schommartz, Tim; Loroch, Stefan; Alawi, Malik; Grundhoff, Adam; Sickmann, Albert

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesviruses have large and complex DNA genomes. The largest among the herpesviruses, those of the cytomegaloviruses, include over 170 genes. Although most herpesvirus gene products are expressed from unspliced transcripts, a substantial number of viral transcripts are spliced. Some viral transcripts are subject to alternative splicing, which leads to the expression of several proteins from a single gene. Functional analysis of individual proteins derived from an alternatively spliced gene is difficult, as deletion and nonsense mutagenesis, both common methods used in the generation of viral gene knockout mutants, affect several or all gene products at the same time. Here, we show that individual gene products of an alternatively spliced herpesvirus gene can be inactivated selectively by mutagenesis of the splice donor or acceptor site and by intron deletion or substitution mutagenesis. We used this strategy to dissect the essential M112/113 gene of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), which encodes the MCMV Early 1 (E1) proteins. The expression of each of the four E1 protein isoforms was inactivated individually, and the requirement for each isoform in MCMV replication was analyzed in fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. We show that the E1 p87 isoform, but not the p33, p36, and p38 isoforms, is essential for viral replication in cell culture. Moreover, the presence of one of the two medium-size isoforms (p36 or p38) and the presence of intron 1, but not its specific sequence, are required for viral replication. This study demonstrates the usefulness of splice site mutagenesis for the functional analysis of alternatively spliced herpesvirus genes. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses include up to 170 genes in their DNA genomes. The functions of most viral gene products remain poorly defined. The construction of viral gene knockout mutants has thus been an important tool for functional analysis of viral proteins. However, this strategy is of limited use when

  8. Binding of nuclear factors to the 5 prime -interferon consensus sequence of the HLA-A2 class I gene

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bouteiller, P.; Bogarad, L.D.; Roberts, M.R.; Ruddle, F.H. ); Barbosa, J.A. )

    1990-02-01

    To investigate the regulatory role of the conserved interferon consensus sequence (ICS) found in the 5{prime} flanking region of HLA class I genes, the authors studied the binding of nuclear proteins to the ICS of HLA-A2 gene (ICS-A2) by the gel shift assay. Nuclear extracts from several human cell lines expressing different levels of surface class I molecules reveal an ICS-A2-protein complex of similar mobility, the amount of which varies in a cell-type=dependent manner. In some cell lines, interferon-{gamma} treatment decreased the level of this complex. The overlapping enhancer A element also competes for the formation of this ICS-A2-protein complex. Footprinting and methylation interference analyses demonstrate that nuclear protein(s) protect specific sequences within the ICS-A2 element, suggesting that these protein(s) may represent interferon-sensitive transcription factors.

  9. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10–15%) creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO) allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2'-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy. PMID:26325627

  10. Two stages splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudaber, Mohammad Hassan; Yusof, Yuhani

    2015-05-01

    The study of the biological process of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) splicing system in a translucent approach was investigated in 2012 by Yusof under the framework of formal language theory. In this work, the concepts of splicing system in two stages as well as splicing languages are mathematically and biologically discussed. Additionally, some theorems based on recognition site factor of initial strings at the existence of two initial strings and two rules are provided via Yusof-Goode (Y-G) approach. Besides, an example is also given in showing the biological meaning of the introduced concept.

  11. Genome-wide survey of allele-specific splicing in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nembaware, Victoria; Lupindo, Bukiwe; Schouest, Katherine; Spillane, Charles; Scheffler, Konrad; Seoighe, Cathal

    2008-01-01

    Background Accurate mRNA splicing depends on multiple regulatory signals encoded in the transcribed RNA sequence. Many examples of mutations within human splice regulatory regions that alter splicing qualitatively or quantitatively have been reported and allelic differences in mRNA splicing are likely to be a common and important source of phenotypic diversity at the molecular level, in addition to their contribution to genetic disease susceptibility. However, because the effect of a mutation on the efficiency of mRNA splicing is often difficult to predict, many mutations that cause disease through an effect on splicing are likely to remain undiscovered. Results We have combined a genome-wide scan for sequence polymorphisms likely to affect mRNA splicing with analysis of publicly available Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) and exon array data. The genome-wide scan uses published tools and identified 30,977 SNPs located within donor and acceptor splice sites, branch points and exonic splicing enhancer elements. For 1,185 candidate splicing polymorphisms the difference in splicing between alternative alleles was corroborated by publicly available exon array data from 166 lymphoblastoid cell lines. We developed a novel probabilistic method to infer allele-specific splicing from EST data. The method uses SNPs and alternative mRNA isoforms mapped to EST sequences and models both regulated alternative splicing as well as allele-specific splicing. We have also estimated heritability of splicing and report that a greater proportion of genes show evidence of splicing heritability than show heritability of overall gene expression level. Our results provide an extensive resource that can be used to assess the possible effect on splicing of human polymorphisms in putative splice-regulatory sites. Conclusion We report a set of genes showing evidence of allele-specific splicing from an integrated analysis of genomic polymorphisms, EST data and exon array data, including several

  12. How did alternative splicing evolve?

    PubMed

    Ast, Gil

    2004-10-01

    Alternative splicing creates transcriptome diversification, possibly leading to speciation. A large fraction of the protein-coding genes of multicellular organisms are alternatively spliced, although no regulated splicing has been detected in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeasts. A comparative analysis of unicellular and multicellular eukaryotic 5' splice sites has revealed important differences - the plasticity of the 5' splice sites of multicellular eukaryotes means that these sites can be used in both constitutive and alternative splicing, and for the regulation of the inclusion/skipping ratio in alternative splicing. So, alternative splicing might have originated as a result of relaxation of the 5' splice site recognition in organisms that originally could support only constitutive splicing. PMID:15510168

  13. pH profile of the adsorption of nucleotides onto montmorillonite. II - Adsorption and desorption of 5-prime-AMP in iron-calcium montmorillonite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Lawless, J. G.; Mazzurco, J.; Church, F. M.; Margulies, L.; Orenberg, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of 5-prime-AMP with montmorillonite saturated with various ratios of two metals found ubiquitously on the surface of earth, that is, iron and calcium, is investigated. Adsorption and desorption of the nucleotide were studied in the pH range of 2-12 at three levels of addition: 0.080, 0.268 and 0.803 mmole 5-prime-AMP per gram of clay. Two desorption stages were employed - H2O wash and NaOH extraction (pH = 12.0). 5-prime-AMP was preferentially adsorbed on the Fe-containing clays relative to the Ca clay. The nucleotide was fully recovered by the two desorption stages, mostly by the NaOH extraction. The evidence at hand indicates that 5-prime-AMP reaction with clay is affected by electrostatic interactions involving both attraction and repulsion forces. Some specific adsorption, possibly the result of covalent bonding and complex formation with the adsorbed ion, cannot be ruled out for iron but does not appear to operate for calcium. Changes in pH cause varying degrees of attaction and repulsion of 5-prime-AMP and may have been operating on the primitive earth, leading to sequences of adsorption and release of this biomolecule.

  14. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient. PMID:26016411

  15. Chromatin and alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Alló, M; Schor, I E; Muñoz, M J; de la Mata, M; Agirre, E; Valcárcel, J; Eyras, E; Kornblihtt, A R

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing affects more than 90% of human genes. Coupling between transcription and splicing has become crucial in the complex network underlying alternative splicing regulation. Because chromatin is the real template for nuclear transcription, changes in its structure, but also in the "reading" and "writing" of the histone code, could modulate splicing choices. Here, we discuss the evidence supporting these ideas, from the first proposal of chromatin affecting alternative splicing, performed 20 years ago, to the latest findings including genome-wide evidence that nucleosomes are preferentially positioned in exons. We focus on two recent reports from our laboratories that add new evidence to this field. The first report shows that a physiological stimulus such as neuron depolarization promotes intragenic histone acetylation (H3K9ac) and chromatin relaxation, causing the skipping of exon 18 of the neural cell adhesion molecule gene. In the second report, we show how specific histone modifications can be created at targeted gene regions as a way to affect alternative splicing: Using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), we increased the levels of H3K9me2 and H3K27me3 in the proximity of alternative exon 33 of the human fibronectin gene, favoring its inclusion into mature messenger RNA (mRNA) through a mechanism that recalls RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing.

  16. Linkage disequilibrium in the insulin gene region is related to the exact number of repeat units present at the 5{prime} flanking polymorphism

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, R.E.; Spielman, R.S.

    1994-09-01

    Tandem DNA repeat units (RUs) located 5{prime} to the insulin (INS) gene give rise to a {open_quotes}5{prime} flanking polymorphism{close_quotes} (5{prime}FP) with minisatellite alleles belonging to 3 size classes. The shortest or {open_quotes}class 1{close_quotes} alleles (mean length of {approximately}40 RUs) are associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), and the 5{prime}FP is one of several INS region loci in strong linkage disequilibrium with IDDM. We have amplified class 1 alleles and have determined the exact number of RUs in individual class 1 alleles found in parents of 50 IDDM families. We also obtained INS region haplotypes by typing two loci near tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and two loci near insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2). We obtained these results: (1) Class 1 alleles (n=101) were found at every integer length from 30 to 44 RUs, the lengths of smallest and largest class 1 alleles observed. The allele frequency distribution was trimodal with peaks at 31, 40 and 42 RUs; 18%, 34% and 48% of the alleles belonged to the three components, respectively. (2) Allelic variation at each flanking locus was highly associated with the exact number of RUs present at the 5{prime}FP. Our results suggest that creation of new 5{prime}FP or other minisatellite haplotypes may be {open_quotes}constrained{close_quotes} in that flanking alleles usually become associated with a new minisatellite length different by only one or two RUs. Furthermore, since many flanking alleles were associated with a single narrow range of class 1 integer lengths, determining exact RU length may aid in visualizing linkage disequilibrium and allelic associations involving other minisatellite loci.

  17. Spliced leader RNA-mediated trans-splicing in phylum Rotifera.

    PubMed

    Pouchkina-Stantcheva, Natalia N; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2005-06-01

    In kinetoplastids, Euglena, and four metazoan phyla, trans-splicing has been described as a mechanism for the generation of mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs): 5'-ends of precursor mRNAs are replaced by a short spliced leader (SL) exon from a small SL RNA. Although the full phylogenetic range is unknown, trans-splicing has not been found in vertebrates, insects, plants, or yeast. In animal groups where it does occur, i.e., nematodes, cnidarians, platyhelminths, and primitive chordates, SL RNAs do not show sequence relatedness across phyla. The apparently sporadic phylogenetic distribution and the lack of SL RNA homology have led to opposing hypotheses on its evolution, involving either an ancient origin followed by loss in multiple lineages or independent acquisition in several taxa. Here we present evidence for the occurrence of trans-splicing in bdelloid rotifers (Bdelloidea, Rotifera). A common 23-nt sequence, representing the SL exon-diagnostic of SL RNA-mediated trans-splicing-was found at the 5'-end of at least 50%-65% of mRNAs from Adineta ricciae and Philodina sp. The trans-splicing pattern in bdelloid rotifers can be unusually complex, as observed in transcripts from a heat shock protein gene, hsp82-1, where the SL exon was spliced to three alternative positions. Bdelloid rotifer SL RNAs were found to be 105 or 106 nt long and comprised the SL sequence, a conserved splice donor site and an intron containing a putative spliceosome-binding motif. Intriguingly, some similarity of rotifer SL RNA sequence and predicted secondary structure was seen to that of the predominant SL1 RNA of nematodes, although it is unlikely that this demonstrates homology. In addition, sequence corresponding to the rotifer SL exon was found at the 5'-end of a number of full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) clones in a rice (Oryza sativa) database. None of these cDNAs gave a close match with homologous plant genes, suggesting that a small but significant portion of the rice expressed

  18. Extracellular matrix and hormones transcriptionally regulate bovine. beta. -casein 5 prime sequences in stably transfected mouse mammary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidhauser, C. Bissell, M.J. ); Myers, C.A.; Casperson, G.F. )

    1990-12-01

    Milk protein regulation involves synergistic action of lactogenic hormones and extracellular matrix (ECM). It is well established that substratum has a dramatic effect on morphology and function of mammary cells. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the ECM- and hormone-dependent gene expression, however, have not been resolved. To address this question, a subpopulation (designated CID 9) of the mouse mammary epithelial cell strain COMMA-2D has been developed in which more than 35% of the cells express {beta}-casein, form alveoli-like structures when plated onto a reconstituted basement membrane, and secrete {beta}-casein undirectionally into a lumen. These cells were stably transfected with a series of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) fusion genes to study transcriptional regulation of the bovine {beta}-casein gene. The expression of CAT in these lines demonstrated a striking matrix and hormone dependency. This regulation occurered primarily at the transcriptional level and was dependent on the length of the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-casein promotor. Both matrix and hormonal control of transcription occurred within at least the first 1790 base pairs upstream and/or 42 base pairs downstream of the transcriptional initiation site. The ECM effect was independent of glucocorticoid stimulation. However, prolactin was essential and hydrocortisone further increased CAT expression. Endogenous {beta}-casein expression in these lines was similar to that of the parent CID 9 cells. Our data indicate the existence of matrix-dependent elements that regulate transcription.

  19. Global regulation of alternative splicing by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR)

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Oz; Oren, Shirley; Safran, Michal; Deshet-Unger, Naamit; Akiva, Pinchas; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Cesarkas, Karen; Kabesa, Reut; Amariglio, Ninette; Unger, Ron; Rechavi, Gideon; Eyal, Eran

    2013-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a major mechanism for gene regulation and transcriptome diversity. Despite the extent of the phenomenon, the regulation and specificity of the splicing machinery are only partially understood. Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing of pre-mRNA by ADAR enzymes has been linked to splicing regulation in several cases. Here we used bioinformatics approaches, RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray of ADAR knockdown cells to globally examine how ADAR and its A-to-I RNA editing activity influence alternative mRNA splicing. Although A-to-I RNA editing only rarely targets canonical splicing acceptor, donor, and branch sites, it was found to affect splicing regulatory elements (SREs) within exons. Cassette exons were found to be significantly enriched with A-to-I RNA editing sites compared with constitutive exons. RNA-seq and exon-specific microarray revealed that ADAR knockdown in hepatocarcinoma and myelogenous leukemia cell lines leads to global changes in gene expression, with hundreds of genes changing their splicing patterns in both cell lines. This global change in splicing pattern cannot be explained by putative editing sites alone. Genes showing significant changes in their splicing pattern are frequently involved in RNA processing and splicing activity. Analysis of recently published RNA-seq data from glioblastoma cell lines showed similar results. Our global analysis reveals that ADAR plays a major role in splicing regulation. Although direct editing of the splicing motifs does occur, we suggest it is not likely to be the primary mechanism for ADAR-mediated regulation of alternative splicing. Rather, this regulation is achieved by modulating trans-acting factors involved in the splicing machinery. PMID:23474544

  20. Alternatively spliced, spliceosomal twin introns in Helminthosporium solani.

    PubMed

    Ág, Norbert; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2015-12-01

    Spliceosomal twin introns, "stwintrons", have been defined as complex intervening sequences that carry a second intron ("internal intron") interrupting one of the conserved sequence domains necessary for their correct splicing via consecutive excision events. Previously, we have described and experimentally verified stwintrons in species of Sordariomycetes, where an "internal intron" interrupted the donor sequence of an "external intron". Here we describe and experimentally verify two novel stwintrons of the potato pathogen Helminthosporium solani. One instance involves alternative splicing of an internal intron interrupting the donor domain of an external intron and a second one interrupting the acceptor domain of an overlapping external intron, both events leading to identical mature mRNAs. In the second case, an internal intron interrupts the donor domain of the external intron, while an alternatively spliced intron leads to an mRNA carrying a premature chain termination codon. We thus extend the stwintron concept to the acceptor domain and establish a link of the occurrence of stwintrons with that of alternative splicing.

  1. Alternatively spliced, spliceosomal twin introns in Helminthosporium solani.

    PubMed

    Ág, Norbert; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2015-12-01

    Spliceosomal twin introns, "stwintrons", have been defined as complex intervening sequences that carry a second intron ("internal intron") interrupting one of the conserved sequence domains necessary for their correct splicing via consecutive excision events. Previously, we have described and experimentally verified stwintrons in species of Sordariomycetes, where an "internal intron" interrupted the donor sequence of an "external intron". Here we describe and experimentally verify two novel stwintrons of the potato pathogen Helminthosporium solani. One instance involves alternative splicing of an internal intron interrupting the donor domain of an external intron and a second one interrupting the acceptor domain of an overlapping external intron, both events leading to identical mature mRNAs. In the second case, an internal intron interrupts the donor domain of the external intron, while an alternatively spliced intron leads to an mRNA carrying a premature chain termination codon. We thus extend the stwintron concept to the acceptor domain and establish a link of the occurrence of stwintrons with that of alternative splicing. PMID:26514742

  2. RNA splicing and genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, P.A.

    1988-11-25

    The splicing of long transcripts RNA (copied from DNA in the cell nucleus) into smaller specific mRNA is an important event in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. The splicing reaction occurs as a late step in the nuclear pathway for synthesis of mRNAs. This pathway commences with initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase II and probably involves an integrated series of steps each dependent on previous events. Splicing of precursors to mRNAs involves the formation of a spliceosome complex containing 5' and 3' splice sites. This complex contains the evolutionary highly conserved small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) Us, U4, U5, and U6. The most abundant snRNA, U1, is required to form the spliceosome and may be a part of the spliceosome. Analogues of these snRNAs have been identified in yeast. Assembly of the spliceosome probably involves the binding of a multi-snRNA complex containing U4, U5, and U6 snRNAs. Several observations suggest that the association of snRNAs in such complexes is quite dynamic. It is argued that the snRANs in the spliceosome form a catalytic RNA structure that is responsible for the cleavage and ligation steps during splicing.

  3. Splice junctions in adenovirus 2 early region 4 mRNAs: multiple splice sites produce 18 to 24 RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Tigges, M A; Raskas, H J

    1984-01-01

    We localized the splice junctions in adenovirus 2 early region 4 (E4) mRNAs. Processing of the E4 precursor RNA positioned the donor splice site of the 5' leader sequence adjacent to acceptor sites near the 5' ends of five of the six open reading regions in the E4 transcription unit. Of particular interest among the E4 mRNAs is an extensively spliced class which includes multiple species with sizes ranging from 1.1 to 0.75 kilobases (kb). Purified 1.1- to 0.75-kb mRNAs specified at least 10 polypeptides in vitro. We detected eight acceptor and two donor splice sites utilized in the deletion of the intron from the 3' portion of these mRNAs. E4 RNAs were isolated from the cytoplasm of infected cells at 5, 9, 12, and 18 h after infection. The E4 mRNAs were present throughout infection, but different members of the 1.1- to 0.7-kb class were predominant at each time assayed. Alternate splicing of the 3.0-kb E4 precursor RNA can generate as many as 25 mRNAs that encode at least 16 polypeptides. Images PMID:6336328

  4. Inactivation of the ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Lactobacillus leichmannii by 2 prime -chloro-2 prime -deoxyuridine 5 prime -triphosphate: A 3 prime -2 prime hydrogen transfer during the formation of 3 prime -keto-2 prime -deoxyuridine 5 prime -triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, G.W.; Harris, G.; Stubbe, J. )

    1988-10-04

    The ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase of Lactobacillus leichmannii converts the substrate analogue 2{prime}-chloro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine 5{prime}-triphosphate (C1UTP) into a mixture of 2{prime}-deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) and the unstable product 3{prime}-keto-2{prime}-deoxyuridine triphosphate (3{prime}-keto-dUTP). This ketone can be trapped by reduction with NaBH{sub 4}, producing a 4:1 mixture of xylo-dUTP and dUTP. When (3{prime}-{sup 3}H)C1UTP is treated with enzyme in the presence of NaBH{sub 4}, the isomeric deoxyuridines isolated after alkaline phosphatase treatment retained 15% of the {sup 3}H in C1UTP. Degradation of these isomeric nucleosides has established the location of the {sup 3}H in 3{prime}-keto-dUTP as predominantly 2{prime}(S). The xylo-dU had 98.6% of its label at the 2{prime}(S) position and 1.5% at 2{prime}(R). The isolated dU had 89.6% of its label at 2{prime}(S) and 1.4% at 2{prime}(R), with the remaining 9% label inferred to be at the 3{prime}-carbon, this resulting from the direct enzymic production of dUTP. These results are consistent with enzymic production of a 1:1,000 mixture of dUTP and 3{prime}-keto-dUTP, where the 3{prime}-hydrogen of C1UTP is retained at 3{prime} during production of dUTP and is transferred to 2{prime}(S) during production of 3{prime}-keto-dUTP. The implications of these results and the unique role of the cofactor adenosylcobalamin are discussed in terms of reductase being a model for the B{sub 12}-dependent rearrangement reactions.

  5. Desmin splice variants causing cardiac and skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Park, K Y; Dalakas, M C; Goebel, H H; Ferrans, V J; Semino-Mora, C; Litvak, S; Takeda, K; Goldfarb, L G

    2000-11-01

    Desmin myopathy is a hereditary or sporadic cardiac and skeletal myopathy characterised by intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin reactive deposits in muscle cells. We have characterised novel splice site mutations in the gene desmin resulting in deletion of the entire exon 3 during the pre-mRNA splicing. Sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA identified a heterozygous de novo A to G change at the +3 position of the splice donor site of intron 3 (IVS3+3A-->G) in a patient with sporadic skeletal and cardiac myopathy. A G to A transition at the highly conserved -1 nucleotide position of intron 2 affecting the splice acceptor site (IVS2-1G-->A) was found in an unrelated patient with a similar phenotype. Expression of genomic DNA fragments carrying the IVS3+3A-->G and IVS2-1G-->A mutations confirmed that these mutations cause exon 3 deletion. Aberrant splicing leads to an in frame deletion of 32 complete codons and is predicted to result in mutant desmin lacking 32 amino acids from the 1B segment of the alpha helical rod. Functional analysis of the mutant desmin in SW13 (vim-) cells showed aggregation of abnormal coarse clumps of desmin positive material dispersed throughout the cytoplasm. This is the first report on the pathogenic potentials of splice site mutations in the desmin gene.

  6. Splice assembly tool and method of splicing

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1980-01-01

    A splice assembly tool for assembling component parts of an electrical conductor while producing a splice connection between electrical cables therewith, comprises a first structural member adaptable for supporting force applying means thereon, said force applying means enabling a rotary force applied manually thereto to be converted to a longitudinal force for subsequent application against a first component part of said electrical connection, a second structural member adaptable for engaging a second component part in a manner to assist said first structural member in assembling the component parts relative to one another and transmission means for conveying said longitudinal force between said first and said second structural members, said first and said second structural members being coupled to one another by said transmission means, wherein at least one of said component parts comprises a tubular elastomeric sleeve and said force applying means provides a relatively high mechanical advantage when said rotary force is applied thereto so as to facilitate assembly of said at least one tubular elastomeric sleeve about said other component part in an interference fit manner.

  7. SpliceDisease database: linking RNA splicing and disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Jie; Li, Kaibo; Zhao, Wei; Cui, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing is an important aspect of gene regulation in many organisms. Splicing of RNA is regulated by complicated mechanisms involving numerous RNA-binding proteins and the intricate network of interactions among them. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or its regulatory proteins have been shown to be involved in human diseases. Defects in pre-mRNA splicing process have emerged as a common disease-causing mechanism. Therefore, a database integrating RNA splicing and disease associations would be helpful for understanding not only the RNA splicing but also its contribution to disease. In SpliceDisease database, we manually curated 2337 splicing mutation disease entries involving 303 genes and 370 diseases, which have been supported experimentally in 898 publications. The SpliceDisease database provides information including the change of the nucleotide in the sequence, the location of the mutation on the gene, the reference Pubmed ID and detailed description for the relationship among gene mutations, splicing defects and diseases. We standardized the names of the diseases and genes and provided links for these genes to NCBI and UCSC genome browser for further annotation and genomic sequences. For the location of the mutation, we give direct links of the entry to the respective position/region in the genome browser. The users can freely browse, search and download the data in SpliceDisease at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/sdisease.

  8. Past and future of providing matched, unrelated donors for marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roeckel, I E; Baker, J

    1997-01-01

    Prior to 1979, bone marrow transplants were only performed with histocompatible sibling donors. Once it was established that histocompatible, unrelated donors could donate marrow for transplantation, the recruitment of such donors needed to be standardized. Blood donor centers had already identified the histocompatibility locus antigen (HLA) typing for donors who could be recruited to donate bone marrow. Recruiting a large number of donors required systematic evaluation and testing according to defined standards which were published in 1988 by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). Peripheral stem cell collection (PBS) has been added as a transplant source. It promises additional therapeutic modalities, such as gene splicing to address other than cancer therapy.

  9. The intronic splicing code: multiple factors involved in ATM pseudoexon definition.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Buratti, Emanuele; van Santen, Maria A; Lührmann, Reinhard; Baralle, Francisco E

    2010-02-17

    Abundance of pseudo splice sites in introns can potentially give rise to innumerable pseudoexons, outnumbering the real ones. Nonetheless, these are efficiently ignored by the splicing machinery, a process yet to be understood completely. Although numerous 5' splice site-like sequences functioning as splicing silencers have been found to be enriched in predicted human pseudoexons, the lack of active pseudoexons pose a fundamental challenge to how these U1snRNP-binding sites function in splicing inhibition. Here, we address this issue by focusing on a previously described pathological ATM pseudoexon whose inhibition is mediated by U1snRNP binding at intronic splicing processing element (ISPE), composed of a consensus donor splice site. Spliceosomal complex assembly demonstrates inefficient A complex formation when ISPE is intact, implying U1snRNP-mediated unproductive U2snRNP recruitment. Furthermore, interaction of SF2/ASF with its motif seems to be dependent on RNA structure and U1snRNP interaction. Our results suggest a complex combinatorial interplay of RNA structure and trans-acting factors in determining the splicing outcome and contribute to understanding the intronic splicing code for the ATM pseudoexon.

  10. Cysteinyl peptides of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase labeled by the affinity label 8-((4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)thio)adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, S.H.; Colman, R.F. )

    1990-03-13

    The affinity label 8-((4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)thio)adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP) reacts covalently with rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase, incorporating 2 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit upon complete inactivation. Protection against inactivation is provided by phosphoenolpyruvate, K{sup +}, and Mn{sup 2+} and only 1 mol of reagent/mol of subunit is incorporated. The authors have now identified the resultant modified residues. After reaction with 8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP at pH 7.0, modified enzyme was incubated with ({sup 3}H)NaBH{sub 4} to reduce the carbonyl groups of enzyme-bound 8-BDB-TA-5{prime}-TP and to introduce a radioactive tracer into the modified residues. Following carboxymethylation and digestion with trypsin, the radioactive peptides were separated on a phenylboronate agarose column followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography in 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid with an acetonitrile gradient. Gas-phase sequencing gave the cysteine-modified peptides Asn{sup 162}-Ile-Cys-Lys{sup 165} and Cys{sup 151}-Asp-Glu-Asn-Ile-Leu-Trp-Leu-Asp-Tyr-Lys{sup 161}, with a smaller amount of Asn{sup 43}-Thr-Gly-Ile-Ile-Cys-Thr-Ile-Gly-Pro-Ala-Ser-Arg{sup 55}. Reaction in the presence of the protectants phosphoenolpyruvate, K{sup +}, and Mn{sup 2+} yielded Asn-Ile-Cys-Lys as the only labeled peptide, indicating that inactivation is caused by modification of Cys{sup 151} and Cys{sup 48}.

  11. Rapid generation of splicing reporters with pSpliceExpress

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Shivendra; Khanna, Amit; Stamm, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Almost all human protein-coding transcripts undergo pre-mRNA splicing and a majority of them is alternatively spliced. The most common technique used to analyze the regulation of an alternative exon is through reporter minigene constructs. However, their construction is time-consuming and is often complicated by the limited availability of appropriate restriction sites. Here, we report a fast and simple recombination-based method to generate splicing reporter genes, using a new vector, pSpliceExpress. The system allows generation of minigenes within one week. Minigenes generated with pSpliceExpress show the same regulation as displayed by conventionally cloned reporter constructs and provide an alternate avenue to study splice site selection in vivo. PMID:18930792

  12. Splicing of intron 3 of human BACE requires the flanking introns 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Annies, Maik; Stefani, Muriel; Hueber, Andreas; Fischer, Frauke; Paganetti, Paolo

    2009-10-16

    Regulation of proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein by the aspartic protease BACE may occur by alternative splicing and the generation of enzymatically inactive forms. In fact, the presence of exonic donor and acceptor sites for intron 3 generates the two deficient variants BACE457 and BACE476. In HEK293 cells, when introns are inserted separately in the BACE cDNA, we found that whilst introns 2 and 4 are efficiently spliced out, intron 3 is not removed. On the other hand, splicing to wild-type BACE is restored when intron 3 is flanked by the two other introns. The presence of all three introns also leads to alternative splicing of intron 3 and the generation of BACE476. In contrast, BACE457 expression takes place only after mutating the donor splice site of intron 3, indicating that additional regulatory elements are necessary for the use of the splicing site within exon 4. Overall, our data demonstrate that a complex splicing of intron 3 regulates the maturation of the BACE mRNA. This appears orchestrated by domains present in the exons and introns flanking intron 3. Excessive BACE activity is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, therefore this complex regulation might guarantee low neuronal BACE activity and disease prevention.

  13. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain.

  14. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef

    2010-01-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT–PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  15. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain. PMID:20512402

  16. RNA splicing in a new rhabdovirus from Culex mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Ryusei; Isawa, Haruhiko; Hoshino, Keita; Tsuda, Yoshio; Yanase, Tohru; Sasaki, Toshinori; Kobayashi, Mutsuo; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2011-07-01

    Among members of the order Mononegavirales, RNA splicing events have been found only in the family Bornaviridae. Here, we report that a new rhabdovirus isolated from the mosquito Culex tritaeniorhynchus replicates in the nuclei of infected cells and requires RNA splicing for viral mRNA maturation. The virus, designated Culex tritaeniorhynchus rhabdovirus (CTRV), shares a similar genome organization with other rhabdoviruses, except for the presence of a putative intron in the coding region for the L protein. Molecular phylogenetic studies indicated that CTRV belongs to the family Rhabdoviridae, but it is yet to be assigned a genus. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the CTRV virion is extremely elongated, unlike virions of rhabdoviruses, which are generally bullet shaped. Northern hybridization confirmed that a large transcript (approximately 6,500 nucleotides [nt]) from the CTRV L gene was present in the infected cells. Strand-specific reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses identified the intron-exon boundaries and the 76-nt intron sequence, which contains the typical motif for eukaryotic spliceosomal intron-splice donor/acceptor sites (GU-AG), a predicted branch point, and a polypyrimidine tract. In situ hybridization exhibited that viral RNAs are primarily localized in the nucleus of infected cells, indicating that CTRV replicates in the nucleus and is allowed to utilize the host's nuclear splicing machinery. This is the first report of RNA splicing among the members of the family Rhabdoviridae.

  17. Our favourite alternative splice site.

    PubMed

    Lerivray, Hubert; Méreau, Agnès; Osborne, H Beverley

    2006-05-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread mechanism in mammals that generates several mRNAs from one gene, thereby creating genetic diversity of the genome. Variant splice patterns are often specific to different stages of development or particular tissues, and alternative splicing defects are being more frequently detected in genetic diseases and cancers. The increasingly important role of alternative splicing in the function and the regulation of cellular process makes it critical to have an easy-to-use data repository for the biological and medical research communities. We have compared web resources that give access to information on alternatively spliced genes, and the FAST DB (Friendly Alternative Splicing and Transcripts DataBase) site came out as our favourite.

  18. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  19. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Celine K.; Black, Douglas L.; Zheng, Sika

    2016-01-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that regulate splicing, both during development and in the adult brain. PMID:27094079

  20. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Samuel E; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing "minigene" in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest.

  1. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  2. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  3. Tissue-specific methylation of individual CpG dinucleotides in the 5{prime} upstream region of the mouse catalase gene (Cas-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, I.L.; Singh, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The intracellular antioxidant enzyme, catalase, is encoded by a gene whose level of expression in different organisms, including humans, varies with tissue-type. The {open_quotes}TATA-less{close_quotes} 5{prime} upstream region of the catalase gene, in mice and humans, contains a CpG island. Such CG-rich regions are target sites for cytosine methylation and have been implicated in tissue-specific gene expression. However, the methylation status of individual CpG dinucleotides and their significance in gene expression has not been established. A 275 bp fragment within the 5{prime} region of Cas-1 was evaluated for CpG methylation. HpaII digestion of genomic DNA, followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification (HpaII-PCR), suggests that at least one of three CCGG is not methylated in nine different somatic tissues that express this enzyme at various levels. In contrast, all three CCGG sites are methylated in DNA from sperm and spleen. Further examination of the methylation specificity of individual CCGG sites was conducted using sodium bisulfite modification of genomic DNA followed by HPaII-PCR. Sodium bisulfite modifies non-methylated cytosines to uracils, changing a CG to a TG dinucleotide. This nucleotide substitution eliminates HpaII sites and allows the methylation status of each of the CCGG sites to be assessed. The ability to discern the number and combination of methylated sites within the 5{prime} region of a gene permits the determination of a possible correlation between differential methylation patterns and temporal/spatial gene regulation. Analysis of differential methylation, using the mouse catalase gene as a model, provides further insight into CpG methylation as one mechanism of mammalian gene regulation.

  4. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  5. Therapeutic targeting of splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that splicing patterns are frequently altered in cancer and that mutations in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins, as well as mutations affecting the splicing of key cancer-associated genes, are enriched in cancer. In parallel, there is also accumulating evidence that several molecular subtypes of cancer are highly dependent on splicing function for cell survival. These findings have resulted in a growing interest in targeting splicing catalysis, splicing regulatory proteins, and/or specific key altered splicing events in the treatment of cancer. Here we present strategies that exist and that are in development to target altered dependency on the spliceosome, as well as aberrant splicing, in cancer. These include drugs to target global splicing in cancer subtypes that are preferentially dependent on wild-type splicing for survival, methods to alter post-translational modifications of splicing-regulating proteins, and strategies to modulate pathologic splicing events and protein-RNA interactions in cancer. PMID:27603132

  6. A new family of retroviral long terminal repeat elements in the human genome identified by their homologies to an element 5{prime} to the spider monkey haptoglobin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, L.M.; Maeda, N.

    1995-06-10

    A new family of retroviral long terminal repeats that we name Spm-LTR has been identified as a result of DNA sequence comparisons between the entire Gen-Bank databank and an element, SPHP, located 5{prime} to the haptoglobin gene of spider monkeys. The 18 human Spm-LTR sequences so identified fall into three subtypes. There is no sequence similarity between Spm-LTR elements and any endogenous retroviral LTR sequences previously reported except for general features that define LTRs. However, a previously described repeated sequence (MER-4) forms a portion of the Spm-LTR sequence. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. A novel splicing mutation alters DSPP transcription and leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta type II.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jiucun; Ma, Yanyun; Du, Wenqi; Zhao, Siyang; Zhang, Zuowei; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Liu, Yue; Xiao, Huasheng; Wang, Hongyan; Jin, Li; Liu, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) type II is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a serious disorders in teeth. Mutations of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene were revealed to be the causation of DGI type II (DGI-II). In this study, we identified a novel mutation (NG_011595.1:g.8662T>C, c.135+2T>C) lying in the splice donor site of intron 3 of DSPP gene in a Chinese Han DGI-II pedigree. It was found in all affected subjects but not in unaffected ones or other unrelated healthy controls. The function of the mutant DSPP gene, which was predicted online and subsequently confirmed by in vitro splicing analysis, was the loss of splicing of intron 3, leading to the extended length of DSPP mRNA. For the first time, the functional non-splicing of intron was revealed in a novel DSPP mutation and was considered as the causation of DGI-II. It was also indicated that splicing was of key importance to the function of DSPP and this splice donor site might be a sensitive mutation hot spot. Our findings combined with other reports would facilitate the genetic diagnosis of DGI-II, shed light on its gene therapy and help to finally conquer human diseases.

  8. Nucleotide sequence composition adjacent to intronic splice sites improves splicing efficiency via its effect on pre-mRNA local folding in fungi.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Zohar; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-10-01

    RNA splicing is the central process of intron removal in eukaryotes known to regulate various cellular functions such as growth, development, and response to external signals. The canonical sequences indicating the splicing sites needed for intronic boundary recognition are well known. However, the roles and evolution of the local folding of intronic and exonic sequence features adjacent to splice sites has yet to be thoroughly studied. Here, focusing on four fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus nidulans, and Candida albicans), we performed for the first time a comprehensive high-resolution study aimed at characterizing the encoding of intronic splicing efficiency in pre-mRNA transcripts and its effect on intron evolution. Our analysis supports the conjecture that pre-mRNA local folding strength at intronic boundaries is under selective pressure, as it significantly affects splicing efficiency. Specifically, we show that in the immediate region of 12-30 nucleotides (nt) surrounding the intronic donor site there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding; similarly, in the region of 15-33 nt surrounding the acceptor and branch sites there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding. We also show that in most cases there is a preference for strong pre-mRNA folding further away from intronic splice sites. In addition, we demonstrate that these signals are not associated with gene-specific functions, and they correlate with splicing efficiency measurements (r = 0.77, P = 2.98 × 10(-21)) and with expression levels of the corresponding genes (P = 1.24 × 10(-19)). We suggest that pre-mRNA folding strength in the above-mentioned regions has a direct effect on splicing efficiency by improving the recognition of intronic boundaries. These new discoveries are contributory steps toward a broader understanding of splicing regulation and intronic/transcript evolution.

  9. Nucleotide sequence composition adjacent to intronic splice sites improves splicing efficiency via its effect on pre-mRNA local folding in fungi.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Zohar; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-10-01

    RNA splicing is the central process of intron removal in eukaryotes known to regulate various cellular functions such as growth, development, and response to external signals. The canonical sequences indicating the splicing sites needed for intronic boundary recognition are well known. However, the roles and evolution of the local folding of intronic and exonic sequence features adjacent to splice sites has yet to be thoroughly studied. Here, focusing on four fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus nidulans, and Candida albicans), we performed for the first time a comprehensive high-resolution study aimed at characterizing the encoding of intronic splicing efficiency in pre-mRNA transcripts and its effect on intron evolution. Our analysis supports the conjecture that pre-mRNA local folding strength at intronic boundaries is under selective pressure, as it significantly affects splicing efficiency. Specifically, we show that in the immediate region of 12-30 nucleotides (nt) surrounding the intronic donor site there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding; similarly, in the region of 15-33 nt surrounding the acceptor and branch sites there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding. We also show that in most cases there is a preference for strong pre-mRNA folding further away from intronic splice sites. In addition, we demonstrate that these signals are not associated with gene-specific functions, and they correlate with splicing efficiency measurements (r = 0.77, P = 2.98 × 10(-21)) and with expression levels of the corresponding genes (P = 1.24 × 10(-19)). We suggest that pre-mRNA folding strength in the above-mentioned regions has a direct effect on splicing efficiency by improving the recognition of intronic boundaries. These new discoveries are contributory steps toward a broader understanding of splicing regulation and intronic/transcript evolution. PMID:26246046

  10. Nucleotide sequence composition adjacent to intronic splice sites improves splicing efficiency via its effect on pre-mRNA local folding in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zafrir, Zohar; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    RNA splicing is the central process of intron removal in eukaryotes known to regulate various cellular functions such as growth, development, and response to external signals. The canonical sequences indicating the splicing sites needed for intronic boundary recognition are well known. However, the roles and evolution of the local folding of intronic and exonic sequence features adjacent to splice sites has yet to be thoroughly studied. Here, focusing on four fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus nidulans, and Candida albicans), we performed for the first time a comprehensive high-resolution study aimed at characterizing the encoding of intronic splicing efficiency in pre-mRNA transcripts and its effect on intron evolution. Our analysis supports the conjecture that pre-mRNA local folding strength at intronic boundaries is under selective pressure, as it significantly affects splicing efficiency. Specifically, we show that in the immediate region of 12–30 nucleotides (nt) surrounding the intronic donor site there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding; similarly, in the region of 15–33 nt surrounding the acceptor and branch sites there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding. We also show that in most cases there is a preference for strong pre-mRNA folding further away from intronic splice sites. In addition, we demonstrate that these signals are not associated with gene-specific functions, and they correlate with splicing efficiency measurements (r = 0.77, P = 2.98 × 10−21) and with expression levels of the corresponding genes (P = 1.24 × 10−19). We suggest that pre-mRNA folding strength in the above-mentioned regions has a direct effect on splicing efficiency by improving the recognition of intronic boundaries. These new discoveries are contributory steps toward a broader understanding of splicing regulation and intronic/transcript evolution. PMID:26246046

  11. Splicing in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Zaghlool, Ammar; Ameur, Adam; Cavelier, Lucia; Feuk, Lars

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear over the past decade that RNA has important functions in human cells beyond its role as an intermediate translator of DNA to protein. It is now known that RNA plays highly specific roles in pathways involved in regulatory, structural, and catalytic functions. The complexity of RNA production and regulation has become evident with the advent of high-throughput methods to study the transcriptome. Deep sequencing has revealed an enormous diversity of RNA types and transcript isoforms in human cells. The transcriptome of the human brain is particularly interesting as it contains more expressed genes than other tissues and also displays an extreme diversity of transcript isoforms, indicating that highly complex regulatory pathways are present in the brain. Several of these regulatory proteins are now identified, including RNA-binding proteins that are neuron specific. RNA-binding proteins also play important roles in regulating the splicing process and the temporal and spatial isoform production. While significant progress has been made in understanding the human transcriptome, many questions still remain regarding the basic mechanisms of splicing and subcellular localization of RNA. A long-standing question is to what extent the splicing of pre-mRNA is cotranscriptional and posttranscriptional, respectively. Recent data, including studies of the human brain, indicate that splicing is primarily cotranscriptional in human cells. This chapter describes the current understanding of splicing and splicing regulation in the human brain and discusses the recent global sequence-based analyses of transcription and splicing. PMID:25172473

  12. Synthesis and characterization of ( sup 3 H)-5 prime azido-N-1-naphthylphthlamic acid, a photolabile N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid analog

    SciTech Connect

    Voet, J.G.; Dodge, B.; Harris, K.; Jacobs, M.; Larkin, L.; Bader, S.; Schnitzler, G.; Sutherland, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The NPA (N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid) receptor is an important protein involved in the regulation of transport of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In our attempt to isolate and characterize this protein we have previously synthesized and characterized a photolabile analog of NPA, 5{prime}-azido-NPA (Az-NPA) and shown it to be a competitor of NPA for binding sites on the NPA receptor as well as an inhibitor of auxin transport. We have now synthesized and characterized ({sup 3}H)-Az-NPA. The precursor, 2,3,4,5-Br-5{prime}-amino-NPA was dehydrohalogenated with tritium gas by Research Products International. The amino group was converted to an azido group and the product purified by HPLC. ({sup 3}H)-Az-NPA was found to be photolabile and to co-chromatograph with our synthetic unlabeled Az-NPA. Furthermore, the tritiated material was found to bind to zucchini hypocotyl cell membranes in a manner competitive with NPA as well as unlabeled Az-NPA. Photolysis of zucchini phase-partitioned plasma membranes in the presence of ({sup 3}H)-Az-NPA resulted in covalent association of tritium with the membranes. Much of this covalent association could be prevented by prior treatment of the membranes with excess NPA.

  13. Mutations that alter RNA splicing of the human HPRT gene: a review of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, J P; Rogan, P K; Cariello, N; Nicklas, J A

    1998-11-01

    The human HPRT gene contains spans approximately 42,000 base pairs in genomic DNA, has a mRNA of approximately 900 bases and a protein coding sequence of 657 bases (initiation codon AUG to termination codon UAA). This coding sequence is distributed into 9 exons ranging from 18 (exon 5) to 184 (exon 3) base pairs. Intron sizes range from 170 (intron 7) to 13,075 (intron 1) base pairs. In a database of human HPRT mutations, 277 of 2224 (12.5%) mutations result in alterations in splicing of the mRNA as analyzed by both reverse transcriptase mediated production of a cDNA followed by PCR amplification and cDNA sequencing and by genomic DNA PCR amplification and sequencing. Mutations have been found in all eight 5' (donor) and 3' (acceptor) splice sequences. Mutations in the 5' splice sequences of introns 1 and 5 result in intron inclusion in the cDNA due to the use of cryptic donor splice sequences within the introns; mutations in the other six 5' sites result in simple exon exclusion. Mutations in the 3' splice sequences of introns 1, 3, 7 and 8 result in partial exon exclusion due to the use of cryptic acceptor splice sequences within the exons; mutations in the other four 3' sites result in simple exon exclusion. A base substitution in exon 3 (209G-->T) creates a new 5' (donor) splice site which results in the exclusion of 110 bases of exon 3 from the cDNA. Two base substitutions in intron 8 (IVS8-16G-->A and IVS8-3T-->G) result in the inclusion of intron 8 sequences in the cDNA due to the creation of new 3' (acceptor) splice sites. Base substitution within exons 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8 also result in splice alterations in cDNA. Those in exons 1 and 6 are at the 3' end of the exon and may directly affect splicing. Those within exons 3 and 4 may be the result of the creation of nonsense codons, while those in exon 8 cannot be explained by this mechanism. Lastly, many mutations that affect splicing of the HPRT mRNA have pleiotropic effects in that multiple cDNA products are

  14. Direct selection for mutations affecting specific splice sites in a hamster dihydrofolate reductase minigene.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I T; Chasin, L A

    1993-01-01

    A Chinese hamster cell line containing an extra exon 2 (50 bp) inserted into a single intron of a dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) minigene was constructed. The extra exon 2 was efficiently spliced into the RNA, resulting in an mRNA that is incapable of coding for the DHFR enzyme. Mutations that decreased splicing of this extra exon 2 caused it to be skipped and so produced normal dhfr mRNA. In contrast to the parental cell line, the splicing mutants display a DHFR-positive growth phenotype. Splicing mutants were isolated from this cell line after treatment with four different mutagens (racemic benzo[c]phenanthrene diol epoxide, ethyl methanesulfonate, ethyl nitrosourea, and UV irradiation). By polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct DNA sequencing, we determined the base changes in 66 mutants. Each of the mutagens generated highly specific base changes. All mutations were single-base substitutions and comprised 24 different changes distributed over 16 positions. Most of the mutations were within the consensus sequences at the exon 2 splice donor, acceptor, and branch sites. The RNA splicing patterns in the mutants were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The recruitment of cryptic sites was rarely seen; simple exon skipping was the predominant mutant phenotype. The wide variety of mutations that produced exon skipping suggests that this phenotype is the typical consequence of splice site damage and supports the exon definition model of splice site selection. A few mutations were located outside the consensus sequences, in the exon or between the branch point and the polypyrimidine tract, identifying additional positions that play a role in splice site definition. That most of these 66 mutations fell within consensus sequences in this near-saturation mutagenesis suggests that splicing signals beyond the consensus may consist of robust RNA structures. Images PMID:8417332

  15. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG)

    PubMed Central

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations. PMID:21407258

  16. Large exon size does not limit splicing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, I T; Chasin, L A

    1994-03-01

    Exon sizes in vertebrate genes are, with a few exceptions, limited to less than 300 bases. It has been proposed that this limitation may derive from the exon definition model of splice site recognition. In this model, a downstream donor site enhances splicing at the upstream acceptor site of the same exon. This enhancement may require contact between factors bound to each end of the exon; an exon size limitation would promote such contact. To test the idea that proximity was required for exon definition, we inserted random DNA fragments from Escherichia coli into a central exon in a three-exon dihydrofolate reductase minigene and tested whether the expanded exons were efficiently spliced. DNA from a plasmid library of expanded minigenes was used to transfect a CHO cell deletion mutant lacking the dhfr locus. PCR analysis of DNA isolated from the pooled stable cotransfectant populations displayed a range of DNA insert sizes from 50 to 1,500 nucleotides. A parallel analysis of the RNA from this population by reverse transcription followed by PCR showed a similar size distribution. Central exons as large as 1,400 bases could be spliced into mRNA. We also tested individual plasmid clones containing exon inserts of defined sizes. The largest exon included in mRNA was 1,200 bases in length, well above the 300-base limit implied by the survey of naturally occurring exons. We conclude that a limitation in exon size is not part of the exon definition mechanism.

  17. Tissue-Specific Genetic Control of Splicing: Implications for the Study of Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Kenneth D; Maia, Jessica M; Shianna, Kevin V; Gabriel, Willow N; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Hulette, Christine M; Denny, Thomas N; Goldstein, David B

    2008-01-01

    Numerous genome-wide screens for polymorphisms that influence gene expression have provided key insights into the genetic control of transcription. Despite this work, the relevance of specific polymorphisms to in vivo expression and splicing remains unclear. We carried out the first genome-wide screen, to our knowledge, for SNPs that associate with alternative splicing and gene expression in human primary cells, evaluating 93 autopsy-collected cortical brain tissue samples with no defined neuropsychiatric condition and 80 peripheral blood mononucleated cell samples collected from living healthy donors. We identified 23 high confidence associations with total expression and 80 with alternative splicing as reflected by expression levels of specific exons. Fewer than 50% of the implicated SNPs however show effects in both tissue types, reflecting strong evidence for distinct genetic control of splicing and expression in the two tissue types. The data generated here also suggest the possibility that splicing effects may be responsible for up to 13 out of 84 reported genome-wide significant associations with human traits. These results emphasize the importance of establishing a database of polymorphisms affecting splicing and expression in primary tissue types and suggest that splicing effects may be of more phenotypic significance than overall gene expression changes. PMID:19222302

  18. Correlated Evolution of Nucleotide Positions within Splice Sites in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Denisov, Stepan; Bazykin, Georgii; Favorov, Alexander; Mironov, Andrey; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Splice sites (SSs)--short nucleotide sequences flanking introns--are under selection for spliceosome binding, and adhere to consensus sequences. However, non-consensus nucleotides, many of which probably reduce SS performance, are frequent. Little is known about the mechanisms maintaining such apparently suboptimal SSs. Here, we study the correlations between strengths of nucleotides occupying different positions of the same SS. Such correlations may arise due to epistatic interactions between positions (i.e., a situation when the fitness effect of a nucleotide in one position depends on the nucleotide in another position), their evolutionary history, or to other reasons. Within both the intronic and the exonic parts of donor SSs, nucleotides that increase (decrease) SS strength tend to co-occur with other nucleotides increasing (respectively, decreasing) it, consistent with positive epistasis. Between the intronic and exonic parts of donor SSs, the correlations of nucleotide strengths tend to be negative, consistent with negative epistasis. In the course of evolution, substitutions at a donor SS tend to decrease the strength of its exonic part, and either increase or do not change the strength of its intronic part. In acceptor SSs, the situation is more complicated; the correlations between adjacent positions appear to be driven mainly by avoidance of the AG dinucleotide which may cause aberrant splicing. In summary, both the content and the evolution of SSs is shaped by a complex network of interdependences between adjacent nucleotides that respond to a range of sometimes conflicting selective constraints. PMID:26642327

  19. Alternative splicing regulation and cell lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; He, Ling; Tang, Liling

    2012-11-01

    The alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an essential mechanism for protein diversity. It plays important biological roles, such as proliferation, differentiation and development of cells. Furthermore, alternative splicing participates in the pathogenesis of diseases, including cancer. Thus, in-depth understanding of splicing regulation is of great significance. Regulation of alternative splicing is an extraordinary complicated process in which several signal molecules are at work. Besides the cis-elements and trans-factors, several lines of evidences suggest that other molecules, structures or process also regulate splicing, such as RNA structures, transcription and transcription factors, chromatin and protein. Meanwhile, increasing body of evidence shows that alternative splicing correlated closely to stem cell lineage differentiation. It means that there is a fundamental role for splicing in controlling regulatory program required for cell lineage differentiation. This review systematically sums up the regulation of alternative splicing and summarizes the splicing events during cell lineage differentiation of stem cells.

  20. Linkage disequilibrium between polymorphisms at the 5{prime} untranslated region and intron 5 (Dde I) of the antithrombin III (ATIII) gene in the Chinese

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.S.H.; Liu, Y.; Low, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    A length polymorphism at the 5{prime} untranslated region of exon 1 and an RFLP (Dde I) in intron 5 (nt 160) of the ATIII gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction with primers of published sequences. DNA fragments were size-fractionated by agarose gel electrophoresis (3% NuSieve and 1% Seakem GTG) and photographed over a UV transilluminator. A strong linkage disequilibrium was observed between these two polymorphisms of the ATIII gene in the Chinese ({chi}{sup 2} = 63.7; {triangle} 0.42, P < 0.001). The estimated frequencies of the three haplotypes were found to be 0.37 for SD+, 0.40 for LD+ and 0.23 for LD-.

  1. Targeting RNA splicing for disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Havens, Mallory A; Duelli, Dominik M; Hastings, Michelle L

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of pre-messenger RNA into mature messenger RNA is an essential step for the expression of most genes in higher eukaryotes. Defects in this process typically affect cellular function and can have pathological consequences. Many human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that cause splicing defects. Furthermore, a number of diseases are associated with splicing defects that are not attributed to overt mutations. Targeting splicing directly to correct disease-associated aberrant splicing is a logical approach to therapy. Splicing is a favorable intervention point for disease therapeutics, because it is an early step in gene expression and does not alter the genome. Significant advances have been made in the development of approaches to manipulate splicing for therapy. Splicing can be manipulated with a number of tools including antisense oligonucleotides, modified small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), trans-splicing, and small molecule compounds, all of which have been used to increase specific alternatively spliced isoforms or to correct aberrant gene expression resulting from gene mutations that alter splicing. Here we describe clinically relevant splicing defects in disease states, the current tools used to target and alter splicing, specific mutations and diseases that are being targeted using splice-modulating approaches, and emerging therapeutics.

  2. Discovery and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Novel Splice-junction Peptides Using RNA-Seq*

    PubMed Central

    Sheynkman, Gloria M.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Frey, Brian L.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-01-01

    Human proteomic databases required for MS peptide identification are frequently updated and carefully curated, yet are still incomplete because it has been challenging to acquire every protein sequence from the diverse assemblage of proteoforms expressed in every tissue and cell type. In particular, alternative splicing has been shown to be a major source of this cell-specific proteomic variation. Many new alternative splice forms have been detected at the transcript level using next generation sequencing methods, especially RNA-Seq, but it is not known how many of these transcripts are being translated. Leveraging the unprecedented capabilities of next generation sequencing methods, we collected RNA-Seq and proteomics data from the same cell population (Jurkat cells) and created a bioinformatics pipeline that builds customized databases for the discovery of novel splice-junction peptides. Eighty million paired-end Illumina reads and ∼500,000 tandem mass spectra were used to identify 12,873 transcripts (19,320 including isoforms) and 6810 proteins. We developed a bioinformatics workflow to retrieve high-confidence, novel splice junction sequences from the RNA data, translate these sequences into the analogous polypeptide sequence, and create a customized splice junction database for MS searching. Based on the RefSeq gene models, we detected 136,123 annotated and 144,818 unannotated transcript junctions. Of those, 24,834 unannotated junctions passed various quality filters (e.g. minimum read depth) and these entries were translated into 33,589 polypeptide sequences and used for database searching. We discovered 57 splice junction peptides not present in the Uniprot-Trembl proteomic database comprising an array of different splicing events, including skipped exons, alternative donors and acceptors, and noncanonical transcriptional start sites. To our knowledge this is the first example of using sample-specific RNA-Seq data to create a splice-junction database and

  3. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing.

  4. Site-specific deletion in cauliflower mosaic virus DNA: possible involvement of RNA splicing and reverse transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hirochika, Hirohiko; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Ubasawa, Aiko; Ikeda, Joh-E

    1985-01-01

    A frequent site-specific deletion was observed in the life cycle of cauliflower mosaic virus (S strain). Analysis of the sequence around the deletion site and the parental sequence implied that the deletion was promoted at sequences similar to the donor and acceptor consensus sequences of RNA splicing, designated as the deletion donor and acceptor sequences, respectively. To elucidate the mechanism of this site-specific deletion, point mutations were introduced into the deletion donor sequence (GT to GG or GA transversion). Deletion at the original deletion donor site did not occur in these mutants, instead, new (cryptic) donor sites were activated. All of these activated cryptic sites had sequences similar to the splicing consensus sequence. In all cases except one, the original deletion acceptor site was used. These results can be most readily explained by postulating that the site-specific deletion occurs by reverse transcription of spliced viral RNA. This frequent site-specific deletion was not observed in other strains. For a virus which replicates by reverse transcription, a mechanism to regulate the rate of splicing is required to ensure the intactness of the viral genome. We discuss the possibility that the S strain has a mutation in this regulatory mechanism. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 5.Fig. 7. PMID:16453624

  5. Evolution of splicing regulatory networks in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    McManus, C. Joel; Coolon, Joseph D.; Eipper-Mains, Jodi; Wittkopp, Patricia J.; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2014-01-01

    The proteome expanding effects of alternative pre-mRNA splicing have had a profound impact on eukaryotic evolution. The events that create this diversity can be placed into four major classes: exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5′ splice sites, and alternative 3′ splice sites. Although the regulatory mechanisms and evolutionary pressures among alternative splicing classes clearly differ, how these differences affect the evolution of splicing regulation remains poorly characterized. We used RNA-seq to investigate splicing differences in D. simulans, D. sechellia, and three strains of D. melanogaster. Regulation of exon skipping and tandem alternative 3′ splice sites (NAGNAGs) were more divergent than other splicing classes. Splicing regulation was most divergent in frame-preserving events and events in noncoding regions. We further determined the contributions of cis- and trans-acting changes in splicing regulatory networks by comparing allele-specific splicing in F1 interspecific hybrids, because differences in allele-specific splicing reflect changes in cis-regulatory element activity. We find that species-specific differences in intron retention and alternative splice site usage are primarily attributable to changes in cis-regulatory elements (median ∼80% cis), whereas species-specific exon skipping differences are driven by both cis- and trans-regulatory divergence (median ∼50% cis). These results help define the mechanisms and constraints that influence splicing regulatory evolution and show that networks regulating the four major classes of alternative splicing diverge through different genetic mechanisms. We propose a model in which differences in regulatory network architecture among classes of alternative splicing affect the evolution of splicing regulation. PMID:24515119

  6. Molecular analysis of mutations affecting hprt mRNA splicing in human T-lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A.M. Pisa Univ. ); Tates, A.D.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Vrieling, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) cDNA from 6-thioguanine-resistant T-lymphocytes cloned from smoking and non-smoking adult donors showed that 35% of these mutants were defective in splicing of hprt mRNA. Among a set of 42 hprt splice mutants, the authors observed (1) complete loss of one or more exons, (2) partial loss of one exon, or (3) inclusion of part of an intron sequence between adjacent exons. Loss of exon 4 was significantly more frequent than of the other exons, suggesting that the sequences that regulate splicing of this exon are either larger than those of the other exons or especially prone to mutation. In order to identify the molecular nature of DNA alterations causing aberrant splicing of hprt mRNA, 17 splice mutants were analyzed in more detail by sequencing the genomic regions flanking the mis-spliced exon. Base pair substitutions or small deletions causing defective splicing were either detected in exon sequences or in splice site consensus sequences of introns.

  7. NOTCH2 and FLT3 gene mis-splicings are common events in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): new potential targets in AML

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Natan, Michal; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Pilarski, Patrick M.; Bach, Christian; Pevzner, Samuel; Calimeri, Teresa; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Lode, Laurence; Verselis, Sigitas; Fox, Edward A.; Galinsky, Ilene; Mathews, Steven; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Wadleigh, Martha; Steensma, David P.; Motyckova, Gabriela; Deangelo, Daniel J.; Quackenbush, John; Tenen, Daniel G.; Stone, Richard M.; Griffin, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed an increase in alternative splicing of multiple RNAs in cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared with CD34+ bone marrow cells from normal donors. Aberrantly spliced genes included a number of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and genes involved in regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, and cell differentiation. Among the most commonly mis-spliced genes (>70% of AML patients) were 2, NOTCH2 and FLT3, that encode myeloid cell surface proteins. The splice variants of NOTCH2 and FLT3 resulted from complete or partial exon skipping and utilization of cryptic splice sites. Longitudinal analyses suggested that NOTCH2 and FLT3 aberrant splicing correlated with disease status. Correlation analyses between splice variants of these genes and clinical features of patients showed an association between NOTCH2-Va splice variant and overall survival of patients. Our results suggest that NOTCH2 and FLT3 mis-splicing is a common characteristic of AML and has the potential to generate transcripts encoding proteins with altered function. Thus, splice variants of these genes might provide disease markers and targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:24574459

  8. Endogenous Multiple Exon Skipping and Back-Splicing at the DMD Mutation Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kameyama, Toshiki; Saito, Takashi; Masuda, Satoru; Tanihata, Jun; Nagata, Tetsuya; Mayeda, Akila; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscular disorder. It was reported that multiple exon skipping (MES), targeting exon 45–55 of the DMD gene, might improve patients’ symptoms because patients who have a genomic deletion of all these exons showed very mild symptoms. Thus, exon 45–55 skipping treatments for DMD have been proposed as a potential clinical cure. Herein, we detected the expression of endogenous exons 44–56 connected mRNA transcript of the DMD using total RNAs derived from human normal skeletal muscle by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and identified a total of eight types of MES products around the hotspot. Surprisingly, the 5′ splice sites of recently reported post-transcriptional introns (remaining introns after co-transcriptional splicing) act as splicing donor sites for MESs. We also tested exon combinations to generate DMD circular RNAs (circRNAs) and determined the preferential splice sites of back-splicing, which are involved not only in circRNA generation, but also in MESs. Our results fit the current circRNA-generation model, suggesting that upstream post-transcriptional introns trigger MES and generate circRNA because its existence is critical for the intra-intronic interaction or for extremely distal splicing. PMID:27754374

  9. Alternative splicing of RNAs transcribed from the human c- myb gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shen-Ong, G.L.C.; Skurla, R.M. Jr.; Owens, J.D.; Mushinski, J.F. )

    1990-06-01

    An alternative splicing event in which a portion of the intron bounded by the vE6 and vE7 exons with v-{ital myb} homology is included as an additional 363-nucleotide coding exon (termed E6A or coding exon 9A) has been described for normal and tumor murine cells that express {ital myb}. The authors show that this alternative splicing event is conserved in human c-{ital myb} transcripts. In addition, another novel exon (termed E7A or coding exon 10A) is identified in human c-{ital myb} mRNAs expressed in normal and tumor cells. Although the {ital myb} protein isoform encoded by murine E6A-containing mRNA is larger than the major c-{ital myb} protein, the predicted products of both forms of human alternatively spliced {ital myb} transcripts are 3{prime}-truncated {ital myb} proteins that terminate in the alternative exons. These proteins are predicted to lack the same carboxy-terminal domains as the viral {ital myb} proteins encoded by avian myeloblastosis virus and E26 virus. The junction sequences that flank these exons closely resemble the consensus splice donor and splice acceptor sequences, yet the alternative transcripts are less abundant than is the major form of c-{ital myb} transcripts. The contribution that alternative splicing events in c-{ital myb} expression may make on c-{ital myb} function remains to be elucidated.

  10. Some Characterizations in Splicing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Yusof, Yuhani; Wan Heng, Fong

    2010-11-01

    The splitting and recombinant of deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA by specified enzymes using concepts in Formal Language Theory was first mathematically modeled by Head in 1987. This splicing system, S can be presented as a set of initial string I over an alphabet A that acts upon 5' or 3' overhangs of restriction enzymes and can be simply viewed as S = (A, I, B, C). In this paper, a great interest in presenting some relations on certain types of splicing system namely null-context, uniform, simple, semi-simple, semi-null and Sk based on differentiating their rules are given as proposition, corollaries and counterexamples.

  11. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  12. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  13. The chicken FMR1 gene is highly conserved with a CCT 5{prime} - untranslated repeat and encodes an RNA-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.K.; Zhang, F.; Ashley, C.T. Jr.; Warren, S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The transcriptional silencing of the human gene, fragile X metal retardation 1 (FMR1), is due to abnormal methylation in response to an expanded 5{prime}-untranslated CGG trinucleotide repeat and accounts for most cases of fragile X syndrome, a frequent inherited form of metal retardation. Although the encoded fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is known to have properties of a RNA-binding protein, the precise function of FMRP remains to be elucidated. We report the cloning of the chicken homolog of FMR1 and show strong evolutionary conservation, with nucleotide and amino acid identities of 85 and 92%, respectively, between chicken and human. In place of the mammalian CGG trinucleotide repeat, a 99-nt tripartite repetitive element containing a CCT trinucleotide repeat flanked on both sides by dinucleotide repeats was identified. Blocks of highly conserved 3{prime}-untranslated sequence were also found. Within the coding region, two copies each of the highly conserved K homology motif and the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) box motif, both ribonucleotide particle family domains implicated in RNA binding, were identified. Chicken FMRP was found to bind RNA in vitro, and this activity correlated with the presence of the carboxy-terminal portion of the protein that includes the RGG motifs. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Increased inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase gene expression in replicating cells: A response to growth factors, not to changes in cell cycle parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutani, Hiroshi; Collart, F.R.; Glesne, D.A.; Huberman, E. |

    1997-07-01

    The authors have analyzed levels of inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH; E.C. 1.1.1.205) type II mRNA levels in a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL-131, and a Chinese hamster ovary cell line synchronously progressing through the cell cycle following treatment with aphidicolin. Following release from the aphidicolin block at the G{sub 1}-S phase boundary, the type II IMPDH gene was found to be constitutively expressed at a similar level during all stages of the cell cycle. To analyze growth regulation, as opposed to cell cycle regulation, stable SK-MEL-131 transfectants that express a type II IMPDH-promoted heterologous construct were assayed following deprivation of serum growth factors and after restimulation with fresh serum. Serum deprivation resulted in down-regulation of both steady state type II IMPDH mRNA levels and promoter activity, while restimulation with serum resulted in up-regulation of these parameters. These findings support the conclusion that the increase in IMPDH type II gene expression in replicating cells is mainly due to growth factor regulation rather than changes in cell cycle parameters and that this regulation is mediated primarily by a transcriptional mechanism. The increased level of IMPDH expression and activity found in many tumors may therefore also be due to a transcriptionally mediated response to growth factors.

  15. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  16. Exploitation of a thermosensitive splicing event to study pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Cizdziel, P.E.; De Mars, M.; Murphy, E.C. Jr.

    1988-04-01

    The spliced form of MuSVts110 viral RNA is approximately 20-fold more abundant at growth temperatures of 33/sup 0/C or lower than at 37 to 41/sup 0/C. This difference is due to changes in the efficiency of MuSVts110 RNA splicing rather than selective thermolability of the spliced species at 37 to 41/sup 0/C or general thermosensitivity of RNA splicing in MuSVts110-infected cells. Moreover, RNA transcribed from MuSVts110 DNA introduced into a variety of cell lines is spliced in a temperature-sensitive fashion, suggesting that the structure of the viral RNA controls the efficiency of the event. The authors exploited this novel splicing event to study the cleavage and ligation events during splicing in vivo. No spliced viral mRNA or splicing intermediates were observed in MuSVts110-infected cells (6m2 cells) at 39/sup 0/C. However, after a short (about 30-min) lag following a shift to 33/sup 0/C, viral pre-mRNA cleaved at the 5' splice site began to accumulate. Ligated exons were not detected until about 60 min following the initial detection of cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting that these two splicing reactions did not occur concurrently. Splicing of viral RNA in the MuSVts110 revertant 54-5A4, which lacks the sequence -AG/TGT- at the usual 3' splice site, was studied. Cleavage at the 5' splice site in the revertant viral RNA proceeded in a temperature-sensitive fashion. No novel cryptic 3' splice sites were activated; however, splicing at an alternate upstream 3' splice site used at low efficiency in normal MuSVts110 RNA was increased to a level close to that of 5'-splice-site cleavage in the revertant viral RNA.

  17. Splice Sites Seldom Slide: Intron Evolution in Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Sêton Bocco, Steven; Csűrös, Miklós

    2016-01-01

    We examine exon junctions near apparent amino acid insertions and deletions in alignments of orthologous protein-coding genes. In 1,917 ortholog families across nine oomycete genomes, 10–20% of introns are near an alignment gap, indicating at first sight that splice-site displacements are frequent. We designed a robust algorithmic procedure for the delineation of intron-containing homologous regions, and combined it with a parsimony-based reconstruction of intron loss, gain, and splice-site shift events on a phylogeny. The reconstruction implies that 12% of introns underwent an acceptor-site shift, and 10% underwent a donor-site shift. In order to offset gene annotation problems, we amended the procedure with the reannotation of intron boundaries using alignment evidence. The corresponding reconstruction involves much fewer intron gain and splice-site shift events. The frequency of acceptor- and donor-side shifts drops to 4% and 3%, respectively, which are not much different from what one would expect by random codon insertions and deletions. In other words, gaps near exon junctions are mostly artifacts of gene annotation rather than evidence of sliding intron boundaries. Our study underscores the importance of using well-supported gene structure annotations in comparative studies. When transcription evidence is not available, we propose a robust ancestral reconstruction procedure that corrects misannotated intron boundaries using sequence alignments. The results corroborate the view that boundary shifts and complete intron sliding are only accidental in eukaryotic genome evolution and have a negligible impact on protein diversity. PMID:27412607

  18. Splice Sites Seldom Slide: Intron Evolution in Oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Sêton Bocco, Steven; Csűrös, Miklós

    2016-01-01

    We examine exon junctions near apparent amino acid insertions and deletions in alignments of orthologous protein-coding genes. In 1,917 ortholog families across nine oomycete genomes, 10-20% of introns are near an alignment gap, indicating at first sight that splice-site displacements are frequent. We designed a robust algorithmic procedure for the delineation of intron-containing homologous regions, and combined it with a parsimony-based reconstruction of intron loss, gain, and splice-site shift events on a phylogeny. The reconstruction implies that 12% of introns underwent an acceptor-site shift, and 10% underwent a donor-site shift. In order to offset gene annotation problems, we amended the procedure with the reannotation of intron boundaries using alignment evidence. The corresponding reconstruction involves much fewer intron gain and splice-site shift events. The frequency of acceptor- and donor-side shifts drops to 4% and 3%, respectively, which are not much different from what one would expect by random codon insertions and deletions. In other words, gaps near exon junctions are mostly artifacts of gene annotation rather than evidence of sliding intron boundaries. Our study underscores the importance of using well-supported gene structure annotations in comparative studies. When transcription evidence is not available, we propose a robust ancestral reconstruction procedure that corrects misannotated intron boundaries using sequence alignments. The results corroborate the view that boundary shifts and complete intron sliding are only accidental in eukaryotic genome evolution and have a negligible impact on protein diversity. PMID:27412607

  19. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  20. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  1. The genetics of splicing in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin; Hackett, Christopher S.; Zhang, Shile; Song, Young K.; Bell, Robert J.A.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Quigley, David A.; Balmain, Allan; Song, Jun S.; Costello, Joseph F.; Gustafson, W. Clay; Dyke, Terry Van; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Khan, Javed; Weiss, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA splicing, a critical and tightly regulated cellular function, underlies the majority of proteomic diversity, and is frequently disrupted in disease. Using an integrative genomics approach, we combined both genome and exon level transcriptome data in two somatic tissues (cerebella and peripheral ganglia) from a transgenic mouse model of neuroblastoma, a tumor that arises from peripheral neural crest. Here we describe splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) associated with differential splicing across the genome that we use to identify genes with previously unknown functions within the splicing pathway and to define de novo intronic splicing motifs that influence splicing from hundreds of bases away. Our results show that these splicing motifs represent sites for functional recurrent mutations and highlight novel candidate genes in human cancers, including childhood neuroblastoma. PMID:25637275

  2. Becoming a Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Organ and Gender. > U.S. Waiting List Candidate Data HOW TO BECOME A DONOR The most important thing to do is to sign up as an organ and tissue donor in your state's donor registry. To cover all bases, it's also helpful to: Designate your decision on ...

  3. New Splice Site Acceptor Mutation in AIRE Gene in Autoimmune Polyendocrine Syndrome Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Mireia; Hanzu, Felicia A.; Pradas-Juni, Marta; Aranda, Gloria B.; Halperin, Irene; Puig-Domingo, Manuel; Aguiló, Sira; Fernández-Rebollo, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 240300) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by the presence of at least two of three major diseases: hypoparathyroidism, Addison’s disease, and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. We aim to identify the molecular defects and investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics in an index case and other members of a consanguineous family. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site acceptor (SSA) of intron 5 (c.653-1G>A) in two siblings with different clinical outcomes of APS-1. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that this AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the constitutive SSA of intron 5, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSA in intron 5. Surprisingly, the use of an alternative SSA entails the uncovering of a cryptic donor splice site in exon 5. This new transcript generates a truncated protein (p.A214fs67X) containing the first 213 amino acids and followed by 68 aberrant amino acids. The mutation affects the proper splicing, not only at the acceptor but also at the donor splice site, highlighting the complexity of recognizing suitable splicing sites and the importance of sequencing the intron-exon junctions for a more precise molecular diagnosis and correct genetic counseling. As both siblings were carrying the same mutation but exhibited a different APS-1 onset, and one of the brothers was not clinically diagnosed, our finding highlights the possibility to suspect mutations in the AIRE gene in cases of childhood chronic candidiasis and/or hypoparathyroidism otherwise unexplained, especially when the phenotype is associated with other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988226

  4. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  5. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3′-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  6. Living donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S C; Flowers, J L; Dunkin, B; Sklar, G N; Cho, E

    1999-03-01

    The need for more organs for kidney transplantation is increasing. Cadaver sources for these organs are stable, therefore living donation must increase if the need is to be met. Less perfect kidneys are now being transplanted. The pool of potential donors is being expanded. The process of kidney donation is being made easier in an effort to increase the number of donors. The donor work-up is being streamlined. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy has been introduced, and appears to be promising as a technique of lessening donor pain and suffering, while maintaining excellent graft results.

  7. Epistatic selection of a sequence 5{prime} of the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis may account for the high frequency of this disease in the Caucasian population

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Jr. |; Nash, E.; Cutting, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the more common lethal autosomal recessive disorders in Caucasian populations. Numerous hypotheses including genetic drift, founder effect, sex ratio, segregation distortions and various forms of heterozygote advantage have been proposed to explain the relatively high frequency of CF alleles. The observation of high linkage disequilibrium between markers at the 5{prime} end of CFTR and mutations that cause CF raised the possibility of epistatic selection. CF-linked marker allele frequencies were determined in 417 elderly individuals from a stable Czech population that survived high levels of infant and childhood mortality in the pre-antibiotic era. These data were compared with allele frequencies of 646 contemporary newborns and 345 young adults drawn from the same population who had significantly lower mortality rates in the antibiotic era. Allele frequencies of markers CS7/Hhal and KM19/Pstl from the D7S23 locus are significantly different (p<0.05) between elderly female and male subjects in this population. Furthermore, there is a significant difference in the allele frequencies of marker CS7/Hhal when newborn females and elderly women are compared (p<0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the allele status at the CS7 region influenced female survival in the period of high infant and childhood mortality in the pre-antibiotic era. Under this selective pressure, CFTR mutations that occurred on the {open_quotes}favorable{close_quotes} background would marginally increase in frequency in each successive generation and more ancient mutations residing on this background would become the most frequent in the general population.

  8. Stereochemical control over Mn(II)-Thio versus Mn(II)-Oxy coordination in adenosine 5 prime -O-(1-thiodiphosphate) complexes at the active site of creatine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Smithers, G.W.; Sammons, R.D.; Goodhart, P.J.; LoBrutto, R.; Reed, G.H. )

    1989-02-21

    The stereochemical configurations of the Mn(II) complexes with the resolved epimers of adenosine 5{prime}-O-(1-thiodiphosphate) (ADP{alpha}S), bound at the active site of creatine kinase, have been determined in order to assess the relative strengths of enzymic stereoselectivity versus Lewis acid/base preferences in metal-ligand binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data have been obtained for Mn(II) in anion-stabilized, dead-end (transition-state analogue) complexes, in ternary enzyme-Mn{sup II}ADP{alpha}S complexes, and in the central complexes of the equilibrium mixture. The modes of coordination of Mn(II) at P{sub alpha} in the nitrate-stabilized, dead-end complexes with each epimer of ADP{alpha}S were ascertained by EPR measurements with (R{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S and (S{sub p})-({alpha}-{sup 17}O)ADP{alpha}S. A reduction in the magnitude of the {sup 55}Mn hyperfine coupling constant in the spectrum for the complex containing (S{sub p})-ADP{alpha}S is indicative of Mn(II)-thio coordination at P{sub alpha}. The results indicate that a strict discrimination for a unique configuration of the metal-nucleotide substrate is expressed upon binding of all of the substrates to form the active complex (or an analogue thereof). This enzymic stereoselectivity provides sufficient binding energy to overcome an intrinsic preference for the hard Lewis acid Mn(II) to coordinate to the hard Lewis base oxygen.

  9. Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in Southern African blacks: P gene-associated haplotypes suggest a major mutation in the 5{prime} region of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, M.; Stevens, G.; Beukering, J. van

    1994-09-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) occurs with a prevalence of 1 in 3900 among Southern African (SA) blacks. The major contributors to morbidity and mortality are skin cancer and decreased visual acuity. Two distinct phenotypes occur, namely individuals with ephelides (darkly pigmented patches) and those without. There is complete concordance with regard to ephelus status among siblings. The disorder is linked to markers on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, and no obligatory cross-overs were observed with polymophic markers at the human homolog, P, of the mouse pink eyed dilute gene, p. Contrary to what has been shown for Caucasoid ty-pos OCA, this condition shows locus homogeneity among SA blacks. The P gene is an excellent candidate for ty-pos OCA and mutations in this gene will confirm its role in causing the common form of albinism in SA. Numerous P gene mutations have been described in other populations. In an attempt to detect mutations, the P gene cDNA was used to search for structural rearrangements or polymorphisms. Six polymorphisms (plR10/Scal, 912/Xbal, 912/HincII, 912/TaqI, 1412/TaqI [two systems] and 1412/HindIII) were detected with subclones of the P cDNA and haplotypes were determined in each family. None were clearly associated with an albinism-related rearrangement. However, strong linkage disequilibrium was observed with alleles at loci toward the 5{prime} region of the gene ({triangle}=0.65, 0.57 and 0.80 for the three polymorphisms detected with the 912 subclone), suggesting a major ty-pos OCA mutation in this region. Haplotype analysis provides evidence for a major mutation associated with the same haplotype in individuals with ephelides (8/12 OCA chromosomes) and those without ephelides (24:30). The presence of other ty-pos OCA associated haplotypes indicates several other less common mutations.

  10. Hallmarks of alternative splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oltean, S; Bates, D O

    2014-11-13

    The immense majority of genes are alternatively spliced and there are many isoforms specifically associated with cancer progression and metastasis. The splicing pattern of specific isoforms of numerous genes is altered as cells move through the oncogenic process of gaining proliferative capacity, acquiring angiogenic, invasive, antiapoptotic and survival properties, becoming free from growth factor dependence and growth suppression, altering their metabolism to cope with hypoxia, enabling them to acquire mechanisms of immune escape, and as they move through the epithelial-mesenchymal and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions and metastasis. Each of the 'hallmarks of cancer' is associated with a switch in splicing, towards a more aggressive invasive cancer phenotype. The choice of isoforms is regulated by several factors (signaling molecules, kinases, splicing factors) currently being identified systematically by a number of high-throughput, independent and unbiased methodologies. Splicing factors are de-regulated in cancer, and in some cases are themselves oncogenes or pseudo-oncogenes and can contribute to positive feedback loops driving cancer progression. Tumour progression may therefore be associated with a coordinated splicing control, meaning that there is the potential for a relatively small number of splice factors or their regulators to drive multiple oncogenic processes. The understanding of how splicing contributes to the various phenotypic traits acquired by tumours as they progress and metastasise, and in particular how alternative splicing is coordinated, can and is leading to the development of a new class of anticancer therapeutics-the alternative-splicing inhibitors. PMID:24336324

  11. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly due to a novel splice site mutation in the FBN2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Mehar, Virendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Kumar, Ravindra; Yadav, Summi; Singh, Kuldeep; Callewaert, Bert; Pathan, Shahnawaz; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by crumpled ears, congenital contractures, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Only few cases have been described to date. Here we report a newborn with congenital contractures, crumpled ears and scoliosis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel fibrillin-2 mutation at the donor splice site of intron 28. We discuss the differential diagnosis of neonates with congenital contractures and review the current knowledge on congenital contractural arachnodactyly. PMID:27625873

  12. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly due to a novel splice site mutation in the FBN2 gene.

    PubMed

    Mehar, Virendra; Yadav, Dinesh; Kumar, Ravindra; Yadav, Summi; Singh, Kuldeep; Callewaert, Bert; Pathan, Shahnawaz; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul J

    2014-09-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by crumpled ears, congenital contractures, arachnodactyly and scoliosis. Only few cases have been described to date. Here we report a newborn with congenital contractures, crumpled ears and scoliosis. Molecular analysis revealed a novel fibrillin-2 mutation at the donor splice site of intron 28. We discuss the differential diagnosis of neonates with congenital contractures and review the current knowledge on congenital contractural arachnodactyly. PMID:27625873

  13. Alternative Splicing in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shengming; Tang, Fang; Zhu, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) occurs widely in plants and can provide the main source of transcriptome and proteome diversity in an organism. AS functions in a range of physiological processes, including plant disease resistance, but its biological roles and functional mechanisms remain poorly understood. Many plant disease resistance (R) genes undergo AS, and several R genes require alternatively spliced transcripts to produce R proteins that can specifically recognize pathogen invasion. In the finely-tuned process of R protein activation, the truncated isoforms generated by AS may participate in plant disease resistance either by suppressing the negative regulation of initiation of immunity, or by directly engaging in effector-triggered signaling. Although emerging research has shown the functional significance of AS in plant biotic stress responses, many aspects of this topic remain to be understood. Several interesting issues surrounding the AS of R genes, especially regarding its functional roles and regulation, will require innovative techniques and additional research to unravel. PMID:24918296

  14. Extensive in silico analysis of NF1 splicing defects uncovers determinants for splicing outcome upon 5' splice-site disruption.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, K; Roca, X; Beiglböck, H; Callens, T; Etzler, J; Rao, A R; Krainer, A R; Fonatsch, C; Messiaen, L

    2007-06-01

    We describe 94 pathogenic NF1 gene alterations in a cohort of 97 Austrian neurofibromatosis type 1 patients meeting the NIH criteria. All mutations were fully characterized at the genomic and mRNA levels. Over half of the patients carried novel mutations, and only a quarter carried recurrent minor-lesion mutations at 16 mutational warm spots. The remaining patients carried NF1 microdeletions (7%) and rare recurring mutations. Thirty-six of the mutations (38%) altered pre-mRNA splicing, and fall into five groups: exon skipping resulting from mutations at authentic splice sites (type I), cryptic exon inclusion caused by deep intronic mutations (type II), creation of de novo splice sites causing loss of exonic sequences (type III), activation of cryptic splice sites upon authentic splice-site disruption (type IV), and exonic sequence alterations causing exon skipping (type V). Extensive in silico analyses of 37 NF1 exons and surrounding intronic sequences suggested that the availability of a cryptic splice site combined with a strong natural upstream 3' splice site (3'ss)is the main determinant of cryptic splice-site activation upon 5' splice-site disruption. Furthermore, the exonic sequences downstream of exonic cryptic 5' splice sites (5'ss) resemble intronic more than exonic sequences with respect to exonic splicing enhancer and silencer density, helping to distinguish between exonic cryptic and pseudo 5'ss. This study provides valuable predictors for the splicing pathway used upon 5'ss mutation, and underscores the importance of using RNA-based techniques, together with methods to identify microdeletions and intragenic copy-number changes, for effective and reliable NF1 mutation detection.

  15. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liao, Yong; Guo, Luo; Wang, Honglian; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xing, Qinghe

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser) in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203) containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  16. Cryptic splice sites and split genes

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Yuri; Chan, Elcie; Sarkar, Rupa; Wong, Frederick; Vorechovsky, Igor; Winston, Robert M.; Tatusova, Tatiana; Dibb, Nick J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new program called cryptic splice finder (CSF) that can reliably identify cryptic splice sites (css), so providing a useful tool to help investigate splicing mutations in genetic disease. We report that many css are not entirely dormant and are often already active at low levels in normal genes prior to their enhancement in genetic disease. We also report a fascinating correlation between the positions of css and introns, whereby css within the exons of one species frequently match the exact position of introns in equivalent genes from another species. These results strongly indicate that many introns were inserted into css during evolution and they also imply that the splicing information that lies outside some introns can be independently recognized by the splicing machinery and was in place prior to intron insertion. This indicates that non-intronic splicing information had a key role in shaping the split structure of eukaryote genes. PMID:21470962

  17. The zinc fingers of the SR-like protein ZRANB2 are single-stranded RNA-binding domains that recognize 5′ splice site-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mansfield, Robyn E.; Vaz, Paula M.; McGrath, Aaron P.; Setiyaputra, Surya; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Chen, Eva S.; Morris, Brian J.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.

    2009-09-02

    The alternative splicing of mRNA is a critical process in higher eukaryotes that generates substantial proteomic diversity. Many of the proteins that are essential to this process contain arginine/serine-rich (RS) domains. ZRANB2 is a widely-expressed and highly-conserved RS-domain protein that can regulate alternative splicing but lacks canonical RNA-binding domains. Instead, it contains 2 RanBP2-type zinc finger (ZnF) domains. We demonstrate that these ZnFs recognize ssRNA with high affinity and specificity. Each ZnF binds to a single AGGUAA motif and the 2 domains combine to recognize AGGUAA(N{sub x})AGGUAA double sites, suggesting that ZRANB2 regulates alternative splicing via a direct interaction with pre-mRNA at sites that resemble the consensus 5{prime} splice site. We show using X-ray crystallography that recognition of an AGGUAA motif by a single ZnF is dominated by side-chain hydrogen bonds to the bases and formation of a guanine-tryptophan-guanine 'ladder.' A number of other human proteins that function in RNA processing also contain RanBP2 ZnFs in which the RNA-binding residues of ZRANB2 are conserved. The ZnFs of ZRANB2 therefore define another class of RNA-binding domain, advancing our understanding of RNA recognition and emphasizing the versatility of ZnF domains in molecular recognition.

  18. Molecular aspects of DNA splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Yuhani; Lim, Wen Li; Goode, T. Elizabeth; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan; Wahab, Mohd Firdaus Abd

    2015-05-01

    The pioneer model of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) splicing system in a framework of Formal Language Theory was introduced by Head that led to the existence of other models of splicing system, namely Paun, Pixton and Yusof-Goode. These entire models are inspired by the molecular biological process of DNA splicing. Hence, this paper focuses on the translucent DNA splicing process, particularly on the generated language. Starting with some preliminaries in a limit graph, this paper also provides the experimental design with the predicted and actual result.

  19. The low information content of Neurospora splicing signals: implications for RNA splicing and intron origin.

    PubMed

    Collins, Richard A; Stajich, Jason E; Field, Deborah J; Olive, Joan E; DeAbreu, Diane M

    2015-05-01

    When we expressed a small (0.9 kb) nonprotein-coding transcript derived from the mitochondrial VS plasmid in the nucleus of Neurospora we found that it was efficiently spliced at one or more of eight 5' splice sites and ten 3' splice sites, which are present apparently by chance in the sequence. Further experimental and bioinformatic analyses of other mitochondrial plasmids, random sequences, and natural nuclear genes in Neurospora and other fungi indicate that fungal spliceosomes recognize a wide range of 5' splice site and branchpoint sequences and predict introns to be present at high frequency in random sequence. In contrast, analysis of intronless fungal nuclear genes indicates that branchpoint, 5' splice site and 3' splice site consensus sequences are underrepresented compared with random sequences. This underrepresentation of splicing signals is sufficient to deplete the nuclear genome of splice sites at locations that do not comprise biologically relevant introns. Thus, the splicing machinery can recognize a wide range of splicing signal sequences, but splicing still occurs with great accuracy, not because the splicing machinery distinguishes correct from incorrect introns, but because incorrect introns are substantially depleted from the genome.

  20. Expanded criteria donors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sandy; Lai, Jennifer C

    2014-08-01

    The greatest challenge facing liver transplantation today is the shortage of donor livers. Demand far exceeds supply, and this deficit has driven expansion of what is considered an acceptable organ. The evolving standard has not come without costs, however, as each new frontier of expanded donor quality (i.e., advancing donor age, donation after cardiac death, and split liver) may have traded wait-list for post-transplant morbidity and mortality. This article delineates the nature and severity of risk associated with specific deceased donor liver characteristics and recommends strategies to maximally mitigate these risks. PMID:25017080

  1. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants. PMID:24361966

  2. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations. PMID:26300000

  3. Functional selection of splicing enhancers that stimulate trans-splicing in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Boukis, L A; Bruzik, J P

    2001-01-01

    The role of exonic sequences in naturally occurring trans-splicing has not been explored in detail. Here, we have identified trans-splicing enhancers through the use of an iterative selection scheme. Several classes of enhancer sequences were identified that led to dramatic increases in trans-splicing efficiency. Two sequence families were investigated in detail. These include motifs containing the element (G/C)GAC(G/C) and also 5' splice site-like sequences. Distinct elements were tested for their ability to function as splicing enhancers and in competition experiments. In addition, discrete trans-acting factors were identified. This work demonstrates that splicing enhancers are able to effect a large increase in trans-splicing efficiency and that the process of exon definition is able to positively enhance trans-splicing even though the reaction itself is independent of the need for the 5' end of U1 snRNA. Due to the presence of internal introns in messages that are trans-spliced, the natural arrangement of 5' splice sites downstream of trans-splicing acceptors may lead to a general promotion of this unusual reaction. PMID:11421358

  4. Aberrant RNA splicing in cancer; expression changes and driver mutations of splicing factor genes.

    PubMed

    Sveen, A; Kilpinen, S; Ruusulehto, A; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2016-05-12

    Alternative splicing is a widespread process contributing to structural transcript variation and proteome diversity. In cancer, the splicing process is commonly disrupted, resulting in both functional and non-functional end-products. Cancer-specific splicing events are known to contribute to disease progression; however, the dysregulated splicing patterns found on a genome-wide scale have until recently been less well-studied. In this review, we provide an overview of aberrant RNA splicing and its regulation in cancer. We then focus on the executors of the splicing process. Based on a comprehensive catalog of splicing factor encoding genes and analyses of available gene expression and somatic mutation data, we identify cancer-associated patterns of dysregulation. Splicing factor genes are shown to be significantly differentially expressed between cancer and corresponding normal samples, and to have reduced inter-individual expression variation in cancer. Furthermore, we identify enrichment of predicted cancer-critical genes among the splicing factors. In addition to previously described oncogenic splicing factor genes, we propose 24 novel cancer-critical splicing factors predicted from somatic mutations.

  5. Splicing factor SRSF1 negatively regulates alternative splicing of MDM2 under damage

    PubMed Central

    Comiskey, Daniel F.; Jacob, Aishwarya G.; Singh, Ravi K.; Tapia-Santos, Aixa S.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic stress induces alternative splicing of the oncogene MDM2 generating MDM2-ALT1, an isoform attributed with tumorigenic properties. However, the mechanisms underlying this event remain unclear. Here we explore MDM2 splicing regulation by utilizing a novel minigene that mimics endogenous MDM2 splicing in response to UV and cisplatinum-induced DNA damage. We report that exon 11 is necessary and sufficient for the damage-specific alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene and that the splicing factor SRSF1 binds exon 11 at evolutionarily conserved sites. Interestingly, mutations disrupting this interaction proved sufficient to abolish the stress-induced alternative splicing of the MDM2 minigene. Furthermore, SRSF1 overexpression promoted exclusion of exon 11, while its siRNA-mediated knockdown prevented the stress-induced alternative splicing of endogenous MDM2. Additionally, we observed elevated SRSF1 levels under stress and in tumors correlating with the expression of MDM2-ALT1. Notably, we demonstrate that MDM2-ALT1 splicing can be blocked by targeting SRSF1 sites on exon 11 using antisense oligonucleotides. These results present conclusive evidence supporting a negative role for SRSF1 in MDM2 alternative splicing. Importantly, we define for the first time, a clear-cut mechanism for the regulation of damage-induced MDM2 splicing and present potential strategies for manipulating MDM2 expression via splicing modulation. PMID:25845590

  6. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  7. HS3D, A Dataset of Homo Sapiens Splice Regions, and its Extraction Procedure from a Major Public Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollastro, Pasquale; Rampone, Salvatore

    The aim of this work is to describe a cleaning procedure of GenBank data, producing material to train and to assess the prediction accuracy of computational approaches for gene characterization. A procedure (GenBank2HS3D) has been defined, producing a dataset (HS3D - Homo Sapiens Splice Sites Dataset) of Homo Sapiens Splice regions extracted from GenBank (Rel.123 at this time). It selects, from the complete GenBank Primate Division, entries of Human Nuclear DNA according with several assessed criteria; then it extracts exons and introns from these entries (actually 4523 + 3802). Donor and acceptor sites are then extracted as windows of 140 nucleotides around each splice site (3799 + 3799). After discarding windows not including canonical GT-AG junctions (65 + 74), including insufficient data (not enough material for a 140 nucleotide window) (686 + 589), including not AGCT bases (29 + 30), and redundant (218 + 226), the remaining windows (2796 + 2880) are reported in the dataset. Finally, windows of false splice sites are selected by searching canonical GT-AG pairs in not splicing positions (271 937 + 332 296). The false sites in a range +/- 60 from a true splice site are marked as proximal. HS3D, release 1.2 at this time, is available at the Web server of the University of Sannio: http://www.sci.unisannio.it/docenti/rampone/.

  8. Functional coupling of transcription and splicing.

    PubMed

    Montes, Marta; Becerra, Soraya; Sánchez-Álvarez, Miguel; Suñé, Carlos

    2012-06-15

    The tightly regulated process of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) alternative splicing is a key mechanism to increase the number and complexity of proteins encoded by the genome. Evidence gathered in recent years has established that transcription and splicing are physically and functionally coupled and that this coupling may be an essential aspect of the regulation of splicing and alternative splicing. Recent advances in our understanding of transcription and of splicing regulation have uncovered the multiple interactions between components from both types of machinery. These interactions help to explain the functional coupling of RNAPII transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing for efficient and regulated gene expression at the molecular level. Recent technological advances, in addition to novel cell and molecular biology approaches, have led to the development of new tools for addressing mechanistic questions to achieve an integrated and global understanding of the functional coupling of RNAPII transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Here, we review major milestones and insights into RNA polymerase II transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing as well as new concepts and challenges that have arisen from multiple genome-wide approaches and analyses at the single-cell resolution.

  9. Donor Telomere Length SAA

    Cancer.gov

    A new NCI study has found that, among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received a hematopoietic cell transplant from an unrelated donor, those whose donor white blood cells had longer telomeres had higher survival rates five-years after transplant

  10. Rich Donors, Poor Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The shifting ideological winds of foreign aid donors have driven their policy towards governments in poor countries. Donors supported state-led development policies in poor countries from the 1940s to the 1970s; market and private-sector driven reforms during the 1980s and 1990s; and returned their attention to the state with an emphasis on…

  11. Dealing with Donor Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Techniques that reduce donors' resistance to college fund-raising requests, either direct mail or telephone solicitations, are offered. These include: respecting the prospects' concerns about privacy; offering nonintrusive giving options; honesty and clarity of communication; reinforcing donor sense of control; connecting with prospects'…

  12. The Characterizations of Different Splicing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Fariba; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan

    The concept of splicing system was first introduced by Head in 1987 to model the biological process of DNA recombination mathematically. This model was made on the basis of formal language theory which is a branch of applied discrete mathematics and theoretical computer science. In fact, splicing system treats DNA molecule and the recombinant behavior by restriction enzymes and ligases in the form of words and splicing rules respectively. The notion of splicing systems was taken into account from different points of view by many mathematicians. Several modified definitions have been introduced by many researchers. In this paper, some properties of different kinds of splicing systems are presented and their relationships are investigated. Furthermore, these results are illustrated by some examples.

  13. The connection between splicing and cancer.

    PubMed

    Srebrow, Anabella; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2006-07-01

    Alternative splicing is a crucial mechanism for generating protein diversity. Different splice variants of a given protein can display different and even antagonistic biological functions. Therefore, appropriate control of their synthesis is required to assure the complex orchestration of cellular processes within multicellular organisms. Mutations in cis-acting splicing elements or changes in the activity of constitutive or alternative splicing could have a profound regulatory proteins that compromise the accuracy of either impact on human pathogenesis, in particular in tumor development and progression. Mutations in splicing elements, for example, have been found in genes such as LKB1, KIT, CDH17, KLF6 and BRCA1, and changes in trans-acting regulators can affect the expression of genes such as Ron, RAC1 and CD44.

  14. Characterization of an apparently synonymous F5 mutation causing aberrant splicing and factor V deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, F; Bulato, C; Nielsen, B I; Lee, K; Wielders, S J; Simioni, P; Key, N S; Castoldi, E

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation factor V (FV) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder. We investigated a patient with severe FV deficiency (FV:C < 3%) and moderate bleeding symptoms. Thrombin generation experiments showed residual FV expression in the patient's plasma, which was quantified as 0.7 ± 0.3% by a sensitive prothrombinase-based assay. F5 gene sequencing identified a novel missense mutation in exon 4 (c.578G>C, p.Cys193Ser), predicting the abolition of a conserved disulphide bridge, and an apparently synonymous variant in exon 8 (c.1281C>G). The observation that half of the patient's F5 mRNA lacked the last 18 nucleotides of exon 8 prompted us to re-evaluate the c.1281C>G variant for its possible effects on splicing. Bioinformatics sequence analysis predicted that this transversion would activate a cryptic donor splice site and abolish an exonic splicing enhancer. Characterization in a F5 minigene model confirmed that the c.1281C>G variant was responsible for the patient's splicing defect, which could be partially corrected by a mutation-specific morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. The aberrantly spliced F5 mRNA, whose stability was similar to that of the normal mRNA, encoded a putative FV mutant lacking amino acids 427-432. Expression in COS-1 cells indicated that the mutant protein is poorly secreted and not functional. In conclusion, the c.1281C>G mutation, which was predicted to be translationally silent and hence neutral, causes FV deficiency by impairing pre-mRNA splicing. This finding underscores the importance of cDNA analysis for the correct assessment of exonic mutations. PMID:25470420

  15. Alternative Splicing Regulation During C. elegans Development: Splicing Factors as Regulated Targets

    PubMed Central

    Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing generates protein diversity and allows for post-transcriptional gene regulation. Estimates suggest that 10% of the genes in Caenorhabditis elegans undergo alternative splicing. We constructed a splicing-sensitive microarray to detect alternative splicing for 352 cassette exons and tested for changes in alternative splicing of these genes during development. We found that the microarray data predicted that 62/352 (∼18%) of the alternative splicing events studied show a strong change in the relative levels of the spliced isoforms (>4-fold) during development. Confirmation of the microarray data by RT-PCR was obtained for 70% of randomly selected genes tested. Among the genes with the most developmentally regulated alternatively splicing was the hnRNP F/H splicing factor homolog, W02D3.11 – now named hrpf-1. For the cassette exon of hrpf-1, the inclusion isoform comprises 65% of hrpf-1 steady state messages in embryos but only 0.1% in the first larval stage. This dramatic change in the alternative splicing of an alternative splicing factor suggests a complex cascade of splicing regulation during development. We analyzed splicing in embryos from a strain with a mutation in the splicing factor sym-2, another hnRNP F/H homolog. We found that approximately half of the genes with large alternative splicing changes between the embryo and L1 stages are regulated by sym-2 in embryos. An analysis of the role of nonsense-mediated decay in regulating steady-state alternative mRNA isoforms was performed. We found that 8% of the 352 events studied have alternative isoforms whose relative steady-state levels in embryos change more than 4-fold in a nonsense-mediated decay mutant, including hrpf-1. Strikingly, 53% of these alternative splicing events that are affected by NMD in our experiment are not obvious substrates for NMD based on the presence of premature termination codons. This suggests that the targeting of splicing factors by NMD may have downstream

  16. Splicing regulation: From a parts list of regulatory elements to an integrated splicing code

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zefeng; Burge, Christopher B.

    2008-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to both proteomic diversity and control of gene expression levels. Splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages, and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human diseases. An important long-term goal in the splicing field is to determine a set of rules or “code” for splicing that will enable prediction of the splicing pattern of any primary transcript from its sequence. Outside of the core splice site motifs, the bulk of the information required for splicing is thought to be contained in exonic and intronic cis-regulatory elements that function by recruitment of sequence-specific RNA-binding protein factors that either activate or repress the use of adjacent splice sites. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge of splicing cis-regulatory elements and their context-dependent effects on splicing, emphasizing recent global/genome-wide studies and open questions. PMID:18369186

  17. 30 CFR 57.12088 - Splicing trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Splicing trailing cables. 57.12088 Section 57... Underground Only § 57.12088 Splicing trailing cables. No splice, except a vulcanized splice or its equivalent, shall be made in a trailing cable within 25 feet of the machine unless the machine is equipped with...

  18. Coordinate repression of a trio of neuron-specific splicing events by the splicing regulator PTB.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Liu, W; Grabowski, P J

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the ability of the polypyrimidine tract binding protein PTB to function as a coordinator of splicing regulation for a trio of neuron-specific exons that are subject to developmental splicing changes in the rat cerebellum. Three neuron-specific exons that show positive regulation are derived from the GABA(A) receptor gamma2 subunit 24 nucleotide exon, clathrin light chain B exon EN, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR1 subunit exon 5 pre-mRNAs. The functional activity of splicing repressor signals located in the 3' splice site regions adjacent to the neural exons is shown using an alternative splicing switch assay, in which these short RNA sequences function in trans to switch splicing to the neural pathway in HeLa splicing reactions. Parallel UV crosslinking/competition assays demonstrate selective binding of PTB in comparison to substantially lower binding at adjacent, nonneural 3' splice sites. Substantially lower PTB binding and splicing switch activity is also observed for the 3' splice site of NMDA exon 21, which is subject to negative regulation in cerebellum tissue in the same time frame. In splicing active neural extracts, the balance of control shifts to positive regulation, and this shift correlates with a PTB status that is predominantly the neural form. In this context, the addition of recombinant PTB is sufficient to switch splicing to the nonneural pathway. The neural extracts also reveal specific binding of the CUG triplet repeat binding protein to a subset of regulatory 3' splice site regions. These interactions may interfere with PTB function or modulate splicing levels in a substrate-specific manner within neural tissue. Together these results strengthen the evidence that PTB is a splicing regulator with multiple targets and demonstrate its ability to discriminate among neural and nonneural substrates. Thus, a variety of mechanisms that counterbalance the splicing repressor function of PTB in neural tissue are

  19. Fibronectin Splice Variation in Human Knee Cartilage, Meniscus and Synovial Membrane: Observations in Osteoarthritic Knee

    PubMed Central

    Scanzello, Carla R.; Markova, Dessislava Z.; Chee, Ana; Xiu, Yan; Adams, Sherrill L.; Anderson, Greg; Zgonis, Miltiadis; Qin, Ling; An, Howard S.; Zhang, Yejia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibronectin (FN) is a widely expressed molecule that can participate in development of osteoarthritis (OA) affecting cartilage, meniscus, and synovial membrane (SM). The alternatively spliced isoforms of FN in joint tissues other than cartilage have not been extensively studied previously. The present study compares FN splice variation in patients with varying degrees of osteoarthritic change. Design Joint tissues were collected from asymptomatic donors and patients undergoing arthroscopic procedures. Total RNA was amplified by PCR using primers flanking alternatively spliced Extra Domain A (EDA), Extra Domain B (EDB) and Variable (V) regions. Results EDB+, EDB− and EDA− and V+ variants were present in all joint tissues, while the EDA+ variant was rarely detected. Expression levels of EDB+ and EDV+ variants were similar in cartilage, synovium and meniscal tissues. Synovial expression of V+ FN in arthroscopy patients varied with degree of cartilage degeneration. Two V− isoforms, previously identified in cartilage, were also present in SM and meniscus. Conclusions Fibronectin splicing in meniscus and SM bears striking resemblance to that of cartilage. Expression levels of synovial V+ FN varied with degree of cartilage degeneration. V+ FN should be investigated as a potential biomarker of disease stage or progression in larger populations. PMID:25410897

  20. Genome-Wide Landscape of Alternative Splicing Events in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Braden; Lum, Gengkon; Sablok, Gaurav; Min, Xiang Jia

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Brachypodium distachyon has emerged as a model plant for studying monocot grasses and cereal crops. Using assembled expressed transcript sequences and subsequent mapping to the corresponding genome, we identified 1219 alternative splicing (AS) events spanning across 2021 putatively assembled transcripts generated from 941 genes. Approximately, 6.3% of expressed genes are alternatively spliced in B. distachyon. We observed that a majority of the identified AS events were related to retained introns (55.5%), followed by alternative acceptor sites (16.7%). We also observed a low percentage of exon skipping (5.0%) and alternative donor site events (8.8%). The ‘complex event’ that consists of a combination of two or more basic splicing events accounted for ∼14.0%. Comparative AS transcript analysis revealed 163 and 39 homologous pairs between B. distachyon and Oryza sativa and between B. distachyon and Arabidopsis thaliana, respectively. In all, we found 16 AS transcripts to be conserved in all 3 species. AS events and related putative assembled transcripts annotation can be systematically browsed at Plant Alternative Splicing Database (http://proteomics.ysu.edu/altsplice/plant/). PMID:23297300

  1. HLA-A*68020103 shows an eight nucleotides deletion within intron 2 but has normal mRNA splicing and serological recognition.

    PubMed

    Balas, A; Sánchez-García, F; Bustamante, L; García-Sánchez, F; Vicario, J L

    2007-09-01

    A novel A*68020103 allele was completely characterized by sequencing in a Spanish bone marrow donor. A*68020103 has an eight nucleotides deletion at the 5'-end of intron 2, when compared with other A*6802 alleles. This alteration does not affect either its mRNA splicing process or serological detection. PMID:17661918

  2. hnRNP H binding at the 5′ splice site correlates with the pathological effect of two intronic mutations in the NF-1 and TSHβ genes

    PubMed Central

    Buratti, Emanuele; Baralle, Marco; De Conti, Laura; Baralle, Diana; Romano, Maurizio; Ayala, Youhna M.; Baralle, Francisco E.

    2004-01-01

    We have recently reported a disease-causing substitution (+5G > C) at the donor site of NF-1 exon 3 that produces its skipping. We have now studied in detail the splicing mechanism involved in analyzing RNA–protein complexes at several 5′ splice sites. Characteristic protein patterns were observed by pulldown and band-shift/super-shift analysis. Here, we show that hnRNP H binds specifically to the wild-type GGGgu donor sequence of the NF-1 exon 3. Depletion analyses shows that this protein restricts the accessibility of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1snRNA) to the donor site. In this context, the +5G > C mutation abolishes both U1snRNP base pairing and the 5′ splice site (5′ss) function. However, exon recognition in the mutant can be rescued by disrupting the binding of hnRNP H, demonstrating that this protein enhances the effects of the +5G > C substitution. Significantly, a similar situation was found for a second disease-causing +5G > A substitution in the 5′ss of TSHβ exon 2, which harbors a GGgu donor sequence. Thus, the reason why similar nucleotide substitutions can be either neutral or very disruptive of splicing function can be explained by the presence of specific binding signatures depending on local contexts. PMID:15299088

  3. Aberrant splicing and drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Shouse, Geoffrey P; Zhou, Qi; Mirshahidi, Saied; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has unveiled a new window into the heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In particular, recurrent mutations in spliceosome machinery and genome-wide aberrant splicing events have been recognized as a prominent component of this disease. This review will focus on how these factors influence drug resistance through altered splicing of tumor suppressor and oncogenes and dysregulation of the apoptotic signaling network. A better understanding of these factors in disease progression is necessary to design appropriate therapeutic strategies recognizing specific alternatively spliced or mutated oncogenic targets. PMID:27613060

  4. Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Vivo by Overexpression of Antagonistic Splicing Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caceres, Javier F.; Stamm, Stefan; Helfman, David M.; Krainer, Adrian R.

    1994-09-01

    The opposing effects of SF2/ASF and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 influence alternative splicing in vitro. SF2/ASF or hnRNP A1 complementary DNAs were transiently overexpressed in HeLa cells, and the effect on alternative splicing of several cotransfected reporter genes was measured. Increased expression of SF2/ASF activated proximal 5' splice sites, promoted inclusion of a neuron-specific exon, and prevented abnormal exon skipping. Increased expression of hnRNP A1 activated distal 5' splice sites. Therefore, variations in the intracellular levels of antagonistic splicing factors influence different modes of alternative splicing in vivo and may be a natural mechanism for tissue-specific or developmental regulation of gene expression.

  5. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  6. Cadaveric donor selection and management.

    PubMed

    Studer, Sean M; Orens, Jonathan B

    2006-10-01

    While there is little doubt that proper donor selection is extremely important to achieve good outcomes from transplantation, there are only limited data regarding the current criteria utilized to select the "ideal donor". Importantly, there are not enough donor lungs available for all of those in need. Until an adequate supply of donor organs exists, lives will be lost on the transplant waiting list. While efforts have been made to increase donor awareness, additional transplants can be realized by improving donor utilization. This can be achieved by active participation of transplant teams in donor management and by utilizing "extended criteria" organs. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of using "extended criteria" donors, as this practice could result in increased posttransplant morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the approach to identification of potential lung donors, optimal donor management, and the clinical importance of various donor factors upon recipient outcomes.

  7. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Deger, S; Giessing, M; Roigas, J; Wille, A H; Lein, M; Schönberger, B; Loening, S A

    2005-01-01

    Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy (LDN) has removed disincentives of potential donors and may bear the potential to increase kidney donation. Multiple modifications have been made to abbreviate the learning curve while at the same time guarantee the highest possible level of medical quality for donor and recipient. We reviewed the literature for the evolution of the different LDN techniques and their impact on donor, graft and operating surgeon, including the subtleties of different surgical accesses, vessel handling and organ extraction. We performed a literature search (PubMed, DIMDI, medline) to evaluate the development of the LDN techniques from 1995 to 2003. Today more than 200 centres worldwide perform LDN. Hand-assistance has led to a spread of LDN. Studies comparing open and hand-assisted LDN show a reduction of operating and warm ischaemia times for the hand-assisted LDN. Different surgical access sites (trans- or retroperitoneal), different vessel dissection approaches, donor organ delivery techniques, delivery sites and variations of hand-assistance techniques reflect the evolution of LDN. Proper techniques and their combination for the consecutive surgical steps minimize both warm ischaemia time and operating time while offering the donor a safe minimally invasive laparoscopic procedure. LDN has breathed new life into the moribund field of living kidney donation. Within a few years LDN could become the standard approach in living kidney donation. Surgeons working in this field must be trained thoroughly and well acquainted with the subtleties of the different LDN techniques and their respective advantages and disadvantages. PMID:16754618

  8. Species-dependent splice recognition of a cryptic exon resulting from a recurrent intronic CEP290 mutation that causes congenital blindness.

    PubMed

    Garanto, Alejandro; Duijkers, Lonneke; Collin, Rob W J

    2015-01-01

    A mutation in intron 26 of CEP290 (c.2991+1655A>G) is the most common genetic cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe type of inherited retinal degeneration. This mutation creates a cryptic splice donor site, resulting in the insertion of an aberrant exon (exon X) into ~50% of all CEP290 transcripts. A humanized mouse model with this mutation did not recapitulate the aberrant CEP290 splicing observed in LCA patients, suggesting differential recognition of cryptic splice sites between species. To further assess this phenomenon, we generated two CEP290 minigene constructs, with and without the intronic mutation, and transfected these in cell lines of various species. RT-PCR analysis revealed that exon X is well recognized by the splicing machinery in human and non-human primate cell lines. Intriguingly, this recognition decreases in cell lines derived from species such as dog and rodents, and it is completely absent in Drosophila. In addition, other cryptic splicing events corresponding to sequences in intron 26 of CEP290 were observed to varying degrees in the different cell lines. Together, these results highlight the complexity of splice site recognition among different species, and show that care is warranted when generating animal models to mimic splice site mutations in vivo.

  9. Germinal HPRT splice donor site mutation results in multiple RNA splicing products in T-lymphocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, T.C.; Albertini, R.J.; O`Neill, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by birth defects, progressive bone marrow failure and increased risk for leukemia. FA cells display chromosome breakage and increased cell killing in response to DNA crosslinking agents. At least 5 genes have been defined by cell complementation studies, but only one of these, FAC has been cloned to date. Efforts to map and isolate new FA genes by functional complementation have been hampered by the lack of immortalized FA fibroblast cell lines. Here we report the use of a novel immortalization strategy to create 4 new immortalized FA fibroblast lines, including one from the rare complementation group D. 16 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Distinct splicing signatures affect converged pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome patients carrying mutations in different splicing regulators.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinsong; Zhou, Bing; Thol, Felicitas; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Liang; Shao, Changwei; DeBoever, Christopher; Hou, Jiayi; Li, Hairi; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Ganser, Arnold; Bejar, Rafael; Zhang, Dong-Er; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Heuser, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous myeloid disorders with prevalent mutations in several splicing factors, but the splicing programs linked to specific mutations or MDS in general remain to be systematically defined. We applied RASL-seq, a sensitive and cost-effective platform, to interrogate 5502 annotated splicing events in 169 samples from MDS patients or healthy individuals. We found that splicing signatures associated with normal hematopoietic lineages are largely related to cell signaling and differentiation programs, whereas MDS-linked signatures are primarily involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage responses. Despite the shared roles of affected splicing factors in the 3' splice site definition, mutations in U2AF1, SRSF2, and SF3B1 affect divergent splicing programs, and interestingly, the affected genes fall into converging cancer-related pathways. A risk score derived from 11 splicing events appears to be independently associated with an MDS prognosis and AML transformation, suggesting potential clinical relevance of altered splicing patterns in MDS. PMID:27492256

  11. Alternative Splicing in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Love, Julia E.; Hayden, Eric J.; Rohn, Troy T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases have a variety of different genes contributing to their underlying pathology. Unfortunately, for many of these diseases it is not clear how changes in gene expression affect pathology. Transcriptome analysis of neurodegenerative diseases using ribonucleic acid sequencing (RNA Seq) and real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) provides for a platform to allow investigators to determine the contribution of various genes to the disease phenotype. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD) there are several candidate genes reported that may be associated with the underlying pathology and are, in addition, alternatively spliced. Thus, AD is an ideal disease to examine how alternative splicing may affect pathology. In this context, genes of particular interest to AD pathology include the amyloid precursor protein (APP), TAU, and apolipoprotein E (APOE). Here, we review the evidence of alternative splicing of these genes in normal and AD patients, and recent therapeutic approaches to control splicing. PMID:26942228

  12. Novel splice site mutation in keratin 1 underlies mild epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma in three kindreds.

    PubMed

    Hatsell, S J; Eady, R A; Wennerstrand, L; Dopping-Hepenstal, P; Leigh, I M; Munro, C; Kelsell, D P

    2001-04-01

    We report a novel mutation in the exon 6 splice donor site of keratin 1 (G4134A) that segregates with a palmoplantar keratoderma in three kindreds. The nucleotide substitution leads to the utilization of a novel in-frame splice site 54 bases downstream of the mutation with the subsequent insertion of 18 amino acids into the 2B rod domain. This mutation appears to have a milder effect than previously described mutations in the helix initiation and termination sequence on the function of the rod domain, with regard to filament assembly and stability. Affected individuals displayed only mild focal epidermolysis in the spinous layer of palmoplantar epidermis, in comparison with cases of bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma also due to keratin 1 mutations, which show widespread and severe epidermolysis. This study describes a novel mutation in KRT1 that results in a phenotype distinct from classical bullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma.

  13. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: Mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.C. ); McCloskey, D.A.; Simard, L.R.; McInnes, R.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. The authors previously established by complementation analysis that 29 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, they sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283{r arrow} T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. They observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5{prime} 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. They conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus.

  14. Shedding UV light on alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Matthew S; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A

    2009-05-15

    After DNA damage, cells modulate pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing to induce an anti- or proapoptotic response. In this issue, Muñoz et al. (2009) uncover a cotranscriptional mechanism for activating alternative pre-mRNA splicing after ultraviolet irradiation that depends unexpectedly on hyperphosphorylation of the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain and decreased rates of transcription elongation.

  15. Distinctive Characteristics of Educational Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell N., III.

    2008-01-01

    Examining the charitable behavior of 56,663 US households, this paper evaluates the distinctive characteristics of educational donors as compared with donors to noneducational charitable organizations and with nondonors. In general, educational donors had significantly greater income, wealth, and education than other donors. Educational donors…

  16. Translational control of intron splicing in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Jaillon, Olivier; Bouhouche, Khaled; Gout, Jean-François; Aury, Jean-Marc; Noel, Benjamin; Saudemont, Baptiste; Nowacki, Mariusz; Serrano, Vincent; Porcel, Betina M; Ségurens, Béatrice; Le Mouël, Anne; Lepère, Gersende; Schächter, Vincent; Bétermier, Mireille; Cohen, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Sperling, Linda; Duret, Laurent; Meyer, Eric

    2008-01-17

    Most eukaryotic genes are interrupted by non-coding introns that must be accurately removed from pre-messenger RNAs to produce translatable mRNAs. Splicing is guided locally by short conserved sequences, but genes typically contain many potential splice sites, and the mechanisms specifying the correct sites remain poorly understood. In most organisms, short introns recognized by the intron definition mechanism cannot be efficiently predicted solely on the basis of sequence motifs. In multicellular eukaryotes, long introns are recognized through exon definition and most genes produce multiple mRNA variants through alternative splicing. The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway may further shape the observed sets of variants by selectively degrading those containing premature termination codons, which are frequently produced in mammals. Here we show that the tiny introns of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia are under strong selective pressure to cause premature termination of mRNA translation in the event of intron retention, and that the same bias is observed among the short introns of plants, fungi and animals. By knocking down the two P. tetraurelia genes encoding UPF1, a protein that is crucial in NMD, we show that the intrinsic efficiency of splicing varies widely among introns and that NMD activity can significantly reduce the fraction of unspliced mRNAs. The results suggest that, independently of alternative splicing, species with large intron numbers universally rely on NMD to compensate for suboptimal splicing efficiency and accuracy.

  17. The Alternative Splicing Mutation Database: a hub for investigations of alternative splicing using mutational evidence

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, Jason M; Rajesh, Preeti; Ilikchyan, Irina; Deng, Ying; Mishra, Pankaj K; Wang, Qi; Wu, Xiaochun; Afonin, Kirill A; Grose, William E; Wang, Ye; Khuder, Sadik; Fedorov, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    Background Some mutations in the internal regions of exons occur within splicing enhancers and silencers, influencing the pattern of alternative splicing in the corresponding genes. To understand how these sequence changes affect splicing, we created a database of these mutations. Findings The Alternative Splicing Mutation Database (ASMD) serves as a repository for all exonic mutations not associated with splicing junctions that measurably change the pattern of alternative splicing. In this initial published release (version 1.2), only human sequences are present, but the ASMD will grow to include other organisms, (see Availability and requirements section for the ASMD web address). This relational database allows users to investigate connections between mutations and features of the surrounding sequences, including flanking sequences, RNA secondary structures and strengths of splice junctions. Splicing effects of the mutations are quantified by the relative presence of alternative mRNA isoforms with and without a given mutation. This measure is further categorized by the accuracy of the experimental methods employed. The database currently contains 170 mutations in 66 exons, yet these numbers increase regularly. We developed an algorithm to derive a table of oligonucleotide Splicing Potential (SP) values from the ASMD dataset. We present the SP concept and tools in detail in our corresponding article. Conclusion The current data set demonstrates that mutations affecting splicing are located throughout exons and might be enriched within local RNA secondary structures. Exons from the ASMD have below average splicing junction strength scores, but the difference is small and is judged not to be significant. PMID:18611286

  18. Alternative splicing of Wilms tumor suppressor 1 (Wt1) exon 4 results in protein isoforms with different functions.

    PubMed

    Schnerwitzki, Danny; Perner, Birgit; Hoppe, Beate; Pietsch, Stefan; Mehringer, Rebecca; Hänel, Frank; Englert, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene Wt1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for development of multiple organs including kidneys, gonads, spleen and heart. In mammals Wt1 comprises 10 exons with two characteristic splicing events: inclusion or skipping of exon 5 and alternative usage of two splice donor sites between exons 9 and 10. Most fish including zebrafish and medaka possess two wt1 paralogs, wt1a and wt1b, both lacking exon 5. Here we have characterized wt1 in guppy, platyfish and the short-lived African killifish Nothobranchius furzeri. All fish except zebrafish show alternative splicing of exon 4 of wt1a but not of wt1b with the wt1a(-exon 4) isoform being the predominant splice variant. With regard to function, Wt1a(+exon 4) showed less dimerization but stimulated transcription more effectively than the Wt1a(-exon 4) isoform. A specific knockdown of wt1a exon 4 in zebrafish was associated with anomalies in kidney development demonstrating a physiological function for Wt1a exon 4. Interestingly, alternative splicing of exon 4 seems to be an early evolutionary event as it is observed in the single wt1 gene of the sturgeon, a species that has not gone through teleost-specific genome duplication. PMID:25014653

  19. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making.

  20. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making. PMID:24919733

  1. Splicing of the Large Intron Present in the Nonstructural Gene of Minute Virus of Mice Is Governed by TIA-1/TIAR Binding Downstream of the Nonconsensus Donor▿

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Young; Pintel, David

    2009-01-01

    The essential proteins NS1 and NS2 of minute virus of mice are encoded by mRNAs R1 and R2, respectively. R2 is derived from R1 by excision of a large intron and thus splicing governs the relative ratios of NS1 and NS2. Excision of the large intron utilizes a nonconsensus 5′ donor site. We identified a U-rich and A-rich intronic sequence immediately downstream of the nonconsensus 5′ donor site that functions as an intronic splicing enhancer (ISE) required for efficient large-intron excision. The ISE binds the cellular RNA-processing proteins TIA-1 and TIAR, which enhance usage of the nonconsensus donor. PMID:19339348

  2. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M.; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P.; Clark, John M.; Reynolds, Stuart E.; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Feil, Edward J.; Urrutia, Araxi O.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation. PMID:26169943

  3. Splicing therapy for neuromuscular disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Andrew G.L.; Wood, Matthew J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are two of the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases in humans. Both conditions are fatal and no clinically available treatments are able to significantly alter disease course in either case. However, by manipulation of pre-mRNA splicing using antisense oligonucleotides, defective transcripts from the DMD gene and from the SMN2 gene in SMA can be modified to once again produce protein and restore function. A large number of in vitro and in vivo studies have validated the applicability of this approach and an increasing number of preliminary clinical trials have either been completed or are under way. Several different oligonucleotide chemistries can be used for this purpose and various strategies are being developed to facilitate increased delivery efficiency and prolonged therapeutic effect. As these novel therapeutic compounds start to enter the clinical arena, attention must also be drawn to the question of how best to facilitate the clinical development of such personalised genetic therapies and how best to implement their provision. PMID:23631896

  4. Alternative Splice in Alternative Lice.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Corona, Jaime M; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Chen, Lu; Olds, Brett P; Clark, John M; Reynolds, Stuart E; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Feil, Edward J; Urrutia, Araxi O

    2015-10-01

    Genomic and transcriptomics analyses have revealed human head and body lice to be almost genetically identical; although con-specific, they nevertheless occupy distinct ecological niches and have differing feeding patterns. Most importantly, while head lice are not known to be vector competent, body lice can transmit three serious bacterial diseases; epidemictyphus, trench fever, and relapsing fever. In order to gain insights into the molecular bases for these differences, we analyzed alternative splicing (AS) using next-generation sequencing data for one strain of head lice and one strain of body lice. We identified a total of 3,598 AS events which were head or body lice specific. Exon skipping AS events were overrepresented among both head and body lice, whereas intron retention events were underrepresented in both. However, both the enrichment of exon skipping and the underrepresentation of intron retention are significantly stronger in body lice compared with head lice. Genes containing body louse-specific AS events were found to be significantly enriched for functions associated with development of the nervous system, salivary gland, trachea, and ovarian follicle cells, as well as regulation of transcription. In contrast, no functional categories were overrepresented among genes with head louse-specific AS events. Together, our results constitute the first evidence for transcript pool differences in head and body lice, providing insights into molecular adaptations that enabled human lice to adapt to clothing, and representing a powerful illustration of the pivotal role AS can play in functional adaptation.

  5. Linking Splicing to Pol II Transcription Stabilizes Pre-mRNAs and Influences Splicing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Martin J; Yang, Chin-Rang; Kotlajich, Matthew V

    2006-01-01

    RNA processing is carried out in close proximity to the site of transcription, suggesting a regulatory link between transcription and pre-mRNA splicing. Using an in vitro transcription/splicing assay, we demonstrate that an association of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription and pre-mRNA splicing is required for efficient gene expression. Pol II-synthesized RNAs containing functional splice sites are protected from nuclear degradation, presumably because the local concentration of the splicing machinery is sufficiently high to ensure its association over interactions with nucleases. Furthermore, the process of transcription influences alternative splicing of newly synthesized pre-mRNAs. Because other RNA polymerases do not provide similar protection from nucleases, and their RNA products display altered splicing patterns, the link between transcription and RNA processing is RNA Pol II-specific. We propose that the connection between transcription by Pol II and pre-mRNA splicing guarantees an extended half-life and proper processing of nascent pre-mRNAs. PMID:16640457

  6. SplicePlot: a utility for visualizing splicing quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Eric; Nance, Tracy; Montgomery, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: RNA sequencing has provided unprecedented resolution of alternative splicing and splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL). However, there are few tools available for visualizing the genotype-dependent effects of splicing at a population level. SplicePlot is a simple command line utility that produces intuitive visualization of sQTLs and their effects. SplicePlot takes mapped RNA sequencing reads in BAM format and genotype data in VCF format as input and outputs publication-quality Sashimi plots, hive plots and structure plots, enabling better investigation and understanding of the role of genetics on alternative splicing and transcript structure. Availability and implementation: Source code and detailed documentation are available at http://montgomerylab.stanford.edu/spliceplot/index.html under Resources and at Github. SplicePlot is implemented in Python and is supported on Linux and Mac OS. A VirtualBox virtual machine running Ubuntu with SplicePlot already installed is also available. Contact: wu.eric.g@gmail.com or smontgom@stanford.edu PMID:24363378

  7. Alternative Splicing Signatures in RNA-seq Data: Percent Spliced in (PSI).

    PubMed

    Schafer, Sebastian; Miao, Kui; Benson, Craig C; Heinig, Matthias; Cook, Stuart A; Hubner, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of alternative exons are spliced out of messenger RNA to increase protein diversity. High-throughput sequencing of short cDNA fragments (RNA-seq) generates a genome-wide snapshot of these post-transcriptional processes. RNA-seq reads yield insights into the regulation of alternative splicing by revealing the usage of known or unknown splice sites as well as the expression level of exons. Constitutive exons are never covered by split alignments, whereas alternative exonic parts are located within highly expressed splicing junctions. The ratio between reads including or excluding exons, also known as percent spliced in index (PSI), indicates how efficiently sequences of interest are spliced into transcripts. This protocol describes a method to calculate the PSI without prior knowledge of splicing patterns. It provides a quantitative, global assessment of exon usage that can be integrated with other tools that identify differential isoform processing. Novel, complex splicing events along a genetic locus can be visualized in an exon-centric manner and compared across conditions.

  8. Systematic screening for mutations in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the human dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Cichon, S.; Noethen, M.M.; Stoeber, G.

    1996-07-26

    A possible dysregulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. In the present study we systematically searched for the presence of mutations in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the dopamine D{sub 1} receptor (DRD1) gene. This region has previously been shown to contain a functional promoter. We investigated 119 unrelated individuals (including 36 schizophrenic patients, 38 bipolar affective patients, and 45 healthy controls) using single-strand conformation analysis (SSCA). Eleven overlapping PCR fragments covered 2,189 bp of DNA sequence. We identified six single base substitutions: -2218T/C, -2102C/A, -2030T/C, -1992G/A, -1251G/C, and -800T/C. None of the mutations was found to be located in regions which have important influence on the level of transcriptional activity. Allele frequencies were similar in patients and controls, indicating that genetic variation in the 5{prime}-regulatory region of the DRD1 gene is unlikely to play a frequent, major role in the genetic predisposition to either schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Structural analysis of the 5 prime flanking region of the. beta. -globin gene in African sickle cell anemia patients: Further evidence for three origins of the sickle cell mutation in Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Chebloune, Y.; Pagnier, J.; Trabuchet, G.; Faure, C.; Verdier, G.; Labie, D.; Nigon, V. )

    1988-06-01

    Haplotype analysis of the {beta}-globin gene cluster shows two regions of DNA characterized by nonrandom association of restriction site polymorphisms. These regions are separated by a variable segment containing the repeated sequences (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y}, which might be involved in recombinational events. Studies of haplotypes linked to the sickle cell gene in Africa provide strong argument for three origins of the mutation: Benin, Senegal, and the Central African Republic. The structure of the variable segment in the three African populations was studied by S1 nuclease mapping of genomic DNA, which allows a comparison of several samples. A 1080-base-pair DNA segment was sequenced for one sample from each population. S1 nuclease mapping confirmed the homogeneity of each population with regard to both (ATTTT){sub n} and (AT){sub x}T{sub y} repeats. The authors found three additional structures for (AT){sub x}T{sub y} correlating with the geographic origin of the patients. Ten other nucleotide positions, 5{prime} and 3{prime} to the (AT){sub x}T{sub y} copies, were found to be variable when compared to homologous sequences from human and monkey DNAs. These results allow us to propose an evolutionary scheme for the polymorphisms in the 5{prime} flanking region of the {beta}-globin gene. The results strongly support the hypothesis of three origins for the sickle mutation in Africa.

  10. Suppressors of the cdc-25.1(gf)-associated intestinal hyperplasia reveal important maternal roles for prp-8 and a subset of splicing factors in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hebeisen, Michaël; Drysdale, John; Roy, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The maternal contribution of gene products enables embryos to initiate their developmental program in the absence of zygotic gene expression. In Caenorhabditis elegans, maternal CDC-25.1 levels are tightly regulated to promote early cell divisions, while stabilization of this phosphatase by gain-of-function mutations gives rise to intestinal-specific hyperplasia. To identify regulators of CDC-25.1 levels and/or function, we performed a modifier screen of the cdc-25.1(gf)-dependent hyperplasia. One of the isolated suppressor mutants possesses a donor splice site mutation in prp-8, a key splicing factor of the U5-specific snRNP. prp-8(rr40) produces aberrant prp-8 splice variants that generate C-terminal truncations at the expense of wild-type prp-8. Levels of maternal transcripts are reduced, including cdc-25.1, while zygotic transcripts appear unperturbed, suggesting a germ-line-specific role for this splicing factor in regulating the splicing, and consequently, the steady-state levels of maternal transcripts. Using a novel feeding RNAi strategy we found that only a subset of splicing factors suppress cdc-25.1(gf), suggesting that they too may play specific roles in germ-line spliceosome function. In humans, mutations in the corresponding hPrp8 C-terminal domain result in retinitis pigmentosa, a retinal-specific disorder. Intriguingly, despite affecting the general splicing apparatus, both human and C. elegans show tissue-specific defects resulting from mutations in this key splicing component. Our findings suggest that in addition to its important regulatory function in the C. elegans germ line, prp-8(rr40) may provide further insight into the etiology of this splicing-associated human disorder. PMID:18945809

  11. RNA splicing. The human splicing code reveals new insights into the genetic determinants of disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui Y; Alipanahi, Babak; Lee, Leo J; Bretschneider, Hannes; Merico, Daniele; Yuen, Ryan K C; Hua, Yimin; Gueroussov, Serge; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Hughes, Timothy R; Morris, Quaid; Barash, Yoseph; Krainer, Adrian R; Jojic, Nebojsa; Scherer, Stephen W; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate precision medicine and whole-genome annotation, we developed a machine-learning technique that scores how strongly genetic variants affect RNA splicing, whose alteration contributes to many diseases. Analysis of more than 650,000 intronic and exonic variants revealed widespread patterns of mutation-driven aberrant splicing. Intronic disease mutations that are more than 30 nucleotides from any splice site alter splicing nine times as often as common variants, and missense exonic disease mutations that have the least impact on protein function are five times as likely as others to alter splicing. We detected tens of thousands of disease-causing mutations, including those involved in cancers and spinal muscular atrophy. Examination of intronic and exonic variants found using whole-genome sequencing of individuals with autism revealed misspliced genes with neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Our approach provides evidence for causal variants and should enable new discoveries in precision medicine.

  12. A multi-split mapping algorithm for circular RNA, splicing, trans-splicing and fusion detection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Steve; Otto, Christian; Doose, Gero; Tanzer, Andrea; Langenberger, David; Christ, Sabina; Kunz, Manfred; Holdt, Lesca M; Teupser, Daniel; Hackermüller, Jörg; Stadler, Peter F

    2014-02-10

    Numerous high-throughput sequencing studies have focused on detecting conventionally spliced mRNAs in RNA-seq data. However, non-standard RNAs arising through gene fusion, circularization or trans-splicing are often neglected. We introduce a novel, unbiased algorithm to detect splice junctions from single-end cDNA sequences. In contrast to other methods, our approach accommodates multi-junction structures. Our method compares favorably with competing tools for conventionally spliced mRNAs and, with a gain of up to 40% of recall, systematically outperforms them on reads with multiple splits, trans-splicing and circular products. The algorithm is integrated into our mapping tool segemehl (http://www.bioinf.uni-leipzig.de/Software/segemehl/).

  13. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  14. Variation in alternative splicing across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gene; Holste, Dirk; Kreiman, Gabriel; Burge, Christopher B

    2004-01-01

    Background Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is widely used by higher eukaryotes to generate different protein isoforms in specific cell or tissue types. To compare AS events across human tissues, we analyzed the splicing patterns of genomically aligned expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from libraries of cDNAs from different tissues. Results Controlling for differences in EST coverage among tissues, we found that the brain and testis had the highest levels of exon skipping. The most pronounced differences between tissues were seen for the frequencies of alternative 3' splice site and alternative 5' splice site usage, which were about 50 to 100% higher in the liver than in any other human tissue studied. Quantifying differences in splice junction usage, the brain, pancreas, liver and the peripheral nervous system had the most distinctive patterns of AS. Analysis of available microarray expression data showed that the liver had the most divergent pattern of expression of serine-arginine protein and heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein genes compared to the other human tissues studied, possibly contributing to the unusually high frequency of alternative splice site usage seen in liver. Sequence motifs enriched in alternative exons in genes expressed in the brain, testis and liver suggest specific splicing factors that may be important in AS regulation in these tissues. Conclusions This study distinguishes the human brain, testis and liver as having unusually high levels of AS, highlights differences in the types of AS occurring commonly in different tissues, and identifies candidate cis-regulatory elements and trans-acting factors likely to have important roles in tissue-specific AS in human cells. PMID:15461793

  15. The behavior of bonded doubler splices for composite sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeller, T. A.; Weisahaar, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of an investigation into the behavior of adhesively bonded doubler splices of two composite material sandwich panels are presented. The splices are studied from three approaches: analytical; numerical (finite elements); and experimental. Several parameters that characterize the splice are developed to determine their influence upon joint strength. These parameters are: doubler overlap length; core stiffness; laminate bending stiffness; the size of the gap between the spliced sandwich panels; and room and elevated temperatures. Similarities and contrasts between these splices and the physically similar single and double lap joints are discussed. The results of this investigation suggest several possible approaches to improving the strength of the sandwich splices.

  16. Alternative splicing regulated by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Congjun; Huang, Wen; Li, Weizhong; Li, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT) and control (CT) groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥ 3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG) while ~3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR <0.001) at the gene level, had a significantly higher number of junction reads mapped to Exon#8 (Donor) and Exon#11 (Acceptor) in BT. This event had the potential to result in the formation of a COL5A3 mRNA isoform with 2 of the 69 exons missing. In addition, 216 differentially expressed transcript isoforms regulated by butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC inhibitors.

  17. Functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator expression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells by AAV6.2-mediated segmental trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuhu; Lou, Howard H; Boyer, Julie L; Limberis, Maria P; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Hackett, Neil R; Leopold, Philip L; Wilson, James M; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is characterized by deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a Cl(-) transporter. The packaging constraints of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors preclude delivery of both an active promoter and CFTR cDNA to target cells. We hypothesized that segmental trans-splicing, in which two AAV vectors deliver the 5' and 3' halves of the CFTR cDNA, could mediate splicing of two pre-mRNAs into a full-length, functional CFTR mRNA. Using a segmental trans-splicing 5' donor-3' acceptor pair that split the CFTR cDNA between exons 14a and 14b, cotransfection of donor and acceptor plasmids into CFTR(-) cells resulted in full-length CFTR message and protein. Microinjection of plasmids into CFTR(-) cells produced cAMP-activated Cl(-) conductance. Vectors created with an engineered human serotype, AAV6.2, were used to deliver CFTR donor and acceptor constructs, resulting in full-length CFTR mRNA and protein as well as cAMP-activated Cl(-) conductance in CFTR(-) cells, including human CF airway epithelial IB3-1 cells. Thus, segmental trans-splicing can be used with AAV vectors to mediate expression of CFTR, a strategy potentially applicable to individuals with CF.

  18. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    PubMed

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  19. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, F.; Textoris-Taube, K.; Keller, C.; Golnik, R.; Vigneron, N.; Van den Eynde, B. J.; Schuler-Thurner, B.; Schadendorf, D.; Lorenz, F. K. M.; Uckert, W.; Urban, S.; Lehmann, A.; Albrecht-Koepke, N.; Janek, K.; Henklein, P.; Niewienda, A.; Kloetzel, P. M.; Mishto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100mel47–52/40–42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100mel47–52/40–42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8+ T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  20. Coupling of signal transduction to alternative pre-mRNA splicing by a composite splice regulator.

    PubMed Central

    König, H; Ponta, H; Herrlich, P

    1998-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a fundamental mechanism of differential gene expression in that it can give rise to functionally distinct proteins from a single gene, according to the developmental or physiological state of cells in multicellular organisms. In the pre-mRNA of the cell surface molecule CD44, the inclusion of up to 10 variant exons (v1-v10) is regulated during development, upon activation of lymphocytes and dendritic cells, and during tumour progression. Using minigene constructs containing CD44 exon v5, we have discovered exonic RNA elements that couple signal transduction to alternative splicing. They form a composite splice regulator encompassing an exon recognition element and splice silencer elements. Both type of elements are necessary to govern cell type-specific inclusion of the exon as well as inducible inclusion in T cells after stimulation by concanavalin A, by Ras signalling or after activation of protein kinase C by phorbol ester. Inducible splicing does not depend on de novo protein synthesis. The coupling of signal transduction to alternative splicing by such elements probably represents the mechanism whereby splice patterns of genes are established during development and can be changed under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:9582284

  1. Potential control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 asp expression by alternative splicing in the upstream untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Michael S; Birch, Katherine E; Deacon, Nicholas J; Mosse, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    The negative-sense asp open reading frame (ORF) positioned opposite to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env gene encodes the 189 amino acid, membrane-associated ASP protein. Negative-sense transcription, regulated by long terminal repeat sequences, has been observed early in HIV-1 infection in vitro. All subtypes of HIV-1 were scanned to detect the negative-sense asp ORF and to identify potential regulatory sequences. A series of highly conserved upstream short open reading frames (sORFs) was identified. This potential control region from HIV-1(NL4-3), containing six sORFs, was cloned upstream of the reporter gene EGFP. Expression by transfection of HEK293 cells indicated that the introduction of this sORF region inhibits EGFP reporter expression; analysis of transcripts revealed no significant changes in levels of EGFP mRNA. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (RT-PCR) further demonstrated that the upstream sORF region undergoes alternative splicing in vitro. The most abundant product is spliced to remove sORFs I to V, leaving only the in-frame sORF VI upstream of asp. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of typical splice donor- and acceptor-site motifs. Mutation of the highly conserved splice donor and acceptor sites modulates, but does not fully relieve, inhibition of EGFP production. The strong conservation of asp and its sORFs across all HIV-1 subtypes suggests that the asp gene product may have a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. Alternative splicing of the upstream sORF region provides a potential mechanism for controlling expression of the asp gene.

  2. IntSplice: prediction of the splicing consequences of intronic single-nucleotide variations in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Akihide; Okuno, Tatsuya; Rahman, Mohammad Alinoor; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Takeda, Jun-Ichi; Masuda, Akio; Selcen, Duygu; Engel, Andrew G; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-07-01

    Precise spatiotemporal regulation of splicing is mediated by splicing cis-elements on pre-mRNA. Single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) affecting intronic cis-elements possibly compromise splicing, but no efficient tool has been available to identify them. Following an effect-size analysis of each intronic nucleotide on annotated alternative splicing, we extracted 105 parameters that could affect the strength of the splicing signals. However, we could not generate reliable support vector regression models to predict the percent-splice-in (PSI) scores for normal human tissues. Next, we generated support vector machine (SVM) models using 110 parameters to directly differentiate pathogenic SNVs in the Human Gene Mutation Database and normal SNVs in the dbSNP database, and we obtained models with a sensitivity of 0.800±0.041 (mean and s.d.) and a specificity of 0.849±0.021. Our IntSplice models were more discriminating than SVM models that we generated with Shapiro-Senapathy score and MaxEntScan::score3ss. We applied IntSplice to a naturally occurring and nine artificial intronic mutations in RAPSN causing congenital myasthenic syndrome. IntSplice correctly predicted the splicing consequences for nine of the ten mutants. We created a web service program, IntSplice (http://www.med.nagoya-u.ac.jp/neurogenetics/IntSplice) to predict splicing-affecting SNVs at intronic positions from -50 to -3. PMID:27009626

  3. SpliceJumper: a classification-based approach for calling splicing junctions from RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Next-generation RNA sequencing technologies have been widely applied in transcriptome profiling. This facilitates further studies of gene structure and expression on the genome wide scale. It is an important step to align reads to the reference genome and call out splicing junctions for the following analysis, such as the analysis of alternative splicing and isoform construction. However, because of the existence of introns, when RNA-seq reads are aligned to the reference genome, reads can not be fully mapped at splicing sites. Thus, it is challenging to align reads and call out splicing junctions accurately. Results In this paper, we present a classification based approach for calling splicing junctions from RNA-seq data, which is implemented in the program SpliceJumper. SpliceJumper uses a machine learning approach which combines multiple features extracted from RNA-seq data. We compare SpliceJumper with two existing RNA-seq analysis approaches, TopHat2 and MapSplice2, on both simulated and real data. Our results show that SpliceJumper outperforms TopHat2 and MapSplice2 in accuracy. The program SpliceJumper can be downloaded at https://github.com/Reedwarbler/SpliceJumper. PMID:26678515

  4. Origin of Spliceosomal Introns and Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Manuel; Roy, Scott William

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review the current knowledge on the prehistory, origins, and evolution of spliceosomal introns. First, we briefly outline the major features of the different types of introns, with particular emphasis on the nonspliceosomal self-splicing group II introns, which are widely thought to be the ancestors of spliceosomal introns. Next, we discuss the main scenarios proposed for the origin and proliferation of spliceosomal introns, an event intimately linked to eukaryogenesis. We then summarize the evidence that suggests that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had remarkably high intron densities and many associated characteristics resembling modern intron-rich genomes. From this intron-rich LECA, the different eukaryotic lineages have taken very distinct evolutionary paths leading to profoundly diverged modern genome structures. Finally, we discuss the origins of alternative splicing and the qualitative differences in alternative splicing forms and functions across lineages. PMID:24890509

  5. The human serotonin 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor: Complete cDNA, genomic structure, and alternatively spliced variant

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Enzhong; Zhu, Lingyu; Zhao, Lingyun

    1996-08-01

    The complete 4775-nt cDNA encoding the human serotonin 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (5-HT{sub 2C}R), a G-protein-coupled receptor, has been isolated. It contains a 1377-nt coding region flanked by a 728-nt 5{prime}-untranslated region and a 2670-nt 3{prime}-untranslated region. By using the cloned 5-HT{sub 2C}R cDNA probe, the complete human gene for this receptor has been isolated and shown to contain six exons and five introns spanning at least 230 kb of DNA. The coding region of the human 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene is interrupted by three introns, and the positions of the intron/exon junctions are conserved between the human and the rodent genes. In addition, an alternatively spliced 5-HT{sub 2C}R RNA that contains a 95-nt deletion in the region coding for the second intracellular loop and the fourth transmembrane domain of the receptor has been identified. This deletion leads to a frameshift and premature termination so that the short isoform RNA encodes a putative protein of 248 amino acids. The ratio for the short isoform over the 5-HT{sub 2C}R RNA was found to be higher in choroid plexus tumor than in normal brain tissue, suggesting the possibility of differential regulation of the 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene in different neural tissues or during tumorigenesis. Transcription of the human 5-HT{sub 2C}R gene was found to be initiated at multiple sites. No classical TATA-box sequence was found at the appropriate location, and the 5{prime}-flanking sequence contains many potential transcription factor-binding sites. A 7.3-kb 5{prime}-flanking 5-HT{sub 2C}R DNA directed the efficient expression of a luciferase reported gene in SK-N-SH and IMR32 neuroblastoma cells, indicating that is contains a functional promoter. 69 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Epigenetics in alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Luco, Reini F.; Allo, Mariano; Schor, Ignacio E.; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.; Misteli, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays critical roles in differentiation, development and disease and is a major source for protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. Traditionally, analysis of alternative splicing regulation has focused on RNA sequence elements and their associated factors, but recent provocative studies point to a key function of chromatin structure and histone modifications in alternative splicing regulation. These insights suggest that epigenetic regulation not only determines what parts of the genome are expressed, but also how they are spliced. PMID:21215366

  7. Why Minority Donors Are Needed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Search Register with your state as an Organ Donor Home Why Donate Becoming a Donor About Donation & ... Why Donate RELATED INFORMATION Minority Focused Grantee Publications Organ Donation Process Enrolling as a Donor Trying to Save a Life Testing for Brain ...

  8. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosion-proof splice boxes. 18.43 Section 18... Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held and adequately insulated. Strain clamps shall be provided for all cables entering a splice box....

  9. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosion-proof splice boxes. 18.43 Section 18... Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held and adequately insulated. Strain clamps shall be provided for all cables entering a splice box....

  10. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosion-proof splice boxes. 18.43 Section 18... Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held and adequately insulated. Strain clamps shall be provided for all cables entering a splice box....

  11. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosion-proof splice boxes. 18.43 Section 18... Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held and adequately insulated. Strain clamps shall be provided for all cables entering a splice box....

  12. 30 CFR 18.43 - Explosion-proof splice boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Explosion-proof splice boxes. 18.43 Section 18... Design Requirements § 18.43 Explosion-proof splice boxes. Internal connections shall be rigidly held and adequately insulated. Strain clamps shall be provided for all cables entering a splice box....

  13. 30 CFR 77.602 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 77.602... COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 77.602 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be: (a) Mechanically strong with adequate electrical conductivity;...

  14. 30 CFR 75.604 - Permanent splicing of trailing cables.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permanent splicing of trailing cables. 75.604... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.604 Permanent splicing of trailing cables. When permanent splices in trailing cables are made, they shall be:...

  15. 46 CFR 111.60-19 - Cable splices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with section 25.11 of IEEE 45-2002 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 110.10-1). ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable splices. 111.60-19 Section 111.60-19 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-19 Cable splices. (a) A cable must not be spliced in...

  16. 30 CFR 75.603 - Temporary splice of trailing cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary splice of trailing cable. 75.603... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.603 Temporary splice of trailing cable. One temporary splice may be made in any trailing cable. Such trailing cable...

  17. Schizophyllum commune has an extensive and functional alternative splicing repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Gehrmann, Thies; Pelkmans, Jordi F.; Lugones, Luis G.; Wösten, Han A. B.; Abeel, Thomas; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide studies have demonstrated that fungi possess the machinery to alternatively splice pre-mRNA. However, there has not been a systematic categorization of the functional impact of alternative splicing in a fungus. We investigate alternative splicing and its functional consequences in the model mushroom forming fungus Schizophyllum commune. Alternative splicing was demonstrated for 2,285 out of 12,988 expressed genes, resulting in 20% additional transcripts. Intron retentions were the most common alternative splicing events, accounting for 33% of all splicing events, and 43% of the events in coding regions. On the other hand, exon skipping events were rare in coding regions (1%) but enriched in UTRs where they accounted for 57% of the events. Specific functional groups, including transcription factors, contained alternatively spliced genes. Alternatively spliced transcripts were regulated differently throughout development in 19% of the 2,285 alternatively spliced genes. Notably, 69% of alternatively spliced genes have predicted alternative functionality by loss or gain of functional domains, or by acquiring alternative subcellular locations. S. commune exhibits more alternative splicing than any other studied fungus. Taken together, alternative splicing increases the complexity of the S. commune proteome considerably and provides it with a rich repertoire of alternative functionality that is exploited dynamically. PMID:27659065

  18. Splicing biomarkers of disease severity in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamori, Masayuki; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Puwanant, Araya; Welle, Steve; Eichinger, Katy; Pandya, Shree; Dekdebrun, Jeannne; Heatwole, Chad R.; McDermott, Michael P.; Chen, Tian; Cline, Melissa; Tawil, Rabi; Osborne, Robert J.; Wheeler, Thurman M.; Swanson, Maurice; Moxley, Richard T.; Thornton, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop RNA splicing biomarkers of disease severity and therapeutic response in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2). Methods In a discovery cohort we used microarrays to perform global analysis of alternative splicing in DM1 and DM2. The newly identified splicing changes were combined with previous data to create a panel of 50 putative splicing defects. In a validation cohort of 50 DM1 subjects we measured the strength of ankle dorsiflexion (ADF) and then obtained a needle biopsy of tibialis anterior (TA) to analyze splice events in muscle RNA. The specificity of DM-associated splicing defects was assessed in disease controls. The CTG expansion size in muscle tissue was determined by Southern blot. The reversibility of splicing defects was assessed in transgenic mice by using antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) to reduce levels of toxic RNA. Results Forty-two splicing defects were confirmed in TA muscle in the validation cohort. Among these, 20 events showed graded changes that correlated with ADF weakness. Five other splice events were strongly affected in DM1 subjects with normal ADF strength. Comparison to disease controls and mouse models indicated that splicing changes were DM-specific, mainly attributable to MBNL1 sequestration, and reversible in mice by targeted knockdown of toxic RNA. Splicing defects and weakness were not correlated with CTG expansion size in muscle tissue. Interpretation Alternative splicing changes in skeletal muscle may serve as biomarkers of disease severity and therapeutic response in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:23929620

  19. Cryptic exon activation by disruption of exon splice enhancer: novel mechanism causing 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stucki, Martin; Suormala, Terttu; Fowler, Brian; Valle, David; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2009-10-16

    3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (MCC) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine catabolism. MCC is a heteromeric mitochondrial enzyme composed of biotin-containing alpha (MCCA) and smaller beta (MCCB) subunits encoded by MCCA and MCCB, respectively. We report studies of the c.1054G-->A mutation in exon 11 of MCCB detected in the homozygous state in a patient with MCC deficiency. Sequence analysis of MCCB cDNA revealed two overlapping transcripts, one containing the normal 73 bp of exon 11 including the missense mutation c.1054G-->A (p.G352R), the other with exon 11 replaced by a 64-bp sequence from intron 10 (cryptic exon 10a) that maintains the reading frame and is flanked by acceptable splice consensus sites. In expression studies, we show that both transcripts lack detectable MCC activity. Western blot analysis showed slightly reduced levels of MCCB using the transcript containing the missense mutation, whereas no MCCB was detected with the transcript containing the cryptic exon 10a. Analysis of the region harboring the mutation revealed that the c.1054G-->A mutation is located in an exon splice enhancer sequence. Using MCCB minigene constructs to transfect MCCB-deficient fibroblasts, we demonstrate that the reduction in utilization of exon 11 associated with the c.1054G-->A mutation is due to alteration of this exon splice enhancer. Further, we show that optimization of the weak splice donor site of exon 11 corrects the splicing defect. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a point mutation disrupting an exon splice enhancer that causes exon skipping along with utilization of a cryptic exon.

  20. Inhibition of Splicing but not Cleavage at the 5' Splice Site by Truncating Human β -globin Pre-mRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furdon, Paul J.; Kole, Ryszard

    1986-02-01

    Human β -globin mRNAs truncated in the second exon or in the first intron have been processed in vitro in a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Transcripts containing a fragment of the second exon as short as 53 nucleotides are efficiently spliced, whereas transcripts truncated 24 or 14 nucleotides downstream from the 3' splice site are spliced inefficiently, if at all. All of these transcripts, however, are efficiently and accurately cleaved at the 5' splice site. In contrast, RNA truncated in the first intron, 54 nucleotides upstream from the 3' splice site, is not processed at all. These findings suggest that cleavage at the 5' splice site and subsequent splicing steps--i.e., cleavage at the 3' splice site and exon ligation--need not be coupled. Anti-Sm serum inhibits the complete splicing reaction and cleavage at the 5' splice site, suggesting involvement of certain ribonucleoprotein particles in the cleavage reaction. ATP and Mg2+ are required for cleavage at the 5' splice site at concentrations similar to those for the complete splicing reaction.

  1. Blood Donor Management in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jingxing; Liu, Zhong; Stevens, Lori; Sadler, Andrew; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite a steady increase in total blood collections and voluntary non-remunerated blood donors, China continues to have many challenges with its blood donation system. The country's donation rate remains low at 9%o, with over 60% of donors being first-time donors. Generally there is a lack of adequate public awareness about blood donation. The conservative donor selection criteria, the relatively long donation interval, and the small donation volume have further limited blood supply. To ensure a sufficient and safe blood supply that meets the increasing clinical need for blood products, there is an urgent need to strengthen the country's blood donor management. This comprehensive effort should include educating and motivating more individuals especially from the rural areas to be involved in blood donation, developing rational and evidence-based selection criteria for donor eligibility, designing a donor follow-up mechanism to encourage more future donations, assessing the current donor testing strategy, improving donor service and care, building regional and national shared donor deferral database, and enhancing the transparency of the blood donation system to gain more trust from the general public. The purpose of the review is to provide an overview of the key process of and challenges with the blood donor management system in China. PMID:25254023

  2. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  3. Histone methylation, alternative splicing and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fiszbein, Ana; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing, as well as chromatin structure, greatly contributes to specific transcriptional programs that promote neuronal differentiation. The activity of G9a, the enzyme responsible for mono- and di-methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2) in mammalian euchromatin, has been widely implicated in the differentiation of a variety of cell types and tissues. In a recent work from our group (Fiszbein et al., 2016) we have shown that alternative splicing of G9a regulates its nuclear localization and, therefore, the efficiency of H3K9 methylation, which promotes neuronal differentiation. We discuss here our results in the light of a report from other group (Laurent et al. 2015) demonstrating a key role for the alternative splicing of the histone demethylase LSD1 in controlling specific gene expression in neurons. All together, these results illustrate the importance of alternative splicing in the generation of a proper equilibrium between methylation and demethylation of histones for the regulation of neuron-specific transcriptional programs. PMID:27606339

  4. Histone methylation, alternative splicing and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fiszbein, Ana; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing, as well as chromatin structure, greatly contributes to specific transcriptional programs that promote neuronal differentiation. The activity of G9a, the enzyme responsible for mono- and di-methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me1 and H3K9me2) in mammalian euchromatin, has been widely implicated in the differentiation of a variety of cell types and tissues. In a recent work from our group (Fiszbein et al., 2016) we have shown that alternative splicing of G9a regulates its nuclear localization and, therefore, the efficiency of H3K9 methylation, which promotes neuronal differentiation. We discuss here our results in the light of a report from other group (Laurent et al. 2015) demonstrating a key role for the alternative splicing of the histone demethylase LSD1 in controlling specific gene expression in neurons. All together, these results illustrate the importance of alternative splicing in the generation of a proper equilibrium between methylation and demethylation of histones for the regulation of neuron-specific transcriptional programs.

  5. RNA structure in splicing: An evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Ling; Taggart, Allison J; Fairbrother, William G

    2016-09-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is a key post-transcriptional regulation process in which introns are excised and exons are ligated together. A novel class of structured intron was recently discovered in fish. Simple expansions of complementary AC and GT dimers at opposite boundaries of an intron were found to form a bridging structure, thereby enforcing correct splice site pairing across the intron. In some fish introns, the RNA structures are strong enough to bypass the need of regulatory protein factors for splicing. Here, we discuss the prevalence and potential functions of highly structured introns. In humans, structured introns usually arise through the co-occurrence of C and G-rich repeats at intron boundaries. We explore the potentially instructive example of the HLA receptor genes. In HLA pre-mRNA, structured introns flank the exons that encode the highly polymorphic β sheet cleft, making the processing of the transcript robust to variants that disrupt splicing factor binding. While selective forces that have shaped HLA receptor are fairly atypical, numerous other highly polymorphic genes that encode receptors contain structured introns. Finally, we discuss how the elevated mutation rate associated with the simple repeats that often compose structured intron can make structured introns themselves rapidly evolving elements. PMID:27454491

  6. Splicing-related features of introns serve to propel evolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuping; Li, Chun; Gong, Xi; Wang, Yanlu; Zhang, Kunshan; Cui, Yaru; Sun, Yi Eve; Li, Siguang

    2013-01-01

    The role of spliceosomal intronic structures played in evolution has only begun to be elucidated. Comparative genomic analyses of fungal snoRNA sequences, which are often contained within introns and/or exons, revealed that about one-third of snoRNA-associated introns in three major snoRNA gene clusters manifested polymorphisms, likely resulting from intron loss and gain events during fungi evolution. Genomic deletions can clearly be observed as one mechanism underlying intron and exon loss, as well as generation of complex introns where several introns lie in juxtaposition without intercalating exons. Strikingly, by tracking conserved snoRNAs in introns, we found that some introns had moved from one position to another by excision from donor sites and insertion into target sties elsewhere in the genome without needing transposon structures. This study revealed the origin of many newly gained introns. Moreover, our analyses suggested that intron-containing sequences were more prone to sustainable structural changes than DNA sequences without introns due to intron's ability to jump within the genome via unknown mechanisms. We propose that splicing-related structural features of introns serve as an additional motor to propel evolution.

  7. Splicing-coupled 3' end formation requires a terminal splice acceptor site, but not intron excision.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lee; West, Steven

    2013-08-01

    Splicing of human pre-mRNA is reciprocally coupled to 3' end formation by terminal exon definition, which occurs co-transcriptionally. It is required for the final maturation of most human pre-mRNAs and is therefore important to understand. We have used several strategies to block splicing at specific stages in vivo and studied their effect on 3' end formation. We demonstrate that a terminal splice acceptor site is essential to establish coupling with the poly(A) signal in a chromosomally integrated β-globin gene. This is in part to alleviate the suppression of 3' end formation by U1 small nuclear RNA, which is known to bind pre-mRNA at the earliest stage of spliceosome assembly. Interestingly, blocks to splicing that are subsequent to terminal splice acceptor site function, but before catalysis, have little observable effect on 3' end formation. These data suggest that early stages of spliceosome assembly are sufficient to functionally couple splicing and 3' end formation, but that on-going intron removal is less critical. PMID:23716637

  8. Multiple splicing pathways of group II trans-splicing introns in wheat mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Massel, Karen; Silke, Jordan R; Bonen, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Trans-splicing of discontinuous introns in plant mitochondria requires the assembly of independently-transcribed precursor RNAs into splicing-competent structures, and they are expected to be excised as Y-branched molecules ("broken lariats") because these introns belong to the group II ribozyme family. We now demonstrate that this is just one of several trans-splicing pathways for wheat mitochondrial nad1 intron 4 and nad5 intron 2; they also use a hydrolytic pathway and the liberated 5'-half-intron linear molecules are unexpectedly abundant in the RNA population. We also observe a third productive splicing pathway for nad5 intron 2 that yields full-length excised introns in which the termini are joined in vivo and possess non-encoded nucleotides. In the case of trans-splicing nad1 intron 1, which has a weakly-structured and poorly-conserved core sequence, excision appears to be solely through a hydrolytic pathway. When wheat embryos are germinated in the cold rather than at room temperature, an increased complexity in trans-splicing products is seen for nad1 intron 4, suggesting that there can be environmental effects on the RNA folding of bipartite introns. Our observations provide insights into intron evolution and the complexity of RNA processing events in plant mitochondria.

  9. The adipogenic transcriptional cofactor ZNF638 interacts with splicing regulators and influences alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chen; Ma, Xinran; Meruvu, Sunitha; Hugendubler, Lynne; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that transcription and alternative splicing are coordinated processes; however, our knowledge of specific factors implicated in both functions during the process of adipocyte differentiation is limited. We have previously demonstrated that the zinc finger protein ZNF638 plays a role as a transcriptional coregulator of adipocyte differentiation via induction of PPARγ in cooperation with CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs). Here we provide new evidence that ZNF638 is localized in nuclear bodies enriched with splicing factors, and through biochemical purification of ZNF638’s interacting proteins in adipocytes and mass spectrometry analysis, we show that ZNF638 interacts with splicing regulators. Functional analysis of the effects of ectopic ZNF638 expression on a minigene reporter demonstrated that ZNF638 is sufficient to promote alternative splicing, a function enhanced through its recruitment to the minigene promoter at C/EBP responsive elements via C/EBP proteins. Structure-function analysis revealed that the arginine/serine-rich motif and the C-terminal zinc finger domain required for speckle localization are necessary for the adipocyte differentiation function of ZNF638 and for the regulation of the levels of alternatively spliced isoforms of lipin1 and nuclear receptor co-repressor 1. Overall, our data demonstrate that ZNF638 participates in splicing decisions and that it may control adipogenesis through regulation of the relative amounts of differentiation-specific isoforms. PMID:25024404

  10. Multiple splicing pathways of group II trans-splicing introns in wheat mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Massel, Karen; Silke, Jordan R; Bonen, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Trans-splicing of discontinuous introns in plant mitochondria requires the assembly of independently-transcribed precursor RNAs into splicing-competent structures, and they are expected to be excised as Y-branched molecules ("broken lariats") because these introns belong to the group II ribozyme family. We now demonstrate that this is just one of several trans-splicing pathways for wheat mitochondrial nad1 intron 4 and nad5 intron 2; they also use a hydrolytic pathway and the liberated 5'-half-intron linear molecules are unexpectedly abundant in the RNA population. We also observe a third productive splicing pathway for nad5 intron 2 that yields full-length excised introns in which the termini are joined in vivo and possess non-encoded nucleotides. In the case of trans-splicing nad1 intron 1, which has a weakly-structured and poorly-conserved core sequence, excision appears to be solely through a hydrolytic pathway. When wheat embryos are germinated in the cold rather than at room temperature, an increased complexity in trans-splicing products is seen for nad1 intron 4, suggesting that there can be environmental effects on the RNA folding of bipartite introns. Our observations provide insights into intron evolution and the complexity of RNA processing events in plant mitochondria. PMID:26970277

  11. Adding In Silico Assessment of Potential Splice Aberration to the Integrated Evaluation of BRCA Gene Unclassified Variants

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Maxime P.; Di Sera, Tonya L.; Nix, David A.; Paquette, Andrew M.; Parsons, Michael T.; Bell, Russel; Hoffman, Andrea; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Goldgar, David E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clinical mutation screening of the cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 generates many unclassified variants (UVs). Most of these UVs are either rare missense substitutions or nucleotide substitutions near the splice junctions of the protein coding exons. Previously, we developed a quantitative method for evaluation of BRCA gene UVs—the “integrated evaluation”—that combines a sequence analysis‐based prior probability of pathogenicity with patient and/or tumor observational data to arrive at a posterior probability of pathogenicity. One limitation of the sequence analysis‐based prior has been that it evaluates UVs from the perspective of missense substitution severity but not probability to disrupt normal mRNA splicing. Here, we calibrated output from the splice‐site fitness program MaxEntScan to generate spliceogenicity‐based prior probabilities of pathogenicity for BRCA gene variants; these range from 0.97 for variants with high probability to damage a donor or acceptor to 0.02 for exonic variants that do not impact a splice junction and are unlikely to create a de novo donor. We created a database http://priors.hci.utah.edu/PRIORS/ that provides the combined missense substitution severity and spliceogenicity‐based probability of pathogenicity for BRCA gene single‐nucleotide substitutions. We also updated the BRCA gene Ex‐UV LOVD, available at http://hci‐exlovd.hci.utah.edu, with 77 re‐evaluable variants. PMID:26913838

  12. SplicePie: a novel analytical approach for the detection of alternative, non-sequential and recursive splicing.

    PubMed

    Pulyakhina, Irina; Gazzoli, Isabella; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Verwey, Nisha; den Dunnen, Johan T; den Dunnen, Johan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Laros, Jeroen F J

    2015-07-13

    Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism present in eukaryotic cells to obtain a wide range of transcripts and protein isoforms from a relatively small number of genes. The mechanisms regulating (alternative) splicing and the paradigm of consecutive splicing have recently been challenged, especially for genes with a large number of introns. RNA-Seq, a powerful technology using deep sequencing in order to determine transcript structure and expression levels, is usually performed on mature mRNA, therefore not allowing detailed analysis of splicing progression. Sequencing pre-mRNA at different stages of splicing potentially provides insight into mRNA maturation. Although the number of tools that analyze total and cytoplasmic RNA in order to elucidate the transcriptome composition is rapidly growing, there are no tools specifically designed for the analysis of nuclear RNA (which contains mixtures of pre- and mature mRNA). We developed dedicated algorithms to investigate the splicing process. In this paper, we present a new classification of RNA-Seq reads based on three major stages of splicing: pre-, intermediate- and post-splicing. Applying this novel classification we demonstrate the possibility to analyze the order of splicing. Furthermore, we uncover the potential to investigate the multi-step nature of splicing, assessing various types of recursive splicing events. We provide the data that gives biological insight into the order of splicing, show that non-sequential splicing of certain introns is reproducible and coinciding in multiple cell lines. We validated our observations with independent experimental technologies and showed the reliability of our method. The pipeline, named SplicePie, is freely available at: https://github.com/pulyakhina/splicing_analysis_pipeline. The example data can be found at: https://barmsijs.lumc.nl/HG/irina/example_data.tar.gz. PMID:25800735

  13. SplicePie: a novel analytical approach for the detection of alternative, non-sequential and recursive splicing.

    PubMed

    Pulyakhina, Irina; Gazzoli, Isabella; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Verwey, Nisha; den Dunnen, Johan T; den Dunnen, Johan; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Laros, Jeroen F J

    2015-07-13

    Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism present in eukaryotic cells to obtain a wide range of transcripts and protein isoforms from a relatively small number of genes. The mechanisms regulating (alternative) splicing and the paradigm of consecutive splicing have recently been challenged, especially for genes with a large number of introns. RNA-Seq, a powerful technology using deep sequencing in order to determine transcript structure and expression levels, is usually performed on mature mRNA, therefore not allowing detailed analysis of splicing progression. Sequencing pre-mRNA at different stages of splicing potentially provides insight into mRNA maturation. Although the number of tools that analyze total and cytoplasmic RNA in order to elucidate the transcriptome composition is rapidly growing, there are no tools specifically designed for the analysis of nuclear RNA (which contains mixtures of pre- and mature mRNA). We developed dedicated algorithms to investigate the splicing process. In this paper, we present a new classification of RNA-Seq reads based on three major stages of splicing: pre-, intermediate- and post-splicing. Applying this novel classification we demonstrate the possibility to analyze the order of splicing. Furthermore, we uncover the potential to investigate the multi-step nature of splicing, assessing various types of recursive splicing events. We provide the data that gives biological insight into the order of splicing, show that non-sequential splicing of certain introns is reproducible and coinciding in multiple cell lines. We validated our observations with independent experimental technologies and showed the reliability of our method. The pipeline, named SplicePie, is freely available at: https://github.com/pulyakhina/splicing_analysis_pipeline. The example data can be found at: https://barmsijs.lumc.nl/HG/irina/example_data.tar.gz.

  14. Differential regulation of alternative 3{prime} splicing of {epsilon} messenger RNA variants

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, D.; Zhang, K.; Saxon, A.

    1995-08-15

    Alternative 3{prime} splicing of the one active human {epsilon} heavy chain gene results in variants of {epsilon} mRNA encoding distinct IgE proteins. The same relative amounts of these {epsilon} mRNA variants were produced by non-atopic donor B cells when driven in a variety of T-dependent or T-independent systems. The most abundant variants were those for classic secreted {epsilon} and a novel secreted form (CH4-M2{double_prime}). In contrast, cells from subjects with high levels of serum IgE secondary to parasitic infection or atopy spontaneously produced higher relative levels of the CH4-M2{prime} {epsilon} mRNA variant, lower relative amounts of both the membrane and CH4-M2{double_prime} secreted variants, and very low levels of the CH4{prime}-CH5 variant. The existence of and corresponding changes in levels of the CH4-M2{prime}-enclosed secreted protein were demonstrated. IL-10 induced this same differential expression of {epsilon} splice variants in vitro when used to costimulate IL-4 plus CD40-driven B cells and could differentially enhance the production of CH4-M2{prime} protein by established IgE-secreting cell lines. Inhibition of IgE by cross-linking the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) decreased the levels of {epsilon} mRNA and resulted in a distinct pattern of {epsilon} mRNA characterized by a dramatic decrease in CH4-M2{prime} splice variant. IL-6, IL-2, or IFN-{gamma} did not change the {epsilon} mRNA pattern. Overall, the absolute and relative amounts of the different {epsilon} mRNA splice variants produced appear to be controlled in a differentiation-related fashion.

  15. Functional analysis of a C. elegans trans-splice acceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, R; Liou, R F; Blumenthal, T

    1993-01-01

    The rol-6 gene is trans-spliced to the 22 nt leader, SL1, 173 nt downstream of the transcription start. We have analyzed splicing in transformants carrying extrachromosomal arrays of rol-6 with mutations in the trans-splice acceptor site. This site is a close match to the consensus, UUUCAG, that is highly conserved in both trans-splice and intron acceptor sites in C. elegans. When the trans-splice site was inactivated by mutating the perfectly-conserved AG, trans-splicing still occurred, but at a cryptic site 20 nt upstream. We tested the frequency with which splicing switched from the normal site to the cryptic site when the pyrimidines at this site were changed to A's. Since most C. elegans 3' splice sites lack an obvious polypyrimidine tract, we hypothesized that these four pyrimidines might play this role, and indeed mutation of these bases caused splicing to switch to the cryptic site. We also demonstrated that a major reason the downstream site is normally favored is because it occurs at a boundary between A+U rich and non-A+U rich RNA. When the RNA between the two splice sites was made less A+U rich, splicing occurred preferentially at the upstream site. Images PMID:8451190

  16. Deregulation of splicing factors and breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Silipo, Marco; Gautrey, Hannah; Tyson-Capper, Alison

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that many genes implicated in the development and progression of breast cancer undergo aberrant alternative splicing events to produce proteins with pro-cancer properties. These changes in alternative splicing can arise from mutations or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the DNA sequences of cancer-related genes, which can strongly affect the activity of splicing factors and influence the splice site choice. However, it is important to note that absence of mutations is not sufficient to prevent misleading choices in splice site selection. There is now increasing evidence to demonstrate that the expression profile of ten splicing factors (including SRs and hnRNPs) and eight RNA-binding proteins changes in breast cancer cells compared with normal cells. These modifications strongly influence the alternative splicing pattern of many cancer-related genes despite the absence of any detrimental mutations within their DNA sequences. Thus, a comprehensive assessment of the splicing factor status in breast cancer is important to provide insights into the mechanisms that lead to breast cancer development and metastasis. Whilst most studies focus on mutations that affect alternative splicing in cancer-related genes, this review focuses on splicing factors and RNA-binding proteins that are themselves deregulated in breast cancer and implicated in cancer-related alternative splicing events.

  17. An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vernia, Santiago; Edwards, Yvonne Jk; Han, Myoung Sook; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia. PMID:27635635

  18. IRAS: High-Throughput Identification of Novel Alternative Splicing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental regulatory process of gene expression. Defects in alternative splicing can lead to various diseases, and modification of disease-causing splicing events presents great therapeutic promise. Splicing outcome is commonly affected by extracellular stimuli and signaling cascades that converge on RNA-binding splicing regulators. These trans-acting factors recognize cis-elements in pre-mRNA transcripts to affect spliceosome assembly and splice site choices. Identification of these splicing regulators and/or upstream modulators has been difficult and traditionally done by piecemeal. High-throughput screening strategies to find multiple regulators of exon splicing have great potential to accelerate the discovery process, but typically confront low sensitivity and low specificity of screening assays. Here we describe a unique screening strategy, IRAS (identifying regulators of alternative splicing), using a pair of dual-output minigene reporters to allow for sensitive detection of exon splicing changes. Each dual-output reporter produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fluorescent signals to assay the two spliced isoforms exclusively. The two complementary minigene reporters alter GFP/RFP output ratios in the opposite direction in response to splicing change. Applying IRAS in cell-based high-throughput screens allows sensitive and specific identification of splicing regulators and modulators for any alternative exons of interest. In comparison to previous high-throughput screening methods, IRAS substantially enhances the specificity of the screening assay. This strategy significantly eliminates false positives without sacrificing sensitive identification of true regulators of splicing. PMID:27241759

  19. Development of a novel splice array platform and its application in the identification of alternative splice variants in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microarrays strategies, which allow for the characterization of thousands of alternative splice forms in a single test, can be applied to identify differential alternative splicing events. In this study, a novel splice array approach was developed, including the design of a high-density oligonucleotide array, a labeling procedure, and an algorithm to identify splice events. Results The array consisted of exon probes and thermodynamically balanced junction probes. Suboptimal probes were tagged and considered in the final analysis. An unbiased labeling protocol was developed using random primers. The algorithm used to distinguish changes in expression from changes in splicing was calibrated using internal non-spliced control sequences. The performance of this splice array was validated with artificial constructs for CDC6, VEGF, and PCBP4 isoforms. The platform was then applied to the analysis of differential splice forms in lung cancer samples compared to matched normal lung tissue. Overexpression of splice isoforms was identified for genes encoding CEACAM1, FHL-1, MLPH, and SUSD2. None of these splicing isoforms had been previously associated with lung cancer. Conclusions This methodology enables the detection of alternative splicing events in complex biological samples, providing a powerful tool to identify novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer and other pathologies. PMID:20525254

  20. The Human Splicing Factor ASF/SF2 can Specifically Recognize Pre-mRNA 5' Splice Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Ping; Manley, James L.

    1994-04-01

    ASF/SF2 is a human protein previously shown to function in in vitro pre-mRNA splicing as an essential factor necessary for all splices and also as an alternative splicing factor, capable of switching selection of 5' splice sites. To begin to study the protein's mechanism of action, we have investigated the RNA binding properties of purified recombinant ASF/SF2. Using UV crosslinking and gel shift assays, we demonstrate that the RNA binding region of ASF/SF2 can interact with RNA in a sequence-specific manner, recognizing the 5' splice site in each of two different pre-mRNAs. Point mutations in the 5' splice site consensus can reduce binding by as much as a factor of 100, with the largest effects observed in competition assays. These findings support a model in which ASF/SF2 aids in the recognition of pre-mRNA 5' splice sites.

  1. Sequence-specific flexibility organization of splicing flanking sequence and prediction of splice sites in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yongchun; Zhang, Pengfei; Liu, Li; Li, Tao; Peng, Yong; Li, Guangpeng; Li, Qianzhong

    2014-09-01

    More and more reported results of nucleosome positioning and histone modifications showed that DNA structure play a well-established role in splicing. In this study, a set of DNA geometric flexibility parameters originated from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were introduced to discuss the structure organization around splice sites at the DNA level. The obtained profiles of specific flexibility/stiffness around splice sites indicated that the DNA physical-geometry deformation could be used as an alternative way to describe the splicing junction region. In combination with structural flexibility as discriminatory parameter, we developed a hybrid computational model for predicting potential splicing sites. And the better prediction performance was achieved when the benchmark dataset evaluated. Our results showed that the mechanical deformability character of a splice junction is closely correlated with both the splice site strength and structural information in its flanking sequences.

  2. Analysis of an alternatively spliced exon of the neurofibromatosis type 1 gene in cultured melanocytes from patients with neurofibromatosis 1.

    PubMed

    Eisenbarth, I; Hoffmeyer, S; Kaufmann, D; Assum, G; Krone, W

    1995-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is characterized by clinical features that primarily affect tissues derived from the neural crest (neurofibromas, café-aulait macules). Because aberrant regulation of alternative splicing in the NF1 gene transcript may be of functional significance, cultured melanocytes from café-aulait macules (CALM), as an example of benign NF1 lesions, were examined for the expression of the different alternative splice products of this gene. Both kinds of NF1 messengers (type 1 and 2) were found not only in CALM melanocytes but also in keratinocytes, fibroblasts and blood cells. Except in blood cells, there was a predominance of the type 2 transcript. Melanocytes from NF1 patients and healthy donors showed similar expression patterns under several culture conditions. Our results suggest that the development of CALM does not correlate with a switch in the ratio of type 1 to type 2 NF1 messenger RNA.

  3. The influence of Argonaute proteins on alternative RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Batsché, Eric; Ameyar-Zazoua, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor RNAs is an important process in multicellular species because it impacts several aspects of gene expression: from the increase of protein repertoire to the level of expression. A large body of evidences demonstrates that factors regulating chromatin and transcription impact the outcomes of alternative splicing. Argonaute (AGO) proteins were known to play key roles in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. More recently, their role in the nucleus of human somatic cells has emerged. Here, we will discuss some of the nuclear functions of AGO, with special emphasis on alternative splicing. The AGO-mediated modulation of alternative splicing is based on several properties of these proteins: their binding to transcripts on chromatin and their interactions with many proteins, especially histone tail-modifying enzymes, HP1γ and splicing factors. AGO proteins may favor a decrease in the RNA-polymerase II kinetics at actively transcribed genes leading to the modulation of alternative splicing decisions. They could also influence alternative splicing through their interaction with core components of the splicing machinery and several splicing factors. We will discuss the modes of AGO recruitment on chromatin at active genes. We suggest that long intragenic antisense transcripts (lincRNA) might be an important feature of genes containing splicing events regulated by AGO.

  4. Alternative Splicing and Subfunctionalization Generates Functional Diversity in Fungal Proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-López, Claudia; Lorenz, Michael C.; van Hoof, Ambro

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is commonly used by the Metazoa to generate more than one protein from a gene. However, such diversification of the proteome by alternative splicing is much rarer in fungi. We describe here an ancient fungal alternative splicing event in which these two proteins are generated from a single alternatively spliced ancestral SKI7/HBS1 gene retained in many species in both the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. While the ability to express two proteins from a single SKI7/HBS1 gene is conserved in many fungi, the exact mechanism by which they achieve this varies. The alternative splicing was lost in Saccharomyces cerevisiae following the whole-genome duplication event as these two genes subfunctionalized into the present functionally distinct HBS1 and SKI7 genes. When expressed in yeast, the single gene from Lachancea kluyveri generates two functionally distinct proteins. Expression of one of these proteins complements hbs1, but not ski7 mutations, while the other protein complements ski7, but not hbs1. This is the first known case of subfunctionalization by loss of alternative splicing in yeast. By coincidence, the ancestral alternatively spliced gene was also duplicated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe with subsequent subfunctionalization and loss of splicing. Similar subfunctionalization by loss of alternative splicing in fungi also explains the presence of two PTC7 genes in the budding yeast Tetrapisispora blattae, suggesting that this is a common mechanism to preserve duplicate alternatively spliced genes. PMID:23516382

  5. Evolution of Nova-Dependent Splicing Regulation in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Živin, Marko; Darnell, Robert B

    2007-01-01

    A large number of alternative exons are spliced with tissue-specific patterns, but little is known about how such patterns have evolved. Here, we study the conservation of the neuron-specific splicing factors Nova1 and Nova2 and of the alternatively spliced exons they regulate in mouse brain. Whereas Nova RNA binding domains are 94% identical across vertebrate species, Nova-dependent splicing silencer and enhancer elements (YCAY clusters) show much greater divergence, as less than 50% of mouse YCAY clusters are conserved at orthologous positions in the zebrafish genome. To study the relation between the evolution of tissue-specific splicing and YCAY clusters, we compared the brain-specific splicing of Nova-regulated exons in zebrafish, chicken, and mouse. The presence of YCAY clusters in lower vertebrates invariably predicted conservation of brain-specific splicing across species, whereas their absence in lower vertebrates correlated with a loss of alternative splicing. We hypothesize that evolution of Nova-regulated splicing in higher vertebrates proceeds mainly through changes in cis-acting elements, that tissue-specific splicing might in some cases evolve in a single step corresponding to evolution of a YCAY cluster, and that the conservation level of YCAY clusters relates to the functions encoded by the regulated RNAs. PMID:17937501

  6. Anti-tumor activity of splice-switching oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, John A.; Li, Shyh-Dar; Yang, Angela; Huang, Leaf; Kole, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing has emerged as an important target for molecular therapies. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) modulate alternative splicing by hybridizing to pre-mRNA sequences involved in splicing and blocking access to the transcript by splicing factors. Recently, the efficacy of SSOs has been established in various animal disease models; however, the application of SSOs against cancer targets has been hindered by poor in vivo delivery of antisense therapeutics to tumor cells. The apoptotic regulator Bcl-x is alternatively spliced to express anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL and pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS. Bcl-xL is upregulated in many cancers and is associated with chemoresistance, distinguishing it as an important target for cancer therapy. We previously showed that redirection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing from Bcl-xL to -xS induced apoptosis in breast and prostate cancer cells. In this study, the effect of SSO-induced Bcl-x splice-switching on metastatic melanoma was assessed in cell culture and B16F10 tumor xenografts. SSOs were delivered in vivo using lipid nanoparticles. Administration of nanoparticle with Bcl-x SSO resulted in modification of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing in lung metastases and reduced tumor load, while nanoparticle alone or formulated with a control SSO had no effect. Our findings demonstrate in vivo anti-tumor activity of SSOs that modulate Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:20719743

  7. Characterization of human milk donors.

    PubMed

    Osbaldiston, Richard; Mingle, Leigh A

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this research was to create a detailed characterization of human milk donors, including descriptive information about demographics and lifestyle, involvement with the milk bank, reasons for donating, problems encountered while breastfeeding and pumping milk, barriers to donating milk, affective experiences, and personal values. Data were collected via telephone interview of 87 donors and 19 nondonor controls. Few relationships were found between the descriptive information and amount of milk donated. Donors reported fewer problems pumping milk than nondonors. Strategies for recruiting new donors and strategies for increasing donation amounts are presented.

  8. Entropic contributions to the splicing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osella, Matteo; Caselle, Michele

    2009-12-01

    It has been recently argued that depletion attraction may play an important role in different aspects of cellular organization, ranging from the organization of transcriptional activity in transcription factories to the formation of nuclear bodies. In this paper, we suggest a new application of these ideas in the context of the splicing process, a crucial step of messenger RNA maturation in eukaryotes. We shall show that entropy effects and the resulting depletion attraction may explain the relevance of the aspecific intron length variable in the choice of splice-site recognition modality. On top of that, some qualitative features of the genome architecture of higher eukaryotes can find evolutionary realistic motivation in the light of our model.

  9. Distal regulation of alternative splicing by splicing enhancer in equine beta-casein intron 1.

    PubMed

    Lenasi, Tina; Peterlin, B Matija; Dovc, Peter

    2006-03-01

    The complexity of cotranscriptional splicing is reflected in the coordinated interplay between various cis-elements and transacting factors. In this report, we demonstrated that a cis-element in intron 1 of the equine beta-casein gene (intronic splicing enhancer 1, ISE1) increases the inclusion of all weak exons in its pre-mRNA. The ISE1 also functioned on a hybrid transcript, which was transcribed from the alpha-globin promoter, where it increased the inclusion of the human fibronectin EDA exon and the beta-casein exon 5. The region of ISE1 necessary for its function included the same sequence as is found in some exonic splicing enhancers. Since the ISE1 influenced the splicing of the entire transcript from intron 1, we propose a model for the cotranscriptional splicing of beta-casein mRNA, where the 5' end of the growing transcript remains associated with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. Thus, the ISE1 remains in close proximity to the mRNA exit groove throughout transcription and influences all weak exons as soon as they are copied.

  10. Organ Donor FAQ's: Who Can Be a Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... citizens have been organ donors. Can non-resident aliens donate and receive organs? Non-resident aliens can both donate and receive organs in the ... the 12,375 organ donors were non-resident aliens. In this same year, 259 (1%) of the ...

  11. Splicing and spliceosome formation of the yeast MATa1 transcript require a minimum distance from the 5' splice site to the internal branch acceptor site.

    PubMed Central

    Köhrer, K; Domdey, H

    1988-01-01

    Small deletions of 6, 7, and 12 nucleotides introduced between the 5' splice site and the internal branch acceptor site of the first intron of the yeast MATa1 gene completely abolish accurate splicing in vitro in these constructs. Splicing only occurs at an alternative 5' splice site which was found in the first exon of the MATa1 gene and which is used both in vivo and in vitro. The splicing defect cannot be cured by expanding the distance from the branch point to the 3' splice site. If the alternative 5' splice site is deleted as well in these constructs, neither spliced products nor spliceosomes are formed. Our findings especially lead to the conclusion that a minimum distance between the 5' splice site and the internal branch acceptor site of the intron is required for the formation of splicing complexes and for accurate splicing. Images PMID:3054807

  12. Vials: Visualizing Alternative Splicing of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Strobelt, Hendrik; Alsallakh, Bilal; Botros, Joseph; Peterson, Brant; Borowsky, Mark; Pfister, Hanspeter; Lex, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a process by which the same DNA sequence is used to assemble different proteins, called protein isoforms. Alternative splicing works by selectively omitting some of the coding regions (exons) typically associated with a gene. Detection of alternative splicing is difficult and uses a combination of advanced data acquisition methods and statistical inference. Knowledge about the abundance of isoforms is important for understanding both normal processes and diseases and to eventually improve treatment through targeted therapies. The data, however, is complex and current visualizations for isoforms are neither perceptually efficient nor scalable. To remedy this, we developed Vials, a novel visual analysis tool that enables analysts to explore the various datasets that scientists use to make judgments about isoforms: the abundance of reads associated with the coding regions of the gene, evidence for junctions, i.e., edges connecting the coding regions, and predictions of isoform frequencies. Vials is scalable as it allows for the simultaneous analysis of many samples in multiple groups. Our tool thus enables experts to (a) identify patterns of isoform abundance in groups of samples and (b) evaluate the quality of the data. We demonstrate the value of our tool in case studies using publicly available datasets. PMID:26529712

  13. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila; Bendixen, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB) in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation. PMID:26101749

  14. Integrating alternative splicing detection into gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Sylvain; Schiex, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is now considered as a major actor in transcriptome/proteome diversity and it cannot be neglected in the annotation process of a new genome. Despite considerable progresses in term of accuracy in computational gene prediction, the ability to reliably predict AS variants when there is local experimental evidence of it remains an open challenge for gene finders. Results We have used a new integrative approach that allows to incorporate AS detection into ab initio gene prediction. This method relies on the analysis of genomically aligned transcript sequences (ESTs and/or cDNAs), and has been implemented in the dynamic programming algorithm of the graph-based gene finder EuGÈNE. Given a genomic sequence and a set of aligned transcripts, this new version identifies the set of transcripts carrying evidence of alternative splicing events, and provides, in addition to the classical optimal gene prediction, alternative optimal predictions (among those which are consistent with the AS events detected). This allows for multiple annotations of a single gene in a way such that each predicted variant is supported by a transcript evidence (but not necessarily with a full-length coverage). Conclusions This automatic combination of experimental data analysis and ab initio gene finding offers an ideal integration of alternatively spliced gene prediction inside a single annotation pipeline. PMID:15705189

  15. The doublesex splicing enhancer components Tra2 and Rbp1 also repress splicing through an intronic silencer.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junlin; Su, Shihuang; Mattox, William

    2007-01-01

    The activation of sex-specific alternative splice sites in the Drosophila melanogaster doublesex and fruitless pre-mRNAs has been well studied and depends on the serine-arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors Tra, Tra2, and Rbp1. Little is known, however, about how SR factors negatively regulate splice sites in other RNAs. Here we examine how Tra2 blocks splicing of the M1 intron from its own transcript. We identify an intronic splicing silencer (ISS) adjacent to the M1 branch point that is sufficient to confer Tra2-dependent repression on another RNA. The ISS was found to function independently of its position within the intron, arguing against the idea that bound repressors function by simply interfering with branch point accessibility to general splicing factors. Conserved subelements of the silencer include five short repeated sequences that are required for Tra2 binding but differ from repeated binding sites found in Tra2-dependent splicing enhancers. The ISS also contains a consensus binding site for Rbp1, and this protein was found to facilitate repression of M1 splicing both in vitro and in Drosophila larvae. In contrast to the cooperative binding of SR proteins observed on the doublesex splicing enhancer, we found that Rbp1 and Tra2 bind to the ISS independently through distinct sequences. Our results suggest that functionally synergistic interactions of these SR factors can cause either splicing activation or repression.

  16. Genome-wide identification and characterization of tissue-specific RNA editing events in D. melanogaster and their potential role in regulating alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Mazloomian, Alborz; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing is a widespread mechanism that plays a crucial role in diversifying gene products. Its abundance and importance in regulating cellular processes were revealed using new sequencing technologies. The majority of these editing events, however, cannot be associated with regulatory mechanisms. We use tissue-specific high-throughput libraries of D. melanogaster to study RNA editing. We introduce an analysis pipeline that utilises large input data and explicitly captures ADAR's requirement for double-stranded regions. It combines probabilistic and deterministic filters and can identify RNA editing events with a low estimated false positive rate. Analyzing ten different tissue types, we predict 2879 editing sites and provide their detailed characterization. Our analysis pipeline accurately distinguishes genuine editing sites from SNPs and sequencing and mapping artifacts. Our editing sites are 3 times more likely to occur in exons with multiple splicing acceptor/donor sites than in exons with unique splice sites (p-value < 2.10(-15)). Furthermore, we identify 244 edited regions where RNA editing and alternative splicing are likely to influence each other. For 96 out of these 244 regions, we find evolutionary evidence for conserved RNA secondary-structures near splice sites suggesting a potential regulatory mechanism where RNA editing may alter splicing patterns via changes in local RNA structure.

  17. Genome-wide identification and characterization of tissue-specific RNA editing events in D. melanogaster and their potential role in regulating alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mazloomian, Alborz; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing is a widespread mechanism that plays a crucial role in diversifying gene products. Its abundance and importance in regulating cellular processes were revealed using new sequencing technologies. The majority of these editing events, however, cannot be associated with regulatory mechanisms. We use tissue-specific high-throughput libraries of D. melanogaster to study RNA editing. We introduce an analysis pipeline that utilises large input data and explicitly captures ADAR's requirement for double-stranded regions. It combines probabilistic and deterministic filters and can identify RNA editing events with a low estimated false positive rate. Analyzing ten different tissue types, we predict 2879 editing sites and provide their detailed characterization. Our analysis pipeline accurately distinguishes genuine editing sites from SNPs and sequencing and mapping artifacts. Our editing sites are 3 times more likely to occur in exons with multiple splicing acceptor/donor sites than in exons with unique splice sites (p-value < 2.10−15). Furthermore, we identify 244 edited regions where RNA editing and alternative splicing are likely to influence each other. For 96 out of these 244 regions, we find evolutionary evidence for conserved RNA secondary-structures near splice sites suggesting a potential regulatory mechanism where RNA editing may alter splicing patterns via changes in local RNA structure. PMID:26512413

  18. Half pint/Puf68 is required for negative regulation of splicing by the SR splicing factor Transformer2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanzhi; Wagner, Eric J; Mattox, William

    2013-08-01

    The SR family of proteins plays important regulatory roles in the control of alternative splicing in a wide range of organisms. These factors affect splicing through both positive and negative controls of splice site recognition by pre-spliceosomal factors. Recent studies indicate that the Drosophila SR factor Transformer 2 (Tra2) activates and represses splicing through distinct and separable effector regions of the protein. While the interactions of its Arg-Ser-rich activator region have been well studied, cofactors involved in splicing repression have yet to be found. Here we use a luciferase-based splicing reporter assay to screen for novel proteins necessary for Tra2-dependent repression of splicing. This approach identified Half pint, also known as Puf68, as a co-repressor required for Tra2-mediated autoregulation of the M1 intron. In vivo, Half pint is required for Tra2-dependent repression of M1 splicing but is not necessary for Tra2-dependent activation of doublesex splicing. Further experiments indicate that the effect of Hfp is sequence-specific and that it associates with these target transcripts in cells. Importantly, known M1 splicing regulatory elements are sufficient to sensitize a heterologous intron to Hfp regulation. Two alternative proteins deriving from Hfp transcripts, Hfp68, and Hfp58, were found to be expressed in vivo but differed dramatically in their effect on M1 splicing. Comparison of the cellular localization of these forms in S2 cells revealed that Hfp68 is predominantly localized to the nucleus while Hfp58 is distributed across both the nucleus and cytoplasm. This accords with their observed effects on splicing and suggests that differential compartmentalization may contribute to the specificity of these isoforms. Together, these studies reveal a function for Half pint in splicing repression and demonstrate it to be specifically required for Tra2-dependent intron inclusion.

  19. The epithelial splicing factors ESRP1 and ESRP2 positively and negatively regulate diverse types of alternative splicing events

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Claude C.; Shen, Shihao; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-type and tissue-specific alternative splicing events are regulated by combinatorial control involving both abundant RNA binding proteins as well as those with more discrete expression and specialized functions. Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Proteins 1 and 2 (ESRP1 and ESRP2) are recently discovered epithelial-specific RNA binding proteins that promote splicing of the epithelial variant of the FGFR2, ENAH, CD44 and CTNND1 transcripts. To catalogue a larger set of splicing events under the regulation of the ESRPs we profiled splicing changes induced by RNA interference-mediated knockdown of ESRP1 and ESRP2 expression in a human epithelial cell line using the splicing sensitive Affymetrix Exon ST1.0 Arrays. Analysis of the microarray data resulted in the identification of over a hundred candidate ESRP regulated splicing events. We were able to independently validate 38 of these targets by RT-PCR. The ESRP regulated events encompass all known types of alternative splicing events, most prominent being alternative cassette exons and splicing events leading to alternative 3' terminal exons. Importantly, a number of these regulated splicing events occur in gene transcripts that encode proteins with well-described roles in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton organization, cell-cell adhesion, cell polarity and cell migration. In sum, this work reveals a novel list of transcripts differentially spliced in epithelial and mesenchymal cells, implying that coordinated alternative splicing plays a critical role in determination of cell type identity. These results further establish ESRP1 and ESRP2 as global regulators of an epithelial splicing regulatory network. PMID:19829082

  20. Half pint/Puf68 is required for negative regulation of splicing by the SR splicing factor Transformer2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanzhi; Wagner, Eric J; Mattox, William

    2013-08-01

    The SR family of proteins plays important regulatory roles in the control of alternative splicing in a wide range of organisms. These factors affect splicing through both positive and negative controls of splice site recognition by pre-spliceosomal factors. Recent studies indicate that the Drosophila SR factor Transformer 2 (Tra2) activates and represses splicing through distinct and separable effector regions of the protein. While the interactions of its Arg-Ser-rich activator region have been well studied, cofactors involved in splicing repression have yet to be found. Here we use a luciferase-based splicing reporter assay to screen for novel proteins necessary for Tra2-dependent repression of splicing. This approach identified Half pint, also known as Puf68, as a co-repressor required for Tra2-mediated autoregulation of the M1 intron. In vivo, Half pint is required for Tra2-dependent repression of M1 splicing but is not necessary for Tra2-dependent activation of doublesex splicing. Further experiments indicate that the effect of Hfp is sequence-specific and that it associates with these target transcripts in cells. Importantly, known M1 splicing regulatory elements are sufficient to sensitize a heterologous intron to Hfp regulation. Two alternative proteins deriving from Hfp transcripts, Hfp68, and Hfp58, were found to be expressed in vivo but differed dramatically in their effect on M1 splicing. Comparison of the cellular localization of these forms in S2 cells revealed that Hfp68 is predominantly localized to the nucleus while Hfp58 is distributed across both the nucleus and cytoplasm. This accords with their observed effects on splicing and suggests that differential compartmentalization may contribute to the specificity of these isoforms. Together, these studies reveal a function for Half pint in splicing repression and demonstrate it to be specifically required for Tra2-dependent intron inclusion. PMID:23880637

  1. Analysis of aberrantly spliced transcripts of a novel de novo GNAS mutant in a male with albright hereditary osteodystrophy and PHP1A.

    PubMed

    Ham, H-J; Baek, K-H; Lee, J-Y; Kim, S Y; Mo, E Y; Kim, E S; Han, J H; Moon, S-D

    2015-07-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is a genetic disorder due to target-organ unresponsiveness to parathyroid hormone (PTH). PHP type 1A (PHP1A) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) and PTH resistance caused by defects at the GNAS locus. We analyzed the GNAS gene in a male with typical AHO and elevated PTH levels. We identified a novel de novo heterozygous mutation at the splice donor site in intron-7 (IVS7+1G>A, c.585+1G>A) of the GNAS gene. No GNAS mutations were detected in his parents. Our patient was diagnosed with PHP1A due to a heterozygous de novo mutation in the GNAS gene. Reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR analysis and sequencing revealed that this de novo splice mutation generated alternative splicing errors leading to the formation of 2 mutant transcripts: one with exon-7 deleted, the other with whole intron-7 included. To investigate whether these aberrantly spliced transcripts were stable, we assessed the differential expression of GNAS mRNAs in the proband's blood by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. In the proband, the relative expression levels of wild-type, exon-7-deleted, and intron-7-included GNAS mRNAs were 0.21, 6.12E-07, and 1.08E-04, respectively, relative to wild-type GNAS mRNA from a healthy control (set at 1.0). This suggests that this novel de novo splicing mutation generates rapidly decaying mutant transcripts, which might affect stimulatory G-protein activity and give rise to this sporadic case. In conclusion, this is an interesting report of aberrantly spliced mRNAs from a de novo splice mutation of the GNAS gene causing PHP1A in a male. PMID:25502941

  2. SR protein kinases promote splicing of nonconsensus introns.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Jesse J; Marvin, Michael C; Shokat, Kevan M; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of the spliceosome is essential for RNA splicing, yet how and to what extent kinase signaling affects splicing have not been defined on a genome-wide basis. Using a chemical genetic approach, we show in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that the SR protein kinase Dsk1 is required for efficient splicing of introns with suboptimal splice sites. Systematic substrate mapping in fission yeast and human cells revealed that SRPKs target evolutionarily conserved spliceosomal proteins, including the branchpoint-binding protein Bpb1 (SF1 in humans), by using an RXXSP consensus motif for substrate recognition. Phosphorylation of SF1 increases SF1 binding to introns with nonconsensus splice sites in vitro, and mutation of such sites to consensus relieves the requirement for Dsk1 and phosphorylated Bpb1 in vivo. Modulation of splicing efficiency through kinase signaling pathways may allow tuning of gene expression in response to environmental and developmental cues. PMID:26167880

  3. Dysfunctional Gene Splicing as a Potential Contributor to Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Glatt, Stephen J.; Cohen, Ori S.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major mechanism by which the proteomic diversity of eukaryotic genomes is amplified. Much akin to neuropsychiatric disorders themselves, alternative splicing events can be influenced by genetic, developmental, and environmental factors. Here we review the evidence that abnormalities of splicing may contribute to the liability toward these disorders. First, we introduce the phenomenon of alternative splicing and describe the processes involved in its regulation. We then review the evidence for specific splicing abnormalities in a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including psychotic disorders (schizophrenia), affective disorders (bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder), suicide, substance abuse disorders (cocaine abuse and alcoholism), and neurodevelopmental disorders (autism). Next, we provide a theoretical reworking of the concept of “gene-focused” epidemiologic and neurobiologic investigations. Lastly, we suggest potentially fruitful lines for future research that should illuminate the nature, extent, causes, and consequences of alternative splicing abnormalities in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:21438146

  4. Degradation of 4,4{prime}-Dichlorobiphenyl, 3,3{prime}, 4,4{prime}-Tetrachlorobiphenyl, and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-Hexachlorobiphenyl by the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D.; Lamar, R.; Hickey, W.J.

    1995-11-01

    The white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has demonstrated abilities to degrade many xenobiotic chemicals. In this study, the degradation of three model polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (4,4{prime}- dichlorobiphenyl [DCB], 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}-tetrachlorobiphenyl, and 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl) by P. chrysosporium in liquid culture was examined. After 28 days of incubation, {sup 14}C partitioning analysis indicated extensive degradation of DCB, including 11% mineralization. In contrast, there was negligible mineralization of the tetrachloro- or hexachlorobiphenyl and little evidence for any significant metabolism. With all of the model PCBs, a large fraction of the {sup 14}C was determined to be biomass bound. Results from a time course study done with 4,4{prime}-[{sup 14}C]DCB to examine {sup 14}C partitioning dynamics indicated that the biomass-bound {sup 14}C was likely attributable to nonspecific adsorption of the PCBs to the fungal hyphae. In a subsequent isotope trapping experiment, 4-chlorobenzoic acid and 4-chlorobenzyl alcohol were identified as metabolites produced from 4,4{prime}-[{sup 14}C]DCB. To the best of our knowledge, this the first report describing intermediates formed by P. chrysosporium during PCB degradation. Results from these experiments suggested similarities between P. chrysosporium and bacterial systems in terms of effects of congener chlorination degree and pattern on PCB metabolism and intermediates characteristic of the PCB degradation process. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jose E; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; de Souza, Sandro J

    2015-01-01

    Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs) are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many different samples need to be compared. Some popular tools for the analysis of ASEs are known to report thousands of events without annotations and/or graphical representations. A new tool for the identification and visualization of ASEs is here described, which can be used by biologists without a solid bioinformatics background. Results. A software suite named Splicing Express was created to perform ASEs analysis from transcriptome sequencing data derived from next-generation DNA sequencing platforms. Its major goal is to serve the needs of biomedical researchers who do not have bioinformatics skills. Splicing Express performs automatic annotation of transcriptome data (GTF files) using gene coordinates available from the UCSC genome browser and allows the analysis of data from all available species. The identification of ASEs is done by a known algorithm previously implemented in another tool named Splooce. As a final result, Splicing Express creates a set of HTML files composed of graphics and tables designed to describe the expression profile of ASEs among all analyzed samples. By using RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map and the Rat Body Map, we show that Splicing Express is able to perform all tasks in a straightforward way, identifying well-known specific events. Availability and Implementation. Splicing Express is written in Perl and is suitable to run only in UNIX-like systems. More details can be found at: http://www.bioinformatics-brazil.org/splicingexpress.

  6. Superconducting cable-in-conduit low resistance splice

    DOEpatents

    Artman, Thomas A.

    2003-06-24

    A low resistance splice connects two cable-in-conduit superconductors to each other. Dividing collars for arranging sub-cable units from each conduit are provided, along with clamping collars for mating each sub-cable wire assembly to form mated assemblies. The mated assemblies ideally can be accomplished by way of splicing collar. The mated assemblies are cooled by way of a flow of coolant, preferably helium. A method for implementing such a splicing is also described.

  7. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M G; Pinto, Yigal M; Creemers, Esther E

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new functional protein (function) is likely to be retained, and this way, the genome has gradually evolved to encode for genes with multiple isoforms, thereby creating an enormously diverse transcriptome. Advances in technologies to characterize RNA populations have led to a better understanding of RNA processing in health and disease. In the heart, alternative splicing is increasingly being recognized as an important layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Moreover, the recent identification of several cardiac splice factors, such as RNA-binding motif protein 20 and SF3B1, not only provided important insight into the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing but also revealed how these splicing factors impact functional properties of the heart. Here, we review our current knowledge of alternative splicing in the heart, with a particular focus on the major and minor spliceosome, the factors controlling RNA splicing, and the role of alternative splicing in cardiac development and disease. PMID:26846640

  8. Viral interactions with components of the splicing machinery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are often interrupted by stretches of sequence with no protein coding potential or obvious function. After transcription, these interrupting sequences must be removed to give rise to the mature messenger RNA. This fundamental process is called RNA splicing and is achieved by complicated machinery made of protein and RNA that assembles around the RNA to be edited. Viruses also use RNA splicing to maximize their coding potential and economize on genetic space, and use clever strategies to manipulate the splicing machinery to their advantage. This article gives an overview of the splicing process and provides examples of viral strategies that make use of various components of the splicing system to promote their replicative cycle. Representative virus families have been selected to illustrate the interaction with various regulatory proteins and ribonucleoproteins. The unifying theme is fine regulation through protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions with the spliceosome components and associated factors to promote or prevent spliceosome assembly on given splice sites, in addition to a strong influence from cis-regulatory sequences on viral transcripts. Because there is an intimate coupling of splicing with the processes that direct mRNA biogenesis, a description of how these viruses couple the regulation of splicing with the retention or stability of mRNAs is also included. It seems that a unique balance of suppression and activation of splicing and nuclear export works optimally for each family of viruses.

  9. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M G; Pinto, Yigal M; Creemers, Esther E

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new functional protein (function) is likely to be retained, and this way, the genome has gradually evolved to encode for genes with multiple isoforms, thereby creating an enormously diverse transcriptome. Advances in technologies to characterize RNA populations have led to a better understanding of RNA processing in health and disease. In the heart, alternative splicing is increasingly being recognized as an important layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Moreover, the recent identification of several cardiac splice factors, such as RNA-binding motif protein 20 and SF3B1, not only provided important insight into the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing but also revealed how these splicing factors impact functional properties of the heart. Here, we review our current knowledge of alternative splicing in the heart, with a particular focus on the major and minor spliceosome, the factors controlling RNA splicing, and the role of alternative splicing in cardiac development and disease.

  10. Impacts of Alternative Splicing Events on the Differentiation of Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing was found to be a common phenomenon after the advent of whole transcriptome analyses or next generation sequencing. Over 90% of human genes were demonstrated to undergo at least one alternative splicing event. Alternative splicing is an effective mechanism to spatiotemporally expand protein diversity, which influences the cell fate and tissue development. The first focus of this review is to highlight recent studies, which demonstrated effects of alternative splicing on the differentiation of adipocytes. Moreover, use of evolving high-throughput approaches, such as transcriptome analyses (RNA sequencing), to profile adipogenic transcriptomes, is also addressed. PMID:26389882

  11. Some characteristics of probabilistic one-sided splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model for DNA computing using the recombination behavior of DNA molecules known as asplicing system has been introduced in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings at the specific places and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string yielding the new strings. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions for splicing systems have been considered to increase the computational power of the languages generated. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic one-sided splicing systems, which are special types of probabilistic splicing systems, are investigated. We prove that probabilistic one-sided splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the languages generated.

  12. Evolutionary Insights into RNA trans-Splicing in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Quan; Li, Cong; Zuo, Zhixiang; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-01-01

    Pre-RNA splicing is an essential step in generating mature mRNA. RNA trans-splicing combines two separate pre-mRNA molecules to form a chimeric non-co-linear RNA, which may exert a function distinct from its original molecules. Trans-spliced RNAs may encode novel proteins or serve as noncoding or regulatory RNAs. These novel RNAs not only increase the complexity of the proteome but also provide new regulatory mechanisms for gene expression. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that trans-splicing occurs frequently in both physiological and pathological processes. In addition, mRNA reprogramming based on trans-splicing has been successfully applied in RNA-based therapies for human genetic diseases. Nevertheless, clarifying the extent and evolution of trans-splicing in vertebrates and developing detection methods for trans-splicing remain challenging. In this review, we summarize previous research, highlight recent advances in trans-splicing, and discuss possible splicing mechanisms and functions from an evolutionary viewpoint. PMID:26966239

  13. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide computational analysis of alternative splicing (AS) in several flowering plants has revealed that pre-mRNAs from about 30% of genes undergo AS. Chlamydomonas, a simple unicellular green alga, is part of the lineage that includes land plants. However, it diverged from land plants about one billion years ago. Hence, it serves as a good model system to study alternative splicing in early photosynthetic eukaryotes, to obtain insights into the evolution of this process in plants, and to compare splicing in simple unicellular photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes. We performed a global analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using its recently completed genome sequence and all available ESTs and cDNAs. Results Our analysis of AS using BLAT and a modified version of the Sircah tool revealed AS of 498 transcriptional units with 611 events, representing about 3% of the total number of genes. As in land plants, intron retention is the most prevalent form of AS. Retained introns and skipped exons tend to be shorter than their counterparts in constitutively spliced genes. The splice site signals in all types of AS events are weaker than those in constitutively spliced genes. Furthermore, in alternatively spliced genes, the prevalent splice form has a stronger splice site signal than the non-prevalent form. Analysis of constitutively spliced introns revealed an over-abundance of motifs with simple repetitive elements in comparison to introns involved in intron retention. In almost all cases, AS results in a truncated ORF, leading to a coding sequence that is around 50% shorter than the prevalent splice form. Using RT-PCR we verified AS of two genes and show that they produce more isoforms than indicated by EST data. All cDNA/EST alignments and splice graphs are provided in a website at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/chlamy. Conclusions The extent of AS in Chlamydomonas that we observed is much smaller than observed in

  14. Viral interactions with components of the splicing machinery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are often interrupted by stretches of sequence with no protein coding potential or obvious function. After transcription, these interrupting sequences must be removed to give rise to the mature messenger RNA. This fundamental process is called RNA splicing and is achieved by complicated machinery made of protein and RNA that assembles around the RNA to be edited. Viruses also use RNA splicing to maximize their coding potential and economize on genetic space, and use clever strategies to manipulate the splicing machinery to their advantage. This article gives an overview of the splicing process and provides examples of viral strategies that make use of various components of the splicing system to promote their replicative cycle. Representative virus families have been selected to illustrate the interaction with various regulatory proteins and ribonucleoproteins. The unifying theme is fine regulation through protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions with the spliceosome components and associated factors to promote or prevent spliceosome assembly on given splice sites, in addition to a strong influence from cis-regulatory sequences on viral transcripts. Because there is an intimate coupling of splicing with the processes that direct mRNA biogenesis, a description of how these viruses couple the regulation of splicing with the retention or stability of mRNAs is also included. It seems that a unique balance of suppression and activation of splicing and nuclear export works optimally for each family of viruses. PMID:27571697

  15. Age-dependent gain of alternative splice forms and biased duplication explain the relation between splicing and duplication

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Julien; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We analyze here the relation between alternative splicing and gene duplication in light of recent genomic data, with a focus on the human genome. We show that the previously reported negative correlation between level of alternative splicing and family size no longer holds true. We clarify this pattern and show that it is sufficiently explained by two factors. First, genes progressively gain new splice variants with time. The gain is consistent with a selectively relaxed regime, until purifying selection slows it down as aging genes accumulate a large number of variants. Second, we show that duplication does not lead to a loss of splice forms, but rather that genes with low levels of alternative splicing tend to duplicate more frequently. This leads us to reconsider the role of alternative splicing in duplicate retention. PMID:21173032

  16. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of Shaker potassium channel transcripts results from distinct modes of regulating 3' splice choice.

    PubMed

    Iverson, L E; Mottes, J R; Yeager, S A; Germeraad, S E

    1997-05-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor RNA enables a single gene to encode multiple protein isoforms with different functional characteristics and tissue distributions. Differential splicing of Drosophila Shaker (Sh) gene transcripts regulates the tissue-specific expression of kinetically distinct potassium ion channels throughout development. Regulation of Sh alternative splicing is being examined in germline transformants using lacZ as a reporter gene. P-element constructs were generated in which one or both of the two mutually exclusive Sh 3' acceptor sites were positioned in the same translational reading frame as the lacZ coding sequences. The constructs were introduced into the germline and the transgenic animals examined for tissue-specific beta-galactosidase expression patterns. Some tissues exhibit "promiscuous" splicing; these tissues are competent to splice to either 3' acceptor even when both are present on the same pre-mRNA. In other tissues splice choice results from competition between the two 3' sites; these tissues can splice to either site when it is the only available 3' acceptor, but when given a choice will splice to only one of the two 3' acceptors. In some tissues, splicing occurs exclusively at only one of the 3' acceptor sites; these tissues are not competent to splice to one of the sites even if it is the only 3' acceptor present on the pre-mRNA. These results suggests that multiple, distinct regulatory modes are operating to control tissue-specific alternative splicing of Sh 3' domains and are discussed in terms of potential underlying mechanisms for regulating the tissue-specific expression of alternatively spliced genes.

  17. The Lombardy Rare Donor Programme

    PubMed Central

    Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Paccapelo, Cinzia; Manera, Maria Cristina; Rebulla, Paolo; Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Marconi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2005, the government of Lombardy, an Italian region with an ethnically varied population of approximately 9.8 million inhabitants including 250,000 blood donors, founded the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme, a regional network of 15 blood transfusion departments coordinated by the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory of the Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan. During 2005 to 2012, Lombardy funded LORD-P with 14.1 million euros. Materials and methods During 2005–2012 the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme members developed a registry of blood donors and a bank of red blood cell units with either rare blood group phenotypes or IgA deficiency. To do this, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory performed extensive serological and molecular red blood cell typing in 59,738 group O or A, Rh CCDee, ccdee, ccDEE, ccDee, K− or k− donors aged 18–55 with a record of two or more blood donations, including both Caucasians and ethnic minorities. In parallel, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory implemented a 24/7 service of consultation, testing and distribution of rare units for anticipated or emergent transfusion needs in patients developing complex red blood cell alloimmunisation and lacking local compatible red blood cell or showing IgA deficiency. Results Red blood cell typing identified 8,747, 538 and 33 donors rare for a combination of common antigens, negative for high-frequency antigens and with a rare Rh phenotype, respectively. In June 2012, the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme frozen inventory included 1,157 red blood cell units. From March 2010 to June 2012 one IgA-deficient donor was detected among 1,941 screened donors and IgA deficiency was confirmed in four previously identified donors. From 2005 to June 2012, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory provided 281 complex red blood cell alloimmunisation consultations and distributed 8,008 Lombardy Rare Donor Programme red blood cell units within and outside the region

  18. [Altruism and the donor].

    PubMed

    Langlois, A

    1991-08-01

    On December 20, 1988, the government of France passed a law to protect people who voluntarily participate in biomedical research. This article makes extensive reference to a major study, titled From Biology to Ethics, by Jean Bernard, a well-respected authority in the field of bioethics. The author looks at models proposed by Bernard, as examples for health volunteers, in particular, the blood donor and the self-experimenter. To set the tone of the article, she recalls the concept of altruism, as first proposed by Auguste Comte, then makes a linkage between his philosophy and Bernard's point of view. By trial and error, in their discussions, various ethics committees and the French State Council have agreed upon what constitutes fair compensation under the law. Unlike their Canadian counterparts, medical researchers in France have free access to volunteers who are not in perfect health--e.g., the elderly, people suffering from kidney deficiency, cirrhosis of the liver, etc.--but these "experimental subjects" receive no monetary compensation. Thus, healthy and less-than-healthy volunteers do not receive equal treatment under the law. This inequity, added to the fear of what amounts to a tax on the human body and the difficulty of ensuring just compensation, is giving rise to a great deal of uncertainty.

  19. [Altruism and the donor].

    PubMed

    Langlois, A

    1991-08-01

    On December 20, 1988, the government of France passed a law to protect people who voluntarily participate in biomedical research. This article makes extensive reference to a major study, titled From Biology to Ethics, by Jean Bernard, a well-respected authority in the field of bioethics. The author looks at models proposed by Bernard, as examples for health volunteers, in particular, the blood donor and the self-experimenter. To set the tone of the article, she recalls the concept of altruism, as first proposed by Auguste Comte, then makes a linkage between his philosophy and Bernard's point of view. By trial and error, in their discussions, various ethics committees and the French State Council have agreed upon what constitutes fair compensation under the law. Unlike their Canadian counterparts, medical researchers in France have free access to volunteers who are not in perfect health--e.g., the elderly, people suffering from kidney deficiency, cirrhosis of the liver, etc.--but these "experimental subjects" receive no monetary compensation. Thus, healthy and less-than-healthy volunteers do not receive equal treatment under the law. This inequity, added to the fear of what amounts to a tax on the human body and the difficulty of ensuring just compensation, is giving rise to a great deal of uncertainty. PMID:1878857

  20. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G.; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D.; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rodenko, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I–restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags. PMID:26401003

  1. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katja; Koester, Tino; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance. PMID:26213982

  2. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules.

    PubMed

    Berkers, Celia R; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib

    2015-11-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I-restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags.

  3. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them.

  4. An artificial riboswitch for controlling pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Suk; Gusti, Veronica; Pillai, Sailesh G; Gaur, Rajesh K

    2005-11-01

    Riboswitches, as previously reported, are natural RNA aptamers that regulate the expression of numerous bacterial metabolic genes in response to small molecule ligands. It has recently been shown that these RNA genetic elements are also present near the splice site junctions of plant and fungal introns, thus raising the possibility of their involvement in regulating mRNA splicing. Here it is shown for the first time that a riboswitch can be engineered to regulate pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. We show that insertion of a high-affinity theophylline binding aptamer into the 3' splice site (3' ss) region of a model pre-mRNA (AdML-Theo29AG) enables its splicing to be repressed by the addition theophylline. Our results indicate that the location of 3' ss AG within the aptamer plays a crucial role in conferring theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing. We also show that theophylline-mediated control of pre-mRNA splicing is highly specific by first demonstrating that a small molecule ligand similar in shape and size to theophylline had no effect on the splicing of AdML-Theo29AG pre-mRNA. Second, theophylline failed to exert any influence on the splicing of a pre-mRNA that does not contain its binding site. Third, theophylline specifically blocks the step II of the splicing reaction. Finally, we provide evidence that theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing is functionally relevant. PMID:16244133

  5. Evolution of alternative splicing in primate brain transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lan; Shen, Shihao; Jiang, Peng; Sato, Seiko; Davidson, Beverly L.; Xing, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a predominant form of gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. The evolution of alternative splicing provides an important mechanism for the acquisition of novel gene functions. In this work, we carried out a genome-wide phylogenetic survey of lineage-specific splicing patterns in the primate brain, via high-density exon junction array profiling of brain transcriptomes of humans, chimpanzees and rhesus macaques. We identified 509 genes showing splicing differences among these species. RT–PCR analysis of 40 exons confirmed the predicted splicing evolution of 33 exons. Of these 33 exons, outgroup analysis using rhesus macaques confirmed 13 exons with human-specific increase or decrease in transcript inclusion levels after humans diverged from chimpanzees. Some of the human-specific brain splicing patterns disrupt domains critical for protein–protein interactions, and some modulate translational efficiency of their host genes. Strikingly, for exons showing splicing differences across species, we observed a significant increase in the rate of silent substitutions within exons, coupled with accelerated sequence divergence in flanking introns. This indicates that evolution of cis-regulatory signals is a major contributor to the emergence of human-specific splicing patterns. In one gene (MAGOH), using minigene reporter assays, we demonstrated that the combination of two human-specific cis-sequence changes created its human-specific splicing pattern. Together, our data reveal widespread human-specific changes of alternative splicing in the brain and suggest an important role of splicing in the evolution of neuronal gene regulation and functions. PMID:20460271

  6. Modulation of RNA splicing as a potential treatment for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauman, John A; Kole, Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    Close to 90% of human genes are transcribed into pre-mRNA that undergoes alternative splicing, producing multiple mRNAs and proteins from single genes. This process is largely responsible for human proteome diversity, and about half of genetic disease-causing mutations affect splicing. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) comprise an emerging class of antisense therapeutics that modify gene expression by directing pre-mRNA splice site usage. Bauman et al. investigated an SSO that up-regulated the expression of an anti-cancer splice variant while simultaneously eliminating an over-expressed cancer-causing splice variant.  This was accomplished by targeting pre-mRNA of the apoptotic regulator Bcl-x, which is alternatively spliced to express anti- and pro-apoptotic splice variants Bcl-xL and Bcl-xS, respectively. High expression of Bcl-xL is a hallmark of many cancers and is considered a general mechanism used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis. Redirection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing from Bcl-xL to -xS by SSO induced apoptotic and chemosensitizing effects in various cancer cell lines. Importantly, the paper shows that delivery of Bcl-x SSO using a lipid nanoparticle redirected Bcl-x splicing and reduced tumor burden in melanoma lung metastases. This was the first demonstration of SSO efficacy in tumors in vivo. SSOs are not limited to be solely potential anti-cancer drugs. SSOs were first applied to repair aberrant splicing in thalassemia, a genetic disease, they have been used to create novel proteins (e.g., ∆7TNFR1), and they have recently progressed to clinical trials for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 

  7. Alternative splicing of TAF6: downstream transcriptome impacts and upstream RNA splice control elements.

    PubMed

    Kamtchueng, Catherine; Stébenne, Marie-Éve; Delannoy, Aurélie; Wilhelm, Emmanuelle; Léger, Hélène; Benecke, Arndt G; Bell, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    The TAF6δ pathway of apoptosis can dictate life versus death decisions independently of the status of p53 tumor suppressor. TAF6δ is an inducible pro-apoptotic subunit of the general RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription factor TFIID. Alternative splice site choice of TAF6δ has been shown to be a pivotal event in triggering death via the TAF6δ pathway, yet nothing is currently known about the mechanisms that promote TAF6δ splicing. Furthermore the transcriptome impact of the gain of function of TAF6δ versus the loss of function of the major TAF6α splice form remains undefined. Here we employ comparative microarray analysis to show that TAF6δ drives a transcriptome profile distinct from that resulting from depletion of TAF6α. To define the cis-acting RNA elements responsible for TAF6δ alternative splicing we performed a mutational analysis of a TAF6 minigene system. The data point to several new RNA elements that can modulate TAF6δ and also reveal a role for RNA secondary structure in the selection of TAF6δ.

  8. 5 prime -Azido-(3,6- sup 3 H sub 2 )-1-naphthylphthalamic acid, a photoactivatable probe for naphthylphthalamic acid receptor proteins from higher plants: Identification of a 23-kDa protein from maize coleoptile plasma membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, R.; Feldwisch, J.; Schell, J.; Palme, K. ); Boland, W. )

    1992-01-15

    1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) is a specific inhibitor of polar auxin transport that blocks carrier mediated auxin efflux from plant cells. To allow identification of the NPA receptor thought to be part of the auxin efflux carrier, the authors have synthesized a tritiated, photolabile NPA analogue, 5{prime}-azido-(3,6-{sup 3}H{sub 2})NPA (({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA). This analogue was used to identify NPA-binding proteins in fractions highly enriched for plasma membrane vesicles isolated from maize coleoptiles (Zea mays L.). Competition studies showed that binding of ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA to maize plasma membrane vesicles was blocked by nonradioactive NPA but not by benzoic acid. After incubation of plasma membrane vesicles with ({sup 3}H{sub 2})N{sub 3}NPA and exposure to UV light, they observed specific photoaffinity labeling of a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 23 kDa. Pretreatment of the plasma membrane vesicles with indole-3-acetic acid or with the auxin-transport inhibitors NPA and 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid strongly reduced specific labeling of this protein. This 23-kDa protein was also labeled by addition of 5-azido-(7-{sup 3}H)indole-3-acetic acid to plasma membranes prior to exposure to UV light. The 23-kDa protein was solubilized from plasma membranes by 1% Triton X-100. The possibility that this 23-kDa polypeptide is part of the auxin efflux carrier system is discussed.

  9. Structure-function analysis of the trypanosomatid spliced leader RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Goncharov, I; Xu, Y X; Zimmer, Y; Sherman, K; Michaeli, S

    1998-01-01

    In trypanosomes, all mRNAs possess a spliced leader (SL) at their 5' end. SL is added to pre-mRNA via trans -splicing from a small RNA, the SL RNA. To examine structure-function aspects of the trypanosomatid SL RNA, an in vivo system was developed in the monogenetic trypanosomatid Leptomonas collosoma to analyze the function of chimeric and site-directed SL RNA mutants in trans -splicing. Stable cell lines expressing chimeric and mutated SL RNA from the authentic SL RNA regulatory unit were obtained. The chimeric RNA was expressed and assembled into an SL RNP particle, but could not serve as a substrate in splicing. Mutations in loop II and III of L.collosoma SL RNA formed the Y structure intermediate. In addition, a double SL RNA mutant in loop II, and positions 7 and 8 of the intron, also formed the Y structure intermediate, suggesting that these intron positions, although proposed to participate in the interaction of SL RNA with U5, may not be crucial for the first step of the trans -splicing reaction. A mutation in the exon located in loop I was not utilized in splicing, suggesting the importance of exon sequences for trans -splicing in trypanosomes. However, a double SL RNA mutant in loop II and exon position 31 was utilized in both steps of splicing; the mutant thus provides a model molecule for further analysis of positions essential for the function of the SL RNA. PMID:9547281

  10. Alternative splicing of inner-ear-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Yueyue; Nie, Hongyun; Ma, Xin; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays a fundamental role in the development and physiological function of the inner ear. Inner-ear-specific gene splicing is necessary to establish the identity and maintain the function of the inner ear. For example, exon 68 of Cadherin 23 (Cdh23) gene is subject to inner-ear-specific alternative splicing, and as a result, Cdh23(+ 68) is only expressed in inner ear hair cells. Alternative splicing along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea contributes to frequency tuning, particularly in lower vertebrates, such as chickens and turtles. Differential splicing of Kcnma1, which encodes for the α subunit of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel), has been suggested to affect the channel gating properties and is important for frequency tuning. Consequently, deficits in alternative splicing have been shown to cause hearing loss, as we can observe in Bronx Waltzer (bv) mice and Sfswap mutant mice. Despite the advances in this field, the regulation of alternative splicing in the inner ear remains elusive. Further investigation is also needed to clarify the mechanism of hearing loss caused by alternative splicing deficits. PMID:27376950

  11. Splicing enhancement in the yeast rp51b intron.

    PubMed Central

    Libri, D; Lescure, A; Rosbash, M

    2000-01-01

    Splicing enhancement in higher eukaryotes has been linked to SR proteins, to U1 snRNP, and to communication between splice sites across introns or exons mediated by protein-protein interactions. It has been previously shown that, in yeast, communication mediated by RNA-RNA interactions between the two ends of introns is a basis for splicing enhancement. We designed experiments of randomization-selection to isolate splicing enhancers that would work independently from RNA secondary structures. Surprisingly, one of the two families of sequences selected was essentially composed of 5' splice site variants. We show that this sequence enhances splicing independently of secondary structure, is exportable to heterologous contexts, and works in multiple copies with additive effects. The data argue in favor of an early role for splicing enhancement, possibly coincident with commitment complex formation. Genetic compensation experiments with U1 snRNA mutants suggest that U1 snRNP binding to noncanonical locations is required for splicing enhancement. PMID:10744020

  12. Involvement of PARP1 in the regulation of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Elena; Maiorano, John; Zhang, Qingyang; Eteleeb, Abdallah M; Convertini, Paolo; Chen, Jing; Infantino, Vittoria; Stamm, Stefan; Wang, Jiping; Rouchka, Eric C; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-01-01

    Specialized chromatin structures such as nucleosomes with specific histone modifications decorate exons in eukaryotic genomes, suggesting a functional connection between chromatin organization and the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Through profiling the functional location of Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, we observed that it is associated with the nucleosomes at exon/intron boundaries of specific genes, suggestive of a role for this enzyme in alternative splicing. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase has previously been implicated in the PARylation of splicing factors as well as regulation of the histone modification H3K4me3, a mark critical for co-transcriptional splicing. In light of these studies, we hypothesized that interaction of the chromatin-modifying factor, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase with nucleosomal structures at exon–intron boundaries, might regulate pre-mRNA splicing. Using genome-wide approaches validated by gene-specific assays, we show that depletion of PARP1 or inhibition of its PARylation activity results in changes in alternative splicing of a specific subset of genes. Furthermore, we observed that PARP1 bound to RNA, splicing factors and chromatin, suggesting that Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase serves as a gene regulatory hub to facilitate co-transcriptional splicing. These studies add another function to the multi-functional protein, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, and provide a platform for further investigation of this protein’s function in organizing chromatin during gene regulatory processes. PMID:27462443

  13. Prevalence of alternative splicing choices in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Around 14% of protein-coding genes of Arabidopsis thaliana genes from the TAIR9 genome release are annotated as producing multiple transcript variants through alternative splicing. However, for most alternatively spliced genes in Arabidopsis, the relative expression level of individual splicing variants is unknown. Results We investigated prevalence of alternative splicing (AS) events in Arabidopsis thaliana using ESTs. We found that for most AS events with ample EST coverage, the majority of overlapping ESTs strongly supported one major splicing choice, with less than 10% of ESTs supporting the minor form. Analysis of ESTs also revealed a small but noteworthy subset of genes for which alternative choices appeared with about equal prevalence, suggesting that for these genes the variant splicing forms co-occur in the same cell types. Of the AS events in which both forms were about equally prevalent, more than 80% affected untranslated regions or involved small changes to the encoded protein sequence. Conclusions Currently available evidence from ESTs indicates that alternative splicing in Arabidopsis occurs and affects many genes, but for most genes with documented alternative splicing, one AS choice predominates. To aid investigation of the role AS may play in modulating function of Arabidopsis genes, we provide an on-line resource (ArabiTag) that supports searching AS events by gene, by EST library keyword search, and by relative prevalence of minor and major forms. PMID:20525311

  14. A Broad Set of Chromatin Factors Influences Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, Eric; Myers, Michael P.; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Krainer, Adrian R.; Muchardt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Several studies propose an influence of chromatin on pre-mRNA splicing, but it is still unclear how widespread and how direct this phenomenon is. We find here that when assembled in vivo, the U2 snRNP co-purifies with a subset of chromatin-proteins, including histones and remodeling complexes like SWI/SNF. Yet, an unbiased RNAi screen revealed that the outcome of splicing is influenced by a much larger variety of chromatin factors not all associating with the spliceosome. The availability of this broad range of chromatin factors impacting splicing further unveiled their very context specific effect, resulting in either inclusion or skipping, depending on the exon under scrutiny. Finally, a direct assessment of the impact of chromatin on splicing using an in vitro co-transcriptional splicing assay with pre-mRNAs transcribed from a nucleosomal template, demonstrated that chromatin impacts nascent pre-mRNP in their competence for splicing. Altogether, our data show that numerous chromatin factors associated or not with the spliceosome can affect the outcome of splicing, possibly as a function of the local chromatin environment that by default interferes with the efficiency of splicing. PMID:27662573

  15. Discovering Transcription and Splicing Networks in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wen, Jianguo; Chang, Chung-che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    More and more transcription factors and their motifs have been reported and linked to specific gene expression levels. However, focusing only on transcription is not sufficient for mechanism research. Most genes, especially in eukaryotes, are alternatively spliced to different isoforms. Some of these isoforms increase the biodiversity of proteins. From this viewpoint, transcription and splicing are two of important mechanisms to modulate expression levels of isoforms. To integrate these two kinds of regulation, we built a linear regression model to select a subset of transcription factors and splicing factors for each co-expressed isoforms using least-angle regression approach. Then, we applied this method to investigate the mechanism of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a precursor lesion of acute myeloid leukemia. Results suggested that expression levels of most isoforms were regulated by a set of selected regulatory factors. Some of the detected factors, such as EGR1 and STAT family, are highly correlated with progression of MDS. We discovered that the splicing factor SRSF11 experienced alternative splicing switch, and in turn induced different amino acid sequences between MDS and controls. This splicing switch causes two different splicing mechanisms. Polymerase Chain Reaction experiments also confirmed that one of its isoforms was over-expressed in MDS. We analyzed the regulatory networks constructed from the co-expressed isoforms and their regulatory factors in MDS. Many of these networks were enriched in the herpes simplex infection pathway which involves many splicing factors, and pathways in cancers and acute or chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24244432

  16. Splice Form Dependence of b-Neurexin/Neuroligin Binding Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Koehnke, J.; Katsamba, P; Ahlsen, G; Bahna, F; Vendome, J; Honig, B; Shapiro, L; Jin, X

    2010-01-01

    Alternatively spliced {beta}-neurexins ({beta}-NRXs) and neuroligins (NLs) are thought to have distinct extracellular binding affinities, potentially providing a {beta}-NRX/NL synaptic recognition code. We utilized surface plasmon resonance to measure binding affinities between all combinations of alternatively spliced {beta}-NRX 1-3 and NL 1-3 ectodomains. Binding was observed for all {beta}-NRX/NL pairs. The presence of the NL1 B splice insertion lowers {beta}-NRX binding affinity by 2-fold, while {beta}-NRX splice insertion 4 has small effects that do not synergize with NL splicing. New structures of glycosylated {beta}-NRXs 1 and 2 containing splice insertion 4 reveal that the insertion forms a new {beta} strand that replaces the {beta}10 strand, leaving the NL binding site intact. This helps to explain the limited effect of splice insert 4 on NRX/NL binding affinities. These results provide new structural insights and quantitative binding information to help determine whether and how splice isoform choice plays a role in {beta}-NRX/NL-mediated synaptic recognition.

  17. Identification of a new splice variant of BDNF in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to be involved in the central regulation of energy homeostasis. BDNF splicing variants were discovered in vertebrates. Results from human, mouse and rat suggest that alternative BDNF splicing variants potentially play a role in fat deposition. Using t...

  18. The splicing landscape is globally reprogrammed during male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Ralf; Grellscheid, Sushma Nagaraja; Ehrmann, Ingrid; Dalgliesh, Caroline; Danilenko, Marina; Paronetto, Maria Paola; Pedrotti, Simona; Grellscheid, David; Dixon, Richard J; Sette, Claudio; Eperon, Ian C; Elliott, David J

    2013-12-01

    Meiosis requires conserved transcriptional changes, but it is not known whether there is a corresponding set of RNA splicing switches. Here, we used RNAseq of mouse testis to identify changes associated with the progression from mitotic spermatogonia to meiotic spermatocytes. We identified ∼150 splicing switches, most of which affect conserved protein-coding exons. The expression of many key splicing regulators changed in the course of meiosis, including downregulation of polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) and heterogeneous nuclear RNP A1, and upregulation of nPTB, Tra2β, muscleblind, CELF proteins, Sam68 and T-STAR. The sequences near the regulated exons were significantly enriched in target sites for PTB, Tra2β and STAR proteins. Reporter minigene experiments investigating representative exons in transfected cells showed that PTB binding sites were critical for splicing of a cassette exon in the Ralgps2 mRNA and a shift in alternative 5' splice site usage in the Bptf mRNA. We speculate that nPTB might functionally replace PTBP1 during meiosis for some target exons, with changes in the expression of other splicing factors helping to establish meiotic splicing patterns. Our data suggest that there are substantial changes in the determinants and patterns of alternative splicing in the mitotic-to-meiotic transition of the germ cell cycle. PMID:24038356

  19. Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma caused by activation of a cryptic splice site in KRT9.

    PubMed

    Fuchs-Telem, D; Padalon-Brauch, G; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E

    2013-03-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is caused by mutations in KRT9 and less often, KRT1. All known mutations in KRT9 have been found in regions of the gene encoding the conserved central α-helix rod domain. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of EPPK in a patient of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. The patient was found to carry a novel missense mutation in KRT9, resulting in the substitution of a poorly conserved leucine for valine at position 11 of the amino acid sequence. Despite its unusual location, the mutation was shown to be pathogenic through activation of a cryptic donor splice site, resulting in the deletion of 162 amino acids. The present data indicate the need to screen keratin genes in their entirety, as mutations altering domains of lesser functional importance may exert their deleterious effect at the transcriptional level.

  20. A Novel Otoferlin Splice-Site Mutation in Siblings with Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Runge, Christina L.; Erbe, Christy B.; McNally, Mark T.; Van Dusen, Courtney; Friedland, David R.; Kwitek, Anne E.; Kerschner, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    We characterize a novel otoferlin (OTOF) mutation discovered in a sibling pair diagnosed with ANSD and investigate auditory nerve function through their cochlear implants. Genetic sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation at the OTOF splice donor site of exon 28 (IVS28+1 G>T) in both siblings. Functional investigation showed that the intronic sequence between exons 28 and 29 was retained in the mutated minigenes that were expressed in 293T cells. Auditory nerve compound action potential recovery functions in the siblings demonstrated different rates of neural recovery, with sibling AN1 showing rapid recovery (1.14 ms) and AN2 showing average recovery (.78 ms) compared to subjects with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) (average: adults .71 ms; children .85 ms). Differences in neural recovery were consistent with speech perception differences between the siblings. Genotype information may indicate site of lesion in hearing loss; however, additional, as yet, unknown factors may impact clinical outcomes and must be considered. PMID:24135434

  1. A case of mild CHARGE syndrome associated with a splice site mutation in CHD7.

    PubMed

    Wells, Constance; Loundon, Natalie; Garabedian, Noël; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Cordier-Bouvier, Marie-Dominique; Goudeffroye, Géraldine; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Marlin, Sandrine

    2016-04-01

    CHARGE syndrome (MIM#214800) (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia of choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear abnormalities/deafness) is caused by heterozygous mutation of CHD7 transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this report, we describe a patient with bilateral hearing impairment, unusually-shaped ears, no intellectual disability and a patent ductus arteriosus. Further investigation showed abnormal semicircular canals and the presence of olfactory bulbs. He does not fulfill the Blake or the Verloes criteria for CHARGE. A de novo mutation at the donor splice site of intron 33 was identified (c.7164 + 1G > A). It is of importance to diagnose mildly affected patients for appropriate genetic counselling and to better understand the mild end of the phenotypic spectrum of CHARGE syndrome.

  2. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  3. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... for blood transfusions side effects associated with allergic reactions to the anesthesia death The best source of information about risks and expected donor outcomes is your transplant team. In addition, it’s important to take an active role in ...

  4. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  5. SQSTM1 splice site mutation in distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Bucelli, Robert C.; Arhzaouy, Khalid; Pestronk, Alan; Pittman, Sara K.; Rojas, Luisa; Sue, Carolyn M.; Evilä, Anni; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne; Harms, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic etiology and characterize the clinicopathologic features of a novel distal myopathy. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing on a family with an autosomal dominant distal myopathy and targeted exome sequencing in 1 patient with sporadic distal myopathy, both with rimmed vacuolar pathology. We also evaluated the pathogenicity of identified mutations using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and expression studies. Results: Sequencing identified a likely pathogenic c.1165+1 G>A splice donor variant in SQSTM1 in the affected members of 1 family and in an unrelated patient with sporadic distal myopathy. Affected patients had late-onset distal lower extremity weakness, myopathic features on EMG, and muscle pathology demonstrating rimmed vacuoles with both TAR DNA-binding protein 43 and SQSTM1 inclusions. The c.1165+1 G>A SQSTM1 variant results in the expression of 2 alternatively spliced SQSTM1 proteins: 1 lacking the C-terminal PEST2 domain and another lacking the C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain, both of which have distinct patterns of cellular and skeletal muscle localization. Conclusions: SQSTM1 is an autophagic adaptor that shuttles aggregated and ubiquitinated proteins to the autophagosome for degradation via its C-terminal UBA domain. Similar to mutations in VCP, dominantly inherited mutations in SQSTM1 are now associated with rimmed vacuolar myopathy, Paget disease of bone, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and frontotemporal dementia. Our data further suggest a pathogenic connection between the disparate phenotypes. PMID:26208961

  6. Multiple early transcripts and splicing of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus IE-1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, G E; Henner, D J

    1988-01-01

    The immediate-early IE-1 gene of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus was cloned, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. Sequence analysis indicated that this gene would encode a protein of 582 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 66,822. Analysis of IE-1 gene expression during baculovirus infection identified two transcripts. One, 1.9 kilobases (kb), was expressed at constant steady-state levels throughout infection, whereas the other, 2.1 kb, was expressed only early in infection. Analysis of IE-1 cDNA clones demonstrated that the 2.1-kb transcript contained the entire 1.9-kb transcript (exon 1) plus an additional 5' end (exon 0). Genomic Southern analysis placed the exon 0 sequences on the EcoRI B fragment, 4 kilobase pairs upstream of exon 1. Sequencing of the upstream region identified an open reading frame whose 5' end was identical to the exon 0 sequences in the cDNAs. Examination of the genomic DNA sequences around the exon-exon junction revealed sequences similar to published consensus splice acceptor and donor sequences. This is the first example of splicing of any viral transcript during baculovirus infection. Images PMID:3043024

  7. Donor selection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Sitaramesh; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increased scrutiny on the quality in health care with particular emphasis on institutional heart transplant survival outcomes. An important aspect of successful transplantation is appropriate donor selection. We review the current guidelines as well as areas of controversy in the selection of appropriate hearts as donor organs to ensure optimal outcomes. This decision is paramount to the success of a transplant program as well as recipient survival and graft function post-transplant. PMID:25132976

  8. [Alternative splicing regulation: implications in cancer diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montiel, Nancy; Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Martínez-Contreras, Rebeca

    2015-04-01

    The accurate expression of the genetic information is regulated by processes like mRNA splicing, proposed after the discoveries of Phil Sharp and Richard Roberts, who demonstrated the existence of intronic sequences, present in almost every structural eukaryotic gene, which should be precisely removed. This intron removal is called "splicing", which generates different proteins from a single mRNA, with different or even antagonistic functions. We currently know that alternative splicing is the most important source of protein diversity, given that 70% of the human genes undergo splicing and that mutations causing defects in this process could originate up to 50% of genetic diseases, including cancer. When these defects occur in genes involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and cell cycle regulation, there is an impact on cancer progression, rising the opportunity to diagnose and treat some types of cancer according to a particular splicing profile.

  9. Some relations between two stages DNA splicing languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudaber, Mohammad Hassan; Yusof, Yuhani; Mohamad, Mohd Sham

    2014-06-01

    A new symbolization of Yusof-Goode (Y-G) rule, which is associated with Y-G splicing system, was introduced by Yusof in 2012 under the framework of formal language theory. The purpose of this investigation is to present the biological process of DNA splicing in a translucent way. In this study, two stages splicing languages are introduced based on Y-G approach and some relations between stage one and stage two splicing languages are presented, given as theorems. Additionally, the existing relations between two stages splicing languages based on crossings and contexts of restriction enzymes factors with respect to two initial strings (having two cutting sites) and two rules are presented as subset.

  10. [Statistical analysis of DNA sequences nearby splicing sites].

    PubMed

    Korzinov, O M; Astakhova, T V; Vlasov, P K; Roĭtberg, M A

    2008-01-01

    Recognition of coding regions within eukaryotic genomes is one of oldest but yet not solved problems of bioinformatics. New high-accuracy methods of splicing sites recognition are needed to solve this problem. A question of current interest is to identify specific features of nucleotide sequences nearby splicing sites and recognize sites in sequence context. We performed a statistical analysis of human genes fragment database and revealed some characteristics of nucleotide sequences in splicing sites neighborhood. Frequencies of all nucleotides and dinucleotides in splicing sites environment were computed and nucleotides and dinucleotides with extremely high\\low occurrences were identified. Statistical information obtained in this work can be used in further development of the methods of splicing sites annotation and exon-intron structure recognition.

  11. In vitro splicing reactions in Drosophila Kc nuclear extracts.

    PubMed

    Rio, Donald C

    2014-08-01

    This protocol describes how to generate and analyze products and intermediates in a pre-mRNA splicing reaction. The reaction relies on the use of labeled, capped, synthetic pre-mRNAs, prepared by in vitro transcription, and Drosophila Kc cell culture nuclear extracts. The pre-mRNA substrate is incubated in the nuclear extract under splicing conditions for 1-2 h. The products of the reaction are purified by phenol:chloroform extraction and precipitation with ethanol, and then loaded directly onto a denaturing urea-acrylamide gel. Visualization of the splicing reactions will reveal the pre-mRNA, the spliced mRNA, and the intermediates generated by the first step of splicing. For inefficient reactions, a more sensitive detection method, such as RNase protection, primer extension, or RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction), may be required.

  12. Detecting Image Splicing Using Merged Features in Chroma Space

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guangjie; Dai, Yuewei

    2014-01-01

    Image splicing is an image editing method to copy a part of an image and paste it onto another image, and it is commonly followed by postprocessing such as local/global blurring, compression, and resizing. To detect this kind of forgery, the image rich models, a feature set successfully used in the steganalysis is evaluated on the splicing image dataset at first, and the dominant submodel is selected as the first kind of feature. The selected feature and the DCT Markov features are used together to detect splicing forgery in the chroma channel, which is convinced effective in splicing detection. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can detect splicing forgeries with lower error rate compared to the previous literature. PMID:24574877

  13. The evolutionary landscape of alternative splicing in vertebrate species.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L; Irimia, Manuel; Pan, Qun; Xiong, Hui Y; Gueroussov, Serge; Lee, Leo J; Slobodeniuc, Valentina; Kutter, Claudia; Watt, Stephen; Colak, Recep; Kim, TaeHyung; Misquitta-Ali, Christine M; Wilson, Michael D; Kim, Philip M; Odom, Duncan T; Frey, Brendan J; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2012-12-21

    How species with similar repertoires of protein-coding genes differ so markedly at the phenotypic level is poorly understood. By comparing organ transcriptomes from vertebrate species spanning ~350 million years of evolution, we observed significant differences in alternative splicing complexity between vertebrate lineages, with the highest complexity in primates. Within 6 million years, the splicing profiles of physiologically equivalent organs diverged such that they are more strongly related to the identity of a species than they are to organ type. Most vertebrate species-specific splicing patterns are cis-directed. However, a subset of pronounced splicing changes are predicted to remodel protein interactions involving trans-acting regulators. These events likely further contributed to the diversification of splicing and other transcriptomic changes that underlie phenotypic differences among vertebrate species. PMID:23258890

  14. Functional impact of splice isoform diversity in individual cells

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an effective means for expanding coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes. Recent studies suggest that co-expression of different splice isoforms may increase diversity of RNAs and proteins at a single-cell level. A pertinent question in the field is whether such co-expression is biologically meaningful or, rather, represents insufficiently stringent splicing regulation. Here we argue that isoform co-expression may produce functional outcomes that are difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve using other regulation strategies. Far from being a ‘splicing noise’, co-expression is often established through co-ordinated activity of specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Further work in this area may uncover new biological functions of alternative splicing (AS) and generate important insights into mechanisms allowing different cell types to attain their unique molecular identities. PMID:27528755

  15. RNA splicing factors as oncoproteins and tumor suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Dvinge, Heidi; Kim, Eunhee; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Bradley, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Preface The recent genomic characterization of cancers has revealed recurrent somatic point mutations and copy number changes affecting genes encoding RNA splicing factors. Initial studies of these ‘spliceosomal mutations’ suggest that the proteins bearing these mutations exhibit altered splice site and/or exon recognition preferences relative to their wild-type counterparts, resulting in cancer-specific mis-splicing. Such changes in the splicing machinery may create novel vulnerabilities in cancer cells that can be therapeutically exploited using compounds that can influence the splicing process. Further studies to dissect the biochemical, genomic, and biological effects of spliceosomal mutations are critical for the development of cancer therapies targeted to these mutations. PMID:27282250

  16. Position-dependent splicing activation and repression by SR and hnRNP proteins rely on common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Erkelenz, Steffen; Mueller, William F.; Evans, Melanie S.; Busch, Anke; Schöneweis, Katrin; Hertel, Klemens J.; Schaal, Heiner

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by splicing factors that modulate splice site selection. In some cases, however, splicing factors show antagonistic activities by either activating or repressing splicing. Here, we show that these opposing outcomes are based on their binding location relative to regulated 5′ splice sites. SR proteins enhance splicing only when they are recruited to the exon. However, they interfere with splicing by simply relocating them to the opposite intronic side of the splice site. hnRNP splicing factors display analogous opposing activities, but in a reversed position dependence. Activation by SR or hnRNP proteins increases splice site recognition at the earliest steps of exon definition, whereas splicing repression promotes the assembly of nonproductive complexes that arrest spliceosome assembly prior to splice site pairing. Thus, SR and hnRNP splicing factors exploit similar mechanisms to positively or negatively influence splice site selection. PMID:23175589

  17. Structural analysis of Aircraft fuselage splice joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaya Prakash, R.; Kumar, G. Raj; Vijayanandh, R.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Ramganesh, T.

    2016-09-01

    In Aviation sector, composite materials and its application to each component are one of the prime factors of consideration due to the high strength to weight ratio, design flexibility and non-corrosive so that the composite materials are widely used in the low weight constructions and also it can be treated as a suitable alternative to metals. The objective of this paper is to estimate and compare the suitability of a composite skin joint in an aircraft fuselage with different joints by simulating the displacement, normal stress, vonmises stress and shear stress with the help of numerical solution methods. The reference Z-stringer component of this paper is modeled by CATIA and numerical simulation is carried out by ANSYS has been used for splice joint presents in the aircraft fuselage with three combinations of joints such as riveted joint, bonded joint and hybrid joint. Nowadays the stringers are using to avoid buckling of fuselage skin, it has joined together by rivets and they are connected end to end by splice joint. Design and static analysis of three-dimensional models of joints such as bonded, riveted and hybrid are carried out and results are compared.

  18. A novel SMARCAL1 missense mutation that affects splicing in a severely affected Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Belinchón, Alberta; Fernández-Camblor, Carlota; Valenciano-Fuente, Blanca; Lapunzina, Pablo; Heath, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal failure and immunodeficiency. In this work, we report the molecular studies undertaken in a severely affected SIOD patient that died at six years old due to nephropathy. The patient was screened for mutations using a targeted skeletal dysplasias panel. A homozygous novel missense mutation was identified, c.1615C > G (p.[Leu539Val]) that was predicted as mildly pathogenic by in silico pathogenicity prediction tools. However, splicing prediction software suggested that this variant may create a new splicing donor site in exon 9, which was subsequently confirmed using a minigene assay in HEK293 cells. Thus, the splicing alteration, c.1615C > G; r.1615c > g, 1615_1644del; (p.[Leu539_Ile548del]), results in the loss of 10 amino acids of the HARP-ATPase catalytic domain and the RPA-binding domain. Several studies have demonstrated a weak genotype-phenotype correlation among such patients. Thus, the molecular characterization has helped us to understand why a predicted weakly pathogenic missense mutation results in severe SIOD and should be considered in similar scenarios. PMID:27282802

  19. Alternate cyclin D1 mRNA splicing modulates p27KIP1 binding and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiping; Wang, Chenguang; Jiao, Xuanmao; Katiyar, Sanjay; Casimiro, Mathew C; Prendergast, George C; Powell, Michael J; Pestell, Richard G

    2008-03-14

    Cyclin D1 is an important cell cycle regulator, but in cancer its overexpression also increases cellular migration mediated by p27 KIP1 stabilization and RhoA inhibition. Recently, a common polymorphism at the exon 4-intron 4 boundary of the human cyclin D1 gene within a splice donor region was associated with an altered risk of developing cancer. Altered RNA splicing caused by this polymorphism gives rise to a variant cyclin D1 isoform termed cyclin D1b, which has the same N terminus as the canonical cyclin D1a isoform but a distinct C terminus. In this study we show that these different isoforms have unique properties with regard to the cellular migration function of cyclin D1. Although they displayed little difference in transcriptional co-repression assays on idealized reporter genes, microarray cDNA expression analysis revealed differential regulation of genes, including those that influence cellular migration. Additionally, whereas cyclin D1a stabilized p27 KIP1 and inhibited RhoA-induced ROCK kinase activity, promoting cellular migration, cyclin D1b failed to stabilize p27 KIP1 or inhibit ROCK kinase activity and had no effect on migration. Our findings argue that alternate splicing is an important determinant of the function of cyclin D1 in cellular migration.

  20. Surprising diversity and distribution of spliced leader RNAs in flatworms.

    PubMed

    Davis, R E

    1997-07-01

    Trans-splicing generates the mature 5' ends of certain mRNAs through the addition of a small spliced leader (SL) exon to pre-mRNAs. To search for novel flatworm spliced leaders, degenerate oligonucleotides and 5' RACE [corrected was used to isolate and characterize the 5' terminal sequences of enolase mRNAs in diverse flatworms. Several new spliced leaders and their SL RNA genes were identified, characterized, and compared. All parasitic trematodes examined trans-splice enolase. A primitive polyclad turbellarian, Stylochus zebra, also contains a trans-spliced enolase mRNA. The S. zebra SL is the longest SL yet identified, 51 nucleotides. Comparison of flatworm SLs indicates that they vary significantly in sequence and length. This suggests that neither spliced leader exon sequence nor size is likely to be essential for trans-splicing in flatworms. Flatworm SL RNAs have unusual Sm binding sites with characteristics distinct from other known flatworm snRNA Sm binding sites. Predicted flatworm SL RNA secondary structures show variation exhibiting 2-4 stem loops. Although limited in sequence similarity, phylogenetically conserved regions within the diverse flatworm SL RNAs suggest that they are likely to be derived from a common ancestor and provide information on potentially important SL RNA elements. The identification of a SL in a primitive flatworm suggests that trans-splicing may have been an ancestral feature in the phylum. Representative species of other early and more recent clades within the phylum, however, do not trans-splice enolase, nor do they or representatives of several other flatworm groups, have an SL RNA with a phylogenetically conserved region identified in the current study.

  1. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  2. Motivations for Giving of Alumni Donors, Lapsed Donors and Non-Donors: Implications for Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugano, Emilio Kariuki

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive and causal comparative study sought to identify motivations for alumni donor acquisition and retention in Christian institutions of higher learning. To meet this objective, motivations for alumni donors, lapsed donors, and non-donors were analyzed and compared. Data was collected through an electronic survey of a stratified sample…

  3. A recombination hot spot in the Rh genes revealed by analysis of unrelated donors with the rare D-- phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, T.J.; Poulter, M.; Carritt, B.

    1996-11-01

    We have studied the arrangement of Rh (rhesus) genes in donors who are completely null for the products of one of them, RHCE. We show that five of six homozygous individuals with the so-called Rh D-- phenotype, who express no red-cell antigens of the C/c and E/e series, have rearranged RHCE genes in which internal sequences have been replaced by the corresponding sequences from RHD. Moreover, although there is heterogeneity at the 3{prime} end, the 5{prime} boundary of this chimerism is within the same small interval around exon 2. This interval is characterized by an exceptionally high degree of sequence homology between RHCE and RHD, a high density of dispersed repetitive elements, and the presence of an alternating purine-pyrimidine copolymer tract. We suggest that these features may explain the mechanistic basis for the origin of the rearrangement. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Ratios of Four STAT3 Splice Variants in Human Eosinophils and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Turton, Keren B; Annis, Douglas S; Rui, Lixin; Esnault, Stephane; Mosher, Deane F

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key mediator of leukocyte differentiation and proliferation. The 3' end of STAT3 transcripts is subject to two alternative splicing events. One results in either full-length STAT3α or in STAT3β, which lacks part of the C-terminal transactivation domain. The other is at a tandem donor (5') splice site and results in the codon for Ser-701 being included (S) or excluded (ΔS). Despite the proximity of Ser-701 to the site of activating phosphorylation at Tyr-705, ΔS/S splicing has barely been studied. Sequencing of cDNA from purified eosinophils revealed the presence of four transcripts (S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β) rather than the three reported in publically available databases from which ΔS-β is missing. To gain insight into regulation of the two alternative splicing events, we developed a quantitative(q) PCR protocol to compare transcript ratios in eosinophils in which STAT3 is upregulated by cytokines, activated B cell diffuse large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) cells in which STAT3 is dysregulated, and in germinal center B cell-like DLBCL cells in which it is not. With the exception of one line of activated B cell DLCBL cells, the four variants were found in roughly the same ratios despite differences in total levels of STAT3 transcripts. S-α was the most abundant, followed by S-β. ΔS-α and ΔS-β together comprised 15.6 ± 4.0 % (mean ± SD, n = 21) of the total. The percentage of STAT3β variants that were ΔS was 1.5-fold greater than of STAT3α variants that were ΔS. Inspection of Illumina's "BodyMap" RNA-Seq database revealed that the ΔS variant accounts for 10-26 % of STAT3 transcripts across 16 human tissues, with less variation than three other genes with the identical tandem donor splice site sequence. Thus, it seems likely that all cells contain the S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β variants of STAT3.

  5. Ratios of Four STAT3 Splice Variants in Human Eosinophils and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Turton, Keren B.; Annis, Douglas S.; Rui, Lixin; Esnault, Stephane; Mosher, Deane F.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key mediator of leukocyte differentiation and proliferation. The 3' end of STAT3 transcripts is subject to two alternative splicing events. One results in either full-length STAT3α or in STAT3β, which lacks part of the C-terminal transactivation domain. The other is at a tandem donor (5') splice site and results in the codon for Ser-701 being included (S) or excluded (ΔS). Despite the proximity of Ser-701 to the site of activating phosphorylation at Tyr-705, ΔS/S splicing has barely been studied. Sequencing of cDNA from purified eosinophils revealed the presence of four transcripts (S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β) rather than the three reported in publically available databases from which ΔS-β is missing. To gain insight into regulation of the two alternative splicing events, we developed a quantitative(q) PCR protocol to compare transcript ratios in eosinophils in which STAT3 is upregulated by cytokines, activated B cell diffuse large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) cells in which STAT3 is dysregulated, and in germinal center B cell-like DLBCL cells in which it is not. With the exception of one line of activated B cell DLCBL cells, the four variants were found in roughly the same ratios despite differences in total levels of STAT3 transcripts. S-α was the most abundant, followed by S-β. ΔS-α and ΔS-β together comprised 15.6±4.0 % (mean±SD, n=21) of the total. The percentage of STAT3β variants that were ΔS was 1.5-fold greater than of STAT3α variants that were ΔS. Inspection of Illumina’s “BodyMap” RNA-Seq database revealed that the ΔS variant accounts for 10-26 % of STAT3 transcripts across 16 human tissues, with less variation than three other genes with the identical tandem donor splice site sequence. Thus, it seems likely that all cells contain the S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β variants of STAT3. PMID:25984943

  6. WT1 interacts with the splicing protein RBM4 and regulates its ability to modulate alternative splicing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, M. Andrea; Heinrich, Bettina; Raitskin, Oleg; Adams, David J.; Mangs, Helena; Goy, Christine; Ladomery, Michael; Sperling, Ruth; Stamm, Stefan; Morris, Brian J. . E-mail: brianm@medsci.usyd.edu.au

    2006-10-15

    Wilm's tumor protein 1 (WT1), a protein implicated in various cancers and developmental disorders, consists of two major isoforms: WT1(-KTS), a transcription factor, and WT1(+KTS), a post-transcriptional regulator that binds to RNA and can interact with splicing components. Here we show that WT1 interacts with the novel splicing regulator RBM4. Each protein was found to colocalize in nuclear speckles and to cosediment with supraspliceosomes in glycerol gradients. RBM4 conferred dose-dependent and cell-specific regulation of alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs transcribed from several reporter genes. We found that overexpressed WT1(+KTS) abrogated this effect of RBM4 on splice-site selection, whereas WT1(-KTS) did not. We conclude that the (+KTS) form of WT1 is able to inhibit the effect of RBM4 on alternative splicing.

  7. The High Level of Aberrant Splicing of ISCU in Slow-Twitch Muscle May Involve the Splicing Factor SRSF3

    PubMed Central

    Österman, Lennart; Lindsten, Hans; Holmberg, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary myopathy with lactic acidosis (HML) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by an intronic one-base mutation in the iron-sulfur cluster assembly (ISCU) gene, resulting in aberrant splicing. The incorrectly spliced transcripts contain a 100 or 86 bp intron sequence encoding a non-functional ISCU protein, which leads to defects in several Fe-S containing proteins in the respiratory chain and the TCA cycle. The symptoms in HML are restricted to skeletal muscle, and it has been proposed that this effect is due to higher levels of incorrectly spliced ISCU in skeletal muscle compared with other energy-demanding tissues. In this study, we confirm that skeletal muscle contains the highest levels of incorrect ISCU splice variants compared with heart, brain, liver and kidney using a transgenic mouse model expressing human HML mutated ISCU. We also show that incorrect splicing occurs to a significantly higher extent in the slow-twitch soleus muscle compared with the gastrocnemius and quadriceps. The splicing factor serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3) was identified as a potential candidate for the slow fiber specific regulation of ISCU splicing since this factor was expressed at higher levels in the soleus compared to the gastrocnemius and quadriceps. We identified an interaction between SRSF3 and the ISCU transcript, and by overexpressing SRSF3 in human myoblasts we observed increased levels of incorrectly spliced ISCU, while knockdown of SRSF3 resulted in decreased levels. We therefore suggest that SRSF3 may participate in the regulation of the incorrect splicing of mutant ISCU and may, at least partially, explain the muscle-specific symptoms of HML. PMID:27783661

  8. Splicing and splice factor SRp55 participate in the response to DNA damage by changing isoform ratios of target genes.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Valery; Schmidt, Erin L; Filippova, Maria; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J

    2008-08-15

    Alternative splicing is an important source of protein diversity, and is an established but not yet fully understood mechanism for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. Its regulation is governed by a variety of mechanisms, including variation in the expression levels of splicing factors engaged in spliceosome formation. SRp55 is one of the most ubiquitous splicing factors and one that can be up-regulated by DNA damage in the absence of p53, and we had previously found that depletion of its activity increased resistance to DNA damage in p53-dependant manner. To assess its influence on the splicing patterns of genes involved in apoptosis, we performed splice-specific microarray analysis of cells treated with siRNA specific for this gene. This analysis, backed by RT-PCR verification, identified three genes, KSR1, ZAK and mda7/IL24, which are sensitive to SRp55 depletion. We also analyzed the splice patterns of apoptosis-related genes in p53-deficient U2OS cells following treatment with the genotoxic drug mitomycin C. This analysis revealed that DNA damage resulted in changes in splicing activity that modified the splicing pattern of Fas, a key pro-apoptotic, p53-inducible death receptor. Interestingly, this modification led to an enrichment of the anti-apoptotic soluble Fas isoform, and this secreted isoform was detected in the media surrounding cells subjected to DNA damage. These findings show that modulation of splicing activity in p53-deficient cells during the early response to sub-lethal DNA damage results in a change in the splicing of target genes, thus modifying the cellular response to genotoxic agents.

  9. Blood Donation by Elderly Repeat Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Thomas; Lander-Kox, Jutta; Alt, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Upper age limits for blood donors are intended to protect elderly blood donors from donor reactions. However, due to a lack of data about adverse reactions in elderly blood donors, upper age limits are arbitrary and vary considerably between different countries. Methods Here we present data from 171,231 voluntary repeat whole blood donors beyond the age of 68 years. Results Blood donations from repeat blood donors beyond the age of 68 years increased from 2,114 in 2005 to 38,432 in 2012 (from 0,2% to 4.2% of all whole blood donations). Adverse donor reactions in repeat donors decreased with age and were lower than in the whole group (0.26%), even in donors older than 71 years (0.16%). However, from the age of 68 years, the time to complete recovery after donor reactions increased. Donor deferrals were highest in young blood donors (21.4%), but increased again in elderly blood donors beyond 71 years (12.6%). Conclusion Blood donation by regular repeat blood donors older than 71 years may be safely continued. However, due to a lack of data for donors older than 75 years, blood donation in these donors should be handled with great caution. PMID:25254019

  10. A rare splicing mutation in the PROS1 gene of a Korean patient with type I hereditary protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jonghyeon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Chang, Myung Hee; Choi, Jong-Rak; Yoo, Jong-Ha

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary protein S (PS) deficiency (Gene ID: 5627; MIM # 176880) is a notable risk factor for recurrent venous thrombosis, inherited as an autosomal-dominant trait, either homozygous or heterozygous. It may be caused by point mutations in the gene (PROS1) encoding PS, which contains 15 exons on the chromosome 3q11.2. Only a few point mutations associated with the PROS1 gene in patients with hereditary PS deficiency have been reported. A 60-year-old woman was admitted for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the right lower extremity. Upon coagulation examination, both the free PS antigen level and the total PS antigen level were decreased, so the DNA-PCR products of all 15 exons, including the exon-intron boundaries of the PROS1, gene were directly sequenced. A substitution from guanine to adenine at position +5 of the donor splice site of intron 10 (c.1155+5G>A) was identified. Further familial study was performed, and the patient's older sister was revealed to have the same mutation; she was already taking warfarin due to diagnosed pulmonary thromboembolism. Here we report a G to A transition at position +5 of intron 10 from the splice donor site as a rare case of a patient with type I hereditary PS deficiency in Korea.

  11. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  12. Who is the best alternative allotransplant donor?

    PubMed Central

    Gale, RP; Eapen, M

    2015-01-01

    Assuming that most physicians will chose an HLA-identical sibling as the best allotransplant donor, the question arises who is the best alternative donor when an HLA-identical sibling is unavailable? The most commonly used alternative donors are HLA-identical or -mismatched unrelated donors, HLA-matched or -mismatched umbilical cord blood donor or a related, HLA-haplotype-matched related donors. Each alternative donor option has advantages and disadvantages. We discuss selected aspects of these issues based on data from randomized clinical trials and observational databases. However, because there are limited data to address specific clinical settings, quantification of expert opinion is sometimes needed. PMID:26039206

  13. Dietary uptake efficiency of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl in yellow perch and rainbow trout: Role of dietary and body lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowska, H.; Fisher, S.W.; Dabrowski, K.; Staubus, A.E.

    1999-05-01

    Dietary uptake efficiency ({alpha}) and eliminate rate constants (k{sub d}) of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) were determined in two fish species, yellow perch and rainbow trout, to investigate the influence of dietary and body lipid levels on bioaccumulation. Groups of juvenile fish with significant differences in percent body lipid were fed with a low-fat(LF) or high-fat(HF) diet spiked with 5 or 50 ppb of {sup 14}C-HCBP for 32 d. Thereafter, fish were fed an uncontaminated LF or HF diet to allow for elimination of HCBP. Feeding and growth rates were quantified. There were eight fish lipid-dietary lipid-HCBP concentration exposure combinations for each species. Four fish from each exposure were collected at the beginning of the study and at 10--17-d intervals during exposure and elimination periods for lipid and {sup 14}C-HCBP analysis. The {alpha} values ranged from 74 to 95% in yellow perch and from 79 to 99% in rainbow trout. The greatest {alpha} values, of 95 to 99%, were found in fish given diets with 5 ppb HCBP. Uptake of HCBP was influenced by both dietary and body lipids and depended on the current status of both lipid pools. The elimination rate constants were in the range of 0.000 to 0.004 d{sup {minus}1} in yellow perch and 0.003 to 0.010 d{sup {minus}1} in rainbow trout. No significant differences in elimination rate constants between HF and LF fish groups were found. In fish on a constant dietary lipid regime, the k{sub d} values tended to be less in HF than in LF fish. However, in fish groups offered diets with a change in lipid regime. The k{sub d} tended to be greater. Lipid x time interactions in the HF and LF fish groups undergoing a change in lipid regime indicated that the k{sub d} values, like the {alpha} values, were influenced by both lipid pools. Changes in elimination rates due to dietary/body lipid status impacted BAFs more strongly than changes in uptake efficiencies. The BAFs were in the range of 1.11 to 2

  14. Splicing analysis of unclassified variants in COL2A1 and COL11A1 identifies deep intronic pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Allan J; McNinch, Annie; Whittaker, Joanne; Treacy, Becky; Oakhill, Kim; Poulson, Arabella; Snead, Martin P

    2012-01-01

    UK NHS diagnostic service sequence analysis of genes generally examines and reports on variations within a designated region 5′ and 3′ of each exon, typically 30 bp up and downstream. However, because of the degenerate nature of the splice sites, intronic variants outside the AG and GT dinucleotides of the acceptor and donor splice sites (ASS and DSS) are most often classified as being of unknown clinical significance, unless there is some functional evidence of their pathogenicity. It is now becoming clear that mutations deep within introns can also interfere with normal processing of pre-mRNA and result in pathogenic effects on the mature transcript. In diagnostic laboratories, these deep intronic variants most often fall outside of the regions analysed and so are rarely reported. With the likelihood that next generation sequencing will identify more of these unclassified variants, it will become important to perform additional studies to determine the pathogenicity of such sequence anomalies. Here, we analyse variants detected in either COL2A1 or COL11A1 in patients with Stickler syndrome. These have been analysed both in silico and functionally using either RNA isolated from the patient's cells or, more commonly, minigenes as splicing reporters. We show that deep intronic mutations are not a rare occurrence, including one variant that results in multiple transcripts, where both de novo donor and ASS are created by the mutation. Another variant produces transcripts that result in either haploinsufficiency or a dominant negative effect, potentially modifying the disease phenotype. PMID:22189268

  15. Peptidic tools applied to redirect alternative splicing events.

    PubMed

    Nancy, Martínez-Montiel; Nora, Rosas-Murrieta; Rebeca, Martínez-Contreras

    2015-05-01

    Peptides are versatile and attractive biomolecules that can be applied to modulate genetic mechanisms like alternative splicing. In this process, a single transcript yields different mature RNAs leading to the production of protein isoforms with diverse or even antagonistic functions. During splicing events, errors can be caused either by mutations present in the genome or by defects or imbalances in regulatory protein factors. In any case, defects in alternative splicing have been related to several genetic diseases including muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer's disease and cancer from almost every origin. One of the most effective approaches to redirect alternative splicing events has been to attach cell-penetrating peptides to oligonucleotides that can modulate a single splicing event and restore correct gene expression. Here, we summarize how natural existing and bioengineered peptides have been applied over the last few years to regulate alternative splicing and genetic expression. Under different genetic and cellular backgrounds, peptides have been shown to function as potent vehicles for splice correction, and their therapeutic benefits have reached clinical trials and patenting stages, emphasizing the use of regulatory peptides as an exciting therapeutic tool for the treatment of different genetic diseases.

  16. Prediction and assessment of splicing alterations: implications for clinical testing.

    PubMed

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Couch, Fergus J; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Radice, Paolo; Sinilnikova, Olga M

    2008-11-01

    Sequence variants that may result in splicing alterations are a particular class of inherited variants for which consequences can be more readily assessed, using a combination of bioinformatic prediction methods and in vitro assays. There is also a general agreement that a variant would invariably be considered pathogenic on the basis of convincing evidence that it results in transcript(s) carrying a premature stop codon or an in-frame deletion disrupting known functional domain(s). This commentary discusses current practices used to assess the clinical significance of this class of variants, provides suggestions to improve assessment, and highlights the issues involved in routine assessment of potential splicing aberrations. We conclude that classification of sequence variants that may alter splicing is greatly enhanced by supporting in vitro analysis. Additional studies that assess large numbers of variants for induction of splicing aberrations and exon skipping are needed to define the contribution of splicing/exon skipping to cancer and disease. These studies will also provide the impetus for development of algorithms that better predict splicing patterns. To facilitate variant classification and development of more specific bioinformatic tools, we call for the deposition of all laboratory data from splicing analyses into national and international databases. PMID:18951448

  17. An alternative splicing program promotes adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vernia, Santiago; Edwards, Yvonne JK; Han, Myoung Sook; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Kim, Jason K; Davis, Roger J

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the complexity of the transcriptome and controls isoform-specific gene expression. Whether alternative splicing contributes to metabolic regulation is largely unknown. Here we investigated the contribution of alternative splicing to the development of diet-induced obesity. We found that obesity-induced changes in adipocyte gene expression include alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Bioinformatics analysis associated part of this alternative splicing program with sequence specific NOVA splicing factors. This conclusion was confirmed by studies of mice with NOVA deficiency in adipocytes. Phenotypic analysis of the NOVA-deficient mice demonstrated increased adipose tissue thermogenesis and improved glycemia. We show that NOVA proteins mediate a splicing program that suppresses adipose tissue thermogenesis. Together, these data provide quantitative analysis of gene expression at exon-level resolution in obesity and identify a novel mechanism that contributes to the regulation of adipose tissue function and the maintenance of normal glycemia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17672.001 PMID:27635635

  18. Evolution of a tissue-specific splicing network.

    PubMed

    Taliaferro, J Matthew; Alvarez, Nehemiah; Green, Richard E; Blanchette, Marco; Rio, Donald C

    2011-03-15

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) is a strategy employed by most eukaryotes to increase transcript and proteomic diversity. Many metazoan splicing factors are members of multigene families, with each member having different functions. How these highly related proteins evolve unique properties has been unclear. Here we characterize the evolution and function of a new Drosophila splicing factor, termed LS2 (Large Subunit 2), that arose from a gene duplication event of dU2AF(50), the large subunit of the highly conserved heterodimeric general splicing factor U2AF (U2-associated factor). The quickly evolving LS2 gene has diverged from the splicing-promoting, ubiquitously expressed dU2AF(50) such that it binds a markedly different RNA sequence, acts as a splicing repressor, and is preferentially expressed in testes. Target transcripts of LS2 are also enriched for performing testes-related functions. We therefore propose a path for the evolution of a new splicing factor in Drosophila that regulates specific pre-mRNAs and contributes to transcript diversity in a tissue-specific manner.

  19. Aberrant and alternative splicing in skeletal system disease.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xin; Tang, Liling

    2013-10-01

    The main function of skeletal system is to support the body and help movement. A variety of factors can lead to skeletal system disease, including age, exercise, and of course genetic makeup and expression. Pre-mRNA splicing plays a crucial role in gene expression, by creating multiple protein variants with different biological functions. The recent studies show that several skeletal system diseases are related to pre-mRNA splicing. This review focuses on the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease. On the one hand, splice site mutation that leads to aberrant splicing often causes genetic skeletal system disease, like COL1A1, SEDL and LRP5. On the other hand, alternative splicing without genomic mutation may generate some marker protein isoforms, for example, FN, VEGF and CD44. Therefore, understanding the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease will aid in uncovering the mechanism of disease and contribute to the future development of gene therapy. PMID:23800666

  20. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413]. PMID:27222125

  1. Donor substrate regulation of transketolase.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga A; Meshalkina, Ludmilla E; Golbik, Ralph; Hübner, Gerhard; Kochetov, German A

    2004-11-01

    The influence of substrates on the interaction of apotransketolase with thiamin diphosphate was investigated in the presence of magnesium ions. It was shown that the donor substrates, but not the acceptor substrates, enhance the affinity of the coenzyme either to only one active center of transketolase or to both active centers, but to different degrees in each, resulting in a negative cooperativity for coenzyme binding. In the absence of donor substrate, negative cooperativity is not observed. The donor substrate did not affect the interaction of the apoenzyme with the inactive coenzyme analogue, N3'-pyridyl-thiamin diphosphate. The influence of the donor substrate on the coenzyme-apotransketolase interaction was predicted as a result of formation of the transketolase reaction intermediate 2-(alpha,beta-dihydroxyethyl)-thiamin diphosphate, which exhibited a higher affinity to the enzyme than thiamin diphosphate. The enhancement of thiamin diphosphate's affinity to apotransketolase in the presence of donor substrate is probably one of the mechanisms underlying the substrate-affected transketolase regulation at low coenzyme concentrations.

  2. Inappropriate splicing of a chimeric gene containing a large internal exon results in exon skipping in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Davisson, R L; Nuutinen, N; Coleman, S T; Sigmund, C D

    1996-10-15

    We generated transgenic mice containing a chimeric construct consisting of the alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain (alpha cMHC) promoter and the human renin (hRen) gene in order to target hRen synthesis specifically to the heart. The construct consisted of three segments: (i) an alpha cMHC DNA segment including 4.5 kb of 5' flanking DNA and an additional 1.1 kb of genomic DNA encompassing exons I-III (non-coding) and the first two introns; (ii) a partial hRen cDNA consisting of exons I-VI; and (iii) a hRen genomic segment containing exons VII through IX, their intervening introns, and 400 bp of 3' flanking DNA. This results in the formation of a 909 bp internal fusion exon consisting of alpha cMHC, polylinker, and hRen sequences. Despite the presence of splice acceptor and donor sites bracketing this exon, transcription of this transgene resulted in a major alternatively spliced mRNA lacking the exon and therefore a majority of the hRen coding sequence. Cloning and sequencing of RT-PCR products from several heart samples from two independent transgenic lines confirmed accurate and faithful splicing of alpha cMHC exon II to hRen exon VII thus bypassing the internal fusion exon. All other exons (alpha cMHC exons I and II and hRen exons VII, VIII and IX) were appropriately spliced. These results are consistent with the hypothesis on exon definition which states that internal exons have a size limitation. Moreover, the results demonstrate that transgenes present in the genome at independent insertion sites and in either a single copy or multiple copies can be subject to exon skipping. The implications for transgene design will be discussed.

  3. Factors influencing alternative splice site utilization in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, X Y; Manley, J L

    1987-01-01

    To study factors that influence the choice of alternative pre-mRNA splicing pathways, we introduced plasmids expressing either wild-type or mutated simian virus 40 (SV40) early regions into tissue culture cells and then measured the quantities of small-t and large-T RNAs produced. One important element controlling splice site selection was found to be the size of the intron removed in the production of small-t mRNA; expansion of this intron (from 66 to 77 or more nucleotides) resulted in a substantial increase in the amount of small-t mRNA produced relative to large-T mRNA. This suggests that in the normal course of SV40 early pre-mRNA processing, large-T splicing is at a competitive advantage relative to small-t splicing because of the small size of the latter intron. Several additional features of the pre-mRNA that can influence splice site selection were also identified by analyzing the effects of mutations containing splice site duplications. These include the strengths of competing 5' splice sites and the relative positions of splice sites in the pre-mRNA. Finally, we showed that the ratio of small-t to large-T mRNA was 10 to 15-fold greater in human 293 cells than in HeLa cells or other mammalian cell types. These results suggest the existence of cell-specific trans-acting factors that can dramatically alter the pattern of splice site selection in a pre-mRNA. Images PMID:3029566

  4. Estimation of alternative splicing variability in human populations

    PubMed Central

    Gonzàlez-Porta, Mar; Calvo, Miquel; Sammeth, Michael; Guigó, Roderic

    2012-01-01

    DNA arrays have been widely used to perform transcriptome-wide analysis of gene expression, and many methods have been developed to measure gene expression variability and to compare gene expression between conditions. Because RNA-seq is also becoming increasingly popular for transcriptome characterization, the possibility exists for further quantification of individual alternative transcript isoforms, and therefore for estimating the relative ratios of alternative splice forms within a given gene. Changes in splicing ratios, even without changes in overall gene expression, may have important phenotypic effects. Here we have developed statistical methodology to measure variability in splicing ratios within conditions, to compare it between conditions, and to identify genes with condition-specific splicing ratios. Furthermore, we have developed methodology to deconvolute the relative contribution of variability in gene expression versus variability in splicing ratios to the overall variability of transcript abundances. As a proof of concept, we have applied this methodology to estimates of transcript abundances obtained from RNA-seq experiments in lymphoblastoid cells from Caucasian and Yoruban individuals. We have found that protein-coding genes exhibit low splicing variability within populations, with many genes exhibiting constant ratios across individuals. When comparing these two populations, we have found that up to 10% of the studied protein-coding genes exhibit population-specific splicing ratios. We estimate that ∼60% of the total variability observed in the abundance of transcript isoforms can be explained by variability in transcription. A large fraction of the remaining variability can likely result from variability in splicing. Finally, we also detected that variability in splicing is uncommon without variability in transcription. PMID:22113879

  5. Functional roles of alternative splicing factors in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Cieply, Benjamin; Carstens, Russ P

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an important mechanism used to generate greater transcriptomic and proteomic diversity from a finite genome. Nearly all human gene transcripts are alternatively spliced and can produce protein isoforms with divergent and even antagonistic properties that impact cell functions. Many AS events are tightly regulated in a cell-type or tissue-specific manner, and at different developmental stages. AS is regulated by RNA-binding proteins, including cell- or tissue-specific splicing factors. In the past few years, technological advances have defined genome-wide programs of AS regulated by increasing numbers of splicing factors. These splicing regulatory networks (SRNs) consist of transcripts that encode proteins that function in coordinated and related processes that impact the development and phenotypes of different cell types. As such, it is increasingly recognized that disruption of normal programs of splicing regulated by different splicing factors can lead to human diseases. We will summarize examples of diseases in which altered expression or function of splicing regulatory proteins has been implicated in human disease pathophysiology. As the role of AS continues to be unveiled in human disease and disease risk, it is hoped that further investigations into the functions of numerous splicing factors and their regulated targets will enable the development of novel therapies that are directed at specific AS events as well as the biological pathways they impact. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:311–326. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1276 For further resources related to this article, please visit the http://wires.wiley.com/remdoi.cgi?doi=10.1002/wrna.1276WIREs website. Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. PMID:25630614

  6. PASTA: splice junction identification from RNA-Sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Next generation transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) is emerging as a powerful experimental tool for the study of alternative splicing and its regulation, but requires ad-hoc analysis methods and tools. PASTA (Patterned Alignments for Splicing and Transcriptome Analysis) is a splice junction detection algorithm specifically designed for RNA-Seq data, relying on a highly accurate alignment strategy and on a combination of heuristic and statistical methods to identify exon-intron junctions with high accuracy. Results Comparisons against TopHat and other splice junction prediction software on real and simulated datasets show that PASTA exhibits high specificity and sensitivity, especially at lower coverage levels. Moreover, PASTA is highly configurable and flexible, and can therefore be applied in a wide range of analysis scenarios: it is able to handle both single-end and paired-end reads, it does not rely on the presence of canonical splicing signals, and it uses organism-specific regression models to accurately identify junctions. Conclusions PASTA is a highly efficient and sensitive tool to identify splicing junctions from RNA-Seq data. Compared to similar programs, it has the ability to identify a higher number of real splicing junctions, and provides highly annotated output files containing detailed information about their location and characteristics. Accurate junction data in turn facilitates the reconstruction of the splicing isoforms and the analysis of their expression levels, which will be performed by the remaining modules of the PASTA pipeline, still under development. Use of PASTA can therefore enable the large-scale investigation of transcription and alternative splicing. PMID:23557086

  7. Monitoring Alternative Splicing Changes in Arabidopsis Circadian Clock Genes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Fuller, John; Calixto, Cristiane P G; McNicol, Jim; Booth, Clare; Brown, John W S; Staiger, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control makes an important contribution to circadian regulation of gene expression. In higher plants, alternative splicing is particularly prevalent upon abiotic and biotic stress and in the circadian system. Here we describe in detail a high-resolution reverse transcription-PCR based panel (HR RT-PCR) to monitor alternative splicing events. The use of the panel allows the quantification of changes in the proportion of splice isoforms between different samples, e.g., different time points, different tissues, genotypes, ecotypes, or treatments. PMID:26867620

  8. Diversity of teleost leukocyte molecules: role of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Maisey, Kevin; Imarai, Mónica

    2011-11-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism of gene expression control that also produces a large proteome from a limited number of genes. In the immune system of mammals, numerous relevant genes have been found to undergo alternative splicing that contributes to the complexity of immune response. An increasing number of reports have recently indicated that alternative splicing also occurs in other vertebrates, such as fish. In this review we summarize the general features of such molecular events in cytokines and leukocyte co-receptors and their contribution to diversity and regulation of fish leukocytes. PMID:20723604

  9. Mass fusion splicing machine for ribbon-type optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaka, K.; Yanagi, T.; Asano, Y.

    1986-11-01

    A mass fusion splicer was designed and manufactured. Using this splicer, mass fusion splicing of optical fiber ribbons was investigated. Ten-fiber ribbon tapes were cut and spliced at an average loss of 0.08 dB for GI and 0.24 dB for SM. They were reinforced by heat-shrinkable tubes with EVA adhesive improved for ribbon tape. An average tensile strength until break was about 3.2 kg soon after splice and about 8.3 kg after reinforcement.

  10. Genome-wide profiling of alternative splicing in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Mitchell K.P.; Esiri, Margaret M.; Tan, Michelle G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a highly regulated process which generates transcriptome and proteome diversity through the skipping or inclusion of exons within gene loci. Identification of aberrant alternative splicing associated with human diseases has become feasible with the development of new genomic technologies and powerful bioinformatics. We have previously reported genome-wide gene alterations in the neocortex of a well-characterized cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and matched elderly controls using a commercial exon microarray platform [1]. Here, we provide detailed description of analyses aimed at identifying differential alternative splicing events associated with AD. PMID:26484111

  11. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications.

  12. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications. PMID:18160357

  13. The Resistance and Strength of Soft Solder Splices between Conductors in MICE Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Pan, Heng; Green, Michael A; Dietderich, Dan; Gartner, T. E.; Higley, Hugh C; Mentink, M.; Xu, FengYu; Trillaud, F.; Liu, X. K.; Wang, Li; Zheng, S. X.; Tam, D.G.

    2010-08-03

    Two of the three types of MICE magnets will have splices within their coils. The MICE coupling coils may have as many as fifteen one-meter long splices within them. Each of the MICE focusing coils may have a couple of 0.25-meter long conductor splices. Equations for the calculation of resistance of soldered lap splices of various types are presented. This paper presents resistance measurements of soldered lap splices of various lengths. Measured splice resistance is shown for one-meter long splices as a function of the fabrication method. Another important consideration is the strength of the splices. The measured breaking stress of splices of various lengths is presented in this paper. Tin-lead solders and tin-silver solders were used for the splices that were tested. From the data given in this report, the authors recommend that the use of lead free solders be avoided for low temperature coils.

  14. Donor criteria in hepatic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jonas, S; Bechstein, W O; Keck, H; Lemmens, H P; Blumhardt, G; Neuhaus, P

    1994-01-01

    The early outcome of 201 liver grafts transplanted consecutively between September 1988 and November 1991 was investigated retrospectively. Donors were categorized according to their hospitalization periods in an intensive care unit (ICU) prior to harvesting, their causes of death, and the variables generally believed to be critical in liver donation, such as arterial hypotension (n = 69; 34.3%), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 20; 9.9%), elevated serum-aminotransferases (s-AT) (n = 11; 5.5%), or an age over 50 years (n = 16; 8.0%). Ninety-one donors (45.3%) spent less than 24 h in an ICU; 29 donors (14.4%) and 14 donors (7.0%) had hospitalization periods generally considered critical of 4-6 days and more than 6 days, respectively. The most common causes of death were subarachnoidal bleeding (n = 70; 34.8%), isolated head injuries (n = 68; 33.8%), and polytraumata (n = 33; 16.4%). The postischemic hepatocellular damage was evaluated comparing peak post-transplant s-AT, which did not differ significantly between groups; nor did donor and recipient ages or cold ischemia times. Fourteen grafts (7.0%) showed a reversible preservation injury presenting with post-transplant s-AT elevated above 2000 IU/l. Five cases (2.5%) of a primary non-functioning graft (PNF) underwent early retransplantation successfully. Serum-aminotransferases (AST: 4944 +/- 2280 IU/l; ATL: 3186 +/- 1918 IU/l) were significantly (P < 0.01) elevated as compared to primary functioning grafts (AST: 699 +/- 935 IU/l; ALT: 620 +/- 701 IU/l). The donor structure of both groups reflected the distribution of variables in the entire collective. No significant overrepresentations were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Splicing changes in SMA mouse motoneurons and SMN-depleted neuroblastoma cells: Evidence for involvement of splicing regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Qing; Kayikci, Melis; Odermatt, Philipp; Meyer, Kathrin; Michels, Olivia; Saxena, Smita; Ule, Jernej; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletions or mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The second gene copy, SMN2, produces some, but not enough, functional SMN protein. SMN is essential to assemble small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that form the spliceosome. However, it is not clear whether SMA is caused by defects in this function that could lead to splicing changes in all tissues, or by the impairment of an additional, less well characterized, but motoneuron-specific SMN function. We addressed the first possibility by exon junction microarray analysis of motoneurons (MNs) isolated by laser capture microdissection from a severe SMA mouse model. This revealed changes in multiple U2-dependent splicing events. Moreover, splicing appeared to be more strongly affected in MNs than in other cells. By testing mutiple genes in a model of progressive SMN depletion in NB2a neuroblastoma cells, we obtained evidence that U2-dependent splicing changes occur earlier than U12-dependent ones. As several of these changes affect genes coding for splicing regulators, this may acerbate the splicing response induced by low SMN levels and induce secondary waves of splicing alterations. PMID:25692239

  16. [The safety of blood donors].

    PubMed

    Courchelle, J; Baudry, C; Bourboul, M-C; Coudurier, N

    2011-04-01

    For a long time, safety has been patient-centred and taken for granted. Indeed, it needed a dramatic accident and the study of post-donation information for the question to be looked into again. However, under various statutory, organizational aspects and the professionalization of the staffs, safety has always accompanied the donor throughout its course of donation. Self-sufficiency is, certainly, the first mission of the Établissement Français du Sang: while we have to supply patients with sufficient blood products complying with quality criteria, we must not however forget the essential respect for the safety of the donor.

  17. Maps, codes, and sequence elements: can we predict the protein output from an alternatively spliced locus?

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shalini; Black, Douglas L

    2006-11-22

    Alternative splicing choices are governed by splicing regulatory protein interactions with splicing silencer and enhancer elements present in the pre-mRNA. However, the prediction of these choices from genomic sequence is difficult, in part because the regulators can act as either enhancers or silencers. A recent study describes how for a particular neuronal splicing regulatory protein, Nova, the location of its binding sites is highly predictive of the protein's effect on an exon's splicing.

  18. Binding of a candidate splice regulator to a calcitonin-specific splice enhancer regulates calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Timothy P; Tran, Quincy; Roesser, James R

    2003-01-27

    The calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pre-mRNA is alternatively processed in a tissue-specific manner leading to the production of calcitonin mRNA in thyroid C cells and CGRP mRNA in neurons. A candidate calcitonin/CGRP splice regulator (CSR) isolated from rat brain was shown to inhibit calcitonin-specific splicing in vitro. CSR specifically binds to two regions in the calcitonin-specific exon 4 RNA previously demonstrated to function as a bipartate exonic splice enhancer (ESE). The two regions, A and B element, are necessary for inclusion of exon 4 into calcitonin mRNA. A novel RNA footprinting method based on the UV cross-linking assay was used to define the site of interaction between CSR and B element RNA. Base changes at the CSR binding site prevented CSR binding to B element RNA and CSR was unable to inhibit in vitro splicing of pre-mRNAs containing the mutated CSR binding site. When expressed in cells that normally produce predominantly CGRP mRNA, a calcitonin/CGRP gene containing the mutated CSR binding site expressed predominantly calcitonin mRNA. These observations demonstrate that CSR binding to the calcitonin-specific ESE regulates calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA splicing.

  19. Hierarchy of Certain Types of DNA Splicing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Yuhani; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Goode, T. Elizabeth; Mahmud, Mazri; Heng, Fong Wan

    A Head splicing system (H-system)consists of a finite set of strings (words) written over a finite alphabet, along with a finite set of rules that acts on the strings by iterated cutting and pasting to create a splicing language. Any interpretation that is aligned with Tom Head's original idea is one in which the strings represent double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) and the rules represent the cutting and pasting action of restriction enzymes and ligase, respectively. A new way of writing the rule sets is adopted so as to make the biological interpretation transparent. This approach is used in a formal language- theoretic analysis of the hierarchy of certain classes of splicing systems, namely simple, semi-simple and semi-null splicing systems. The relations between such systems and their associated languages are given as theorems, corollaries and counterexamples.

  20. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  1. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  2. Photograph of John Fedak, marine coppersmith, brazing a funner splice ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photograph of John Fedak, marine coppersmith, brazing a funner splice in the process of making a funnel. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pipe Coppersmith Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks.

  4. 3. Detail of beam splice and column capital on the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Detail of beam splice and column capital on the second floor of the Cloth Room Building/Old Bleach House, Monadnock Mills. Beam and column edges are chamfered. - Monadnock Mills, 15 Water Street, Claremont, Sullivan County, NH

  5. Network of evolutionary processors with splicing rules and permitting context.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ashish; Krithivasan, Kamala

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we consider networks of evolutionary processors with splicing rules and permitting context (NEPPS) as language generating and computational devices. Such a network consists of several processors placed on the nodes of a virtual graph and are able to perform splicing (which is a biologically motivated operation) on the words present in that node, according to the splicing rules present there. Before applying the splicing operation on words, we check for the presence of certain symbols (permitting context) in the strings on which the rule is applied. Each node is associated with an input and output filter. When the filters are based on random context conditions, one gets the computational power of Turing machines with networks of size two. We also show how these networks can be used to solve NP-complete problems in linear time. PMID:17045388

  6. Single-Donor Leukophoretic Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    Leukocyte separation-and-retrieval device utilizes granulocyte and monocyte property of leukoadhesion to glass surfaces as basis of their separation from whole blood. Device is used with single donor technique and has application in biological and chemical processing, veterinary research and clinical care.

  7. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of TCF7L2

    PubMed Central

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Welch, Cullan; Hansson, Ola; Adhikari, Neeta; Scott, Laura J.; Usher, Nicolle; Tong, Maurine; Sprau, Andrew; Swift, Amy; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Erdos, Michael R.; He, Zhi; Saxena, Richa; Harmon, Brennan; Kotova, Olga; Hoffman, Eric P.; Altshuler, David; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S.; Hall, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Common variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been identified as the strongest genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the mechanisms by which these non-coding variants increase risk for T2D are not well-established. We used 13 expression assays to survey mRNA expression of multiple TCF7L2 splicing forms in up to 380 samples from eight types of human tissue (pancreas, pancreatic islets, colon, liver, monocytes, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines) and observed a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing. We tested whether the expression of TCF7L2 splicing forms was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7903146 and rs12255372, located within introns 3 and 4 of the gene and most strongly associated with T2D. Expression of two splicing forms was lower in pancreatic islets with increasing counts of T2D-associated alleles of the SNPs: a ubiquitous splicing form (P = 0.018 for rs7903146 and P = 0.020 for rs12255372) and a splicing form found in pancreatic islets, pancreas and colon but not in other tissues tested here (P = 0.009 for rs12255372 and P = 0.053 for rs7903146). Expression of this form in glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets correlated with expression of proinsulin (r2 = 0.84–0.90, P < 0.00063). In summary, we identified a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of TCF7L2. After adjustment for multiple tests, no association between expression of TCF7L2 in eight types of human tissue samples and T2D-associated genetic variants remained significant. Alternative splicing of TCF7L2 in pancreatic islets warrants future studies. GenBank Accession Numbers: FJ010164–FJ010174. PMID:19602480

  8. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of TCF7L2.

    PubMed

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Welch, Cullan; Hansson, Ola; Adhikari, Neeta; Scott, Laura J; Usher, Nicolle; Tong, Maurine; Sprau, Andrew; Swift, Amy; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Erdos, Michael R; He, Zhi; Saxena, Richa; Harmon, Brennan; Kotova, Olga; Hoffman, Eric P; Altshuler, David; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S; Hall, Jennifer L

    2009-10-15

    Common variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been identified as the strongest genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the mechanisms by which these non-coding variants increase risk for T2D are not well-established. We used 13 expression assays to survey mRNA expression of multiple TCF7L2 splicing forms in up to 380 samples from eight types of human tissue (pancreas, pancreatic islets, colon, liver, monocytes, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines) and observed a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing. We tested whether the expression of TCF7L2 splicing forms was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7903146 and rs12255372, located within introns 3 and 4 of the gene and most strongly associated with T2D. Expression of two splicing forms was lower in pancreatic islets with increasing counts of T2D-associated alleles of the SNPs: a ubiquitous splicing form (P = 0.018 for rs7903146 and P = 0.020 for rs12255372) and a splicing form found in pancreatic islets, pancreas and colon but not in other tissues tested here (P = 0.009 for rs12255372 and P = 0.053 for rs7903146). Expression of this form in glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets correlated with expression of proinsulin (r(2) = 0.84-0.90, P < 0.00063). In summary, we identified a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of TCF7L2. After adjustment for multiple tests, no association between expression of TCF7L2 in eight types of human tissue samples and T2D-associated genetic variants remained significant. Alternative splicing of TCF7L2 in pancreatic islets warrants future studies. GenBank Accession Numbers: FJ010164-FJ010174. PMID:19602480

  9. The landscape of alternative splicing in cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Peng; Wang, Dan; Wu, Jun; Yang, Junjun; Ren, Tong; Zhu, Baoli; Xiang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) is a key regulatory mechanism in protein synthesis and proteome diversity. In this study, we identified alternative splicing events in four pairs of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) and adjacent nontumor tissues using RNA sequencing. Methods The transcripts of the four paired samples were thoroughly analyzed by RNA sequencing. SpliceMap software was used to detect the splicing junctions. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis was conducted to detect the alternative spliced genes-related signal pathways. The alternative spliced genes were validated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results There were 35 common alternative spliced genes in the four CSCC samples; they were novel and CSCC specific. Sixteen pathways were significantly enriched (P<0.05). One novel 5′AS site in the KLHDC7B gene, encoding kelch domain-containing 7B, and an exon-skipping site in the SYCP2 gene, encoding synaptonemal complex 2, were validated by RT-PCR. The KLHDC7B gene with 5′AS was found in 67.5% (27/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with cellular differentiation and tumor size. The exon-skipping site of the SYCP2 gene was found in 35.0% (14/40) of CSCC samples and was significantly related with depth of cervical invasion. Conclusion The KLHDC7B and the SYCP2 genes with alternative spliced events might be involved in the development and progression of CSCC and could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of CSCC. PMID:25565867

  10. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  11. Purifying Selection on Exonic Splice Enhancers in Intronless Genes

    PubMed Central

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2016-01-01

    Exonic splice enhancers (ESEs) are short nucleotide motifs, enriched near exon ends, that enhance the recognition of the splice site and thus promote splicing. Are intronless genes under selection to avoid these motifs so as not to attract the splicing machinery to an mRNA that should not be spliced, thereby preventing the production of an aberrant transcript? Consistent with this possibility, we find that ESEs in putative recent retrocopies are at a higher density and evolving faster than those in other intronless genes, suggesting that they are being lost. Moreover, intronless genes are less dense in putative ESEs than intron-containing ones. However, this latter difference is likely due to the skewed base composition of intronless sequences, a skew that is in line with the general GC richness of few exon genes. Indeed, after controlling for such biases, we find that both intronless and intron-containing genes are denser in ESEs than expected by chance. Importantly, nucleotide-controlled analysis of evolutionary rates at synonymous sites in ESEs indicates that the ESEs in intronless genes are under purifying selection in both human and mouse. We conclude that on the loss of introns, some but not all, ESE motifs are lost, the remainder having functions beyond a role in splice promotion. These results have implications for the design of intronless transgenes and for understanding the causes of selection on synonymous sites. PMID:26802218

  12. A novel splice site mutation of CDHR1 in a consanguineous Israeli Christian Arab family segregating autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ben; Chervinsky, Elena; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Shalev, Stavit A.; Briscoe, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the genetic basis for autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy in a consanguineous Israeli Christian Arab family. Methods Patients underwent a detailed ophthalmic examination, including funduscopy, electroretinography (ERG), visual field testing, and optical coherence tomography. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping using a single nucleotide polymorphism array was performed to identify homozygous regions shared between the two affected individuals. Mutation screening of the underlying gene was performed with direct sequencing. In silico analysis was used to predict the effect of the mutation on splicing. Results The family included two affected individuals. Clinical findings included progressive deterioration of visual acuity, photophobia, defective color vision, loss of central visual fields, pigmentary deposits localized mainly in the peripheral retina, a thinned and atrophic macular region, retinal vessel attenuation, absent ERG cone responses, and reduced ERG rod responses. Homozygosity mapping revealed several homozygous intervals shared among the affected individuals. One, a 12Mb interval on chromosome 10, included the CDHR1 gene. Direct sequencing revealed a single base transversion, c.1485+2T>G, located in the conserved donor splice site of Intron 13. This mutation cosegregated with the disease in the family, and was not detected in 208 Israeli Christian Arab control chromosomes. In silico analysis predicted that this mutation eliminates the Intron 13 donor splice site. Conclusions Only three distinct pathogenic mutations of CDHR1 have been reported to date in patients with autosomal recessive retinal degeneration. Here we report a novel splice site mutation of CDHR1, c.1485+2T>G, underlying autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy in a consanguineous Israeli Christian Arab family. This report expands the spectrum of pathogenic mutations of the CDHR1 gene. PMID:23233793

  13. Identification of a splicing enhancer in MLH1 using COMPARE, a new assay for determination of relative RNA splicing efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dong-Qing; Mattox, William

    2006-01-15

    Exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) are sequences that facilitate recognition of splice sites and prevent exon-skipping. Because ESEs are often embedded within protein-coding sequences, alterations in them can also often be interpreted as nonsense, missense or silent mutations. To correctly interpret exonic mutations and their roles in diseases, it is important to develop strategies that identify ESE mutations. Potential ESEs can be found computationally in many exons but it has proven difficult to predict whether a given mutation will have effects on splicing based on sequence alone. Here, we describe a flexible in vitro method that can be used to functionally compare the effects of multiple sequence variants on ESE activity in a single in vitro splicing reaction. We have applied this method in parallel with conventional splicing assays to test for a splicing enhancer in exon 17 of the human MLH1 gene. Point mutations associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have previously been found to correlate with exon-skipping in both lymphocytes and tumors from patients. We show that sequences from this exon can replace an ESE from the mouse IgM gene to support RNA splicing in HeLa nuclear extracts. ESE activity was reduced by HNPCC point mutations in codon 659, indicating that their primary effect is on splicing. Surprisingly, the strongest enhancer function mapped to a different region of the exon upstream of this codon. Together, our results indicate that HNPCC point mutations in codon 659 affect an auxillary element that augments the enhancer function to ensure exon inclusion.

  14. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 359 359 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  15. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  16. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk regulated cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The C-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk regulated cell proliferation. PMID:24452013

  17. The alternative splicing program of differentiated smooth muscle cells involves concerted non-productive splicing of post-transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Llorian, Miriam; Gooding, Clare; Bellora, Nicolas; Hallegger, Martina; Buckroyd, Adrian; Wang, Xiao; Rajgor, Dipen; Kayikci, Melis; Feltham, Jack; Ule, Jernej; Eyras, Eduardo; Smith, Christopher W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a key component of gene expression programs that drive cellular differentiation. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are important in the function of a number of physiological systems; however, investigation of SMC AS has been restricted to a handful of events. We profiled transcriptome changes in mouse de-differentiating SMCs and observed changes in hundreds of AS events. Exons included in differentiated cells were characterized by particularly weak splice sites and by upstream binding sites for Polypyrimidine Tract Binding protein (PTBP1). Consistent with this, knockdown experiments showed that that PTBP1 represses many smooth muscle specific exons. We also observed coordinated splicing changes predicted to downregulate the expression of core components of U1 and U2 snRNPs, splicing regulators and other post-transcriptional factors in differentiated cells. The levels of cognate proteins were lower or similar in differentiated compared to undifferentiated cells. However, levels of snRNAs did not follow the expression of splicing proteins, and in the case of U1 snRNP we saw reciprocal changes in the levels of U1 snRNA and U1 snRNP proteins. Our results suggest that the AS program in differentiated SMCs is orchestrated by the combined influence of auxiliary RNA binding proteins, such as PTBP1, along with altered activity and stoichiometry of the core splicing machinery. PMID:27317697

  18. Discover hidden splicing variations by mapping personal transcriptomes to personal genomes.

    PubMed

    Stein, Shayna; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Park, Juw Won; Xing, Yi

    2015-12-15

    RNA-seq has become a popular technology for studying genetic variation of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Commonly used RNA-seq aligners rely on the consensus splice site dinucleotide motifs to map reads across splice junctions. Consequently, genomic variants that create novel splice site dinucleotides may produce splice junction RNA-seq reads that cannot be mapped to the reference genome. We developed and evaluated an approach to identify 'hidden' splicing variations in personal transcriptomes, by mapping personal RNA-seq data to personal genomes. Computational analysis and experimental validation indicate that this approach identifies personal specific splice junctions at a low false positive rate. Applying this approach to an RNA-seq data set of 75 individuals, we identified 506 personal specific splice junctions, among which 437 were novel splice junctions not documented in current human transcript annotations. 94 splice junctions had splice site SNPs associated with GWAS signals of human traits and diseases. These involve genes whose splicing variations have been implicated in diseases (such as OAS1), as well as novel associations between alternative splicing and diseases (such as ICA1). Collectively, our work demonstrates that the personal genome approach to RNA-seq read alignment enables the discovery of a large but previously unknown catalog of splicing variations in human populations.

  19. Discover hidden splicing variations by mapping personal transcriptomes to personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Shayna; Lu, Zhi-xiang; Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Park, Juw Won; Xing, Yi

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq has become a popular technology for studying genetic variation of pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Commonly used RNA-seq aligners rely on the consensus splice site dinucleotide motifs to map reads across splice junctions. Consequently, genomic variants that create novel splice site dinucleotides may produce splice junction RNA-seq reads that cannot be mapped to the reference genome. We developed and evaluated an approach to identify ‘hidden’ splicing variations in personal transcriptomes, by mapping personal RNA-seq data to personal genomes. Computational analysis and experimental validation indicate that this approach identifies personal specific splice junctions at a low false positive rate. Applying this approach to an RNA-seq data set of 75 individuals, we identified 506 personal specific splice junctions, among which 437 were novel splice junctions not documented in current human transcript annotations. 94 splice junctions had splice site SNPs associated with GWAS signals of human traits and diseases. These involve genes whose splicing variations have been implicated in diseases (such as OAS1), as well as novel associations between alternative splicing and diseases (such as ICA1). Collectively, our work demonstrates that the personal genome approach to RNA-seq read alignment enables the discovery of a large but previously unknown catalog of splicing variations in human populations. PMID:26578562

  20. JAK2 Exon 14 Skipping in Patients with Primary Myelofibrosis: A Minor Splice Variant Modulated by the JAK2-V617F Allele Burden

    PubMed Central

    Catarsi, Paolo; Rosti, Vittorio; Morreale, Giacomo; Poletto, Valentina; Villani, Laura; Bertorelli, Roberto; Pedrazzini, Matteo; Zorzetto, Michele; Barosi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is an acquired clonal disease of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment, characterized by bone marrow fibrosis, anemia, splenomegaly and extramedullary hematopoiesis. About 60% of patients with PMF harbor a somatic mutation of the JAK2 gene (JAK2-V617F) in their hematopoietic lineage. Recently, a splicing isoform of JAK2, lacking exon 14 (JAK2Δ14) was described in patients affected by myeloproliferative diseases. Materials and Methods By using a specific RT-qPCR method, we measured the ratio between the splicing isoform and the JAK2 full-length transcript (JAK2+14) in granulocytes, isolated from peripheral blood, of forty-four patients with PMF and nine healthy donors. Results We found that JAK2Δ14 was only slightly increased in patients and, at variance with published data, the splicing isoform was also detectable in healthy controls. We also found that, in patients bearing the JAK2-V617F mutation, the percentage of mutated alleles correlated with the observed increase in JAK2Δ14. Homozygosity for the mutation was also associated with a higher level of JAK2+14. Bioinformatic analysis indicates the possibility that the G>T transversion may interfere with the correct splicing of exon 14 by modifying a splicing regulatory sequence. Conclusions Increased levels of JAK2 full-length transcript and a small but significant increase in JAK2 exon 14 skipping, are associated with the JAK2-V617F allele burden in PMF granulocytes. Our data do not confirm a previous claim that the production of the JAK2Δ14 isoform is related to the pathogenesis of PMF. PMID:25617626

  1. Contextual fear conditioning induces differential alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Poplawski, Shane G; Peixoto, Lucia; Porcari, Giulia S; Wimmer, Mathieu E; McNally, Anna G; Mizuno, Keiko; Giese, K Peter; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Koberstein, John N; Risso, Davide; Speed, Terence P; Abel, Ted

    2016-10-01

    The process of memory consolidation requires transcription and translation to form long-term memories. Significant effort has been dedicated to understanding changes in hippocampal gene expression after contextual fear conditioning. However, alternative splicing by differential transcript regulation during this time period has received less attention. Here, we use RNA-seq to determine exon-level changes in expression after contextual fear conditioning and retrieval. Our work reveals that a short variant of Homer1, Ania-3, is regulated by contextual fear conditioning. The ribosome biogenesis regulator Las1l, small nucleolar RNA Snord14e, and the RNA-binding protein Rbm3 also change specific transcript usage after fear conditioning. The changes in Ania-3 and Las1l are specific to either the new context or the context-shock association, while the changes in Rbm3 occur after context or shock only. Our analysis revealed novel transcript regulation of previously undetected changes after learning, revealing the importance of high throughput sequencing approaches in the study of gene expression changes after learning. PMID:27451143

  2. Evolutionary Character of Alternative Splicing in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengjun; Yang, Hong; Yang, Huizhao

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the most important ways to enhance the functional diversity of genes. Huge amounts of data have been produced by microarray, expressed sequence tag, and RNA-seq, and plenty of methods have been developed specifically for this task. The most frequently asked questions in previous research were as follows. What is the content rate of AS genes among the whole gene set? How many AS types are presented in the genome, and which type is dominant? How about the conservation ability of AS among different species? Which kinds of isoforms from some genes have the environmental response to help individual adaptation? Based on this background, we collected analysis results from 17 species to try to map out the landscape of AS studies in plants. We have noted the shortages of previous results, and we appeal to all scientists working in the AS field to make a standard protocol so that analyses between different projects are comparable. PMID:26819552

  3. Alternative splicing impairs soluble guanylyl cyclase function in aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emil; Golunski, Eva; Laing, Susan T; Estrera, Anthony L; Sharina, Iraida G

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key regulator of several important vascular functions and is important for maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and vascular plasticity. Diminished sGC expression and function contributes to pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. However, the processes that control sGC expression in vascular tissue remain poorly understood. Previous work in animal and cell models revealed the complexity of alternative splicing of sGC genes and demonstrated its importance in modulation of sGC function. The aim of this study was to examine the role of alternative splicing of α1 and β1 sGC in healthy and diseased human vascular tissue. Our study found a variety of α1 and β1 sGC splice forms expressed in human aorta. Their composition and abundance were different between samples of aortic tissue removed during surgical repair of aortic aneurysm and samples of aortas without aneurysm. Aortas with aneurysm demonstrated decreased sGC activity, which correlated with increased expression of dysfunctional sGC splice variants. In addition, the expression of 55-kDa oxidation-resistant α1 isoform B sGC (α1-IsoB) was significantly lower in aortic samples with aneurysm. The α1-IsoB splice variant was demonstrated to support sGC activity in aortic lysates. Together, our results suggest that alternative splicing contributes to diminished sGC function in vascular dysfunction. Precise understanding of sGC splicing regulation could help to design new therapeutic interventions and to personalize sGC-targeting therapies in treatments of vascular disease.

  4. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing. PMID:26553470

  5. scaRNAs regulate splicing and vertebrate heart development.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prakash; Kibiryeva, Nataliya; Uechi, Tamayo; Marshall, Jennifer; O'Brien, James E; Artman, Michael; Kenmochi, Naoya; Bittel, Douglas C

    2015-08-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) plays an important role in regulating mammalian heart development, but a link between misregulated splicing and congenital heart defects (CHDs) has not been shown. We reported that more than 50% of genes associated with heart development were alternatively spliced in the right ventricle (RV) of infants with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Moreover, there was a significant decrease in the level of 12 small cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) that direct the biochemical modification of specific nucleotides in spliceosomal RNAs. We sought to determine if scaRNA levels influence patterns of AS and heart development. We used primary cells derived from the RV of infants with TOF to show a direct link between scaRNA levels and splice isoforms of several genes that regulate heart development (e.g., GATA4, NOTCH2, DAAM1, DICER1, MBNL1 and MBNL2). In addition, we used antisense morpholinos to knock down the expression of two scaRNAs (scarna1 and snord94) in zebrafish and saw a corresponding disruption of heart development with an accompanying alteration in splice isoforms of cardiac regulatory genes. Based on these combined results, we hypothesize that scaRNA modification of spliceosomal RNAs assists in fine tuning the spliceosome for dynamic selection of mRNA splice isoforms. Our results are consistent with disruption of splicing patterns during early embryonic development leading to insufficient communication between the first and second heart fields, resulting in conotruncal misalignment and TOF. Our findings represent a new paradigm for determining the mechanisms underlying congenital cardiac malformations.

  6. Regulation of plant developmental processes by a novel splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Ali, Gul Shad; Palusa, Saiprasad G; Golovkin, Maxim; Prasad, Jayendra; Manley, James L; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2007-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins play important roles in constitutive and alternative splicing and other aspects of mRNA metabolism. We have previously isolated a unique plant SR protein (SR45) with atypical domain organization. However, the biological and molecular functions of this novel SR protein are not known. Here, we report biological and molecular functions of this protein. Using an in vitro splicing complementation assay, we showed that SR45 functions as an essential splicing factor. Furthermore, the alternative splicing pattern of transcripts of several other SR genes was altered in a mutant, sr45-1, suggesting that the observed phenotypic abnormalities in sr45-1 are likely due to altered levels of SR protein isoforms, which in turn modulate splicing of other pre-mRNAs. sr45-1 exhibited developmental abnormalities, including delayed flowering, narrow leaves and altered number of petals and stamens. The late flowering phenotype was observed under both long days and short days and was rescued by vernalization. FLC, a key flowering repressor, is up-regulated in sr45-1 demonstrating that SR45 influences the autonomous flowering pathway. Changes in the alternative splicing of SR genes and the phenotypic defects in the mutant were rescued by SR45 cDNA, further confirming that the observed defects in the mutant are due to the lack of SR45. These results indicate that SR45 is a novel plant-specific splicing factor that plays a crucial role in regulating developmental processes. PMID:17534421

  7. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  8. Statistical and Computational Methods for High-Throughput Sequencing Data Analysis of Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The burgeoning field of high-throughput sequencing significantly improves our ability to understand the complexity of transcriptomes. Alternative splicing, as one of the most important driving forces for transcriptome diversity, can now be studied at an unprecedent resolution. Efficient and powerful computational and statistical methods are in urgent need to facilitate the characterization and quantification of alternative splicing events. Here we discuss methods in splice junction read mapping, and methods in exon-centric or isoform-centric quantification of alternative splicing. In addition, we discuss HITS-CLIP and splicing QTL analyses which are novel high-throughput sequencing based approaches in the dissection of splicing regulation. PMID:24058384

  9. Designing shallow donors in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    The production of n-type semiconducting diamond has been a long-standing experimental challenge. The first-principles simulation of shallow dopants in semiconductors has been a long-standing theoretical challenge. A desirable theoretical goal is to identify impurities that will act as shallow donors in diamond and assess their experimental viability. I will discuss this identification process for the LiN4 donor complex. It builds a scientific argument from several models and computational results in the absence of computational tools that are both trustworthy and computationally tractable for this task. I will compare the theoretical assessment of viability with recent experimental efforts to co-dope diamond with lithium and nitrogen. Finally, I discuss the computational tools needed to facilitate future work on this problem and some preliminary simulations of donors near diamond surfaces. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program lab managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Changing Pattern of Donor Selection Criteria in Deceased Donor Liver Transplant: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Dronacharya; Naidu, Sudeep; Sharma, Sanjay; Ranjan, Priya; Godara, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    During the last couple of decades, with standardization and progress in surgical techniques, immunosuppression and post liver transplantation patient care, the outcome of liver transplantation has been optimized. However, the principal limitation of transplantation remains access to an allograft. The number of patients who could derive benefit from liver transplantation markedly exceeds the number of available deceased donors. The large gap between the growing list of patients waiting for liver transplantation and the scarcity of donor organs has fueled efforts to maximize existing donor pool and identify new avenues. This article reviews the changing pattern of donor for liver transplantation using grafts from extended criteria donors (elderly donors, steatotic donors, donors with malignancies, donors with viral hepatitis), donation after cardiac death, use of partial grafts (split liver grafts) and other suboptimal donors (hypernatremia, infections, hypotension and inotropic support). PMID:25755521

  11. Management of the feline blood donor.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, P M

    1992-12-01

    The feline blood donor should be considered a valuable asset to the veterinary clinic. As public awareness increases, so will the demand for high-quality blood products. Meeting this demand will require planning and a blood donor management program tailored to the clinic's needs. Consideration should be given to the areas of blood value, donor selection, blood collection, and maintaining donor health when developing a donor management program. Suggestions for reducing the stress and aggravation often associated with feline blood collection are provided.

  12. Convergent origins and rapid evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in metazoa: insights from the ctenophora and hydrozoa.

    PubMed

    Derelle, Romain; Momose, Tsuyoshi; Manuel, Michael; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Houliston, Evelyn

    2010-04-01

    Replacement of mRNA 5' UTR sequences by short sequences trans-spliced from specialized, noncoding, spliced leader (SL) RNAs is an enigmatic phenomenon, occurring in a set of distantly related animal groups including urochordates, nematodes, flatworms, and hydra, as well as in Euglenozoa and dinoflagellates. Whether SL trans-splicing has a common evolutionary origin and biological function among different organisms remains unclear. We have undertaken a systematic identification of SL exons in cDNA sequence data sets from non-bilaterian metazoan species and their closest unicellular relatives. SL exons were identified in ctenophores and in hydrozoan cnidarians, but not in other cnidarians, placozoans, or sponges, or in animal unicellular relatives. Mapping of SL absence/presence obtained from this and previous studies onto current phylogenetic trees favors an evolutionary scenario involving multiple origins for SLs during eumetazoan evolution rather than loss from a common ancestor. In both ctenophore and hydrozoan species, multiple SL sequences were identified, showing high sequence diversity. Detailed analysis of a large data set generated for the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica revealed trans-splicing of given mRNAs by multiple alternative SLs. No evidence was found for a common identity of trans-spliced mRNAs between different hydrozoans. One feature found specifically to characterize SL-spliced mRNAs in hydrozoans, however, was a marked adenosine enrichment immediately 3' of the SL acceptor splice site. Our findings of high sequence divergence and apparently indiscriminate use of SLs in hydrozoans, along with recent findings in other taxa, indicate that SL genes have evolved rapidly in parallel in diverse animal groups, with constraint on SL exon sequence evolution being apparently rare.

  13. SR proteins are required for nematode trans-splicing in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, J R; Bruzik, J P

    1999-01-01

    SR (ser/arg) proteins have been shown to play roles in numerous aspects of pre-mRNA splicing, including modulation of alternative splicing, commitment of substrates to the splicing pathway, and splice site communication. The last of these, splice site communication, is particularly relevant to trans-splicing in which the 5' and 3' exons originate on separate molecules. The participation of SR proteins in naturally occurring, spliced leader RNA-dependent transsplicing has not been examined. Here, we have isolated SR proteins from an organism that performs both trans- and cis-splicing, the nematode Ascaris lumbricoides. To examine their activity in in vitro splicing reactions, we have also developed and characterized an SR protein-depleted whole-cell extract. When tested in this extract, the nematode SR proteins are required for both trans- and cis-splicing. In addition, the state of phosphorylation of the nematode SR proteins is critical to their activity in vitro. Interestingly, mammalian (HeLa) and A. lumbricoides SR proteins exhibit equivalent activities in cis-splicing, while the nematode SR proteins are much more active in trans-splicing. Thus, it appears that SR proteins purified from an organism that naturally trans-splices its pre-mRNAs promote this reaction to a greater extent than do their mammalian counterparts. PMID:10411135

  14. TCGASpliceSeq a compendium of alternative mRNA splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Wong, Wing Chung; Brown, Robert; Akbani, Rehan; Su, Xiaoping; Broom, Bradley; Melott, James; Weinstein, John

    2016-01-01

    TCGA's RNASeq data represent one of the largest collections of cancer transcriptomes ever assembled. RNASeq technology, combined with computational tools like our SpliceSeq package, provides a comprehensive, detailed view of alternative mRNA splicing. Aberrant splicing patterns in cancers have been implicated in such processes as carcinogenesis, de-differentiation and metastasis. TCGA SpliceSeq (http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/TCGASpliceSeq) is a web-based resource that provides a quick, user-friendly, highly visual interface for exploring the alternative splicing patterns of TCGA tumors. Percent Spliced In (PSI) values for splice events on samples from 33 different tumor types, including available adjacent normal samples, have been loaded into TCGA SpliceSeq. Investigators can interrogate genes of interest, search for the genes that show the strongest variation between or among selected tumor types, or explore splicing pattern changes between tumor and adjacent normal samples. The interface presents intuitive graphical representations of splicing patterns, read counts and various statistical summaries, including percent spliced in. Splicing data can also be downloaded for inclusion in integrative analyses. TCGA SpliceSeq is freely available for academic, government or commercial use. PMID:26602693

  15. TCGASpliceSeq a compendium of alternative mRNA splicing in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael; Wong, Wing Chung; Brown, Robert; Akbani, Rehan; Su, Xiaoping; Broom, Bradley; Melott, James; Weinstein, John

    2016-01-01

    TCGA's RNASeq data represent one of the largest collections of cancer transcriptomes ever assembled. RNASeq technology, combined with computational tools like our SpliceSeq package, provides a comprehensive, detailed view of alternative mRNA splicing. Aberrant splicing patterns in cancers have been implicated in such processes as carcinogenesis, de-differentiation and metastasis. TCGA SpliceSeq (http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/TCGASpliceSeq) is a web-based resource that provides a quick, user-friendly, highly visual interface for exploring the alternative splicing patterns of TCGA tumors. Percent Spliced In (PSI) values for splice events on samples from 33 different tumor types, including available adjacent normal samples, have been loaded into TCGA SpliceSeq. Investigators can interrogate genes of interest, search for the genes that show the strongest variation between or among selected tumor types, or explore splicing pattern changes between tumor and adjacent normal samples. The interface presents intuitive graphical representations of splicing patterns, read counts and various statistical summaries, including percent spliced in. Splicing data can also be downloaded for inclusion in integrative analyses. TCGA SpliceSeq is freely available for academic, government or commercial use. PMID:26602693

  16. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  17. Long-Time Dynamics through Parallel Trajectory Splicing.

    PubMed

    Perez, Danny; Cubuk, Ekin D; Waterland, Amos; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Voter, Arthur F

    2016-01-12

    Simulating the atomistic evolution of materials over long time scales is a longstanding challenge, especially for complex systems where the distribution of barrier heights is very heterogeneous. Such systems are difficult to investigate using conventional long-time scale techniques, and the fact that they tend to remain trapped in small regions of configuration space for extended periods of time strongly limits the physical insights gained from short simulations. We introduce a novel simulation technique, Parallel Trajectory Splicing (ParSplice), that aims at addressing this problem through the timewise parallelization of long trajectories. The computational efficiency of ParSplice stems from a speculation strategy whereby predictions of the future evolution of the system are leveraged to increase the amount of work that can be concurrently performed at any one time, hence improving the scalability of the method. ParSplice is also able to accurately account for, and potentially reuse, a substantial fraction of the computational work invested in the simulation. We validate the method on a simple Ag surface system and demonstrate substantial increases in efficiency compared to previous methods. We then demonstrate the power of ParSplice through the study of topology changes in Ag42Cu13 core-shell nanoparticles. PMID:26605853

  18. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments. PMID:27492621

  19. Long-time dynamics through parallel trajectory splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny; Cubuk, Ekin D.; Waterland, Amos; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-11-24

    Simulating the atomistic evolution of materials over long time scales is a longstanding challenge, especially for complex systems where the distribution of barrier heights is very heterogeneous. Such systems are difficult to investigate using conventional long-time scale techniques, and the fact that they tend to remain trapped in small regions of configuration space for extended periods of time strongly limits the physical insights gained from short simulations. We introduce a novel simulation technique, Parallel Trajectory Splicing (ParSplice), that aims at addressing this problem through the timewise parallelization of long trajectories. The computational efficiency of ParSplice stems from a speculation strategy whereby predictions of the future evolution of the system are leveraged to increase the amount of work that can be concurrently performed at any one time, hence improving the scalability of the method. ParSplice is also able to accurately account for, and potentially reuse, a substantial fraction of the computational work invested in the simulation. We validate the method on a simple Ag surface system and demonstrate substantial increases in efficiency compared to previous methods. As a result, we then demonstrate the power of ParSplice through the study of topology changes in Ag42Cu13 core–shell nanoparticles.

  20. Long-time dynamics through parallel trajectory splicing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perez, Danny; Cubuk, Ekin D.; Waterland, Amos; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-11-24

    Simulating the atomistic evolution of materials over long time scales is a longstanding challenge, especially for complex systems where the distribution of barrier heights is very heterogeneous. Such systems are difficult to investigate using conventional long-time scale techniques, and the fact that they tend to remain trapped in small regions of configuration space for extended periods of time strongly limits the physical insights gained from short simulations. We introduce a novel simulation technique, Parallel Trajectory Splicing (ParSplice), that aims at addressing this problem through the timewise parallelization of long trajectories. The computational efficiency of ParSplice stems from a speculation strategymore » whereby predictions of the future evolution of the system are leveraged to increase the amount of work that can be concurrently performed at any one time, hence improving the scalability of the method. ParSplice is also able to accurately account for, and potentially reuse, a substantial fraction of the computational work invested in the simulation. We validate the method on a simple Ag surface system and demonstrate substantial increases in efficiency compared to previous methods. As a result, we then demonstrate the power of ParSplice through the study of topology changes in Ag42Cu13 core–shell nanoparticles.« less

  1. BRR2a Affects Flowering Time via FLC Splicing.

    PubMed

    Mahrez, Walid; Shin, Juhyun; Muñoz-Viana, Rafael; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Trejo-Arellano, Minerva S; Exner, Vivien; Siretskiy, Alexey; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Köhler, Claudia; Hennig, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Several pathways control time to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana through transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation. In recent years, mRNA processing has gained interest as a critical regulator of flowering time control in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms linking RNA splicing to flowering time are not well understood. In a screen for Arabidopsis early flowering mutants we identified an allele of BRR2a. BRR2 proteins are components of the spliceosome and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis BRR2a is ubiquitously expressed in all analyzed tissues and involved in the processing of flowering time gene transcripts, most notably FLC. A missense mutation of threonine 895 in BRR2a caused defects in FLC splicing and greatly reduced FLC transcript levels. Reduced FLC expression increased transcription of FT and SOC1 leading to early flowering in both short and long days. Genome-wide experiments established that only a small set of introns was not correctly spliced in the brr2a mutant. Compared to control introns, retained introns were often shorter and GC-poor, had low H3K4me1 and CG methylation levels, and were often derived from genes with a high-H3K27me3-low-H3K36me3 signature. We propose that BRR2a is specifically needed for efficient splicing of a subset of introns characterized by a combination of factors including intron size, sequence and chromatin, and that FLC is most sensitive to splicing defects. PMID:27100965

  2. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments. PMID:27492621

  3. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  4. BRR2a Affects Flowering Time via FLC Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mahrez, Walid; Shin, Juhyun; Exner, Vivien; Siretskiy, Alexey; Köhler, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Several pathways control time to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana through transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation. In recent years, mRNA processing has gained interest as a critical regulator of flowering time control in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms linking RNA splicing to flowering time are not well understood. In a screen for Arabidopsis early flowering mutants we identified an allele of BRR2a. BRR2 proteins are components of the spliceosome and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis BRR2a is ubiquitously expressed in all analyzed tissues and involved in the processing of flowering time gene transcripts, most notably FLC. A missense mutation of threonine 895 in BRR2a caused defects in FLC splicing and greatly reduced FLC transcript levels. Reduced FLC expression increased transcription of FT and SOC1 leading to early flowering in both short and long days. Genome-wide experiments established that only a small set of introns was not correctly spliced in the brr2a mutant. Compared to control introns, retained introns were often shorter and GC-poor, had low H3K4me1 and CG methylation levels, and were often derived from genes with a high-H3K27me3-low-H3K36me3 signature. We propose that BRR2a is specifically needed for efficient splicing of a subset of introns characterized by a combination of factors including intron size, sequence and chromatin, and that FLC is most sensitive to splicing defects. PMID:27100965

  5. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  6. The probability of finding suitable directed donors.

    PubMed

    Kanter, M; Selvin, S; Myhre, B A

    1989-02-01

    A series of tables based on mathematical calculations is given as guidelines for the number of directed donors needed by members of various ethnic/racial groups to provide a desired number of units of blood with a selected probability of achieving this result. From these tables, certain conclusions can be drawn. Unrelated donors who do not know their blood type are an inefficient source of directed donors. Rh-negative patients are unlikely to obtain enough directed-donor units from either related or unrelated donors with confidence unless these donors known their blood type. In general, siblings, parents, and offspring are the most efficient directed donors from the standpoint of compatibility. Cousins, uncles, aunts, nieces, and nephews are not much more likely to be compatible than unrelated donors are. It is easier to obtain suitable directed-donor units among Hispanics than among whites, blacks, or Asians, due to their skewed blood group frequencies. In general, using O-negative directed donors for Rh-positive recipients does not significantly increase the likelihood of finding suitable donors.

  7. The identification of potential cadaveric organ donors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J F; McCosker, C J; Hibberd, A D; Chapman, J R; Compton, J S; Mahony, J F; Mohacsi, P J; MacDonald, G J; Spratt, P M

    1995-02-01

    Most Australian transplantation programs are severely restricted in their activities by a limited availability of cadaveric donor organs. To investigate possible reasons for this problem, an audit was undertaken over three 12-month periods of all deaths in 13 hospitals in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. From 7406 deaths, 271 patients were classified as having been realistic, medically suitable potential donors. Of these, only 60 (22%) became actual donors. In the other 211 patients, donation did not occur because of unsuccessful resuscitation (30%), permission refusal by relatives (34%), and failure to identify or support the potential donors (36%). If the impediments to organ donation which were identified in this study could be overcome, allowing a greater number of potential donors to become actual donors, the chronic shortage of cadaveric donor organs for transplantation could be at least partly relieved.

  8. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V; Giani, Anette S; Hofmann, Jan A; Schmidt, Alexander H

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  9. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors. PMID:26876789

  10. Cotranscriptional splicing of a group I intron is facilitated by the Cbp2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, A.S.; Thomas, J. Jr.; Tirupati, H.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report investigates the coupling between transcription and splicing of a mitochondrial group I intron in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the effect of the Cbp2 protein on splicing. 65 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected themore » splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.« less

  12. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.

  13. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  14. Integrative analysis of many RNA-seq datasets to study alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyuan; Dai, Chao; Kang, Shuli; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2014-06-01

    Alternative splicing is an important gene regulatory mechanism that dramatically increases the complexity of the proteome. However, how alternative splicing is regulated and how transcription and splicing are coordinated are still poorly understood, and functions of transcript isoforms have been studied only in a few limited cases. Nowadays, RNA-seq technology provides an exceptional opportunity to study alternative splicing on genome-wide scales and in an unbiased manner. With the rapid accumulation of data in public repositories, new challenges arise from the urgent need to effectively integrate many different RNA-seq datasets for study alterative splicing. This paper discusses a set of advanced computational methods that can integrate and analyze many RNA-seq datasets to systematically identify splicing modules, unravel the coupling of transcription and splicing, and predict the functions of splicing isoforms on a genome-wide scale.

  15. Intron Retention in the Alternatively Spliced Region of RON Results from Weak 3’ Splice Site Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay D.; Lucas, Christian M.; Eperon, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The RON gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor for macrophage-stimulating protein. A constitutively active isoform that arises by skipping of exon 11 is expressed in carcinomas and contributes to an invasive phenotype. However, a high proportion of the mRNA expressed from the endogenous gene, or from transfected minigenes, appears to retain introns 10 and 11. It is not known whether this represents specific repression or the presence of weak splicing signals. We have used chimeric pre-mRNAs spliced in vitro to investigate the reason for intron retention. A systematic test showed that, surprisingly, the exon sequences known to modulate exon 11 skipping were not limiting, but the 3’ splice site regions adjacent to exons 11 and 12 were too weak to support splicing when inserted into a globin intron. UV-crosslinking experiments showed binding of hnRNP F/H just 5’ of these regions, but the hnRNP F/H target sequences did not mediate inhibition. Instead, the failure of splicing is linked to weak binding of U2AF65, and spliceosome assembly stalls prior to formation of any of the ATP-dependent complexes. We discuss mechanisms by which U2AF65 binding is facilitated in vivo. PMID:24155930

  16. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C. K.; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; Zhang, Junyu; Sheng, Jianzhong; Huang, Hefeng

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common female endocrine disorders and a leading cause of female subfertility. The mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of PCOS remains to be illustrated. Here, we identify two alternative splice variants (ASVs) of the androgen receptor (AR), insertion and deletion isoforms, in granulosa cells (GCs) in ∼62% of patients with PCOS. AR ASVs are strongly associated with remarkable hyperandrogenism and abnormalities in folliculogenesis, and are absent from all control subjects without PCOS. Alternative splicing dramatically alters genome-wide AR recruitment and androgen-induced expression of genes related to androgen metabolism and folliculogenesis in human GCs. These findings establish alternative splicing of AR in GCs as the major pathogenic mechanism for hyperandrogenism and abnormal folliculogenesis in PCOS. PMID:25825716

  17. Identifying splicing regulatory elements with de Bruijn graphs.

    PubMed

    Badr, Eman; Heath, Lenwood S

    2014-12-01

    Splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are short, degenerate sequences on pre-mRNA molecules that enhance or inhibit the splicing process via the binding of splicing factors, proteins that regulate the functioning of the spliceosome. Existing methods for identifying SREs in a genome are either experimental or computational. Here, we propose a formalism based on de Bruijn graphs that combines genomic structure, word count enrichment analysis, and experimental evidence to identify SREs found in exons. In our approach, SREs are not restricted to a fixed length (i.e., k-mers, for a fixed k). As a result, we identify 2001 putative exonic enhancers and 3080 putative exonic silencers for human genes, with lengths varying from 6 to 15 nucleotides. Many of the predicted SREs overlap with experimentally verified binding sites. Our model provides a novel method to predict variable length putative regulatory elements computationally for further experimental investigation.

  18. RNA Splicing Factors and RNA-Directed DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao-Feng; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    RNA-directed histone and/or DNA modification is a conserved mechanism for the establishment of epigenetic marks from yeasts and plants to mammals. The heterochromation formation in yeast is mediated by RNAi-directed silencing mechanism, while the establishment of DNA methylation in plants is through the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) pathway. Recently, splicing factors are reported to be involved in both RNAi-directed heterochromatin formation in yeast and the RdDM pathway in plants. In yeast, splicing factors may provide a platform for facilitating the siRNA generation through an interaction with RDRC and thereby affect the heterochromatin formation, whereas in plants, various splicing factors seem to act at different steps in the RdDM pathway. PMID:24833507

  19. Widespread Expansion of Protein Interaction Capabilities by Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinping; Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Kang, Shuli; Sheynkman, Gloria M; Hao, Tong; Richardson, Aaron; Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Shen, Yun A; Murray, Ryan R; Spirohn, Kerstin; Begg, Bridget E; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; MacWilliams, Andrew; Pevzner, Samuel J; Zhong, Quan; Trigg, Shelly A; Tam, Stanley; Ghamsari, Lila; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Rodriguez, Maria D; Balcha, Dawit; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Zhou, Xianghong J; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Charloteaux, Benoit; Chen, Alyce A; Calderwood, Michael A; Aloy, Patrick; Roth, Frederick P; Hill, David E; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Xia, Yu; Vidal, Marc

    2016-02-11

    While alternative splicing is known to diversify the functional characteristics of some genes, the extent to which protein isoforms globally contribute to functional complexity on a proteomic scale remains unknown. To address this systematically, we cloned full-length open reading frames of alternatively spliced transcripts for a large number of human genes and used protein-protein interaction profiling to functionally compare hundreds of protein isoform pairs. The majority of isoform pairs share less than 50% of their interactions. In the global context of interactome network maps, alternative isoforms tend to behave like distinct proteins rather than minor variants of each other. Interaction partners specific to alternative isoforms tend to be expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and belong to distinct functional modules. Our strategy, applicable to other functional characteristics, reveals a widespread expansion of protein interaction capabilities through alternative splicing and suggests that many alternative "isoforms" are functionally divergent (i.e., "functional alloforms"). PMID:26871637

  20. Identifying splicing regulatory elements with de Bruijn graphs.

    PubMed

    Badr, Eman; Heath, Lenwood S

    2014-12-01

    Splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are short, degenerate sequences on pre-mRNA molecules that enhance or inhibit the splicing process via the binding of splicing factors, proteins that regulate the functioning of the spliceosome. Existing methods for identifying SREs in a genome are either experimental or computational. Here, we propose a formalism based on de Bruijn graphs that combines genomic structure, word count enrichment analysis, and experimental evidence to identify SREs found in exons. In our approach, SREs are not restricted to a fixed length (i.e., k-mers, for a fixed k). As a result, we identify 2001 putative exonic enhancers and 3080 putative exonic silencers for human genes, with lengths varying from 6 to 15 nucleotides. Many of the predicted SREs overlap with experimentally verified binding sites. Our model provides a novel method to predict variable length putative regulatory elements computationally for further experimental investigation. PMID:25393830

  1. RBM20, a gene for hereditary cardiomyopathy, regulates titin splicing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Schafer, Sebastian; Greaser, Marion L.; Radke, Michael H.; Liss, Martin; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Maatz, Henrike; Schulz, Herbert; Li, Shijun; Parrish, Amanda M.; Dauksaite, Vita; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Klaassen, Sabine; Gerull, Brenda; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Hacker, Timothy A.; Saupe, Kurt W.; Dec, G. William; Ellinor, Patrick T.; MacRae, Calum A.; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Saar, Kathrin; Hubner, Norbert; Gotthardt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in the adaptation of cardiac function exemplified by the isoform switch of titin, which adjusts ventricular filling. We previously identified a rat strain deficient in titin splicing. Using genetic mapping, we found a loss-of-function mutation in RBM20 as the underlying cause for the pathological titin isoform expression. Mutations in human RBM20 have previously been shown to cause dilated cardiomyopathy. We showed that the phenotype of Rbm20 deficient rats resembles the human pathology. Deep sequencing of the human and rat cardiac transcriptome revealed an RBM20 dependent regulation of alternative splicing. Additionally to titin we identified a set of 30 genes with conserved regulation between human and rat. This network is enriched for genes previously linked to cardiomyopathy, ion-homeostasis, and sarcomere biology. Our studies emphasize the importance of posttranscriptional regulation in cardiac function and provide mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:22466703

  2. Widespread Expansion of Protein Interaction Capabilities by Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinping; Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Kang, Shuli; Sheynkman, Gloria M; Hao, Tong; Richardson, Aaron; Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Shen, Yun A; Murray, Ryan R; Spirohn, Kerstin; Begg, Bridget E; Duran-Frigola, Miquel; MacWilliams, Andrew; Pevzner, Samuel J; Zhong, Quan; Trigg, Shelly A; Tam, Stanley; Ghamsari, Lila; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Rodriguez, Maria D; Balcha, Dawit; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles; Zhou, Xianghong J; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Charloteaux, Benoit; Chen, Alyce A; Calderwood, Michael A; Aloy, Patrick; Roth, Frederick P; Hill, David E; Iakoucheva, Lilia M; Xia, Yu; Vidal, Marc

    2016-02-11

    While alternative splicing is known to diversify the functional characteristics of some genes, the extent to which protein isoforms globally contribute to functional complexity on a proteomic scale remains unknown. To address this systematically, we cloned full-length open reading frames of alternatively spliced transcripts for a large number of human genes and used protein-protein interaction profiling to functionally compare hundreds of protein isoform pairs. The majority of isoform pairs share less than 50% of their interactions. In the global context of interactome network maps, alternative isoforms tend to behave like distinct proteins rather than minor variants of each other. Interaction partners specific to alternative isoforms tend to be expressed in a highly tissue-specific manner and belong to distinct functional modules. Our strategy, applicable to other functional characteristics, reveals a widespread expansion of protein interaction capabilities through alternative splicing and suggests that many alternative "isoforms" are functionally divergent (i.e., "functional alloforms").

  3. The splicing fate of plant SPO11 genes.

    PubMed

    Sprink, Thorben; Hartung, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Toward the global understanding of plant meiosis, it seems to be essential to decipher why all as yet sequenced plants need or at least encode for two different meiotic SPO11 genes. This is in contrast to mammals and fungi, where only one SPO11 is present. Both SPO11 in Arabidopsis thaliana are essential for the initiation of double strand breaks (DSBs) during the meiotic prophase. In nearly all eukaryotic organisms DSB induction during prophase I by SPO11 leads to meiotic DSB repair, thereby ensuring the formation of a necessary number of crossovers (CO) as physical connections between the homologous chromosomes. We aim to investigate the specific functions and evolution of both SPO11 genes in land plants. Therefore, we identified and cloned the respective orthologous genes from Brassica rapa, Carica papaya, Oryza sativa, and Physcomitrella patens. In parallel we determined the full length cDNA sequences of SPO11-1 and -2 from all of these plants by RT-PCR. During these experiments we observed that the analyzed plants exhibit a pattern of alternative splicing products of both SPO11 mRNAs. Such an aberrant splicing has previously been described for Arabidopsis and therefore seems to be conserved throughout evolution. Most of the splicing forms of SPO11-1 and -2 seem to be non-functional as they either showed intron retention (IR) or shortened exons. However, the positional distribution and number of alternative splicing events vary strongly between the different plants. The cDNAs showed in most cases premature termination codons (PTCs) due to frameshift. Nevertheless, in some cases we found alternatively spliced but functional cDNAs. These findings let us suggest that alternative splicing of SPO11 depends on the respective gene sequence and on the plant species. Therefore, this conserved mechanism might play a role concerning regulation of SPO11.

  4. Regulation of Chemoresistance Via Alternative Messenger RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Eblen, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of drug resistance to chemotherapy is a significant problem in the treatment of cancer, greatly increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Tumors are often sensitive to chemotherapy upon initial treatment, but repeated treatments can select for those cells that have were able to survive initial therapy and have acquired cellular mechanisms to enhance their resistance to subsequent chemotherapy treatment. Many cellular mechanisms of drug resistance have been identified, most of which result from changes in gene and protein expression. While changes at the transcriptional level have been duly noted, it is primarily the post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA into mature mRNA that regulates the composition of the proteome and it is the proteome that actually regulates the cell’s response to chemotherapeutic insult, inducing cell survival or death. During pre-mRNA processing, intronic non-protein-coding sequences are removed and protein-coding exons are spliced to form a continuous template for protein translation. Alternative splicing involves the differential inclusion or exclusion of exonic sequences into the mature transcript, generating different mRNA templates for protein production. This regulatory mechanism enables the potential to produce many different protein isoforms from the same gene. In this review I will explain the mechanism of alternative pre-mRNA splicing and look at some specific examples of how splicing factors, splicing factor kinases and alternative splicing of specific pre-mRNAs from genes have been shown to contribute to acquisition of the drug resistant phenotype. PMID:22248731

  5. The splicing fate of plant SPO11 genes.

    PubMed

    Sprink, Thorben; Hartung, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Toward the global understanding of plant meiosis, it seems to be essential to decipher why all as yet sequenced plants need or at least encode for two different meiotic SPO11 genes. This is in contrast to mammals and fungi, where only one SPO11 is present. Both SPO11 in Arabidopsis thaliana are essential for the initiation of double strand breaks (DSBs) during the meiotic prophase. In nearly all eukaryotic organisms DSB induction during prophase I by SPO11 leads to meiotic DSB repair, thereby ensuring the formation of a necessary number of crossovers (CO) as physical connections between the homologous chromosomes. We aim to investigate the specific functions and evolution of both SPO11 genes in land plants. Therefore, we identified and cloned the respective orthologous genes from Brassica rapa, Carica papaya, Oryza sativa, and Physcomitrella patens. In parallel we determined the full length cDNA sequences of SPO11-1 and -2 from all of these plants by RT-PCR. During these experiments we observed that the analyzed plants exhibit a pattern of alternative splicing products of both SPO11 mRNAs. Such an aberrant splicing has previously been described for Arabidopsis and therefore seems to be conserved throughout evolution. Most of the splicing forms of SPO11-1 and -2 seem to be non-functional as they either showed intron retention (IR) or shortened exons. However, the positional distribution and number of alternative splicing events vary strongly between the different plants. The cDNAs showed in most cases premature termination codons (PTCs) due to frameshift. Nevertheless, in some cases we found alternatively spliced but functional cDNAs. These findings let us suggest that alternative splicing of SPO11 depends on the respective gene sequence and on the plant species. Therefore, this conserved mechanism might play a role concerning regulation of SPO11. PMID:25018755

  6. The splicing fate of plant SPO11 genes

    PubMed Central

    Sprink, Thorben; Hartung, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Toward the global understanding of plant meiosis, it seems to be essential to decipher why all as yet sequenced plants need or at least encode for two different meiotic SPO11 genes. This is in contrast to mammals and fungi, where only one SPO11 is present. Both SPO11 in Arabidopsis thaliana are essential for the initiation of double strand breaks (DSBs) during the meiotic prophase. In nearly all eukaryotic organisms DSB induction during prophase I by SPO11 leads to meiotic DSB repair, thereby ensuring the formation of a necessary number of crossovers (CO) as physical connections between the homologous chromosomes. We aim to investigate the specific functions and evolution of both SPO11 genes in land plants. Therefore, we identified and cloned the respective orthologous genes from Brassica rapa, Carica papaya, Oryza sativa, and Physcomitrella patens. In parallel we determined the full length cDNA sequences of SPO11-1 and -2 from all of these plants by RT-PCR. During these experiments we observed that the analyzed plants exhibit a pattern of alternative splicing products of both SPO11 mRNAs. Such an aberrant splicing has previously been described for Arabidopsis and therefore seems to be conserved throughout evolution. Most of the splicing forms of SPO11-1 and -2 seem to be non-functional as they either showed intron retention (IR) or shortened exons. However, the positional distribution and number of alternative splicing events vary strongly between the different plants. The cDNAs showed in most cases premature termination codons (PTCs) due to frameshift. Nevertheless, in some cases we found alternatively spliced but functional cDNAs. These findings let us suggest that alternative splicing of SPO11 depends on the respective gene sequence and on the plant species. Therefore, this conserved mechanism might play a role concerning regulation of SPO11. PMID:25018755

  7. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  8. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb. PMID:27368438

  9. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb.

  10. Testing steel-cord belt splices with a magnetic conveyor belt monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.

    1985-03-01

    Steel-cord belt splices fail for a variety of reasons, including corrosion, poor vulcanising, and incorrect construction. The latter often leads to early failure. A conveyor belt monitor (CBM) has been used to evaluate the splice lay-up. The mass of the overlapping cords and their magnetic signature are used to rapidly locate suspect splices in the belt. The general shape of the magnetic signature for ideal splices will be discussed.

  11. Regulation of BCL-X splicing reveals a role for the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1/hnRNP I) in alternative 5′ splice site selection

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Bordi, Matteo; Biasio, Valentina Di; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) modulates many physiological and pathological processes. For instance, AS of the BCL-X gene balances cell survival and apoptosis in development and cancer. Herein, we identified the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) as a direct regulator of BCL-X AS. Overexpression of PTBP1 promotes selection of the distal 5′ splice site in BCL-X exon 2, generating the pro-apoptotic BCL-Xs splice variant. Conversely, depletion of PTBP1 enhanced splicing of the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant. In vivo cross-linking experiments and site-directed mutagenesis restricted the PTBP1 binding site to a polypyrimidine tract located between the two alternative 5′ splice sites. Binding of PTBP1 to this site was required for its effect on splicing. Notably, a similar function of PTBP1 in the selection of alternative 5′ splice sites was confirmed using the USP5 gene as additional model. Mechanistically, PTBP1 displaces SRSF1 binding from the proximal 5′ splice site, thus repressing its selection. Our study provides a novel mechanism of alternative 5′ splice site selection by PTBP1 and indicates that the presence of a PTBP1 binding site between two alternative 5′ splice sites promotes selection of the distal one, while repressing the proximal site by competing for binding of a positive regulator. PMID:25294838

  12. Rivet-fastener belt splices reduce conveyor downtime

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    At Sahara Coal Co's No. 21 Mine in Illinois some 18 miles of conveyor belting are in underground use bringing coal from the faces to a main haulage conveyor which transports the coal to the surface. The belt material is nylon carcass with rubber cover. Because of relatively low roof clearance, thinner belt than is typically used underground is employed, since a 500 ft roll of thicker belting would be unable to negotiate low-clearance entries. This thinner belt material could not be spliced using conventional fasteners, but solid-plate rivetted splicing has been found to be satisfactory.

  13. Changes in the expression of splicing factor transcripts and variations in alternative splicing are associated with lifespan in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin P; Pilling, Luke C; Emond, Florence; Flurkey, Kevin; Harrison, David E; Yuan, Rong; Peters, Luanne L; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David; Harries, Lorna W

    2016-10-01

    Dysregulation of splicing factor expression and altered alternative splicing are associated with aging in humans and other species, and also with replicative senescence in cultured cells. Here, we assess whether expression changes of key splicing regulator genes and consequent effects on alternative splicing are also associated with strain longevity in old and young mice, across 6 different mouse strains with varying lifespan (A/J, NOD.B10Sn-H2(b) /J, PWD.Phj, 129S1/SvlmJ, C57BL/6J and WSB/EiJ). Splicing factor expression and changes to alternative splicing were associated with strain lifespan in spleen and to a lesser extent in muscle. These changes mainly involved hnRNP splicing inhibitor transcripts with most changes more marked in spleens of young animals from long-lived strains. Changes in spleen isoform expression were suggestive of reduced cellular senescence and retained cellular proliferative capacity in long-lived strains. Changes in muscle isoform expression were consistent with reduced pro-inflammatory signalling in longer-lived strains. Two splicing regulators, HNRNPA1 and HNRNPA2B1, were also associated with parental longevity in humans, in the InCHIANTI aging study. Splicing factors may represent a driver, mediator or early marker of lifespan in mouse, as expression differences were present in the young animals of long-lived strains. Changes to alternative splicing patterns of key senescence genes in spleen and key remodelling genes in muscle suggest that correct regulation of alternative splicing may enhance lifespan in mice. Expression of some splicing factors in humans was also associated with parental longevity, suggesting that splicing regulation may also influence lifespan in humans. PMID:27363602

  14. Changes in the expression of splicing factor transcripts and variations in alternative splicing are associated with lifespan in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin P; Pilling, Luke C; Emond, Florence; Flurkey, Kevin; Harrison, David E; Yuan, Rong; Peters, Luanne L; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Melzer, David; Harries, Lorna W

    2016-10-01

    Dysregulation of splicing factor expression and altered alternative splicing are associated with aging in humans and other species, and also with replicative senescence in cultured cells. Here, we assess whether expression changes of key splicing regulator genes and consequent effects on alternative splicing are also associated with strain longevity in old and young mice, across 6 different mouse strains with varying lifespan (A/J, NOD.B10Sn-H2(b) /J, PWD.Phj, 129S1/SvlmJ, C57BL/6J and WSB/EiJ). Splicing factor expression and changes to alternative splicing were associated with strain lifespan in spleen and to a lesser extent in muscle. These changes mainly involved hnRNP splicing inhibitor transcripts with most changes more marked in spleens of young animals from long-lived strains. Changes in spleen isoform expression were suggestive of reduced cellular senescence and retained cellular proliferative capacity in long-lived strains. Changes in muscle isoform expression were consistent with reduced pro-inflammatory signalling in longer-lived strains. Two splicing regulators, HNRNPA1 and HNRNPA2B1, were also associated with parental longevity in humans, in the InCHIANTI aging study. Splicing factors may represent a driver, mediator or early marker of lifespan in mouse, as expression differences were present in the young animals of long-lived strains. Changes to alternative splicing patterns of key senescence genes in spleen and key remodelling genes in muscle suggest that correct regulation of alternative splicing may enhance lifespan in mice. Expression of some splicing factors in humans was also associated with parental longevity, suggesting that splicing regulation may also influence lifespan in humans.

  15. Genome-wide Identification of Zero Nucleotide Recursive Splicing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Michael O.; Olson, Sara; Wei, Xintao; Garrett, Sandra C.; Osman, Ahmad; Bolisetty, Mohan; Plocik, Alex; Celniker, Susan; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2015-01-01

    Recursive splicing is a process in which large introns are removed in multiple steps by resplicing at ratchet points - 5′ splice sites recreated after splicing1. Recursive splicing was first identified in the Drosophila Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene1 and only three additional Drosophila genes have since been experimentally shown to undergo recursive splicing2,3. Here, we identify 197 zero nucleotide exon ratchet points in 130 introns of 115 Drosophila genes from total RNA sequencing data generated from developmental time points, dissected tissues, and cultured cells. The sequential nature of recursive splicing was confirmed by identification of lariat introns generated by splicing to and from the ratchet points. We also show that recursive splicing is a constitutive process, that depletion of U2AF inhibits recursive splicing, and that the sequence and function of ratchet points are evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila. Finally, we identified four recursively spliced human genes, one of which is also recursively spliced in Drosophila. Together these results indicate that recursive splicing is commonly used in Drosophila, occurs in human and provides insight into the mechanisms by which some large introns are removed. PMID:25970244

  16. Genetic Variation of Pre-mRNA Alternative Splicing in Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi-xiang; Jiang, Peng; Xing, Yi

    2011-01-01

    The precise splicing outcome of a transcribed gene is controlled by complex interactions between cis regulatory splicing signals and trans-acting regulators. In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is a prevalent mechanism for generating transcriptome and proteome diversity. Alternative splicing can modulate gene function, affect organismal phenotype and cause disease. Common genetic variation that affects splicing regulation can lead to differences in alternative splicing between human individuals and consequently impact expression level or protein function. In several well-documented examples, such natural variation of alternative splicing has indeed been shown to influence disease susceptibility and drug response. With new microarray- and sequencing-based genomic technologies that can analyze eukaryotic transcriptomes at the exon- or nucleotide-level, it has become possible to globally compare the alternative splicing profiles across human individuals in any tissue or cell type of interest. Recent large-scale transcriptome studies using high-density splicing-sensitive microarray and deep RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) have revealed widespread genetic variation of alternative splicing in humans. In the future, an extensive catalogue of alternative splicing variation in human populations will help elucidate the molecular underpinnings of complex traits and human diseases, and shed light on the mechanisms of splicing regulation in human cells. PMID:22095823

  17. Mutation of putative branchpoint consensus sequences in plant introns reduces splicing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C G; Clark, G; Davidson, D; Smith, P; Brown, J W

    1996-03-01

    Intron lariat formation between the 5' end of an intron and a branchpoint adenosine is a fundamental aspect of the first step in animal and yeast nuclear pre-mRNA splicing. Despite similarities in intron sequence requirements and the components of splicing, differences exist between the splicing of plant and vertebrate introns. The identification of AU-rich sequences as major functional elements in plant introns and the demonstration that a branchpoint consensus sequence was not required for splicing have led to the suggestion that the transition from AU-rich intron to GC-rich exon is a major potential signal by which plant pre-mRNA splice sites are recognized. The role of putative branchpoint sequences as an internal signal in plant intron recognition/definition has been re-examined. Single nucleotide mutations in putative branchpoint adenosines contained within CUNAN sequences in four different plant introns all significantly reduced splicing efficiency. These results provide the most direct evidence to date for preferred branchpoint sequences being required for the efficient splicing of at least some plant introns in addition to the important role played by AU sequences in dicot intron recognition. The observed patterns of 3' splice site selection in the introns studied are consistent with the scanning model described for animal intron 3' splice site selection. It is suggested that, despite the clear importance of AU sequences for plant intron splicing, the fundamental processes of splice site selection and splicing in plants are similar to those in animals.

  18. Changes in splicing factor expression are associated with advancing age in man.

    PubMed

    Holly, Alice C; Melzer, David; Pilling, Luke C; Fellows, Alexander C; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ferrucci, Luigi; Harries, Lorna W

    2013-09-01

    Human ageing is associated with decreased cellular plasticity and adaptability. Changes in alternative splicing with advancing age have been reported in man, which may arise from age-related alterations in splicing factor expression. We determined whether the mRNA expression of key splicing factors differed with age, by microarray analysis in blood from two human populations and by qRT-PCR in senescent primary fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Potential regulators of splicing factor expression were investigated by siRNA analysis. Approximately one third of splicing factors demonstrated age-related transcript expression changes in two human populations. Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) transcript expression correlated with splicing factor expression in human microarray data. Senescent primary fibroblasts and endothelial cells also demonstrated alterations in splicing factor expression, and changes in alternative splicing. Targeted knockdown of the ATM gene in primary fibroblasts resulted in up-regulation of some age-responsive splicing factor transcripts. We conclude that isoform ratios and splicing factor expression alters with age in vivo and in vitro, and that ATM may have an inhibitory role on the expression of some splicing factors. These findings suggest for the first time that ATM, a core element in the DNA damage response, is a key regulator of the splicing machinery in man.

  19. Gamete donors' expectations and experiences of contact with their donor offspring

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Maggie; Bourne, Kate; Fisher, Jane; Johnson, Louise; Hammarberg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the expectations and experiences of anonymous gamete donors about contact with their donor offspring? SUMMARY ANSWER Rather than consistently wanting to remain distant from their donor offspring, donors' expectations and experiences of contact with donor offspring ranged from none to a close personal relationship. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Donor conception is part of assisted reproduction in many countries, but little is known about its continuing influence on gamete donors' lives. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A qualitative research model appropriate for understanding participants' views was employed; semi-structured interviews were conducted during January–March 2013. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Before 1998, gamete donors in Victoria, Australia, were subject to evolving legislation that allowed them to remain anonymous or (from 1988) to consent to the release of identifying information. An opportunity to increase knowledge of donors' expectations and experiences of contact with their donor offspring recently arose in Victoria when a recommendation was made to introduce mandatory identification of donors on request from their donor offspring, with retrospective effect. Pre-1998 donors were invited through an advertising campaign to be interviewed about their views, experiences and expectations; 36 sperm donors and 6 egg donors participated. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE This research is unusual in achieving participation by donors who would not normally identify themselves to researchers or government inquiries. Qualitative thematic analysis revealed that most donors did not characterize themselves as parents of their donor offspring. Donors' expectations and experiences of contact with donor offspring ranged from none to a close personal relationship. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION It is not possible to establish whether participants were representative of all pre-1998 donors. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Anonymous

  20. Hydroperoxides as Hydrogen Bond Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, Kristian H.; Tram, Camilla M.; Hansen, Anne S.; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Hydroperoxides are formed in the atmosphere following autooxidation of a wide variety of volatile organics emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources. This raises the question of whether they can form hydrogen bonds that facilitate aerosol formation and growth. Using a combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, FT-IR, and ab initio calculations, we have compared the gas phase hydrogen bonding ability of tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBuOOH) to that of tert-butanol (tBuOH) for a series of bimolecular complexes with different acceptors. The hydrogen bond acceptor atoms studied are nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur. Both in terms of calculated redshifts and binding energies (BE), our results suggest that hydroperoxides are better hydrogen bond donors than the corresponding alcohols. In terms of hydrogen bond acceptor ability, we find that nitrogen is a significantly better acceptor than the other three atoms, which are of similar strength. We observe a similar trend in hydrogen bond acceptor ability with other hydrogen bond donors including methanol and dimethylamine.

  1. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bergsma, Atze J; In 't Groen, Stijn Lm; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, Wwm Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  2. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Atze J; in ‘t Groen, Stijn LM; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, WWM Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  3. Living-donor liver transplantation: current perspective.

    PubMed

    Lobritto, Steven; Kato, Tomoaki; Emond, Jean

    2012-11-01

    The disparity between the number of available deceased liver donors and the number of patients awaiting transplantation continues to be an ongoing issue predisposing to death on the liver transplant waiting list. Deceased donor shortage strategies including the use of extended donor-criteria deceased donor grafts, split liver transplants, and organs harvested after cardiac death have fallen short of organ demand. Efforts to raise donor awareness are ongoing, but the course has been arduous to date. Living donor transplantation is a means to access an unlimited donor organ supply and offers potential advantages to deceased donation. Donor safety remains paramount demanding improvements and innovations in both the donor and recipient operations to ensure superior outcomes. The specialty operation is best preformed at centers with specific expertise and shuttling of select patients to these centers supported by third party payers is critical. Training future surgeons at centers with this specific experience can help disseminate this technology to improve local availability. Ongoing research in immunosuppression minimization, withdrawal and tolerance induction may make living donation a desired first-line operation rather than a necessary albeit less-desirable option. This chapter summarizes the progress of living liver donation and its potential applications. PMID:23397534

  4. [Living donor liver transplantation in adults].

    PubMed

    Neumann, U P; Neuhaus, P; Schmeding, M

    2010-09-01

    The worldwide shortage of adequate donor organs implies that living donor liver transplantation represents a valuable alternative to cadaveric transplantation. In addition to the complex surgical procedure the correct identification of eligible donors and recipients plays a decisive role in living donor liver transplantation. Donor safety must be of ultimate priority and overrules all other aspects involved. In contrast to the slightly receding numbers in Europe and North America, in recent years Asian programs have enjoyed constantly increasing living donor activity. The experience of the past 15 years has clearly demonstrated that technical challenges of both bile duct anastomosis and venous outflow of the graft significantly influence postoperative outcome. While short-term in-hospital morbidity remains increased compared to cadaveric transplantation, long-term survival of both graft and patient are comparable or even better than in deceased donor transplantation. Especially for patients expecting long waiting times under the MELD allocation system, living donor liver transplantation offers an excellent therapeutic alternative. Expanding the so-called "Milan criteria" for HCC patients with the option for living donor liver transplantation is currently being controversially debated.

  5. Gamete donation: ethical implications for donors.

    PubMed

    Shenfield, Francoise

    1999-01-01

    The interests of gamete donors have only recently been recognized in assisted reproduction; traditionally, the interests of the patients (typically a couple) and the prospective child are paramount. However, assisted reproduction would not be possible without donors, and the simple utilitarian view would be to place their interests first to maximize the availability of the practice. There are several ethical issues on both sides of the donor--recipient equation, some of which are mutual and others are in conflict. For example, the word 'donation' implies there is no payment. Informed consent for donation is essential if the autonomy of the donor is to be respected, and includes information about the results of screening. This is a sensitive issue, especially when pathology is found in a donor who is not being screened for his or her own immediate benefit. Counselling may result in donors refusing to take part, but may also lead to selection by the person recruiting the donors, sometimes as a consequence of examining the motivation of the donor. In this case, the main problem is the ethical basis of the selection process. Other aspects of gamete donation may lead to a conflict of interests between the donor, the recipients and even the prospective child, particularly in terms of anonymity and the information that is made available about the specific circumstances of donation. Implications and support counselling are essential tools in achieving an acceptable balance for all parties involved.

  6. Deep learning of the tissue-regulated splicing code

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Michael K. K.; Xiong, Hui Yuan; Lee, Leo J.; Frey, Brendan J.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Alternative splicing (AS) is a regulated process that directs the generation of different transcripts from single genes. A computational model that can accurately predict splicing patterns based on genomic features and cellular context is highly desirable, both in understanding this widespread phenomenon, and in exploring the effects of genetic variations on AS. Methods: Using a deep neural network, we developed a model inferred from mouse RNA-Seq data that can predict splicing patterns in individual tissues and differences in splicing patterns across tissues. Our architecture uses hidden variables that jointly represent features in genomic sequences and tissue types when making predictions. A graphics processing unit was used to greatly reduce the training time of our models with millions of parameters. Results: We show that the deep architecture surpasses the performance of the previous Bayesian method for predicting AS patterns. With the proper optimization procedure and selection of hyperparameters, we demonstrate that deep architectures can be beneficial, even with a moderately sparse dataset. An analysis of what the model has learned in terms of the genomic features is presented. Contact: frey@psi.toronto.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24931975

  7. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ.

  8. Coordinated Dynamics of RNA Splicing Speckles in the Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Kota, Krishna P; Alam, Samer G; Nickerson, Jeffrey A; Dickinson, Richard B; Lele, Tanmay P

    2016-06-01

    Despite being densely packed with chromatin, nuclear bodies and a nucleoskeletal network, the nucleus is a remarkably dynamic organelle. Chromatin loops form and relax, RNA transcripts and transcription factors move diffusively, and nuclear bodies move. We show here that RNA splicing speckled domains (splicing speckles) fluctuate in constrained nuclear volumes and remodel their shapes. Small speckles move in a directed way toward larger speckles with which they fuse. This directed movement is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels or inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. The random movement of speckles is reduced upon decreasing cellular ATP levels, moderately reduced after inhibition of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and modestly increased upon inhibiting RNA polymerase II activity. To define the paths through which speckles can translocate in the nucleus, we generated a pressure gradient to create flows in the nucleus. In response to the pressure gradient, speckles moved along curvilinear paths in the nucleus. Collectively, our results demonstrate a new type of ATP-dependent motion in the nucleus. We present a model where recycling splicing factors return as part of small sub-speckles from distal sites of RNA processing to larger splicing speckles by a directed ATP-driven mechanism through interchromatin spaces.

  9. Homolog-specific PCR primer design for profiling splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Gyan Prakash; Hanumappa, Mamatha; Kushwaha, Garima; Nguyen, Henry T.; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    To study functional diversity of proteins encoded from a single gene, it is important to distinguish the expression levels among the alternatively spliced variants. A variant-specific primer pair is required to amplify each alternatively spliced variant individually. For this purpose, we developed a new feature, homolog-specific primer design (HSPD), in our high-throughput primer and probe design software tool, PRIMEGENS-v2. The algorithm uses a de novo approach to design primers without any prior information of splice variants or close homologs for an input query sequence. It not only designs primer pairs but also finds potential isoforms and homologs of the input sequence. Efficiency of this algorithm was tested for several gene families in soybean. A total of 187 primer pairs were tested under five different abiotic stress conditions with three replications at three time points. Results indicate a high success rate of primer design. Some primer pairs designed were able to amplify all splice variants of a gene. Furthermore, by utilizing combinations within the same multiplex pool, we were able to uniquely amplify a specific variant or duplicate gene. Our method can also be used to design PCR primers to specifically amplify homologs in the same gene family. PRIMEGENS-v2 is available at: http://primegens.org. PMID:21415011

  10. Neural Differentiation Modulates the Vertebrate Brain Specific Splicing Program

    PubMed Central

    Madgwick, Alicia; Fort, Philippe; Hanson, Peter S.; Thibault, Philippe; Gaudreau, Marie-Claude; Lutfalla, Georges; Möröy, Tarik; Abou Elela, Sherif; Chaudhry, Bill; Elliott, David J.; Morris, Christopher M.; Venables, Julian P.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing patterns are known to vary between tissues but these patterns have been found to be predominantly peculiar to one species or another, implying only a limited function in fundamental neural biology. Here we used high-throughput RT-PCR to monitor the expression pattern of all the annotated simple alternative splicing events (ASEs) in the Reference Sequence Database, in different mouse tissues and identified 93 brain-specific events that shift from one isoform to another (switch-like) between brain and other tissues. Consistent with an important function, regulation of a core set of 9 conserved switch-like ASEs is highly conserved, as they have the same pattern of tissue-specific splicing in all vertebrates tested: human, mouse and zebrafish. Several of these ASEs are embedded within genes that encode proteins associated with the neuronal microtubule network, and show a dramatic and concerted shift within a short time window of human neural stem cell differentiation. Similarly these exons are dynamically regulated in zebrafish development. These data demonstrate that although alternative splicing patterns often vary between species, there is nonetheless a core set of vertebrate brain-specific ASEs that are conserved between species and associated with neural differentiation. PMID:25993117

  11. The plethora of PMCA isoforms: Alternative splicing and differential expression.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    In this review the four different genes of the mammalian plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and their spliced isoforms are discussed with respect to their tissue distribution, their differences during development and their importance for regulating Ca²⁺ homeostasis under different conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  12. Promoter-driven splicing regulation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Moldón, Alberto; Malapeira, Jordi; Gabrielli, Natalia; Gogol, Madelaine; Gómez-Escoda, Blanca; Ivanova, Tsvetomira; Seidel, Chris; Ayté, José

    2008-10-16

    The meiotic cell cycle is modified from the mitotic cell cycle by having a pre-meiotic S phase that leads to high levels of recombination, two rounds of nuclear division with no intervening DNA synthesis and a reductional pattern of chromosome segregation. Rem1 is a cyclin that is only expressed during meiosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Cells in which rem1 has been deleted show decreased intragenic meiotic recombination and a delay at the onset of meiosis I (ref. 1). When ectopically expressed in mitotically growing cells, Rem1 induces a G1 arrest followed by severe mitotic catastrophes. Here we show that rem1 expression is regulated at the level of both transcription and splicing, encoding two proteins with different functions depending on the intron retention. We have determined that the regulation of rem1 splicing is not dependent on any transcribed region of the gene. Furthermore, when the rem1 promoter is fused to other intron-containing genes, the chimaeras show a meiotic-specific regulation of splicing, exactly the same as endogenous rem1. This regulation is dependent on two transcription factors of the forkhead family, Mei4 (ref. 2) and Fkh2 (ref. 3). Whereas Mei4 induces both transcription and splicing of rem1, Fkh2 is responsible for the intron retention of the transcript during vegetative growth and the pre-meiotic S phase. PMID:18815595

  13. 16. VIEW OF TYPICAL MAIN GIRDER WELDED 'BUTT SPLICE,' SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF TYPICAL MAIN GIRDER WELDED 'BUTT SPLICE,' SHOWING THE 'EYE PLATES' AND THE ATTACHMENT OF THE SIDEWALK CANTILEVER BRACKETS, NORTH GIRDER, PANEL 5, LOOKING SOUTHEAST Ryan & Harms - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  14. Complexity of the alternative splicing landscape in plants.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anireddy S N; Marquez, Yamile; Kalyna, Maria; Barta, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of precursor mRNAs (pre-mRNAs) from multiexon genes allows organisms to increase their coding potential and regulate gene expression through multiple mechanisms. Recent transcriptome-wide analysis of AS using RNA sequencing has revealed that AS is highly pervasive in plants. Pre-mRNAs from over 60% of intron-containing genes undergo AS to produce a vast repertoire of mRNA isoforms. The functions of most splice variants are unknown. However, emerging evidence indicates that splice variants increase the functional diversity of proteins. Furthermore, AS is coupled to transcript stability and translation through nonsense-mediated decay and microRNA-mediated gene regulation. Widespread changes in AS in response to developmental cues and stresses suggest a role for regulated splicing in plant development and stress responses. Here, we review recent progress in uncovering the extent and complexity of the AS landscape in plants, its regulation, and the roles of AS in gene regulation. The prevalence of AS in plants has raised many new questions that require additional studies. New tools based on recent technological advances are allowing genome-wide analysis of RNA elements in transcripts and of chromatin modifications that regulate AS. Application of these tools in plants will provide significant new insights into AS regulation and crosstalk between AS and other layers of gene regulation.

  15. A mutation in a splicing factor that causes retinitis pigmentosa has a transcriptome-wide effect on mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Substantial progress has been made in the identification of sequence elements that control mRNA splicing and the genetic variants in these elements that alter mRNA splicing (referred to as splicing quantitative trait loci – sQTLs). Genetic variants that affect mRNA splicing in trans are harder to identify because their effects can be more subtle and diffuse, and the variants are not co-located with their targets. We carried out a transcriptome-wide analysis of the effects of a mutation in a ubiquitous splicing factor that causes retinitis pigmentosa (RP) on mRNA splicing, using exon microarrays. Results Exon microarray data was generated from whole blood samples obtained from four individuals with a mutation in the splicing factor PRPF8 and four sibling controls. Although the mutation has no known phenotype in blood, there was evidence of widespread differences in splicing between cases and controls (affecting approximately 20% of exons). Most probesets with significantly different inclusion (defined as the expression intensity of the exon divided by the expression of the corresponding transcript) between cases and controls had higher inclusion in cases and corresponded to exons that were shorter than average, AT rich, located towards the 5’ end of the gene and flanked by long introns. Introns flanking affected probesets were particularly depleted for the shortest category of introns, associated with splicing via intron definition. Conclusions Our results show that a mutation in a splicing factor, with a phenotype that is restricted to retinal tissue, acts as a trans-sQTL cluster in whole blood samples. Characteristics of the affected exons suggest that they are spliced co-transcriptionally and via exon definition. However, due to the small sample size available for this study, further studies are required to confirm the widespread impact of this PRPF8 mutation on mRNA splicing outside the retina. PMID:24969741

  16. Some characteristics on the generative power of weighted one-sided splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yee Siang; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2015-10-01

    A splicing system is a formal model for DNA based computation using the recombinant behavior of DNA molecules in the presence of enzymes and ligase. Since it was introduced in 1987, several variants with different restrictions and extensions have been developed. In this paper, a restricted variant of splicing systems, called one-sided splicing systems have been studied. The generative capacity of one-sided splicing systems with the presence of weight is investigated. We have also shown that the use of different weighting spaces and weight operations results in weighted one-sided splicing systems with different generative capacities.

  17. Electromechanical behaviour of REBCO tape lap splices under transverse compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grether, A.; Scheuerlein, C.; Ballarino, A.; Bottura, L.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the influence of transverse compressive stress on the resistance and critical current (I c ) of soldered REBCO tape lap splices. Internal contact resistances dominate the overall REBCO lap splice resistances. Application of transverse compressive stress up to 250 MPa during the resistance measurements does not alter the resistance and I c of the soldered REBCO splices that were studied. The resistance of unsoldered REBCO tape lap splices depends strongly on the contact pressure. At a transverse compressive stress of 100 MPa, to which Roebel cables are typically exposed in high field magnets, the crossover splice contact resistance is comparable to the internal tape resistances.

  18. AVISPA: a web tool for the prediction and analysis of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Barash, Yoseph; Vaquero-Garcia, Jorge; González-Vallinas, Juan; Xiong, Hui Yuan; Gao, Weijun; Lee, Leo J; Frey, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome complexity and its relation to numerous diseases underpins the need to predict in silico splice variants and the regulatory elements that affect them. Building upon our recently described splicing code, we developed AVISPA, a Galaxy-based web tool for splicing prediction and analysis. Given an exon and its proximal sequence, the tool predicts whether the exon is alternatively spliced, displays tissue-dependent splicing patterns, and whether it has associated regulatory elements. We assess AVISPA's accuracy on an independent dataset of tissue-dependent exons, and illustrate how the tool can be applied to analyze a gene of interest. AVISPA is available at http://avispa.biociphers.org.

  19. DGTI Register of Rare Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hustinx, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Summary For patients with antibodies against the most common blood groups a rapid and efficient supply of compatible erythrocyte concentrates is self-evident. But typically we have to make the greatest effort providing blood for these patients, which have made antibodies against common blood groups. There are however patients with antibodies against rare blood group antigens that need special blood. The supply of such blood can be very difficult and mostly time-consuming. For this reason we set up a database of blood donors with rare blood groups. Since 2005 the BTS SRC Berne Ltd. has run this database on behalf of the Swiss BTS SRC. After a reorganization and extension of the database, conducted during 2011/2012, the data file was renamed ‘DGTI Register of Rare Donors’ and is now run under the patronage of the German Society for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology (DGTI). PMID:25538534

  20. [Liver transplants from living donors].

    PubMed

    Rogiers, X; Danninger, F; Malagó, M; Knoefel, W T; Gundlach, M; Bassas, A; Burdelski, M; Broelsch, C E

    1996-03-01

    In this article the authors discuss the advantages of Living Related Liver Transplantation (LRLT), criteria for the selection of donors and the standard operation technique. Among a total of 241 liver transplantation (LTx), 42 LRLT were performed at the University of Hamburg between October 1, 1991 and December 19, 1994. The body weight of recipients for LRLT ranged from 4,6 to 39 kg, with 64,2% having less than 10 kg. The volume of the donor left lateral liver lobe ranged from 100 cc to 350 cc. The average one year survival rate among electively operated patients-status 3-4 (UNOS 1995 classification) was 86.7%, two year survival rate 83.3%. The main advantages of LRLT are consired the following: 1. Absence of mortality on the waiting list, 2. Optimal timing of the transplantation (elective procedure, patient in a good condition), 3. Excellent organ (no primary non function), 4. A possible immunologic advantage, 5. Relief of the waiting list for cadaveric organs, 6. Psychological benefit for the family, 7. Cost effectiveness. Potential candidates for living donation with more than one cardiovascular risk factors were excluded. Social and psychological reasons leading to rejection of candidates were as follows: unstable family structure, expected professional or financial difficulties after living donation or withdrawal from consent. LRLT gives parents of a child with TLD a chance to avoid the risk of death on the waiting list or primary non function of the graft. LRLT has therefore established an important place in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:8768973

  1. A general definition and nomenclature for alternative splicing events.

    PubMed

    Sammeth, Michael; Foissac, Sylvain; Guigó, Roderic

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of the transcriptome present in eukaryotic cells is one of the most challenging tasks in the postgenomic era. In this regard, alternative splicing (AS) is a key phenomenon contributing to the production of different mature transcripts from the same primary RNA sequence. As a plethora of different transcript forms is available in databases, a first step to uncover the biology that drives AS is to identify the different types of reflected splicing variation. In this work, we present a general definition of the AS event along with a notation system that involves the relative positions of the splice sites. This nomenclature univocally and dynamically assigns a specific "AS code" to every possible pattern of splicing variation. On the basis of this definition and the corresponding codes, we have developed a computational tool (AStalavista) that automatically characterizes the complete landscape of AS events in a given transcript annotation of a genome, thus providing a platform to investigate the transcriptome diversity across genes, chromosomes, and species. Our analysis reveals that a substantial part--in human more than a quarter-of the observed splicing variations are ignored in common classification pipelines. We have used AStalavista to investigate and to compare the AS landscape of different reference annotation sets in human and in other metazoan species and found that proportions of AS events change substantially depending on the annotation protocol, species-specific attributes, and coding constraints acting on the transcripts. The AStalavista system therefore provides a general framework to conduct specific studies investigating the occurrence, impact, and regulation of AS.

  2. Transcriptome analysis reveals differential splicing events in IPF lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Nance, Tracy; Smith, Kevin S; Anaya, Vanessa; Richardson, Rhea; Ho, Lawrence; Pala, Mauro; Mostafavi, Sara; Battle, Alexis; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Rosen, Glenn; Montgomery, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex disease in which a multitude of proteins and networks are disrupted. Interrogation of the transcriptome through RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) enables the determination of genes whose differential expression is most significant in IPF, as well as the detection of alternative splicing events which are not easily observed with traditional microarray experiments. We sequenced messenger RNA from 8 IPF lung samples and 7 healthy controls on an Illumina HiSeq 2000, and found evidence for substantial differential gene expression and differential splicing. 873 genes were differentially expressed in IPF (FDR<5%), and 440 unique genes had significant differential splicing events in at least one exonic region (FDR<5%). We used qPCR to validate the differential exon usage in the second and third most significant exonic regions, in the genes COL6A3 (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 7.18e-10) and POSTN (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 2.06e-09), which encode the extracellular matrix proteins collagen alpha-3(VI) and periostin. The increased gene-level expression of periostin has been associated with IPF and its clinical progression, but its differential splicing has not been studied in the context of this disease. Our results suggest that alternative splicing of these and other genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. We have developed an interactive web application which allows users to explore the results of our RNA-Seq experiment, as well as those of two previously published microarray experiments, and we hope that this will serve as a resource for future investigations of gene regulation in IPF.

  3. Transcriptome analysis reveals differential splicing events in IPF lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Nance, Tracy; Smith, Kevin S; Anaya, Vanessa; Richardson, Rhea; Ho, Lawrence; Pala, Mauro; Mostafavi, Sara; Battle, Alexis; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Rosen, Glenn; Montgomery, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex disease in which a multitude of proteins and networks are disrupted. Interrogation of the transcriptome through RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) enables the determination of genes whose differential expression is most significant in IPF, as well as the detection of alternative splicing events which are not easily observed with traditional microarray experiments. We sequenced messenger RNA from 8 IPF lung samples and 7 healthy controls on an Illumina HiSeq 2000, and found evidence for substantial differential gene expression and differential splicing. 873 genes were differentially expressed in IPF (FDR<5%), and 440 unique genes had significant differential splicing events in at least one exonic region (FDR<5%). We used qPCR to validate the differential exon usage in the second and third most significant exonic regions, in the genes COL6A3 (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 7.18e-10) and POSTN (RNA-Seq adjusted pval = 2.06e-09), which encode the extracellular matrix proteins collagen alpha-3(VI) and periostin. The increased gene-level expression of periostin has been associated with IPF and its clinical progression, but its differential splicing has not been studied in the context of this disease. Our results suggest that alternative splicing of these and other genes may be involved in the pathogenesis of IPF. We have developed an interactive web application which allows users to explore the results of our RNA-Seq experiment, as well as those of two previously published microarray experiments, and we hope that this will serve as a resource for future investigations of gene regulation in IPF.

  4. Tumor suppressor properties of the splicing regulatory factor RBM10

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Jordi; Bechara, Elias; Schlesinger, Doerte; Delgado, Javier; Serrano, Luis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RBM10 is an RNA binding protein and alternative splicing regulator frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinomas. Recent results indicate that RBM10 inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells by promoting skipping of exon 9 of the gene NUMB, a frequent alternative splicing change in lung cancer generating a negative regulator of Notch signaling. Complementing these observations, we show that knock down of RBM10 in human cancer cells enhances growth of mouse tumor xenografts, confirming that RBM10 acts as a tumor suppressor, while knock down of an oncogenic mutant version of RBM10 reduces xenograft tumor growth. A RBM10 mutation found in lung cancer cells, V354E, disrupts RBM10-mediated regulation of NUMB alternative splicing, inducing the cell proliferation-promoting isoform. We now show that 2 natural RBM10 isoforms that differ by the presence or absence of V354 in the second RNA Recognition Motif (RRM2), display similar regulatory effects on NUMB alternative splicing, suggesting that V354E actively disrupts RBM10 activity. Structural modeling localizes V354 in the outside surface of one α-helix opposite to the RNA binding surface of RBM10, and we show that the mutation does not compromise binding of the RRM2 domain to NUMB RNA regulatory sequences. We further show that other RBM10 mutations found in lung adenocarcinomas also compromise regulation of NUMB exon 9. Collectively, our previous and current results reveal that RBM10 is a tumor suppressor that represses Notch signaling and cell proliferation through the regulation of NUMB alternative splicing. PMID:26853560

  5. Alternative splicing within the chicken c-ets-1 locus: implications for transduction within the E26 retrovirus of the c-ets proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Leprince, D; Duterque-Coquillaud, M; Li, R P; Henry, C; Flourens, A; Debuire, B; Stehelin, D

    1988-01-01

    Two overlapping c-ets-1 cDNA clones were isolated which contained the alpha and beta genomic sequences homologous to the 5' end of v-ets not detected in the previously described c-ets RNA species or proteins. Nucleotide sequencing demonstrated that these cDNAs corresponded to the splicing of alpha and beta to a common set of 3' exons (a through F) already found in the p54c-ets-1 mRNA. They contained an open reading frame of 1,455 nucleotides which could encode a polypeptide of 485 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 53 kilodaltons. However, when expressed in COS-1 cells, the cDNAs directed the synthesis of a protein with an apparent molecular mass in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 68 kilodaltons, p68c-ets-1, comigrating with a protein expressed at low levels in normal chicken spleen cells. These two proteins were shown to be identical by partial digestion with protease V8. Northern (RNA) blot hybridization analysis with the p68c-ets-1 -specific sequence and RNase protection experiments showed that the corresponding mRNA was expressed in normal chicken spleen and not in normal chicken thymus or in various T lymphoid cell lines. Thus, two closely related proteins, having distinct amino-terminal parts, are generated within the same locus by alternative addition of different 5' exons, alpha and beta or I54, respectively, onto a common set of 3' exons (a to F). Finally, we demonstrate that an aberrant splicing event between a cryptic splice donor site in c-myb exon E6 and the normal splice acceptor site of c-ets-1 exon alpha involved in the genesis of the E26 myb-ets sequence. Images PMID:2841475

  6. Alternative Splice Transcripts for MHC Class I-like MICA Encode Novel NKG2D Ligands with Agonist or Antagonist Functions.

    PubMed

    Gavlovsky, Pierre-Jean; Tonnerre, Pierre; Gérard, Nathalie; Nedellec, Steven; Daman, Andrew W; McFarland, Benjamin J; Charreau, Béatrice

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I chain-related proteins A and B (MICA and MICB) and UL16-binding proteins are ligands of the activating NKG2D receptor involved in cancer and immune surveillance of infection. Structurally, MICA/B proteins contain an α3 domain, whereas UL16-binding proteins do not. We identified novel alternative splice transcripts for MICA encoding five novel MICA isoforms: MICA-A, -B1, -B2, -C, and -D. Alternative splicing associates with MICA*015 and *017 and results from a point deletion (G) in the 5' splice donor site of MICA intron 4 leading to exon 3 and exon 4 skipping and/or deletions. These changes delete the α3 domain in all isoforms, and the α2 domain in the majority of isoforms (A, B1, C, and D). Endothelial and hematopoietic cells contained endogenous alternative splice transcripts and isoforms. MICA-B1, -B2, and -D bound NKG2D by surface plasmon resonance and were expressed at the cell surface. Functionally, MICA-B2 contains two extracellular domains (α1 and α2) and is a novel potent agonist ligand for NKG2D. We found that MICA-D is a new truncated form of MICA with weak affinity for NKG2D despite lacking α2 and α3 domains. MICA-D may functionally impair NKG2D activation by competing with full-length MICA or MICA-B2 for NKG2D engagement. Our study established NKG2D binding for recombinant MICA-B1 but found no function for this isoform. New truncated MICA isoforms exhibit a range of functions that may drive unexpected immune mechanisms and provide new tools for immunotherapy. PMID:27342847

  7. Discovery and characterization of secretory IgD in rainbow trout: secretory IgD is produced through a novel splicing mechanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramirez-Gomez, F.; Greene, W.; Rego, K.; Hansen, J.D.; Costa, G.; Kataria, P.; Bromage, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    The gene encoding IgH δ has been found in all species of teleosts studied to date. However, catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the only species of fish in which a secretory form of IgD has been characterized, and it occurs through the use of a dedicated δ-secretory exon, which is absent from all other species examined. Our studies have revealed that rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) use a novel strategy for the generation of secreted IgD. The trout secretory δ transcript is produced via a run-on event in which the splice donor site at the end of the last constant domain exon (D7) is ignored and transcription continues until a stop codon is reached 33 nt downstream of the splice site, resulting in the production of an in-frame, 11-aa secretory tail at the end of the D7 domain. In silico analysis of several published IgD genes suggested that this unique splicing mechanism may also be used in other species of fish, reptiles, and amphibians. Alternative splicing of the secretory δ transcript resulted in two δ-H chains, which incorporated Cμ1 and variable domains. Secreted IgD was found in two heavily glycosylated isoforms, which are assembled as monomeric polypeptides associated with L chains. Secretory δ mRNA and IgD+ plasma cells were detected in all immune tissues at a lower frequency than secretory IgM. Our data demonstrate that secretory IgD is more prevalent and widespread across taxa than previously thought, and thus illustrate the potential that IgD may have a conserved role in immunity.

  8. Alternative Splice Transcripts for MHC Class I-like MICA Encode Novel NKG2D Ligands with Agonist or Antagonist Functions.

    PubMed

    Gavlovsky, Pierre-Jean; Tonnerre, Pierre; Gérard, Nathalie; Nedellec, Steven; Daman, Andrew W; McFarland, Benjamin J; Charreau, Béatrice

    2016-08-01

    MHC class I chain-related proteins A and B (MICA and MICB) and UL16-binding proteins are ligands of the activating NKG2D receptor involved in cancer and immune surveillance of infection. Structurally, MICA/B proteins contain an α3 domain, whereas UL16-binding proteins do not. We identified novel alternative splice transcripts for MICA encoding five novel MICA isoforms: MICA-A, -B1, -B2, -C, and -D. Alternative splicing associates with MICA*015 and *017 and results from a point deletion (G) in the 5' splice donor site of MICA intron 4 leading to exon 3 and exon 4 skipping and/or deletions. These changes delete the α3 domain in all isoforms, and the α2 domain in the majority of isoforms (A, B1, C, and D). Endothelial and hematopoietic cells contained endogenous alternative splice transcripts and isoforms. MICA-B1, -B2, and -D bound NKG2D by surface plasmon resonance and were expressed at the cell surface. Functionally, MICA-B2 contains two extracellular domains (α1 and α2) and is a novel potent agonist ligand for NKG2D. We found that MICA-D is a new truncated form of MICA with weak affinity for NKG2D despite lacking α2 and α3 domains. MICA-D may functionally impair NKG2D activation by competing with full-length MICA or MICA-B2 for NKG2D engagement. Our study established NKG2D binding for recombinant MICA-B1 but found no function for this isoform. New truncated MICA isoforms exhibit a range of functions that may drive unexpected immune mechanisms and provide new tools for immunotherapy.

  9. The Interplay of Temperature and Genotype on Patterns of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jakšić, Ana Marija; Schlötterer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is the highly regulated process of variation in the removal of introns from premessenger-RNA transcripts. The consequences of alternative splicing on the phenotype are well documented, but the impact of the environment on alternative splicing is not yet clear. We studied variation in alternative splicing among four different temperatures, 13, 18, 23, and 29°, in two Drosophila melanogaster genotypes. We show plasticity of alternative splicing with up to 10% of the expressed genes being differentially spliced between the most extreme temperatures for a given genotype. Comparing the two genotypes at different temperatures, we found <1% of the genes being differentially spliced at 18°. At extreme temperatures, however, we detected substantial differences in alternative splicing—with almost 10% of the genes having differential splicing between the genotypes: a magnitude similar to between species differences. Genes with differential alternative splicing between genotypes frequently exhibit dominant inheritance. Remarkably, the pattern of surplus of differences in alternative splicing at extreme temperatures resembled the pattern seen for gene expression intensity. Since different sets of genes were involved for the two phenotypes, we propose that purifying selection results in the reduction of differences at benign temperatures. Relaxed purifying selection at temperature extremes, on the other hand, may cause the divergence in gene expression and alternative splicing between the two strains in rarely encountered environments. PMID:27440867

  10. RNA splicing regulated by RBFOX1 is essential for cardiac function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Frese, Karen S; Meder, Benjamin; Keller, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Haas, Jan; Vogel, Britta; Fischer, Simon; Backes, Christina; Matzas, Mark; Köhler, Doreen; Benes, Vladimir; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-08-15

    Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms through which the proteomic and functional diversity of eukaryotes is achieved. However, the complex nature of the splicing machinery, its associated splicing regulators and the functional implications of alternatively spliced transcripts are only poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of the splicing regulator rbfox1 in vivo using the zebrafish as a model system. We found that loss of rbfox1 led to progressive cardiac contractile dysfunction and heart failure. By using deep-transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we show that depletion of rbfox1 in zebrafish results in an altered isoform expression of several crucial target genes, such as actn3a and hug. This study underlines that tightly regulated splicing is necessary for unconstrained cardiac function and renders the splicing regulator rbfox1 an interesting target for investigation in human heart failure and cardiomyopathy.

  11. SON controls cell-cycle progression by coordinated regulation of RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eun-Young; DeKelver, Russell C; Lo, Miao-Chia; Nguyen, Tuyet Ann; Matsuura, Shinobu; Boyapati, Anita; Pandit, Shatakshi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2011-04-22

    It has been suspected that cell-cycle progression might be functionally coupled with RNA processing. However, little is known about the role of the precise splicing control in cell-cycle progression. Here, we report that SON, a large Ser/Arg (SR)-related protein, is a splicing cofactor contributing to efficient splicing of cell-cycle regulators. Downregulation of SON leads to severe impairment of spindle pole separation, microtubule dynamics, and genome integrity. These molecular defects result from inadequate RNA splicing of a specific set of cell-cycle-related genes that possess weak splice sites. Furthermore, we show that SON facilitates the interaction of SR proteins with RNA polymerase II and other key spliceosome components, suggesting its function in efficient cotranscriptional RNA processing. These results reveal a mechanism for controlling cell-cycle progression through SON-dependent constitutive splicing at suboptimal splice sites, with strong implications for its role in cancer and other human diseases.

  12. RNA splicing regulated by RBFOX1 is essential for cardiac function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Karen S.; Meder, Benjamin; Keller, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Haas, Jan; Vogel, Britta; Fischer, Simon; Backes, Christina; Matzas, Mark; Köhler, Doreen; Benes, Vladimir; Katus, Hugo A.; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms through which the proteomic and functional diversity of eukaryotes is achieved. However, the complex nature of the splicing machinery, its associated splicing regulators and the functional implications of alternatively spliced transcripts are only poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of the splicing regulator rbfox1 in vivo using the zebrafish as a model system. We found that loss of rbfox1 led to progressive cardiac contractile dysfunction and heart failure. By using deep-transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we show that depletion of rbfox1 in zebrafish results in an altered isoform expression of several crucial target genes, such as actn3a and hug. This study underlines that tightly regulated splicing is necessary for unconstrained cardiac function and renders the splicing regulator rbfox1 an interesting target for investigation in human heart failure and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26116573

  13. Convergent evolution of alternative splices at domain boundaries of the BK channel.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anthony A; Aldrich, Richard W

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread mechanism for generating transcript diversity in higher eukaryotic genomes. The alternative splices of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channel have been the subject of a good deal of experimental functional characterization in the Arthropoda, Chordata, and Nematoda phyla. In this review, we examine a list of splices of the BK channel by manual curation of Unigene clusters mapped to mouse, human, chicken, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans genomes. We find that BK alternative splices do not appear to be conserved across phyla. Despite this lack of conservation, splices occur in both vertebrates and invertebrates at identical regions of the channel at experimentally established domain boundaries. The fact that, across phyla, unique splices occur at experimentally established domain boundaries suggests a prominent role for the convergent evolution of alternative splices that produce functional changes via changes in interdomain communication. PMID:18694345

  14. The Conserved Splicing Factor SUA Controls Alternative Splicing of the Developmental Regulator ABI3 in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sugliani, Matteo; Brambilla, Vittoria; Clerkx, Emile J.M.; Koornneef, Maarten; Soppe, Wim J.J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) is a major regulator of seed maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We detected two ABI3 transcripts, ABI3-α and ABI3-β, which encode full-length and truncated proteins, respectively. Alternative splicing of ABI3 is developmentally regulated, and the ABI3-β transcript accumulates at the end of seed maturation. The two ABI3 transcripts differ by the presence of a cryptic intron in ABI3